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Sample records for bioprosthetic regenerate template

  1. Salivary Gland Development: A Template for Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaishali N.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian salivary gland develops as a highly branched structure designed to produce and secrete saliva. This review will focus on research on mouse submandibular gland development and the translation of this basic research towards therapy for patients suffering from salivary hypofunction. Here we review the most recent literature that has enabled a better understanding of the mechanisms of salivary gland development. Additionally, we discuss approaches proposed to restore salivary function using gene and cell-based therapy. Increasing our understanding of the developmental mechanisms involved during development is critical to design effective therapies for regeneration and repair of damaged glands. PMID:24333774

  2. Vascularization of bioprosthetic valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughner, Derek R.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Heenatigala, Dino; Lohmann, Tara; Ellis, Chris G.

    1999-04-01

    Cell membrane remnants represent a probable nucleation site for calcium deposition in bioprosthetic heart valves. Calcification is a primary failure mode of both bovine pericardial and porcine aortic heterograft bioprosthesis but the nonuniform pattern of calcium distribution within the tissue remains unexplained. Searching for a likely cellular source, we considered the possibility of a previously overlooked small blood vessel network. Using a videomicroscopy technique, we examined 5 matched pairs of porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and 14 samples from 6 bovine pericardia. Tissue was placed on a Leitz Metallux microscope and transilluminated with a 75 watt mercury lamp. Video images were obtained using a silicon intensified target camera equipped with a 431 nm interference filter to maximize contrast of red cells trapped in a capillary microvasculature. Video images were recorded for analysis on a Silicon Graphics Image Analysis work station equipped with a video frame grabber. For porcine valves, the technique demonstrated a vascular bed in the central spongiosa at cusp bases with vessel sizes from 6-80 micrometers . Bovine pericardium differed with a more uniform distribution of 7-100 micrometers vessels residing centrally. Thus, small blood vessel endothelial cells provide a potential explanation patterns of bioprosthetic calcification.

  3. Enhanced Elastic Modulus of Regenerated Silk Fibroin by Geometric Confinement in Anodized Aluminum Oxide Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiankang; Li, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Geometric confinement is a promising method for the reconstruction of silk fibroin to form diversified structures with excellent mechanical properties. To accomplish geometric confinement, a water vapor assistant embossing process is used with porous anodic aluminum oxide templates, yielding silk fibroin nanopillars with diameters ranging from 40 nm to 130 nm. The elastic modulus of the regenerated silk fibroin nanopillars is investigated with atomic force microscopy nanoindentation analysis. Compared to films with the same treatment conditions, geometric confinement provided a twofold increase in elastic modulus in embossed silk fibroin nanopillars, indicating that β-sheet crystal ordering occurred during the water vapor assistant embossing process. These results demonstrate the feasibility and mechanical property enhancement of the embossing method to fabricate silk nanostructures, and will be useful in designing miniaturized devices.

  4. In vitro characterization of a chitosan skin regenerating template as a scaffold for cells cultivation.

    PubMed

    Hilmi, Abu Bakar Mohd; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Hassan, Asma; Lim, Chin Keong; Noorsal, Kartini; Zainol, Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan is a marine-derived product that has been widely used in clinical applications, especially in skin reconstruction. The mammalian scaffolds derived from bovine and porcine material have many limitations, for example, prion transmission and religious concerns. Therefore, we created a chitosan skin regenerating template (SRT) and investigated the behavior of fibroblast cell-scaffold constructs. Primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were isolated and then characterized using vimentin and versican. HDF were seeded into chitosan SRT at a density of 3×10(6) cells/cm(2) for fourteen days. Histological analysis and live cells imaging revealed that the cell-chitosan constructs within interconnected porous chitosan showed significant interaction between the cells as well as between the cells and the chitosan. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed cells spreading and covering the pores. As the pore sizes of the chitosan SRT range between 40-140 μm, an average porosity is about 93 ± 12.57% and water uptake ratio of chitosan SRT is 536.02 ± 14.29%, it is a supportive template for fibroblast attachment and has potential in applications as a dermal substitute.

  5. In vitro biocompatibility of chitosan porous skin regenerating templates (PSRTs) using primary human skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, C K; Yaacob, N S; Ismail, Z; Halim, A S

    2010-04-01

    Biopolymer chitosan (beta-1,4-d-glucosamine) comprises the copolymer mixture of N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine. The natural biocompatibility and biodegradability of chitosan have recently highlighted its potential use for applications in wound management. Chemical and physical modifications of chitosan influence its biocompatibility and biodegradability, but it is unknown as to what degree. Hence, the biocompatibility of the chitosan porous skin regenerating templates (PSRT 82, 87 and 108) was determined using an in vitro toxicology model at the cellular and molecular level on primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (pNHEK). Cytocompatibility was accessed by using a 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay from 24 to 72h. To assess the genotoxicity of the PSRTs, DNA damage to the pNHEK was evaluated by using the Comet assay following direct contact with the various PSRTs. Furthermore, the skin pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-8 were examined to evaluate the tendency of the PSRTs to provoke inflammatory responses. All PSRTs were found to be cytocompatible, but only PSRT 108 was capable of stimulating cell proliferation. While all of the PSRTs showed some DNA damage, PSRT 108 showed the least DNA damage followed by PSRT 87 and 82. PSRT 87 and 82 induced a higher secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-8 in the pNHEK cultures than did PSRT 108. Hence, based on our experiments, PSRT 108 is the most biocompatible wound dressing of the three tested.

  6. Templated agarose scaffolds for the support of motor axon regeneration into sites of complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingyong; Lu, Paul; Bednark, Bridget; Lynam, Dan; Conner, James M; Sakamoto, Jeff; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2013-02-01

    Bioengineered scaffolds have the potential to support and guide injured axons after spinal cord injury, contributing to neural repair. In previous studies we have reported that templated agarose scaffolds can be fabricated into precise linear arrays and implanted into the partially injured spinal cord, organizing growth and enhancing the distance over which local spinal cord axons and ascending sensory axons extend into a lesion site. However, most human injuries are severe, sparing only thin rims of spinal cord tissue in the margins of a lesion site. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether template agarose scaffolds seeded with bone marrow stromal cells secreting Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) would support regeneration into severe, complete spinal cord transection sites. Moreover, we tested responses of motor axon populations originating from the brainstem. We find that templated agarose scaffolds support motor axon regeneration into a severe spinal cord injury model and organize axons into fascicles of highly linear configuration. BDNF significantly enhances axonal growth. Collectively, these findings support the feasibility of scaffold implantation for enhancing central regeneration after even severe central nervous system injury.

  7. BDNF gene delivery within and beyond templated agarose multi-channel guidance scaffolds enhances peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Mingyong; Lu, Paul; Lynam, Dan; Bednark, Bridget; Campana, W. Marie; Sakamoto, Jeff; Tuszynski, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Objective. We combined implantation of multi-channel templated agarose scaffolds with growth factor gene delivery to examine whether this combinatorial treatment can enhance peripheral axonal regeneration through long sciatic nerve gaps. Approach. 15 mm long scaffolds were templated into highly organized, strictly linear channels, mimicking the linear organization of natural nerves into fascicles of related function. Scaffolds were filled with syngeneic bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) secreting the growth factor brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and lentiviral vectors expressing BDNF were injected into the sciatic nerve segment distal to the scaffold implantation site. Main results. Twelve weeks after injury, scaffolds supported highly linear regeneration of host axons across the 15 mm lesion gap. The incorporation of BDNF-secreting cells into scaffolds significantly increased axonal regeneration, and additional injection of viral vectors expressing BDNF into the distal segment of the transected nerve significantly enhanced axonal regeneration beyond the lesion. Significance. Combinatorial treatment with multichannel bioengineered scaffolds and distal growth factor delivery significantly improves peripheral nerve repair, rivaling the gold standard of autografts.

  8. Percutaneous Valvuloplasty for Bioprosthetic Tricuspid Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rohit; Sharma, Anjali; Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter tricuspid balloon valvuloplasty (PTTBV) is an accepted treatment option for symptomatic severe native tricuspid valve stenosis, although surgical tricuspid valve replacement remains the treatment of choice. There have been few reports of successful PTTBV for bioprosthetic tricuspid valve stenosis. We present case reports of 3 patients from our hospital experience. Two of the 3 cases were successful, with lasting clinical improvement, whereas the 3rd patient failed to show a reduction in valve gradient. We describe the standard technique used for PTTBV. We present results from a literature review that identified 16 previously reported cases of PTTBV for bioprosthetic severe tricuspid stenosis, with overall favorable results. We conclude that PTTBV should perhaps be considered for a select patient population in which symptomatic improvement and hemodynamic stability are desired immediately, and particularly for patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. PMID:28265212

  9. A Primer on Wound Healing in Colorectal Surgery in the Age of Bioprosthetic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex, dynamic process that is vital for closure of cutaneous injuries, restoration of abdominal wall integrity after laparotomy closure, and to prevent anastomotic dehiscence after bowel surgery. Derangements in healing have been described in multiple processes including diabetes mellitus, corticosteroid use, irradiation for malignancy, and inflammatory bowel disease. A thorough understanding of the process of healing is necessary for clinical decision making and knowledge of the current state of the science may lead future researchers in developing methods to enable our ability to modulate healing, ultimately improving outcomes. An exciting example of this ability is the use of bioprosthetic materials used for abdominal wall surgery (hernia repair/reconstruction). These bioprosthetic meshes are able to regenerate and remodel from an allograft or xenograft collagen matrix into site-specific tissue; ultimately being degraded and minimizing the risk of long-term complications seen with synthetic materials. The purpose of this article is to review healing as it relates to cutaneous and intestinal trauma and surgery, factors that impact wound healing, and wound healing as it pertains to bioprosthetic materials. PMID:25435821

  10. A Case Report of the First Nonburn-related Military Trauma Victim Treated with Spray Skin Regenerative Therapy in Combination with a Dermal Regenerate Template

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Rendon, Juan L.; Latham, Kerry P.; Fleming, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Massive soft tissue and skin loss secondary to war-related traumas are among the most frequently encountered challenges in the care of wounded warriors. This case report outlines the first military nonburn-related trauma patient treated by a combination of regenerative modalities. Our case employs spray skin technology to an established dermal regenerate matrix. Our patient, a 29-year-old active duty male, suffered a combat blast trauma in 2010 while deployed. The patient’s treatment course was complicated by a severe necrotizing fasciitis infection requiring over 100 surgical procedures for disease control and reconstruction. In secondary delayed reconstruction procedures, this triple-limb amputee underwent successful staged ventral hernia repair via a component separation technique with biologic mesh underlay although this resulted in a skin deficit of more than 600 cm2. A dermal regenerate template was applied to the abdominal wound to aid in establishing a “neodermis.” Three weeks after dermal regenerate application, spray skin was applied to the defect in conjunction with a 6:1 meshed split thickness skin graft. The dermal regenerate template allowed for optimization of the wound bed for skin grafting. The use of spray skin allowed for a 6:1 mesh ratio, thus minimizing the donor-site size and morbidity. Together, this approach resulted in complete healing of a large full-thickness wound. The patient is now able to perform activities of daily living, walk without a cane, and engage in various physical activities. Overall, our case highlights the potential that combining regenerative therapies can achieve in treating severe war-related and civilian traumatic injuries. PMID:28293522

  11. A Case Report of the First Nonburn-related Military Trauma Victim Treated with Spray Skin Regenerative Therapy in Combination with a Dermal Regenerate Template.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Ian L; Hammer, Daniel A; Rendon, Juan L; Latham, Kerry P; Fleming, Mark E

    2016-12-01

    Massive soft tissue and skin loss secondary to war-related traumas are among the most frequently encountered challenges in the care of wounded warriors. This case report outlines the first military nonburn-related trauma patient treated by a combination of regenerative modalities. Our case employs spray skin technology to an established dermal regenerate matrix. Our patient, a 29-year-old active duty male, suffered a combat blast trauma in 2010 while deployed. The patient's treatment course was complicated by a severe necrotizing fasciitis infection requiring over 100 surgical procedures for disease control and reconstruction. In secondary delayed reconstruction procedures, this triple-limb amputee underwent successful staged ventral hernia repair via a component separation technique with biologic mesh underlay although this resulted in a skin deficit of more than 600 cm(2). A dermal regenerate template was applied to the abdominal wound to aid in establishing a "neodermis." Three weeks after dermal regenerate application, spray skin was applied to the defect in conjunction with a 6:1 meshed split thickness skin graft. The dermal regenerate template allowed for optimization of the wound bed for skin grafting. The use of spray skin allowed for a 6:1 mesh ratio, thus minimizing the donor-site size and morbidity. Together, this approach resulted in complete healing of a large full-thickness wound. The patient is now able to perform activities of daily living, walk without a cane, and engage in various physical activities. Overall, our case highlights the potential that combining regenerative therapies can achieve in treating severe war-related and civilian traumatic injuries.

  12. Bioprosthetic Tissue Matrices in Complex Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Broyles, Justin M.; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sacks, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex abdominal defects are difficult problems encountered by surgeons in multiple specialties. Although current evidence supports the primary repair of these defects with mesh reinforcement, it is unclear which mesh is superior for any given clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to explore the characteristics of and clinical relevance behind bioprosthetic tissue matrices in an effort to better clarify their role in abdominal wall reconstruction. Methods: We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature on the use of bioprosthetic mesh in human subjects. Basic science articles and large retrospective and prospective reviews were included in author’s analysis. The clinical performance and characteristics of 13 bioprosthetic tissue matrices were evaluated. Results: The majority of the products evaluated perform well in contaminated fields, where the risk of wound-healing difficulties is high. Clinical outcomes, which included infection, reherniation, and bulge formation, were variable, and the majority of the studies had a mean follow-up of less than 24 months. Conclusions: Although bioprosthetic matrix has a multitude of indications within the growing field of abdominal wall reconstruction, the functionality, regenerative capacity, and long-term fate of these products have yet to be fully established. Furthermore, the clinical performance, indications, and contraindications for each type of matrix need to be fully evaluated in long-term outcome studies. PMID:25289285

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: An Underestimated Cause of Bioprosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Bouchiat, Coralie; Saison, Julien; Boisset, Sandrine; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Issartel, Bertrand; Dauwalder, Olivier; Benito, Yvonne; Jarraud, Sophie; Grando, Jacqueline; Boibieux, Andre; Dumitrescu, Oana; Delahaye, François; Farhat, Fadi; Thivolet-Bejui, Françoise; Frieh, Jean-Philippe; Vandenesch, François

    2015-01-01

    Background. Atypical mycobacteria, or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), have been barely reported as infective endocarditis (IE) agents. Methods. From January 2010 to December 2013, cardiac valve samples sent to our laboratory as cases of blood culture-negative suspected IE were analyzed by 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When positive for NTM, hsp PCR allowed species identification. Demographic, clinical, echocardiographic, histopathological, and Ziehl-Neelsen staining data were then collected. Results. Over the study period, 6 of 370 cardiac valves (belonging to 5 patients in 3 hospitals) were positive for Mycobacterium chelonae (n = 5) and Mycobacterium lentiflavum (n = 1) exclusively on bioprosthetic material. The 5 patients presented to the hospital for heart failure without fever 7.1–18.9 months (median 13.1 months) after biological prosthetic valve implantation. Echocardiography revealed paravalvular regurgitation due to prosthesis dehiscence in all patients. Histopathological examination of the explanted material revealed inflammatory infiltrates in all specimens, 3 of which were associated with giant cells. Gram staining and conventional cultures remained negative, whereas Ziehl-Neelsen staining showed acid-fast bacilli in all patients. Allergic etiology was ruled out by antiporcine immunoglobulin E dosages. These 5 cases occurred exclusively on porcine bioprosthetic material, revealing a statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE (P < .001). Conclusions. The body of evidence confirmed the diagnosis of prosthetic IE. The statistically significant association between bioprosthetic valves and NTM IE encourages systematic Ziehl-Neelsen staining of explanted bioprosthetic valves in case of early bioprosthesis dysfunction, even without an obvious sign of IE. In addition, we strongly question the cardiac bioprosthesis conditioning process after animal sacrifice. PMID:26213691

  14. Bioprosthetic mitral valve thrombosis complicating antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, successfully treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Chamsi-Pasha, Mohammed A; Alyousef, Tareq; Sayyed, Samer

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of bioprosthetic valve thrombosis and related embolic complications is extremely rare, obviating the need for long-term anticoagulation. As a result, experience in the diagnosis and treatment of bioprosthetic valve thrombosis is fairly limited. We report the first case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as bioprosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, 15 months after valve replacement, and successfully treated with thrombolytic therapy.

  15. Bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction due to native valve preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Mori, Yoshio; Umeda, Yukio; Takiya, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Mitral valve replacement with preservation of the mitral leaflets and subvalvular apparatus is considered to maintain left ventricular geometry and function and reduce the risk of myocardial rupture. However, the routine use of this technique may lead to early complications such as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and even mitral inflow obstruction, requiring reoperation. We describe a rare case of bioprosthetic mitral valve dysfunction caused by a native valve preserving procedure.

  16. Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis in Association with Enterococcus durans

    PubMed Central

    Di Gioacchino, Lorena; Balestrini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are common organisms associated with endocarditis, but infection by Enterococcus durans is very rare. To our knowledge, only 3 cases have been reported in the medical literature, and all 3 have involved native valves. Here we publish the first reported case (to our knowledge) of E. durans endocarditis in association with a bioprosthetic aortic valve. After the organism and its antibiotic susceptibility were identified, the 74-year-old male patient was treated successfully with teicoplanin and gentamicin, over a course of 6 weeks. PMID:27127436

  17. A Genomics-Based Model for Prediction of Severe Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ponasenko, Anastasia V.; Khutornaya, Maria V.; Kutikhin, Anton G.; Rutkovskaya, Natalia V.; Tsepokina, Anna V.; Kondyukova, Natalia V.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    Severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification is a significant problem in cardiovascular surgery. Unfortunately, clinical markers did not demonstrate efficacy in prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Here, we examined whether a genomics-based approach is efficient in predicting the risk of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. A total of 124 consecutive Russian patients who underwent mitral valve replacement surgery were recruited. We investigated the associations of the inherited variation in innate immunity, lipid metabolism and calcium metabolism genes with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Genotyping was conducted utilizing the TaqMan assay. Eight gene polymorphisms were significantly associated with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification and were therefore included into stepwise logistic regression which identified male gender, the T/T genotype of the rs3775073 polymorphism within the TLR6 gene, the C/T genotype of the rs2229238 polymorphism within the IL6R gene, and the A/A genotype of the rs10455872 polymorphism within the LPA gene as independent predictors of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. The developed genomics-based model had fair predictive value with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.73. In conclusion, our genomics-based approach is efficient for the prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. PMID:27589735

  18. A Genomics-Based Model for Prediction of Severe Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Calcification.

    PubMed

    Ponasenko, Anastasia V; Khutornaya, Maria V; Kutikhin, Anton G; Rutkovskaya, Natalia V; Tsepokina, Anna V; Kondyukova, Natalia V; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E; Barbarash, Leonid S

    2016-08-31

    Severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification is a significant problem in cardiovascular surgery. Unfortunately, clinical markers did not demonstrate efficacy in prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Here, we examined whether a genomics-based approach is efficient in predicting the risk of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. A total of 124 consecutive Russian patients who underwent mitral valve replacement surgery were recruited. We investigated the associations of the inherited variation in innate immunity, lipid metabolism and calcium metabolism genes with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. Genotyping was conducted utilizing the TaqMan assay. Eight gene polymorphisms were significantly associated with severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification and were therefore included into stepwise logistic regression which identified male gender, the T/T genotype of the rs3775073 polymorphism within the TLR6 gene, the C/T genotype of the rs2229238 polymorphism within the IL6R gene, and the A/A genotype of the rs10455872 polymorphism within the LPA gene as independent predictors of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification. The developed genomics-based model had fair predictive value with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.73. In conclusion, our genomics-based approach is efficient for the prediction of severe bioprosthetic mitral valve calcification.

  19. Cardiac crossroads: deciding between mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Tillquist, Maggie N; Maddox, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 15 million people in the United States suffer from either aortic or mitral valvular disease. For patients with severe and symptomatic valvular heart disease, valve replacement surgery improves morbidity and mortality outcomes. In 2009, 90,000 valve replacement surgeries were performed in the United States. This review evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and bioprosthetic prosthetic heart valves as well as the factors for consideration in deciding the appropriate valve type for an individual patient. Although many caveats exist, the general recommendation is for patients younger than 60 to 65 years to receive mechanical valves due to the valve’s longer durability and for patients older than 60 to 65 years to receive a bioprosthetic valve to avoid complications with anticoagulants. Situations that warrant special consideration include patient co-morbidities, the need for anticoagulation, and the potential for pregnancy. Once these characteristics have been considered, patients’ values, anxieties, and expectations for their lifestyle and quality of life should be incorporated into final valve selection. Decision aids can be useful in integrating preferences in the valve decision. Finally, future directions in valve technology, anticoagulation, and medical decision-making are discussed. PMID:21448466

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for aortic bioprosthetic valve failure with cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Fudim, Marat; Markley, Roshanak R; Robbins, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Acutely failing bioprosthetic valves represent a clinical emergency and are exceedingly challenging given the paucity of therapeutic options. Oftentimes, these patients are not re-operative candidates due to clinical instability. We present 2 cases of acute degenerative aortic bioprosthetic valve failure with cardiogenic shock treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). These cases were characterized by hemodynamic instability with vasopressor dependence and (multiple) organ failure. These 2 cases demonstrate that TAVR should be considered as a treatment option for unstable patients with bioprosthetic failure.

  1. Comparison of a sealed, polymer foam biodegradable temporizing matrix against Integra® dermal regeneration template in a porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John Edward; Dearman, Bronwyn Louise

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and optimize the first stage of a proposed two-stage skin graft replacement strategy. This entails creation of a material that can be applied immediately after burn excision to "temporize" the wound bed, become integrated as a "neodermis," resist contraction and infection, and provide the grounding for the second stage (an autologous, cultured composite skin). Four 8 × 8 cm wounds were generated in six pigs to assess and compare wound contraction using Integra® dermal regeneration template, a biodegradable temporizing polymer matrix (sealed and unsealed), and a secondary intention wound. All dressings were contiguous. Infection resulted in early spontaneous delamination of the Integra® marring the long-term comparison. The wounds treated with the sealed polymer thus contracted significantly less than the wounds treated with Integra® over the 28 days. Histologically, a thick layer of scar developed superficial to the Integra®, unsealed polymer, and in the secondary intention wounds when compared with the sealed polymer, where such a scar layer was characteristically minimal. No clinical signs of infection were observed for any polymer-treated wound. Once the Integra® silicone layer delaminated, wound contraction was aggressive. Optimization of the biodegradable sealing membrane is imminent, and the second stage of composite skin development is under way.

  2. Quantification of the edge effect in calcified bioprosthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Wika, K E; Utoh, J; Brown, J; Harasaki, H

    1993-10-01

    In bioprosthetic tissue samples that had been implanted in the subcutaneous space of rats, and recurring pattern of calcification was observed. In this pattern, which we call the edge effect, the interior of the tissue is calcified and is surrounded and separated from the subcutaneous fluid by a zone that is free from calcification. The edge effect has been qualitatively described in the literature for subcutaneous implants and for valve leaflets, and it may be related to the mechanism of calcification for these materials. The thickness of the calcification free outer layer was quantified for glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium, glycerol treated bovine pericardium, glutaraldehyde treated human dura mater, and glycerol treated human dura mater. The edge effect values were found to be unique and consistent for each material type, and they were inversely related to the shrinkage temperatures and the calcium contents of the materials. It was determined that the chemical treatment was more important than the tissue type in determining the edge effect value.

  3. Design of Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves using biaxial test data.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Y; Paulson, K; Tyberg, J; Ronsky, J; Ali, I; Di Martino, E; Narine, K

    2015-01-01

    Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves (BAVs) do not have the serious limitations of mechanical aortic valves in terms of thrombosis. However, the lifetime of BAVs is too short, often requiring repeated surgeries. The lifetime of BAVs might be improved by using computer simulations of the structural behavior of the leaflets. The goal of this study was to develop a numerical model applicable to the optimization of durability of BAVs. The constitutive equations were derived using biaxial tensile tests. Using a Fung model, stress and strain data were computed from biaxial test data. SolidWorks was used to develop the geometry of the leaflets, and ABAQUS finite element software package was used for finite element calculations. Results showed the model is consistent with experimental observations. Reaction forces computed by the model corresponded with experimental measurements when the biaxial test was simulated. As well, the location of maximum stresses corresponded to the locations of frequent tearing of BAV leaflets. Results suggest that BAV design can be optimized with respect to durability.

  4. Simulated bioprosthetic heart valve deformation under quasi-static loading.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Abad, Ajay; Sacks, Michael S

    2005-11-01

    For more than 40 years, the replacement of diseased natural heart valves with prosthetic devices has dramatically extended the quality and length of the lives of millions of patients worldwide. However, bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) continue to fail due to structural failure resulting from poor tissue durability and faulty design. Clearly, an in-depth understanding of the biomechanical behavior of BHV at both the tissue and functional prosthesis levels is essential to improving BHV design and to reduce rates of failure. In this study, we simulated quasi-static BHV leaflet deformation under 40, 80, and 120 mm Hg quasi-static transvalvular pressures. A Fung-elastic material model was used that incorporated material parameters and axes derived from actual leaflet biaxial tests and measured leaflet collagen fiber structure. Rigorous experimental validation of predicted leaflet strain field was used to validate the model results. An overall maximum discrepancy of 2.36% strain between the finite element (FE) results and experiment measurements was obtained, indicating good agreement between computed and measured major principal strains. Parametric studies utilizing the material parameter set from one leaflet for all three leaflets resulted in substantial variations in leaflet stress and strain distributions. This result suggests that utilization of actual leaflet material properties is essential for accurate BHV FE simulations. The present study also underscores the need for rigorous experimentation and accurate constitutive models in simulating BHV function and design.

  5. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-03-11

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models.

  6. Design and Fabrication of a Thin-Walled Freeform Scaffold on the Basis of Medical Image Data and a 3D Printed Template: Potential Use in Bile Duct Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Suk Hee; Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Ji Eun; Chun, Seung Woo; Jang, Kiseok; Kim, Youn Hwan; Jeong, Mi Ae; Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyo Jin; Lee, Nak Kyu; Choi, Dongho; Kim, Han Joon

    2017-03-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, combined with medical imaging technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has shown great potential in patient-specific tissue regeneration. Here, we successfully fabricated an ultrathin tubular freeform structure that has a wall thickness of several tens of micrometers and is capable of providing sufficient mechanical flexibility. Such a thin geometry cannot easily be achieved by 3D printing alone; therefore, it was realized through a serial combination of processes that included the 3D printing of a sacrificial template, the dip-coating of the biomaterial, and the removal of the inner template. We demonstrated the feasibility of this novel tissue engineering construct by conducting bile duct surgery on rabbits. Moving from a rational design based on MRI data to a successful surgical procedure for reconstruction, we confirmed that the presented method of fabricating scaffolds has the potential for use in customized bile duct regeneration. In addition to the specific application presented here, the developed process and scaffold are expected to have universal applicability in other soft tissue engineering fields, particularly those involving vascular, airway, and abdominal tubular tissues.

  7. Assessing Anticalcification Treatments in Bioprosthetic Tissue by Using the New Zealand Rabbit Intramuscular Model

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gregory A; Faught, Joelle M; Olin, Jane M

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit intramuscular model can be used for detecting calcification in bioprosthetic tissue and to compare the calcification in the rabbit to that of native human valves. The rabbit model was compared with the commonly used Sprague–Dawley rat subcutaneous model. Eighteen rabbits and 18 rats were used to assess calcification in bioprosthetic tissue over time (7, 14, 30, and 90 d). The explanted rabbit and rat tissue discs were measured for calcium by using atomic absorption and Raman spectroscopy. Calcium deposits on the human valve explants were assessed by using Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the NZW rabbit model is robust for detecting calcification in a shorter duration (14 d), with less infection complications, more space to implant tissue groups (thereby reducing animal use numbers), and a more metabolically and mechanically dynamic environment than the rat subcutaneous model . The human explanted valves and rabbit explanted tissue both showed Raman peaks at 960 cm−1 which is representative of hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite is the final calcium and phosphate species in the calcification of bioprosthetic heart valves and rabbit intramuscular implants. The NZW rabbit intramuscular model is an effective model for assessing calcification in bioprosthetic tissue. PMID:19619417

  8. Phosphatase enzyme activity is retained in glutaraldehyde treated bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Maranto, A R; Schoen, F J

    1988-01-01

    Calcification of bioprosthetic valves, which frequently causes their failure, begins in cell remnants analogous to matrix vesicles of physiologic mineralization. Because the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) is important in normal skeletal mineralization, the authors hypothesized that AP also might be present in bioprosthetic valve tissue and thereby contribute to calcification. AP activity of fresh and glutaraldehyde (GLUT) treated bovine pericardium was measured by the conversion of p-nitrophenyl phosphate to p-nitrophenol. After 24 hrs in 0.6% HEPES buffered GLUT and storage for 2 weeks in 0.2% GLUT, considerable AP hydrolytic activity remained relative to that of fresh tissue (Vmax: 24 vs 45 microM reaction product/min/mg tissue protein, respectively), although binding was moderately reduced (KM: 1900 vs 1400 microM substrate, respectively). Light microscopic histochemistry suggested cell oriented AP activity. Ultrastructural examination of GLUT treated tissue demonstrated reaction product along membranes of vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts, the sites of early calcific deposits in bioprosthetic valves. Thus, AP hydrolytic activity is largely preserved following GLUT treatment of bovine pericardium. These results indicate that the widely held view that GLUT eliminates all metabolic activities of bioprosthetic tissue is inaccurate and suggests that examination of the role of AP and other phosphatases may stimulate approaches for inhibiting calcification.

  9. Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in a patient who had bovine bioprosthetic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hashoul, Jehard; Saliba, Waleed; Bloch, Irina; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen

    2016-01-01

    Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapidly progressing dementia, general neurologic deterioration, and death. When the leading symptoms are visual disturbances, it is termed as the Heidenhain variant of CJD (HvCJD). CJD was reported following prion-contaminated pericardium transplants but never after bovine bioprosthetic cardiac valve. In this case report, we describe HvCJD in a patient who had a bovine bioprosthetic cardiac valve implant. An 82-year-old-woman was referred to neuro-ophthalmology clinic for unexplained visual loss that started 1 month previously. Medical history included aortic valve replacement with bovine bioprosthetic valve. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/120 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye; otherwise, the eye examination was normal. Humphrey visual fields revealed complete right homonymous hemianopsia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated nonspecific white matter changes. A week later, she was hospitalized due to memory impairment; repeated MRI and total body computed tomography scan showed no significant findings. Electroencephalography recordings and extremely elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau protein were compatible with CJD. The patient died 3 weeks later; autopsy was not performed. The patient had HvCJD. Ophthalmologists being first to see these patients should be aware of this diagnosis. Contaminated bovine bioprosthetic valve might be another source for prion disease. Further research is required to establish this issue. PMID:27905341

  10. [Study of cytotoxicity of bioprosthetic heart valve material and its store solution].

    PubMed

    Cheng, S; Shi, Y; Liang, W; Li, W

    1999-09-01

    This study compared the cytotoxicities of bioprosthetic heart valve materials crosslinked by glutaraldehyde, stored in 4% formaldehyde or Hank's solution. Human embryonic pulmonary fibroblasts or L-929 cell culture in vitro were used. Cell proliferative inhibition index(CP II) was calculated for bioprosthetic heart valve materials using different store methods in different rinse periods(before, 10 days, 20 days, 30 days). The results demonstrate: (1) bioprosthetic heart valve materials stored in 4% formaldehyde or in Hank's solution both have significant cytotoxicity, and the longer the rinse time continues, the lower the cytotoxicity declines; (2) HEL cell is more sensitive than L-929 cell in detecting the cytotoxicity of toxic biomaterials but for weak toxic biomaterials the two cell lines are not significanth different; (3) formatldehyde solution increases the cytotoxicity of biomaterials stored in it, but the enhanced cytotoxicity can be easily relieved by rinse. The authors conclude that bioprosthetic heart valve materials have long term significant cytotoxicity and the biomaterial cytotoxicity test using human fibroblasts is more sensitive and precise than other tests.

  11. Donkey pericardium as an alternative bioprosthetic heart valve material.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanliang; Xu, Li; Liu, Yuxi; Li, Quan; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xuemei; Liu, Tianqi

    2013-03-01

    This study comparatively evaluates the characteristics of glutaraldehyde-treated acellular bovine and donkey pericardium using histological and electronic microscopic observation techniques, shrinkage temperature, and mechanical properties, as well as determining calcium and phosphorus content at 4 and 8 weeks after the subcutaneous implantation of donkey and bovine pericardium in Wistar rats. Donkey pericardium was significantly thinner compared with bovine pericardium (1.622 ±  0.161 mm vs. 4.027 ± 0.401 mm, P < 0.0001) and was associated with significantly greater tensile strength (14.21 ±  3.81 MPa vs. 3.78 ± 1.20 MPa, P = 0.001) and elastic modulus (81.67 ± 20.41 MPa vs. 21.67 ± 11.69 MPa, P <  0.0001) over bovine pericardium. Shrinkage temperature of donkey pericardium was similar to that of bovine pericardium (87.43 ± 0.55°C vs. 87.50 ± 0.36°C, P =  0.810). No differences between groups were observed for maximum load (donkey: 21.64 ± 7.02 KN/m vs. bovine: 15.05 ± 4.50 KN/m, P = 0.082) and tear strength (donkey: 11.54 ± 5.33 MPa vs. bovine: 10.69 ±  3.77 MPa, P = 0.757). Calcium content was significantly lower in donkey pericardium compared with bovine pericardium at 4 weeks (690.15 ± 191.27 µg/g vs. 1381.73 ± 62.52 µg/g, P = 0.001) and 8 weeks (205.24 ± 62.40 µg/g vs. 910.48 ± 398.29 µg/g, P = 0.037). This preliminary study has confirmed that glutaraldehyde-tanned donkey pericardium, demonstrating reduced calcification and increased tensile strength, may provide a suitable bioprosthetic valve substitute.

  12. A label-free fluorescent direct detection of live Salmonella typhimurium using cascade triple trigger sequences-regenerated strand displacement amplification and hairpin template-generated-scaffolded silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Li, Xiaocheng; Ma, Suzhen; Men, Shuai; Wei, Heng; Cui, Jingjing; Wang, Hongning

    2017-01-15

    The harm of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) to public health mainly by the consumption of contaminated agricultural products or water stresses an urgent need for rapid detection methods to help control the spread of S. typhimurium. In this work, an intelligently designed sensor system took creative advantage of triple trigger sequences-regenerated strand displacement amplification and self-protective hairpin template-generated-scaffolded silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) for the first time. In the presence of live S. typhimurium, single-stranded trigger sequences were released from aptamer-trigger sequences complex, initiating a branch migration to open the hairpin template I containing complementary scaffolds of AgNCs. Then the first strand displacement amplification was induced to produce numerous scaffolds of AgNCs and reporter strands which initiated a branch migration to open the hairpin template II containing complementary scaffolds of AgNCs. Then the second strand displacement amplification was induced to generate numerous scaffolds of AgNCs and trigger sequences which initiated the third branch migration and strand displacement amplification to produce numerous scaffolds of AgNCs and reporter strands in succession. Cyclically, the reproduction of the trigger sequences and cascade successive production of scaffolds were achieved successfully, forming highly fluorescent AgNCs, thus providing significantly enhanced fluorescent signals to achieve ultrasensitive detection of live S. typhimurium down to 50 CFU/mL with a linear range from 10(2) to 10(7)CFU/mL. It is the first report on a fluorescent biosensor for detecting viable S. typhimurium directly, which can distinguish from heat denatured S. typhimurium. And it develops a new strategy to generate the DNA-scaffolds for forming AgNCs.

  13. The use of Integra® bilaminar dermal regeneration template in apert syndactyly reconstruction: a novel alternative to simplify care and improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jung, James J; Woo, Albert S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2012-01-01

    The reconstruction of the third web space in Apert syndactyly often involves pedicled groin flaps to resurface exposed distal (and sometimes proximal) phalanges. We report a case in which the right-hand third web space was reconstructed with traditional pedicled groin flaps and the left hand with the Integra(®) regenerative skin template. We report that both left and right hands achieved similar outcomes, but the hand reconstructed with groin flaps required debulking, whilst the hand reconstructed with Integra was easier to care for.

  14. Alkaline phosphatase activity of glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium used in bioprosthetic cardiac valves.

    PubMed

    Maranto, A R; Schoen, F J

    1988-10-01

    Bioprosthetic valves fail frequently because of pathological mineralization, a process that begins in cell remnants of the glutaraldehyde (GLUT) fixed tissue. Other pathological cardiovascular calcification and physiological mineralization in skeletal/dental tissues are both largely initiated in cell-derived membranous structures (often called "matrix vesicles"), and the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (AP) likely has an important function in the pathogenesis of mineral nucleation. This study tested the hypothesis that AP might also be present in and contribute to calcification of bioprosthetic valves. AP activity of fresh and GLUT-treated bovine pericardium was measured by the conversion of p-nitrophenyl phosphate to p-nitrophenol. Following 24 hours in 0.6% HEPES-buffered GLUT and storage for 2 weeks in 0.2% GLUT, considerable AP hydrolytic activity remained in GLUT-treated tissue relative to that of fresh tissue (Vmax, 24 vs. 45 mumol reaction product/min/mg tissue protein, respectively), although binding was somewhat reduced (Km, 1.9 X 10(3) vs. 1.4 X 10(3) microM substrate, respectively). Enzyme reaction product was demonstrated in both fixed and fresh tissue by light microscopic histochemical studies, confirming the biochemical results. Reaction product was noted along membranes of vascular endothelial cells and interstitial fibroblasts, the sites of early calcific deposits in bioprosthetic valves, by ultrastructural examination of GLUT-treated tissue. We conclude that GLUT-treated bovine pericardium retains much of the hydrolytic activity of AP, an enzyme associated with normal skeletal and pathological cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mineralization, and suggest that further examination of the mechanistic role of this enzyme may stimulate new approaches for slowing or preventing calcification of bioprosthetic tissue.

  15. Implantation of mitral, aortic, and tricuspid bioprostheses due to infective endocarditis with necessary reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Danielecki, Cezary; Bugajski, Paweł; Olszewski, Roman; Greberski, Krzysztof; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    The patient was admitted to the Department of Cardiac Surgery of the J. Struś City Hospital in Poznan due to infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Implantation of three biological valve prostheses proceeded without complications. Starting on day 23, the patient's general condition deteriorated, with high fever. Despite postoperative antibiotic therapy, transesophageal echocardiography revealed the presence of vegetation on the bioprosthetic aortic valve. On the 46(th) day after the initial surgery, the patient required replacement of the aortic bioprosthesis, which exhibited the presence of numerous vegetations. The bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valves were not affected by the degenerative process. On the 12(th) day after the reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve, the patient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition.

  16. Implantation of mitral, aortic, and tricuspid bioprostheses due to infective endocarditis with necessary reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Bugajski, Paweł; Olszewski, Roman; Greberski, Krzysztof; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The patient was admitted to the Department of Cardiac Surgery of the J. Struś City Hospital in Poznan due to infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Implantation of three biological valve prostheses proceeded without complications. Starting on day 23, the patient's general condition deteriorated, with high fever. Despite postoperative antibiotic therapy, transesophageal echocardiography revealed the presence of vegetation on the bioprosthetic aortic valve. On the 46th day after the initial surgery, the patient required replacement of the aortic bioprosthesis, which exhibited the presence of numerous vegetations. The bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valves were not affected by the degenerative process. On the 12th day after the reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve, the patient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition. PMID:27785140

  17. Bioprosthetic versus mechanical prostheses for valve replacement in end-stage renal disease patients: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong Fang; Zhou, Jessie J.; Karagaratnam, Aran; Phan, Steven; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) indicated for dialysis are increasingly requiring cardiac valve surgery. The choice of bioprosthetic or mechanic valve prosthesis for such patients requires careful risk assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess current evidence available. Methods A comprehensive search from six electronic databases was performed from their inception to February 2015. Results from patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac surgery for bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement were identified. Results Sixteen studies with 8,483 patients with ESRD undergoing cardiac valve replacement surgery were included. No evidence of publication bias was detected. Prior angioplasty by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery was significantly higher in the bioprosthetic group compared to the mechanical group (16.0% vs. 12.0%, P=0.04); all other preoperative baseline patient characteristics were similar. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality or all-cause mortality between the two comparisons. Compared with the mechanical group, the frequency of bleeding (5.2% vs. 6.4%, P=0.04) and risk of thromboembolism (2.7% vs. 12.8%, P=0.02) were significantly lower in the bioprosthetic group. There were similar rates of reoperation and valve endocarditis. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that patients with ESRD undergoing bioprosthetic or mechanical valve replacement had similar mid-long term survival. The bioprosthetic group had lower rates of bleeding and thromboembolism. Further studies are required to differentiate the impact of valve location. The presented results may be applicable for ESRD patients requiring prosthetic valve replacement. PMID:27162649

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of early bioprosthetic malfunction in the mitral valve position due to thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Butnaru, Adi; Shaheen, Joseph; Tzivoni, Dan; Tauber, Rachel; Bitran, Daniel; Silberman, Shuli

    2013-11-01

    Bioprosthetic valve thrombosis is uncommon and the diagnosis is often elusive and may be confused with valve degeneration. We report our experience with mitral bioprosthetic valve thrombosis and suggest a therapeutic approach. From 2002 to 2011, 149 consecutive patients who underwent mitral valve replacement with a bioprosthesis at a single center were retrospectively screened for clinical or echocardiographic evidence of valve malfunction. Nine were found to have valve thrombus. All 9 patients had their native valve preserved, representing 24% of those with preserved native valves. Five patients (group 1) presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure at 16.4 ± 12.4 months after surgery. Echocardiogram revealed homogenous echo-dense film on the ventricular surface of the bioprosthesis with elevated transvalvular gradient, resembling early degeneration. The first 2 patients underwent reoperation: valve thrombus was found and confirmed by histologic examination. Based on these, the subsequent 3 patients received anticoagulation treatment with complete thrombus resolution: mean mitral gradient decreased from 23 ± 4 to 6 ± 1 mm Hg and tricuspid regurgitation gradient decreased from 83 ± 20 to 49 ± 5 mm Hg. Four patients (group 2) were asymptomatic, but routine echocardiogram showed a discrete mass on the ventricular aspect of the valve: 1 underwent reoperation to replace the valve and 3 received anticoagulation with complete resolution of the echocardiographic findings. In conclusion, bioprosthetic mitral thrombosis occurs in about 6% of cases. In our experience, onset is early, before anticipated valve degeneration. Clinical awareness followed by an initial trial with anticoagulation is warranted. Surgery should be reserved for those who are not responsive or patients in whom the hemodynamic status does not allow delay. Nonresection of the native valve at the initial operation may play a role in the origin of this entity.

  19. Inhibition of Calcification of Bioprosthetic Heart Valves by Local Controlled-Release Diphosphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Robert J.; Wolfrum, Jacqueline; Schoen, Frederick J.; Hawley, Marguerite A.; Lund, Sally Anne; Langer, Robert

    1985-04-01

    Bioprostheses fabricated from porcine aortic valves are widely used to replace diseased heart valves. Calcification is the principal cause of the clinical failure of these devices. In the present study, inhibition of the calcification of bioprosthetic heart valve cusps implanted subcutaneously in rats was achieved through the adjacent implantation of controlled-release matrices containing the anticalcification agent ethanehydroxydiphosphonate dispersed in a copolymer of ethylene-vinyl acetate. Prevention of calcification was virtually complete, without the adverse effects of retarded bone and somatic growth that accompany systemic administration of ethanehydroxydiphosphonate.

  20. Antiphospholipid Syndrome and Libman-Sacks Endocarditis in a Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Sladek, Eric H; Accola, Kevin D

    2016-02-01

    This report describes one the first cases of antiphospholipid syndrome and Libman-Sacks endocarditis in a bioprosthetic valve. A redo mitral valve replacement was carried out owing to early deterioration of the prior valve. Initially it was considered secondary to rheumatic heart disease; however, pathology analysis and autoimmune workup revealed antiphospholipid syndrome with Libman-Sacks endocarditis. We believe certain populations with mitral valve stenosis may have an underlying antiphospholipid syndrome. As a result, there needs to be a lower threshold for identifying this disease.

  1. Biomechanical Behavior of Bioprosthetic Heart Valve Heterograft Tissues: Characterization, Simulation, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joao S; Feaver, Kristen R; Zhang, Will; Kamensky, David; Aggarwal, Ankush; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    The use of replacement heart valves continues to grow due to the increased prevalence of valvular heart disease resulting from an ageing population. Since bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) continue to be the preferred replacement valve, there continues to be a strong need to develop better and more reliable BHVs through and improved the general understanding of BHV failure mechanisms. The major technological hurdle for the lifespan of the BHV implant continues to be the durability of the constituent leaflet biomaterials, which if improved can lead to substantial clinical impact. In order to develop improved solutions for BHV biomaterials, it is critical to have a better understanding of the inherent biomechanical behaviors of the leaflet biomaterials, including chemical treatment technologies, the impact of repetitive mechanical loading, and the inherent failure modes. This review seeks to provide a comprehensive overview of these issues, with a focus on developing insight on the mechanisms of BHV function and failure. Additionally, this review provides a detailed summary of the computational biomechanical simulations that have been used to inform and develop a higher level of understanding of BHV tissues and their failure modes. Collectively, this information should serve as a tool not only to infer reliable and dependable prosthesis function, but also to instigate and facilitate the design of future bioprosthetic valves and clinically impact cardiology.

  2. Bioprosthetic tricuspid valve replacement in carcinoid heart disease from primary ovarian carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Tsugu, Toshimitsu; Iwanaga, Shiro; Murata, Mitsushige; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-07-01

    Carcinoid heart disease (CHD) commonly occurs in association with primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors with hepatic metastases. Unlike primary gastrointestinal tract carcinoid tumors, primary ovarian carcinoid tumors may cause CHD without hepatic metastases, accounting for only 0.3 % of all carcinoid tumors. Only 37 cases of CHD from primary ovarian carcinoid tumors have been reported. We present a case of CHD in which tricuspid valve thickening and shortening led to reduced valve mobility with the resulting severe tricuspid regurgitation. Considering these characteristics of an abnormal tricuspid valve, we suspected CHD, but prosthetic valve replacement was performed without sufficient systemic examination before surgery. Two years after valve replacement, the patient underwent excision of a mass in the lower abdomen, which was diagnosed as an ovarian carcinoid tumor by histopathological examination. The patient has been observed for more than 3 years after tricuspid valve replacement. She has not experienced bioprosthetic valve leaflet degeneration or dysfunction, although it has been reported that bioprosthetic valves may degenerate in patients with carcinoid tumors. Sufficient systemic examinations should be performed to explore the cause of disease.

  3. An immersogeometric variational framework for fluid–structure interaction: application to bioprosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Kamensky, David; Hsu, Ming-Chen; Schillinger, Dominik; Evans, John A.; Aggarwal, Ankush; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S.; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a geometrically flexible technique for computational fluid–structure interaction (FSI). The motivating application is the simulation of tri-leaflet bioprosthetic heart valve function over the complete cardiac cycle. Due to the complex motion of the heart valve leaflets, the fluid domain undergoes large deformations, including changes of topology. The proposed method directly analyzes a spline-based surface representation of the structure by immersing it into a non-boundary-fitted discretization of the surrounding fluid domain. This places our method within an emerging class of computational techniques that aim to capture geometry on non-boundary-fitted analysis meshes. We introduce the term “immersogeometric analysis” to identify this paradigm. The framework starts with an augmented Lagrangian formulation for FSI that enforces kinematic constraints with a combination of Lagrange multipliers and penalty forces. For immersed volumetric objects, we formally eliminate the multiplier field by substituting a fluid–structure interface traction, arriving at Nitsche’s method for enforcing Dirichlet boundary conditions on object surfaces. For immersed thin shell structures modeled geometrically as surfaces, the tractions from opposite sides cancel due to the continuity of the background fluid solution space, leaving a penalty method. Application to a bioprosthetic heart valve, where there is a large pressure jump across the leaflets, reveals shortcomings of the penalty approach. To counteract steep pressure gradients through the structure without the conditioning problems that accompany strong penalty forces, we resurrect the Lagrange multiplier field. Further, since the fluid discretization is not tailored to the structure geometry, there is a significant error in the approximation of pressure discontinuities across the shell. This error becomes especially troublesome in residual-based stabilized methods for incompressible flow, leading

  4. Fluid–structure interaction analysis of bioprosthetic heart valves: Significance of arterial wall deformation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S.; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a framework that combines variational immersed-boundary and arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) methods for fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a bioprosthetic heart valve implanted in an artery that is allowed to deform in the model. We find that the variational immersed-boundary method for FSI remains robust and effective for heart valve analysis when the background fluid mesh undergoes deformations corresponding to the expansion and contraction of the elastic artery. Furthermore, the computations presented in this work show that the arterial wall deformation contributes significantly to the realism of the simulation results, leading to flow rates and valve motions that more closely resemble those observed in practice. PMID:25580046

  5. In vitro comparative assessment of decellularized bovine pericardial patches and commercial bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Aguiari, Paola; Iop, Laura; Favaretto, Francesca; Fidalgo, Cátia Marisa Lourenco; Naso, Filippo; Milan, Gabriella; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Spina, Michel; Bassetto, Franco; Bagno, Andrea; Vettor, Roberto; Gerosa, Gino

    2017-02-03

    Notwithstanding their wide exploitation, biological prosthetic heart valves are characterized by limited durability (10-15 years). The treatment of biological tissues with chemical crosslinking agents such as glutaraldehyde accounts for the enhanced risk of structural deterioration associated with the early failure of bioprosthetic valves. To overcome the shortcomings of the currently available solutions, adoption of decellularized biological tissues of animal origin has emerged as a promising approach. The present study aims to assess in vitro cardiovascular scaffolds composed of bovine pericardium decellularized with the novel TRITDOC (TRIton-X100 and TauroDeOxyCholic acid) procedure. The effects of the treatment have been assessed by means of histological, biomolecular, cellular, biochemical and biomechanical analyses. The TRITDOC procedure grants the complete decellularization of bovine pericardial scaffolds while preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and the biomechanical properties. With a dedicated ELISA test, the TRITDOC procedure has been proven to ensure the complete removal of the alphaGal antigen, responsible for hyperacute rejection and for long-term deterioration of xenogenic biomaterials. Static seeding of the acellular pericardial patches with human adipose-derived stem cells resulted in an evenly repopulated scaffold without signs of calcification. The in vitro cyto-/immuno-compatibility response of the TRITDOC-bovine pericardium was compared with glutaraldehyde-treated xenogenic pericardium collected from two bioprosthetic devices currently used in clinical practice: PERIMOUNT MAGNA and TRIFECTA(TM). TRITDOC-bovine pericardium exhibited lower complement activation, lower cytotoxicity and a lower tendency to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to the tested commercial bioprostheses. Therefore, TRITDOC-decellularized pericardium could be considered as possible candidate material for the production of prosthetic heart valves.

  6. Increased cellular expression of matrix proteins that regulate mineralization is associated with calcification of native human and porcine xenograft bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsa, S S; Harrity, P J; Maercklein, P B; Kleppe, L; Veinot, J; Edwards, W D; Johnson, C M; Fitzpatrick, L A

    1997-01-01

    Dystrophic mineralization remains the leading cause of stenotic or regurgitant failure in native human and porcine bioprosthetic heart valves. We hypothesized that cellular expression of noncollagenous matrix proteins (osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteonectin) that regulate skeletal mineralization may orchestrate valvular calcification. Porcine bioprosthetic heart valves and native human heart valves obtained during replacement surgery were analyzed for cells, matrix proteins that regulate mineralization, and vessels. Cell accumulation and calcification were correlated for both valve types (rho = 0.75, P = 0.01, native; rho = 0.42, P = 0.08, bioprosthetic). Osteopontin expression correlated with cell accumulation (rho = 0.58, P = 0.04) and calcification (rho = 0.52, P = 0.06) for bioprosthetic valves. Osteocalcin expression correlated with calcification (rho = 0.77, P = 0.04) and cell accumulation (rho = 0.69, P = 0.07) in native valves. Comparisons of calcified versus noncalcified native and bioprosthetic valves for averaged total matrix protein mRNA signal score revealed increased noncollagenous proteins mRNA levels in calcified valves (P = 0.07, group I vs. group II; P = 0.02, group III vs. group IV). When stratified according to positive versus negative mRNA signal status, both calcified bioprosthetic valves (P = 0.03) and calcified native valves (P = 0.01) were significantly more positive for noncollagenous proteins mRNA than their noncalcified counterparts. Local cell-associated expression of proteins regulating mineralization suggests a highly coordinated mechanism of bioprosthetic and native valve calcification analogous to physiologic bone mineralization. Modulation of cellular infiltration or cellular expression of matrix proteins that regulate mineralization, may offer an effective therapeutic approach to the prevention of valve failure secondary to calcification. PMID:9062358

  7. Harnessing osteopontin and other natural inhibitors to mitigate ectopic calcification of bioprosthetic heart valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohri, Rachit

    Dystrophic calcification has been the long-standing major cause of bioprosthetic heart valve failure, and has been well studied in terms of the underlying causative mechanisms. Such understanding has yielded several anti-calcification strategies involving biomaterial modification at the preparation stage: chemical alteration, extraction of calcifiable components, or material modification with small-molecule anti-calcific agents. However, newer therapeutic opportunities are offered by the growing illustration of the pathology as a dynamic, actively regulated process involving several gene products, such as osteopontin (OPN), matrix-gla protein (MGP) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Osteopontin, a multi-functional matricellular glycosylated phosphoprotein has emerged as a prime candidate for the role of an in vivo inhibitor of ectopic calcification with two putative mechanisms: crystal poisoning and mineral-dissolution. The full therapeutic realization of its potential necessitates a better understanding of the mechanisms of anti-calcification by osteopontin, as well as appropriate in vivo models in which to evaluate its efficacy, potency and molecular mechanisms. In this work, we pursued the development and characterization of a reliable in vivo model with the OPN-null mouse to simulate the calcification of bioprosthetic valve material, namely glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium (GFBP) tissue. Subsequently, we used the calcification model to evaluate hypotheses based on the anti-calcific potential of osteopontin. Several modes of administering exogenous OPN to the implant site in OPN-null mice were explored, including soluble injected OPN, OPN covalently immobilized on the biomaterial, and OPN adsorbed onto the biomaterial. An investigation of the structure-function aspects of the anti-calcific ability of OPN was also pursued in the in vivo model. The OPN-null mouse was also used as an in vivo test-bed to evaluate the anti-calcific potential of other biomolecules

  8. New treatments using alginate in order to reduce the calcification of bovine bioprosthetic heart valve tissue.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, C; Rao, K P

    1997-01-01

    Calcification limits the functional lifetime of cardiac valve substitutes fabricated from glutaraldehyde preserved bovine pericardium. Host factors, mainly younger age, and implant factors, mainly glutaraldehyde cross-linking, are implicated in the calcification process. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking is believed to activate the potential sites in the tissues for biocalcification. In the present work, we investigated the possibility of using alginate azide (AA) instead of glutaraldehyde for the preservation of pericardial tissues in order to enhance the durability of bioprosthetic heart valves. Grafting with poly(GMA-BA) copolymer to the alginate azide cross-linked pericardial (AACPC) tissue was carried out to obtain better stability, strength, and anticalcification properties. The strength property and thermal stability of the AA cross-linked tissues were studied. Calcification studies in rat subdermal models reveal that AA cross-linking reduces the calcification to negligible levels. After 30 days implantation, the calcium content was found to be 10.4 +/- 1.2 and 6.1 +/- 0.3 micrograms mg-1 for untreated AACPC and polymer grafted AACPC, respectively, compared to a value of 100 +/- 1.2 micrograms mg-1 calcium recorded for control glutaraldehyde cross-linked pericardial (GCPC) tissues.

  9. Effects of Leaflet Design on Transvalvular Gradients of Bioprosthetic Heart Valves.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Ronsky, Janet; Ali, Imtiaz; Basha, Ameen; Bhanji, Alisha; Narine, Kishan

    2016-12-01

    Bioprosthetic aortic valves (BAVs) are becoming the prostheses of choice in heart valve replacement. The objective of this paper is to assess the effects of leaflet geometry on the mechanics and hemodynamics of BAVs in a fluid structure interaction model. The curvature and angle of leaflets were varied in 10 case studies whereby the following design parameters were altered: a circular arch, a line, and a parabola for the radial curvature, and a circular arch, a spline, and a parabola for the circumferential curvature. Six different leaflet angles (representative of the inclination of the leaflets toward the surrounding aortic wall) were analyzed. The 3-dimensional geometry of the models were created using SolidWorks, Pointwise was used for meshing, and Comsol Multiphysics was used for implicit finite element calculations. Realistic loading was enforced by considering the time-dependent strongly-coupled interaction between blood flow and leaflets. Higher mean pressure gradients as well as von Mises stresses were obtained with a parabolic or circular curvature for radial curvature or a parabolic or spline curvature for the circumferential curvature. A smaller leaflet angle was associated with a lower pressure gradient, and, a lower von Mises stress. The leaflet curvature and angle noticeably affected the speed of valve opening, and closing. When a parabola was used for circumferential or radial curvature, leaflets displacements were asymmetric, and they opened and closed more slowly. A circular circumferential leaflet curvature, a linear leaflet radial curvature, and leaflet inclination toward the surrounding aortic wall were associated with superior BAVs mechanics.

  10. Hydrodynamic performance of a prototype bioprosthetic valve derived from the pulmonary valve of Phoca groenlandica.

    PubMed

    Agathos, E Andreas; Shen, Ming; Styrc, Witold; Giannakopoulou, Stamatina; Lachanas, Elias; Tomos, Perikles

    2012-01-01

    Biological valves offer significant advantages over mechanical valves, and for this reason, we studied the possibility of using a new animal source such as that of Phoca groenlandica. Four aortic and four pulmonary leaflets were cut radially and their uniaxial tensile testing was evaluated. Three prototype pulmonary valves of Phoca groenlandica preserved in buffered glutaraldehyde solution 0.625% at pH 7.4 were mounted on a 19, 21, and 27 mm novel support system (stent) with heart shape commissural posts covered with polytetrafluoroethylene. The valves were tested in a steady flow system, the peak pressure gradients (PPGs) were measured, and the effective orifice areas (EOAs) were calculated for the flows of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 L/min. There were five different measurements for each flow variant. Aortic and pulmonary leaflets present no statistically significant difference in failure strength (p = 0.93). The PPGs across the valves for the flow of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 L/min for all three tested valves were low and the corresponding calculated EOAs were large. The new bioprosthetic valve derived from the pulmonary valve of Phoca groenlandica mounted on this novel support system presented a satisfactory hydrodynamic performance in a steady flow system. More research is needed before it can be considered suitable for human cardiac valve replacement.

  11. Triglycidylamine Cross-linking Combined with Ethanol Inhibits Bioprosthetic Heart Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Jeanne M.; Bakay, Marina A.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Gorman, Robert C.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Kruth, Howard S.; Ashworth, Paul E.; Kutty, Jaishankar K.; Schoen, Frederick J.; Bianco, Richard W.; Levy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the most important factors responsible for the calcific failure of bioprosthetic heart valves is glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Ethanol (EtOH) incubation after glutaraldehyde cross-linking has previously been reported to confer anti-calcification efficacy for bioprostheses. The present studies investigated the anticalcification efficacy in vivo of the novel cross-linking agent, triglycidyl amine (TGA), with or without EtOH incubation, in comparison to glutaraldehyde. Methods TGA cross-linking (+/− EtOH) was used to prepare porcine aortic valves for both rat subdermal implants and sheep mitral valve replacements, for comparisons with glutaraldehyde-fixed controls. Thermal denaturation temperature (Ts), an index of cross-linking, cholesterol extraction, and hydrodynamic properties were quantified. Explant endpoints included quantitative and morphologic assessment of calcification. Results Ts after TGA were intermediate between unfixed and glutaraldehyde-fixed. EtOH incubation resulted in almost complete extraction of cholesterol from TGA or glutaraldehyde-fixed cusps. Rat subdermal explants (90days) demonstrated that TGA-EtOH resulted in a significantly greater level of inhibition of calcification than other conditions. Thus, TGA-ethanol stent mounted porcine aortic valve bioprostheses were fabricated for comparisons with glutaraldehyde-pretreated controls. In hydrodynamic studies, TGA-EtOH bioprostheses had lower pressure gradients than glutaraldehyde-fixed. TGA-ethanol bioprostheses used as mitral valve replacements in juvenile sheep (150 days) demonstrated significantly lower calcium levels in both explanted porcine aortic cusp and aortic wall samples compared to glutaraldehyde-fixed controls. However, TGA-EtOH sheep explants also demonstrated isolated calcific nodules and intracuspal hematomas. Conclusions TGA-EtOH pretreatment of porcine aortic valves confers significant calcification resistance in both rat subdermal and sheep circulatory

  12. Multiclassifier system with hybrid learning applied to the control of bioprosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Kurzynski, Marek; Krysmann, Maciej; Trajdos, Pawel; Wolczowski, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the problem of recognition of the intended hand movements for the control of bio-prosthetic hand is addressed. The proposed method is based on recognition of electromiographic (EMG) and mechanomiographic (MMG) biosignals using a multiclassifier system (MCS) working in a two-level structure with a dynamic ensemble selection (DES) scheme and original concepts of competence function. Additionally, feedback information coming from bioprosthesis sensors on the correct/incorrect classification is applied to the adjustment of the combining mechanism during MCS operation through adaptive tuning competences of base classifiers depending on their decisions. Three MCS systems operating in decision tree structure and with different tuning algorithms are developed. In the MCS1 system, competence is uniformly allocated to each class belonging to the group indicated by the feedback signal. In the MCS2 system, the modification of competence depends on the node of decision tree at which a correct/incorrect classification is made. In the MCS3 system, the randomized model of classifier and the concept of cross-competence are used in the tuning procedure. Experimental investigations on the real data and computer-simulated procedure of generating feedback signals are performed. In these investigations classification accuracy of the MCS systems developed is compared and furthermore, the MCS systems are evaluated with respect to the effectiveness of the procedure of tuning competence. The results obtained indicate that modification of competence of base classifiers during the working phase essentially improves performance of the MCS system and that this improvement depends on the MCS system and tuning method used.

  13. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species.

  14. Neomycin and pentagalloyl glucose enhanced cross-linking for elastin and glycosaminoglycans preservation in bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Tripi, Daniel R; Vyavahare, Naren R

    2014-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde cross-linked bioprosthetic heart valves fail within 12-15 years of implantation due to limited durability. Glutaraldehyde does not adequately stabilize extracellular matrix components such as glycosaminoglycans and elastin, and loss of these components could be a major cause of degeneration of valve after implantation. We have shown earlier that neomycin-based cross-linking stabilizes glycosaminoglycans in the tissue but fails to stabilize elastin component. Here, we report a new treatment where neomycin and pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) were incorporated into glutaraldehyde cross-linking neomycin-PGG-Glutaraldehyde (NPG) to stabilize both glycosaminoglycans and elastin in porcine aortic valves. In vitro studies demonstrated a marked increase in extracellular matrix stability against enzymatic degradation after cross-linking and 10 month storage in NPG group when compared to glutaraldehyde controls. Tensile properties showed increased lower elastic modulus in both radial and circumferential directions in NPG group as compared to glutaraldehyde, probably due to increased elastin stabilization with no changes in upper elastic modulus and extensibility. The enhanced extracellular matrix stability was further maintained in NPG-treated tissues after rat subdermal implantation for three weeks. NPG group also showed reduced calcification when compared to glutaraldehyde controls. We conclude that NPG cross-linking would be an excellent alternative to glutaraldehyde cross-linking of bioprosthetic heart valves to improve its durability.

  15. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.; Talin, Albert A.

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  16. On a two-level multiclassifier system with error correction applied to the control of bioprosthetic hand.

    PubMed

    Kurzynski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an advanced method of recognition of patient's intention to move of hand prosthesis. The proposed method is based on two-level multiclassifier system (MCS) with homogeneous base classifiers dedicated to EEG, EMG and MMG biosignals and with combining mechanism using a dynamic ensemble selection (DES) scheme and probabilistic competence function. Additionally, the feedback signal derived from the prosthesis sensors is applied to the correction of classification algorithm. The performance of MCS with proposed competence function and combining procedure were experimentally compared against three benchmark MCSs using real data concerning the recognition of six types of grasping movements. The systems developed achieved the highest classification accuracies demonstrating the potential of multiple classifier systems with multimodal biosignals for the control of bioprosthetic hand.

  17. Bone Marrow–Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Bacterial Clearance and Preserve Bioprosthetic Integrity in a Model of Mesh Infection

    PubMed Central

    Criman, Erik T.; Kurata, Wendy E.; Matsumoto, Karen W.; Aubin, Harry T.; Campbell, Carmen E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reported incidence of mesh infection in contaminated operative fields is as high as 30% regardless of the material used. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to possess favorable immunomodulatory properties and improve tissue incorporation when seeded onto bioprosthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether seeding noncrosslinked bovine pericardium (Veritas Collagen Matrix) with allogeneic bone marrow–derived MSCs improves infection resistance in vivo after inoculation with Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: Rat bone marrow–derived MSCs at passage 3 were seeded onto bovine pericardium and cultured for 7 days before implantation. Additional rats (n = 24) were implanted subcutaneously with MSC-seeded or unseeded mesh and inoculated with 7 × 105 colony-forming units of E. coli or saline before wound closure (group 1, unseeded mesh/saline; group 2, unseeded mesh/E. coli; group 3, MSC-seeded mesh/E. coli; 8 rats per group). Meshes were explanted at 4 weeks and underwent microbiologic and histologic analyses. Results: MSC-seeded meshes inoculated with E. coli demonstrated superior bacterial clearance and preservation of mesh integrity compared with E. coli–inoculated unseeded meshes (87.5% versus 0% clearance; p = 0.001). Complete mesh degradation concurrent with abscess formation was observed in 100% of rats in the unseeded/E. coli group, which is in contrast to 12.5% of rats in the MSC-seeded/E. coli group. Histologic evaluation determined that remodeling characteristics of E. coli–inoculated MSC-seeded meshes were similar to those of uninfected meshes 4 weeks after implantation. Conclusions: Augmenting a bioprosthetic material with stem cells seems to markedly enhance resistance to bacterial infection in vivo and preserve mesh integrity. PMID:27482490

  18. Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemesha, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how a second-grade class used large templates to draw and paint five-digit numbers. The lesson integrated artistic knowledge and vocabulary with their mathematics lesson in place value. Students learned how draftspeople use templates, and they studied number paintings by Charles Demuth and Jasper Johns. (KM)

  19. E3 Charter Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a charter template which includes decisions made during the project planning phase, as well as local project goals, a communication strategy, an outreach strategy, distribution of responsibilities and a schedule.

  20. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental detail, agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  1. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Greenwell, Henry; Fiorellini, Joseph; Giannobile, William; Offenbacher, Steven; Salkin, Leslie; Townsend, Cheryl; Sheridan, Phillip; Genco, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Untreated periodontal disease leads to tooth loss through destruction of the attachment apparatus and tooth-supporting structures. The goals of periodontal therapy include not only the arrest of periodontal disease progression,but also the regeneration of structures lost to disease where appropriate. Conventional surgical approaches (e.g., flap debridement) continue to offer time-tested and reliable methods to access root surfaces,reduce periodontal pockets, and attain improved periodontal form/architecture. However, these techniques offer only limited potential towards recovering tissues destroyed during earlier disease phases. Recently, surgical procedures aimed at greater and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues and functional attachment close to their original level have been developed, analyzed, and employed in clinical practice. This paper provides a review of the current understanding of the mechanisms, cells, and factors required for regeneration of the periodontium and of procedures used to restore periodontal tissues around natural teeth. Targeted audiences for this paper are periodontists and/or researchers with an interest in improving the predictability of regenerative procedures. This paper replaces the version published in 1993.

  2. Periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  3. Dynamic and fluid–structure interaction simulations of bioprosthetic heart valves using parametric design with T-splines and Fung-type material models

    PubMed Central

    Kamensky, David; Xu, Fei; Kiendl, Josef; Wang, Chenglong; Wu, Michael C. H.; Mineroff, Joshua; Reali, Alessandro; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper builds on a recently developed immersogeometric fluid–structure interaction (FSI) methodology for bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) modeling and simulation. It enhances the proposed framework in the areas of geometry design and constitutive modeling. With these enhancements, BHV FSI simulations may be performed with greater levels of automation, robustness and physical realism. In addition, the paper presents a comparison between FSI analysis and standalone structural dynamics simulation driven by prescribed transvalvular pressure, the latter being a more common modeling choice for this class of problems. The FSI computation achieved better physiological realism in predicting the valve leaflet deformation than its standalone structural dynamics counterpart. PMID:26392645

  4. Dynamic and fluid-structure interaction simulations of bioprosthetic heart valves using parametric design with T-splines and Fung-type material models.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Xu, Fei; Kiendl, Josef; Wang, Chenglong; Wu, Michael C H; Mineroff, Joshua; Reali, Alessandro; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    This paper builds on a recently developed immersogeometric fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology for bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) modeling and simulation. It enhances the proposed framework in the areas of geometry design and constitutive modeling. With these enhancements, BHV FSI simulations may be performed with greater levels of automation, robustness and physical realism. In addition, the paper presents a comparison between FSI analysis and standalone structural dynamics simulation driven by prescribed transvalvular pressure, the latter being a more common modeling choice for this class of problems. The FSI computation achieved better physiological realism in predicting the valve leaflet deformation than its standalone structural dynamics counterpart.

  5. Prognosis after surgical replacement with a bioprosthetic aortic valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: systematic review of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Guyatt, Gordon H; O’Brien, Kathleen; Bain, Eva; Stein, Madeleine; Bhagra, Sai; Sit, Daegan; Kamran, Rakhshan; Chang, Yaping; Devji, Tahira; Mir, Hassan; Manja, Veena; Schofield, Toni; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Agoritsas, Thomas; Bagur, Rodrigo; Otto, Catherine M; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of survival, stroke, atrial fibrillation, structural valve deterioration, and length of hospital stay after surgical replacement of an aortic valve (SAVR) with a bioprosthetic valve in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Data sources Medline, Embase, PubMed (non-Medline records only), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane CENTRAL from 2002 to June 2016. Study selection Eligible observational studies followed patients after SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve for at least two years. Methods Reviewers, independently and in duplicate, evaluated study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias for patient important outcomes. We used the GRADE system to quantify absolute effects and quality of evidence. Published survival curves provided data for survival and freedom from structural valve deterioration, and random effect models provided the framework for estimates of pooled incidence rates of stroke, atrial fibrillation, and length of hospital stay. Results In patients undergoing SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve, median survival was 16 years in those aged 65 or less, 12 years in those aged 65 to 75, seven years in those aged 75 to 85, and six years in those aged more than 85. The incidence rate of stroke was 0.25 per 100 patient years (95% confidence interval 0.06 to 0.54) and atrial fibrillation 2.90 per 100 patient years (1.78 to 4.79). Post-SAVR, freedom from structural valve deterioration was 94.0% at 10 years, 81.7% at 15 years, and 52% at 20 years, and mean length of hospital stay was 12 days (95% confidence interval 9 to 15). Conclusion Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis undergoing SAVR with a bioprosthetic valve can expect only slightly lower survival than those without aortic stenosis, and a low incidence of stroke and, up to 10 years, of structural valve deterioration. The rate of deterioration

  6. Biometric template revocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Craig M.

    2004-08-01

    Biometric are a powerful technology for identifying humans both locally and at a distance. In order to perform identification or verification biometric systems capture an image of some biometric of a user or subject. The image is then converted mathematical to representation of the person call a template. Since we know that every human in the world is different each human will have different biometric images (different fingerprints, or faces, etc.). This is what makes biometrics useful for identification. However unlike a credit card number or a password to can be given to a person and later revoked if it is compromised and biometric is with the person for life. The problem then is to develop biometric templates witch can be easily revoked and reissued which are also unique to the user and can be easily used for identification and verification. In this paper we develop and present a method to generate a set of templates which are fully unique to the individual and also revocable. By using bases set compression algorithms in an n-dimensional orthogonal space we can represent a give biometric image in an infinite number of equally valued and unique ways. The verification and biometric matching system would be presented with a given template and revocation code. The code will then representing where in the sequence of n-dimensional vectors to start the recognition.

  7. Mechanism of valve failure and efficacy of reintervention through catheterization in patients with bioprosthetic valves in the pulmonary position

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Bergersen, Lisa; Baird, Christopher W; Porras, Diego; Esch, Jesse J; Lock, James E; Marshall, Audrey C

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical and transcatheter bioprosthetic valves (BPVs) in the pulmonary position in patients with congenital heart disease may ultimately fail and undergo transcatheter reintervention. Angiographic assessment of the mechanism of BPV failure has not been previously described. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the mode of BPV failure (stenosis/regurgitation) requiring transcatheter reintervention and to describe the angiographic characteristics of the failed BPVs and report the types and efficacy of reinterventions. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective single-center review of consecutive patients who previously underwent pulmonary BPV placement (surgical or transcatheter) and subsequently underwent percutaneous reintervention from 2005 to 2014. Results: Fifty-five patients with surgical (41) and transcutaneous pulmonary valve (TPV) (14) implantation of BPVs underwent 66 catheter reinterventions. The surgically implanted valves underwent fifty reinterventions for indications including 16 for stenosis, seven for regurgitation, and 27 for both, predominantly associated with leaflet immobility, calcification, and thickening. Among TPVs, pulmonary stenosis (PS) was the exclusive failure mode, mainly due to loss of stent integrity (10) and endocarditis (4). Following reintervention, there was a reduction of right ventricular outflow tract gradient from 43 ± 16 mmHg to 16 ± 10 mmHg (P < 0.001) and RVp/AO ratio from 0.8 ± 0.2 to 0.5 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001). Reintervention with TPV placement was performed in 45 (82%) patients (34 surgical, 11 transcatheter) with no significant postintervention regurgitation or paravalvular leak. Conclusion: Failing surgically implanted BPVs demonstrate leaflet calcification, thickness, and immobility leading to PS and/or regurgitation while the mechanism of TPV failure in the short- to mid-term is stenosis, mainly from loss of stent integrity. This can be effectively treated with a catheter-based approach

  8. Regenerator seal

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Leonard C.; Pacala, Theodore; Sippel, George R.

    1981-01-01

    A method for manufacturing a hot side regenerator cross arm seal assembly having a thermally stablilized wear coating with a substantially flat wear surface thereon to seal between low pressure and high pressure passages to and from the hot inboard side of a rotary regenerator matrix includes the steps of forming a flat cross arm substrate member of high nickel alloy steel; fixedly securing the side edges of the substrate member to a holding fixture with a concave surface thereacross to maintain the substrate member to a slightly bent configuration on the fixture surface between the opposite ends of the substrate member to produce prestress therein; applying coating layers on the substrate member including a wear coating of plasma sprayed nickel oxide/calcium flouride material to define a wear surface of slightly concave form across the restrained substrate member between the free ends thereon; and thereafter subjecting the substrate member and the coating thereon to a heat treatment of 1600.degree. F. for sixteen hours to produce heat stabilizing growth in the coating layers on the substrate member and to produce a thermally induced growth stress in the wear surface that substantially equalizes the prestress in the substrate whereby when the cross arm is removed from the fixture surface following the heat treatment step a wear face is formed on the cross arm assembly that will be substantially flat between the ends.

  9. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  10. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  11. Templated biomimetic multifunctional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chih-Hung; Gonzalez, Adriel; Linn, Nicholas C.; Jiang, Peng; Jiang, Bin

    2008-02-01

    We report a bioinspired templating technique for fabricating multifunctional optical coatings that mimic both unique functionalities of antireflective moth eyes and superhydrophobic cicada wings. Subwavelength-structured fluoropolymer nipple arrays are created by a soft-lithography-like process. The utilization of fluoropolymers simultaneously enhances the antireflective performance and the hydrophobicity of the replicated films. The specular reflectivity matches the optical simulation using a thin-film multilayer model. The dependence of the size and the crystalline ordering of the replicated nipples on the resulting antireflective properties have also been investigated by experiment and modeling. These biomimetic materials may find important technological application in self-cleaning antireflection coatings.

  12. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  13. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  14. Templated quasicrystalline molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, Joe; Young, Kirsty; Lowe, Michael; Hars, Sanger; Yadav, Thakur; Hesp, David; Dhanak, Vinod; Tsai, An-Pang; Sharma, Hem Raj; McGrath, Ronan

    2014-03-01

    Quasicrystals are materials with long range ordering but no periodicity. We report scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observations of quasicrystalline molecular layers on five-fold quasicrystal surfaces. The molecules adopt positions and orientations on the surface consistent with the quasicrystalline ordering of the substrate. Carbon-60 adsorbs atop sufficiently-separated Fe atoms on icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe to form a unique quasicrystalline lattice whereas further C60 molecules decorate remaining surface Fe atoms in a quasi-degenerate fashion. Pentacene (Pn) adsorbs at tenfold-symmetric points around surface-bisected rhombic triacontahedral clusters in icosahedral Ag-In-Yb. These systems constitute the first demonstrations of quasicrystalline molecular ordering on a template. EPSRC EP/D05253X/1, EP/D071828/1, UK BIS.

  15. Ten-year experience with the porcine bioprosthetic valve: interrelationship of valve survival and patient survival in 1,050 valve replacements.

    PubMed

    Jones, E L; Weintraub, W S; Craver, J M; Guyton, R A; Cohen, C L; Corrigan, V E; Hatcher, C R

    1990-03-01

    The porcine bioprosthetic valve was used in 440 patients having isolated mitral valve replacement (MVR), 522 patients having isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), and 88 patients having MVR + AVR between 1974 and 1981. Patients with associated surgical procedures were excluded. Mean follow-up was 8.3 years. At 10 years, there was no difference in patient survival between those having AVR and those having MVR. Reoperations were performed on 192 patients. Endocarditis was the reason for reoperation in 3.7% of patients who had MVR and 10.6% of those who had AVR. Structural valve degeneration was the reason for reoperation in 89.7% of MVR patients and 78.8% of AVR patients (p = 0.04). Hospital mortality among patients having valve reoperations was 4.7%. At 10 years, the freedom from valve reoperation for all causes and from structural valve degeneration was significantly better for the AVR group than the MVR group (74% +/- 3% versus 61% +/- 4%, p = 0.004; and 79% +/- 3% versus 63% +/- 4%, p = 0.0006, respectively). For patients in their 60s, the 10-year freedom from reoperation was 92% +/- 2% for AVR and 80% +/- 6% for MVR (p = not significant). At 10 years, freedom from cardiac-related death and valve reoperation was best for both MVR and AVR patients in their 60s. Patients 70 years old or older rarely had reoperation but died before valve failure occurred. The 10-year freedom from all major valve-related events (cardiac-related death, reoperation, thromboembolism, endocarditis, and anticoagulant-related bleeding) was practically the same for both MVR and AVR patients (48% +/- 3% versus 49% +/- 3%, respectively). The porcine bioprosthetic valve is the valve of choice only for patients 60 years old or older. Patients in their 70s have an extremely low rate of reoperation but a high rate of cardiac-related death and do not outlive the prostheses.

  16. A Template for Insect Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article is intended to update the reader on the progress made on insect embryo cryopreservation in the past 20 years and gives information for developing a protocol for cryopreserving insects by using a 2001 study as a template. The study used for the template is the cryopreservation of the Old...

  17. Brain templates and atlases.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alan C; Janke, Andrew L; Collins, D Louis; Baillet, Sylvain

    2012-08-15

    The core concept within the field of brain mapping is the use of a standardized, or "stereotaxic", 3D coordinate frame for data analysis and reporting of findings from neuroimaging experiments. This simple construct allows brain researchers to combine data from many subjects such that group-averaged signals, be they structural or functional, can be detected above the background noise that would swamp subtle signals from any single subject. Where the signal is robust enough to be detected in individuals, it allows for the exploration of inter-individual variance in the location of that signal. From a larger perspective, it provides a powerful medium for comparison and/or combination of brain mapping findings from different imaging modalities and laboratories around the world. Finally, it provides a framework for the creation of large-scale neuroimaging databases or "atlases" that capture the population mean and variance in anatomical or physiological metrics as a function of age or disease. However, while the above benefits are not in question at first order, there are a number of conceptual and practical challenges that introduce second-order incompatibilities among experimental data. Stereotaxic mapping requires two basic components: (i) the specification of the 3D stereotaxic coordinate space, and (ii) a mapping function that transforms a 3D brain image from "native" space, i.e. the coordinate frame of the scanner at data acquisition, to that stereotaxic space. The first component is usually expressed by the choice of a representative 3D MR image that serves as target "template" or atlas. The native image is re-sampled from native to stereotaxic space under the mapping function that may have few or many degrees of freedom, depending upon the experimental design. The optimal choice of atlas template and mapping function depend upon considerations of age, gender, hemispheric asymmetry, anatomical correspondence, spatial normalization methodology and disease

  18. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  19. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  20. Bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposites and hybrid biomaterials for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Allo, Bedilu A; Costa, Daniel O; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2012-06-20

    Strategies for bone tissue engineering and regeneration rely on bioactive scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix and act as templates onto which cells attach, multiply, migrate and function. Of particular interest are nanocomposites and organic-inorganic (O/I) hybrid biomaterials based on selective combinations of biodegradable polymers and bioactive inorganic materials. In this paper, we review the current state of bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposite and O/I hybrid biomaterials and their applications in bone regeneration. We focus specifically on nanocomposites based on nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glass (BG) fillers in combination with biodegradable polyesters and their hybrid counterparts. Topics include 3D scaffold design, materials that are widely used in bone regeneration, and recent trends in next generation biomaterials. We conclude with a perspective on the future application of nanocomposites and O/I hybrid biomaterials for regeneration of bone.

  1. Bioactive and Biodegradable Nanocomposites and Hybrid Biomaterials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Allo, Bedilu A.; Costa, Daniel O.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Mequanint, Kibret; Rizkalla, Amin S.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for bone tissue engineering and regeneration rely on bioactive scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix and act as templates onto which cells attach, multiply, migrate and function. Of particular interest are nanocomposites and organic-inorganic (O/I) hybrid biomaterials based on selective combinations of biodegradable polymers and bioactive inorganic materials. In this paper, we review the current state of bioactive and biodegradable nanocomposite and O/I hybrid biomaterials and their applications in bone regeneration. We focus specifically on nanocomposites based on nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioactive glass (BG) fillers in combination with biodegradable polyesters and their hybrid counterparts. Topics include 3D scaffold design, materials that are widely used in bone regeneration, and recent trends in next generation biomaterials. We conclude with a perspective on the future application of nanocomposites and O/I hybrid biomaterials for regeneration of bone. PMID:24955542

  2. Template Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, J. C.; Sanip, S. M.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    The template synthesis of carbon nanostructures formed in porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) template with a pore size of 200 nm by a liquid phase impregnation of the template with a polymer, polyfurfuryl alcohol, followed by carbonization is studied. The temperatures of exposure to furfuryl alcohol vapour were varied between 50 and 70° C. The resultant carbon nanotubules formed were hollow with open ends having diameter ranging from 220-300 nm which is in agreement with the pore size of the template used. The BET surface area was found to increase from 11.64 m2/g before pyrolysis to 90.19 m2/g after pyrolysis as a result of the formation of carbon nanotubules.

  3. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  4. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  5. Emerging rules for inducing organ regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yannas, Ioannis V

    2013-01-01

    We review the available evidence for regeneration of adult organs of very diverse nature and examine the applicability of simple rules that can be used to summarize these treatments. In the field of regenerative medicine no widely accepted paradigm is currently available that can guide formulation of new theories on the mechanism of regeneration in adults and open new directions for improved regeneration outcomes. The four rules have emerged from multiyear quantitative studies with skin and peripheral nerve regeneration using scaffold libraries based on a simple, well-defined collagen scaffold. These largely quantitative rules distinguish sharply between spontaneously regenerative and nonregenerative tissues, select the two reactants that are required for regeneration, recognize the essential modification of the wound healing process that must be realized prior to regeneration, and identify three structural features of scaffolds that are required for regenerative activity. The combined evidence points at certain requirements for the structure of a collagen scaffold with regenerative activity. An active scaffold emerges as a temporarily insoluble collagen surface, equipped with sufficient ligands for integrins of contractile cells, that inhibits wound contraction while also serving as a topographic template for new stroma synthesis. The four rules, based on studies with just two organs (skin and peripheral nerves), are now viewed in the context of ongoing studies using scaffolds based on decellularized matrices, which are mostly based on collagen. Decellularized matrices have been used during the past few years to regenerate, in whole or in part, the urethra, the abdominal wall, the Achilles tendon, the bladder, the trachea and other organs in several animal models and occasionally in humans. Although these acellular matrices are distinctly different from simple collagen scaffolds, and the methods used by the investigators are still evolving, the results obtained

  6. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  7. Future directions. Collagen-based prostheses for meniscal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stone, K R; Rodkey, W G; Webber, R J; McKinney, L; Steadman, J R

    1990-03-01

    Prosthetic meniscal replacement offers the ability to stabilize the meniscectomized knee and provide prophylaxis against early degenerative arthritis. Since prosthetic meniscal replacement may be performed in the setting of normal articular cartilage, a prosthesis will be required to match the exact joint configuration, induce the same lubricity, produce the same coefficient of friction, and absorb and dampen the same joint forces (without incurring significant creep or abrasion) as does the normal meniscus. This feat is currently beyond the capabilities of artificial materials alone. Alternatively, collagen-based prostheses acting as resorbable regeneration templates offer the possibility of inducing regrowth of new menisci. This paper presents a summary of hypotheses, considerations, and laboratory evidence for the use of collagen-based, resorbable matrices as regeneration templates.

  8. Cooperation of catalysts and templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kanavarioti, A.; Nibley, C. W.; Macklin, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    In order to understand how self-reproducing molecules could have originated on the primitive Earth or extraterrestrial bodies, it would be useful to find laboratory models of simple molecules which are able to carry out processes of catalysis and templating. Furthermore, it may be anticipated that systems in which several components are acting cooperatively to catalyze each other's synthesis will have different behavior with respect to natural selection than those of purely replicating systems. As the major focus of this work, laboratory models are devised to study the influence of short peptide catalysts on template reactions which produce oligonucleotides or additional peptides. Such catalysts could have been the earliest protoenzymes of selective advantage produced by replicating oligonucleotides. Since this is a complex problem, simpler systems are also studied which embody only one aspect at a time, such as peptide formation with and without a template, peptide catalysis of nontemplated peptide synthesis, and model reactions for replication of the type pioneered by Orgel.

  9. Indentation hardness: A simple test that correlates with the dissipated-energy predictor for fatigue-life in bovine pericardium membranes for bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Rojo, Francisco Javier; García Paez, José María; Bourges, Jean Yves; Herrero, Eduardo Jorge; Millán, Isabel; Alvarez, Lourdes; Cordon, Ángeles; Guinea, Gustavo V

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of hardness with fatigue in calf pericardium, a biomaterial commonly used in bioprosthetic heart valves, and its relationship with the energy dissipated during the first fatigue cycle that has been shown to be a predictor of fatigue-life (García Páez et al., 2006, 2007; Rojo et al., 2010). Fatigue tests were performed in vitro on 24 pericardium specimens cut in a root-to-apex direction. The specimens were subjected to a maximum stress of 1MPa in blocks of 10, 25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 cycles. By means of a modified Shore A hardness test procedure, the hardness of the specimen was measured before and after fatigue tests. Results showed a significant correlation of such hardness with fatigue performance and with the energy dissipated in the first cycle of fatigue, a predictor of pericardium durability. The study showed indentation hardness as a simple and reliable indicator of mechanical performance, one which could be easily implemented in improving tissue selection.

  10. A preliminary durability study of two types of low-profile pericardial bioprosthetic valves through the use of accelerated fatigue testing and flow characterization.

    PubMed

    Schuster, P R; Wagner, J W

    1989-02-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valves are being used more often because of certain advantages they have over artificial valves. The bioprostheses are less thrombogenic, cause a lower incidence of hemolysis, and usually fail in a slow progressive manner. A combination of flow characterization and accelerated testing was used to assess the durability of two types of pericardial valves, the Ionescu-Shiley Low Profile Mitral and the Carpentier-Edwards Low Profile Aortic valve. The flow characterization work was done in an aortic chamber designed for in vivo simulation. The function of the valve was monitored between different stages of the accelerated testing using laser Doppler anemometry. Accelerated testing was performed at 1300 cardiac cycles per minute, and physiologic conditions both in closing pressures and the ambient temperature were maintained. Results indicated a change in flow characteristics owing to cyclic loading of the leaflet tissue. The flow orifice increased over time leading to a decrease in peak velocity. Future developments in Doppler ultrasound may facilitate non-invasive assessment of these peak velocity variations. Calcification of the tissue was not considered, since this was an in vitro study.

  11. Biometric template transformation: a security analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Abhishek; Nandakumar, Karthik; Jain, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical steps in designing a secure biometric system is protecting the templates of the users that are stored either in a central database or on smart cards. If a biometric template is compromised, it leads to serious security and privacy threats because unlike passwords, it is not possible for a legitimate user to revoke his biometric identifiers and switch to another set of uncompromised identifiers. One methodology for biometric template protection is the template transformation approach, where the template, consisting of the features extracted from the biometric trait, is transformed using parameters derived from a user specific password or key. Only the transformed template is stored and matching is performed directly in the transformed domain. In this paper, we formally investigate the security strength of template transformation techniques and define six metrics that facilitate a holistic security evaluation. Furthermore, we analyze the security of two wellknown template transformation techniques, namely, Biohashing and cancelable fingerprint templates based on the proposed metrics. Our analysis indicates that both these schemes are vulnerable to intrusion and linkage attacks because it is relatively easy to obtain either a close approximation of the original template (Biohashing) or a pre-image of the transformed template (cancelable fingerprints). We argue that the security strength of template transformation techniques must consider also consider the computational complexity of obtaining a complete pre-image of the transformed template in addition to the complexity of recovering the original biometric template.

  12. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  13. Wide band gap semiconductor templates

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Stan, Liliana; Jia, Quanxi; DePaula, Raymond F.; Usov, Igor O.

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to a thin film structure based on an epitaxial (111)-oriented rare earth-Group IVB oxide on the cubic (001) MgO terminated surface and the ion-beam-assisted deposition ("IBAD") techniques that are amendable to be over coated by semiconductors with hexagonal crystal structures. The IBAD magnesium oxide ("MgO") technology, in conjunction with certain template materials, is used to fabricate the desired thin film array. Similarly, IBAD MgO with appropriate template layers can be used for semiconductors with cubic type crystal structures.

  14. Supply-Chain Optimization Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiett, William F.; Sealing, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    The Supply-Chain Optimization Template (SCOT) is an instructional guide for identifying, evaluating, and optimizing (including re-engineering) aerospace- oriented supply chains. The SCOT was derived from the Supply Chain Council s Supply-Chain Operations Reference (SCC SCOR) Model, which is more generic and more oriented toward achieving a competitive advantage in business.

  15. Progress of NIL template making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusa, Satoshi; Hiraka, Takaaki; Kobiki, Ayumi; Sasaki, Shiho; Itoh, Kimio; Toyama, Nobuhito; Kurihara, Masaaki; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2007-05-01

    Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) has been counted as one of the lithography solutions for hp32nm node and beyond. Recently, the small line edge roughness (LER) as well as the potentially high resolution that will ensure no-OPC mask feature is attracting many researchers. The template making is one of the most critical issues for the realization of NIL. Especially when we think of a practical template fabrication process on a 65mm square format that is going to be the industry standard, the resolution of the template making process showed a limitation. We have achieved for the first time an hp22nm resolution on the 65nm template format. Both line and space patterns and hole patterns were well resolved. Regarding dot patterns, we still need improvement, but we have achieved resolution down to hp28nm. Although so far we cannot achieve these resolution limits of various pattern category at the same time on one substrate, an intermediate process condition showed sufficient uniformity both in lateral CD and in vertical depth. Global pattern image placement also showed sufficient numbers at this stage of lithography development. A 20nm feature (with a pitch of 80nm) showed sufficient imprint result.

  16. [Resources of regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Sedel'nikov, Z V; Kreshchenko, N D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the intensity of blastema growth in operated planarians at an early stage of regeneration as a function of the following factors: area of regenerate and its function and number of regeneration foci (volume of regeneration). There was no direct dependence between the intensity of regeneration and the size of regenerating fragment, as well as the volume of regeneration. Some specific features of the early stage of regeneration have been described, which suggest its determinate character. The behavior of neoblasts during formation of blastemas with different localization is discussed.

  17. Specialized progenitors and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reddien, Peter W

    2013-03-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating all body parts. Planarian regeneration requires neoblasts, a population of dividing cells that has been studied for over a century. Neoblast progeny generate new cells of blastemas, which are the regenerative outgrowths at wounds. If the neoblasts comprise a uniform population of cells during regeneration (e.g. they are all uncommitted and pluripotent), then specialization of new cell types should occur in multipotent, non-dividing neoblast progeny cells. By contrast, recent data indicate that some neoblasts express lineage-specific transcription factors during regeneration and in uninjured animals. These observations raise the possibility that an important early step in planarian regeneration is the specialization of neoblasts to produce specified rather than naïve blastema cells.

  18. [Pharynx regeneration in planarians].

    PubMed

    Kreshchenko, N D

    2009-01-01

    The obtained and published data on pharynx regeneration in planarians have been reviewed. Planarians can regenerate from a small body fragment and restore all missing organs including the pharynx. The pharynx is a relatively autonomous organ with a differentiated structure and specialized function. Pharynx regeneration has specific features, and its studies are of considerable theoretical interest. Pharynx regeneration can also be a convenient model to study the molecular mechanisms of regeneration that remain undisclosed. In addition, this model can be used to test biologically active compounds in order to elucidate their effect on morphogenesis. This subject of investigation benefits by a simpler and more adequate analysis as well as a possibility to use large numbers of animals and small quantities of analyzed substances.

  19. Ceramic regenerator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Jerrold E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating an Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) regenerator containing intricate hydraulic passages from a ceramic material in order to allow operation with high temperature combustion gas and to reduce weight as compared with metallic materials was demonstrated. Platelet technology, ceramic tape casting, and multilayer ceramic packaging techniques were used in this fabrication of subscale silicon nitride components. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed to simulate a methane cooled regenerator for an ATR engine. The regenerator vane was designed to operate at realistic service conditions, i.e., 600 psi in a 3500 R (3040 F), 500 fps combustion gas environment. A total of six regenerators were fabricated and tested. The regenerators were shown to be able to withstand internal pressurization to 1575 psi. They were subjected to testing in 500 fps, 3560 R (3100 F) air/propane combustion products and were operated satisfactorily for an excess of 100 hr and 40 thermal cycles which exceeded 2460 R (2000 F).

  20. Fumigant Management Plan - Phase 1 Templates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FMPs are required by pesticide labels, so EPA provides chemical-specific soil fumigant templates and samples in PDF and Word formats. Choose the appropriate template for products containing chloropicrin, dazomet, metam sodium/potassium, or methyl bromide.

  1. Transforming surgery through biomaterial template technology.

    PubMed

    Hodde, Jason; Hiles, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Templates inserted into surgical wounds strongly influence the healing responses in humans. The science of these templates, in the form of extracellular matrix biomaterials, is rapidly evolving and improving as the natural interactions with the body become better understood.

  2. Notch Signaling Inhibits Axon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bejjani, Rachid El; Hammarlund, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many neurons have limited capacity to regenerate their axons after injury. Neurons in the mammalian CNS do not regenerate, and even neurons in the PNS often fail to regenerate to their former targets. This failure is likely due in part to pathways that actively restrict regeneration; however, only a few factors that limit regeneration are known. Here, using single-neuron analysis of regeneration in vivo, we show that Notch/lin-12 signaling inhibits the regeneration of mature C. elegans neurons. Notch signaling suppresses regeneration by acting autonomously in the injured cell to prevent growth cone formation. The metalloprotease and gamma-secretase cleavage events that lead to Notch activation during development are also required for its activity in regeneration. Furthermore, blocking Notch activation immediately after injury improves regeneration. Our results define a novel, post-developmental role for the Notch pathway as a repressor of axon regeneration in vivo. PMID:22284182

  3. Redo aortic valve surgery versus transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation for failing surgical bioprosthetic valves: consecutive patients in a single-center setting

    PubMed Central

    Wottke, Michael; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Piazza, Nicolo; Lange, Ruediger; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to a considerable rise in bioprosthetic as opposed to mechanical valve implantations, an increase of patients presenting with failing bioprosthetic surgical valves in need of a reoperation is to be expected. Redo surgery may pose a high-risk procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an innovative, less-invasive treatment alternative for these patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the outcome of consecutive patients after a valve-in-valve TAVI [transcatheter aortic valve-in-surgical aortic valve (TAV-in-SAV)] as compared to a standard reoperation [surgical aortic valve redo-operation (SAV-in-SAV)] has not yet been performed. The goal of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes after TAV-in-SAV and SAV-in-SAV in a single center setting. Methods All SAV-in-SAV and TAV-in-SAV patients from January 2001 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with previous mechanical or transcatheter valves, active endocarditis and concomitant cardiac procedures were excluded. Patient characteristics, preoperative data, post-procedural complications, and 30-day mortality were collected from a designated database. Mean values ± SD were calculated for all continuous variables. Counts and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. The Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare categorical variables. Continuous variables were compared using the t-test for independent samples. A 2-sided P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 102 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 50 patients (49%) underwent a transcatheter valve-in-valve procedure, while 52 patients (51%) underwent redo-surgery. Patients in the TAV-in-SAV group were significantly older, had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE and exhibited a lower mean left ventricular ejection fraction than patients in the SAV-in-SAV group (78.1±6.7 vs. 66.2±13.1, P<0.001; 27.4±18.7 vs. 14.4±10, P<0.001; and 49.8±13

  4. Template boundary definition in mammalian telomerase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiunn-Liang; Greider, Carol W

    2003-11-15

    Telomerase uses a short template sequence in its intrinsic RNA component to synthesize telomere repeats. Disruption of the helix P1b in human telomerase RNA or alteration of its distance from the template resulted in telomerase copying residues past the normal template boundary both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, helix P1b is important for template boundary definition in human telomerase. Mouse telomerase RNA lacks helix P1b, and the boundary is established at 2 nt downstream of the 5'-end. The divergent structure of boundary definition elements in mammals, yeast, and ciliates suggests diverse mechanisms for template boundary definition in telomerase.

  5. Metal nanodisks using bicellar templates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A

    2013-12-03

    Metallic nanodisks and a method of making them. The metallic nanodisks are wheel-shaped structures that that provide large surface areas for catalytic applications. The metallic nanodisks are grown within bicelles (disk-like micelles) that template the growth of the metal in the form of approximately circular dendritic sheets. The zero-valent metal forming the nanodisks is formed by reduction of a metal ion using a suitable electron donor species.

  6. Template synthesis of nanophase mesocarbon.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nancy Y; Jian, Kengqing; Külaots, Indrek; Crawford, Gregory P; Hurt, Robert H

    2003-10-01

    Templating techniques are used increasingly to create carbon materials with precisely engineered pore systems. This article presents a new templating technique that achieves simultaneous control of pore structure and molecular (crystal) structure in a single synthesis step. With the use of discotic liquid crystalline precursors, unique carbon structures can be engineered by selecting the size and geometry of the confining spaces and selecting the template material to induce edge-on or face-on orientation of the discotic precursor. Here mesophase pitch is infiltrated by capillary forces into a nanoporous glass followed by slow carbonization and NaOH etching. The resulting porous carbon material exhibits interconnected solid grains about 100 nm in size, a monodisperse pore size of 60 nm, 42% total porosity, and an abundance of edge-plane inner surfaces that reflect the favored edge-on anchoring of the mesophase precursor on glass. This new carbon form is potentially interesting for a number of important applications in which uniform large pores, active-site-rich surfaces, and easy access to interlayer spaces in nanometric grains are advantageous.

  7. LTL - The Little Template Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gössl, C. A.; Drory, N.; Snigula, J.

    2004-07-01

    The Little Template Library is an expression templates based C++ library for array processing, image processing, FITS and ASCII I/O, and linear algebra. It is released under the GNU Public License (GPL). Although the library is developed with application to astronomical image and data processing in mind, it is by no means restricted to these fields of application. In fact, it qualifies as a fully general array processing package. Focus is laid on a high abstraction level regarding the handling of expressions involving arrays or parts thereof and linear algebra related operations without the usually involved negative impact on performance. The price to pay is dependence on a compiler implementing enough of the current ANSI C++ specification, as well as significantly higher demand on resources at compile time. The LTL provides dynamic arrays of up to 5 dimensions, sub-arrays and slicing, support for fixed size vectors and matrices including basic linear algebra operations, expression templates based evaluation, and I/O facilities for columnar ASCII and FITS format files. In addition it supplies utility classes for statistics, linear and non-linear least squares fitting, and command line and configuration file parsing. YODA (Drory 2002) and all elements of the WeCAPP reduction pipeline (Riffeser et al. 2001, Gössl & Riffeser 2002, 2003) were implemented using the LTL.

  8. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  9. Air regenerating and conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grishayenkov, B. G.

    1975-01-01

    Various physicochemical methods of regenerating and conditioning air for spacecraft are described with emphasis on conditions which affect efficiency of the system. Life support systems used in closed, hermetically sealed environments are discussed with references to actual application in the Soviet Soyuz and Voskhod manned spacecraft. Temperature and humidity control, removal of carbon dioxide, oxygen regeneration, and removal of bacteria and viruses are among the factors considered.

  10. Functional Programming with C++ Template Metaprograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkoláb, Zoltán

    Template metaprogramming is an emerging new direction of generative programming. With the clever definitions of templates we can force the C++ compiler to execute algorithms at compilation time. Among the application areas of template metaprograms are the expression templates, static interface checking, code optimization with adaption, language embedding and active libraries. However, as template metaprogramming was not an original design goal, the C++ language is not capable of elegant expression of metaprograms. The complicated syntax leads to the creation of code that is hard to write, understand and maintain. Although template metaprogramming has a strong relationship with functional programming, this is not reflected in the language syntax and existing libraries. In this paper we give a short and incomplete introduction to C++ templates and the basics of template metaprogramming. We will enlight the role of template metaprograms, and some important and widely used idioms. We give an overview of the possible application areas as well as debugging and profiling techniques. We suggest a pure functional style programming interface for C++ template metaprograms in the form of embedded Haskell code which is transformed to standard compliant C++ source.

  11. Learning templates for artistic portrait lighting analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowu; Jin, Xin; Wu, Hongyu; Zhao, Qinping

    2015-02-01

    Lighting is a key factor in creating impressive artistic portraits. In this paper, we propose to analyze portrait lighting by learning templates of lighting styles. Inspired by the experience of artists, we first define several novel features that describe the local contrasts in various face regions. The most informative features are then selected with a stepwise feature pursuit algorithm to derive the templates of various lighting styles. After that, the matching scores that measure the similarity between a testing portrait and those templates are calculated for lighting style classification. Furthermore, we train a regression model by the subjective scores and the feature responses of a template to predict the score of a portrait lighting quality. Based on the templates, a novel face illumination descriptor is defined to measure the difference between two portrait lightings. Experimental results show that the learned templates can well describe the lighting styles, whereas the proposed approach can assess the lighting quality of artistic portraits as human being does.

  12. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance, and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed. PMID:25453031

  13. Vertical Carbon Nanotube Device in Nanoporous Templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maschmann, Matthew Ralph (Inventor); Fisher, Timothy Scott (Inventor); Sands, Timothy (Inventor); Bashir, Rashid (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A modified porous anodic alumina template (PAA) containing a thin CNT catalyst layer directly embedded into the pore walls. CNT synthesis using the template selectively catalyzes SWNTs and DWNTs from the embedded catalyst layer to the top PAA surface, creating a vertical CNT channel within the pores. Subsequent processing allows for easy contact metallization and adaptable functionalization of the CNTs and template for a myriad of applications.

  14. DNA-templated gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadegan, Reza; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hossein; Safavi, Afsaneh; Khajouee, Mahmood Barati

    2008-10-01

    We have developed simple methods of reproducibly creating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-templated gold nanowires on silicon. First DNA nanowires were aligned on silicon surfaces. Briefly, modified silicon wafer was soaked in the DNA solution, and then the solution was removed using micropipettes; the surface tension at the moving air-solution interface is sufficient to align the DNA nanowires on the silicon wafer. In another attempt, an aqueous dispersion of sodium azide-stabilized gold nanoparticles was prepared. The nanoparticles aligned double-stranded λ-DNA to form a linear nanoparticle array. Continuous gold nanowires were obtained. The above nanowires were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results of the characterizations show the wires to be 57-323 nm wide, to be continuous with a length of 2.8-9.5 μm. The use of DNA as a template for the self-assembly of conducting nanowires represents a potentially important approach in the fabrication of nanoscale interconnects.

  15. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7 nm node and beyond. Specifically, a grapho-epitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with sub-resolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any grapho-epitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to respectively over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. In this work, using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus pre-pattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important towards DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in grapho-epitaxy DSA.

  16. Method of installing sub-sea templates

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, J.E.

    1984-03-06

    A subsea template is installed by a method which includes the steps of securing the template in a position beneath the deck of a semi-submersible drilling vessel, moving the semi-submersible drilling vessel to an appropriate offshore site and subsequently lowering the template from the semi-submersible to the sea bed. In addition, at least three anchorage templates may be loaded onto one or both of the pontoons of the semi-submersible drilling vessel at its original position and are subsequently lowered from the pontoons to their respective locations on the sea bed after the semi-submersible has moved to the offshore site.

  17. A hybrid approach for face template protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. C.; Yuen, Pong C.; Jain, Anil K.

    2008-03-01

    Biometric template protection is one of the important issues in deploying a practical biometric system. To tackle this problem, many algorithms have been reported in recent years, most of them being applicable to fingerprint biometric. Since the content and representation of fingerprint template is different from templates of other modalities such as face, the fingerprint template protection algorithms cannot be directly applied to face template. Moreover, we believe that no single template protection method is capable of satisfying the diversity, revocability, security and performance requirements. We propose a three-step cancelable framework which is a hybrid approach for face template protection. This hybrid algorithm is based on the random projection, class distribution preserving transform and hash function. Two publicly available face databases, namely FERET and CMU-PIE, are used for evaluating the template protection scheme. Experimental results show that the proposed method maintains good template discriminability, resulting in good recognition performance. A comparison with the recently developed random multispace quantization (RMQ) biohashing algorithm shows that our method outperforms the RMQ algorithm.

  18. Templated Dry Printing of Conductive Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, David Alexander

    Printed electronics can lower the cost and increase the ubiquity of electrical components such as batteries, sensors, and telemetry systems. Unfortunately, the advance of printed electronics has been held back by the limited minimum resolution, aspect ratio, and feature fidelity of present printing techniques such as gravure, screen printing and inkjet printing. Templated dry printing offers a solution to these problems by patterning nanoparticle inks into templates before drying. This dissertation shows advancements in two varieties of templated dry nanoprinting. The first, advective micromolding in vapor-permeable templates (AMPT) is a microfluidic approach that uses evaporation-driven mold filling to create submicron features with a 1:1 aspect ratio. We will discuss submicron surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made through this process, and the refinement process in the template manufacturing process necessary to make these devices. We also present modeling techniques that can be applied to future AMPT templates. We conclude with a modified templated dry printing that improves throughput and isolated feature patterning by transferring dry-templated features with laser ablation. This method utilizes surface energy-defined templates to pattern features via doctor blade coating. Patterned and dried features can be transferred to a polymer substrate with an Nd:YAG MOPA fiber laser, and printed features can be smaller than the laser beam width.

  19. Bioelectricity and epimorphic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott; Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2007-11-01

    All cells have electric potentials across their membranes, but is there really compelling evidence to think that such potentials are used as instructional cues in developmental biology? Numerous reports indicate that, in fact, steady, weak bioelectric fields are observed throughout biology and function during diverse biological processes, including development. Bioelectric fields, generated upon amputation, are also likely to play a key role during vertebrate regeneration by providing the instructive cues needed to direct migrating cells to form a wound epithelium, a structure unique to regenerating animals. However, mechanistic insight is still sorely lacking in the field. What are the genes required for bioelectric-dependent cell migration during regeneration? The power of genetics combined with the use of zebrafish offers the best opportunity for unbiased identification of the molecular players in bioelectricity.

  20. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Regeneration**

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in regenerative medicine, which aims to regenerate and replace lost/dysfunctional tissues or organs. Biomaterials (scaffolds) serve as temporary 3D substrates to guide neo tissue formation and organization. It is often beneficial for a scaffolding material to mimic the characteristics of extracellular matrix (ECM) at the nanometer scale and to induce certain natural developmental or/and wound healing processes for tissue regeneration applications. This article reviews the fabrication and modification technologies for nanofibrous, nanocomposite, and nanostructured drug-delivering scaffolds. ECM-mimicking nanostructured biomaterials have been shown to actively regulate cellular responses including attachment, proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition. Nano-scaled drug delivery systems can be successfully incorporated into a porous 3D scaffold to enhance the tissue regeneration capacity. In conclusion, nano-structured biomateials are a very exciting and rapidly expanding research area, and are providing new enabling technologies for regenerative medicine. PMID:19946357

  1. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  2. Air Sampling System Evaluation Template

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, Brent

    2000-05-09

    The ASSET1.0 software provides a template with which a user can evaluate an Air Sampling System against the latest version of ANSI N13.1 "Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities". The software uses the ANSI N13.1 PIC levels to establish basic design criteria for the existing or proposed sampling system. The software looks at such criteria as PIC level, type of radionuclide emissions, physical state of the radionuclide, nozzle entrance effects, particulate transmission effects, system and component accuracy and precision evaluations, and basic system operations to provide a detailed look at the subsystems of a monitoring and sampling system/program. A GAP evaluation can then be completed which leads to identification of design and operational flaws in the proposed systems. Corrective measures can then be limited to the GAPs.

  3. Regenerator seal design

    DOEpatents

    Eckart, Francis H.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary regenerator disc matrix has a face seal with a cross arm and arcuate rim segments joined by prestress clamps to prestrain the arcuate rim seals so as to compensate seal rim twisting or coning and resultant disc face seal leakage as produced by operating thermal gradients across the seal.

  4. Template synthesis of ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lijun; Jell, Gavin; Dong, Yixiang; Jones, Julian R; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-08-28

    Hydroxyapatite has found wide application in bone tissue engineering. Here we use a macroporous carbon template to generate highly ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics composed of close-packed hollow spherical pores with interconnected channels. The template has advantages for the preparation of ordered materials.

  5. Visual Templates in Pattern Generalization Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.

    2010-01-01

    In this research article, I present evidence of the existence of visual templates in pattern generalization activity. Such templates initially emerged from a 3-week design-driven classroom teaching experiment on pattern generalization involving linear figural patterns and were assessed for existence in a clinical interview that was conducted four…

  6. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailability of nutrients is an essential factor controlling primary productivity in the ocean. In addition to macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, availability of the trace element iron unequivocally affects growth rates and community structure of phytoplankton and thereby primary productivity in many ocean regions. External sources of iron such as Aeolian dust, upwelling of Fe-rich waters, and hydrothermal are reduced in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, and most Fe used by phytoplankton has been regenerated by zooplankton. While zooplankton regeneration of Fe was first shown two decades ago, major factors controlling this process such as chemical composition of prey and grazer taxonomy are not well constrained. As pH varies significantly in digestive systems between protozoa and mesozooplankton, we hypothesize that the extent and the bioavailability of regenerated Fe is a function of the digestive physiology. Furthermore, major element components such as silica for diatoms and calcium carbonate for cocolithophores may be able to buffer the pH of digestive systems of different grazer taxa. Such effects may further influence the magnitude and bioavailability of regenerated Fe. In order to constrain the effect of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on Fe bioavailability, 55Fe-labeled phytoplankton were fed to different grazers and unlabeled phytoplankton were subsequently inoculated to the filtrate of the grazing experiment in the regrowth phase of the experiment, and the uptake of 55Fe into the phytoplankton biomass was monitored over time. A parallel uptake experiment using inorganic 55Fe was used to compare the bioavailability of regenerated and inorganic Fe to the same phytoplankton species. Furthermore, some samples of the inorganic and the regenerated uptake experiments were treated with an oxalate rinse to remove any adsorbed Fe. This allowed us to estimate the adsorption of 55Fe from either source to the cell walls of

  7. Nanoimprint lithography using disposable biomass template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanabata, Makoto; Takei, Satoshi; Sugahara, Kigen; Nakajima, Shinya; Sugino, Naoto; Kameda, Takao; Fukushima, Jiro; Matsumoto, Yoko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2016-04-01

    A novel nanoimprint lithography process using disposable biomass template having gas permeability was investigated. It was found that a disposable biomass template derived from cellulose materials shows an excellent gas permeability and decreases transcriptional defects in conventional templates such as quartz, PMDS, DLC that have no gas permeability. We believe that outgasses from imprinted materials are easily removed through the template. The approach to use a cellulose for template material is suitable as the next generation of clean separation technology. It is expected to be one of the defect-less thermal nanoimprint lithographic technologies. It is also expected that volatile materials and solvent including materials become available that often create defects and peelings in conventional temples that have no gas permeability.

  8. Limb regeneration: a new development?

    PubMed

    Nacu, Eugen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2011-01-01

    Salamander limb regeneration is a classical model of tissue morphogenesis and patterning. Through recent advances in cell labeling and molecular analysis, a more precise, mechanistic understanding of this process has started to emerge. Long-standing questions include to what extent limb regeneration recapitulates the events observed in mammalian limb development and to what extent are adult- or salamander- specific aspects deployed. Historically, researchers studying limb development and limb regeneration have proposed different models of pattern formation. Here we discuss recent data on limb regeneration and limb development to argue that although patterning mechanisms are likely to be similar, cell plasticity and signaling from nerves play regeneration-specific roles.

  9. A Finger Vein Identification Method Based on Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Tao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    New methods for extracting vein features from finger vein image and generating templates for matching are proposed. In the algorithm for generating templates, we proposed a parameter-templates quality factor (TQF) - to measure the quality of generated templates. So that we can use fewer finger vein samples to generate templates that meet the quality requirement of identification. The recognition accuracy of using proposed methods of finger vein feature extraction and template generation strategy for identification is 97.14%.

  10. Tissue regeneration with photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elieza G.; Arany, Praveen R.

    2013-03-01

    Low level light therapy (LLLT) has been widely reported to reduce pain and inflammation and enhance wound healing and tissue regeneration in various settings. LLLT has been noted to have both stimulatory and inhibitory biological effects and these effects have been termed Photobiomodulation (PBM). Several elegant studies have shown the key role of Cytochrome C oxidase and ROS in initiating this process. The downstream biological responses remain to be clearly elucidated. Our work has demonstrated activation of an endogenous latent growth factor complex, TGF-β1, as one of the major biological events in PBM. TGF-β1 has critical roles in various biological processes especially in inflammation, immune responses, wound healing and stem cell biology. This paper overviews some of the studies demonstrating the efficacy of PBM in promoting tissue regeneration.

  11. Templated Growth of Magnetic Recording Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Vignesh

    Current and potential next-generation magnetic recording technologies are based on the writing and reading of bits on a magnetic thin film with a granular microstructure, with grains of the magnetic material surrounded by an amorphous segregant. In order to realize the highest achievable data storage capabilities, there is a need for better control of the magnetic media microstructure, particularly in terms of minimizing grain size and grain boundary thickness distributions. In this work, a guided magnetic media growth is attempted by creating a pre-fabricated template with a specific material and morphology. The template is designed in such a way that, when magnetic media consisting of the magnetic alloy and segregant are sputtered, the sites on the template result in a controlled two-phase growth of magnetic media. The template is fabricated using self-assembling block copolymers, which can be used to fabricate nanostructures with a regular hexagonal lattice of spheres of one block in the other's matrix. These are then used as etch-masks to fabricate the template. In this thesis, we describe the approach used to fabricate these templates and demonstrate the two-phase growth of magnetic recording media. In such an approach, the magnetic grain size is defined by the uniform pitch of the block copolymer pattern, resulting in a uniform microstructure with much better grain size distribution than can be obtained with conventional un-templated media growth. The templated growth technique is also a suitable additive technique for the fabrication of Bit Patterned Media, another potential next-generation technology wherein the magnetic bits are isolated patterned islands. Combining nanoimprint lithography with templated growth, we can generate a long range spatially ordered array of magnetic islands with no etching of the magnetic material.

  12. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  13. [Periodontitis and tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2005-08-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a destructive disease that affects the supporting structures of the teeth including periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. If left untreated, patients may lose multiple teeth and extensive prosthetic treatment will be required. In order to re-engineer lost tooth-supporting tissues, various therapeutic modalities have been used clinically. Periodontal regeneration procedures including guided tissue regeneration have achieved substantial effects. However, there are several issues to be solved. They are highly technique-sensitive, applicable to limited cases which are susceptible to treatment, and supposed to have relatively low predictability. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new approaches to improve the predictability and effectiveness of regenerative therapies for periodontal tissues. Recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been introduced to restore lost tissues more effectively where the biological process of healing is mimicked. To achieve this, integration of three key elements is required: progenitor/stem cells, growth factors and the extracellular matrix scaffold. Although it has been shown that implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into periodontal osseous defects induced regeneration of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in dogs, further extensive preclinical studies are required. On the other hand, application of growth factors, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor in the treatment of human periodontitis, is promising and is now in clinical trial. Furthermore, the rate of release of growth factor from the scaffold also can profoundly affect the results of tissue engineering strategies and the development of new materials is expected. In addition, as tissue regenerative potential is negatively regulated by aging, the effects of aging have to be clarified to gain complete regeneration.

  14. Templated Native Silk Smectic Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon (Inventor); Park, Jae-Hyung (Inventor); Valluzzi, Regina (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention relates to a method of preparing a fibrous protein smectic hydrogel by way of a solvent templating process, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; and collecting the resulting fibrous protein smectic hydrogel and allowing it to dry. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a method of obtaining predominantly one enantiomer from a racemic mixture, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; allowing the enantiomers of racemic mixture to diffuse selectively into the smectic hydrogel in solution; removing the smectic hydrogel from the solution; rinsing predominantly one enantiomer from the surface of the smectic hydrogel; and extracting predominantly one enantiomer from the interior of the smectic hydrogel. The present invention also relates to a smectic hydrogel prepared according to an aforementioned method.

  15. Templated Native Silk Smectic Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon (Inventor); Park, Jae-Hyung (Inventor); Valluzzi, Regina (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention relates to a method of preparing a fibrous protein smectic hydrogel by way of a solvent templating process, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; and collecting the resulting fibrous protein smectic hydrogel and allowing it to dry. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a method of obtaining predominantly one enantiomer from a racemic mixture, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; allowing the enantiomers of racemic mixture to diffuse selectively into the smectic hydrogel in solution; removing the smectic hydrogel from the solution; rinsing predominantly one enantiomer from the surface of the smectic hydrogel; and extracting predominantly one enantiomer from the interior of the smectic hydrogel. The present invention also relates to a smectic hydrogel prepared according to an aforementioned method.

  16. Templated native silk smectic gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon (Inventor); Park, Jae-Hyung (Inventor); Valluzzi, Regina (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    One aspect of the present invention relates to a method of preparing a fibrous protein smectic hydrogel by way of a solvent templating process, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; and collecting the resulting fibrous protein smectic hydrogel and allowing it to dry. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a method of obtaining predominantly one enantiomer from a racemic mixture, comprising the steps of pouring an aqueous fibrous protein solution into a container comprising a solvent that is not miscible with water; sealing the container and allowing it to age at about room temperature; allowing the enantiomers of racemic mixture to diffuse selectively into the smectic hydrogel in solution; removing the smectic hydrogel from the solution; rinsing predominantly one enantiomer from the surface of the smectic hydrogel; and extracting predominantly one enantiomer from the interior of the smectic hydrogel. The present invention also relates to a smectic hydrogel prepared according to an aforementioned method.

  17. Biomineralization Guided by Paper Templates

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Laromaine, Anna; Hong, Estrella; Derda, Ratmir; Whitesides, George M.

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of partially mineralized scaffolds fabricated in 3D shapes using paper by folding, and by supporting deposition of calcium phosphate by osteoblasts cultured in these scaffolds. This process generates centimeter-scale free-standing structures composed of paper supporting regions of calcium phosphate deposited by osteoblasts. This work is the first demonstration that paper can be used as a scaffold to induce template-guided mineralization by osteoblasts. Because paper has a porous structure, it allows transport of O2 and nutrients across its entire thickness. Paper supports a uniform distribution of cells upon seeding in hydrogel matrices, and allows growth, remodelling, and proliferation of cells. Scaffolds made of paper make it possible to construct 3D tissue models easily by tuning material properties such as thickness, porosity, and density of chemical functional groups. Paper offers a new approach to study mechanisms of biomineralization, and perhaps ultimately new techniques to guide or accelerate the repair of bone. PMID:27277575

  18. Template boundary definition in Tetrahymena telomerase.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cary K; Miller, Michael C; Collins, Kathleen

    2002-02-15

    Telomerase elongates chromosome ends by addition of telomeric DNA repeats. The telomerase ribonucleoprotein can copy only a short template sequence within the telomerase RNA subunit. Here, we identify a region of telomerase RNA that is necessary for both correct 5' template boundary definition and high affinity telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) interaction. We also demonstrate that TERT mutants in the RNA binding domain compromise both 5' boundary definition and RNA binding. Our results indicate that sequence-specific interaction of a telomerase RNA element with the TERT RNA binding domain, not the active site motifs, defines the template boundary.

  19. Templating irreversible covalent macrocyclization by using anions.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Kolesnikov, Grigory V; Arnold, Rene; Lavrov, Herman V; Khrustalev, Victor N

    2013-03-11

    Inorganic anions were used as templates in the reaction between a diamine and an activated diacid to form macrocyclic amides. The reaction conditions were found to perform the macrocyclization sufficiently slow to observe a template effect. A number of analytical methods were used to clarify the reaction mechanisms and to show that the structure of the intermediate plays a decisive role in determining the product distribution. For the macrocyclization under kinetic control, it was shown that the amount of a template, the conformational rigidity of building blocks, and the anion affinities of reaction components and intermediates are important parameters that one should take into consideration to achieve high yields.

  20. Fascinating properties of bioactive templated glasses: A new generation of nanostructured bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; Vallet-Regí, María

    2011-04-01

    This review article, dedicated to Prof. Osamu Terasaki, is focused on current trends in nanostructured bioceramics in the field of bone repair and regeneration. This communication overviews the main characteristics of so called "templated glasses" recently described which exhibit an outstanding bioactive behavior compared with conventional bioactive glasses. A deep study regarding the control of textural, structural and compositional properties in the nanometric scale in relation to the charming bioactivity properties described for these nanostructured materials is herein discussed. The possibility to tailor such properties offers a wide range of reactivity/bioactivity depending on the medical application requested.

  1. Templated and template-free fabrication strategies for zero-dimensional hollow MOF superstructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyehyun; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2017-03-23

    Various fabrication strategies for hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) superstructures are reviewed and classified using various types of external templates and their properties. Hollow MOF superstructures have also been prepared without external templates, wherein unstable intermediates obtained during reactions convert to the final hollow MOF superstructures. Many hollow MOF superstructures have been fabricated using hard templates. After the core-shell core@MOF structure was prepared using a hard template, the core was selectively etched to generate a hollow MOF superstructure. Another approach for generating hollow superstructures is to use a solid reactant as a sacrificial template; this method requires no additional etching process. Soft templates such as discontinuous liquid/emulsion droplets and gas bubbles in a continuous soft phase have also been employed to prepare hollow MOF superstructures.

  2. Dazomet Fumigant Management Plan Phase 2 Templates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These templates provide a framework for reporting application block information, buffer zones, emergency response plan, tarp plan, soil conditions, air monitoring, and more for pesticide products containing the active ingredient dazomet, such as Basamid G.

  3. Water Quality Exchange Web Template User Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a step by step guide to using the WQX Web Monitoring Data Entry Template for Physical/Chemical data to prepare your data for import into the WQX Web tool, and subsequent transfer to the STORET Data Warehouse.

  4. Using wavelets to learn pattern templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Clayton D.; Nowak, Robert D.

    2002-07-01

    Despite the success of wavelet decompositions in other areas of statistical signal and image processing, current wavelet-based image models are inadequate for modeling patterns in images, due to the presence of unknown transformations (e.g., translation, rotation, location of lighting source) inherent in most pattern observations. In this paper we introduce a hierarchical wavelet-based framework for modeling patterns in digital images. This framework takes advantage of the efficient image representations afforded by wavelets, while accounting for unknown translation and rotation. Given a trained model, we can use this framework to synthesize pattern observations. If the model parameters are unknown, we can infer them from labeled training data using TEMPLAR (Template Learning from Atomic Representations), a novel template learning algorithm with linear complexity. TEMPLAR employs minimum description length (MDL) complexity regularization to learn a template with a sparse representation in the wavelet domain. We discuss several applications, including template learning, pattern classification, and image registration.

  5. The Template: A Way To Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schueneman, Margot

    1977-01-01

    When beginning students first attempt coil pots, there is a tendency to rely on the design of the coil to cover up any irregularities in form. One of the ways to help students see whether or not a form is getting away from then is to use a template. Explains and demonstrates how the contour of the template helps to guide the placement of the…

  6. Lipid bilayers on nano-templates

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Artyukhin, Alexander B.; Bakajin, Olgica; Stoeve, Pieter

    2009-08-04

    A lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising a nanotube or nanowire and a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire. One embodiment provides a method of fabricating a lipid bilayer on a nano-template comprising the steps of providing a nanotube or nanowire and forming a lipid bilayer around the polymer cushion. One embodiment provides a protein pore in the lipid bilayer. In one embodiment the protein pore is sensitive to specific agents

  7. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  8. Brain regeneration in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Jun; Kado, Koji; Tochinai, Shin

    2007-02-01

    Urodele amphibians are highly regenerative animals. After partial removal of the brain in urodeles, ependymal cells around the wound surface proliferate, differentiate into neurons and glias and finally regenerate the lost tissue. In contrast to urodeles, this type of brain regeneration is restricted only to the larval stages in anuran amphibians (frogs). In adult frogs, whereas ependymal cells proliferate in response to brain injury, they cannot migrate and close the wound surface, resulting in the failure of regeneration. Therefore frogs, in particular Xenopus, provide us with at least two modes to study brain regeneration. One is to study normal regeneration by using regenerative larvae. In this type of study, the requirement of reconnection between a regenerating brain and sensory neurons was demonstrated. Functional restoration of a regenerated telencephalon was also easily evaluated because Xenopus shows simple responses to the stimulus of a food odor. The other mode is to compare regenerative larvae and non-regenerative adults. By using this mode, it is suggested that there are regeneration-competent cells even in the non-regenerative adult brain, and that immobility of those cells might cause the failure of regeneration. Here we review studies that have led to these conclusions.

  9. Regeneration therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    Regeneration therapy can be classified into three categories. The first category, in vitro regeneration therapy, makes use of transplanted cultured cells, including embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic precursor cells and beta-cell lines, in conjunction with immunosuppressive therapy or immunoisolation for the treatment of patients with Type 1 diabetes. In the second type of regeneration therapy, ex vivo regeneration therapy, a patient's own cells, such as bone marrow stem cells, are transiently removed and induced to differentiate into beta-cells in vitro. However, at the present time, insulin-producing cells cannot be generated from bone marrow stem cells. In vivo regeneration therapy, the third type of regeneration therapy, enables impaired tissue to regenerate from a patient's own cells in vivo. beta-Cell neogenesis from non-beta-cells, and beta-cell proliferation in vivo have been considered in particular as regeneration therapies for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Regeneration therapy for pancreatic beta-cells can be combined with various other therapeutic strategies, including islet transplantation, cell-based therapy, gene therapy and drug therapy, to promote beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis; it is hoped that these strategies will, in the future, provide a cure for diabetes.

  10. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  11. Calcifying tissue regeneration via biomimetic materials chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Green, David W.; Goto, Tazuko K.; Kim, Kye-Seong; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Materials chemistry is making a fundamental impact in regenerative sciences providing many platforms for tissue development. However, there is a surprising paucity of replacements that accurately mimic the structure and function of the structural fabric of tissues or promote faithful tissue reconstruction. Methodologies in biomimetic materials chemistry have shown promise in replicating morphologies, architectures and functional building blocks of acellular mineralized tissues dentine, enamel and bone or that can be used to fully regenerate them with integrated cell populations. Biomimetic materials chemistry encompasses the two processes of crystal formation and mineralization of crystals into inorganic formations on organic templates. This review will revisit the successes of biomimetics materials chemistry in regenerative medicine, including coccolithophore simulants able to promote in vivo bone formation. In-depth knowledge of biomineralization throughout evolution informs the biomimetic materials chemist of the most effective techniques for regenerative framework construction exemplified via exploitation of liquid crystals (LCs) and complex self-organizing media. Therefore, a new innovative direction would be to create chemical environments that perform reaction–diffusion exchanges as the basis for building complex biomimetic inorganic structures. This has evolved widely in biology, as have LCs, serving as self-organizing templates in pattern formation of structural biomaterials. For instance, a study is highlighted in which artificially fabricated chiral LCs, made from bacteriophages are transformed into a faithful copy of enamel. While chemical-based strategies are highly promising at creating new biomimetic structures there are limits to the degree of complexity that can be generated. Thus, there may be good reason to implement living or artificial cells in ‘morphosynthesis’ of complex inorganic constructs. In the future, cellular construction is

  12. Calcifying tissue regeneration via biomimetic materials chemistry.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Goto, Tazuko K; Kim, Kye-Seong; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-12-06

    Materials chemistry is making a fundamental impact in regenerative sciences providing many platforms for tissue development. However, there is a surprising paucity of replacements that accurately mimic the structure and function of the structural fabric of tissues or promote faithful tissue reconstruction. Methodologies in biomimetic materials chemistry have shown promise in replicating morphologies, architectures and functional building blocks of acellular mineralized tissues dentine, enamel and bone or that can be used to fully regenerate them with integrated cell populations. Biomimetic materials chemistry encompasses the two processes of crystal formation and mineralization of crystals into inorganic formations on organic templates. This review will revisit the successes of biomimetics materials chemistry in regenerative medicine, including coccolithophore simulants able to promote in vivo bone formation. In-depth knowledge of biomineralization throughout evolution informs the biomimetic materials chemist of the most effective techniques for regenerative framework construction exemplified via exploitation of liquid crystals (LCs) and complex self-organizing media. Therefore, a new innovative direction would be to create chemical environments that perform reaction-diffusion exchanges as the basis for building complex biomimetic inorganic structures. This has evolved widely in biology, as have LCs, serving as self-organizing templates in pattern formation of structural biomaterials. For instance, a study is highlighted in which artificially fabricated chiral LCs, made from bacteriophages are transformed into a faithful copy of enamel. While chemical-based strategies are highly promising at creating new biomimetic structures there are limits to the degree of complexity that can be generated. Thus, there may be good reason to implement living or artificial cells in 'morphosynthesis' of complex inorganic constructs. In the future, cellular construction is probably

  13. Mechanobiology of skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Carter, D R; Beaupré, G S; Giori, N J; Helms, J A

    1998-10-01

    Skeletal regeneration is accomplished by a cascade of biologic processes that may include differentiation of pluripotential tissue, endochondral ossification, and bone remodeling. It has been shown that all these processes are influenced strongly by the local tissue mechanical loading history. This article reviews some of the mechanobiologic principles that are thought to guide the differentiation of mesenchymal tissue into bone, cartilage, or fibrous tissue during the initial phase of regeneration. Cyclic motion and the associated shear stresses cause cell proliferation and the production of a large callus in the early phases of fracture healing. For intermittently imposed loading in the regenerating tissue: (1) direct intramembranous bone formation is permitted in areas of low stress and strain; (2) low to moderate magnitudes of tensile strain and hydrostatic tensile stress may stimulate intramembranous ossification; (3) poor vascularity can promote chondrogenesis in an otherwise osteogenic environment; (4) hydrostatic compressive stress is a stimulus for chondrogenesis; (5) high tensile strain is a stimulus for the net production of fibrous tissue; and (6) tensile strain with a superimposed hydrostatic compressive stress will stimulate the development of fibrocartilage. Finite element models are used to show that the patterns of tissue differentiation observed in fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis can be predicted from these fundamental mechanobiologic concepts. In areas of cartilage formation, subsequent endochondral ossification normally will proceed, but it can be inhibited by intermittent hydrostatic compressive stress and accelerated by octahedral shear stress (or strain). Later, bone remodeling at these sites can be expected to follow the same mechanobiologic adaptation rules as normal bone.

  14. Regenerable solid imine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

    2013-09-10

    Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

  15. Closed end regeneration method

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2006-06-27

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g. metal, enzyme, etc. particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as irons, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  16. Polymer scaffolds with preferential parallel grooves enhance nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Atefeh; Faroni, Alessandro; Minogue, Ben M; Downes, Sandra; Terenghi, Giorgio; Reid, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    We have modified the surface topography of poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) blended films to improve cell proliferation and to guide the regeneration of peripheral nerves. Films with differing shaped grooves were made using patterned silicon templates, sloped walls (SL), V-shaped (V), and square-shaped (SQ), and compared with nongrooved surfaces with micropits. The solvent cast films were tested in vitro using adult adipose-derived stem cells differentiated to Schwann cell-like cells. Cell attachment, proliferation, and cell orientation were all improved on the grooved surfaces, with SL grooves giving the best results. We present in vivo data on Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerve injury with a 10-mm gap, evaluating nerve regeneration at 3 weeks across a polymer nerve conduit modified with intraluminal grooves (SL, V, and SQ) and differing wall thicknesses (70, 100, 120, and 210 μm). The SL-grooved nerve conduit showed a significant improvement over the other topographical-shaped grooves, while increasing the conduit wall thickness saw no positive effect on the biological response of the regenerating nerve. Furthermore, the preferred SL-grooved conduit (C) with 70 μm wall thickness was compared with the current clinical gold standard of autologous nerve graft (Ag) in the rat 10-mm sciatic nerve gap model. At 3 weeks postsurgery, all nerve gaps across both groups were bridged with regenerated nerve fibers. At 16 weeks, features of regenerated axons were comparable between the autograft (Ag) and conduit (C) groups. End organ assessments of muscle weight, electromyography, and skin reinnervation were also similar between the groups. The comparable experimental outcome between conduit and autograft, suggests that the PCL/PLA conduit with inner lumen microstructured grooves could be used as a potential alternative treatment for peripheral nerve repair.

  17. Pre-operative templating for trauma hemiarthroplasty (Thompson's)

    PubMed Central

    Green, Robert Nicholas; Rushton, Paul R.P.; Kramer, Derek; Inman, Dominic; Partington, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical complications may be avoided by preoperative templating in trauma hemiarthroplasty. Materials and methods Digital templates for the Stryker™ range of Thompson's prostheses were created and fifty trauma patients that had undergone cemented hemiarthroplasty were retrospectively templated by 2 blinded surgeons. Results Templating for prosthesis size was highly accurate with excellent Inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Sensitivity for identifying femoral canals too narrow for a Thompsons was 100%. Conclusions Templating is a valuable tool and should be standard practice in trauma. We have demonstrated that it is possible to generate custom templates to allow accurate templating. PMID:26566327

  18. Stimuli-responsive one-dimensional copolymer nanostructures fabricated by metallogel template polymerization and their adsorption of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xing; Tang, Liming; Qiang, Lu

    2014-06-14

    pH responsive poly(N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide-co-4-vinylpyridine) (P(MBA-4VP)) one dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been prepared by metallogel template copolymerization, which was carried out in an Ag(i)-coordinated organogel with benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as the initiator. The product has been characterized using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results reveal that the gel fiber is a crucial template for polymerization. Due to the degradation of the template in copolymerization, nanofibers of metallogel were transcribed to copolymer nanowires. The introduction of co-monomer 4-vinylpyridine (4VP) imparts to the 1D copolymer nanostructures pH sensitivity and the possible use as an adsorption material of aspirin. Adsorbed 1D copolymer nanostructures could be regenerated using proton solvent, acid medium and salt solution. In addition, silver nanoparticle loaded copolymer nanowires have been produced from the reduction of silver ions instead of template removal, where silver ions act both as the template and as the nanoparticle growth substrate.

  19. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-09-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  20. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nuan; Tian, Lingling; He, Liumin; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-01-01

    Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM)-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed. PMID:27857724

  1. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle manually controlled readily automated to start and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is bed provides highly concentrated biocide source when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  2. Waveform Similarity Analysis: A Simple Template Comparing Approach for Detecting and Quantifying Noisy Evoked Compound Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Potas, Jason Robert; de Castro, Newton Gonçalves; Maddess, Ted; de Souza, Marcio Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Experimental electrophysiological assessment of evoked responses from regenerating nerves is challenging due to the typical complex response of events dispersed over various latencies and poor signal-to-noise ratio. Our objective was to automate the detection of compound action potential events and derive their latencies and magnitudes using a simple cross-correlation template comparison approach. For this, we developed an algorithm called Waveform Similarity Analysis. To test the algorithm, challenging signals were generated in vivo by stimulating sural and sciatic nerves, whilst recording evoked potentials at the sciatic nerve and tibialis anterior muscle, respectively, in animals recovering from sciatic nerve transection. Our template for the algorithm was generated based on responses evoked from the intact side. We also simulated noisy signals and examined the output of the Waveform Similarity Analysis algorithm with imperfect templates. Signals were detected and quantified using Waveform Similarity Analysis, which was compared to event detection, latency and magnitude measurements of the same signals performed by a trained observer, a process we called Trained Eye Analysis. The Waveform Similarity Analysis algorithm could successfully detect and quantify simple or complex responses from nerve and muscle compound action potentials of intact or regenerated nerves. Incorrectly specifying the template outperformed Trained Eye Analysis for predicting signal amplitude, but produced consistent latency errors for the simulated signals examined. Compared to the trained eye, Waveform Similarity Analysis is automatic, objective, does not rely on the observer to identify and/or measure peaks, and can detect small clustered events even when signal-to-noise ratio is poor. Waveform Similarity Analysis provides a simple, reliable and convenient approach to quantify latencies and magnitudes of complex waveforms and therefore serves as a useful tool for studying evoked compound

  3. Molecular approach to echinoderm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thorndyke, M C; Chen, W C; Beesley, P W; Patruno, M

    2001-12-15

    Until very recently echinoderm regeneration research and indeed echinoderm research in general has suffered because of the lack of critical mass. In terms of molecular studies of regeneration, echinoderms in particular have lagged behind other groups in this respect. This is in sharp contrast to the major advances achieved with molecular and genetic techniques in the study of embryonic development in echinoderms. The aim of our studies has been to identify genes involved in the process of regeneration and in particular neural regeneration in different echinoderm species. Our survey included the asteroid Asterias rubens and provided evidence for the expression of Hox gene homologues in regenerating radial nerve cords. Present evidence suggests: 1) ArHox1 expression is maintained in intact radial nerve cord and may be upregulated during regeneration. 2) ArHox1 expression may contribute to the dedifferentiation and/or cell proliferation process during epimorphic regeneration. From the crinoid Antedon bifida, we have been successful in cloning a fragment of a BMP2/4 homologue (AnBMP2/4) and analysing its expression during arm regeneration. Here, we discuss the importance of this family of growth factors in several regulatory spheres, including maintaining the identity of pluripotent blastemal cells or as a classic skeletal morphogenic regulator. There is clearly substantial scope for future echinoderm research in the area of molecular biology and certain aspects are discussed in this review.

  4. Conversion of Radiology Reporting Templates to the MRRT Standard.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E; Genereaux, Brad; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Radiology workgroup developed the Management of Radiology Report Templates (MRRT) profile, which defines both the format of radiology reporting templates using an extension of Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5), and the transportation mechanism to query, retrieve, and store these templates. Of 200 English-language report templates published by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), initially encoded as text and in an XML schema language, 168 have been converted successfully into MRRT using a combination of automated processes and manual editing; conversion of the remaining 32 templates is in progress. The automated conversion process applied Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT) scripts, an XML parsing engine, and a Java servlet. The templates were validated for proper HTML5 and MRRT syntax using web-based services. The MRRT templates allow radiologists to share best-practice templates across organizations and have been uploaded to the template library to supersede the prior XML-format templates. By using MRRT transactions and MRRT-format templates, radiologists will be able to directly import and apply templates from the RSNA Report Template Library in their own MRRT-compatible vendor systems. The availability of MRRT-format reporting templates will stimulate adoption of the MRRT standard and is expected to advance the sharing and use of templates to improve the quality of radiology reports.

  5. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  6. Synthesis of RNA oligomers on heterogeneous templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of an RNA world in the chemical origin of life is appealing, as nucleic acids are capable of both information storage and acting as templates that catalyse the synthesis of complementary molecules. Template-directed synthesis has been demonstrated for homogeneous oligonucleotides that, like natural nucleic acids, have 3',5' linkages between the nucleotide monomers. But it seems likely that prebiotic routes to RNA-like molecules would have produced heterogeneous molecules with various kinds of phosphodiester linkages and both linear and cyclic nucleotide chains. Here we show that such heterogeneity need be no obstacle to the templating of complementary molecules. Specifically, we show that heterogeneous oligocytidylates, formed by the montmorillonite clay-catalysed condensation of actuated monomers, can serve as templates for the synthesis of oligoguanylates. Furthermore, we show that oligocytidylates that are exclusively 2',5'-linked can also direct synthesis of oligoguanylates. Such heterogeneous templating reactions could have increased the diversity of the pool of protonucleic acids from which life ultimately emerged.

  7. Nanofibrous structured biomimetic strategies for skin tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jayarama Reddy, Venugopal; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Balamurugan, Ramalingam; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Mimicking porous topography of natural extracellular matrix is advantageous for successful regeneration of damaged tissues or organs. Nanotechnology being one of the most promising and growing technology today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering. Nanofibrous structures that mimic the native extracellular matrix and promote the adhesion of various cells are being developed as tissue-engineered scaffolds for skin, bone, vasculature, heart, cornea, nervous system, and other tissues. A range of novel biocomposite materials has been developed to enhance the bioactive or therapeutic properties of these nanofibrous scaffolds via surface modifications, including the immobilization of functional cell-adhesive ligands and bioactive molecules such as drugs, enzymes, and cytokines. In skin tissue engineering, usage of allogeneic skin is avoided to reestablish physiological continuity and also to address the challenge of curing acute and chronic wounds, which remains as the area of exploration with various biomimetic approaches. Two-dimensional, three-dimensional scaffolds and stem cells are presently used as dermal regeneration templates for the treatment of full-thickness skin defects resulting from injuries and severe burns. The present review elaborates specifically on the fabrication of nanofibrous structured strategies for wound dressings, wound healing, and controlled release of growth factors for skin tissue regeneration.

  8. Implication of two different regeneration systems in limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Makanae, Aki; Mitogawa, Kazumasa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Limb regeneration is a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration in urodele amphibians, such as an axolotl. An amputated limb starts regenerating from a remaining stump (proximal) to lost finger tips (distal). In the present case, proximal−distal (PD) reorganization takes place in a regenerating tissue, called a blastema. It has been a mystery how an induced blastema recognizes its position and restores an exact replica of missing parts. Recently, a new experimental system called the accessory limb model (ALM) has been established. The gained ALM phenotypes are demanding to reconsider the reorganization PD positional values. Based on the ALM phenotype, it is reasonable to hypothesize that reorganization of positional values has a certain discontinuity and that two different regeneration systems cooperatively reorganize the PD axis to restore an original structure. In this review, PD axis reestablishments are focused on limb regeneration. Knowledge from ALM studies in axolotls and Xenopus is providing a novel concept of PD axis reorganization in limb regeneration. PMID:27499860

  9. Injectable silk foams for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Lo, Tim J; Fournier, Eric P; Brown, Joseph E; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Gil, Eun S; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-18

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration is demonstrated. Adipose-derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10-d period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3-month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure is applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate.

  10. Injectable Silk Foams for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, E.; Lo, T.J.; Fournier, E.P.; Brown, J.E.; Abbott, R.D.; Gil, E.S.; Marra, K.G.; Rubin, J.P.; Leisk, G.G.; Kaplan, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow for the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration. Adipose derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10 day period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3 month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure was applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. PMID:25323438

  11. A Hybrid Approach to Protect Palmprint Templates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongmei; Xiong, Ke; Qiu, Zhengding

    2014-01-01

    Biometric template protection is indispensable to protect personal privacy in large-scale deployment of biometric systems. Accuracy, changeability, and security are three critical requirements for template protection algorithms. However, existing template protection algorithms cannot satisfy all these requirements well. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach that combines random projection and fuzzy vault to improve the performances at these three points. Heterogeneous space is designed for combining random projection and fuzzy vault properly in the hybrid scheme. New chaff point generation method is also proposed to enhance the security of the heterogeneous vault. Theoretical analyses of proposed hybrid approach in terms of accuracy, changeability, and security are given in this paper. Palmprint database based experimental results well support the theoretical analyses and demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed hybrid approach. PMID:24982977

  12. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  13. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  14. Implementation of the template model of vision.

    PubMed

    Sobey, P J; Horridge, G A

    1990-06-22

    Adopting principles learnt from insect vision we have constructed model of a general-purpose front-end visual system for motion detection that is designed to operate in parallel along each photoreceptor axis with only local connections. The model is also designed to assist electrophysiological analysis of visual processing because it puts the response to a moving scene into sets of template responses similar to the distribution of activity among different neurons. An earlier template model divided the visual image into the fields of adjacent receptors, measured as intensity or receptor modulation at small increments of time. As soon as we used this model with natural scenes, however, we found that we had to look at changes in intensity, not intensity itself. Running the new model also generated new insights into the effects of very fast motion, of blurring the image, and the value of lateral inhibition. We also experimented with ways of measuring the angular velocity of the image moving across the eye. The camera eye is moved at a known speed and the range to objects is calculated from the angular velocity of contrasts moving across the receptor array. The original template model is modified so that contrast is saturated in a new representation of the original image data. This reduces the 8-bit grey-scale image to a log, 3 = 1.6-bit image, which becomes the input to a look-up table of templates. The output consists of groups of responding templates in specific ratios that define the input features, and these ratios lead into types of invariance at a higher level of further logic. At any stage, there can be persistent parallel inputs from all earlier stages. This design would enable groups of templates to be tuned to different expected situations, such as different velocities, different directions and different types of edges.

  15. How useful is templating for total knee replacement component sizing?

    PubMed

    Peek, A C; Bloch, B; Auld, J

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to assess the accuracy of digital templating at our institution, by comparing the templated component sizes with those implanted, and to determine whether templating the preoperative films had any measurable difference on the radiographic outcome, and if, where there was a mismatch between the implanted and templated sizes, the templated size would have been preferable. While a number of studies have evaluated the accuracy of both acetate and digital templating, none has to our knowledge looked back at post-operative radiographs and reviewed these in light of the templated and implanted sizes. Data was collected from 90 PFC Sigma (DePuy, UK) total knee replacements done sequentially, 45 of whom were templated digitally using a calibrating ball and Agfa Orthopaedic Tools software. Postoperative radiographs were graded independently for correct sizing. All templates were within one size of the implanted prosthesis. The femoral component appeared to be more often oversized on the postoperative radiographs in the non-templated group. In addition, most tibial trays that were found be too small had been templated to a larger size. There was a trend towards tibial trays templated too large to have been templated to a smaller size. We conclude that digital templating with a calibrating device is a useful part of preoperative planning for total knee arthroplasty.

  16. Augmenter of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-07-09

    'Augmenter of liver regeneration' (ALR) (also known as hepatic stimulatory substance or hepatopoietin) was originally found to promote growth of hepatocytes in the regenerating or injured liver. ALR is expressed ubiquitously in all organs, and exclusively in hepatocytes in the liver. ALR, a survival factor for hepatocytes, exhibits significant homology with ERV1 (essential for respiration and viability) protein that is essential for the survival of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ALR comprises 198 to 205 amino acids (approximately 22 kDa), but is post-translationally modified to three high molecular weight species (approximately 38 to 42 kDa) found in hepatocytes. ALR is present in mitochondria, cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. Mitochondrial ALR may be involved in oxidative phosphorylation, but also functions as sulfhydryl oxidase and cytochrome c reductase, and causes Fe/S maturation of proteins. ALR, secreted by hepatocytes, stimulates synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide in Kupffer cells via a G-protein coupled receptor. While the 22 kDa rat recombinant ALR does not stimulate DNA synthesis in hepatocytes, the short form (15 kDa) of human recombinant ALR was reported to be equipotent as or even stronger than TGF-α or HGF as a mitogen for hepatocytes. Altered serum ALR levels in certain pathological conditions suggest that it may be a diagnostic marker for liver injury/disease. Although ALR appears to have multiple functions, the knowledge of its role in various organs, including the liver, is extremely inadequate, and it is not known whether different ALR species have distinct functions. Future research should provide better understanding of the expression and functions of this enigmatic molecule.

  17. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  18. Affordance Templates for Shared Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen; Dinh, Paul; Hambuchen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the Affordance Template framework used to supervise task behaviors on the NASA-JSC Valkyrie robot at the 2013 DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) Trials. This framework provides graphical interfaces to human supervisors that are adjustable based on the run-time environmental context (e.g., size, location, and shape of objects that the robot must interact with, etc.). Additional improvements, described below, inject degrees of autonomy into instantiations of affordance templates at run-time in order to enable efficient human supervision of the robot for accomplishing tasks.

  19. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    SciTech Connect

    Onoda, Hiroaki; Ishima, Yuya; Takenaka, Atsushi; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  20. Vertex finding with deformable templates at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Nikita; Khanov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    We present a novel vertex finding technique. The task is formulated as a discrete-continuous optimisation problem in a way similar to the deformable templates approach for the track finding. Unlike the track finding problem, "elastic hedgehogs" rather than elastic arms are used as deformable templates. They are initialised by a set of procedures which provide zero level approximation for vertex positions and track parameters at the vertex point. The algorithm was evaluated using the simulated events for the LHC CMS detector and demonstrated good performance.

  1. Templates for Deposition of Microscopic Pointed Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Templates for fabricating sharply pointed microscopic peaks arranged in nearly regular planar arrays can be fabricated by a relatively inexpensive technique that has recently been demonstrated. Depending on the intended application, a semiconducting, insulating, or metallic film could be deposited on such a template by sputtering, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, or any other suitable conventional deposition technique. Pointed structures fabricated by use of these techniques may prove useful as photocathodes or field emitters in plasma television screens. Selected peaks could be removed from such structures and used individually as scanning tips in atomic force microscopy or mechanical surface profiling.

  2. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W. Robb

    2015-01-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  3. Coculture in musculoskeletal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2014-10-01

    Most tissues in the body are made up of more than one cell type. For successful tissue regeneration, it is essential to simulate the natural conditions of the cellular environment as much as possible. In a coculture system, two or more cell types are brought together, interact, and communicate in the same culture environment. The coculture system provides a powerful in vitro tool in research on cell-to-cell communications, repair, and regeneration. This review provides an overview on recent studies on general platforms and applications of coculture systems to enhance musculoskeletal regeneration, with a particular focus on osteogenesis, chondrogensis, and angiogenesis.

  4. Coverage of Deep Cutaneous Wounds Using Dermal Template in Combination with Negative-pressure Therapy and Subsequent Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alexandre A.; Lobato, Rodolfo C.; Nakamoto, Hugo A.; Tuma, Paulo; Ferreira, Marcus C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We consider the use of dermal matrix associated with a skin graft to cover deep wounds in the extremities when tendon and bone are exposed. The objective of this article was to evaluate the efficacy of covering acute deep wounds through the use of a dermal regeneration template (Integra) associated with vacuum therapy and subsequent skin grafting. Methods: Twenty patients were evaluated prospectively. All of them had acute (up to 3 weeks) deep wounds in the limbs. We consider a deep wound to be that with exposure of bone, tendon, or joint. Results: The average area of integration of the dermal regeneration template was 86.5%. There was complete integration of the skin graft over the dermal matrix in 14 patients (70%), partial integration in 5 patients (25%), and total loss in 1 case (5%). The wound has completely closed in 95% of patients. Conclusions: The use of Integra dermal template associated with negative-pressure therapy and skin grafting showed an adequate rate of resolution of deep wounds with low morbidity. PMID:25289363

  5. Distinctive Capillary Action by Micro-channels in Bone-like Templates can Enhance Recruitment of Cells for Restoration of Large Bony Defect

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Daniel S.; Koch, Alia; Eisig, Sidney; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Shim, Jae Hyuck

    2015-01-01

    Without an active, thriving cell population that is well-distributed and stably anchored to the inserted template, exceptional bone regeneration does not occur. With conventional templates, the absence of internal micro-channels results in the lack of cell infiltration, distribution, and inhabitance deep inside the templates. Hence, a highly porous and uniformly interconnected trabecular-bone-like template with micro-channels (biogenic microenvironment template; BMT) has been developed to address these obstacles. The novel BMT was created by innovative concepts (capillary action) and fabricated with a sponge-template coating technique. The BMT consists of several structural components: inter-connected primary-pores (300-400 µm) that mimic pores in trabecular bone, micro-channels (25-70 µm) within each trabecula, and nanopores (100-400 nm) on the surface to allow cells to anchor. Moreover, the BMT has been documented by mechanical test study to have similar mechanical strength properties to those of human trabecular bone (~3.8 MPa)12. The BMT exhibited high absorption, retention, and habitation of cells throughout the bridge-shaped (Π) templates (3 cm height and 4 cm length). The cells that were initially seeded into one end of the templates immediately mobilized to the other end (10 cm distance) by capillary action of the BMT on the cell media. After 4 hr, the cells homogenously occupied the entire BMT and exhibited normal cellular behavior. The capillary action accounted for the infiltration of the cells suspended in the media and the distribution (active migration) throughout the BMT. Having observed these capabilities of the BMT, we project that BMTs will absorb bone marrow cells, growth factors, and nutrients from the periphery under physiological conditions. The BMT may resolve current limitations via rapid infiltration, homogenous distribution and inhabitance of cells in large, volumetric templates to repair massive skeletal defects. PMID:26380953

  6. Distinctive Capillary Action by Micro-channels in Bone-like Templates can Enhance Recruitment of Cells for Restoration of Large Bony Defect.

    PubMed

    Oh, Daniel S; Koch, Alia; Eisig, Sidney; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Shim, Jae Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Without an active, thriving cell population that is well-distributed and stably anchored to the inserted template, exceptional bone regeneration does not occur. With conventional templates, the absence of internal micro-channels results in the lack of cell infiltration, distribution, and inhabitance deep inside the templates. Hence, a highly porous and uniformly interconnected trabecular-bone-like template with micro-channels (biogenic microenvironment template; BMT) has been developed to address these obstacles. The novel BMT was created by innovative concepts (capillary action) and fabricated with a sponge-template coating technique. The BMT consists of several structural components: inter-connected primary-pores (300-400 µm) that mimic pores in trabecular bone, micro-channels (25-70 µm) within each trabecula, and nanopores (100-400 nm) on the surface to allow cells to anchor. Moreover, the BMT has been documented by mechanical test study to have similar mechanical strength properties to those of human trabecular bone (~3.8 MPa)12. The BMT exhibited high absorption, retention, and habitation of cells throughout the bridge-shaped (Π) templates (3 cm height and 4 cm length). The cells that were initially seeded into one end of the templates immediately mobilized to the other end (10 cm distance) by capillary action of the BMT on the cell media. After 4 hr, the cells homogenously occupied the entire BMT and exhibited normal cellular behavior. The capillary action accounted for the infiltration of the cells suspended in the media and the distribution (active migration) throughout the BMT. Having observed these capabilities of the BMT, we project that BMTs will absorb bone marrow cells, growth factors, and nutrients from the periphery under physiological conditions. The BMT may resolve current limitations via rapid infiltration, homogenous distribution and inhabitance of cells in large, volumetric templates to repair massive skeletal defects.

  7. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  8. Templates Aid Removal Of Defects From Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    Templates used to correlate defects in castings with local wall thicknesses. Placed on part to be inspected after coated with penetrant dye. Positions of colored spots (indicative of defects) noted. Ultrasonic inspector measures thickness of wall at unacceptable defects only - overall inspection not necessary.

  9. Public Notification - RTCR Treatment Technique Violation Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    When a PWS receives a Treatment Technique Violation following an RTCR Level 1 or Level 2 assessment, it must issue a public notice to inform consumers of that violation. This template can be used as a guide to prepare that public notice.

  10. A lightweight approach for biometric template protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Assam, Hisham; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah

    2009-05-01

    Privacy and security are vital concerns for practical biometric systems. The concept of cancelable or revocable biometrics has been proposed as a solution for biometric template security. Revocable biometric means that biometric templates are no longer fixed over time and could be revoked in the same way as lost or stolen credit cards are. In this paper, we describe a novel and an efficient approach to biometric template protection that meets the revocability property. This scheme can be incorporated into any biometric verification scheme while maintaining, if not improving, the accuracy of the original biometric system. However, we shall demonstrate the result of applying such transforms on face biometric templates and compare the efficiency of our approach with that of the well-known random projection techniques. We shall also present the results of experimental work on recognition accuracy before and after applying the proposed transform on feature vectors that are generated by wavelet transforms. These results are based on experiments conducted on a number of well-known face image databases, e.g. Yale and ORL databases.

  11. Templated Electrodeposition of Highly Porous Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Chang; Lim, Stephanie; Liu, Jiabin; Wu, Qian; Cheng, X. M.

    2011-03-01

    The fabrication of nanoporous materials has been of great interest for applications such as biosensors, photonic materials and energy storage. Compared to many other methods, the templated electrodeposition method is low cost, fast, and compatible with large-scale production. In this work, we developed a templated electrochemical deposition technique for fabricating highly ordered and highly porous nanostructured materials. The fabrication involves the following steps: self-assembly of monodispersed polystyrene spheres, electrochemical deposition of the desired materials, and sphere removal by a dissolution process. Deposition of Au and Ni layered metallic nanoporous structures were studied using different electrolytes at appropriate potentials. The pore size of the materials was tuned by using different sizes of template polystyrene spheres ranging from 50nm to 1000nm. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed the highly ordered 3-dimensional hexagonal closed pack (hcp) structures in the samples. The templated electrochemical deposition technique provides a promising alternative approach to preparing highly porous anode materials for battery applications. Work supported by Bryn Mawr K/G fund for faculty research.

  12. Performance Templates and the Regulation of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed, theoretical underpinning for the training and performance improvement method: performance template (P-T). The efficacy of P-T, with limitations, has been demonstrated in this journal and in others. However, the theoretical bases of the P-T approach had not been well-developed. The other…

  13. Stacked subsea templates accelerate deepwater development

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.F.; Blincow, R.M.; Pickard, R.D. )

    1991-10-21

    This paper reports on a deepwater project that can be brought on-line more quickly because of stackable drilling and production templates. Historically, one of the primary barriers to the economic development of deepwater reserves has been the long lead time from discovery to first production. Typically, production facilities must be built and often installed before development wells are drilled. The use of three-slot drilling templates allows development drilling to proceed while the production templates, Christmas trees, flow lines, and production platform are constructed. Thus, the time from initial investment to first revenue reduced. Enserch Exploration Inc., along with partners Petrofina Delaware Inc. and AGIP Petroleum, is using a piggy-back or transportable stacked template system to develop deepwater gas reserves in Mississippi Canyon Block 441, approximately 50 miles south of Grand Isle, La. The discovery is located in 1,410-1,520 ft of water. The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) safety fairway running north to south covers the eastern three fourths of Mississippi Canyon Block 441 and rules out surface production facilities over the well locations.

  14. ARA testbed template based UHE neutrino search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prohira, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an in-ice Antarctic neutrino detector deployed near the South Pole. ARA is designed to detect ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos in the range of 0.1-10 EeV. Data from the ARA testbed, deployed in the 2010-2011 season, is used for a template based neutrino search. Askaryan Radio Array.

  15. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  16. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  17. Regenerable Iodine Water-Disinfection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.

    1994-01-01

    Iodinated resin bed for disinfecting water regenerated to extend its useful life. Water flows through regeneration bed of crystalline iodine during regeneration. At other times, flow diverted around regeneration bed. Although regeneration cycle was manually controlled in demonstration, readily automated to start and stop according to signals and stop according to signals from concentration sensors. Further benefit of regeneration is that regeneration bed provides highly concentrated biocide source (200 mg/L) when needed. Concentrated biocide used to superiodinate system after contamination from routine maintenance or unexpected introduction of large concentration of microbes.

  18. A numerical method of regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  19. Imaginal disc regeneration takes flight.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Iswar K; Serras, Florenci

    2017-04-01

    Drosophila imaginal discs, the larval precursors of adult structures such as the wing and leg, are capable of regenerating after damage. During the course of regeneration, discs can sometimes generate structures that are appropriate for a different type of disc, a phenomenon termed transdetermination. Until recently, these phenomena were studied by physically fragmenting discs and then transplanting them into the abdomens of adult female flies. This field has experienced a renaissance following the development of genetic ablation systems that can damage precisely defined regions of the disc without the need for surgery. Together with more traditional approaches, these newer methods have generated many novel insights into wound healing, the mechanisms that drive regenerative growth, plasticity during regeneration and systemic effects of tissue damage and regeneration.

  20. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhigang

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  1. Tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T; Conte, Greg; Nishimine, Dee; Dault, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As a result of periodontal regeneration research, a series of clinical techniques have emerged that permit tissue engineering to be performed for more efficient regeneration and repair of periodontal defects and improved implant site development. Historically, periodontal regeneration research has focused on a quest for "magic filler" material. This search has led to the development of techniques utilizing autologous bone and bone marrow, allografts, xenografts, and various man-made bone substitutes. Though these techniques have had limited success, the desire for a more effective regenerative approach has resulted in the development of tissue engineering techniques. Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of reconstructive biology which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biologic mediators to facilitate reconstruction/regeneration of a particular tissue. In periodontology, the concept of tissue engineering had its beginnings with guided tissue regeneration, a mechanical approach utilizing nonresorbable membranes to obtain regeneration in defects. In dental implantology, guided bone regeneration membranes +/- mechanical support are used for bone augmentation of proposed implant placement sites. With the availability of partially purified protein mixture from developing teeth and growth factors from recombinant technology, a new era of tissue engineering whereby biologic mediators can be used for periodontal regeneration. The advantage of recombinant growth factors is this tissue engineering device is consistent in its regenerative capacity, and variations in regenerative response are due to individual healing response and/or poor surgical techniques. In this article, the authors review how tissue engineering has advanced and discuss its impact on the clinical management of both periodontal and osseous defects in preparation for implant placement. An understanding of these new tissue engineering techniques is essential for comprehending today's ever

  2. 48 CFR 302.7100 - HHS standard templates and formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS HHS Standard Templates and Formats 302.7100 HHS standard templates..., may be accessed on the ASFR/OGAPA/DA Internet Web site. A complete listing of the standard...

  3. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  4. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.

    1999-05-04

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence is disclosed. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques. 30 figs.

  5. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Martinez, Rubel Francisco

    1999-01-01

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  6. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  7. Emergency department documentation templates: variability in template selection and association with physical examination and test ordering in dizziness presentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical documentation systems, such as templates, have been associated with process utilization. The T-System emergency department (ED) templates are widely used but lacking are analyses of the templates association with processes. This system is also unique because of the many different template options available, and thus the selection of the template may also be important. We aimed to describe the selection of templates in ED dizziness presentations and to investigate the association between items on templates and process utilization. Methods Dizziness visits were captured from a population-based study of EDs that use documentation templates. Two relevant process outcomes were assessed: head computerized tomography (CT) scan and nystagmus examination. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the probability of each outcome for patients who did or did not receive a relevant-item template. Propensity scores were also used to adjust for selection effects. Results The final cohort was 1,485 visits. Thirty-one different templates were used. Use of a template with a head CT item was associated with an increase in the adjusted probability of head CT utilization from 12.2% (95% CI, 8.9%-16.6%) to 29.3% (95% CI, 26.0%-32.9%). The adjusted probability of documentation of a nystagmus assessment increased from 12.0% (95%CI, 8.8%-16.2%) when a nystagmus-item template was not used to 95.0% (95% CI, 92.8%-96.6%) when a nystagmus-item template was used. The associations remained significant after propensity score adjustments. Conclusions Providers use many different templates in dizziness presentations. Important differences exist in the various templates and the template that is used likely impacts process utilization, even though selection may be arbitrary. The optimal design and selection of templates may offer a feasible and effective opportunity to improve care delivery. PMID:21435250

  8. Biomaterials for periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shue, Li; Yufeng, Zhang; Mony, Ullas

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of periodontal tissues. Various methods of regenerative periodontal therapy, including the use of barrier membranes, bone replacement grafts, growth factors and the combination of these procedures have been investigated. The development of biomaterials for tissue engineering has considerably improved the available treatment options above. They fall into two broad classes: ceramics and polymers. The available ceramic-based materials include calcium phosphate (eg, tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite), calcium sulfate and bioactive glass. The bioactive glass bonds to the bone with the formation of a layer of carbonated hydroxyapatite in situ. The natural polymers include modified polysaccharides (eg, chitosan,) and polypeptides (collagen and gelatin). Synthetic polymers [eg, poly(glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)] provide a platform for exhibiting the biomechanical properties of scaffolds in tissue engineering. The materials usually work as osteogenic, osteoconductive and osteoinductive scaffolds. Polymers are more widely used as a barrier material in guided tissue regeneration (GTR). They are shown to exclude epithelial downgrowth and allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. An attempt to overcome the problems related to a collapse of the barrier membrane in GTR or epithelial downgrowth is the use of a combination of barrier membranes and grafting materials. This article reviews various biomaterials including scaffolds and membranes used for periodontal treatment and their impacts on the experimental or clinical management of periodontal defect. PMID:23507891

  9. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  10. Textile-templated electrospun anisotropic scaffolds for regenerative cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Şenel Ayaz, H Gözde; Perets, Anat; Ayaz, Hasan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Govindaraj, Muthu; Brookstein, David; Lelkes, Peter I

    2014-10-01

    For patients with end-stage heart disease, the access to heart transplantation is limited due to the shortage of donor organs and to the potential for rejection of the donated organ. Therefore, current studies focus on bioengineering approaches for creating biomimetic cardiac patches that will assist in restoring cardiac function, by repairing and/or regenerating the intrinsically anisotropic myocardium. In this paper we present a simplified, straightforward approach for creating bioactive anisotropic cardiac patches, based on a combination of bioengineering and textile-manufacturing techniques in concert with nano-biotechnology based tissue-engineering stratagems. Using knitted conventional textiles, made of cotton or polyester yarns as template targets, we successfully electrospun anisotropic three-dimensional scaffolds from poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), and thermoplastic polycarbonate-urethane (PCU, Bionate(®)). The surface topography and mechanical properties of textile-templated anisotropic scaffolds significantly differed from those of scaffolds electrospun from the same materials onto conventional 2-D flat-target electrospun scaffolds. Anisotropic textile-templated scaffolds electrospun from both PLGA and PCU, supported the adhesion and proliferation of H9C2 cardiac myoblasts cell line, and guided the cardiac tissue-like anisotropic organization of these cells in vitro. All cell-seeded PCU scaffolds exhibited mechanical properties comparable to those of a human heart, but only the cells on the polyester-templated scaffolds exhibited prolonged spontaneous synchronous contractility on the entire engineered construct for 10 days in vitro at a near physiologic frequency of ∼120 bpm. Taken together, the methods described here take advantage of straightforward established textile manufacturing strategies as an efficient and cost-effective approach to engineering 3D anisotropic, elastomeric PCU scaffolds that can serve as a cardiac patch.

  11. 21 CFR 888.4800 - Template for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Template for clinical use. 888.4800 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4800 Template for clinical use. (a) Identification. A template for clinical use is a device that consists of a pattern or guide intended for...

  12. Cementum and Periodontal Ligament Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Menicanin, Danijela; Hynes, K; Han, J; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2015-01-01

    The unique anatomy and composition of the periodontium make periodontal tissue healing and regeneration a complex process. Periodontal regeneration aims to recapitulate the crucial stages of wound healing associated with periodontal development in order to restore lost tissues to their original form and function and for regeneration to occur, healing events must progress in an ordered and programmed sequence both temporally and spatially, replicating key developmental events. A number of procedures have been employed to promote true and predictable regeneration of the periodontium. Principally, the approaches are based on the use of graft materials to compensate for the bone loss incurred as a result of periodontal disease, use of barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration and use of bioactive molecules. More recently, the concept of tissue engineering has been integrated into research and applications of regenerative dentistry, including periodontics, to aim to manage damaged and lost oral tissues, through reconstruction and regeneration of the periodontium and alleviate the shortcomings of more conventional therapeutic options. The essential components for generating effective cellular based therapeutic strategies include a population of multi-potential progenitor cells, presence of signalling molecules/inductive morphogenic signals and a conductive extracellular matrix scaffold or appropriate delivery system. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered suitable candidates for cell-based tissue engineering strategies owing to their extensive expansion rate and potential to differentiate into cells of multiple organs and systems. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple tissue sources have been investigated in pre-clinical animal studies and clinical settings for the treatment and regeneration of the periodontium.

  13. a Low Temperature Regenerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.

    2008-03-01

    Testing regenerators presents an interesting challenge. When incorporated into a cryocooler, a regenerator is intimately coupled to the other components: expander, heat exchangers, and compressor. It is difficult to isolate the performance of any single component. We have developed a low temperature test facility that will allow us to separate the performance of the regenerator from the rest of the cryocooler. The purpose of the facility is the characterization of test regenerators using novel materials and/or geometries in temperature ranges down to 15 K. It consists of the following elements: The test column has two regenerators stacked in series. The coldest stage regenerator is the device under test. The warmer stage regenerator contains a stack of stainless steel screen, a well-characterized material. A commercial cryocooler is used to fix the temperatures at both ends of the test regenerator, cooling both heat exchangers flanging the regenerator stack. Heaters allow varying the temperatures and allow measurement of the remaining cooling power, and thus, regenerator effectiveness. A linear compressor delivers an oscillating pressure to the regenerator assembly. An inertance tube and reservoir provide the proper phase difference between mass flow and pressure. This phase shift, along with the imposed temperature differential, simulates the conditions of the test regenerator when used in an actual pulse tube cryocooler. This paper presents development details of the regenerator test facility, and test results on a second stage, stainless steel screen test regenerator.

  14. A multi-template combination algorithm for protein comparative modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianlin

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple protein templates are commonly used in manual protein structure prediction. However, few automated algorithms of selecting and combining multiple templates are available. Results Here we develop an effective multi-template combination algorithm for protein comparative modeling. The algorithm selects templates according to the similarity significance of the alignments between template and target proteins. It combines the whole template-target alignments whose similarity significance score is close to that of the top template-target alignment within a threshold, whereas it only takes alignment fragments from a less similar template-target alignment that align with a sizable uncovered region of the target. We compare the algorithm with the traditional method of using a single top template on the 45 comparative modeling targets (i.e. easy template-based modeling targets) used in the seventh edition of Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP7). The multi-template combination algorithm improves the GDT-TS scores of predicted models by 6.8% on average. The statistical analysis shows that the improvement is significant (p-value < 10-4). Compared with the ideal approach that always uses the best template, the multi-template approach yields only slightly better performance. During the CASP7 experiment, the preliminary implementation of the multi-template combination algorithm (FOLDpro) was ranked second among 67 servers in the category of high-accuracy structure prediction in terms of GDT-TS measure. Conclusion We have developed a novel multi-template algorithm to improve protein comparative modeling. PMID:18366648

  15. Carbon Nanotube Templated Asembly of Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a novel general strategy for fabricating protein-polyion multilayers by electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly on a carbon nanotube (CNT) template. Such a noncovalent functionalization method is important for preserving the activity of biomolecules and the mechanical and electrical properties of CNTs. Glucose oxidase and poly (diallydimethylammonium) chloride polymer were used as a model to investigate the LBL process on a CNT template. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electrochemical characterization confirm the formation of LBL nanostructures on carboxyl functionalized CNTs. We have also demonstrated the applications of these nanoshell bioreactors to the direct electrochemistry of proteins and biosensing. This strategy can be applied to assemble other biological molecules, such as antibodies, antigens, and DNA, for wide bioassay applications.

  16. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating.

    PubMed

    Shastri, V P; Martin, I; Langer, R

    2000-02-29

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control over pore structure, porosity, and other structural and bulk characteristics of the polymer foam. Polymer foams with densities as low as 120 mg/cc, porosity as high as 87%, and high surface areas (20 m(2)/g) have been produced. Foams of poly(l-lactic acid), a biodegradable polymer, produced by this process have been used to engineer a variety of different structures, including tissues with complex geometries such as in the likeness of a human nose.

  17. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Venkatram Prasad; Martin, Ivan; Langer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control over pore structure, porosity, and other structural and bulk characteristics of the polymer foam. Polymer foams with densities as low as 120 mg/cc, porosity as high as 87%, and high surface areas (20 m2/g) have been produced. Foams of poly(l-lactic acid), a biodegradable polymer, produced by this process have been used to engineer a variety of different structures, including tissues with complex geometries such as in the likeness of a human nose. PMID:10696111

  18. Assessing particle kinematics via template matching algorithms.

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Fink, M; Fortov, V; Lipaev, A; Molotkov, V; Morfill, G; Petrov, O; Pustylnik, M; Thoma, M; Thomas, H; Usachev, A; Raeth, C

    2016-04-18

    Template matching algorithms represent a viable tool to locate particles in optical images. A crucial factor of the performance of these methods is the choice of the similarity measure. Recently, it was shown in [Gao and Helgeson, Opt. Express 22 (2014)] that the correlation coefficient (CC) leads to good results. Here, we introduce the mutual information (MI) as a nonlinear similarity measure and compare the performance of the MI and the CC for different noise scenarios. It turns out that the mutual information leads to superior results in the case of signal dependent noise. We propose a novel approach to estimate the velocity of particles which is applicable in imaging scenarios where the particles appear elongated due to their movement. By designing a bank of anisotropic templates supposed to fit the elongation of the particles we are able to reliably estimate their velocity and direction of motion out of a single image.

  19. Deep Human Parsing with Active Template Regression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodan; Liu, Si; Shen, Xiaohui; Yang, Jianchao; Liu, Luoqi; Dong, Jian; Lin, Liang; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the human parsing task, namely decomposing a human image into semantic fashion/body regions, is formulated as an active template regression (ATR) problem, where the normalized mask of each fashion/body item is expressed as the linear combination of the learned mask templates, and then morphed to a more precise mask with the active shape parameters, including position, scale and visibility of each semantic region. The mask template coefficients and the active shape parameters together can generate the human parsing results, and are thus called the structure outputs for human parsing. The deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is utilized to build the end-to-end relation between the input human image and the structure outputs for human parsing. More specifically, the structure outputs are predicted by two separate networks. The first CNN network is with max-pooling, and designed to predict the template coefficients for each label mask, while the second CNN network is without max-pooling to preserve sensitivity to label mask position and accurately predict the active shape parameters. For a new image, the structure outputs of the two networks are fused to generate the probability of each label for each pixel, and super-pixel smoothing is finally used to refine the human parsing result. Comprehensive evaluations on a large dataset well demonstrate the significant superiority of the ATR framework over other state-of-the-arts for human parsing. In particular, the F1-score reaches 64.38 percent by our ATR framework, significantly higher than 44.76 percent based on the state-of-the-art algorithm [28].

  20. Template synthesis and characterizations of nickel nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, T.; Satpati, B.

    2012-06-05

    Template assisted Ni nanorods were grown using electro-deposition process and investigated using an Analytical Transmission Electron Microscope. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and diffraction patterns reveal the polycrystalline nature of grown Ni nanorods and the composition of these nanorods were verified using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The morphology of the grown nanorods was also characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

  1. CLIPS template system for program understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbine, Ronald B.

    1994-01-01

    Program understanding is a subfield of software reengineering and attempts to recognize the run-time behavior of source code. To this point, success in this area has been limited to very small code segments. An expert system, HLAR (High-Level Algorithm Recognizer), has been written in CLIPS and recognizes three sorting algorithms, selection sort, quicksort, and heapsort. This paper describes the HLAR system in general and, in depth, the CLIPS templates used for program representation and understanding.

  2. Template learning in morphological neural nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jennifer L.; Sun, K.

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents an application of morphology neural networks to a template learning problem. Morphology neural networks are a nonlinear version of the familiar artificial neural networks. Typically, an artificial neural net is used to solve pattern classification problems One useful characterization of many neural network algorithms is the ability to 'learn' to respond correctly to new data based only on a selection of known data responses. For example, in the multilayer perceptron model, the 'learning' is a procedure whereby parameters are fed back from output to input neurons and the weights changed to give a better response. The morphological neural net in this paper solves a different type of image processing problem. Specifically, given an input image and an output image which corresponds to a dilated version of the input, one would like to determine what template produced the output. The problem corresponds to teaching the network to solve for the weights in a morphological net, as the weights are the template's values. A reasonable method has been investigated for the boolean case; in this paper results are presented for gray scale images. Image algebra has been shown to provide a succinct expression of neural networks algorithms and also to allow a generalization of neural networks, and thus the authors describe the algorithm in image algebra. The remainder of the paper gives a brief discussion of image algebra, the relationship of image algebra and neural networks, a recap of the dilation morphology neural network boolean for boolean images, and the generalization to grayscale data.

  3. Human action recognition using motion energy template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yanhua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Human action recognition is an active and interesting research topic in computer vision and pattern recognition field that is widely used in the real world. We proposed an approach for human activity analysis based on motion energy template (MET), a new high-level representation of video. The main idea for the MET model is that human actions could be expressed as the composition of motion energy acquired in a three-dimensional (3-D) space-time volume by using a filter bank. The motion energies were directly computed from raw video sequences, thus some problems, such as object location and segmentation, etc., are definitely avoided. Another important competitive merit of this MET method is its insensitivity to gender, hair, and clothing. We extract MET features by using the Bhattacharyya coefficient to measure the motion energy similarity between the action template video and the tested video, and then the 3-D max-pooling. Using these features as input to the support vector machine, extensive experiments on two benchmark datasets, Weizmann and KTH, were carried out. Compared with other state-of-the-art approaches, such as variation energy image, dynamic templates and local motion pattern descriptors, the experimental results demonstrate that our MET model is competitive and promising.

  4. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  5. UV NIL template making and imprint evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shiho; Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Fujii, Akiko; Sakai, Yuko; Sutou, Takanori; Yusa, Satoshi; Kuriyama, Koki; Sakaki, Masashi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2008-10-01

    UV NIL shows excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness, and has been attracting pioneers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterns. We have been focused on the resolution improvement in NIL template making with a 100keV acceleration voltage spot beam EB writer process, and have established a template making process to meet the requirements of the pioneers. Usually such templates needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so). Now, for several semiconductor devices, the UV NIL is considered not only as a patterning solution for R&D purpose but eventually as a potential candidate for production, and instead of a small field, a full chip field mask is required. Although the 100kV EB writers have excellent resolution capability, they are adopting spot beams (SB) to generate the pattern and have a fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. In this paper, we are focusing on the 50keV variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writers, which are used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50keV VSB writers can generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time, and by choosing the right patterning material and process, we achieved resolution down to 28nm.

  6. UV NIL template making and imprint evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shiho; Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Sakai, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2009-01-01

    UV NIL shows excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness, and has been attracting pioneers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterns. We have been focused on the resolution improvement in NIL template making with a 100keV acceleration voltage spot beam EB writer process, and have established a template making process to meet the requirements of the pioneers. Usually such templates needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so) Now, for several semiconductor devices, the UV NIL is considered not only as a patterning solution for R&D purpose but eventually as a potential candidate for production, and instead of a small field, a full chip field mask is required. Although the 100kV EB writers have excellent resolution capability, they are adopting spot beams (SB) to generate the pattern and have a fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. In this paper, we are focusing on the 50keV variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writers, which are used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50keV VSB writers can generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time, and by choosing the right patterning material and process, we achieved resolution down to hp28nm, and initial promising results of hp22nm (partial resolution) for line and spaces, and hp26nm for dense holes were observed..

  7. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  8. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramaniam M; Ugale, Gauri M; Warad, Shivaraj B

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search). All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP. PMID:23626951

  9. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  10. Cell cycle regulation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Zhang, Yong; Bedelbaeva, Khamila; Song, Fengyu; Chen, Xiaoping; Stocum, David L

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of ear punch holes in the MRL mouse and amputated limbs of the axolotl show a number of similarities. A large proportion of the fibroblasts of the uninjured MRL mouse ear are arrested in G2 of the cell cycle, and enter nerve-dependent mitosis after injury to form a ring-shaped blastema that regenerates the ear tissue. Multiple cell types contribute to the establishment of the regeneration blastema of the urodele limb by dedifferentiation, and there is substantial reason to believe that the cells of this early blastema are also arrested in G2, and enter mitosis under the influence of nerve-dependent factors supplied by the apical epidermal cap. Molecular analysis reveals other parallels, such as; (1) the upregulation of Evi5, a centrosomal protein that prevents mitosis by stabilizing Emi1, a protein that inhibits the degradation of cyclins by the anaphase promoting complex and (2) the expression of sodium channels by the epidermis. A central feature in the entry into the cell cycle by MRL ear fibroblasts is a natural downregulation of p21, and knockout of p21 in wild-type mice confers regenerative capacity on non-regenerating ear tissue. Whether the same is true for entry into the cell cycle in regenerating urodele limbs is presently unknown.

  11. Converting Basic D3 Charts into Reusable Style Templates.

    PubMed

    Harper, Jonathan; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2017-02-07

    We present a technique for converting a basic D3 chart into a reusable style template. Then, given a new data source we can apply the style template to generate a chart that depicts the new data, but in the style of the template. To construct the style template we first deconstruct the input D3 chart to recover its underlying structure: the data, the marks and the mappings that describe how the marks encode the data. We then rank the perceptual effectiveness of the deconstructed mappings. To apply the resulting style template to a new data source we first obtain importance ranks for each new data field. We then adjust the template mappings to depict the source data by matching the most important data fields to the most perceptually effective mappings. We show how the style templates can be applied to source data in the form of either a data table or another D3 chart. While our implementation focuses on generating templates for basic chart types (e.g. variants of bar charts, line charts, dot plots, scatterplots, etc.), these are the most commonly used chart types today. Users can easily find such basic D3 charts on the Web, turn them into templates, and immediately see how their own data would look in the visual style (e.g. colors, shapes, fonts, etc.) of the templates. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by applying a diverse set of style templates to a variety of source datasets.

  12. A Neonatal Bimodal MR-CT Head Template

    PubMed Central

    Mohtasebi, Mehrana; Abrishami Moghaddam, Hamid; Grebe, Reinhard; Gity, Masoumeh; Wallois, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal MR templates are appropriate for brain structural analysis and spatial normalization. However, they do not provide the essential accurate details of cranial bones and fontanels-sutures. Distinctly, CT images provide the best contrast for bone definition and fontanels-sutures. In this paper, we present, for the first time, an approach to create a fully registered bimodal MR-CT head template for neonates with a gestational age of 39 to 42 weeks. Such a template is essential for structural and functional brain studies, which require precise geometry of the head including cranial bones and fontanels-sutures. Due to the special characteristics of the problem (which requires inter-subject inter-modality registration), a two-step intensity-based registration method is proposed to globally and locally align CT images with an available MR template. By applying groupwise registration, the new neonatal CT template is then created in full alignment with the MR template to build a bimodal MR-CT template. The mutual information value between the CT and the MR template is 1.17 which shows their perfect correspondence in the bimodal template. Moreover, the average mutual information value between normalized images and the CT template proposed in this study is 1.24±0.07. Comparing this value with the one reported in a previously published approach (0.63±0.07) demonstrates the better generalization properties of the new created template and the superiority of the proposed method for the creation of CT template in the standard space provided by MR neonatal head template. The neonatal bimodal MR-CT head template is freely downloadable from https://www.u-picardie.fr/labo/GRAMFC. PMID:28129340

  13. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  14. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D. N.; Vallance, J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Ceramic Regenerator Design and Reliability Program aims to develop ceramic regenerator cores that can be used in passenger car and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. The major cause of failure of early gas turbine regenerators was found to be chemical attack of the ceramic material. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines late in 1974. Results of 53,065 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, show promise. Five aluminum silicate cores attained the durability objective of 10,000 hours at 800 C (1472 F). Another aluminum silicate core shows minimal evidence of chemical attack after 8071 hours at 982 C (1800 F). Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are included.

  15. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amir, Lisa R; Everts, Vincent; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2009-07-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connective tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical attention as a way to correct congenital growth retardation of bone tissue or to generate bone to fill skeletal defects. The process of bone regeneration involves a complex system of biological changes whereby mechanical stress is converted into a cascade of signals that activate cellular behavior resulting in (enhanced) formation of bone. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the bone regeneration process during distraction osteogenesis. The mechanical and biological factors that are important for the success of the distraction treatment have been partially characterized and are discussed in this review.

  16. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Naruse, Y.

    1992-03-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows ``inventory by difference`` for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  17. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L. ); Naruse, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) was added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer allows inventory by difference'' for radioactive wastes that are to be buried. The MSRS was designed and built to comply with this requirement. Within the TWT, water is generated by the catalytic conversion of hydrogen isotopes and removed by molecular sieve trapping prior to release to the environment. Molecular sieve regeneration is required to remove the trapped water and to rejuvenate the beds. The MSRS permits the collection and direct tritium assay of regenerated tritiated water from molecular sieve beds. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the TWT.

  18. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  19. Some principles of regeneration in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bruce M

    2005-11-01

    This article presents some general principles underlying regenerative phenomena in vertebrates, starting with the epimorphic regeneration of the amphibian limb and continuing with tissue and organ regeneration in mammals. Epimorphic regeneration following limb amputation involves wound healing, followed shortly by a phase of dedifferentiation that leads to the formation of a regeneration blastema. Up to the point of blastema formation, dedifferentiation is guided by unique regenerative pathways, but the overall developmental controls underlying limb formation from the blastema generally recapitulate those of embryonic limb development. Damaged mammalian tissues do not form a blastema. At the cellular level, differentiation follows a pattern close to that seen in the embryo, but at the level of the tissue and organ, regeneration is strongly influenced by conditions inherent in the local environment. In some mammalian systems, such as the liver, parenchymal cells contribute progeny to the regenerate. In others, e.g., skeletal muscle and bone, tissue-specific progenitor cells constitute the main source of regenerating cells. The substrate on which regeneration occurs plays a very important role in determining the course of regeneration. Epimorphic regeneration usually produces an exact replica of the structure that was lost, but in mammalian tissue regeneration the form of the regenerate is largely determined by the mechanical environment acting on the regenerating tissue, and it is normally an imperfect replica of the original. In organ hypertophy, such as that occurring after hepatic resection, the remaining liver mass enlarges, but there is no attempt to restore the original form.

  20. Ceramic regenerator systems development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.; Rao, V. D.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability tests/in industrial gas turbine engines. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate shows minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 7804 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 4983 hours at 982 C. The results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  1. Solvothermal removal of the organic template from L 3 ("sponge") templated silica monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Mulders, Norbert; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2006-10-01

    We compare the methods of continuous solvent (Soxhlet) and supercritical solvent extractions for the removal of the organic template from nanostructured silica monoliths. Our monoliths are formed by templating the L 3 liquid crystal phase of cetylpyridinium chloride in aqueous solutions with tetramethoxy silane. The monoliths that result from both Soxhlet and supercritical extraction methods are mechanically robust, optically clear, and free of cracks. The Soxhlet method compares favorably with supercritical solvent extraction in that equivalent L 3-templated silica can be synthesized without the use of specialized reactor hardware or higher temperatures and high pressures, while avoiding noxious byproducts. The comparative effectiveness of various solvents in the Soxhlet process is related to the Hildebrand solubility parameter, determined by the effective surface area of the extracted silica.

  2. Fingernails Yield Clues to Limb Regeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... embryonic development, as well as limb regeneration in amphibians. They found that the Wnt pathway was active ... nerve cells was crucial for limb regeneration in amphibians, so they wanted to examine their role in ...

  3. Regulation of crustacean molting and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, D.M.; Graham, D.E.; Holland, C.A.; Soumoff, C.; Mykles, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The regulation of molting and regeneration by two antagonistic hormones is discussed. The time course of ecdysteroid titers in crustacean tissues has been followed during molt and regeneration cycles. (ACR)

  4. A model regenerator for a Stirling cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolan, James

    2001-05-01

    An essential feature of the engine patented by Robert Stirling in 1817 was the careful description of the idea of regeneration. In the standard thermodynamic cycle representation of the engine, regeneration is the storing and the reusing of the thermal energy released in the constant volume cooling part of the cycle. Due to the difficulty in treating regeneration quantitatively, introductory physics texts generally either ignore the concept or assume the regeneration to be perfect. As a result students obtain little or no understanding of regeneration. In addition there seem to be differing views in various texts about the efficiency of Stirling engines. In this work a simple finite element model regenerator is presented with which one can do simple calculations. The model does not accurately represent actual regeneration in a practical engine. But the model might help students gain better insight into Stirling engine efficiency and the idea of regeneration.

  5. DNA repair by RNA: Templated, or not templated, that is the question.

    PubMed

    Meers, Chance; Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Cells are continuously exposed to both endogenous and exogenous sources of genomic stress. To maintain chromosome stability, a variety of mechanisms have evolved to cope with the multitude of genetic abnormalities that can arise over the life of a cell. Still, failures to repair these lesions are the driving force of cancers and other degenerative disorders. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most toxic genetic lesions, inhibiting cell ability to replicate, and are sites of mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. DSB repair is known to proceed via two major mechanisms: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HR reliance on the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules offers increased accuracy. While the preferred substrate for HR in mitotic cells is the sister chromatid, this is limited to the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. However, abundant amounts of homologous genetic substrate may exist throughout the cell cycle in the form of RNA. Considered an uncommon occurrence, the direct transfer of information from RNA to DNA is thought to be limited to special circumstances. Studies have shown that RNA molecules reverse transcribed into cDNA can be incorporated into DNA at DSB sites via a non-templated mechanism by NHEJ or a templated mechanism by HR. In addition, synthetic RNA molecules can directly template the repair of DSBs in yeast and human cells via an HR mechanism. New work suggests that even endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a homologous template to repair a DSB in chromosomal DNA. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the recent advancements in DSB repair by RNA via non-templated and templated mechanisms. We will provide current findings, models and future challenges investigating RNA and its role in DSB repair.

  6. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  7. Cryogenic regenerator including sarancarbon heat conduction matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Britcliffe, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A saran carbon matrix is employed to conduct heat through the heat storing volume of a cryogenic regenerator. When helium is adsorbed into the saran carbon matrix, the combination exhibits a volumetric specific heat much higher than previously used lead balls. A helium adsorbed saran regenerator should allow much lower refrigerator temperatures than those practically obtainable with lead based regenerators for regenerator type refrigeration systems.

  8. Deer antler regeneration: cells, concepts, and controversies.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Szuwart, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    The periodic replacement of antlers is an exceptional regenerative process in mammals, which in general are unable to regenerate complete body appendages. Antler regeneration has traditionally been viewed as an epimorphic process closely resembling limb regeneration in urodele amphibians, and the terminology of the latter process has also been applied to antler regeneration. More recent studies, however, showed that, unlike urodele limb regeneration, antler regeneration does not involve cell dedifferentiation and the formation of a blastema from these dedifferentiated cells. Rather, these studies suggest that antler regeneration is a stem-cell-based process that depends on the periodic activation of, presumably neural-crest-derived, periosteal stem cells of the distal pedicle. The evidence for this hypothesis is reviewed and as a result, a new concept of antler regeneration as a process of stem-cell-based epimorphic regeneration is proposed that does not involve cell dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation. Antler regeneration illustrates that extensive appendage regeneration in a postnatal mammal can be achieved by a developmental process that differs in several fundamental aspects from limb regeneration in urodeles.

  9. Full regeneration of the tribasal Polypterus fin.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Rodrigo; Hernández-Martínez, Rocío; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Covarrubias, Luis

    2012-03-06

    Full limb regeneration is a property that seems to be restricted to urodele amphibians. Here we found that Polypterus, the most basal living ray-finned fish, regenerates its pectoral lobed fins with a remarkable accuracy. Pectoral Polypterus fins are complex, formed by a well-organized endoskeleton to which the exoskeleton rays are connected. Regeneration initiates with the formation of a blastema similar to that observed in regenerating amphibian limbs. Retinoic acid induces dose-dependent phenotypes ranging from inhibition of regeneration to apparent anterior-posterior duplications. As in all developing tetrapod limbs and regenerating amphibian blastema, Sonic hedgehog is expressed in the posterior mesenchyme during fin regeneration. Hedgehog signaling plays a role in the regeneration and patterning processes: an increase or reduction of fin bony elements results when this signaling is activated or disrupted, respectively. The tail fin also regenerates but, in contrast with pectoral fins, regeneration can resume after release from the arrest caused by hedgehog inhibition. A comparative analysis of fin phenotypes obtained after retinoic acid treatment or altering the hedgehog signaling levels during regeneration allowed us to assign a limb tetrapod equivalent segment to Polypterus fin skeletal structures, thus providing clues to the origin of the autopod. We propose that appendage regeneration was a common property of vertebrates during the fin to limb transition.

  10. Template for Systems Engineering Tools Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Michelle D.

    2005-01-01

    A discussion of Systems Engineering tools brings out numerous preferences and reactions regarding tools of choice as well as the functions those tools are to perform. A recent study of Systems Engineering Tools for a new Program illustrated the need for a generic template for use by new Programs or Projects to determine the toolset appropriate for their use. This paper will provide the guidelines new initiatives can follow and tailor to their specific needs, to enable them to make their choice of tools in an efficient and informed manner. Clearly, those who perform purely technical functions will need different tools than those who perform purely systems engineering functions. And, everyone has tools they are comfortable with. That degree of comfort is frequently the deciding factor in tools choice rather than an objective study of all criteria and weighting factors. This paper strives to produce a comprehensive list of criteria for selection with suggestions for weighting factors based on a number of assumptions regarding the given Program or Project. In addition, any given Program will begin with assumptions for its toolset based on Program size, tool cost, user base and technical needs. In providing a template for tool selection, this paper will guide the reader through assumptions based on Program need; decision criteria; potential weighting factors; the need for a compilation of available tools; the importance of tool demonstrations; and finally a down selection of tools. While specific vendors cannot be mentioned in this work, it is expected that this template could serve other Programs in the formulation phase by alleviating the trade study process of some of its subjectivity.

  11. New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Qin; Zhao Jinjing; Zhao Tianqi; Jin Juan; Yu Jiehui; Xu Jiqing

    2011-07-15

    Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

  12. Protein-templated biomimetic silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Erienne; Ferrari, Mariana; Cuestas-Ayllon, Carlos; Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Perez-Carvajal, Javier; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Grazú, Valeria; Betancor, Lorena

    2015-03-31

    Biomimetic silica particles can be synthesized as a nanosized material within minutes in a process mimicked from living organisms such as diatoms and sponges. In this work, we have studied the effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a template to direct the synthesis of silica nanoparticles (NPs) with the potential to associate proteins on its surface. Our approach enables the formation of spheres with different physicochemical properties. Particles using BSA as a protein template were smaller (∼250-380 nm) and were more monodisperse than those lacking the proteic core (∼700-1000 nm) as seen by dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analysis. The absence of BSA during synthesis produced silica nanoparticles without any porosity that was detectable by nitrogen adsorption, whereas particles containing BSA developed porosity in the range of 4 to 5 nm which collapsed on the removal of BSA, thus producing smaller pores. These results were in accordance with the pore size calculated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM). The reproducibility of the BSA-templated nanoparticle properties was determined by analyzing four batches of independent synthesizing experiments that maintained their properties. The high positive superficial charge of the nanoparticles facilitated adsorption under mild conditions of a range of proteins from an E. coli extract and a commercial preparation of laccase from Trametes versicolor. All of the proteins were quantitatively desorbed. Experiments conducted showed the reusability of the particles as supports for the ionic adsorption of the biomolecules. The protein loading capacity of the BSA-based biomimetic particles was determined using laccase as 98.7 ± 6.6 mg·g(-1) of particles.

  13. Fluorescent DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ruoqian

    Because of the ultra-small size and biocompatibility of silver nanoclusters, they have attracted much research interest for their applications in biolabeling. Among the many ways of synthesizing silver nanoclusters, DNA templated method is particularly attractive---the high tunability of DNA sequences provides another degree of freedom for controlling the chemical and photophysical properties. However, systematic studies about how DNA sequences and concentrations are controlling the photophysical properties are still lacking. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the binding mechanisms of silver clusters binding and single stranded DNAs. Here in this thesis, we report synthesis and characterization of DNA-templated silver nanoclusters and provide a systematic interrogation of the effects of DNA concentrations and sequences, including lengths and secondary structures. We performed a series of syntheses utilizing five different sequences to explore the optimal synthesis condition. By characterizing samples with UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, we achieved the most proper reactants ratio and synthesis conditions. Two of them were chosen for further concentration dependence studies and sequence dependence studies. We found that cytosine-rich sequences are more likely to produce silver nanoclusters with stronger fluorescence signals; however, sequences with hairpin secondary structures are more capable in stabilizing silver nanoclusters. In addition, the fluorescence peak emission intensities and wavelengths of the DNA templated silver clusters have sequence dependent fingerprints. This potentially can be applied to sequence sensing in the future. However all the current conclusions are not warranted; there is still difficulty in formulating general rules in DNA strand design and silver nanocluster production. Further investigation of more sequences could solve these questions in the future.

  14. New Developments in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Yen Loan; Thavapalachandran, Sujitha; Kizana, Eddy; Chong, James Jh

    2017-04-01

    Numerous pharmacological and device therapies have improved adverse cardiac remodelling and mortality in heart failure. However, none are able to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Stem cell based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells are new approaches that could potentially achieve the elusive goal of true cardiac regeneration. Over the past two decades, various stem cell based approaches have been shown to improve left ventricular function in pre-clinical animal models. Promising results rapidly led to clinical trials, initially using bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, then mesenchymal stromal cell populations and, more recently, progenitor cells from the adult heart itself. These have been shown to be safe and have advanced our understanding of potential suitable recipients, cell delivery routes, and possible mechanisms of action. However, efficacy in these trials has been inconsistent. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are another potential source of stem cells for cardiac regeneration. They could theoretically provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes or cardiac progenitors. Pre-clinical studies in both small and large animal models have shown robust engraftment and improvements in cardiac function. The first clinical trial using hPSC-derived cardiac derivatives has now commenced and others are imminent. In this brief review article, we summarise recent developments in stem cell therapies aimed at cardiac regeneration, including discussion of types of cell and non-cell-based strategies being explored.

  15. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  16. Generating Test Templates via Automated Theorem Proving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kancherla, Mani Prasad

    1997-01-01

    Testing can be used during the software development process to maintain fidelity between evolving specifications, program designs, and code implementations. We use a form of specification-based testing that employs the use of an automated theorem prover to generate test templates. A similar approach was developed using a model checker on state-intensive systems. This method applies to systems with functional rather than state-based behaviors. This approach allows for the use of incomplete specifications to aid in generation of tests for potential failure cases. We illustrate the technique on the cannonical triangle testing problem and discuss its use on analysis of a spacecraft scheduling system.

  17. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; ...

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  18. Progress of UV-NIL template making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Jun; Nakanishi, Yuko; Yusa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Shiho; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya

    2009-04-01

    Nano-imprint lithography (NIL) has been counted as one of the lithography candidates for hp32nm node and beyond and has showed excellent resolution capability with remarkable low line edge roughness that is attracting many researchers in the industry who were searching for the finest patterning technology. Therefore, recently we have been focusing on the resolution improvement on the NIL templates with the 100keV acceleration voltage spot beam (SB) EB writer and the 50keV acceleration voltage variable shaped beam (VSB) EB writer. The 100keV SB writers have high resolution capability, but they show fatally low throughput if we need full chip writing. Usually templates for resolution pioneers needed just a small field (several hundred microns square or so), but recently requirements for full chip templates are increasing. For full chip writing, we have also started the resolution improvement with the 50keV VSB writers used in current 4X photomask manufacturing. The 50keV VSB writers could generate full chip pattern in a reasonable time though resolution limits are inferior to that with the 100keV SB writers. In this paper, we will show latest results with both the 100keV SB and the 50keV VSB EB writers. With the 100keV SB EB writer, we have achieved down to hp15nm resolution for line and space pattern, but found that to achieve further improvement, an innovation in pattern generation method or material would be inevitable. With the 50keV VSB EB writer, we have achieved down to hp22nm resolution for line and space pattern. Though NIL has excellent resolution capability, solutions for defect inspection and repair are not clearly shown yet. In this paper, we will show preliminary inspection results with an EB inspection tool. We tested an EB inspection tool by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI), which was originally developed for and are currently used as a wafer inspection tool, and now have been started to seek the application for mask use, using a programmed defect

  19. The breakage of nanopore in AAO template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X. R.; Wang, H.; Zhen, Y.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, AAO template is fabricated in oxalic acid solution under a constant voltage by several steps. By the Bernoulli principle, the pressure on the wall of hole increases which lead to the breakage of nanopore as a result of the reducing effective migration rate of Al3+. The quantity of the breakage of nanopore rises with the increase of the concentration of Al3+. Further, nanopore is closed by oxide due to the decrease of effective migration rate of Al3+. Finally, a “nanoflower-like” shape can be observed in experiments.

  20. Scale estimation of objects using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaxiola, Leopoldo N.; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.

    2016-09-01

    Scale estimation of objects is a challenging problem in image processing. This work presents a novel method to detect and estimate the scaling factor of a target in an observed scene corrupted with additive noise and clutter. Given a set of available views of the target the proposed method is able to detect the target and estimate its scaling factor using a template matched filters and a scale pyramidal representation. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated in synthetic and real-life scenes in different pattern recognition applications. The obtained results are characterized in terms of objective metrics.

  1. The Contextualization of Archetypes: Clinical Template Governance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rune; Ulriksen, Gro-Hilde; Ellingsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a status report from a large-scale openEHR-based EPR project from the North Norway Regional Health Authority. It concerns the standardization of a regional ICT portfolio and the ongoing development of a new process oriented EPR systems encouraged by the unfolding of a national repository for openEHR archetypes. Subject of interest; the contextualization of clinical templates is governed over multiple national boundaries which is complex due to the dependency of clinical resources. From the outset of this, we are interested in how local, regional, and national organizers maneuver to standardize while applying OpenEHR technology.

  2. Conductive Nanowires Templated by Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Raguzin, Ivan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of conductive nanowires using polymer bottle brushes as templates. In our approach, we synthesized poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate methyl iodide quaternary salt brushes by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization, loaded them with palladium salt, and reduced them in order to form metallic nanowires with average lengths and widths of 300 and 20 nm, respectively. The obtained nanowires were deposited between conductive gold pads and were connected to them by sputtering of additional pads to form an electric circuit. We connected the nanowires in an electric circuit and demonstrated that the conductivity of these nanowires is around 100 S·m(-1).

  3. Gene therapy for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jeffrey; Sun, Michael H; Kang, Quan; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Luu, Hue H; Luo, Qing; Park, Jae Yoon; Li, Yien; Haydon, Rex C; He, Tong-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Efficacious bone regeneration could revolutionize the clinical management of many bone and musculoskeletal disorders. Bone has the unique ability to regenerate and continuously remodel itself throughout life. However, clinical situations arise when bone is unable to heal itself, as with segmental bone loss, fracture non-union, and failed spinal fusion. This leads to significant morbidity and mortality. Current attempts at improved bone healing have been met with limited success, fueling the development of improved techniques. Gene therapy in many ways represents an ideal approach for augmenting bone regeneration. Gene therapy allows specific gene products to be delivered to a precise anatomic location. In addition, the level of transgene expression as well as the duration of expression can be regulated with current techniques. For bone regeneration, the gene of interest should be delivered to the fracture site, expressed at appropriate levels, and then deactivated once the fracture has healed. Delivery of biological factors, mostly bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), has yielded promising results both in animal and clinical studies. There has also been tremendous work on discovering new growth factors and exploring previously defined ones. Finally, significant advances are being made in the delivery systems of the genes, ranging from viral and non-viral vectors to tissue engineering scaffolds. Despite some public hesitation to gene therapy, its use has great potential to expand our ability to treat a variety of human bone and musculoskeletal disorders. It is conceivable that in the near future gene therapy can be utilized to induce bone formation in virtually any region of the body in a minimally invasive manner. As bone biology and gene therapy research progresses, the goal of successful human gene transfer for augmentation of bone regeneration draws nearer.

  4. A subpopulation of adult skeletal muscle stem cells retains all template DNA strands after cell division.

    PubMed

    Rocheteau, Pierre; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Siegl-Cachedenier, Irene; Blasco, Maria A; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-01-20

    Satellite cells are adult skeletal muscle stem cells that are quiescent and constitute a poorly defined heterogeneous population. Using transgenic Tg:Pax7-nGFP mice, we show that Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells are less primed for commitment and have a lower metabolic status and delayed first mitosis compared to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells. Pax7-nGFP(Hi) can give rise to Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells after serial transplantations. Proliferating Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells exhibit lower metabolic activity, and the majority performs asymmetric DNA segregation during cell division, wherein daughter cells retaining template DNA strands express stem cell markers. Using chromosome orientation-fluorescence in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that all chromatids segregate asymmetrically, whereas Pax7-nGFP(Lo) cells perform random DNA segregation. Therefore, quiescent Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells represent a reversible dormant stem cell state, and during muscle regeneration, Pax7-nGFP(Hi) cells generate distinct daughter cell fates by asymmetrically segregating template DNA strands to the stem cell. These findings provide major insights into the biology of stem cells that segregate DNA asymmetrically.

  5. Molecular engineering of porous silica using aryl templates

    DOEpatents

    Loy, D.A.; Shea, K.J.

    1994-06-14

    A process is described for manipulating the porosity of silica using a series of organic template groups covalently incorporated into the silicate matrix. The templates in the bridged polysilsesquioxanes are selectively removed from the material by oxidation with oxygen plasma or other means, leaving engineered voids or pores. The size of these pores is dependent upon the length or size of the template or spacer. The size of the templates is measured in terms of Si-Si distances which range from about 0.67 nm to 1.08 nm. Changes introduced by the loss of the templates result in a narrow range of micropores (i.e. <2 nm). Both aryl and alkyl template groups are used as spacers. Novel microporous silica materials useful as molecular sieves, desiccants, and catalyst supports are produced. 3 figs.

  6. Molecular engineering of porous silica using aryl templates

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Shea, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A process for manipulating the porosity of silica using a series of organic template groups covalently incorporated into the silicate matrix. The templates in the bridged polysilsesquioxanes are selectively removed from the material by oxidation with oxygen plasma or other means, leaving engineered voids or pores. The size of these pores is dependent upon the length or size of the template or spacer. The size of the templates is measured in terms of Si-Si distances which range from about 0.67 nm to 1.08 nm. Changes introduced by the loss of the templates result in a narrow range of micropores (i.e. <2 nm). Both aryl and alkyl template groups are used as spacers. Novel microporous silica materials useful as molecular seives, dessicants, and catalyst supports are produced.

  7. Assessing Usage Patterns of Electronic Clinical Documentation Templates

    PubMed Central

    Vawdrey, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Many vendors of electronic medical records support structured and free-text entry of clinical documents using configurable templates. At a healthcare institution comprising two large academic medical centers, a documentation management data mart and a custom, Web-accessible business intelligence application were developed to track the availability and usage of electronic documentation templates. For each medical center campus, template availability and usage trends were measured from November 2007 through February 2008. By February 2008, approximately 65,000 electronic notes were authored per week on the two campuses. One site had 934 available templates, with 313 being used to author at least one note. The other site had 765 templates, of which 480 were used. The most commonly used template at both campuses was a free text note called “Miscellaneous Nursing Note,” which accounted for 33.3% of total documents generated at one campus and 15.2% at the other. PMID:18998863

  8. Hierarchically structured porous cadmium selenide polycrystals using polystyrene bilayer templates.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Hendricks, Nicholas R; Carter, Kenneth R

    2012-09-18

    In this study, a novel approach is demonstrated to fabricate hierarchically structured cadmium selenide (CdSe) layers with size-tunable nano/microporous morphologies achieved using polystyrene (PS) bilayered templates (top layer: colloidal template) via potentiostatic electrochemical deposition. The PS bilayer template is made in two steps. First, various PS patterns (stripes, ellipsoids, and circles) are prepared as the bottom layers through imprint lithography. In a second step, a top template is deposited that consists of a self-assembled layer of colloidal 2D packed PS particles. Electrochemical growth of CdSe crystals in the voids and selective removal of the PS bilayered templates give rise to hierarchically patterned 2D hexagonal porous CdSe structures. This simple and facile technique provides various unconventional porous CdSe films, arising from the effect of the PS bottom templates.

  9. Silicon template preparation for the fabrication of thin patterned gold films via template stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidl, G.; Dellith, J.; Dellith, A.; Teller, N.; Zopf, D.; Li, G.; Dathe, A.; Mayer, G.; Hübner, U.; Zeisberger, M.; Stranik, O.; Fritzsche, W.

    2015-12-01

    Metallic nanostructures play an important role in the vast field of modern nanophotonics, which ranges from the life sciences to biomedicine and beyond. Gold is a commonly-used and attractive material for plasmonics in the visible wavelength range, most importantly due to its chemical stability. In the present work, we focused on the different methods of plasmonic nanostructure fabrication that possess the greatest potential for cost-efficient fabrication. Initially, reusable (1 0 0) silicon templates were prepared. For this purpose, three different lithography methods (i.e. e-beam, optical, and nanoparticle lithography) were used that correspond to the desired structural scales. The application of a subsequent anisotropic crystal orientation-dependent wet etching process produced well-defined pyramidal structures in a wide variety of sizes, ranging from several microns to less than 100 nm. Finally, a 200 nm-thick gold layer was deposited by means of confocal sputtering on the silicon templates and stripped in order to obtain gold films that feature a surface replica of the initial template structure. The surface roughness that was achieved on the stripped films corresponds well with the roughness of the template used. This makes it possible to prepare cost-efficient high-quality structured films in large quantities with little effort. The gold films produced were thoroughly characterized, particularly with respect to their plasmonic response.

  10. Macrocycle Synthesis by Chloride-Templated Amide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Martí-Centelles, Vicente; Burguete, M Isabel; Luis, Santiago V

    2016-03-04

    A new family of pseudopeptidic macrocyclic compounds has been prepared involving an anion-templated amide bond formation reaction at the macrocyclization step. Chloride anion was found to be the most efficient template in the macrocyclization process, producing improved macrocyclization yields with regard to the nontemplated reaction. The data suggest a kinetic effect of the chloride template, providing an appropriate folded conformation of the open-chain precursor and reducing the energy barrier for the formation of the macrocyclic product.

  11. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries.

  12. Research of Search Template Based on Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yao; Huang, Long-Jun; Zuo, Yi

    Aiming at the problem of requirement identification in the field of search engine, we proposed a scheme that makes use of nature language template. In the help of map-reduce analyze of the user searching log, high frequency template can be obtained. Besides, based on tire tree we designed a algorithm that can make the search engine distinguish user requirements using the template. In that case, the search engine can offer different service according to the user requirements.

  13. Random template placement and prior information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röver, Christian

    2010-05-01

    In signal detection problems, one is usually faced with the task of searching a parameter space for peaks in the likelihood function which indicate the presence of a signal. Random searches have proven to be very efficient as well as easy to implement, compared e.g. to searches along regular grids in parameter space. Knowledge of the parameterised shape of the signal searched for adds structure to the parameter space, i.e., there are usually regions requiring to be densely searched while in other regions a coarser search is sufficient. On the other hand, prior information identifies the regions in which a search will actually be promising or may likely be in vain. Defining specific figures of merit allows one to combine both template metric and prior distribution and devise optimal sampling schemes over the parameter space. We show an example related to the gravitational wave signal from a binary inspiral event. Here the template metric and prior information are particularly contradictory, since signals from low-mass systems tolerate the least mismatch in parameter space while high-mass systems are far more likely, as they imply a greater signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and hence are detectable to greater distances. The derived sampling strategy is implemented in a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm where it improves convergence.

  14. Kinetic theory of amyloid fibril templating.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Jeremy D

    2013-05-14

    The growth of amyloid fibrils requires a disordered or partially unfolded protein to bind to the fibril and adapt the same conformation and alignment established by the fibril template. Since the H-bonds stabilizing the fibril are interchangeable, it is inevitable that H-bonds form between incorrect pairs of amino acids which are either incorporated into the fibril as defects or must be broken before the correct alignment can be found. This process is modeled by mapping the formation and breakage of H-bonds to a one-dimensional random walk. The resulting microscopic model of fibril growth is governed by two timescales: the diffusion time of the monomeric proteins, and the time required for incorrectly bound proteins to unbind from the fibril. The theory predicts that the Arrhenius behavior observed in experiments is due to off-pathway states rather than an on-pathway transition state. The predicted growth rates are in qualitative agreement with experiments on insulin fibril growth rates as a function of protein concentration, denaturant concentration, and temperature. These results suggest a templating mechanism where steric clashes due to a single mis-aligned molecule prevent the binding of additional molecules.

  15. Metal templated design of protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Eric N; Ambroggio, Xavier I; Brodin, Jeffrey D; Lewis, Richard A; Kuhlman, Brian; Tezcan, F Akif

    2010-02-02

    Metal coordination is a key structural and functional component of a large fraction of proteins. Given this dual role we considered the possibility that metal coordination may have played a templating role in the early evolution of protein folds and complexes. We describe here a rational design approach, Metal Templated Interface Redesign (MeTIR), that mimics the time course of a hypothetical evolutionary pathway for the formation of stable protein assemblies through an initial metal coordination event. Using a folded monomeric protein, cytochrome cb(562), as a building block we show that its non-self-associating surface can be made self-associating through a minimal number of mutations that enable Zn coordination. The protein interfaces in the resulting Zn-directed, D(2)-symmetrical tetramer are subsequently redesigned, yielding unique protein architectures that self-assemble in the presence or absence of metals. Aside from its evolutionary implications, MeTIR provides a route to engineer de novo protein interfaces and metal coordination environments that can be tuned through the extensive noncovalent bonding interactions in these interfaces.

  16. Fluorogenic Templated Reaction Cascades for RNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Velema, Willem A; Kool, Eric T

    2017-03-27

    Nucleic acids detection is essential to the study of biological processes and to diagnosis of pathological states. Although PCR is highly effective in vitro, methods that can function without prior sample preparation, thermal cycling, or enzymes are of interest due to their simplicity. Most current non-PCR detection methods rely on linear signal amplification, which hinders the detection of small amounts of genetic material. To address this limitation, we tested a new strategy for attaining higher-order signal amplification, in which a target sequence templates a chemical ligation and the product of this reaction is in turn detected with a second templated reaction. The method is nonenzymatic, isothermal and fluorogenic, allowing the direct detection of nucleic acids in complex matrices. Using this approach, as little as 500 attomoles (10 pM) could be detected with single nucleotide resolution. In a test of selectivity, single nucleotide substitutions and deletions could successfully be detected, including a deletion that is associated with tetracycline resistance in Helicobacter pylori. Compatibility with biological matrices was demonstrated by the direct detection of rRNA in bacterial lysate. Imaging and detection of target sequences on a solid support further illustrates the potential of the new approach for high-throughput analysis.

  17. Fluid discrimination based on rock physics templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Yin, Xingyao; Li, Chao

    2015-10-01

    Reservoir fluid discrimination is an indispensable part of seismic exploration. Reliable fluid discrimination helps to decrease the risk of exploration and to increase the success ratio of drilling. There are many kinds of fluid indicators that are used in fluid discriminations, most of which are single indicators. But single indicators do not always work well under complicated reservoir conditions. Therefore, combined fluid indicators are needed to increase accuracies of discriminations. In this paper, we have proposed an alternative strategy for the combination of fluid indicators. An alternative fluid indicator, the rock physics template-based indicator (RPTI) has been derived to combine the advantages of two single indicators. The RPTI is more sensitive to the contents of fluid than traditional indicators. The combination is implemented based on the characteristic of the fluid trend in the rock physics template, which means few subjective factors are involved. We also propose an inversion method to assure the accuracy of the RPTI input data. The RPTI profile is an intuitionistic interpretation of fluid content. Real data tests demonstrate the applicability and validity.

  18. An ice-templated, linearly aligned chitosan-alginate scaffold for neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Francis, Nicola L; Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Riblett, Benjamin W; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2013-12-01

    Several strategies have been investigated to enhance axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury, however, the resulting growth can be random and disorganized. Bioengineered scaffolds provide a physical substrate for guidance of regenerating axons towards their targets, and can be produced by freeze casting. This technique involves the controlled directional solidification of an aqueous solution or suspension, resulting in a linearly aligned porous structure caused by ice templating. In this study, freeze casting was used to fabricate porous chitosan-alginate (C/A) scaffolds with longitudinally oriented channels. Chick dorsal root ganglia explants adhered to and extended neurites through the scaffold in parallel alignment with the channel direction. Surface adsorption of a polycation and laminin promoted significantly longer neurite growth than the uncoated scaffold (poly-L-ornithine + Laminin = 793.2 ± 187.2 μm; poly-L-lysine + Laminin = 768.7 ± 241.2 μm; uncoated scaffold = 22.52 ± 50.14 μm) (P < 0.001). The elastic modulus of the hydrated scaffold was determined to be 5.08 ± 0.61 kPa, comparable to reported spinal cord values. The present data suggested that this C/A scaffold is a promising candidate for use as a nerve guidance scaffold, because of its ability to support neuronal attachment and the linearly aligned growth of DRG neurites.

  19. Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's window into development.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of regeneration studies by looking in depth at Regeneration and evaluating Morgan's contribution. Although famous for his work with fruit fly genetics, studying Regeneration illuminates Morgan's earlier scientific approach which emphasized the importance of studying a diversity of organisms. Surveying a broad range of regenerative phenomena allowed Morgan to institute a standard scientific terminology that continues to inform regeneration studies today. Most importantly, Morgan argued that regeneration was a fundamental aspect of the growth process and therefore should be accounted for within developmental theory. Establishing important similarities between regeneration and development allowed Morgan to make the case that regeneration could act as a model of development. The nature of the relationship between embryogenesis and regeneration remains an active area of research.

  20. Influence of template fill in graphoepitaxy directed self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doise, Jan; Bekaert, Joost; Chan, Boon Teik; Hong, SungEun; Lin, Guanyang; Gronheid, Roel

    2016-07-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP) is considered a promising patterning approach for the 7-nm node and beyond. Specifically, a graphoepitaxy process using a cylindrical phase BCP may offer an efficient solution for patterning randomly distributed contact holes with subresolution pitches, such as found in via and cut mask levels. In any graphoepitaxy process, the pattern density impacts the template fill (local BCP thickness inside the template) and may cause defects due to over- or underfilling of the template. In order to tackle this issue thoroughly, the parameters that determine template fill and the influence of template fill on the resulting pattern should be investigated. Using three process flow variations (with different template surface energy), template fill is experimentally characterized as a function of pattern density and film thickness. The impact of these parameters on template fill is highly dependent on the process flow, and thus prepattern surface energy. Template fill has a considerable effect on the pattern transfer of the DSA contact holes into the underlying layer. Higher fill levels give rise to smaller contact holes and worse critical dimension uniformity. These results are important for DSA-aware design and show that fill is a crucial parameter in graphoepitaxy DSA.

  1. Light Weight Biomorphous Cellular Ceramics from Cellulose Templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Yee, Bo-Moon; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Bimorphous ceramics are a new class of materials that can be fabricated from the cellulose templates derived from natural biopolymers. These biopolymers are abundantly available in nature and are produced by the photosynthesis process. The wood cellulose derived carbon templates have three- dimensional interconnectivity. A wide variety of non-oxide and oxide based ceramics have been fabricated by template conversion using infiltration and reaction-based processes. The cellular anatomy of the cellulose templates plays a key role in determining the processing parameters (pyrolysis, infiltration conditions, etc.) and resulting ceramic materials. The processing approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the biomorphous cellular ceramics (silicon carbide and oxide based) have been discussed.

  2. Piled tool will level subsea well template for Heidrun TLP

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    This paper reports on piled leveling tools that were contracted for use during the installation of the subsea well template for Conoco Norway Inc.'s Heidrun tension leg platform (TLP) in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The leveling tools are employed after a template has been positioned on the seafloor and anchor pilings have been driven through the template sleeves. One or more tools are lowered and landed on anchor pilings at the low side of the template. No diver support or guidelines are required.

  3. Nerves Regulate Cardiomyocyte Proliferation and Heart Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed I; O'Meara, Caitlin C; Gemberling, Matthew; Zhao, Long; Bryant, Donald M; Zheng, Ruimao; Gannon, Joseph B; Cai, Lei; Choi, Wen-Yee; Egnaczyk, Gregory F; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Poss, Kenneth D; Lee, Richard T

    2015-08-24

    Some organisms, such as adult zebrafish and newborn mice, have the capacity to regenerate heart tissue following injury. Unraveling the mechanisms of heart regeneration is fundamental to understanding why regeneration fails in adult humans. Numerous studies have revealed that nerves are crucial for organ regeneration, thus we aimed to determine whether nerves guide heart regeneration. Here, we show using transgenic zebrafish that inhibition of cardiac innervation leads to reduction of myocyte proliferation following injury. Specifically, pharmacological inhibition of cholinergic nerve function reduces cardiomyocyte proliferation in the injured hearts of both zebrafish and neonatal mice. Direct mechanical denervation impairs heart regeneration in neonatal mice, which was rescued by the administration of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and nerve growth factor (NGF) recombinant proteins. Transcriptional analysis of mechanically denervated hearts revealed a blunted inflammatory and immune response following injury. These findings demonstrate that nerve function is required for both zebrafish and mouse heart regeneration.

  4. Image Hashes as Templates for Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, Tadeusz; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Seifert, Allen; McDonald, Benjamin S.; White, Timothy A.

    2012-07-17

    Imaging systems can provide measurements that confidently assess characteristics of nuclear weapons and dismantled weapon components, and such assessment will be needed in future verification for arms control. Yet imaging is often viewed as too intrusive, raising concern about the ability to protect sensitive information. In particular, the prospect of using image-based templates for verifying the presence or absence of a warhead, or of the declared configuration of fissile material in storage, may be rejected out-of-hand as being too vulnerable to violation of information barrier (IB) principles. Development of a rigorous approach for generating and comparing reduced-information templates from images, and assessing the security, sensitivity, and robustness of verification using such templates, are needed to address these concerns. We discuss our efforts to develop such a rigorous approach based on a combination of image-feature extraction and encryption-utilizing hash functions to confirm proffered declarations, providing strong classified data security while maintaining high confidence for verification. The proposed work is focused on developing secure, robust, tamper-sensitive and automatic techniques that may enable the comparison of non-sensitive hashed image data outside an IB. It is rooted in research on so-called perceptual hash functions for image comparison, at the interface of signal/image processing, pattern recognition, cryptography, and information theory. Such perceptual or robust image hashing—which, strictly speaking, is not truly cryptographic hashing—has extensive application in content authentication and information retrieval, database search, and security assurance. Applying and extending the principles of perceptual hashing to imaging for arms control, we propose techniques that are sensitive to altering, forging and tampering of the imaged object yet robust and tolerant to content-preserving image distortions and noise. Ensuring that the

  5. Template-Directed Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Eun-Ah

    The physical and optical properties of the particles can be tuned by the rational design of nanoparticles (NPs)---the ability to select, in advance, desired particle geometry. In particular, template-directed synthesis can define the geometry of NPs with precise control over the size and shape of individual particles over a wide range of dimensions. This dissertation describes different approaches to create geometry-controlled particles. First, we generated multiscale Au NPs spanning multiple length scales (e.g. >100 nm dimensions, >10 nm thin shells/components, and >1 nm sharp features) with different aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 7.7 using Si templates. Three dimensional (3D) multiscale Au particles showed that increasing the length of the particles resulted in excitation of a longitudinal mode and two different transverse modes having different multipolar orders. The multipolar orders increased for both longitudinal and transverse modes as the aspect ratio increased. Finite-difference time-domain calculations revealed that the structural asymmetry of the 3D anisotropic particles resulted in two distinct transverse plasmon resonances. When the 3D structural change occurred at the ends of the multiscale particle, however, the optical response showed two resonances in the longitudinal direction and only a single resonance in the transverse direction. Second, we created arsenic trioxide (ATO) nanoparticles using nanowell templates. The different sizes of ATO nanocrystals were generated by controlling the concentration of the precursor materials while keeping the well volume the same. Selected area electron diffraction showed that the nanoparticles are single crystalline. Furthermore, the biological activity of ATO nanocrystals as anticancer drug was tested by investigating their cytotoxicity. We found that ATO nanocrystals have a modestly attenuated activity compared to free ATO. Finally, we synthesized Au nanospheres with size control and functionalized the

  6. Solvent-regenerated activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, H. )

    1988-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a University/Industry research project, sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Fluids Design Corporation. The research project studied the solvent regeneration of activated carbon. Activate carbon was used to remove trace organics from aqueous streams, then regenerated by desorbing the adsorbates with organic solvents. The project included a survey of the potential applications in New York State industries, fundamental research on the adsorption/desorption phenomena, and design of a full-scale process. The economics of the full-scale process were evaluated and compared to alternate available technologies. The result of this work is a versatile process with attractive economics. A wide range of adsorbates and solvents were found to be acceptable for this process. The design methodologies are developed and the techniques for evaluating a new application are delineated. 13 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  8. Regeneration of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Sook

    2008-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus results from inadequate mass of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by absolute loss of beta cells due to autoimmune-mediated destruction. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by relative deficiency of beta cells due to lack of compensation for insulin resistance. Restoration of deficient beta cell mass by transplantation from exogenous sources or by endogenous regeneration of insulin-producing cells would be therapeutic options. Mature beta cells have an ability to proliferate; however, it has been shown to be difficult to expand adult beta cells in vitro. Alternatively, regeneration of beta cells from embryonic and adult stem cells and pancreatic progenitor cells is an attractive method to restore islet cell mass. With information obtained from the biology of pancreatic development, direct differentiation of stem and progenitor cells toward a pancreatic beta cell phenotype has been tried using various strategies, including forced expression of beta cell-specific transcription factors. Further research is required to understand how endogenous beta cells differentiate and to develop methods to regenerate beta cells for clinically applicable therapies for diabetes.

  9. Genetic and epigenetic controls of plant regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Huang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved powerful regeneration abilities to recover from damage. Studies on plant regeneration are of high significance as the underlying mechanisms of plant regeneration are not only linking to the fundamental researches in many fields but also to the development of widely used plant biotechnology. Higher plants show three main types of regeneration: tissue regeneration, de novo organogenesis, and somatic embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent research on plant regeneration, mainly focusing on Arabidopsis thaliana and moss. New data suggest that plant hormones trigger regeneration and that several key transcription factors respond to hormone signals to determine cell-fate transition. Cell-fate transition requires genome-wide changes in gene expression, which are regulated via epigenetic pathways. Certain epigenetic factors may be recruited by transcription factors to relocate to new loci and regulate gene expression. Cross talk among hormone signaling, transcription factors, and epigenetic factors is involved in different types of plant regeneration, suggesting that elegant and complex regulatory mechanisms control which type of regeneration is triggered in plants under different circumstances. Since regeneration is initiated by wounding, identification of the wound signal is an important objective for future research.

  10. Business planning: a template for success.

    PubMed

    Dye, Judy

    2002-01-01

    Because managing a laboratory, or any health-care entity, is as much a business as a service, it is important for you to have a good grasp on how you can take opportunities from idea conception to implementation to assessment/revision. Regardless of the size of your proposed project, you need to consider a number of factors, among them: your history and what opportunities you can seize from your strengths and weaknesses; the overall business climate; anticipated costs; staff involvement; how you will market your project; and what measures to use to determine your success. Above all else, you need to set goals, both ultimate and intermediate, to instill focus, incentive, and a sense of achievement. The next time someone on your staff says, "Why don't we try that?," refer to this Template Topic. It can serve as a tool to help you determine whether you should try "that" and be the compass that helps guide your efforts.

  11. Virus Assemblies as Templates for Nanocircuits

    SciTech Connect

    James N Culver; Michael T Harris

    2011-08-31

    The goals of this project were directed at the identification and characterization of bio-mineralization processes and patterning methods for the development of nano scale materials and structures with novel energy and conductive traits. This project utilized a simple plant virus as a model template to investigate methods to attach and coat metals and other inorganic compounds onto biologically based nanotemplates. Accomplishments include: the development of robust biological nanotemplates with enhanced inorganic coating activities; novel coating strategies that allow for the deposition of a continuous inorganic layer onto a bio-nanotemplate even in the absence of a reducing agent; three-dimensional patterning methods for the assemble of nano-featured high aspect ratio surfaces and the demonstrated use of these surfaces in enhancing battery and energy storage applications. Combined results from this project have significantly advanced our understanding and ability to utilize the unique self-assembly properties of biologically based molecules to produce novel materials at the nanoscale level.

  12. Using archetypes for defining CDA templates.

    PubMed

    Moner, David; Moreno, Alberto; Maldonado, José A; Robles, Montserrat; Parra, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    While HL7 CDA is a widely adopted standard for the documentation of clinical information, the archetype approach proposed by CEN/ISO 13606 and openEHR is gaining recognition as a means of describing domain models and medical knowledge. This paper describes our efforts in combining both standards. Using archetypes as an alternative for defining CDA templates permit new possibilities all based on the formal nature of archetypes and their ability to merge into the same artifact medical knowledge and technical requirements for semantic interoperability of electronic health records. We describe the process followed for the normalization of existing legacy data in a hospital environment, from the importation of the HL7 CDA model into an archetype editor, the definition of CDA archetypes and the application of those archetypes to obtain normalized CDA data instances.

  13. Controlling template erosion with advanced cleaning methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, SherJang; Yu, Zhaoning; Wähler, Tobias; Kurataka, Nobuo; Gauzner, Gene; Wang, Hongying; Yang, Henry; Hsu, Yautzong; Lee, Kim; Kuo, David; Dress, Peter

    2012-03-01

    We studied the erosion and feature stability of fused silica patterns under different template cleaning conditions. The conventional SPM cleaning is compared with an advanced non-acid process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry optical critical dimension (SE-OCD) measurements were used to characterize the changes in pattern profile with good sensitivity. This study confirmed the erosion of the silica patterns in the traditional acid-based SPM cleaning mixture (H2SO4+H2O2) at a rate of ~0.1nm per cleaning cycle. The advanced non-acid clean process however only showed CD shift of ~0.01nm per clean. Contamination removal & pattern integrity of sensitive 20nm features under MegaSonic assisted cleaning is also demonstrated.

  14. Nanoporous alumina as templates for multifunctional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, C. T.; Leitao, D. C.; Proenca, M. P.; Ventura, J.; Pereira, A. M.; Araujo, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Due to its manufacturing and size tailoring ease, porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates are an elegant physical-chemical nanopatterning approach and an emergent alternative to more sophisticated and expensive methods currently used in nanofabrication. In this review, we will describe the ground work on the fabrication methods of PAA membranes and PAA-based nanostructures. We will present the specificities of the electrochemical growth processes of multifunctional nanomaterials with diversified shapes (e.g., nanowires and nanotubes), and the fabrication techniques used to grow ordered nanohole arrays. We will then focus on the fabrication, properties and applications of magnetic nanostructures grown on PAA and illustrate their dependence on internal (diameter, interpore distance, length, composition) and external (temperature and applied magnetic field intensity and direction) parameters. Finally, the most outstanding experimental findings on PAA-grown nanostructures and their trends for technological applications (sensors, energy harvesting, metamaterials, and biotechnology) will be addressed.

  15. Biologically Inspired Flagella-Templated Silica Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonjin

    The desire and need for various types of nanostructures have been met with challenges of feasibility, reproducibility, and long fabrication time. To work towards improved bottom-up methods of nanofabrication, bacterial flagella are particularly attractive bio-templates for nanotubes due to their tubular structures and small inner and outer diameters. In this work, flagella isolated from Salmonella typhimurium are used as bio-templates to fabricate silica mineralized nanotubes. The process involves as well-controlled hydrolysis and condensation reaction with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), followed by the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). By controlling the concentration of TEOS and the reaction time, a simple and precise method is developed for creating silica-mineralized flagella nanotubes (SMFNs) with various thicknesses of the silica layer. In addition, the SMFNs are further modified to multifunctional nanotubes by coating metal nanoparticles (NPs) or metal oxide NPs such as gold, palladium, and iron oxide. The metallized SMFNs are achieved through reactions including reductive metallization or oxidative hydrolysis. The results from these studies provide evidence for the complete coating of SMFNs with uniform metal NP sizes and high surface area coverage. The metallized SMFNs are found to be electrically conductive along their network structures. The current-voltage characteristics show remarkably improved electrical conductivities depending on the types of metal NPs loading and SMFN networks concentration. The biologically inspired SMFNs with metal loading will allow have controlled electrical properties that can lead to the potential of creating unique and precise nanoelectronic materials. Lastly, the randomly entangled SMFNs are characterized to demonstrate their capabilities for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface applications.

  16. Graphene Emerges as a Versatile Template for Materials Preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengjie; Wu, Sida; Lv, Wei; Shao, Jiao-Jing; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Graphene and its derivatives are emerging as a class of novel but versatile templates for the controlled preparation and functionalization of materials. In this paper a conceptual review on graphene-based templates is given, highlighting their versatile roles in materials preparation. Graphene is capable of acting as a low-dimensional hard template, where its two-dimensional morphology directs the formation of novel nanostructures. Graphene oxide and other functionalized graphenes are amphiphilic and may be seen as soft templates for formatting the growth or inducing the controlled assembly of nanostructures. In addition, nanospaces in restacked graphene can be used for confining the growth of sheet-like nanostructures, and assemblies of interlinked graphenes can behave either as skeletons for the formation of composite materials or as sacrificial templates for novel materials with a controlled network structure. In summary, flexible graphene and its derivatives together with an increasing number of assembled structures show great potentials as templates for materials production. Many challenges remain, for example precise structural control of such novel templates and the removal of the non-functional remaining templates.

  17. Transdisciplinary Pedagogical Templates and Their Potential for Adaptive Reuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobozy, Eva; Dalziel, James

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the use and usefulness of carefully designed transdisciplinary pedagogical templates (TPTs) aligned to different learning theories. The TPTs are based on the Learning Design Framework outlined in the Larnaca Declaration (Dalziel et al. in this collection). The generation of pedagogical plans or templates is not new. However,…

  18. DEXTRON TEMPLATED MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF POROUS TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An alternative route to the preparation and formation of porous titania powders and carbon coated titania using microwave radiation is described. Inexpensive dextrose was chosen as capping agent or template in view of its high water solubility when compared to other sugar templat...

  19. Non-enzymatic template-directed synthesis on RNA random copolymers - Poly(C, U) templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, G. F.; Inoue, T.; Orgel, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    Random copolymer templates containing cytosine and uracil in ratios of 3:1 and 1:1 are used to explore the optimum conditions for efficient synthesis of guanine and adenine-containing oligonucleotides. The experimental procedure is described, including the preparation of mononucleoside 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolides and random copolymers, the template-directed oligomerization, the removal and reintroduction of mononucleotides in interrupted reactions, the determination of oligomerization efficiency, the alkaline and enzymatic hydrolysis of reaction products, and the column chromatography. Results are presented and discussed for the dependence of adenine incorporation on the formation of short oligo(G)s, optimization of incorporation efficiencies by adjusting monomer concentrations, the characterization of oligomeric product distribution, and the regiospecificity of adenine incorporation. The prebiotic significance of the results is assessed.

  20. Assembly of synthetic Aβ miniamyloids on polyol templates

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sebastian Nils

    2015-01-01

    Summary Covalent dynamic chemistry is used to mimic the first steps of the highly cooperative fibril formation of Aβ peptides. For that purpose, Aβ peptide pentapeptide boronic acids 1 and 2 were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis and studied in esterification experiments with polyhydroxylated templates. The bis-hydroxylated dipeptide Hot=Tap serves as a template of adjustable degree of oligomerization which spontaneously forms boronic esters with peptides of type 1 and 2. Nuclear magnetic resonance can differentiate between regioisomeric boronic esters and identifies preferred sites of esterification on the dimeric template 9. 2-Formylphenylboronic acid (14) is used to link the parent pentapeptide Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-Ala to the template 16 to obtain threefold boronic ester 17. The miniamyloid 17 assembles from seven components by imine and boronic ester bonds between the peptides and the template. The relative orientation and spacing of the peptides mimic the assembly of peptides in Alzheimer β-amyloids. PMID:26734110

  1. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grubbs, Robert K [Albuquerque, NM; Bogart, Gregory R [Corrales, NM; Rogers, John A [Champaign, IL

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  2. DNA-templated nickel nanostructures and protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Hector A; Ludtke, Paul; Willardson, Barry M; Woolley, Adam T

    2006-11-21

    We report a straightforward method for the fabrication of DNA-templated nickel nanostructures on surfaces. These nickel nanomaterials have potential to be applied as nanowires, as templated catalyst lines, as nanoscale magnetic domains, or in directed protein localization. Indeed, we show here that histidine-tagged phosducin-like protein (His-PhLP) binds with high selectivity to both Ni2+-treated surface DNA and DNA-templated nickel metal to create linear protein assemblies on surfaces. The association of His-PhLP with DNA-templated nickel ions or metal is reversible under appropriate rinsing conditions. Nanoscale DNA-templated protein assemblies might be useful in the construction of high-density protein lines for proteomic analysis, for example. Importantly, these nanofabrication procedures are not limited to linear DNA and can be applied readily to other self-assembled DNA topologies.

  3. Assistant template and co-template agents in modeling mesoporous silicas and post-synthesizing organofunctionalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Vaeudo V.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Mesoporous SBA-16 silicas were synthesized through a direct methodology using the template (F127) combined with co-templates (ethanol and n-butanol), with tetraethylorthosilicate as the silica source. These ordered mesoporous silica were characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for 13C (CP/MAS) and 29Si (HP/DEC) nuclei, nitrogen sorption/desorption processes, small angle X-ray analyses (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SAXS and TEM results confirmed the space group Im3m and cubic 3D symmetry, typical for highly ordered SBA-16. The sorption/desorption data for SBA-16 and when functionalized gave type IV isotherms, with hysteresis loop H2. Surface areas of 836; 657 and 618 m2 g-1 and average pore diameters of 7.99; 8.10 and 9.85 nm, for SBA-16A, SBA-16B and SBA-16C were obtained, respectively. When functionalized the silicas presented a reduction in surface area, pore volume and pore diameter due to the pendant chains that interfere with nitrogen sorption in these measurements. The co-template ethanol favors the ordered mesopores with highest wall thicknesses.

  4. Automatic Offloading C++ Expression Templates to CUDA Enabled GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Joo, Balint; Watson, William A.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years, many scientific applications have been developed for powerful graphics processing units (GPUs) and have achieved remarkable speedups. This success can be partially attributed to high performance host callable GPU library routines that are offloaded to GPUs at runtime. These library routines are based on C/C++-like programming toolkits such as CUDA from NVIDIA and have the same calling signatures as their CPU counterparts. Recently, with the sufficient support of C++ templates from CUDA, the emergence of template libraries have enabled further advancement in code reusability and rapid software development for GPUs. However, Expression Templates (ET), which have been very popular for implementing data parallel scientific software for host CPUs because of their intuitive and mathematics-like syntax, have been underutilized by GPU development libraries. The lack of ET usage is caused by the difficulty of offloading expression templates from hosts to GPUs due to the inability to pass instantiated expressions to GPU kernels as well as the absence of the exact form of the expressions for the templates at the time of coding. This paper presents a general approach that enables automatic offloading of C++ expression templates to CUDA enabled GPUs by using the C++ metaprogramming technique and Just-In-Time (JIT) compilation methodology to generate and compile CUDA kernels for corresponding expression templates followed by executing the kernels with appropriate arguments. This approach allows developers to port applications to run on GPUs with virtually no code modifications. More specifically, this paper uses a large ET based data parallel physics library called QDP++ as an example to illustrate many aspects of the approach to offload expression templates automatically and to demonstrate very good speedups for typical QDP++ applications running on GPUs against running on CPUs using this method of offloading. In addition, this approach of automatic offlo

  5. Anterior regeneration in the hemichordate Ptychodera flava

    PubMed Central

    Rychel, Amanda L.; Swalla, Billie J.

    2008-01-01

    Ptychodera flava is a hemichordate whose anterior structures regenerate reproducibly from posterior trunk pieces when amputated. We characterized the cellular processes of anterior regeneration with respect to programmed cell death and cell proliferation, following wound healing. We found scattered proliferating cells at day two of regeneration using a PCNA antibody. On day four, most proliferating cells were associated with the nerve tract under the epidermis, and on day six, a small proboscis derived from proliferated cells was regenerated, and a mouth had broken though the epidermis. TUNEL detected elevated levels of apoptosis in the endoderm that began furthest away from the region of wound healing, then moved anteriorly over eight days. Posterior to anterior apoptosis is likely to remove digestive endoderm for later differentiation of pharyngeal endoderm. We hypothesize that P. flava regeneration is nerve dependent and that remodeling in the gut endoderm plays an important role in regeneration. PMID:18924231

  6. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  7. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Singh, Sachin K; Lakshmi, Mula G Meena; Meghah, Vuppalapaty; Bhatti, Bhawna; Swamy, Cherukuvada V Brahmendra; Sundaram, Curam S; Idris, Mohammed M

    2012-06-01

    The epimorphic regeneration of zebrafish caudal fin is rapid and complete. We have analyzed the biomechanism of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration at various time points based on differential proteomics approaches. The spectrum of proteome changes caused by regeneration were analyzed among controls (0 h) and 1, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postamputation involving quantitative differential proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and differential in-gel electrophoresis Orbitrap analysis. A total of 96 proteins were found differentially regulated between the control nonregenerating and regenerating tissues of different time points for having at least 1.5-fold changes. 90 proteins were identified as differentially regulated for regeneration based on differential in-gel electrophoresis analysis between the control and regenerating tissues. 35 proteins were characterized for its expression in all of the five regenerating time points against the control samples. The proteins identified and associated with regeneration were found to be directly allied with various molecular, biological, and cellular functions. Based on network pathway analysis, the identified proteome data set for regeneration was majorly associated in maintaining cellular structure and architecture. Also the proteins were found associated for the cytoskeleton remodeling pathway and cellular immune defense mechanism. The major proteins that were found differentially regulated during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration includes keratin and its 10 isoforms, cofilin 2, annexin a1, skeletal α1 actin, and structural proteins. Annexin A1 was found to be exclusively undergoing phosphorylation during regeneration. The obtained differential proteome and the direct association of the various proteins might lead to a new understanding of the regeneration mechanism.

  8. A quantitative metabolomics peek into planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Nivedita; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Rangiah, Kannan

    2015-05-21

    The fresh water planarian species Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging stem cell model because of its capability to regenerate a whole animal from a small piece of tissue. It is one of the best model systems to address the basic mechanisms essential for regeneration. Here, we are interested in studying the roles of various amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration, stem cell function and growth. We developed mass spectrometry based quantitative methods and validated the differential enrichment of 35 amines, 7 thiol metabolites and 4 nucleotides from both intact and regenerating planarians. Among the amines, alanine in sexual and asparagine in asexual are the highest (>1000 ng/mg) in the intact planarians. The levels of thiols such as cysteine and GSH are 651 and 1107 ng mg(-1) in planarians. Among the nucleotides, the level of cGMP is the lowest (0.03 ng mg(-1)) and the level of AMP is the highest (187 ng mg(-1)) in both of the planarian strains. We also noticed increasing levels of amines in both anterior and posterior regenerating planarians. The blastema from day 3 regenerating planarians also showed higher amounts of many amines. Interestingly, the thiol (cysteine and GSH) levels are well maintained during planarian regeneration. This suggests an inherent and effective mechanism to control induced oxidative stress because of the robust regeneration and stem cell proliferation. Like in intact planarians, the level of cGMP is also very low in regenerating planarians. Surprisingly, the levels of amines and thiols in head regenerating blastemas are ∼3 times higher compared to those for tail regenerating blastemas. Thus our results strongly indicate the potential roles of amines, thiols and nucleotides in planarian regeneration.

  9. Regeneration: the ultimate example of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Murawala, Prayag; Tanaka, Elly M; Currie, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    The outcome of wound repair in mammals is often characterized by fibrotic scaring. Vertebrates such as zebrafish, frogs, and salamanders not only heal scarlessly, but also can regenerate lost appendages. Decades of study on the process of animal regeneration has produced key insights into the mechanisms of how complex tissue is restored. By examining our current knowledge of regeneration, we can draw parallels with mammalian wound healing to identify the molecular determinants that produce such differing outcomes.

  10. Assistant template and co-template agents in modeling mesoporous silicas and post-synthesizing organofunctionalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Vaeudo V.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2012-12-15

    Mesoporous SBA-16 silicas were synthesized through a direct methodology using the template (F127) combined with co-templates (ethanol and n-butanol), with tetraethylorthosilicate as the silica source. These ordered mesoporous silica were characterized by elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance for {sup 13}C (CP/MAS) and {sup 29}Si (HP/DEC) nuclei, nitrogen sorption/desorption processes, small angle X-ray analyses (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SAXS and TEM results confirmed the space group Im3m and cubic 3D symmetry, typical for highly ordered SBA-16. The sorption/desorption data for SBA-16 and when functionalized gave type IV isotherms, with hysteresis loop H2. Surface areas of 836; 657 and 618 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and average pore diameters of 7.99; 8.10 and 9.85 nm, for SBA-16A, SBA-16B and SBA-16C were obtained, respectively. When functionalized the silicas presented a reduction in surface area, pore volume and pore diameter due to the pendant chains that interfere with nitrogen sorption in these measurements. The co-template ethanol favors the ordered mesopores with highest wall thicknesses. - Graphical Abstract: The mesoporous SBA-16 can be synthesized from binary (F127/TEOS) or ternary (F127/alcohol/TEOs) systems to give well-ordered mesoporous silicas. The co-templates ethanol or butanol gave the final material with highest wall thickness, mainly with ethanol. After these syntheses the pores were successfully organofunctionalized to give a good incorporation of the silylating agents. The final silicas presented of well-arranged solid characteristics as expressing by three distinct peaks, as indexed by the corresponding planes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Syntheses of mesoporous silicas by using ternary (F127/agent/TEOS) and binary (F127/TEOS) systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of co-templates to synthesize mesoporous silicas with larger wall thicknesses. Black

  11. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D.; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti‐angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551–559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium‐derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration. PMID:27499862

  12. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong; Muneoka, Ken

    2014-06-01

    The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti-angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551-559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium-derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration.

  13. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Millay, Douglas P; Sutherland, Lillian B; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-08-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts.

  14. Myomaker is essential for muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Millay, Douglas P.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of injured adult skeletal muscle involves fusion of activated satellite cells to form new myofibers. Myomaker is a muscle-specific membrane protein required for fusion of embryonic myoblasts, but its potential involvement in adult muscle regeneration has not been explored. We show that myogenic basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors induce myomaker expression in satellite cells during acute and chronic muscle regeneration. Moreover, genetic deletion of myomaker in adult satellite cells completely abolishes muscle regeneration, resulting in severe muscle destruction after injury. Myomaker is the only muscle-specific protein known to be absolutely essential for fusion of embryonic and adult myoblasts. PMID:25085416

  15. [Regeneration processes in various species of planarians].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Kreshchenko, N D; Netreba, M V

    2010-01-01

    Blastema growth and functional maturation of the pharynx during regeneration in various planarian species were compared. The intensity of blastema growth was highest in Polycelis tenuis; the lowest, in Schmidtea mediterranea. In the sexual and asexual races of Girardia tigrina blastema growth differed inconsiderably. The function of the pharynx during the regeneration of caudal fragments lacking pharynx was manifested in G. tigrina in the usual amount of time, while in the regeneration of head fragments lacking pharynx, this function occured earlier. In other planarian species of the other two typed, the times of pharynx regeneration had no regular character and took longer compared to the same process in G. tigrina.

  16. Templated repair of long bone defects in rats with bioactive spiral-wrapped electrospun amphiphilic polymer/hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kutikov, Artem B; Skelly, Jordan D; Ayers, David C; Song, Jie

    2015-03-04

    Effective repair of critical-size long bone defects presents a significant clinical challenge. Electrospun scaffolds can be exploited to deliver protein therapeutics and progenitor cells, but their standalone application for long bone repair has not been explored. We have previously shown that electrospun composites of amphiphilic poly(d,l-lactic acid)-co-poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PELA) and hydroxyapatite (HA) guide the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs), making these scaffolds uniquely suited for evaluating cell-based bone regeneration approaches. Here we examine whether the in vitro bioactivity of these electrospun scaffolds can be exploited for long bone defect repair, either through the participation of exogenous MSCs or through the activation of endogenous cells by a low dose of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). In critical-size rat femoral segmental defects, spiral-wrapped electrospun HA-PELA with preseeded MSCs resulted in laminated endochondral ossification templated by the scaffold across the longitudinal span of the defect. Using GFP labeling, we confirmed that the exogenous MSCs adhered to HA-PELA survived at least 7 days postimplantation, suggesting direct participation of these exogenous cells in templated bone formation. When loaded with 500 ng of rhBMP-2, HA-PELA spirals led to more robust but less clearly templated bone formation than MSC-bearing scaffolds. Both treatment groups resulted in new bone bridging over the majority of the defect by 12 weeks. This study is the first demonstration of a standalone bioactive electrospun scaffold for templated bone formation in critical-size long bone defects.

  17. [Regeneration of planarians: experimental object].

    PubMed

    Sheĭman, I M; Kreshchenko, I D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the expediency of using invertebrates, such as flatworms and planarians, as experimental objects. Free-living planarian flatworms (phylum Platyhelminthes, class Turbellaria) are invertebrate animals in which a bilateral symmetry appears for the first time in evolution and organs and tissues form. As the highest ecological link of the food chain--predators--these animals are characterized by a set of behavioral reactions controlled by a differentiated central nervous system. Planarians have unsurpassed ability to regenerate lost or damaged body parts. Owing to the ease of their breeding and their convenience for manipulations, these animals are used to study the influence of chemical and physical factors on the processes of life, growth, and reproduction. Currently, planarians are recognized as a model for biological research in the field of regeneration, stem cell biology, study of their proliferation and differentiation, as well as the regulatory mechanisms of morphogenetic processes. The genome of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea was fully sequenced, which opened up the opportunity to work with this object at the molecular biological level. Furthermore, planarians are used in neurobiological and toxicological studies, in studying the evolutionary aspects of centralization of the nervous system, mechanisms of muscle contraction, and in the development of new antiparasitic drugs. This review aims to demonstrate the relevance and diversity of research conducted on simple biological objects--planarians--to awider audience to show the historical continuity of these studies and their wide geographical distribution and to focus on the studies carried out in Russia, which, as a rule, are not included in the foreign reviews on planarian regeneration.

  18. Bone regeneration and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, K; Abdallah, B M; Applegate, L A; Baldini, N; Cenni, E; Gomez-Barrena, E; Granchi, D; Kassem, M; Konttinen, Y T; Mustafa, K; Pioletti, D P; Sillat, T; Finne-Wistrand, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This invited review covers research areas of central importance for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone tissue repair, including normal fracture healing and healing problems, biomaterial scaffolds for tissue engineering, mesenchymal and foetal stem cells, effects of sex steroids on mesenchymal stem cells, use of platelet-rich plasma for tissue repair, osteogenesis and its molecular markers. A variety of cells in addition to stem cells, as well as advances in materials science to meet specific requirements for bone and soft tissue regeneration by addition of bioactive molecules, are discussed. PMID:21129153

  19. Modulation of Gene Expression using Electrospun Scaffolds with Templated Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y-N; Sanders, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of biomimetic scaffolds is a critical component to fulfill the promise of functional tissue engineered materials. We describe herein a simple technique, based on printed circuit board manufacturing, to produce novel templates for electrospinning scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. This technique facilitates fabrication of electrospun scaffolds with templated architecture, which we defined as a scaffold's bulk mechanical properties being driven by its fiber architecture. Electrospun scaffolds with templated architectures were characterized with regard to fiber alignment and mechanical properties. Fast Fourier transform analysis revealed a high degree of fiber alignment along the conducting traces of the templates. Mechanical testing showed that scaffolds demonstrated tunable mechanical properties as a function of templated architecture. Fibroblast seeded scaffolds were subjected to a peak strain of 3% or 10% at 0.5 Hz for 1 hour. Exposing seeded scaffolds to the low strain magnitude (3%) significantly increased collagen I gene expression compared to the high strain magnitude (10%) in a scaffold architecture dependent manner. These experiments indicate that scaffolds with templated architectures can be produced and modulation of gene expression is possible with templated architectures. This technology holds promise for the long term goal of creating tissue engineered replacements with the biomechanical and biochemical make-up of native tissues. PMID:22447576

  20. Correlation-coefficient-based fast template matching through partial elimination.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Arif; Khan, Sohaib

    2012-04-01

    Partial computation elimination techniques are often used for fast template matching. At a particular search location, computations are prematurely terminated as soon as it is found that this location cannot compete with an already known best match location. Due to the nonmonotonic growth pattern of the correlation-based similarity measures, partial computation elimination techniques have been traditionally considered inapplicable to speed up these measures. In this paper, we show that partial elimination techniques may be applied to a correlation coefficient by using a monotonic formulation, and we propose basic-mode and extended-mode partial correlation elimination algorithms for fast template matching. The basic-mode algorithm is more efficient on small template sizes, whereas the extended mode is faster on medium and larger templates. We also propose a strategy to decide which algorithm to use for a given data set. To achieve a high speedup, elimination algorithms require an initial guess of the peak correlation value. We propose two initialization schemes including a coarse-to-fine scheme for larger templates and a two-stage technique for small- and medium-sized templates. Our proposed algorithms are exact, i.e., having exhaustive equivalent accuracy, and are compared with the existing fast techniques using real image data sets on a wide variety of template sizes. While the actual speedups are data dependent, in most cases, our proposed algorithms have been found to be significantly faster than the other algorithms.

  1. Multimodal biometric approach for cancelable face template generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Padma Polash; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Due to the rapid growth of biometric technology, template protection becomes crucial to secure integrity of the biometric security system and prevent unauthorized access. Cancelable biometrics is emerging as one of the best solutions to secure the biometric identification and verification system. We present a novel technique for robust cancelable template generation algorithm that takes advantage of the multimodal biometric using feature level fusion. Feature level fusion of different facial features is applied to generate the cancelable template. A proposed algorithm based on the multi-fold random projection and fuzzy communication scheme is used for this purpose. In cancelable template generation, one of the main difficulties is keeping interclass variance of the feature. We have found that interclass variations of the features that are lost during multi fold random projection can be recovered using fusion of different feature subsets and projecting in a new feature domain. Applying the multimodal technique in feature level, we enhance the interclass variability hence improving the performance of the system. We have tested the system for classifier fusion for different feature subset and different cancelable template fusion. Experiments have shown that cancelable template improves the performance of the biometric system compared with the original template.

  2. Template synthesis of gold nanotubes in an anodic alumina membrane.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Punit; Wharton, John E; Braide, Otonye; Martin, Charles R

    2004-07-01

    Nanotube-containing membranes prepared by the template method show promise for use as highly selective filters for membrane-based chemical and biological separations. Most of the work to date has been done on gold nanotubes prepared by electroless deposition of Au within the pores of polymeric filtration membranes. These polymeric filters have very low porosities (< 1%), and, as a result, the flux through Au nanotube membranes based on these templates is very low. In contrast, the other popular template membranes-anodic aluminas-have high porosities-30% to 50%. In spite of this potential advantage of anodic alumina templates, there have been no reports of electrolessly plated Au nanotubes within the pores of these templates. This is because the electroless plating method used to deposit Au nanotubes in polymeric templates does not work in aluminas. We have developed a modified electroless plating strategy that can be used to deposit high-quality Au nanotubes within the pores of the alumina templates. We describe this new plating method here.

  3. Recognition of related proteins by iterative template refinement (ITR).

    PubMed Central

    Yi, T. M.; Lander, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    Predicting the structural fold of a protein is an important and challenging problem. Available computer programs for determining whether a protein sequence is compatible with a known 3-dimensional structure fall into 2 categories: (1) structure-based methods, in which structural features such as local conformation and solvent accessibility are encoded in a template, and (2) sequence-based methods, in which aligned sequences of a set of related proteins are encoded in a template. In both cases, the programs use a static template based on a predetermined set of proteins. Here, we describe a computer-based method, called iterative template refinement (ITR), that uses templates combining structure-based and sequence-based information and employs an iterative search procedure to detect related proteins and sequentially add them to the templates. Starting from a single protein of known structure, ITR performs sequential cycles of database search to construct an expanding tree of templates with the aim of identifying subtle relationships among proteins. Evaluating the performance of ITR on 6 proteins, we found that the method automatically identified a variety of subtle structural similarities to other proteins. For example, the method identified structural similarity between arabinose-binding protein and phosphofructokinase, a relationship that has not been widely recognized. PMID:7987226

  4. Convex lens-induced nanoscale templating

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Daniel J.; Michaud, François; Mahshid, Sara; Ahamed, Mohammed Jalal; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason S.; Bérubé, Pierre; Sladek, Rob; Reisner, Walter; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new platform, convex lens-induced nanoscale templating (CLINT), for dynamic manipulation and trapping of single DNA molecules. In the CLINT technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a substrate containing embedded nanotopography, creating a nanoscale gap that can be adjusted during an experiment to confine molecules within the embedded nanostructures. Critically, CLINT has the capability of transforming a macroscale flow cell into a nanofluidic device without the need for permanent direct bonding, thus simplifying sample loading, providing greater accessibility of the surface for functionalization, and enabling dynamic manipulation of confinement during device operation. Moreover, as DNA molecules present in the gap are driven into the embedded topography from above, CLINT eliminates the need for the high pressures or electric fields required to load DNA into direct-bonded nanofluidic devices. To demonstrate the versatility of CLINT, we confine DNA to nanogroove and nanopit structures, demonstrating DNA nanochannel-based stretching, denaturation mapping, and partitioning/trapping of single molecules in multiple embedded cavities. In particular, using ionic strengths that are in line with typical biological buffers, we have successfully extended DNA in sub–30-nm nanochannels, achieving high stretching (90%) that is in good agreement with Odijk deflection theory, and we have mapped genomic features using denaturation analysis. PMID:25092333

  5. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  6. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  7. The pediatric template of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7-18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development.

  8. Supercoiling of the DNA Template during Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Leroy F.; Wang, James C.

    1987-10-01

    Transcription of a right-handed double-helical DNA requires a relative rotation of the RNA polymerase and its nascent RNA around the DNA. We describe conditions under which the resistance to the rotational motion of the transcription ensemble around the DNA can be large. In such cases, the advancing polymerase generates positive supercoils in the DNA template ahead of it and negative supercoils behind it. Mutual annihilation of the positively and negatively supercoiled regions may be prevented by anchoring points on the DNA to a large structure, or, in the case of an unanchored plasmid, by the presence of two oppositely oriented transcription units. In prokaryotes, DNA topoisomerase I preferentially removes negative supercoils and DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) removes positive ones. Our model thus provides an explanation for the experimentally observed high degree of negative or positive supercoiling of intracellular pBR322 DNA when DNA topoisomerase I or gyrase is respectively inhibited. We discuss the implications of our model in terms of supercoiling regulation, DNA conformational transitions, and gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  9. Robust structural identification via polyhedral template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler Larsen, Peter; Schmidt, Søren; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Successful scientific applications of large-scale molecular dynamics often rely on automated methods for identifying the local crystalline structure of condensed phases. Many existing methods for structural identification, such as common neighbour analysis, rely on interatomic distances (or thresholds thereof) to classify atomic structure. As a consequence they are sensitive to strain and thermal displacements, and preprocessing such as quenching or temporal averaging of the atomic positions is necessary to provide reliable identifications. We propose a new method, polyhedral template matching (PTM), which classifies structures according to the topology of the local atomic environment, without any ambiguity in the classification, and with greater reliability than e.g. common neighbour analysis in the presence of thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that the method can reliably be used to identify structures even in simulations near the melting point, and that it can identify the most common ordered alloy structures as well. In addition, the method makes it easy to identify the local lattice orientation in polycrystalline samples, and to calculate the local strain tensor. An implementation is made available under a Free and Open Source Software license.

  10. Software Template for Instruction in Mathematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.; Moebes, Travis A.; Beall, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Intelligent Math Tutor (IMT) is a software system that serves as a template for creating software for teaching mathematics. IMT can be easily connected to artificial-intelligence software and other analysis software through input and output of files. IMT provides an easy-to-use interface for generating courses that include tests that contain both multiple-choice and fill-in-the-blank questions, and enables tracking of test scores. IMT makes it easy to generate software for Web-based courses or to manufacture compact disks containing executable course software. IMT also can function as a Web-based application program, with features that run quickly on the Web, while retaining the intelligence of a high-level language application program with many graphics. IMT can be used to write application programs in text, graphics, and/or sound, so that the programs can be tailored to the needs of most handicapped persons. The course software generated by IMT follows a "back to basics" approach of teaching mathematics by inducing the student to apply creative mathematical techniques in the process of learning. Students are thereby made to discover mathematical fundamentals and thereby come to understand mathematics more deeply than they could through simple memorization.

  11. Ordered macroporous materials by emulsion templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, A.; Pine, D. J.

    1997-10-01

    Ordered macroporous materials with pore diameters comparable to optical wavelengths are predicted to have unique and highly useful optical properties such as photonic bandgaps and optical stop-bands. Tight control over the pore size distribution might also lead to improved macroporous materials (those with pores greater than approximately 50nm) for application as catalytic surfaces and supports, adsorbents, chromatographic materials, filters, light-weight structural materials, and thermal, acoustic and electrical insulators. Although methods exist for producing ordered porous materials with pore diameters less than 10nm (refs 10, 11), there is no general method for producing such materials with uniform pore sizes at larger length scales. Here we report a new method for producing highly monodisperse macroporous materials with pore sizes ranging from 50nm to several micrometres. Starting with an emulsion of equally sized droplets (produced through a repeated fractionation procedure), we form macroporous materials of titania, silica and zirconia by using the emulsion droplets as templates around which material is deposited through a sol-gel process. Subsequent drying and heat treatment yields solid materials with spherical pores left behind by the emulsion droplets. These pores are highly ordered, reflecting the self-assembly of the original monodisperse emulsion droplets into a nearly crystalline array. We show that the pore size can be accurately controlled, and that the technique should be applicable to a wide variety of metal oxides and even organic polymer gels.

  12. Template-based protein structure modeling using TASSER(VMT.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Template-based protein structure modeling is commonly used for protein structure prediction. Based on the observation that multiple template-based methods often perform better than single template-based methods, we further explore the use of a variable number of multiple templates for a given target in the latest variant of TASSER, TASSER(VMT) . We first develop an algorithm that improves the target-template alignment for a given template. The improved alignment, called the SP(3) alternative alignment, is generated by a parametric alignment method coupled with short TASSER refinement on models selected using knowledge-based scores. The refined top model is then structurally aligned to the template to produce the SP(3) alternative alignment. Templates identified using SP(3) threading are combined with the SP(3) alternative and HHEARCH alignments to provide target alignments to each template. These template models are then grouped into sets containing a variable number of template/alignment combinations. For each set, we run short TASSER simulations to build full-length models. Then, the models from all sets of templates are pooled, and the top 20-50 models selected using FTCOM ranking method. These models are then subjected to a single longer TASSER refinement run for final prediction. We benchmarked our method by comparison with our previously developed approach, pro-sp(3) -TASSER, on a set with 874 easy and 318 hard targets. The average GDT-TS score improvements for the first model are 3.5 and 4.3% for easy and hard targets, respectively. When tested on the 112 CASP9 targets, our method improves the average GDT-TS scores as compared to pro-sp3-TASSER by 8.2 and 9.3% for the 80 easy and 32 hard targets, respectively. It also shows slightly better results than the top ranked CASP9 Zhang-Server, QUARK and HHpredA methods. The program is available for download at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/.

  13. Translational Research Design Templates, Grid Computing, and HPC

    PubMed Central

    Saltz, Joel; Oster, Scott; Hastings, Shannon; Langella, Stephen; Ferreira, Renato; Permar, Justin; Sharma, Ashish; Ervin, David; Pan, Tony; Catalyurek, Umit; Kurc, Tahsin

    2011-01-01

    Design templates that involve discovery, analysis, and integration of information resources commonly occur in many scientific research projects. In this paper we present examples of design templates from the biomedical translational research domain and discuss the requirements imposed on Grid middleware infrastructures by them. Using caGrid, which is a Grid middleware system based on the model driven architecture (MDA) and the service oriented architecture (SOA) paradigms, as a starting point, we discuss architecture directions for MDA and SOA based systems like caGrid to support common design templates. PMID:21311740

  14. Age-specific MRI templates for pediatric neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Carmen E.; Richards, John E.; Almli, C. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study created a database of pediatric age-specific MRI brain templates for normalization and segmentation. Participants included children from 4.5 through 19.5 years, totaling 823 scans from 494 subjects. Open-source processing programs (FSL, SPM, ANTS) constructed head, brain and segmentation templates in 6 month intervals. The tissue classification (WM, GM, CSF) showed changes over age similar to previous reports. A volumetric analysis of age-related changes in WM and GM based on these templates showed expected increase/decrease pattern in GM and an increase in WM over the sampled ages. This database is available for use for neuroimaging studies (blindedforreview). PMID:22799759

  15. Drilling template acurately leveled with pile-supported system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on a drilling template for BP Exploration Inc.'s Pompano field set to within 0.015[degrees] of level in Viosca Knoll Block 989 offshore Louisiana. The 280-slot, 285-ton template was installed in 1,290 ft of water. The typical tolerance for a template setting is [plus minus]0.25[degrees] of level. This accuracy ensures that the docking piles will function properly when the jacket is installed and prevents problems with misalignment of drilling and tieback equipment.

  16. Regenerative endodontics: regeneration or repair?

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphane R J; Tomson, Phillip L; Berdal, Ariane

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology and translational research have made it possible to provide treatment modalities that protect the vital pulp, allow manipulation of reactionary and reparative dentinogenesis, and, more recently, permit revascularization of an infected root canal space. These approaches are referred to as regenerative procedures. The method currently used to determine the origin of the tissue secreted during the repair/regeneration process is largely based on the identification of cellular markers (usually proteins) left by cells that were responsible for this tissue production. The presence of these proteins in conjunction with other indicators of cellular behavior (especially biomineralization) and analysis of the structure of the newly generated tissue allow conclusions to be made of how it was formed. Thus far, it has not been possible to truly establish the biological mechanism controlling tertiary dentinogenesis. This article considers current therapeutic techniques to treat the dentin-pulp complex and contextualize them in terms of reparative and regenerative processes. Although it may be considered a semantic argument rather than a biological one, the definitions of regeneration and repair are explored to clarify our position in this era of regenerative endodontics.

  17. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  18. Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M.V.; Puleo, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to promote bone regeneration in the craniofacial region. Most of these interventions utilize implantable materials or devices. Infections resulting from colonization of these implants may result in local tissue destruction in a manner analogous to periodontitis. This destruction is mediated via the expression of various inflammatory mediators and tissue-destructive enzymes. Given the well-documented association among microbial biofilms, inflammatory mediators, and tissue destruction, it seems reasonable to assume that inflammation may interfere with bone healing and regeneration. Paradoxically, recent evidence also suggests that the presence of certain pro-inflammatory mediators is actually required for bone healing. Bone injury (e.g., subsequent to a fracture or surgical intervention) is followed by a choreographed cascade of events, some of which are dependent upon the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators. If inflammation resolves promptly, then proper bone healing may occur. However, if inflammation persists (which might occur in the presence of an infected implant or graft material), then the continued inflammatory response may result in suboptimal bone formation. Thus, the effect of a given mediator is dependent upon the temporal context in which it is expressed. Better understanding of this temporal sequence may be used to optimize regenerative outcomes. PMID:21248364

  19. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  20. Tissue engineering in urothelium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vaegler, Martin; Maurer, Sabine; Toomey, Patricia; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich

    2015-03-01

    The development of therapeutic treatments to regenerate urothelium, manufacture tissue equivalents or neourethras for in-vivo application is a significant challenge in the field of tissue engineering. Many studies have focused on urethral defects that, in most cases, inadequately address current therapies. This article reviews the primary tissue engineering strategies aimed at the clinical requirements for urothelium regeneration while concentrating on promising investigations in the use of grafts, cellular preparations, as well as seeded or unseeded natural and synthetic materials. Despite significant progress being made in the development of scaffolds and matrices, buccal mucosa transplants have not been replaced. Recently, graft tissues appear to have an advantage over the use of matrices. These therapies depend on cell isolation and propagation in vitro that require, not only substantial laboratory resources, but also subsequent surgical implant procedures. The choice of the correct cell source is crucial when determining an in-vivo application because of the risks of tissue changes and abnormalities that may result in donor site morbidity. Addressing an appropriately-designed animal model and relevant regulatory issues is of fundamental importance for the principal investigators when a therapy using cellular components has been developed for clinical use.

  1. Microwave Regenerable Air Purification Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Holtsnider, John T.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The feasibility of using microwave power to thermally regenerate sorbents loaded with water vapor, CO2, and organic contaminants has been rigorously demonstrated. Sorbents challenged with air containing 0.5% CO2, 300 ppm acetone, 50 ppm trichloroethylene, and saturated with water vapor have been regenerated, singly and in combination. Microwave transmission, reflection, and phase shift has also been determined for a variety of sorbents over the frequency range between 1.3-2.7 GHz. This innovative technology offers the potential for significant energy savings in comparison to current resistive heating methods because energy is absorbed directly by the material to be heated. Conductive, convective and radiative losses are minimized. Extremely rapid heating is also possible, i.e., 1400 C in less than 60 seconds. Microwave powered thermal desorption is directly applicable to the needs of Advance Life Support in general, and of EVA in particular. Additionally, the applicability of two specific commercial applications arising from this technology have been demonstrated: the recovery for re-use of acetone (and similar solvents) from industrial waste streams using a carbon based molecular sieve; and the separation and destruction of trichloroethylene using ZSM-5 synthetic zeolite catalyst, a predominant halocarbon environmental contaminant. Based upon these results, Phase II development is strongly recommended.

  2. Temporal regulation of planarian eye regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deochand, Michelle E.; Birkholz, Taylor R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While tissue regeneration is typically studied using standard injury models, in nature injuries vary greatly in the amount and location of tissues lost. Planarians have the unique ability to regenerate from many different injuries (including from tiny fragments with no brain), allowing us to study the effects of different injuries on regeneration timelines. We followed the timing of regeneration for one organ, the eye, after multiple injury types that involved tissue loss (single‐ and double‐eye ablation, and decapitation) in Schmidtea mediterranea. Our data reveal that the timing of regeneration remained constant despite changing injury parameters. Optic tissue regrowth, nerve re‐innervation, and functional recovery were similar between injury types (even when the animal was simultaneously regrowing its brain). Changes in metabolic rate (i.e., starving vs. fed regenerates) also had no effect on regeneration timelines. In addition, our data suggest there may exist a role for optic nerve degeneration following eye ablation. Our results suggest that the temporal regulation of planarian eye regeneration is tightly controlled and resistant to variations in injury type. PMID:27800171

  3. Scaffolds in vascular regeneration: current status

    PubMed Central

    Thottappillil, Neelima; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    An ideal vascular substitute, especially in <6 mm diameter applications, is a major clinical essentiality in blood vessel replacement surgery. Blood vessels are structurally complex and functionally dynamic tissue, with minimal regeneration potential. These have composite extracellular matrix (ECM) and arrangement. The interplay between ECM components and tissue specific cells gives blood vessels their specialized functional attributes. The core of vascular tissue engineering and regeneration relies on the challenges in creating vascular conduits that match native vessels and adequately regenerate in vivo. Out of numerous vascular regeneration concerns, the relevance of ECM emphasizes much attention toward appropriate choice of scaffold material and further scaffold development strategies. The review is intended to be focused on the various approaches of scaffold materials currently in use in vascular regeneration and current state of the art. Scaffold of choice in vascular tissue engineering ranges from natural to synthetic, decellularized, and even scaffold free approach. The applicability of tubular scaffold for in vivo vascular regeneration is under active investigation. A patent conduit with an ample endothelial luminal layer that can regenerate in vivo remains an unanswered query in the field of small diameter vascular tissue engineering. Besides, scaffolds developed for vascular regeneration, should aim at providing functional substitutes for use in a regenerative approach from the laboratory bench to patient bedside. PMID:25632236

  4. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  5. Tityus: a forgotten myth of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tiniakos, Dina G; Kandilis, Apostolos; Geller, Stephen A

    2010-08-01

    The ancient Greek myth of Tityus is related to liver regeneration in the same way as the well known myth of Prometheus is. Depictions of the punishment of Prometheus are frequently used by lecturers on liver regeneration; however, Tityus remains unknown despite the fact that he received the same punishment and his myth could also be used as a paradigm for the organ's extraordinary ability to regenerate. Nevertheless, there is no convincing evidence that ancient Greeks had any specific knowledge about liver regeneration, a concept introduced in the early 19th century. We describe and analyze the myth of Tityus and compare it to the myth of Prometheus. We also explore artistic and literary links and summarize recent scientific data on the mechanisms of liver regeneration. Finally, we highlight links of the legend of Tityus with other sciences.

  6. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  7. Current Bioengineering Methods for Whole Kidney Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Kidney regeneration is likely to provide an inexhaustible source of tissues and organs for immunosuppression-free transplantation. It is currently garnering considerable attention and might replace kidney dialysis as the ultimate therapeutic strategy for renal failure. However, anatomical complications make kidney regeneration difficult. Here, we review recent advances in the field of kidney regeneration, including (i) the directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells/embryonic stem cells into kidney cells; (ii) blastocyst decomplementation; (iii) use of a decellularized cadaveric scaffold; (iv) embryonic organ transplantation; and (v) use of a nephrogenic niche for growing xenoembryos for de novo kidney regeneration from stem cells. All these approaches represent potentially promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Although many obstacles to kidney regeneration remain, we hope that innovative strategies and reliable research will ultimately allow the restoration of renal function in patients with end-stage kidney disease. PMID:26089921

  8. Ordered Nanomaterials Thin Films via Supported Anodized Alumina Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Souni, Mohammed; Habouti, Salah

    2014-10-01

    Supported anodized alumina template films with highly ordered porosity are best suited for fabricating large area ordered nanostructures with tunable dimensions and aspect ratios. In this paper we first discuss important issues for the generation of such templates, including required properties of the Al/Ti/Au/Ti thin film heterostructure on a substrate for high quality templates. We then show examples of anisotropic nanostructure films consisting of noble metals using these templates, discuss briefly their optical properties and their applications to molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Finally we briefly address the possibility to make nanocomposite films, exemplary shown on a plasmonic-thermochromic nanocomposite of VO2-capped Au-nanorods.

  9. Particulate templates and ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kwek, Jin W; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Chan, Derek Y C

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the properties of latex particle templates required to optimize the development of ordered liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography. These networks are key precursors in the assembly of solutions of conducting nanoparticles into large, optically transparent, and conducting microwire networks on substrates (Vakarelski, I. U.; Chan, D. Y. C.; Nonoguchi, T.; Shinto, H.; Higashitani, K. Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 058303). An appropriate combination of heat treatment and oxygen plasma etching of a close-packed latex particle monolayer is shown to create open-spaced particle templates which facilitates the formation of ordered fully connected liquid bridge networks that are critical to the formation of ordered microwire networks. Similar results can also be achieved if non-close-packed latex particle templates with square or honeycomb geometries are used. The present results have important implications for the development of the particulate templates to control the morphology of functional microwire networks by evaporative lithography.

  10. Public Notification - RTCR Failure To Perform Level 1 Assessment Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    When a PWS fails to perform a required Level 1 Assessment, it must issue a public notice to inform the consumers of its water of that failure. You can use this template as a guide to prepare that public notice.

  11. Structural basis of template-boundary definition in Tetrahymena telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Linnea I; Akiyama, Ben M; Ooms, Alexandra; Lu, Cheng; Rubin, Seth M; Stone, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Telomerase is required to maintain repetitive G-rich telomeric DNA sequences at chromosome ends. To do so, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) subunit reiteratively uses a small region of the integral telomerase RNA (TER) as a template. An essential feature of telomerase catalysis is the strict definition of the template boundary to determine the precise TER nucleotides to be reverse transcribed by TERT. We report the 3-Å crystal structure of the Tetrahymena TERT RNA-binding domain (tTRBD) bound to the template boundary element (TBE) of TER. tTRBD is wedged into the base of the TBE RNA stem-loop, and each of the flanking RNA strands wraps around opposite sides of the protein domain. The structure illustrates how the tTRBD establishes the template boundary by positioning the TBE at the correct distance from the TERT active site to prohibit copying of nontemplate nucleotides.

  12. Non-Enzymatic Template-Directed Recombination of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nechaev, Sergey Y.; Lutay, Alexei V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA non-enzymatic recombination reactions are of great interest within the hypothesis of the “RNA world”, which argues that at some stage of prebiotic life development proteins were not yet engaged in biochemical reactions and RNA carried out both the information storage task and the full range of catalytic roles necessary in primitive self-replicating systems. Here we report on the study of recombination reaction occuring between two 96 nucleotides (nts) fragments of RNAs under physiological conditions and governed by a short oligodeoxyribonucleotide template, partially complementary to sequences within each of the RNAs. Analysis of recombination products shows that ligation is predominantly template-directed, and occurs within the complementary complex with the template in “butt-to-butt” manner, in 1- or 3- nts bulges or in 2–3 nts internal loops. Minor recombination products formed in the template-independent manner are detected as well. PMID:19468339

  13. Fumigant Management Plan Templates - Phase 2 Files Listed by Chemical

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FMP templates are in PDF and Word formats for each type of soil fumigant pesticide, with samples of filled out plans. Types are by active ingredient chemical: Chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  14. Methyl Bromide Fumigant Management Plan Phase 2 Templates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Templates provide a checklist and framework for elements including certified pesticide applicator details, application block, buffer zones, sign posting, tarp plan, soil conditions, air monitoring, and good agricultural practices (GAPs).

  15. Template based illumination compensation algorithm for multiview video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lianlian; Ma, Siwei; Zhao, Debin; Gao, Wen

    2010-07-01

    Recently multiview video coding (MVC) standard has been finalized as an extension of H.264/AVC by Joint Video Team (JVT). In the project Joint Multiview Video Model (JMVM) for the standardization, illumination compensation (IC) is adopted as a useful tool. In this paper, a novel illumination compensation algorithm based on template is proposed. The basic idea of the algorithm is that the illumination of the current block has a strong correlation with its adjacent template. Based on this idea, firstly a template based illumination compensation method is presented, and then a template models selection strategy is devised to improve the illumination compensation performance. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the coding efficiency significantly.

  16. Multiple nanostructures based on anodized aluminium oxide templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liaoyong; Xu, Rui; Mi, Yan; Lei, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Several physico-chemical effects and properties in the solid state involve nanoscale interactions between adjacent materials and morphologies. Arrays of binary nanostructures can generate intimate interactions between different sub-components, but fabricating binary nanostructures is challenging. Here, we propose a concept to achieve diverse binary nanostructure arrays with high degrees of controllability for each of the sub-components, including material, dimension and morphology. This binary nanostructuring concept originates with a distinctive binary-pore anodized aluminium oxide template that includes two dissimilar sets of pores in one matrix, where the openings of the two sets of pores are towards opposite sides of the template. Using the same growth mechanism, the binary-pore template can be extended to multi-pore templates with more geometrical options. We also present photoelectrodes, transistors and plasmonic devices made with our binary nanostructure arrays using different combination of materials and morphologies, and demonstrate superior performances compared to their single-component counterparts.

  17. Using bacterial cell growth to template catalytic asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Kaehr, Bryan; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2010-08-07

    We report an approach to position gold nanoparticle catalysts for metal reduction asymmetrically on a biological template (E. coli) by exploiting the polarity of the bacterial cell envelope undergoing growth and division.

  18. Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS) Fumigant Management Plan Template Phase 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These templates provide a framework for developing your FMP, including sections on your supervising pesticide applicator, buffer zones, emergency response plan, handler information, tarp plan, soil conditions, signage, and air monitoring plan.

  19. Ground Water Rule - Boil Water Advisory - Public Notification Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ground Water Rule - Boil Water Advisory - Public Notification Template can be use to issue a Tier 1 Public Notification when it has been determined that source ground water is contaminated with E. Coli bacteria.

  20. GPP Webinar: Solar Procurement Templates and Tools for Higher Education

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Green Power Partnership webinar on solar procurement for Higher Education which features various tools and templates that schools can use to shape and manage the solar procurement process to a successful outcome.

  1. Dental rehabilitation of amelogenesis imperfecta using thermoformed templates.

    PubMed

    Sockalingam, Snmp

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta represents a group of dental developmental conditions that are genomic in origin. Hypoplastic AI, hypomineralised AI or both in combination were the most common types seen clinically. This paper describes oral rehabilitation of a 9-year-old Malay girl with inherited hypoplastic AI using transparent thermoforming templates. The defective surface areas were reconstructed to their original dimensions on stone cast models of the upper and lower arches using composite, and transparent thermoform templates were fabricated on the models. The templates were used as crown formers to reconstruct the defective teeth clinically using esthetically matching composite. The usage of the templates allowed direct light curing of the composite, accurate reproducibility of the anatomic contours of the defective teeth, reduced chair-side time and easy contouring and placement of homogenous thickness of composite in otherwise inaccessible sites of the affected teeth.

  2. Incorporating User Input in Template-Based Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Camille; Beggs, Dale; Younes, Laurent; Jain, Sanjay K; Jedynak, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and elegant method to incorporate user input in a template-based segmentation method for diseased organs. The user provides a partial segmentation of the organ of interest, which is used to guide the template towards its target. The user also highlights some elements of the background that should be excluded from the final segmentation. We derive by likelihood maximization a registration algorithm from a simple statistical image model in which the user labels are modeled as Bernoulli random variables. The resulting registration algorithm minimizes the sum of square differences between the binary template and the user labels, while preventing the template from shrinking, and penalizing for the inclusion of background elements into the final segmentation. We assess the performance of the proposed algorithm on synthetic images in which the amount of user annotation is controlled. We demonstrate our algorithm on the segmentation of the lungs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected mice from μCT images.

  3. Template effects and supramolecular control of photoreactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Bibal, Brigitte; Mongin, Cédric; Bassani, Dario M

    2014-06-21

    A review of supramolecular and template effects on photochemical reactions in solution is presented. Photoinduced [2+2] and [4+4] cycloaddition reactions, isomerization, electron transfer and radical processes are covered, as well as examples of DNA photoligation.

  4. Template Matching Approach to Signal Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; Kulikov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to signal prediction and prognostic assessment of spacecraft health resolves an inherent difficulty in fusing sensor data with simulated data. This technique builds upon previous work that demonstrated the importance of physics-based transient models to accurate prediction of signal dynamics and system performance. While models can greatly improve predictive accuracy, they are difficult to apply in general because of variations in model type, accuracy, or intended purpose. However, virtually any flight project will have at least some modeling capability at its disposal, whether a full-blown simulation, partial physics models, dynamic look-up tables, a brassboard analogue system, or simple hand-driven calculation by a team of experts. Many models can be used to develop a predict, or an estimate of the next day s or next cycle s behavior, which is typically used for planning purposes. The fidelity of a predict varies from one project to another, depending on the complexity of the simulation (i.e. linearized or full differential equations) and the level of detail in anticipated system operation, but typically any predict cannot be adapted to changing conditions or adjusted spacecraft command execution. Applying a predict blindly, without adapting the predict to current conditions, produces mixed results at best, primarily due to mismatches between assumed execution of spacecraft activities and actual times of execution. This results in the predict becoming useless during periods of complicated behavior, exactly when the predict would be most valuable. Each spacecraft operation tends to show up as a transient in the data, and if the transients are misaligned, using the predict can actually harm forecasting performance. To address this problem, the approach here expresses the predict in terms of a baseline function superposed with one or more transient functions. These transients serve as signal templates, which can be relocated in time and space against

  5. Multilayered Short Peptide-Alginate Blends as New Materials for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Grant A; Romanelli, Steven M; Brown, Alexandra M; Sortino, Rachel M; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide based nanomaterials have been gaining increased prominence due to their ability to form permeable scaffolds that promote growth and regeneration of new tissue. In this work for the first time a short hexapeptide motif VQIVYK, derived from the Tau protein family was conjugated with an organic polyamine linker, putrescine and utilized as a template for developing new materials for cartilage tissue regeneration. Our results showed that the conjugate formed extensive nanofibrous assemblies upon self-assembly under aqueous conditions. We then employed the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach to design the scaffold by first incorporating a short segment of the dentin sialophosphoprotein motif GDASYNSDESK followed by integration with the peptide sequence GSGAGAGSGAGAGSGAGA. This sequence mimics Ala, Gly, Ser repeats seen in the spider silk protein. We then incorporated the polysaccharide alginate which served as a hydrogel. To further enhance binding interactions with chondrocytes, and promote the formation of cartilage in vitro, the bionanocomposites were then attached to the chondrocyte binding peptide sequence HDSQLEALIKFM. The thermal properties as well as biodegradability of the scaffold was examined. To confirm biocompatibility, we examined cell viability, attachment and morphology in the presence of bovine chondrocytes. The cells were found to efficiently adhere to the scaffolds which formed an intricate mesh mimicking the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. To evaluate if differentiation occurred in the presence of the scaffolds, we examined in vitro deposition of proteoglycans. Thus, we have developed a new family of nanoscale scaffolds that may be utilized for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  6. Automatic boundary modification of warped basal ganglia template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Enmin; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Ezekiel, Frank; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-07-01

    Accurate segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the brain is of increasing interest in the study of many brain disorders. This paper reports our approach to obtain the segmentation by warping our segmented template to a target and then automatically modifying the boundary of each structure. Test results show that our approach can increase the overlap between the warped template of the lenticular nucleus and the manually delineated lenticular nucleus by 10% compared the approach with only warping. 17

  7. A Template Engine for Parsing Objects from Textual Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajković, Milan; Stanković, Milena; Marković, Ivica

    2011-09-01

    Template engines are widely used for separation of business and presentation logic. They are commonly used in web applications for clean rendering of HTML pages. Another area of usage is message formatting in distributed applications where they transform objects to appropriate representations. This paper explores the possibility of using templates for a reverse process—for creating objects starting from their representations. We present the prototype of engine that we have developed, and describe benefits and drawbacks of this approach.

  8. Templating as a Chain of Custody Tool for Arms Control

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Jacob M.; Tanner, Jennifer E.; Duckworth, Leesa L.

    2013-06-01

    Historically, templates have been considered for use as a treaty accountable item (TAI) authentication tool, alongside item attributes. Because of this, the use of templates has fallen by the wayside due to the perceived intrusiveness of and handling/storage of template data; especially when compared to the negotiability of unclassified attribute threshold values. However, as a chain of custody tool, templates potentially have a large and important role to play in maintaining confidence in the authenticity of the treaty accountable items as they progress through an arms control regime. In general terms, templating is the process of creating a unique, measurable, and repeatable signature which is representative of the TAI. At any point in time, the signature can be re-measured or re-inspected to verify the signature has not changed. Chain of custody is the process by which a controlled boundary is established and maintained around a TAI to both deter and detect unauthorized access to the item. Typically, this is accomplished by putting a tamper indicating device (TID) on the item or container. The TID now acts as a surrogate for the item itself, and is continually checked to ensure the unique identifier and tamper indicating mechanisms have not changed since last inspection. This in and of itself is a form of templating. A stronger template is one that utilizes a signature of the combined item and container. There are many potential signatures which may be exploited, including radiation-, electromagnetic-, and acoustic-based signatures. This paper/presentation will explore the technology and mechanisms in which templating can be applied to create a more robust chain of custody over treaty accountable items as part of a future arms control regime.

  9. Silver nanowires-templated metal oxide for broadband Schottky photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs)-templated transparent metal oxide layer was applied for Si Schottky junction device, which remarked the record fastest photoresponse of 3.4 μs. Self-operating AgNWs-templated Schottky photodetector showed broad wavelength photodetection with high responsivity (42.4 A W-1) and detectivity (2.75 × 1015 Jones). AgNWs-templated indium-tin-oxide (ITO) showed band-to-band excitation due to the internal photoemission, resulting in significant carrier collection performances. Functional metal oxide layer was formed by AgNWs-templated from ITO structure. The grown ITO above AgNWs has a cylindrical shape and acts as a thermal protector of AgNWs for high temperature environment without any deformation. We developed thermal stable AgNWs-templated transparent oxide devices and demonstrated the working mechanism of AgNWs-templated Schottky devices. We may propose the high potential of hybrid transparent layer design for various photoelectric applications, including solar cells.

  10. Template-assisted generation of nanocavities within plasma polymer films.

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Krasimir; Casanal, Ana; Challougui, Hela; Griesser, Hans J

    2009-05-21

    The generation of nanosized cavities within thin film layers is of interest for a number of fundamental and applied reasons. One challenge is to make such systems sufficiently robust mechanically. Plasma polymer (pp) films possess excellent mechanical stability if deposition conditions are selected such as to achieve a sufficient density of cross-linking and resistance to extraction of polymeric material by solvents. In this study, gold nanoparticles of 15 and 70 nm diameter were used as sacrificial templates to generate nanocavities in pp films of various thickness values in the tens of nanometers range. A first pp layer was deposited onto substrates using n-heptylamine (HA) to a thickness of 20 nm. Carboxy-thiolated gold nanoparticles were electrostatically bound onto the surface amine groups of the n-heptylamine plasma polymer (HApp) layer. A second HApp layer was then coated to various thicknesses onto the nanoparticle/HApp surface. The template particles embedded thus in-between the two HApp layers were then dissolved using aqueous KCN solution; monitoring of the plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles enabled verification of template stripping and measurement of the kinetics of stripping. AFM topography images showed little change on extraction of the template nanoparticles, indicating that the plasma polymer layer maintained structural integrity upon template extraction and subsequent drying, and thereby prevented collapse of the empty nanocavities. The concept of template stripping to generate controlled size free volume in thin plasma polymer layers is thus shown to produce robust structures.

  11. Template-directed synthesis of oligonucleotides under eutectic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stribling, R.; Miller, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important sets of model prebiotic experiments consists of reactions that synthesize complementary oligonucleotides from preformed templates under nonenzymatic conditions. Most of these experiments are conducted at 4 degrees C using 0.01-0.1 M concentrations of activated nucleotide monomer and template (monomer equivalent). In an attempt to extend the conditions under which this type of reaction can occur, we have concentrated the reactants by freezing at -18 degrees C, which is close to the NaCl-H2O eutectic at -21 degrees C. The results from this set of experiments suggest that successful syntheses can occur with poly(C) concentrations as low at 5 x 10(-4) M and 2MeImpG concentrations at 10(-3) M. It was also anticipated that this mechanism might allow the previously unsuccessful poly(A)-directed synthesis of oligo(U)s to occur. However, no template effect was seen with the poly(A) and ImpU system. The failure of these conditions to allow template-directed synthesis of oligo(U)s supports the previously proposed idea that pyrimidines may not have been part of the earliest genetic material. Because of the low concentrations of monomer and template that would be expected from prebiotic syntheses, this lower temperature could be considered a more plausible geologic setting for template-directed synthesis than the standard reaction conditions.

  12. Protein function prediction using local 3D templates.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Watson, James D; Thornton, Janet M

    2005-08-19

    The prediction of a protein's function from its 3D structure is becoming more and more important as the worldwide structural genomics initiatives gather pace and continue to solve 3D structures, many of which are of proteins of unknown function. Here, we present a methodology for predicting function from structure that shows great promise. It is based on 3D templates that are defined as specific 3D conformations of small numbers of residues. We use four types of template, covering enzyme active sites, ligand-binding residues, DNA-binding residues and reverse templates. The latter are templates generated from the target structure itself and scanned against a representative subset of all known protein structures. Together, the templates provide a fairly thorough coverage of the known structures and ensure that if there is a match to a known structure it is unlikely to be missed. A new scoring scheme provides a highly sensitive means of discriminating between true positive and false positive template matches. In all, the methodology provides a powerful new tool for function prediction to complement those already in use.

  13. The Affordance Template ROS Package for Robot Task Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Stephen; Dinh, Paul; Hambuchen, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Affordance Template ROS package for quickly programming, adjusting, and executing robot applications in the ROS RViz environment. This package extends the capabilities of RViz interactive markers by allowing an operator to specify multiple end-effector waypoint locations and grasp poses in object-centric coordinate frames and to adjust these waypoints in order to meet the run-time demands of the task (specifically, object scale and location). The Affordance Template package stores task specifications in a robot-agnostic XML description format such that it is trivial to apply a template to a new robot. As such, the Affordance Template package provides a robot-generic ROS tool appropriate for building semi-autonomous, manipulation-based applications. Affordance Templates were developed by the NASA-JSC DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) team and have since successfully been deployed on multiple platforms including the NASA Valkyrie and Robonaut 2 humanoids, the University of Texas Dreamer robot and the Willow Garage PR2. In this paper, the specification and implementation of the affordance template package is introduced and demonstrated through examples for wheel (valve) turning, pick-and-place, and drill grasping, evincing its utility and flexibility for a wide variety of robot applications.

  14. Regenerator for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lewakowski, John J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

  15. RTF glovebox stripper regeneration development

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, A.K.

    1992-10-31

    Currently, the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) glovebox stripper system consists of a catalytic oxidation front end where trace tritium which may escape from the primary tritium process into the glovebox nitrogen system is oxidized to tritiated water. The tritiated water, along with normal water which may leak into the glovebox from the surrounding atmosphere, is then captured on a zeolite bed. Eventually, the zeolite bed becomes saturated with water and must be regenerated to remain effective as a stripper. This is accomplished by heating the zeolite and evolving the trapped water which is then passed over an elevated temperature uranium bed. A waste minimization program was instituted to address this issue. The program has two parallel paths. One path investigates replacing the entire glovebox stripper system with a system of getters to scavenge trace tritium. This report concentrates on the second path, retaining the catalytic oxidation front end but replacing the uranium bed water cracking with alternative technologies.

  16. Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigehito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urodele amphibians, such as newts, can regenerate a functional limb, including joints, after amputation at any level along the proximal−distal axis of the limb. The blastema can regenerate the limb morphology largely independently of the stump after proximal−distal identity has been established, but the remaining and regenerated tissues must be structurally reintegrated (matched in size and shape). Here we used newt joint regeneration as a model to investigate reintegration, because a functionally interlocking joint requires structural integration between its opposing skeletal elements. After forelimbs were amputated at the elbow joint, the joint was regenerated between the remaining and regenerated skeletal elements. The regenerated cartilage was thick around the amputated joint to make a reciprocally interlocking joint structure with the remaining bone. Furthermore, during regeneration, the extracellular matrix of the remaining tissues was lost, suggesting that the remaining tissues might contribute to the morphogenesis of regenerating cartilage. Our results showed that the area of the regenerated cartilage matched the area of the apposed remaining cartilage, thus contributing to formation of a functional structure. PMID:27499865

  17. Reintegration of the regenerated and the remaining tissues during joint regeneration in the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rio; Inoue, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigehito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-02-01

    Urodele amphibians, such as newts, can regenerate a functional limb, including joints, after amputation at any level along the proximal-distal axis of the limb. The blastema can regenerate the limb morphology largely independently of the stump after proximal-distal identity has been established, but the remaining and regenerated tissues must be structurally reintegrated (matched in size and shape). Here we used newt joint regeneration as a model to investigate reintegration, because a functionally interlocking joint requires structural integration between its opposing skeletal elements. After forelimbs were amputated at the elbow joint, the joint was regenerated between the remaining and regenerated skeletal elements. The regenerated cartilage was thick around the amputated joint to make a reciprocally interlocking joint structure with the remaining bone. Furthermore, during regeneration, the extracellular matrix of the remaining tissues was lost, suggesting that the remaining tissues might contribute to the morphogenesis of regenerating cartilage. Our results showed that the area of the regenerated cartilage matched the area of the apposed remaining cartilage, thus contributing to formation of a functional structure.

  18. Weak Evidence of Regeneration Habitat but Strong Evidence of Regeneration Niche for a Leguminous Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Delerue, Florian; Gonzalez, Maya; Michalet, Richard; Pellerin, Sylvain; Augusto, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an ecological niche specific to the regeneration phase has mobilised significant attention. However, the importance of the regeneration niche concept remains unclear. Our main objective was to study the existence of such a regeneration niche for a leguminous shrub, Ulex europaeus. This study was carried out in southwest France in the context of water and nutrient stresses (mainly phosphorus limitation) due to the presence of nutrient-poor sandy soils. We analysed the regeneration of the species from the germination of seeds and emergence of new seedlings until the seedlings reached young shrub size. Our design included a P fertilisation treatment. We also investigated microsite characteristics (micro-topography and vegetation development) as they can interact with meteorological conditions and determine water availability for seeds and seedlings. We found that P availability controlled seedling growth and the time necessary to reach young shrub size. Water availability appeared to impact the species germination and seedlings survival. We also found that P and water availability depended on the interactions between microsite characteristics and climatic variations. Finally we found evidence that P and water availability are important ecological factors shaping the regeneration niche of the species, but we found weak evidence that any microsite would be appropriate for the regeneration of the species in the long term. Future studies regarding regeneration niches need to distinguish more clearly the ecological factors important for regeneration (the regeneration niche per se) and the physical world where the seedlings appear and develop (the regeneration habitat). PMID:26098877

  19. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    PubMed

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material.

  20. Epoxyeicosanoids promote organ and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, Dipak; Kalish, Brian T; Huang, Sui; Bielenberg, Diane R; Le, Hau D; Yang, Jun; Edin, Matthew L; Lee, Craig R; Benny, Ofra; Mudge, Dayna K; Butterfield, Catherine E; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Inceoglu, Bora; Jenkins, Roger L; Simpson, Mary A; Akino, Tomoshige; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Ingber, Donald E; Hammock, Bruce D; Falck, John R; Manthati, Vijaya L; Kaipainen, Arja; D'Amore, Patricia A; Puder, Mark; Zeldin, Darryl C; Kieran, Mark W

    2013-08-13

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), lipid mediators produced by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases, regulate inflammation, angiogenesis, and vascular tone. Despite pleiotropic effects on cells, the role of these epoxyeicosanoids in normal organ and tissue regeneration remains unknown. EETs are produced predominantly in the endothelium. Normal organ and tissue regeneration require an active paracrine role of the microvascular endothelium, which in turn depends on angiogenic growth factors. Thus, we hypothesize that endothelial cells stimulate organ and tissue regeneration via production of bioactive EETs. To determine whether endothelial-derived EETs affect physiologic tissue growth in vivo, we used genetic and pharmacological tools to manipulate endogenous EET levels. We show that endothelial-derived EETs play a critical role in accelerating tissue growth in vivo, including liver regeneration, kidney compensatory growth, lung compensatory growth, wound healing, corneal neovascularization, and retinal vascularization. Administration of synthetic EETs recapitulated these results, whereas lowering EET levels, either genetically or pharmacologically, delayed tissue regeneration, demonstrating that pharmacological modulation of EETs can affect normal organ and tissue growth. We also show that soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous EET levels, promote liver and lung regeneration. Thus, our observations indicate a central role for EETs in organ and tissue regeneration and their contribution to tissue homeostasis.

  1. Muscle cells provide instructions for planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Witchley, Jessica N; Mayer, Mirjam; Wagner, Daniel E; Owen, Jared H; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-08-29

    Regeneration requires both potential and instructions for tissue replacement. In planarians, pluripotent stem cells have the potential to produce all new tissue. The identities of the cells that provide regeneration instructions are unknown. Here, we report that position control genes (PCGs) that control regeneration and tissue turnover are expressed in a subepidermal layer of nonneoblast cells. These subepidermal cells coexpress many PCGs. We propose that these subepidermal cells provide a system of body coordinates and positional information for regeneration, and identify them to be muscle cells of the planarian body wall. Almost all planarian muscle cells express PCGs, suggesting a dual function: contraction and control of patterning. PCG expression is dynamic in muscle cells after injury, even in the absence of neoblasts, suggesting that muscle is instructive for regeneration. We conclude that planarian regeneration involves two highly flexible systems: pluripotent neoblasts that can generate any new cell type and muscle cells that provide positional instructions for the regeneration of any body region.

  2. What makes a RAG regeneration associated?

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Thong C.; Willis, Dianna E.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative failure remains a significant barrier for functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS) injury. As such, understanding the physiological processes that regulate axon regeneration is a central focus of regenerative medicine. Studying the gene transcription responses to axon injury of regeneration competent neurons, such as those of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), has provided insight into the genes associated with regeneration. Though several individual “regeneration-associated genes” (RAGs) have been identified from these studies, the response to injury likely regulates the expression of functionally coordinated and complementary gene groups. For instance, successful regeneration would require the induction of genes that drive the intrinsic growth capacity of neurons, while simultaneously downregulating the genes that convey environmental inhibitory cues. Thus, this view emphasizes the transcriptional regulation of gene “programs” that contribute to the overall goal of axonal regeneration. Here, we review the known RAGs, focusing on how their transcriptional regulation can reveal the underlying gene programs that drive a regenerative phenotype. Finally, we will discuss paradigms under which we can determine whether these genes are injury-associated, or indeed necessary for regeneration. PMID:26300725

  3. Pulp Regeneration: Current Approaches and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Yuan, Guohua; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics aims to replace inflamed/necrotic pulp tissues with regenerated pulp-like tissues to revitalize teeth and improve life quality. Pulp revascularization case reports, which showed successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, indicated the possible clinical application of pulp regeneration via cell homing strategy. From a clinical point of view, functional pulp-like tissues should be regenerated with the characterization of vascularization, re-innervation, and dentin deposition with a regulated rate similar to that of normal pulp. Efficient root canal disinfection and proper size of the apical foramen are the two requisite preconditions for pulp regeneration. Progress has been made on pulp regeneration via cell homing strategies. This review focused on the requisite preconditions and cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration. In addition to the traditionally used mechanical preparation and irrigation, antibiotics, irrigation assisted with EndoVac apical negative-pressure system, and ultrasonic and laser irradiation are now being used in root canal disinfection. In addition, pulp-like tissues could be formed with the apical foramen less than 1 mm, although more studies are needed to determine the appropriate size. Moreover, signaling molecules including stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1α), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), stem cell factor (SCF), and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) were used to achieve pulp-like tissue formation via a cell homing strategy. Studies on the cell sources of pulp regeneration might give some indications on the signaling molecular selection. The active recruitment of endogenous cells into root canals to regenerate pulp-like tissues is a novel concept that may offer an unprecedented opportunity for the near-term clinical translation of current biology-based therapies for dental pulp regeneration. PMID:27014076

  4. Missing Concepts in De Novo Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G.T.-J.; Garcia-Godoy, F.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in the past decade because it offers an alternative approach in treating endodontically involved teeth. Instead of filling the canal space with artificial materials, it attempts to fill the canal with vital tissues. The objective of regeneration is to regain the tissue and restore its function to the original state. In terms of pulp regeneration, a clinical protocol that intends to reestablish pulp/dentin tissues in the canal space has been developed—termed revitalization or revascularization. Histologic studies from animal and human teeth receiving revitalization have shown that pulp regeneration is difficult to achieve. In tissue engineering, there are 2 approaches to regeneration tissues: cell based and cell free. The former involves transplanting exogenous cells into the host, and the latter does not. Revitalization belongs to the latter approach. A number of crucial concepts have not been well discussed, noted, or understood in the field of regenerative endodontics in terms of pulp/dentin regeneration: (1) critical size defect of dentin and pulp, (2) cell lineage commitment to odontoblasts, (3) regeneration vs. repair, and (4) hurdles of cell-based pulp regeneration for clinical applications. This review article elaborates on these missing concepts and analyzes them at their cellular and molecular levels, which will in part explain why the non-cell-based revitalization procedure is difficult to establish pulp/dentin regeneration. Although the cell-based approach has been proven to regenerate pulp/dentin, such an approach will face barriers—with the key hurdle being the shortage of the current good manufacturing practice facilities, discussed herein. PMID:24879576

  5. Nanoparticle Array Assembly Using Chemical Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Sarah Marie

    This dissertation demonstrates chemically-driven self-assembly techniques to produce assemblies of closely-spaced metal nanoparticles from colloidal nanoparticle solution in order to engineer enhanced optical fields. Planar nanoparticle assemblies provide a platform for a multitude of applications and material architectures. With nanoscale inter-particle spacing, metallic nanoparticles enable increased efficiency of photovoltaic devices due to light focusing and enhancement of electromagnetic fields useful for optical sensing of molecules due to coupling of the plasmon resonance in nanoparticle gaps. For molecular sensors, development of self-assembled two-dimensional assemblies of closely-spaced nanoparticles is useful for producing surface plasmon resonance sensors and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based sensing. Using chemical self-assembly, monodisperse, colloidal gold nanoparticles were attached on self-organized polymer templates in order to pattern assemblies of nanoparticle clusters with sub-10 nanometer inter-particle spacing. First citrate-stabilized Au nanoparticles were functionalized with thioctic acid ligands in solution. Then poly(methyl methacrylate) domains in phase-separated poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) thin films were chemically modified with surface amine functional groups. Au nanoparticles were preferentially attached to the functionalized PMMA surface domains using cross-linking chemistry. This method allows for versatility of size, shape, and composition. In this dissertation, we demonstrated attachment of 5, 10, and 20 nm Au and 20 nm Ag nanoparticles. PS-b-PMMA thin films also exhibit versatility of domain size and morphology by varying polymer molecular weights. The nanoparticle diameter to PMMA domain size ratio influenced the cluster size. As the ratio decreased, larger clusters were observed on PMMA domains with increased frequency. SERS measurement of nanoparticle assemblies showed uniform signal

  6. Reparative inflammation takes charge of tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Karin, Michael; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation underlies many chronic and degenerative diseases, but it also mitigates infections, clears damaged cells and initiates tissue repair. Many of the mechanisms that link inflammation to damage repair and regeneration in mammals are conserved in lower organisms, indicating that it is an evolutionarily important process. Recent insights have shed light on the cellular and molecular processes through which conventional inflammatory cytokines and Wnt factors control mammalian tissue repair and regeneration. This is particularly important for regeneration in the gastrointestinal system, especially for intestine and liver tissues in which aberrant and deregulated repair results in severe pathologies. PMID:26791721

  7. Chemistry of Durable and Regenerable Biocidal Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Worley, S. Dave

    2005-01-01

    Unlike the widely used slow-releasing biocidal mechanism now employed in biocidal textiles, a novel regenerable process, based on a regeneration principle and halamine chemistry, has been developed in antimicrobial finishing of textiles. Halamine-modified textile materials demonstrate durable and regenerable antimicrobial functions and execute rapid inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms by contact without yielding drug resistance. The unique properties of the products render them useful materials for medical-use and hygienic textiles. The chemistry of the biocidal materials is be discussed. See Featured Molecules .

  8. Somatic stem cell biology and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Yihan; Li, Dehua; Jin, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Somatic stem cells have been acknowledged for their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types and their capacity for self-renewal. Some mesenchymal stem cells play a dominant role in the repair and reconstruction of periodontal tissues. Both dental-derived and some non-dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells possess the capacity for periodontal regeneration under certain conditions with induced differentiation, proliferation, cellular secretion, and their interactions. Stem cell-based tissue engineering technology promises to bring improvements to periodontal regeneration, biologic tooth repair, and bioengineered implants. The present review discusses the roles and values of various somatic stem cells in periodontal regeneration.

  9. Mechanisms of Guided Bone Regeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Kerns, David G

    2014-01-01

    Post-extraction crestal bone resorption is common and unavoidable which can lead to significant ridge dimensional changes. To regenerate enough bone for successful implant placement, Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) is often required. GBR is a surgical procedure that uses barrier membranes with or without particulate bone grafts or/and bone substitutes. There are two approaches of GBR in implant therapy: GBR at implant placement (simultaneous approach) and GBR before implant placement to increase the alveolar ridge or improve ridge morphology (staged approach). Angiogenesis and ample blood supply play a critical role in promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24894890

  10. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes.

    PubMed

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A; Roumanes, David R; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Quataert, Sally A; Sharma, Gaurav; Mosmann, Tim R

    2016-01-01

    Clustering-based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT--a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a "template" mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter-sample differences is increased by "competition" wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age-related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional altered subpopulations

  11. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. III - Incorporation of adenosine and uridine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonenzymatic template-directed incorporation of adenosine and uridine residues into template sequences was obtained using nucleoside-5-prime phosphoro (2-methyl)imidazolides as substrates and hairpin oligonucleotides as templates. The reactions are regiospecific, producing mainly 3-prime-5-prime phosphodiester bonds. Limited synthesis of CA and AC sequences was observed along with some synthesis of the AA sequences on templates containing TG and GT sequences, along wilth some synthesis of the AA sequences on templates containing TT sequences.

  12. Regenerating America: Meeting the Challenge of Building Local Economies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Medard; And Others

    The document includes five papers on the implications and applications of regeneration by the Regeneration Project, based in Emmaus, Pa. The first paper, "Regenerating America: Meeting the Challenge of Building Local Economies," (Medard Gabel) defines regeneration as economic recovery and growth, fostered by diversification within a…

  13. fgf20 is essential for initiating zebrafish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Geoffrey G; Makino, Shinji; Lien, Ching-Ling; Keating, Mark T

    2005-12-23

    Epimorphic regeneration requires the presence or creation of pluripotent cells capable of reproducing lost organs. Zebrafish fin regeneration is mediated by the creation of blastema cells. Here, we characterize the devoid of blastema (dob) mutant that fails fin regeneration during initial steps, forms abnormal regeneration epithelium, and does not form blastema. This mutation has no impact on embryonic survival. Dob results from an fgf20a null mutation, Y148S. Fgf20a is expressed during initiation of fin regeneration at the epithelial-mesenchymal boundary and later overlaps with the blastema marker msxb. Thus, fgf20a has a regeneration-specific requirement, initiating fin regeneration, and controlling blastema formation.

  14. Muscle regeneration in amphibians and mammals: passing the torch.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bruce M

    2003-02-01

    Skeletal muscle in both amphibians and mammals possesses a high regenerative capacity. In amphibians, a muscle can regenerate in two distinct ways: as a tissue component of an entire regenerating limb (epimorphic regeneration) or as an isolated entity (tissue regeneration). In the absence of epimorphic regenerative ability, mammals can regenerate muscles only by the tissue mode. This review focuses principally on the regeneration of entire muscles and covers what is known and what remains to be elucidated about fundamental mechanisms underlying muscle regeneration at this level.

  15. Polydopamine-Templated Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Polycaprolactone Composite Nanofibers with Enhanced Cytocompatibility and Osteogenesis for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Song, Jinlin; Ji, Ping; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoman; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Mengke; Zhang, Siqi; Deng, Yi; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-02-10

    Nanohydroxyapatite (HA) synthesized by biomimetic strategy is a promising nanomaterial as bone substitute due to its physicochemical features similar to those of natural nanocrystal in bone tissue. Inspired by mussel adhesive chemistry, a novel nano-HA was synthesized in our work by employing polydopamine (pDA) as template under weak alkaline condition. Subsequently, the as-prepared pDA-templated HA (tHA) was introduced into polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix via coelectrospinning, and a bioactive tHA/PCL composite nanofiber scaffold was developed targeted at bone regeneration application. Our research showed that tHA reinforced PCL composite nanofibers exhibited favorable cytocompatibility at given concentration of tHA (0-10 w.t%). Compared to pure PCL and traditional nano-HA enriched PCL (HA/PCL) composite nanofibers, enhanced cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were observed on tHA/PCL composite nanofibers on account of the contribution of pDA present in tHA. More importantly, tHA nanoparticles exposed on the surface of composite nanofibers could further promote osteogenesis of hMSCs in vitro even in the absence of osteogenesis soluble inducing factors when compared to traditional HA/PCL scaffolds, which was supported by in vivo test as well according to the histological analysis. Overall, our study demonstrated that the developed tHA/PCL composite nanofibers with enhanced cytocompatibility and osteogenic capacity hold great potential as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sammarco, Mimi C.; Simkin, Jennifer; Cammack, Alexander J.; Fassler, Danielle; Gossmann, Alexej; Marrero, Luis; Lacey, Michelle; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3) in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response. PMID:26452224

  17. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  18. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yoon, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Byung Gon

    2016-09-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries.

  19. Regeneration-associated macrophages: a novel approach to boost intrinsic regenerative capacity for axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jung; Yoon, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Byung Gon

    2016-01-01

    Axons in central nervous system (CNS) do not regenerate spontaneously after injuries such as stroke and traumatic spinal cord injury. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors are responsible for the regeneration failure. Although intensive research efforts have been invested on extrinsic regeneration inhibitors, the extent to which glial inhibitors contribute to the regeneration failure in vivo still remains elusive. Recent experimental evidence has rekindled interests in intrinsic factors for the regulation of regeneration capacity in adult mammals. In this review, we propose that activating macrophages with pro-regenerative molecular signatures could be a novel approach for boosting intrinsic regenerative capacity of CNS neurons. Using a conditioning injury model in which regeneration of central branches of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons is enhanced by a preceding injury to the peripheral branches, we have demonstrated that perineuronal macrophages surrounding dorsal root ganglia neurons are critically involved in the maintenance of enhanced regeneration capacity. Neuron-derived chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) seems to mediate neuron-macrophage interactions conveying injury signals to perineuronal macrophages taking on a soley pro-regenerative phenotype, which we designate as regeneration-associated macrophages (RAMs). Manipulation of the CCL2 signaling could boost regeneration potential mimicking the conditioning injury, suggesting that the chemokine-mediated RAM activation could be utilized as a regenerative therapeutic strategy for CNS injuries. PMID:27857723

  20. Hyperbaric Oxygen Promotes Proximal Bone Regeneration and Organized Collagen Composition during Digit Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, Mimi C; Simkin, Jennifer; Cammack, Alexander J; Fassler, Danielle; Gossmann, Alexej; Marrero, Luis; Lacey, Michelle; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is critical for optimal bone regeneration. While axolotls and salamanders have retained the ability to regenerate whole limbs, mammalian regeneration is restricted to the distal tip of the digit (P3) in mice, primates, and humans. Our previous study revealed the oxygen microenvironment during regeneration is dynamic and temporally influential in building and degrading bone. Given that regeneration is dependent on a dynamic and changing oxygen environment, a better understanding of the effects of oxygen during wounding, scarring, and regeneration, and better ways to artificially generate both hypoxic and oxygen replete microenvironments are essential to promote regeneration beyond wounding or scarring. To explore the influence of increased oxygen on digit regeneration in vivo daily treatments of hyperbaric oxygen were administered to mice during all phases of the entire regenerative process. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) and histological analysis showed that the daily application of hyperbaric oxygen elicited the same enhanced bone degradation response as two individual pulses of oxygen applied during the blastema phase. We expand past these findings to show histologically that the continuous application of hyperbaric oxygen during digit regeneration results in delayed blastema formation at a much more proximal location after amputation, and the deposition of better organized collagen fibers during bone formation. The application of sustained hyperbaric oxygen also delays wound closure and enhances bone degradation after digit amputation. Thus, hyperbaric oxygen shows the potential for positive influential control on the various phases of an epimorphic regenerative response.

  1. A new template matching method based on contour information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huiying; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Qingxiao; Li, Sicong

    2014-11-01

    Template matching is a significant approach in machine vision due to its effectiveness and robustness. However, most of the template matching methods are so time consuming that they can't be used to many real time applications. The closed contour matching method is a popular kind of template matching methods. This paper presents a new closed contour template matching method which is suitable for two dimensional objects. Coarse-to-fine searching strategy is used to improve the matching efficiency and a partial computation elimination scheme is proposed to further speed up the searching process. The method consists of offline model construction and online matching. In the process of model construction, triples and distance image are obtained from the template image. A certain number of triples which are composed by three points are created from the contour information that is extracted from the template image. The rule to select the three points is that the template contour is divided equally into three parts by these points. The distance image is obtained here by distance transform. Each point on the distance image represents the nearest distance between current point and the points on the template contour. During the process of matching, triples of the searching image are created with the same rule as the triples of the model. Through the similarity that is invariant to rotation, translation and scaling between triangles, the triples corresponding to the triples of the model are found. Then we can obtain the initial RST (rotation, translation and scaling) parameters mapping the searching contour to the template contour. In order to speed up the searching process, the points on the searching contour are sampled to reduce the number of the triples. To verify the RST parameters, the searching contour is projected into the distance image, and the mean distance can be computed rapidly by simple operations of addition and multiplication. In the fine searching process

  2. Chronological protein synthesis in regenerating rat liver.

    PubMed

    He, Jinjun; Hao, Shuai; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Fuzheng; Huang, Lingyun; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng

    2015-07-01

    Liver regeneration has been studied for decades; however, its regulation remains unclear. In this study, we report a dynamic tracing of protein synthesis in rat regenerating liver with a new proteomic technique, (35) S in vivo labeling analysis for dynamic proteomics (SiLAD). Conventional proteomic techniques typically measure protein alteration in accumulated amounts. The SiLAD technique specifically detects protein synthesis velocity instead of accumulated amounts of protein through (35) S pulse labeling of newly synthesized proteins, providing a direct way for analyzing protein synthesis variations. Consequently, protein synthesis within short as 30 min was visualized and protein regulations in the first 8 h of regenerating liver were dynamically traced. Further, the 3.5-5 h post partial hepatectomy (PHx) was shown to be an important regulatory turning point by acute regulation of many proteins in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  3. Adult stem cells underlying lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Despite the massive toll in human suffering imparted by degenerative lung disease, including COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ARDS, the scientific community has been surprisingly agnostic regarding the potential of lung tissue, and in particular the alveoli, to regenerate. However, there is circumstantial evidence in humans and direct evidence in mice that ARDS triggers robust regeneration of lung tissue rather than irreversible fibrosis. The stem cells responsible for this remarkable regenerative process has garnered tremendous attention, most recently yielding a defined set of cloned human airway stem cells marked by p63 expression but with distinct commitment to differentiated cell types typical of the upper or lower airways, the latter of which include alveoli-like structures in vitro and in vivo. These recent advances in lung regeneration and distal airway stem cells and the potential of associated soluble factors in regeneration must be harnessed for therapeutic options in chronic lung disease.

  4. Toward therapeutic pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2006-11-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has disproved the notion that pulmonary alveoli are incapable of regeneration, and on the growing evidence that signals that regulate programs of alveolar turnover (loss and regeneration) are conserved from rodents to humans. We review animal models of alveolar loss and regeneration and their conservation during evolution, and hence their relevance to humans.

  5. How-To-Do-It: Plant Regeneration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietraface, William J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a procedure for the growth of tobacco plants in flasks. Demonstrates plant tissue culture manipulation, totipotency, and plant regeneration in approximately 12 weeks. Discusses methods, materials, and expected results. (CW)

  6. Composite Matrix Regenerator for Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.

    1997-01-01

    This project concerns the design, fabrication and testing of carbon regenerators for use in Stirling power convertors. Radial fiber design with nonmetallic components offers a number of potential advantages over conventional steel regenerators: reduced conduction and pressure drop losses, and the capability for higher temperature, higher frequency operation. Diverse composite fabrication methods are explored and lessons learned are summarized. A pulsed single-blow test rig has been developed that has been used for generating thermal effectiveness data for different flow velocities. Carbon regenerators have been fabricated by carbon vapor infiltration of electroflocked preforms. Performance data in a small Stirling engine are obtained. Prototype regenerators designed for the BP-1000 power convertor were fabricated and delivered to NASA-Lewis.

  7. Laser-induced regeneration of cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil; Shekhter, Anatoly; Guller, Anna; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey

    2011-08-01

    Laser radiation provides a means to control the fields of temperature and thermo mechanical stress, mass transfer, and modification of fine structure of the cartilage matrix. The aim of this outlook paper is to review physical and biological aspects of laser-induced regeneration of cartilage and to discuss the possibilities and prospects of its clinical applications. The problems and the pathways of tissue regeneration, the types and features of cartilage will be introduced first. Then we will review various actual and prospective approaches for cartilage repair; consider possible mechanisms of laser-induced regeneration. Finally, we present the results in laser regeneration of joints and spine disks cartilages and discuss some future applications of lasers in regenerative medicine.

  8. De Novo Kidney Regeneration with Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Yokoo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported on techniques to mobilize and activate endogenous stem-cells in injured kidneys or to introduce exogenous stem cells for tissue repair. Despite many recent advantages in renal regenerative therapy, chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality and the number of CKD patients has been increasing. When the sophisticated structure of the kidneys is totally disrupted by end stage renal disease (ESRD), traditional stem cell-based therapy is unable to completely regenerate the damaged tissue. This suggests that whole organ regeneration may be a promising therapeutic approach to alleviate patients with uncured CKD. We summarize here the potential of stem-cell-based therapy for injured tissue repair and de novo whole kidney regeneration. In addition, we describe the hurdles that must be overcome and possible applications of this approach in kidney regeneration. PMID:23251079

  9. Skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during salamander limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Simon, András

    2016-10-01

    Salamanders can regenerate entire limbs throughout their life. A critical step during limb regeneration is formation of a blastema, which gives rise to the new extremity. Salamander limb regeneration has historically been tightly linked to the term dedifferentiation, however, with refined research tools it is important to revisit the definition of dedifferentiation in the context. To what extent do differentiated cells revert their differentiated phenotypes? To what extent do progeny from differentiated cells cross lineage boundaries during regeneration? How do cell cycle plasticity and lineage plasticity relate to each other? What is the relationship between dedifferentiation of specialized cells and activation of tissue resident stem cells in terms of their contribution to the new limb? Here we highlight these problems through the case of skeletal muscle.

  10. Molecular template-directed synthesis of microporous polymer networks for highly selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yao-Qi; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Geng, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Lin-Bing

    2014-11-26

    Porous polymer networks have great potential in various applications including carbon capture. However, complex monomers and/or expensive catalysts are commonly used for their synthesis, which makes the process complicated, costly, and hard to scale up. Herein, we develop a molecular template strategy to fabricate new porous polymer networks by a simple nucleophilic substitution reaction of two low-cost monomers (i.e., chloromethylbenzene and ethylene diamine). The polymerization reactions can take place under mild conditions in the absence of any catalysts. The resultant materials are interconnected with secondary amines and show well-defined micropores due to the structure-directing role of solvent molecules. These properties make our materials highly efficient for selective CO2 capture, and unusually high CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivities are obtained. Furthermore, the adsorbents can be completely regenerated under mild conditions. Our materials may provide promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 from mixtures such as flue gas and natural gas.

  11. Regeneration of vitamin E in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Chan, A C; Tran, K; Raynor, T; Ganz, P R; Chow, C K

    1991-09-15

    Human platelets possess active lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase which convert arachidonic acid to (12S)-12-hydroperoxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE) plus (12S)-12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and thromboxane B2 plus 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT), respectively. When platelet homogenates were incubated with arachidonate, there was a rapid consumption of platelet tocopherol. Time course analysis revealed that within 0.5 min, over half of arachidonate and tocopherol were metabolized. Mass formation of 12-HPETE and 12-HETE or thromboxane B2 and HHT exceeded that of the mass of tocopherol oxidized. Preincubation with the lipoxygenase inhibitor 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) completely abolished this arachidonate-induced tocopherol oxidation whereas cyclooxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin and aspirin) further potentiated tocopherol oxidation, indicating that this oxidation is closely linked with platelet 12-lipoxygenase activity. Incubation with lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid showed that only 12-HPETE caused a rapid tocopherol oxidation which was followed by a gradual tocopherol regeneration. By using nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor which is also a strong reductant, over 60% of the arachidonate-induced oxidized tocopherol was regenerated. Tocopherol regeneration declined with increasing oxidation time induced by arachidonate, and after 30-60 min virtually no regeneration could be observed, suggesting that the precursor molecule was unstable. We postulate that the precursor molecule is the tocopheroxyl radical. In the presence of ETYA, a lipoxygenase inhibitor without antioxidant properties, either ascorbate or GSH provided significant tocopherol regeneration. Kinetic studies showed that tocopherol regeneration after the addition of ascorbate was essentially completed by 1 min. By contrast, GSH addition caused a steady increase in tocopherol which peaked after 10 min of its

  12. The Utility of Template Analysis in Qualitative Psychology Research.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Joanna; McCluskey, Serena; Turley, Emma; King, Nigel

    2015-04-03

    Thematic analysis is widely used in qualitative psychology research, and in this article, we present a particular style of thematic analysis known as Template Analysis. We outline the technique and consider its epistemological position, then describe three case studies of research projects which employed Template Analysis to illustrate the diverse ways it can be used. Our first case study illustrates how the technique was employed in data analysis undertaken by a team of researchers in a large-scale qualitative research project. Our second example demonstrates how a qualitative study that set out to build on mainstream theory made use of the a priori themes (themes determined in advance of coding) permitted in Template Analysis. Our final case study shows how Template Analysis can be used from an interpretative phenomenological stance. We highlight the distinctive features of this style of thematic analysis, discuss the kind of research where it may be particularly appropriate, and consider possible limitations of the technique. We conclude that Template Analysis is a flexible form of thematic analysis with real utility in qualitative psychology research.

  13. Robust template matching using run-length encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunsue; Suh, Sungho; Cho, Hansang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose a novel template matching algorithm for visual inspection of bare printed circuit board (PCB).1 In the conventional template matching for PCB inspection, the matching score and its relevant offsets are acquired by calculating the maximum value among the convolutions of template image and camera image. While the method is fast, the robustness and accuracy of matching are not guaranteed due to the gap between a design and an implementation resulting from defects and process variations. To resolve this problem, we suggest a new method which uses run-length encoding (RLE). For the template image to be matched, we accumulate data of foreground and background, and RLE data for each row and column in the template image. Using the data, we can find the x and y offsets which minimize the optimization function. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed algorithm are verified through a series of experiments. By comparing the proposed algorithm with the conventional approach, we could realize that the proposed algorithm is not only fast but also more robust and reliable in matching results.

  14. DNA-templated nanowires as sacrificial materials for creating nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; Becerril, Hector A.; Yang, Weichun; Larsen, Megan G.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2008-08-01

    DNA has shown great promise as a template for the controlled localization of various materials and the construction of wires with nanometer-dimension cross sections. We have recently developed a strategy for fabrication of nanocapillaries, using DNA-templated nanowires as a sacrificial material. We first form metal nanowires through the selective electrochemical deposition of nickel atop a surface-aligned DNA molecule. We then deposit a thin layer of silicon dioxide on top of the DNA nanostructures. Next, we photolithographically pattern openings over the ends of the wires and etch through the silicon dioxide layer to expose the metal nanowires. Finally, we etch out the DNA-templated nickel nanowires. This process results in the formation of nanocapillaries having the same dimensions as the originally formed DNA-templated nanowires. We have characterized these DNA-templated nanocapillaries using atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. These constructs have potential for application in nanofluidics, power generation, sample preconcentration, and chemical sensing.

  15. Fabricating Nanodots using Lift-Off of a Nanopore Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Ramsey, Christopher R.; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    A process for fabricating a planar array of dots having characteristic dimensions of the order of several nanometers to several hundred nanometers involves the formation and use of a thin alumina nanopore template on a semiconductor substrate. The dot material is deposited in the nanopores, then the template is lifted off the substrate after the dots have been formed. This process is expected to be a basis for development of other, similar nanofabrication processes for relatively inexpensive mass production of nanometerscale optical, optoelectronic, electronic, and magnetic devices. Alumina nanopore templates are self-organized structures that result from anodization of aluminum under appropriate conditions. Alumina nanopore templates have been regarded as attractive for use in fabricating the devices mentioned above, but prior efforts to use alumina nanopore templates for this purpose have not been successful. One reason for the lack of success is that the aspect ratios (ratios between depth and diameter) of the pores have been too large: large aspect ratios can result in blockage of deposition and/or can prevent successful lift-off. The development of the present process was motivated partly by a requirement to reduce aspect ratios to values (of the order of 10) for which there is little or no blockage of deposition and attempts at lift-off are more likely to be successful. The fabrication process is outlined.

  16. Adaptively Stretched Templates for Normal Type Ia Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Individual BVRI light-curve templates have been determined for 22 unusually well-observed literature Type Ia supernovae by the newly developed template builder AQUAA. This tool uses light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. In the B filter, to high accuracy 19 of these light curves may be represented by a single master template that is stretched adaptively along the time axis. The usual parameter describing average linear stretch is supplemented by two new nonlinear parameters that characterize transitions between regions of different time dilation. The distribution of these parameter values is related to the observed diversity of supernova rise times (Strovink, M., ApJ in press, astro-ph/07050726). Major portions of the VRI light curves, including the pre-maximum and peak regions, may be represented by corresponding master templates that similarly are stretched. When the dependence of absolute supernova luminosity on the limited number of stretch parameters is established, the use of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological distance indicators will be simplified and may be sharpened. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes. PMID:27662342

  18. Large-scale ultraflat nanopatterned surfaces without template residues.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bongsu; Frey, Wolfgang

    2008-04-09

    Ultraflat surfaces are required for many studies of single molecules, and the need for both a wide choice of surface materials and the ability to pattern these surfaces has led to the development of different template-stripping approaches. The fabrication of nanopatterned ultraflat surfaces is particularly challenging, because more than one material is present in the surface. We demonstrate a new template-stripping strategy that allows us to fabricate large-area nanopatterned surfaces, solving the problem of incomplete template removal by introducing a sacrificial carbon layer and a sandwich structure for the template. The thin residual carbon film transferred from the template is removed from the nanopatterned surface by dry etching, as demonstrated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and, for metal nanoparticles embedded in a glass surface, by a shift in the absorption of the localized surface plasmon resonance. We show that gold nanoparticles in a glass surface can be selectively functionalized with thiols yielding about 2 nm height increase. Atomic force microscopy and localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy both indicate that the nanoparticle shape is preserved well.

  19. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-09-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes.

  20. Template identification technology of nuclear warheads and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Su-Ping; Gong, Jian; Hao, Fan-Hua; Hu, Guang-Chun

    2008-02-01

    Template identification technology (TIT) is designed for the scenarios where a batch of disarmed nuclear weapons or components would be dismantled to observe a nuclear disarmament treaty. The core function played by the TIT is to make a judgment on whether the verified item belongs to a certain kind of nuclear weapons or component (NW/NC) or to which kind the verified item belongs. This paper analyses the functions played by the TIT in the process of NW/NC dismantlement, and proposes that two phases would be followed when applying the TIT: firstly to establish NW/NC templates with a sample of size n drawn from a certain kind of disarmament NW; secondly to authenticate NW/NC by means of the TIT. This paper also expatiates some terms related to the concept of the TIT and investigates on the development status of NW/NC TIT based on radiation signatures. The study concludes that the design of template structure is crucial to the establishment of an effective TIT and that starting from different research angles and aiming at the same goal of classification different template structures and corresponding template identification methods can be built up to meet specific identification requirements.

  1. The Utility of Template Analysis in Qualitative Psychology Research

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Joanna; McCluskey, Serena; Turley, Emma; King, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Thematic analysis is widely used in qualitative psychology research, and in this article, we present a particular style of thematic analysis known as Template Analysis. We outline the technique and consider its epistemological position, then describe three case studies of research projects which employed Template Analysis to illustrate the diverse ways it can be used. Our first case study illustrates how the technique was employed in data analysis undertaken by a team of researchers in a large-scale qualitative research project. Our second example demonstrates how a qualitative study that set out to build on mainstream theory made use of the a priori themes (themes determined in advance of coding) permitted in Template Analysis. Our final case study shows how Template Analysis can be used from an interpretative phenomenological stance. We highlight the distinctive features of this style of thematic analysis, discuss the kind of research where it may be particularly appropriate, and consider possible limitations of the technique. We conclude that Template Analysis is a flexible form of thematic analysis with real utility in qualitative psychology research. PMID:27499705

  2. Template-directed photoligation of oligodeoxyribonucleotides via 4-thiothymidine.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Taylor, J S

    1998-01-01

    Non-enzymatic, template-directed ligation of oligonucleotides in aqueous solution has been of great interest because of its potential synthetic and biomedical utility and implications for the origin of life. Though there are many methods for template-directed chemical ligation of oligonucleotides, there are only three reported photochemical methods. In the first report, template-directed photoligation was effected by cyclobutane dimer formation between the 5'- and 3'-terminal thymidines of two oligonucleotides with >290 nm light, which also damages DNA itself. To make the photochemistry of native DNA more selective, we have replaced the thymidine at the 5'-end of one oligonucleotide with 4-thiothymidine (s4T) and show that it photoreacts at 366 nm with a T at the 3'-endof another oligonucleotide in the presence of a complementary template. When a single mismatch is introduced opposite either the s4T or its adjoining T, the ligation efficiency drops by a factor of five or more. We also show that by linking the two ends of the oligonucleotides together, photoligation can be used to form circular DNA molecules and to 'photopadlock' circular DNA templates. Thus, s4T-mediated photo-ligation may have applications to phototriggered antisense-based or antigene-based genetic tools, diagnostic agents and drugs, especially for those situations in which chemical or enzyme-mediated ligation isundesirable or impossible, for example inside a cell. PMID:9628933

  3. Attempted nonenzymatic template-directed oligomerizations on a polyadenylic acid template: implications for the nature of the first genetic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stribling, R.; Miller, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    Previous attempts to produce nonenzymatic template-directed oligomerizations of activated pyrimidines on polypurine templates have been unsuccessful. The only efficient reactions are those where the template is composed primarily of pyrimidines, especially cytosine. Because molecular evolution requires that a synthesized daughter polynucleotide be capable of acting as a template for the synthesis of the original polynucleotide, the one-way replication achieved thus far is inadequate to initiate an evolving system. Several uracil analogs were used in this investigation in order to search for possible replacements for uracil. The monomers used in this investigation were the imidazolides of UMP, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate, the bis-monophosphates of the acyclic nucleosides of uracil, and 2,4-quinazolinedione. The concentrations of various salts, buffers, pH, and temperature were among the different variables investigated in attempts to find conditions that would permit template-directed oligomerizations. Although the different monomers in this study demonstrated varying abilities to form very short oligomers, we were unable to detect any enhancement of this oligomerization that could be attributed to the poly(A) template. Although special conditions might be found that would allow purine-rich templates to work, these reactions cannot be considered robust. The results of our experiments suggest that pyrimidines were not part of the original replicating system on the primitive Earth. It has already been shown that ribose is an unlikely component of the first replicating systems, and we now suggest that phosphate was absent as well. This is due to the low solubility of phosphate in the present ocean (3 x 10(-6) M), as well as the difficulty of prebiotic activation of phosphates.

  4. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  5. Continuous microwave regeneration apparatus for absorption media

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.

    1999-09-07

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for continuously drying and regenerating ceramic beads for use in process gas moisture drying operations such as glove boxes. A microwave energy source is coupled to a process chamber to internally heat the ceramic beads and vaporize moisture contained therein. In a preferred embodiment, the moisture laden ceramic beads are conveyed toward the microwave source by a screw mechanism. The regenerated beads flow down outside of the screw mechanism and are available to absorb additional moisture.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  7. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    hydrogels. The shortcomings of current devices in terms of burst effect , nonuniform dosage, and uneven drug delivery, necessitates a new approach to...Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a 15mm nerve gap in a rat sciatic...main tasks of Aim 1. Specific Aim 2 -- To evaluate the effectiveness of the conduit- drug delivery device to enhance nerve regeneration across a

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  9. Straight-Pore Microfilter with Efficient Regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han; LaConti, Anthony B.; McCallum. Thomas J.; Schmitt, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    A novel, high-efficiency gas particulate filter has precise particle size screening, low pressure drop, and a simple and fast regeneration process. The regeneration process, which requires minimal material and energy consumption, can be completely automated, and the filtration performance can be restored within a very short period of time. This filter is of a novel material composite that contains the support structure and a novel coating.

  10. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  11. Emdogain--periodontal regeneration based on biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Gestrelius, S; Lyngstadaas, S P; Hammarström, L

    2000-06-01

    Biomimicry has been introduced as a term for innovations inspired by nature [1]. Such innovations may appear in almost every part of modern society. This review on the effects of enamel matrix proteins on the formation of cementum and the development of emdogain for regeneration of periodontal tissues lost due to periodontitis shows an example of biomimicry in dentistry. Findings from clinical and laboratory investigations are summarized and the biological basis for enamel matrix-induced periodontal regeneration is discussed.

  12. Caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards.

    PubMed

    Clause, Amanda R; Capaldi, Elizabeth A

    2006-12-01

    Caudal autotomy, or the voluntary self-amputation of the tail, is an anti-predation strategy in lizards that depends on a complex array of environmental, individual, and species-specific characteristics. These factors affect both when and how often caudal autotomy is employed, as well as its overall rate of success. The potential costs of autotomy must be weighed against the benefits of this strategy. Many species have evolved specialized behavioral and physiological adaptations to minimize or compensate for any negative consequences. One of the most important steps following a successful autotomous escape involves regeneration of the lost limb. In some species, regeneration occurs rapidly; such swift regeneration illustrates the importance of an intact, functional tail in everyday experience. In lizards and other vertebrates, regeneration is a highly ordered process utilizing initial developmental programs as well as regeneration-specific mechanisms to produce the correct types and pattern of cells required to sufficiently restore the structure and function of the sacrificed tail. In this review, we discuss the behavioral and physiological features of self-amputation, with particular reference to the costs and benefits of autotomy and the basic mechanisms of regeneration. In the process, we identify how these behaviors could be used to explore the neural regulation of complex behavioral responses within a functional context.

  13. Hedgehog Signaling during Appendage Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhairab N.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Donaldson, Andrew; Weaver, Cyprian V.; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory networks that govern embryonic development have been well defined. While a common hypothesis supports the notion that the embryonic regulatory cascades are reexpressed following injury and tissue regeneration, the mechanistic regulatory pathways that mediate the regenerative response in higher organisms remain undefined. Relative to mammals, lower vertebrates, including zebrafish and newts, have a tremendous regenerative capacity to repair and regenerate a number of organs including: appendages, retina, heart, jaw and nervous system. Elucidation of the pathways that govern regeneration in these lower organisms may provide cues that will enhance the capacity for the regeneration of mammalian organs. Signaling pathways, such as the hedgehog pathway, have been shown to play critical functions during development and during regeneration in lower organisms. These signaling pathways have been shown to modulate multiple processes including cellular origin, positional identity and cellular maturation. The present review will focus on the cellular and molecular regulation of the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway and its interaction with other signaling factors during appendage development and regeneration. PMID:26110318

  14. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pfefferli, Catherine; Jaźwińska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme-derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self-renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap-junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research.

  15. The art of fin regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish fin provides a valuable model to study the epimorphic type of regeneration, whereby the amputated part of the appendage is nearly perfectly replaced. To accomplish fin regeneration, two reciprocally interacting domains need to be established at the injury site, namely a wound epithelium and a blastema. The wound epithelium provides a supporting niche for the blastema, which contains mesenchyme‐derived progenitor cells for the regenerate. The fate of blastemal daughter cells depends on their relative position with respect to the fin margin. The apical compartment of the outgrowth maintains its undifferentiated character, whereas the proximal descendants of the blastema progressively switch from the proliferation program to the morphogenesis program. A delicate balance between self‐renewal and differentiation has to be continuously adjusted during the course of regeneration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of blastema formation, and discusses several studies related to the regulation of growth and morphogenesis during fin regeneration. A wide range of canonical signaling pathways has been implicated during the establishment and maintenance of the blastema. Epigenetic mechanisms play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular plasticity during the transition between differentiation states. Ion fluxes, gap‐junctional communication and protein phosphatase activity have been shown to coordinate proliferation and tissue patterning in the caudal fin. The identification of the downstream targets of the fin regeneration signals and the discovery of mechanisms integrating the variety of input pathways represent exciting future aims in this fascinating field of research. PMID:27499869

  16. Guided tissue regeneration in periapical surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Louis; Chen, Melody Y-H; Ricucci, Domenico; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2010-04-01

    Tissue regeneration by using membrane barriers and bone grafting materials in periapical surgery is an example of tissue engineering technology. Membrane barriers and/or bone grafts are often used to enhance periapical new bone formation. However, the periapical tissues also consist of the periodontal ligament (PDL) and cementum. For regeneration of the periapical tissues after periapical surgery, one of the important requirements is recruitment and differentiation of progenitor/stem cells into committed pre-osteoblasts, pre-PDL cells, and pre-cementoblasts. Homing of progenitor/stem cells into the wounded periapical tissues is regulated by factors such as stromal cell-derived factor 1, growth factors/cytokines, and by microenvironmental cues such as adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix and associated noncollagenous molecules. Tissue regeneration after injury appears to recapitulate the pathway of normal embryonic tissue development. Multiple tissue regeneration involves a complex interaction between different cells, extracellular matrix, growth/differentiation factors, and microenvironmental cues. Little is known concerning the biologic mechanisms that regulate temporal and spatial relationship between alveolar bone, PDL, and cementum regeneration during periapical wound healing. Simply applying a membrane barrier and/or bone graft during periapical surgery might not result in complete regeneration of the periapical tissues. It has not been clearly demonstrated that these biomaterials are capable of recruiting progenitor/stem cells and inducing these undifferentiated mesenchymal cells to differentiate into PDL cells and cementoblasts after periapical surgery.

  17. Development of tin-plated regenerator material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M. Y.; Morie, T.; Tsuchiya, A.

    2017-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of a cryocooler, it is vital to improve the regenerator. In general, the heat capacity of materials decreases as temperature decreases. Thus, when temperature is below 50 K, lead spheres are often used as a regenerator material. However, the pressure drop through a sphere regenerator is larger than that through a screen regenerator. To overcome this dilemma, a new, low pressure loss tin-plated screen is proposed. A comparison test was performed with a two-stage GM cryocooler by replacing part of the first stage regenerator material, bronze screens with tin-plated screens. Compared to a regenerator filled with bronze screens, the cooling capacity of the first stage increased by about 14% at 40 K and 90% at 30 K with such tin-plated screens. The ratio of the wire diameter before and after the deposition was also optimized. An optimum cooling capacity of 53.5 W at 40 K was obtained at a diameter ratio of about 1.4. The detailed experimental results are reported in this paper.

  18. Regeneration of the Pancreas in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer B.; Koustubhan, Punita; Greenman, Melanie; Parsons, Michael J.; Walter, Ingrid; Moss, Larry G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Regenerating organs in diverse biological systems have provided clues to processes that can be harnessed to repair damaged tissue. Adult mammalian β-cells have a limited capacity to regenerate, resulting in diabetes and lifelong reliance on insulin. Zebrafish have been used as a model for the regeneration of many organs. We demonstrate the regeneration of adult zebrafish pancreatic β-cells. This nonmammalian model can be used to define pathways for islet-cell regeneration in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adult transgenic zebrafish were injected with a single high dose of streptozotocin or metronidazole and anesthetized at 3, 7, or 14 days or pancreatectomized. Blood glucose measurements were determined and gut sections were analyzed using specific endocrine, exocrine, and duct cell markers as well as markers for dividing cells. RESULTS Zebrafish recovered rapidly without the need for insulin injections, and normoglycemia was attained within 2 weeks. Although few proliferating cells were present in vehicles, ablation caused islet destruction and a striking increase of proliferating cells, some of which were Pdx1 positive. Dividing cells were primarily associated with affected islets and ducts but, with the exception of surgical partial pancreatectomy, were not extensively β-cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability of the zebrafish to regenerate a functional pancreas using chemical, genetic, and surgical approaches enabled us to identify patterns of cell proliferation in islets and ducts. Further study of the origin and contribution of proliferating cells in reestablishing islet function could provide strategies for treating human diseases. PMID:19491207

  19. Regeneration, tissue injury and the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, James W; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of the immune system in the response to tissue injury has raised the possibility that it might influence tissue, organ or appendage regeneration following injury. One hypothesis that has been discussed is that inflammatory aspects may preclude the occurrence of regeneration, but there is also evidence for more positive roles of immune components. The vertebrate eye is an immunoprivileged site where inflammatory aspects are inhibited by several immunomodulatory mechanisms. In various newt species the ocular tissues such as the lens are regenerative and it has recently been shown that the response to local injury of the lens involves activation of antigen-presenting cells which traffic to the spleen and return to displace and engulf the lens, thereby inducing regeneration from the dorsal iris. The activation of thrombin from prothrombin in the dorsal iris is one aspect of the injury response that is important in the initiation of regeneration. The possible relationships between the immune response and the regenerative response are considered with respect to phylogenetic variation of regeneration in general, and lens regeneration in particular. PMID:17005015

  20. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world’s best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration. PMID:27527229

  1. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  2. Engineered matrices for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, Shelley R.; Hu, Yunhua; Pugh, Amy; Brown, Leanna; Nguyen, Jesse T.; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2000-06-01

    Traditional therapies of autografts and allogeneic banked bone can promote reasonable clinical outcome to repair damaged bone. However, under certain conditions the success of these traditional approaches plummets, providing the incentive for researchers to develop clinical alternatives. The evolving field of tissue engineering in the musculoskeletal system attempts to mimic many of the components from the intact, healthy subject. Those components consist of a biologic scaffold, cells, extracellular matrix, and signaling molecules. The bone biomimetic, i.e., an engineered matrix, provides a porous structural architecture for the regeneration and ingrowth of osseous tissue at the site of injury. To further enhance the regenerative cascade, our strategy has involved porous biodegradable scaffolds containing and releasing signaling molecules and providing a suitable environment for cell attachment, growth and differentiation. In addition, the inclusion of genetically modified osteogenic precursor cells has brought the technology closer to developing a tissue-engineered equivalent. The presentation will describe various formulations and the methods utilized to evaluate the clinical utility of these biomimetics.

  3. Solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; See, G. G.; Schubert, F. H.; Powell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A program to design, develop, fabricate and assemble a one-man, self-contained, solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system (SX-1) incorporating solid electrolyte electrolyzer drums was completed. The SX-1 is a preprototype engineering model designed to produce 0.952 kg (2.1 lb)/day of breathable oxygen (O2) from the electrolysis of metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor. The CO2 supply rate was established based on the metabolic CO2 generation rate for one man of 0.998 kg (2.2 lb)/day. The water supply rate (0.254 kg (0.56 lb)/day) was designed to be sufficient to make up the difference between the 0.952 kg (2.1 lb)/day O2 generation specification and the O2 available through CO2 electrolysis, 0.726 kg (1.6 lb)/day. The SX-1 was successfully designed, fabricated and assembled. Design verification tests (DVT) or the CO Disproportionators, H2 separators, control instrumentation, monitor instrumentation, water feed mechanism were successfully completed. The erratic occurrence of electrolyzer drum leakage prevented the completion of the CO2 electrolyzer module and water electrolyzer module DVT's and also prevented the performance of SX-1 integrated testing. Further development work is required to improve the solid electrolyte cell high temperature seals.

  4. MHD seed recovery/regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Task 1 calls for the design, procurement, construction, and installation of the Seed Regeneration Proof-of-Concept Facility (SRPF) that will produce tonnage quantities of recyclable potassium formate seed at a design rate of 250 lb/hr for testing in the channel at the CDIF while collecting data that will be used to upgrade the design of a 300 MW(sub t) system. Approximately 12 tons of KCOOH (dry basis) as 70-75 wt percent solution were produced. The front end of the plant (potassium sulfate reaction and solids separation/washing units) was operated for five days in March. Most of the operations were conducted at a spent seed feed rate of 250 pounds/hour. A total of 8,500 gallons of dilute KCOOH solution was generated containing approximately 2.6 tons of potassium formate (dry basis). The average KCOOH content of this solution was 7 wt percent. The design KCOOH solution concentration for the front end of the plant is 8.5 wt percent. The evaporation unit was operated for a total of six days during March. Approximately 2.5 tons of potassium formate (dry basis) were processed through the evaporator and concentrated to greater then 7 wt percent.

  5. Tissue Regeneration: A Silk Road.

    PubMed

    Jao, Dave; Mou, Xiaoyang; Hu, Xiao

    2016-08-05

    Silk proteins are natural biopolymers that have extensive structural possibilities for chemical and mechanical modifications to facilitate novel properties, functions, and applications in the biomedical field. The versatile processability of silk fibroins (SF) into different forms such as gels, films, foams, membranes, scaffolds, and nanofibers makes it appealing in a variety of applications that require mechanically superior, biocompatible, biodegradable, and functionalizable biomaterials. There is no doubt that nature is the world's best biological engineer, with simple, exquisite but powerful designs that have inspired novel technologies. By understanding the surface interaction of silk materials with living cells, unique characteristics can be implemented through structural modifications, such as controllable wettability, high-strength adhesiveness, and reflectivity properties, suggesting its potential suitability for surgical, optical, and other biomedical applications. All of the interesting features of SF, such as tunable biodegradation, anti-bacterial properties, and mechanical properties combined with potential self-healing modifications, make it ideal for future tissue engineering applications. In this review, we first demonstrate the current understanding of the structures and mechanical properties of SF and the various functionalizations of SF matrices through chemical and physical manipulations. Then the diverse applications of SF architectures and scaffolds for different regenerative medicine will be discussed in detail, including their current applications in bone, eye, nerve, skin, tendon, ligament, and cartilage regeneration.

  6. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  7. RNA-Catalyzed RNA Ligation on an External RNA Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the hc ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes ligation of the 3' end of an RNA substrate to the 5' end of the ribozyme, were utilized to evolve a ribozyme that catalyzes ligation reactions on an external RNA template. The evolved ribozyme catalyzes the joining of an oligonucleotide 3'-hydroxyl to the 5'-triphosphate of an RNA hairpin molecule. The ribozyme can also utilize various substrate sequences, demonstrating a largely sequence-independent mechanism for substrate recognition. The ribozyme also carries out the ligation of two oligonucleotides that are bound at adjacent positions on a complementary template. Finally, it catalyzes addition of mononucleoside '5-triphosphates onto the '3 end of an oligonucleotide primer in a template-dependent manner. The development of ribozymes that catalyze polymerase-type reactions contributes to the notion that an RNA world could have existed during the early history of life on Earth.

  8. Template-Directed Biopolymerization: Tape-Copying Turing Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2012-10-01

    DNA, RNA and proteins are among the most important macromolecules in a living cell. These molecules are polymerized by molecular machines. These natural nano-machines polymerize such macromolecules, adding one monomer at a time, using another linear polymer as the corresponding template. The machine utilizes input chemical energy to move along the template which also serves as a track for the movements of the machine. In the Alan Turing year 2012, it is worth pointing out that these machines are "tape-copying Turing machines". We review the operational mechanisms of the polymerizer machines and their collective behavior from the perspective of statistical physics, emphasizing their common features in spite of the crucial differences in their biological functions. We also draw the attention of the physics community to another class of modular machines that carry out a different type of template-directed polymerization. We hope this review will inspire new kinetic models for these modular machines.

  9. Nitrocellulose Templated Hierarchical Pore Structure in Mesoporous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohong S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wang, Chong M.; Young, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, a great deal of effort has been expended on the templated synthesis of nanoporous materials. Many different templates have been used to create this nanostructure (surfactants, polymers, latex spheres, etc.), but by far the most widely used has been micelles composed of surfactants. This is a versatile, and highly useful, synthetic method, capable of producing a wide variety of materials and structures. More recently, the synthesis of hierarchical pore structures (i.e. small pores leading to large pores) has been of great interest as a means of enhancing mass transport within these materials.[1] Such hierarchical pore structures have been made by combining surfactant templating methods with latex beads [2], by assembling as-synthesized MCM-41 particles around block co-polymer micelles, followed by crosslinking and calcination [3], by spray drying MCM-41 and MCM-48 agglomerates [4], and by using ''evaporation induced self-assembly'' [5-9].

  10. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein–protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions. PMID:27249579

  11. Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: Template Synthesis and Applications in Energy Storage

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lijia; Qiu, Hao; Dou, Chunmeng; Li, Yun; Pu, Lin; Xu, Jianbin; Shi, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer nanostructures have received increasing attention in both fundamental research and various application fields in recent decades. Compared with bulk conducting polymers, conducting polymer nanostructures are expected to display improved performance in energy storage because of the unique properties arising from their nanoscaled size: high electrical conductivity, large surface area, short path lengths for the transport of ions, and high electrochemical activity. Template methods are emerging for a sort of facile, efficient, and highly controllable synthesis of conducting polymer nanostructures. This paper reviews template synthesis routes for conducting polymer nanostructures, including soft and hard template methods, as well as its mechanisms. The application of conducting polymer mesostructures in energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries, are discussed. PMID:20717527

  12. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-21

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  13. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  14. Template engaged synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guozhu; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2015-03-01

    Hollow ceria-based composites, which consist of noble metal nanoparticles or metal oxides as a secondary component, are being studied extensively for potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis. This is due to their unique features, which exhibit the advantages of a hollow structure (e.g. high surface area and low weight), and also integrate the properties of ceria and noble metals/metal oxides. More importantly, the synergistic effect between constituents in hollow ceria-based composites has been demonstrated in various catalytic reactions. In this feature article, we summarize the state-of-the-art in the synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites, including traditional hard-templates and more recently, sacrificial-template engaged strategies, highlighting the key role of selected templates in the formation of hollow composites. In addition, the catalytic applications of hollow ceria-based composites are briefly surveyed. Finally, challenges and perspectives on future advances of hollow ceria-based composites are outlined.

  15. Template engaged synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guozhu; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2015-03-19

    Hollow ceria-based composites, which consist of noble metal nanoparticles or metal oxides as a secondary component, are being studied extensively for potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis. This is due to their unique features, which exhibit the advantages of a hollow structure (e.g. high surface area and low weight), and also integrate the properties of ceria and noble metals/metal oxides. More importantly, the synergistic effect between constituents in hollow ceria-based composites has been demonstrated in various catalytic reactions. In this feature article, we summarize the state-of-the-art in the synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites, including traditional hard-templates and more recently, sacrificial-template engaged strategies, highlighting the key role of selected templates in the formation of hollow composites. In addition, the catalytic applications of hollow ceria-based composites are briefly surveyed. Finally, challenges and perspectives on future advances of hollow ceria-based composites are outlined.

  16. Template-imprinted nanostructured surfaces for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Tsai, W B; Garrison, M D; Ferrari, S; Ratner, B D

    1999-04-15

    Synthetic materials capable of selectively recognizing proteins are important in separations, biosensors and the development of biomedical materials. The technique of molecular imprinting creates specific recognition sites in polymers by using template molecules. Molecular recognition is attributed to binding sites that complement molecules in size, shape and chemical functionality. But attempts to imprint proteins have met with only limited success. Here we report a method for imprinting surfaces with protein-recognition sites. We use radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma deposition to form polymeric thin films around proteins coated with disaccharide molecules. The disaccharides become covalently attached to the polymer film, creating polysaccharide-like cavities that exhibit highly selective recognition for a variety of template proteins, including albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, ribonuclease and streptavidin. Direct imaging of template recognition is achieved by patterning a surface at the micrometre scale with imprinted regions.

  17. Template-mediated ontogenesis: A novel approach to mesomorphic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Anderson, M.T.; Odinek, J.; Newcomer, P.

    1996-07-01

    In this report the authors describe the methods they have developed for producing stable periodic mesoporous silica gels, thin films of mesoporous silica for sensor applications, a route to nonaqueous synthesis, and the use of various additives in controlling the pore size and structure of these materials. Mesoporous silica is formed by templating silica precursors around micelles of cationic quaternary ammonium surfactants. During the synthesis these micelles undergo a phase transition to a hexagonal, lamellar or cubic liquid crystalline state, thus imposing periodic order on the amorphous silica which occupies the interface of the hydrophilic cationic headgroups of the surfactants. The product of the bulk wet synthesis is a gel composed of micron size silica/surfactant particles, each of which consists of one or more crystalline domains of silica condensed around the surfactant template. The wet gel can then be washed and pyrolyzed to remove the surfactant template, yielding the periodic mesoporous silica product.

  18. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  19. Synthetic Peptide templates for molecular recognition: recent advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yashveer; Dolphin, Gunnar T; Razkin, Jesus; Dumy, Pascal

    2006-09-01

    The creation of molecular systems that can mimic some of the properties of natural macromolecules is one of the major endeavors in contemporary protein chemistry. However, the construction of artificial proteins with predetermined structure and function is difficult on account of complex folding pathways. The use of topological peptide templates has been suggested to induce and stabilize defined secondary and tertiary structures. This is because the recent advances in the chemistry of coupling reagents, protecting groups, and solid-phase synthesis have made the chemical synthesis of peptides with conformationally controlled and complex structures feasible. Besides their use as structure-inducing devices, these peptide templates can also be utilized to construct novel structures with tailor-made functions. Herein, we present recent advances in the field of peptide-template-based approaches with particular emphasis on the demonstrated utility of this approach in molecular recognition, along with related applications.

  20. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  1. Template free synthesis of natural carbohydrates functionalised fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Berenjian, Aydin; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Template-assisted synthesis is one of the most recognised techniques for fabrication of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). However, this process is time consuming, toxic and expensive. In this study, the authors report a completely novel approach for the green and facile synthesis of AgNCs using Matricaria chamomilla, without any additional template. Fluorescent and colloidally stable AgNCs with average particle size of 2.4 nm were successfully produced. They found that carbohydrates from Matricaria chamomilla act as an ideal template to generate fluorescent AgNCs. Moreover, oxygen-bearing functional groups were validated to be the active groups for anchoring and reducing of Ag(+) ions. The novel carbohydrate coating method makes the prepared nanoclusters completely hydrophilic and stable in aqueous matrices.

  2. Kinetic theory and thermodynamics of template-directed copolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Template-directed copolymerization is the fundamental process for the replication, transcription, and translation of genetic information. The copy of the template sequence is grown by the attachment of monomers with a molecular machine. The long-time kinetics of such processes is exactly solvable in terms of iterated function systems. This method determines the effects of sequence heterogeneity and replication errors on the growth of the copy and the statistical properties of its sequence. In particular, a transition can occur between linear and sublinear growth in time of the copy. In the linear regime, the local growth velocity along the template may have a fractal distribution. Furthermore, the growth can be driven around equilibrium by the entropic effect of replication errors in an adverse free-energy landscape.

  3. Silver nanowires--unique templates for functional nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang

    2010-09-01

    This feature article reviews the synthesis and application of silver nanowires with the focus on a polyol process that is capable of producing high quality silver nanowires with high yield. The as-synthesized silver nanowires can be used as both physical templates for the synthesis of metal/dielectric core/shell nanowires and chemical templates for the synthesis of metal nanotubes as well as semiconductor nanowires. Typical examples including Ag/SiO(2) coaxial nanocables, single- and multiple-walled nanotubes made of Au-Ag alloy, AgCl nanowires and AgCl/Au core/shell nanowires are discussed in detail to illustrate the versatility of nanostructures derived from silver nanowire templates. Novel properties associated with these one-dimensional nanostructures are also briefly discussed to shed the light on their potential applications in electronics, photonics, optoelectronics, catalysis, and medicine.

  4. Mesoporous silica and organosilica films templated by nanocrystalline chitin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2013-11-04

    Liquid crystalline phases can be used to impart order into inorganic solids, creating materials that mimic natural architectures. Herein, mesoporous silica and organosilica films with layered structures and high surface areas have been templated by nanocrystalline chitin. Aqueous suspensions of spindle-shaped chitin nanocrystals were prepared by sequential deacetylation and hydrolysis of chitin fibrils isolated from king crab shells. The nanocrystalline chitin self-assembles into a nematic liquid-crystalline phase that has been used to template silica and organosilica composites. Removal of the chitin template by either calcination or sulfuric-acid-catalyzed hydrolysis gave mesoporous silica and ethylene-bridged organosilica films. The large, crack-free mesoporous films have layered structures with features that originate from the nematic organization of the nanocrystalline chitin.

  5. Anticipatory Eye Movements in Interleaving Templates of Human Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matessa, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Performance modeling has been made easier by architectures which package psychological theory for reuse at useful levels of abstraction. CPM-GOMS uses templates of behavior to package at a task level (e.g., mouse move-click, typing) predictions of lower-level cognitive, perceptual, and motor resource use. CPM-GOMS also has a theory for interleaving resource use between templates. One example of interleaving is anticipatory eye movements. This paper describes the use of ACT-Stitch, a framework for translating CPM-GOMS templates and interleaving theory into ACT-R, to model anticipatory eye movements in skilled behavior. The anticipatory eye movements explain performance in a well-practiced perceptual/motor task, and the interleaving theory is supported with results from an eye-tracking experiment.

  6. The cancer paradigms of mammalian regeneration: can mammals regenerate as amphibians?

    PubMed

    Sarig, Rachel; Tzahor, Eldad

    2017-03-15

    Regeneration in mammals is restricted to distinct tissues and occurs mainly by expansion and maturation of resident stem cells. During regeneration, even subtle mutations in the proliferating cells may cause a detrimental effect by eliciting abnormal differentiation or malignant transformation. Indeed, cancer in mammals has been shown to arise through deregulation of stem cells maturation, which often leads to a differentiation block and cell transformation. In contrast, lower organisms such as amphibians retain a remarkable regenerative capacity in various organs, which occurs via de- and re-differentiation of mature cells. Interestingly, regenerating amphibian cells are highly resistant to oncogenic transformation. Therapeutic approaches to improve mammalian regeneration mainly include stem-cell transplantations; but, these have proved unsuccessful in non-regenerating organs such as the heart. A recently developed approach is to induce de-differentiation of mature cardiomyocytes using factors that trigger their re-entry into the cell cycle. This novel approach raises numerous questions regarding the balance between transformation and regeneration induced by de-differentiation of mature mammalian somatic cells. Can this balance be controlled artificially? Do de-differentiated cells acquire the protection mechanisms seen in regenerating cells of lower organisms? Is this model unique to the cardiac tissue, which rarely develops tumors? This review describes regeneration processes in both mammals and lower organisms and, particularly, the ability of regenerating cells to avoid transformation. By comparing the characteristics of mammalian embryonic and somatic cells, we discuss therapeutic strategies of using various cell populations for regeneration. Finally, we describe a novel cardiac regeneration approach and its implications for regenerative medicine.

  7. Unwinding of primer-templates by archaeal family-B DNA polymerases in response to template-strand uracil.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Wu, Xiaohua; Keith, Brian J; Heslop, Pauline; Jones, Anita C; Connolly, Bernard A

    2013-02-01

    Archaeal family-B DNA polymerases bind tightly to deaminated bases and stall replication on encountering uracil in template strands, four bases ahead of the primer-template junction. Should the polymerase progress further towards the uracil, for example, to position uracil only two bases in front of the junction, 3'-5' proof-reading exonuclease activity becomes stimulated, trimming the primer and re-setting uracil to the +4 position. Uracil sensing prevents copying of the deaminated base and permanent mutation in 50% of the progeny. This publication uses both steady-state and time-resolved 2-aminopurine fluorescence to show pronounced unwinding of primer-templates with Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) polymerase-DNA complexes containing uracil at +2; much less strand separation is seen with uracil at +4. DNA unwinding has long been recognized as necessary for proof-reading exonuclease activity. The roles of M247 and Y261, amino acids suggested by structural studies to play a role in primer-template unwinding, have been probed. M247 appears to be unimportant, but 2-aminopurine fluorescence measurements show that Y261 plays a role in primer-template strand separation. Y261 is also required for full exonuclease activity and contributes to the fidelity of the polymerase.

  8. Ferritin-Templated Quantum-Dots for Quantum Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconsitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagonshaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various nanofabrication methods of QD arrays using a wide range manipulation techniques. The precise control of the ferritin-templated QD for a patterned arrangement are offered by various methods, such as a site-specific immobilization of thiolated ferritins through local oxidation using the AFM tip, ferritin arrays induced by gold nanoparticle manipulation, thiolated ferritin positioning by shaving method, etc. In the signal measurements, the current-voltage curve is obtained by measuring the current through the ferritin, between the tip and the substrate for potential sweeping or at constant potential. The measured resistance near zero bias was 1.8 teraohm for single holoferritin and 5.7 teraohm for single apoferritin, respectively.

  9. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes

    PubMed Central

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A.; Roumanes, David R.; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F. Eun‐Hyung; Quataert, Sally A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clustering‐based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT—a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a “template” mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter‐sample differences is increased by “competition” wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age‐related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional

  10. Mechanics of Cellular Adhesion to Artificial Artery Templates

    PubMed Central

    Knöner, Gregor; Rolfe, Barbara E.; Campbell, Julie H.; Parkin, Simon J.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-01-01

    We are using polymer templates to grow artificial artery grafts in vivo for the replacement of diseased blood vessels. We have previously shown that adhesion of macrophages to the template starts the graft formation. We present a study of the mechanics of macrophage adhesion to these templates on a single cell and single bond level with optical tweezers. For whole cells, in vitro cell adhesion densities decreased significantly from polymer templates polyethylene to silicone to Tygon (167, 135, and 65 cells/mm2). These cell densities were correlated with the graft formation success rate (50%, 25%, and 0%). Single-bond rupture forces at a loading rate of 450 pN/s were quantified by adhesion of trapped 2-μm spheres to macrophages. Rupture force distributions were dominated by nonspecific adhesion (forces <40 pN). On polystyrene, preadsorption of fibronectin or presence of serum proteins in the cell medium significantly enhanced adhesion strength from a mean rupture force of 20 pN to 28 pN or 33 pN, respectively. The enhancement of adhesion by fibronectin and serum is additive (mean rupture force of 43 pN). The fraction of specific binding forces in the presence of serum was similar for polystyrene and polymethyl-methacrylate, but specific binding forces were not observed for silica. Again, we found correlation to in vivo experiments, where the density of adherent cells is higher on polystyrene than on silica templates, and can be further enhanced by fibronectin adsorption. These findings show that in vitro adhesion testing can be used for template optimization and to substitute for in-vivo experiments. PMID:16861267

  11. Asymmetric block copolymers for supramolecular templating of inorganic nanospace materials.

    PubMed

    Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Li, Yunqi; Kimura, Tatsuo; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-05-06

    This review focuses on polymeric micelles consisting of asymmetric block copolymers as designed templates for several inorganic nanospace materials with a wide variety of compositions. The presence of chemically distinct domains of asymmetric triblock and diblock copolymers provide self-assemblies with more diverse morphological and functional features than those constructed by EOn POm EOn type symmetric triblock copolymers, thereby affording well-designed nanospace materials. This strategy can produce unprecedented nanospace materials, which are very difficult to prepare through other conventional organic templating approaches. Here, the recent development on the synthesis of inorganic nanospace materials are mainly focused on, such as hollow spheres, tubes, and porous oxides, using asymmetric triblock copolymers.

  12. Templated synthesis of metal nanorods in silica nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuanbo; Zhang, Qiao; Lu, Zhenda; Yin, Yadong

    2011-12-14

    We report a general method for the synthesis of noble metal nanorods, including Au, Ag, Pt, and Pd, based on their seeded growth in silica nanotube templates. The controlled growth of the metals occurs exclusively on the seeds inside the silica nanotubes, which act as hard templates to confine the one-dimensional growth of the metal nanorods and define their aspect ratios. This method affords large quantities of noble metal nanorods with well-controlled aspect ratios and high yield, which may find wide use in the fields of nanophotonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and biomedicine.

  13. Morphology manipulation of M13 bacteriophage template for nanostructure assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo-Duc, Tam-Triet; Zaman, Mohammed S.; Moon, Chung-Hee; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-08-01

    A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage was used as a model system to explore templating of inorganic material on geometrically transformed viruses . Gold-binding filamentous phage were converted to spheroid form with a short chloroform treatment, and the resulting morphology was investigated with electron microscopy. Binding studies revealed that spheroid-shaped gold-binding phage preserved its affinity for gold. Spheroids adhered to a planar substrate assembled clusters or rings of gold nanoparticles. This gold-binding phage served as a demonstration of a highly shape-modifiable viral-template for inorganic materials.

  14. Fabrication of multilayered nanofluidic membranes through silicon templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varricchio, Stefano S. G.; Cyrille, Hibert; Arnaud, Bertsch; Philippe, Renaud

    2015-12-01

    We present a new fabrication method for solid-state nanoporous membranes based on sacrificial template structures made of silicon. The process consists of creating membranes by evaporating thin-films on sacrificial templates which, after their selective removal, opens the nanopores and releases the free-standing membranes. This way it is possible to define the geometry of the pore by design and to build the membrane by stacking thin-films of various materials through evaporation. Such a membrane with controlled porosity, pore geometry, thickness and nano-channel composition provides new opportunities for selective chemical functionalization, gating, electrical sensing or electrical stimulation inside the nanopore.

  15. Macrophage depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration: The roles of regulatory factors for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Linlin; Zeng, Zhigang; Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie

    2017-03-01

    Though macrophages are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration, which is a complex process, the roles and mechanisms of the macrophages in the process of muscle regeneration are still not fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the roles of macrophages and the mechanisms involved in the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. One hundred and twelve C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into muscle contusion and macrophages depleted groups. Their gastrocnemius muscles were harvested at the time points of 12 h, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 d post-injury. The changes in skeletal muscle morphology were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The data showed that CL-liposomes treatment did affect the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MyoD, myogenin) after injury. In addition, CL-liposomes treatment decreased the expression of regulatory factors of muscle regeneration (HGF, uPA, COX-2, IGF-1, MGF, FGF6) and increased the expression of inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES) in the late stage of regeneration. Moreover, there were significant correlations between macrophages and some regulatory factors (such as HGF, uPA) for muscle regeneration. These results suggested that macrophages depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that the regulatory factors for muscle regeneration may play important roles in this process.

  16. A highly oriented hybrid microarray modified electrode fabricated by a template-free method for ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Chu, Zhenyu; Dong, Xueliang; Jin, Wanqin; Dempsey, Eithne

    2013-10-01

    Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and influence the morphologies of hybrid films. A highly oriented hybrid microarray was formed on the highly aligned and vertical SAMs of 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules with rigid backbones, which afforded an intense structure-directing power for the oriented growth of hybrid crystals. Additionally, the density of the microarray could be adjusted by controlling the surface coverage of assembled molecules. Based on the hybrid microarray modified electrode with a large specific area (ca. 10 times its geometrical area), a label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor was constructed for the detection of an oligonucleotide fragment of the avian flu virus H5N1. The DNA biosensor displayed a significantly low detection limit of 5 pM (S/N = 3), a wide linear response from 10 pM to 10 nM, as well as excellent selectivity, good regeneration and high stability. We expect that the proposed template-free method can provide a new reference for the fabrication of a highly oriented hybrid array and the as-prepared microarray modified electrode will be a promising paradigm in constructing highly sensitive and selective biosensors.Highly oriented growth of a hybrid microarray was realized by a facile template-free method on gold substrates for the first time. The proposed formation mechanism involves an interfacial structure-directing force arising from self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) between gold substrates and hybrid crystals. Different SAMs and variable surface coverage of the assembled molecules play a critical role in the interfacial directing forces and

  17. Scaling digital radiographs for templating in total hip arthroplasty using conventional acetate templates independent of calibration markers.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Simpson, Philip M; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Donnelly, William; Crawford, Ross W; Hubble, Matthew J W

    2012-04-01

    We describe a scaling method for templating digital radiographs using conventional acetate templates independent of template magnification without the need for a calibration marker. The mean magnification factor for the radiology department was determined (119.8%; range, 117%-123.4%). This fixed magnification factor was used to scale the radiographs by the method described. Thirty-two femoral heads on postoperative total hip arthroplasty radiographs were then measured and compared with the actual size. The mean absolute accuracy was within 0.5% of actual head size (range, 0%-3%) with a mean absolute difference of 0.16 mm (range, 0-1 mm; SD, 0.26 mm). Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability for both interobserver and intraobserver measurements with intraclass correlation coefficient scores of 0.993 (95% CI, 0.988-0.996) for interobserver measurements and intraobserver measurements ranging between 0.990 and 0.993 (95% CI, 0.980-0.997).

  18. p53 on the crossroad between regeneration and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charni, Meital; Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Molchadsky, Alina; Rotter, Varda

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration and tumorigenesis share common molecular pathways, nevertheless the outcome of regeneration is life, whereas tumorigenesis leads to death. Although the process of regeneration is strictly controlled, malignant transformation is unrestrained. In this review, we discuss the involvement of TP53, the major tumor-suppressor gene, in the regeneration process. We point to the role of p53 as coordinator assuring that regeneration will not shift to carcinogenesis. The fluctuation in p53 activity during the regeneration process permits a tight control. On one hand, its inhibition at the initial stages allows massive proliferation, on the other its induction at advanced steps of regeneration is essential for preservation of robustness and fidelity of the regeneration process. A better understanding of the role of p53 in regulation of regeneration may open new opportunities for implementation of TP53-based therapies, currently available for cancer patients, in regenerative medicine. PMID:27768121

  19. TISSUE REGENERATION. Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I; Fink, Stephen P; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E; Williams, Noelle S; Dawson, Dawn M; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L; Ready, Joseph M; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K V; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-06-12

    Agents that promote tissue regeneration could be beneficial in a variety of clinical settings, such as stimulating recovery of the hematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, a lipid signaling molecule that supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here, we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. The same compound also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. Thus, 15-PGDH inhibition may be a valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue regeneration in diverse clinical contexts.

  20. Gene expression profile of the regeneration epithelium during axolotl limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Leah J; Suárez-Castillo, Edna C; Ortiz-Zuazaga, Humberto; Knapp, Dunja; Tanaka, Elly M; Crews, Craig M

    2011-07-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate missing limbs. The process of limb regeneration requires several key tissues including a regeneration-competent wound epidermis called the regeneration epithelium (RE). We used microarray analysis to profile gene expression of the RE in the axolotl, a Mexican salamander. A list of 125 genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) showed a ≥1.5-fold expression in the RE than in a wound epidermis covering a lateral cuff wound. A subset of the RE ESTs and genes were further characterized for expression level changes over the time-course of regeneration. This study provides the first large scale identification of specific gene expression in the RE.

  1. Unexpected regeneration in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Reines, Brandon; Cheng, Lily I; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-02-01

    Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5-11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight.

  2. Apoptosis, stem cells, and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Andreas; Steller, Hermann

    2010-10-26

    Most metazoans have at least some ability to regenerate damaged cells and tissues, although the regenerative capacity varies depending on the species, organ, or developmental stage. Cell replacement and regeneration occur in two contexts: renewal of spent cells during tissue homeostasis (homeostatic growth), and in response to external injury, wounding, or amputation (epimorphic regeneration). Model organisms that display remarkable regenerative capacity include amphibians, planarians, Hydra, and the vertebrate liver. In addition, several mammalian organs--including the skin, gut, kidney, muscle, and even the human nervous system--have some ability to replace spent or damaged cells. Although the regenerative response is complex, it typically involves the induction of new cell proliferation through formation of a blastema, followed by cell specification, differentiation, and patterning. Stem cells and undifferentiated progenitor cells play an important role in both tissue homeostasis and tissue regeneration. Stem cells are typically quiescent or passing slowly through the cell cycle in adult tissues, but they can be activated in response to cell loss and wounding. A series of studies, mostly performed in Drosophila as well as in Hydra, Xenopus, and mouse, has revealed an unexpected role of apoptotic caspases in the production of mitogenic signals that stimulate the proliferation of stem and progenitor cells to aid in tissue regeneration. This Review summarizes some of the key findings and discusses links to stem cell biology and cancer.

  3. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthesis promotes liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Moffitt, Andrea; Ndungu, Joan; Dellinger, Ryan W; Davis, James G; Agarwal, Beamon; Baur, Joseph A

    2017-02-01

    The regenerative capacity of the liver is essential for recovery from surgical resection or injuries induced by trauma or toxins. During liver regeneration, the concentration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) falls, at least in part due to metabolic competition for precursors. To test whether NAD availability restricts the rate of liver regeneration, we supplied nicotinamide riboside (NR), an NAD precursor, in the drinking water of mice subjected to partial hepatectomy. NR increased DNA synthesis, mitotic index, and mass restoration in the regenerating livers. Intriguingly, NR also ameliorated the steatosis that normally accompanies liver regeneration. To distinguish the role of hepatocyte NAD levels from any systemic effects of NR, we generated mice overexpressing nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme for NAD synthesis, specifically in the liver. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase overexpressing mice were mildly hyperglycemic at baseline and, similar to mice treated with NR, exhibited enhanced liver regeneration and reduced steatosis following partial hepatectomy. Conversely, mice lacking nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in hepatocytes exhibited impaired regenerative capacity that was completely rescued by administering NR.

  4. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  5. Unexpected Regeneration in Middle-Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lily I.; Matzinger, Polly

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Complete regeneration of damaged extremities, including both the epithelium and the underlying tissues, is thought to occur mainly in embryos, fetuses, and juvenile mammals, but only very rarely in adult mammals. Surprisingly, we found that common strains of mice are able to regenerate all of the tissues necessary to completely fill experimentally punched ear holes, but only if punched at middle age. Although young postweaning mice regrew the epithelium without typical pre-scar granulation tissue, they showed only minimal regeneration of connective tissues. In contrast, mice punched at 5–11 months of age showed true amphibian-like blastema formation and regrowth of cartilage, fat, and dermis, with blood vessels, sebaceous glands, hair follicles, and, in black mice, melanocytes. These data suggest that at least partial appendage regeneration may be more common in adult mammals than previously thought and call into question the common view that regenerative ability is lost with age. The data suggest that the age at which various inbred mouse strains become capable of epimorphic regeneration may be correlated with adult body weight. PMID:19226206

  6. Equine model for soft-tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Rollins, Amanda; Moreau, Jodie E; Lo, Tim; Quinn, Kyle P; Fourligas, Nicholas; Georgakoudi, Irene; Leisk, Gary G; Mazan, Melissa; Thane, Kristen E; Taeymans, Olivier; Hoffman, A M; Kaplan, D L; Kirker-Head, C A

    2015-08-01

    Soft-tissue regeneration methods currently yield suboptimal clinical outcomes due to loss of tissue volume and a lack of functional tissue regeneration. Grafted tissues and natural biomaterials often degrade or resorb too quickly, while most synthetic materials do not degrade. In previous research we demonstrated that soft-tissue regeneration can be supported using silk porous biomaterials for at least 18 months in vivo in a rodent model. In the present study, we scaled the system to a survival study using a large animal model and demonstrated the feasibility of these biomaterials for soft-tissue regeneration in adult horses. Both slow and rapidly degrading silk matrices were evaluated in subcutaneous pocket and intramuscular defect depots. We showed that we can effectively employ an equine model over 6 months to simultaneously evaluate many different implants, reducing the number of animals needed. Furthermore, we were able to tailor matrix degradation by varying the initial format of the implanted silk. Finally, we demonstrate ultrasound imaging of implants to be an effective means for tracking tissue regeneration and implant degradation.

  7. Evolutionary history of regeneration in crinoids (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Gahn, Forest J; Baumiller, Tomasz K

    2010-10-01

    The fossil record indicates that crinoids have exhibited remarkable regenerative abilities since their origin in the Ordovician, abilities that they likely inherited from stem-group echinoderms. Regeneration in extant and fossil crinoids is recognized by abrupt differences in the size of abutting plates, aberrant branching patterns, and discontinuities in carbon isotopes. While recovery is common, not all lost body parts can be regenerated; filling plates and overgrowths are evidence of non-regenerative healing. Considering them as a whole, Paleozoic crinoids exhibit the same range of regenerative and non-regenerative healing as Recent crinoids. For example, Paleozoic and extant crinoids show evidence of crown regeneration and stalk regrowth, which can occur only if the entoneural nerve center (chambered organ) remains intact. One group of Paleozoic crinoids, the camerates, may be an exception in that they probably could not regenerate their complex calyx-plating arrangements, including arm facets, but their calyxes could be healed with reparative plates. With that exception, and despite evidence for increases in predation pressure, there is no compelling evidence that crinoids have changed though time in their ability to recover from wounds. Finally, although crinoid appendages may be lost as a consequence of severe abiotic stress and through ontogenetic development, spatiotemporal changes in the intensity and frequency of biotic interactions, especially direct attacks, are the most likely explanation for observed patterns of regeneration and autotomy in crinoids.

  8. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-02-06

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  9. The Molecular and Cellular Choreography of Appendage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-06-16

    Recent advances in limb regeneration are revealing the molecular events that integrate growth control, cell fate programming, and positional information to yield the exquisite replacement of the amputated limb. Parallel progress in several invertebrate and vertebrate models has provided a broader context for understanding the mechanisms and the evolution of regeneration. Together, these discoveries provide a foundation for describing the principles underlying regeneration of complex, multi-tissue structures. As such these findings should provide a wealth of ideas for engineers seeking to reconstitute regeneration from constituent parts or to elicit full regeneration from partial regeneration events.

  10. Triple templating of graphitic carbon nitride to enhance photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Danks, A. E.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Schnepp, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride materials show some promising properties for applications such as photocatalytic water splitting. However, the conversion efficiency is still low due to factors such as a low surface area and limited light absorption. In this paper, we describe a "triple templating" approach to generating porous graphitic carbon nitride. The introduction of pores on several length-scales results in enhanced photocatalytic properties.

  11. Temperature, template topology, and factor requirements of archaeal transcription

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen D.; Jaxel, Christine; Nadal, Marc; Kosa, Peter F.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    Although Archaea are prokaryotic and resemble Bacteria morphologically, their transcription apparatus is remarkably similar to those of eukaryotic cell nuclei. Because some Archaea exist in environments with temperatures of around 100°C, they are likely to have evolved unique strategies for transcriptional control. Here, we investigate the effects of temperature and DNA template topology in a thermophilic archaeal transcription system. Significantly, and in marked contrast with characterized eucaryal systems, archaeal DNA template topology has negligible effect on transcription levels at physiological temperatures using highly purified polymerase and recombinant transcription factors. Furthermore, archaeal transcription does not require hydrolysis of the β-γ phosphoanhydride bond of ATP. However, at lower temperatures, negatively supercoiled templates are transcribed more highly than those that are positively supercoiled. Notably, the block to transcription on positively supercoiled templates at lowered temperatures is at the level of polymerase binding and promoter opening. These data imply that Archaea do not possess a functional homologue of transcription factor TFIIH, and that for the promoters studied, transcription is mediated by TATA box-binding protein, transcription factor TFB, and RNA polymerase alone. Furthermore, they suggest that the reduction of plasmid linking number by hyperthermophilic Archaea in vivo in response to cold shock is a mechanism to maintain gene expression under these adverse circumstances. PMID:9860949

  12. Magnetic and conductive magnetite nanowires by DNA-templating.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hasan Daw A; Watson, Scott M D; Horrocks, Benjamin R; Houlton, Andrew

    2012-09-28

    The synthesis of nanowires made of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) phase iron oxide was achieved using DNA as a template to direct formation of the metal oxide and confine its growth in two dimensions. This simple solution-based approach involves initial association of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) to the DNA "template" molecules, and subsequent co-precipitation of the Fe(3)O(4) material, upon increasing the solution pH, to give the final metal oxide nanowires. Analysis of the DNA-templated material, using a combination of FTIR, XRD, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy, confirmed the iron oxide formed to be the Fe(3)O(4) crystal phase. Investigation of the structural character of the nanowires, carried out by AFM, revealed the metal oxide to form regular coatings of nanometre-scale thickness around the DNA templates. Statistical analysis showed the size distribution of the nanowires to follow a trimodal model, with the modal diameter values identified as 5-6 nm, 14-15 nm, and 23-24 nm. Additional scanning probe microscopy techniques (SCM, MFM) were also used to verify that the nanowire structures are electrically conducting and exhibit magnetic behaviour. Such properties, coupled with the small dimensions of these materials, make them potentially good candidates for application in a host of future nanoscale device technologies.

  13. DNA-templated nanowires: morphology and electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott M. D.; Pike, Andrew R.; Pate, Jonathan; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2014-03-01

    DNA-templating has been used to create nanowires from metals, compound semiconductors and conductive polymers. The mechanism of growth involves nucleation at binding sites on the DNA followed by growth of spherical particles and then, under favourable conditions, a slow transformation to a smooth nanowire. The final transformation is favoured by restricting the amount of templated material per unit length of template and occurs most readily for materials of low surface tension. Electrical measurements on DNA-templated nanowires can be facilitated using three techniques: (i) standard current-voltage measurements with contact electrodes embedded in a dielectric so that there is a minimal step height at the dielectric/electrode boundary across which nanowires may be aligned by molecular combing, (ii) the use of a dried droplet technique and conductive AFM to determine contact resistance by moving the tip along the length of an individual nanowire and (iii) non-contact assessment of conductivity by scanned conductance microscopy on Si/SiO2 substrates.

  14. A low invasiveness patient's specific template for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, Farhad; Hassani, Kamran; Saveh, Amir Hossein; Tabatabai Ghomshe, Farhad

    2017-02-01

    Free-hand pedicle screw placement is still conventional in surgery, although it has potentially high risks. The surgical procedures such as pedicle screw placement are usually designed based on medical imaging, but during surgery, the procedures are not normally followed due to the fact that some points are missed in two-dimensional images and seen only during surgery. In this regards, some highly accurate computer-assisted systems have been proposed and are currently used. Moreover, it is possible to reduce or completely avoid hand working by applying modern digital technology. Therefore, using these technologies has remarkable advantages. In this study, we have presented a new approach of pedicle screw placement in the lumbar and sacral regions using a specific drill guide template. The template was created by additive manufacturing technology and was verified in a clinical study as well. The main aim of this research includes the following: design, analyze, manufacture and evaluate the accuracy of a new patient-specific drill guide template, for lumbar pedicle screw placement, and compare the template to the free-hand technique under fluoroscopy supervision. Our results show that the incidence of cortex perforation is substantially reduced compared to existing methods. Finally, we believe that this approach remarkably lowers the incidence of cortex perforation and could be potentially used in clinical applications, particularly in certain selected cases.

  15. Ordered nanoparticle arrays formed on engineered chaperonin protein templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, R. Andrew; Paavola, Chad D.; Howard, Jeanie; Chan, Suzanne L.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional methods for fabricating nanoscale arrays are usually based on lithographic techniques. Alternative new approaches rely on the use of nanoscale templates made of synthetic or biological materials. Some proteins, for example, have been used to form ordered two-dimensional arrays. Here, we fabricated nanoscale ordered arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots by binding preformed nanoparticles onto crystalline protein templates made from genetically engineered hollow double-ring structures called chaperonins. Using structural information as a guide, a thermostable recombinant chaperonin subunit was modified to assemble into chaperonins with either 3 nm or 9 nm apical pores surrounded by chemically reactive thiols. These engineered chaperonins were crystallized into two-dimensional templates up to 20 microm in diameter. The periodic solvent-exposed thiols within these crystalline templates were used to size-selectively bind and organize either gold (1.4, 5 or 10nm) or CdSe-ZnS semiconductor (4.5 nm) quantum dots into arrays. The order within the arrays was defined by the lattice of the underlying protein crystal. By combining the self-assembling properties of chaperonins with mutations guided by structural modelling, we demonstrate that quantum dots can be manipulated using modified chaperonins and organized into arrays for use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices.

  16. A Writing Template for Probing Students' Botanical Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandersee, James H.; Clary, Renee M.; Guzman, Sandra M.

    2006-01-01

    Writing can be a powerful tool for learning biology. Writing assignments in biology could help students personalize and understand the biology knowledge they are studying. In this article, the authors present the "Botanical Sense of Place" (BSP), a convenient and easy-to-use writing template that they developed to elicit and probe students' prior…

  17. DNA-templated silver nanoclusters for multiplexed fluorescent DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Changfeng; Zhang, Lei; Tan, Chaoliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Bo; Wang, Lianhui; Zhang, Hua

    2015-03-25

    Novel label-free/conjugation-free molecular beacons are designed based on DNA templated-silver nanoclusters for multiplexed DNA detection. The assay is implemented in solution, which makes it easy for the in-situ and real-time analysis. This study demonstrates a new method for multiplexd detection of biological molecules by using fluorescent Ag nanocluster-based molecular beacon probes.

  18. SYNCHROTRON X - RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A MONOLAYER TEMPLATE FOR MINERALIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIMASI,E.; GOWER,L.B.

    2000-11-27

    Mineral nucleation at a Langmuir film interface has been studied by synchrotron x-ray scattering. Diluted calcium bicarbonate solutions were used as subphases for arachidic and stearic acid monolayers, compressed in a Langmuir trough. Self-assembly of the monolayer template is observed directly, and subsequent crystal growth monitored in-situ.

  19. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  20. A Writing Template for Probing Students' Geological Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Because many incoming geoscience students did not acknowledge their previous personal encounters with the earth's geological processes or products, we developed the Geological Sense of Place (GSP) template as a convenient way to assess students' earth science backgrounds through short answer, mini-essay, and induced associative responses. The GSP…