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Sample records for biosurfactants mannosylerythritol lipids

  1. Application of yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, as agrospreaders.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Nakamura, Junichi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The spreading property of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) was investigated in connection with our search for new application in agriculture. The wetting ability of MEL solutions for hydrophobic surfaces was evaluated based on contact angle measurements for several surfactant solutions on abiotic and biotic surfaces. The contact angle of MEL-A solution on a hydrophobic plastic surface at 100 s after placement decreased to 8.4°, and those of other MEL solutions decreased more significantly compared to those of commonly-used nonionic surfactants. In addition, the contact angle of MEL solutions also dropped down to around 10° on various plant leaf surfaces. MEL solutions, in particular, efficiently spread even on poorly wettable Gramineae plant surfaces on which general nonionic surfactant solutions could not. Moreover, the wetting ability of MEL solutions was found to be greatly affected by the structural difference in their carbohydrate configuration. Furthermore, surface pretreatment with MEL solution led to more efficient spreading and fixing of microbial cells onto plant leaf surface compared to several conventional surfactants used in this study. These results suggested that MELs have a potential to use as a natural bio-based spreading agent, particularly as agrochemical spreader for biopesticides.

  2. Mannosylerythritol lipids: a review.

    PubMed

    Arutchelvi, Joseph Irudayaraj; Bhaduri, Sumit; Uppara, Parasu Veera; Doble, Mukesh

    2008-12-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are surface active compounds that belong to the glycolipid class of biosurfactants (BSs). MELs are produced by Pseudozyma sp. as a major component while Ustilago sp. produces them as a minor component. Although MELs have been known for over five decades, they recently regained attention due to their environmental compatibility, mild production conditions, structural diversity, self-assembling properties and versatile biochemical functions. In this review, the MEL producing microorganisms, the production conditions, their applications, their diverse structures and self-assembling properties are discussed. The biosynthetic pathways and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the production of MEL are also explained here.

  3. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  4. Direct xylan conversion into glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T).

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno Torres; Marques, Susana; Fonseca, César; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are glycolipid biosurfactants, produced by Pseudozyma spp., with increasing commercial interest. While MEL can be produced from d-glucose and d-xylose, the direct conversion of the respective lignocellulosic polysaccharides, cellulose and xylan, was not reported yet. The ability of Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and Pseudozyma aphidis PYCC 5535(T) to use cellulose (Avicel(®)) and xylan (beechwood) as carbon and energy source has been assessed along with their capacity of producing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, toward a consolidated bioprocess (CBP) for MEL production. The yeasts assessed were neither able to grow in medium containing Avicel(®) nor produce cellulolytic enzymes under the conditions tested. On contrary, both yeasts were able to efficiently grow in xylan, but MEL production was only detected in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) cultures. MEL titers reached 1.3g/l after 10 days in batch cultures with 40g/l xylan, and 2.0g/l in fed-batch cultures with xylan feeding (additional 40g/l) at day 4. High levels of xylanase activities were detected in xylan cultures, reaching 47-62U/ml (31-32U/mg) at 50°C, and still exhibiting more than 10U/ml under physiological temperature (28°C). Total β-xylosidase activities, displayed mainly as wall-bounded and extracellular activity, accounted for 0.154 and 0.176U/ml in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and P. aphidis PYCC 5535(T) cultures, respectively. The present results demonstrate the potential of Pseudozyma spp. for using directly a fraction of lignocellulosic biomass, xylan, and combining in the same bioprocess the production of xylanolytic enzymes with MEL production.

  5. Control of enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers by treatment with biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, derived from Pseudozyma spp. yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-02-01

    Cutinase-like esterase from the yeasts Pseudozyma antarctica (PaE) shows strong degradation activity in an agricultural biodegradable plastic (BP) model of mulch films composed of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA). P. antarctica is known to abundantly produce a glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL). Here, the effects of MEL on PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs were investigated. Based on PBSA dispersion solution, the degradation of PBSA particles by PaE was inhibited in the presence of MEL. MEL behavior on BP substrates was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a sensor chip coated with polymer films. The positive SPR signal shift indicated that MEL readily adsorbed and spread onto the surface of a BP film. The amount of BP degradation by PaE was monitored based on the negative SPR signal shift and was decreased 1.7-fold by MEL pretreatment. Furthermore, the shape of PBSA mulch films in PaE-containing solution was maintained with MEL pretreatment, whereas untreated films were almost completely degraded and dissolved. These results suggest that MEL covering the surface of BP film inhibits adsorption of PaE and PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs. We applied the above results to control the microbial degradation of BP mulch films. MEL pretreatment significantly inhibited BP mulch film degradation by both PaE solution and BP-degradable microorganism. Moreover, the degradation of these films was recovered after removal of the coated MEL by ethanol treatment. These results demonstrate that the biodegradation of BP films can be readily and reversibly controlled by a physical approach using MEL.

  6. Conversion of cellulosic materials into glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma spp. under SHF and SSF processes.

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno Torres; Santos, Marisa; Ferreira, Carla; Marques, Susana; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo; Fonseca, César

    2014-11-04

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are glycolipids with unique biosurfactant properties and are produced by Pseudozyma spp. from different substrates, preferably vegetable oils, but also sugars, glycerol or hydrocarbons. However, solvent intensive downstream processing and the relatively high prices of raw materials currently used for MEL production are drawbacks in its sustainable commercial deployment. The present work aims to demonstrate MEL production from cellulosic materials and investigate the requirements and consequences of combining commercial cellulolytic enzymes and Pseudozyma spp. under separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes. MEL was produced from cellulosic substrates, Avicel® as reference (>99% cellulose) and hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw, using commercial cellulolytic enzymes (Celluclast 1.5 L® and Novozyme 188®) and Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T) or Pseudozyma aphidis PYCC 5535(T). The strategies included SHF, SSF and fed-batch SSF with pre-hydrolysis. While SSF was isothermal at 28°C, in SHF and fed-batch SSF, yeast fermentation was preceded by an enzymatic (pre-)hydrolysis step at 50°C for 48 h. Pseudozyma antarctica showed the highest MEL yields from both cellulosic substrates, reaching titres of 4.0 and 1.4 g/l by SHF of Avicel® and wheat straw (40 g/l glucan), respectively, using enzymes at low dosage (3.6 and 8.5 FPU/gglucan at 28°C and 50°C, respectively) with prior dialysis. Higher MEL titres were obtained by fed-batch SSF with pre-hydrolysis, reaching 4.5 and 2.5 g/l from Avicel® and wheat straw (80 g/l glucan), respectively. This work reports for the first time MEL production from cellulosic materials. The process was successfully performed through SHF, SSF or Fed-batch SSF, requiring, for maximal performance, dialysed commercial cellulolytic enzymes. The use of inexpensive lignocellulosic substrates associated to straightforward downstream processing

  7. Mannosylerythritol lipids: production and applications.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are a glycolipid class of biosurfactants produced by a variety yeast and fungal strains that exhibit excellent interfacial and biochemical properties. MEL-producing fungi were identified using an efficient screening method for the glycolipid production and taxonomical classification on the basis of ribosomal RNA sequences. MEL production is limited primarily to the genus Pseudozyma, with significant variability among the MEL structures produced by each species. Outside of Pseudozyma, one recently isolated strain, Ustilago scitaminea, has been shown to exhibit abundant MEL-B production from sugarcane juice. Structural analyses of these compounds suggest a role for MELs in numerous cosmetic applications. MELs act as effective topical moisturizers and can repair damaged hair. Furthermore, these compounds have been shown to exhibit both protective and healing activities, to activate fibroblasts and papilla cells, and to act as natural antioxidants. In this review, we provide a brief summary of MEL research over the past few decades, focusing on the identification of MEL-producing fungi, the structural characterization of MELs, the use of alternative compounds as a primary carbon source, and the use of these compounds in cosmetic applications.

  8. Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, show antioxidant and protective effects against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are biosurfactants known for their versatile interfacial and biochemical properties. To broaden their application in cosmetics, we investigated the antioxidant properties of different MEL derivatives (MEL-A, -B, and -C) by using a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazine (DPPH) free-radical- and superoxide anion-scavenging assay. All MEL derivatives tested showed antioxidant activity in vitro, but at lower levels than those of arbutin. Of the MELs, MEL-C, which is produced from soybean oil by Pseudozyma hubeiensis, showed the highest rates of DPPH radical scavenging (50.3% at 10 mg/mL) and superoxide anion scavenging (>50% at 1 mg/mL). The antioxidant property of MEL-C was further examined using cultured human skin fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells) under H(2)O(2) induced oxidative stress. Surprisingly, MEL-C had a higher protective activity against oxidative stress than arbutin did: 10 µg/mL of MEL-C and arbutin had protective activities of 30.3% and 13%, respectively. Expression of an oxidative stress marker, cyclooxygenase-2, in these cells was repressed by treatment with MEL-C as well as by arbutin. MEL-C was thus confirmed to have antioxidant and protective effects in cells, and we suggest that MELs have potential as anti-aging skin care ingredients.

  9. Production of mannosylerythritol lipids and their application in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2013-06-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants abundantly produced by different basidiomycetous yeasts such as Pseudozyma, and show not only excellent interfacial properties but also versatile biochemical actions. These features of MELs make their application in new technology areas possible. Recently, the structural and functional variety of MELs was considerably expanded by advanced microbial screening methods. Different types of MELs bearing different hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts have been reported. The genes responsible for MEL biosynthesis were identified, and their genetic study is now in progress, aiming to control the chemical structure. The excellent properties leading to practical cosmetic ingredients, i.e., moisturization of dry skin, repair of damaged hair, activation of fibroblast and papilla cells and antioxidant and protective effects in skin cells, have been demonstrated on the yeast glycolipid biosurfactants. In this review, the current status of research and development on MELs, particularly the commercial application in cosmetics, is described.

  10. A yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, shows potential moisturizing activity toward cultured human skin cells: the recovery effect of MEL-A on the SDS-damaged human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Suzuki, Michiko; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced in large amounts from renewable vegetable oils by Pseudozyma antarctica, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, the skin care property of MEL-A, the major component of MELs, was investigated using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution of 1 wt%, and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were then evaluated on the basis of the cell viability. The viability of the damaged cells was markedly recovered by the addition of MEL-A in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control, MEL-A solutions of 5 wt% and 10 wt% gave the recovery rate of 73% and 91%, respectively, while ceramide solution of 1 wt% gave the rate of over 100%. This revealed that MEL-A shows a ceramide-like moisturizing activity toward the skin cells. Considering the drawbacks of natural ceramides, namely limited amount and high production cost, the yeast biosurfactants should have a great potential as a novel moisturizer for treating the damaged skin.

  11. Enhanced separation and analysis procedure reveals production of tri-acylated mannosylerythritol lipids by Pseudozyma aphidis.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Eliane; Wijnants, Marc; Packet, Dirk; Lemière, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising biosurfactants because of their high fermentation yields (>100 g l(-1)) and during the last two decades they have gained a lot of attention due to their interesting self-assembling properties and biological activities. In this study, MELs were produced by fed-batch bioreactor fermentation of rapeseed oil with Pseudozyma aphidis MUCL 27852. This high-level MEL-producing yeast secretes four conventional MEL structures, -A, -B, -C and -D, which differ in their degree of acetylation. During our research, unknown compounds synthesized by P. aphidis were detected by thin-layer chromatography. The unknown compounds were separated by flash chromatography and identified as tri-acylated MELs by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The third fatty acid chain on the tri-acylated MELs was positioned on the primary alcohol of the erythritol moiety and comprised long-chain acids, mainly oleic and linoleic acid, which are not found in conventional di-acylated MELs. Furthermore, the LC-MS analysis time of conventional MELs was reduced to almost one-third by switching from HPLC-MS/MS to ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Provided optimization of the fermentation yield, P. aphidis could be an interesting novel producer of tri-acylated MELs and, thereby expand the supply and applicability of biosurfactants.

  12. Characterization and Inducing Melanoma Cell Apoptosis Activity of Mannosylerythritol Lipids-A Produced from Pseudozyma aphidis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Linlin; Li, Hongji; Niu, Yongwu; Chen, Qihe

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are natural glycolipid biosurfactants which have potential applications in the fields of food, cosmetic and medicine. In this study, MELs were produced from vegetable oil by Pseudozyma aphidis. Their structural data through LC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis revealed that MEL-A with two acetyls was the major compound and the identified homologs of MEL-A contained a length of C8 to C14 fatty acid chains. This glycolipid exhibited a surface tension of 27.69 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC), self-assembling into particles in the water solution. It was observed to induce cell growth-inhibition and apoptosis of B16 melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner, as well as cause cell cycle arrest at the S phase. Further quantitative RT-PCR analysis and western blotting revealed an increasing tendency of both mRNA and protein expressions of Caspase-12, CHOP, GRP78 and Caspase-3, and a down-regulation of protein Bcl-2. Combined with the up regulation of signaling IRE1 and ATF6, it can be speculated that MEL-A-induced B16 melanoma cell apoptosis was associated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). PMID:26828792

  13. Characterization of mannosylerythritol lipids containing hexadecatetraenoic acid produced from cuttlefish oil by Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kawamura, Daisuke; Morita, Naoki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds produced by microorganisms. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are promising biosurfactants produced by Ustilaginomycetes, and their physicochemical and biochemical properties differ depending on the chemical structure of their hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic moieties. To further develop MEL derivatives and expand their potential applications, we focused our attention on the use of cuttlefish oil, which contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (e.g., docosahexaenoic acid, C₂₂:₆, and eicosapentaenoic acid, C₂₀:₅, as the sole carbon source. Among the microorganisms capable of producing MEL, only nine strains were able to produce them from cuttlefish oil. On gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis, we observed that Pseudozyma churashimaensis OK96 was particularly suitable for the production of MEL-A, a MEL containing hexadecatetraenoic acid (C₁₆:₄) (23.6% of the total unsaturated fatty acids and 7.7% of the total fatty acids). The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension at CMC of the new MEL-A were 5.7×10⁻⁶ M and 29.5 mN/m, respectively, while those of MEL-A produced from soybean oil were 2.7×10⁻⁶ M and 27.7 mN/m, respectively. With polarized optical and confocal laser scanning microscopies, the self-assembling properties of MEL-A were found to be different from those of conventional MEL. Furthermore, based on the DPPH radical-scavenging assay, the anti-oxidative activity of MEL-A was found to be 2.1-fold higher than that of MEL-A produced from soybean oil. Thus, the newly identified MEL-A is attractive as a new functional material with excellent surface-active and antioxidative properties.

  14. Selective production of deacetylated mannosylerythritol lipid, MEL-D, by acetyltransferase disruption mutant of Pseudozyma hubeiensis.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Makino, Motoki

    2017-08-25

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are produced by several smut fungi of the Ustilaginaceae family; they are promising microbial biosurfactants and have excellent surface-active and self-assembling properties. Pseudozyma hubeiensis is a candidate for abundant MEL production and produces large amounts of 4-O-[(4'-mono-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-β-d-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-C). An acetyltransferase disruption mutant of P. hubeiensis, SY62-MM36, was obtained to selectively produce deacetylated 4-O-[(2',3'-di-O-alkanoyl)-β-d-mannopyranosyl]-meso-erythritol (MEL-D), and the structures of the products were determined. Lower mobility of major spots of the mutant on silica gel thin-layer chromatography verified its more hydrophilic nature than that of wild-type MEL-A, B, and C. Structural analyses confirmed the product to be MEL-D, which comprises acyl chains of caproic acid (C6:0), capric acid (C10:0), and lauric acid (C12:0). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension (γCMC) of the MEL-D were 2.0 × 10(-5) M and 29.7 mN/m, respectively. SY62-MM36 also produced a minor product that was estimated as triacylated MEL-D. The triacylated MEL-D had a CMC of 3.5 × 10(-5) M and a γCMC of 29.6 mN/m. In water, MEL-D formed a lamella liquid crystal phase over a broad range of concentrations. By fed-batch cultivation, the mutant produced 91.6 ± 6.3 g/L of MEL-D for 7 days. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of a novel mannosylerythritol lipid containing a hydroxy fatty acid from castor oil by Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by various yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma, which exhibit excellent surface activities as well as versatile biochemical activities. A study on P. tsukubaensis NBRC1940 as a mono-acetylated MEL (MEL-B) producer revealed that the yeast accumulated a novel glycolipid from castor oil at a yield of 22 g/L. Its main chemical structure was identified as 1-O-β-(2'-O-alka(e)noyl-3'-O-hydroxyalka(e)noyl-6'-O-acetyl-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-erythritol designated as "new MEL-B." The new MEL-B, comprising a hydroxy fatty acid had a reduced surface tension of 28.5 mN/m at a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 2.2×10⁻⁵ M in water. The observed CMC was 5-fold higher than that of conventional MEL-B. When conventional MEL-B was dispersed in water, it self-assembled to form the lamellar (L(α)) phase at a wide range of concentrations. In contrast, new MEL-B formed spherical oily droplets similar to the sponge (L₃) phase, which is observed in aqueous solutions of di-acetylated MEL (MEL-A). The data suggest that the newly identified MEL-B is likely to have a different structure and interfacial properties compared to the conventional MELs, and could facilitate an increase in the application of glycolipid biosurfactants.

  16. Effect of Mannosylerythritol lipid-A on light scattering of AOT/D2O/Octane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Soheil

    2016-09-01

    The light scattering technique is used for the study of interaction of Mannosylerythritol lipid-A on AOT/D2O/Octane. The collective diffusion of AOT/D2O droplets soluble in Octane mixed with lipid is founded from a correlation function of light scattering. We focus on the variation of the dynamic behavior of droplets as a function of the lipid concentrations and the size of droplets. The increase of concentration of Mannosylerythritol lipid-A on microemulsion decreases the dynamic of droplets. The SAXS experiment shows the size and the interaction of the droplets change by increase of Mannosylerythritol lipid-A concentration. A hard sphere model can describe the interaction of lipid with AOT/D2O droplets.

  17. The diastereomers of mannosylerythritol lipids have different interfacial properties and aqueous phase behavior, reflecting the erythritol configuration.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yanagihara, Takashi; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) produced by yeasts are one of the most promising glycolipid biosurfactants. There are two MEL diastereomers, in which the configurations of the erythritol moieties are opposite. The 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2S,3R)-erythritol (S-form) or 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-erythritol (R-form) is the hydrophilic domain. In this study, we prepared S- and R-form MEL homologs with similar fatty acyl groups, and compared their interfacial properties. Among the four diastereomers (S-MEL-B and -D/R-MEL-B and -D), R-form MELs showed a higher critical aggregation concentration and hydrophilicity compared to the corresponding S-form. R-form MELs also efficiently formed relatively large vesicles compared to S-form. Moreover, we estimated the binary phase diagram of the MEL-water system and compared the aqueous phase behavior among the four diastereomers. The present MELs self-assembled into a lamellar (L(α)) structure at all concentration ranges. Meanwhile, the one-phase L(α) region of R-form MELs was wider than those of S-form MELs. R-form MELs may maintain more water between the polar layers in accordance with an extension of the interlayer spacing. These results suggest that the differences in MEL carbohydrate configurations significantly affect interfacial properties, self-assembly, and hydrate ability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface properties of lipoplexes modified with mannosylerythritol lipid-a and tween 80 and their cellular association.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Qi, Xianrong; Kitamoto, Dai; Maitani, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    The surface properties of cationic liposomes and lipoplexes largely determine the cellular association and gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we measured the surface properties, such as zeta potentials, surface pH and hydration levels of MHAPC- and OH-Chol-lipoplexes and their cellular association, without and with the modification of biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) or Tween 80 (MHAPC=N,N-methyl hydroxyethyl aminopropane carbamoyl cholesterol; OH-Chol=cholesteryl-3beta-carboxyamindoethylene-N-hydroxyethylamine). Compared to OH-Chol-lipoplexes, the higher cellular association of MHAPC-lipoplexes correlated with the significantly higher zeta potentials, lower surface pH levels and "drier" surface, as evaluated by the generalized polarization of laurdan. Both MEL-A and Tween 80 modification of MHAPC-lipoplexes did not significantly change zeta potentials and surface pH levels, while MEL-A modification of OH-Chol-lipoplexes seriously decreased them. MEL-A hydrated the liposomal surface of MHAPC-lipoplexes but dehydrated that of OH-Chol-lipoplexes, while Tween 80 hydrated those of MHAPC- and OH-Chol-lipoplexes. In all, cationic liposomes composed of lipids with secondary and tertiary amine exhibited different surface properties and cellular associations of lipoplexes, and modification with surfactants further enlarged their difference. The strong hydration ability of Tween 80 may relate to the low cellular association of lipoplexes, while the dehydration of MEL-A-modified OH-Chol-lipoplexes seemed to compensate the negative zeta potential for the cellular association of lipoplexes.

  19. Biosurfactants: a sustainable replacement for chemical surfactants?

    PubMed

    Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2012-09-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants produced by bacteria and yeasts provide significant opportunities to replace chemical surfactants with sustainable biologically produced alternatives in bulk commercial products such as laundry detergents and surface cleaners. Sophorolipids are already available in sufficient yield to make their use feasible while rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids require further development. The ability to tailor the biosurfactant produced to the specific needs of the product formulation will be an important future step.

  20. Production of microbial glycolipid biosurfactants and their antimicrobial activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial glycolipids produced by bacteria or yeast as secondary metabolites, such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs) and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are “green” biosurfactants desirable in a bioeconomy. High cost of production is a major hurdle toward widespread commercial use of bios...

  1. Genome and transcriptome analysis of the basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica producing extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Koike, Hideaki; Hagiwara, Hiroko; Ito, Emi; Machida, Masayuki; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Pseudozyma antarctica is a non-pathogenic phyllosphere yeast known as an excellent producer of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), multi-functional extracellular glycolipids, from vegetable oils. To clarify the genetic characteristics of P. antarctica, we analyzed the 18 Mb genome of P. antarctica T-34. On the basis of KOG analysis, the number of genes (219 genes) categorized into lipid transport and metabolism classification in P. antarctica was one and a half times larger than that of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (140 genes). The gene encoding an ATP/citrate lyase (ACL) related to acetyl-CoA synthesis conserved in oleaginous strains was found in P. antarctica genome: the single ACL gene possesses the four domains identical to that of the human gene, whereas the other oleaginous ascomycetous species have the two genes covering the four domains. P. antarctica genome exhibited a remarkable degree of synteny to U. maydis genome, however, the comparison of the gene expression profiles under the culture on the two carbon sources, glucose and soybean oil, by the DNA microarray method revealed that transcriptomes between the two species were significantly different. In P. antarctica, expression of the gene sets relating fatty acid metabolism were markedly up-regulated under the oily conditions compared with glucose. Additionally, MEL biosynthesis cluster of P. antarctica was highly expressed regardless of the carbon source as compared to U. maydis. These results strongly indicate that P. antarctica has an oleaginous nature which is relevant to its non-pathogenic and MEL-overproducing characteristics. The analysis and dataset contribute to stimulate the development of improved strains with customized properties for high yield production of functional bio-based materials.

  2. Formation of the two novel glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylribitol lipid and mannosylarabitol lipid, by Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752T.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-11-01

    In order to develop novel glycolipid biosurfactants, Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752(T), which is known as a producer of mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), was cultivated using different sugar alcohols with the presence of vegetable oil. When cultivated in a medium containing 4 % (w/v) olive oil and 4 % D-ribitol or D-arabitol, the yeast strain provided different glycolipids, compared to the case of no sugar alcohol. On TLC, both of the extracted glycolipid fractions gave two major spots corresponding to MEL-A (di-acetylated MEL) and MEL-B (mono-acetylated MEL). Based on (1)H NMR analysis, one glycolipid was identified as MEL-A, but the other was not MEL-B. On high-performance liquid chromatography after acid hydrolysis, the unknown glycolipid from the D-ribitol culture provided mainly two peaks identical to D-mannose and D-ribitol, and the other unknown glycolipid from the D-arabitol culture did two peaks identical to D-mannose and D-arabitol. Accordingly, the two unknown glycolipids were identified as mannosylribitol lipid (MRL) and mannosylarabitol lipid (MAL), respectively. The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension at CMC of MRL were 1.6 × 10(-6) M and 23.7 mN/m, and those of MAL were 1.5 × 10(-6) M and 24.2 mN/m, respectively. These surface-tension-lowering activities were significantly higher compared to conventional MEL. Furthermore, on a water-penetration scan, MRL and MAL efficiently formed not only the lamella phase (L(α)) but also the myelins at a wide range of concentrations, indicating their excellent self-assembling properties and high hydrophilicity. The present two glycolipids should thus facilitate the application of biosurfactants as new functional materials.

  3. Current status in biotechnological production and applications of glycolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Bruno Nicolau; Pessôa, Marina Gabriel; Mano, Mario Cezar Rodrigues; Molina, Gustavo; Neri-Numa, Iramaia Angélica; Pastore, Glaucia Maria

    2016-12-01

    Biosurfactants are natural compounds with surface activity and emulsifying properties produced by several types of microorganisms and have been considered an interesting alternative to synthetic surfactants. Glycolipids are promising biosurfactants, due to low toxicity, biodegradability, and chemical stability in different conditions and also because they have many biological activities, allowing wide applications in different fields. In this review, we addressed general information about families of glycolipids, rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and trehalose lipids, describing their chemical and surface characteristics, recent studies using alternative substrates, and new strategies to improve of production, beyond their specificities. We focus in providing recent developments and trends in biotechnological process and medical and industrial applications.

  4. Microbial biosurfactants: challenges and opportunities for future exploitation.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2012-11-01

    The drive for industrial sustainability has pushed biosurfactants to the top of the agenda of many companies. Biosurfactants offer the possibility of replacing chemical surfactants, produced from nonrenewable resources, with alternatives produced from cheap renewable feedstocks. Biosurfactants are also attractive because they are less damaging to the environment yet are robust enough for industrial use. The most promising biosurfactants at the present time are the glycolipids, sophorolipids produced by Candida yeasts, mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) produced by Pseudozyma yeasts, and rhamnolipids produced by Pseudomonas. Despite the current enthusiasm for these compounds several residual problems remain. This review highlights remaining problems and indicates the prospects for imminent commercial exploitation of a new generation of microbial biosurfactants.

  5. A Gene Cluster for Biosynthesis of Mannosylerythritol Lipids Consisted of 4-O-β-D-Mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-Erythritol as the Sugar Moiety in a Basidiomycetous Yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis.

    PubMed

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kishimoto, Takahide; Morita, Tomotake

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) belong to the glycolipid biosurfactants and are produced by various fungi. The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis produces diastereomer type of MEL-B, which contains 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-erythritol (R-form) as the sugar moiety. In this respect it differs from conventional type of MELs, which contain 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2S,3R)-erythritol (S-form) as the sugar moiety. While the biosynthetic gene cluster for conventional type of MELs has been previously identified in Ustilago maydis and Pseudozyma antarctica, the genetic basis for MEL biosynthesis in P. tsukubaensis is unknown. Here, we identified a gene cluster involved in MEL biosynthesis in P. tsukubaensis. Among these genes, PtEMT1, which encodes erythritol/mannose transferase, had greater than 69% identity with homologs from strains in the genera Ustilago, Melanopsichium, Sporisorium and Pseudozyma. However, phylogenetic analysis placed PtEMT1p in a separate clade from the other proteins. To investigate the function of PtEMT1, we introduced the gene into a P. antarctica mutant strain, ΔPaEMT1, which lacks MEL biosynthesis ability owing to the deletion of PaEMT1. Using NMR spectroscopy, we identified the biosynthetic product as MEL-A with altered sugar conformation. These results indicate that PtEMT1p catalyzes the sugar conformation of MELs. This is the first report of a gene cluster for the biosynthesis of diastereomer type of MEL.

  6. Mannosylerythritol lipids secreted by phyllosphere yeast Pseudozyma antarctica is associated with its filamentous growth and propagation on plant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shigenobu; Morita, Tomotake; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Koitabashi, Motoo; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    The biological function of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) towards their producer, Pseudozyma antarctica, on plant surfaces was investigated. MEL-producing wild-type strain and its MEL production-defective mutant strain (ΔPaEMT1) were compared in terms of their phenotypic traits on the surface of plastic plates, onion peels, and fresh leaves of rice and wheat. While wild-type cells adhering on plastic surfaces and onion peels changed morphologically from single cells to elongated ones for a short period of about 4 h and 1 day, respectively, ΔPaEMT1 cells did not. Microscopic observation of both strains grown on plant leaf surfaces verified that the wild type colonized a significantly bigger area than that of ΔPaEMT1. However, when MELs were exogenously added to the mutant cells on plant surfaces, their colonized area became enlarged. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed a secretion of higher amount of MELs in the cell suspension incubated with wheat leaf cuttings compared to that in the suspension without cuttings. Transcriptional analysis by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR verified that the expression of erythritol/mannose transferase gene and MELs transporter gene of P. antarctica increased in the cells inoculated onto wheat leaves at 4, 6, and 8 days of incubation, indicating a potential of P. antarctica to produce MELs on the leaves. These findings demonstrate that MELs produced by P. antarctica on plant surfaces could be expected to play a significant role in fungal morphological development and propagation on plant surfaces.

  7. Biosurfactants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosurfactants are surfactants whose common feature is biodegradability, which provides them with a major advantage over the majority of surfactants currently in the market. Biosurfactants are produced from a wide range of raw materials, and manufactured using chemical, enzymatic, microbial, and a c...

  8. A Gene Cluster for Biosynthesis of Mannosylerythritol Lipids Consisted of 4-O-β-D-Mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-Erythritol as the Sugar Moiety in a Basidiomycetous Yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis

    PubMed Central

    Saika, Azusa; Koike, Hideaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kishimoto, Takahide; Morita, Tomotake

    2016-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) belong to the glycolipid biosurfactants and are produced by various fungi. The basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma tsukubaensis produces diastereomer type of MEL-B, which contains 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-erythritol (R-form) as the sugar moiety. In this respect it differs from conventional type of MELs, which contain 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2S,3R)-erythritol (S-form) as the sugar moiety. While the biosynthetic gene cluster for conventional type of MELs has been previously identified in Ustilago maydis and Pseudozyma antarctica, the genetic basis for MEL biosynthesis in P. tsukubaensis is unknown. Here, we identified a gene cluster involved in MEL biosynthesis in P. tsukubaensis. Among these genes, PtEMT1, which encodes erythritol/mannose transferase, had greater than 69% identity with homologs from strains in the genera Ustilago, Melanopsichium, Sporisorium and Pseudozyma. However, phylogenetic analysis placed PtEMT1p in a separate clade from the other proteins. To investigate the function of PtEMT1, we introduced the gene into a P. antarctica mutant strain, ΔPaEMT1, which lacks MEL biosynthesis ability owing to the deletion of PaEMT1. Using NMR spectroscopy, we identified the biosynthetic product as MEL-A with altered sugar conformation. These results indicate that PtEMT1p catalyzes the sugar conformation of MELs. This is the first report of a gene cluster for the biosynthesis of diastereomer type of MEL. PMID:27327162

  9. Structural analysis of bacteriorhodopsin solubilized by lipid-like phosphocholine biosurfactants with varying micelle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Haihong; Sun, Chenghao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Surfactants that can provide a more natural substitute for lipid bilayers are important in the purification and in vitro study of membrane proteins. Here we investigate the structural response of a model membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), to phosphocholine biosurfactants. Phosphocholine biosurfactants are a type of biomimetic amphiphile that are similar to phospholipids, in which membrane proteins are commonly embedded. Multiple spectroscopic and zeta potential measurements are employed to characterize the conformational change, secondary and tertiary structure, oligomeric status, surface charge distribution and the structural stability of BR solubilized with phosphocholine biosurfactants of varying tail length. The process of phosphocholine micelle formation is found to facilitate the solubilization of BR, and for long-chain phosphocholines, concentrations much higher than their critical micelle concentrations achieve good solubilization. Phosphocholine biosurfactants are shown to be mild compared with the ionic surfactant SDS or CTAB, and tend to preserve membrane protein structure during solubilization, especially at low micelle concentrations, by virtue of their phospholipid-like zwitterionic head groups. The increase of alkyl chain length is shown to obviously enhance the capability of phosphocholine biosurfactants to stabilize BR. The underlying mechanism for the favorable actions of phosphocholine biosurfactant is also discussed.

  10. Trehalose lipid biosurfactants produced by the actinomycetes Tsukamurella spumae and T. pseudospumae.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Johannes H; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Kühl, Boris; Kraft, Axel; Heinzler, Raphael; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Wray, Victor; Luy, Burkhard; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Lang, Siegmund; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Actinomycetales are known to produce various secondary metabolites including products with surface-active and emulsifying properties known as biosurfactants. In this study, the nonpathogenic actinomycetes Tsukamurella spumae and Tsukamurella pseudospumae are described as producers of extracellular trehalose lipid biosurfactants when grown on sunflower oil or its main component glyceryltrioleate. Crude extracts of the trehalose lipids were purified using silica gel chromatography. The structure of the two trehalose lipid components (TL A and TL B) was elucidated using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight/tandem mass spectroscopy (MALDI-ToF-ToF/MS/MS) and multidimensional NMR experiments. The biosurfactants were identified as 1-α-glucopyranosyl-1-α-glucopyranosid carrying two acyl chains varying of C4 to C6 and C16 to C18 at the 2' and 3' carbon atom of one sugar unit. The trehalose lipids produced demonstrate surface-active behavior and emulsifying capacity. Classified as risk group 1 organisms, T. spumae and T. pseudospumae hold potential for the production of environmentally friendly surfactants.

  11. Interaction of a trehalose lipid biosurfactant produced by Rhodococcus erythropolis 51T7 with a secretory phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Ana; Teruel, José A; Aranda, Francisco J; Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    Trehalose-containing glycolipid biosurfactants form an emerging group of interesting compounds, which alter the structure and properties of phospholipid membranes, and interact with enzymatic and non-enzymatic proteins. Phospholipases A2 constitute a class of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester of glycerophospholipids, and are classified into secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) and intracellular phospholipases A2. In this work, pancreatic sPLA2 was chosen as a model enzyme to study the effect of the trehalose lipid biosurfactant on enzymes acting on interfaces. By using this enzyme, it is possible to study the modulation of enzyme activity, either by direct interaction of the biosurfactant with the protein, or as a result of the incorporation of the glycolipid on the phospholipid target membrane. It is shown that the succinoyl trehalose lipid isolated from Rhodococcus erythropolis 51T7 interacts with porcine pancreatic sPLA2 and inhibits its catalytic activity. Two modes of inhibition are observed, which are clearly differentiated by its timescale. First, a slow inhibition of sPLA2 activity upon preincubation of the enzyme with trehalose lipid in the absence of substrate is described. Second, incorporation of trehalose lipid into the phospholipid target membrane gives rise to a fast enzyme inhibition. These results are discussed in the light of previous data on sPLA2 inhibitors and extend the list of interesting biological activities reported for this R. erythropolis trehalose lipid biosurfactant.

  12. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants by basidiomycetous yeasts.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-05-01

    BSs (biosurfactants) produced by various micro-organisms show unique properties (e.g. mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared with chemically synthesized surfactants. The numerous advantages of BSs have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries but also in environmental protection and energy-saving technology. Among BSs, glycolipid types are the most promising, owing to their high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. MELs (mannosylerythritol lipids), which are glycolipid BSs abundantly produced by basidiomycetous yeasts such as strains of Pseudozyma, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties, but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukaemia cells. MELs also show high binding affinity towards different immunoglobulins and lectins. Recently, a cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BSs should broaden their application in new advanced technologies. In the present review the current status of research and development on glycolipid BSs, especially their production by Pseudozyma yeasts, is described.

  13. Low molecular weight gelators based on biosurfactants, cellobiose lipids by Cryptococcus humicola.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomohiro; Kawamura, Daisuke; Ishibashi, Yuko; Morita, Tomotake; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-01-01

    Cellobiose lipids (CLs) are bolaform glycolipid biosurfactants, which are produced from natural resources by a yeast strain and show fungicidal activity. In this study, the gelation properties of CL in solvents were investigated by several techniques including rheology and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The yeast CL was found to gelate 6 out of 26 solvents. Although it did not provide gels in ethanol or 1, 3-butanediol which are widely used for cosmetic industries, we succeeded in producing gels by mixing ethanol or 1, 3-butanediol with water. AFM observation of the gels on a silicon substrate provided 3D supramolecular structures with an entangled fibrous network. Moreover, it was also found that some of fibrous structures were twisted helical ribbons. This should be due to the cellobiose backbone having several chiral functional groups. The sol-gel phase transition temperatures for gels in mixed ethanol/water and 1, 3-butanediol/water systems were below 100°C, indicating that the gels can be obtained with rather mild preparation conditions. The present CL gels would be useful for novel multifunctional materials applicable to various industries.

  14. Glycolipid biosurfactants: main properties and potential applications in agriculture and food industry.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2016-10-01

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by high structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. They have received much practical attention as biopesticides for controlling plant diseases and protecting stored products. As a result of their antifungal activity towards phytopathogenic fungi and larvicidal and mosquitocidal potencies, glycolipid biosurfactants permit the preservation of plants and plant crops from pest invasion. Also, as a result of their emulsifying and antibacterial activities, glycolipids have great potential as food additives and food preservatives. Furthermore, the valorization of food byproducts via the production of glycolipid biosurfactant has received much attention because it permits the bioconversion of byproducts on valuable compounds and decreases the cost of production. Generally, the use of glycolipids in many fields requires their retention from fermentation media. Accordingly, different strategies have been developed to extract and purify glycolipids. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Biosurfactant gene clusters in eukaryotes: regulation and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim

    2014-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are a class of secondary metabolites representing a wide variety of structures that can be produced from renewable feedstock by a wide variety of micro-organisms. They have (potential) applications in the medical world, personal care sector, mining processes, food industry, cosmetics, crop protection, pharmaceuticals, bio-remediation, household detergents, paper and pulp industry, textiles, paint industries, etc. Especially glycolipid BSs like sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs), mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) and cellobioselipids (CBLs) have been described to provide significant opportunities to (partially) replace chemical surfactants. The major two factors currently limiting the penetration of BSs into the market are firstly the limited structural variety and secondly the rather high production price linked with the productivity. One of the keys to resolve the above mentioned bottlenecks can be found in the genetic engineering of natural producers. This could not only result in more efficient (economical) recombinant producers, but also in a diversification of the spectrum of available BSs as such resolving both limiting factors at once. Unraveling the genetics behind the biosynthesis of these interesting biological compounds is indispensable for the tinkering, fine tuning and rearrangement of these biological pathways with the aim of obtaining higher yields and a more extensive structural variety. Therefore, this review focuses on recent developments in the investigation of the biosynthesis, genetics and regulation of some important members of the family of the eukaryotic glycolipid BSs (MELs, CBLs and SLs). Moreover, recent biotechnological achievements and the industrial potential of engineered strains are discussed.

  16. Deep-sea Rhodococcus sp. BS-15, lacking the phytopathogenic fas genes, produces a novel glucotriose lipid biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Nishi, Shinro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Watsuji, Tomo-O; Nagano, Yuriko; Yabuki, Akinori; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Hatada, Yuji; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from deep-sea sediment collected from the Okinawa Trough. Isolate BS15 produced the largest amount of the glycolipid, generating up to 6.31 ± 1.15 g l(-1) after 4 days at 20 °C. Glucose was identified in the hydrolysate of the purified major component of the biosurfactant glycolipid. According to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis, the hydrophobic moieties in the major component were hexadecanoate, octadecanoate, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoate, 2-hydroxyoctanoate, and succinate. The molecular weight of the purified major glycolipid was calculated to be 1,211, while (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra confirmed that the major component consisted of 2 mol of α-glucoside and 1 mol of β-glucoside. The molecular structure was assigned as novel trisaccharide-type glycolipid biosurfactant, glucotriose lipids. The critical micelle concentration of the purified major glycolipid was 2.3 × 10(-6) M, with a surface tension of 29.5 mN m(-1). Phylogenetic analysis showed isolate BS15 was closely related to a Rhodococcus strains isolated from Antarctica, and to Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen. PCR analysis showed that the fasA, fasB, fasC, fasD, fasE, and fasF genes, which are involved in phytohormone-like cytokinin production, were not present in the genome of BS15; however, analysis of a draft genome sequence of BS15 (5.5 Mb) identified regions with 31 %, 53 %, 46 %, 30 %, and 31 % DNA sequence identity to the fasA, fasB, fasC, and fasD genes, respectively.

  17. [Naturally engineered glycolipid biosurfactants leading to distinctive self-assembling properties].

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Dai

    2008-05-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are functional amphiphilic compounds produced by a variety of microorganisms. They show unique properties (e.g. mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and environmental compatibility) compared to chemically synthesized counterparts. The numerous advantages of BS have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries but in energy and environmental technologies as well. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising BS known, and are produced at yields of over 100 g/l from vegetable oils by yeast strains belonging to the genus Pseudozyma. MELs exhibit excellent surface-active and self-assembling properties leading to the formation of different lyotropic liquid crystals such as sponge (L(3)), bicontinuous cubic (V(2)) and lamella (L(alpha)) phases. They also show versatile biochemical actions, including antitumor and differentiation-inducing activities against human leukemia cells, rat pheochromocytoma cells and mouse melanoma cells. MELs also display high binding affinity toward different immunoglobulins and lectins, indicating great potentials as new affinity ligands for the glycoproteins. More significantly, the cationic liposomes bearing MELs increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells via membrane fusion processes. The yeast BS should thus be novel nanobiomaterials, and broaden their applications in various advanced technologies.

  18. Microbial biosurfactants and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Owen P

    2010-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants are amphipathic molecules having typical molecular weights of 500-1500 Da, made up of peptides, saccharides or lipids or their combinations. In biodegradation processes they mediate solubilisation, mobilization and/or accession of hydrophobic substrates to microbes. They may be located on the cell surface or be secreted into the extracellular medium and they facilitate uptake of hydrophobic molecules through direct cellular contact with hydrophobic solids or droplets or through micellarisation. They are also involved in cell physiological processes such as biofilm formation and detachment, and in diverse biofilm associated processes such as wastewater treatment and microbial pathogenesis. The protection of contaminants in biosurfactants micelles may also inhibit uptake of contaminants by microbes. In bioremediation processes biosurfactants may facilitate release of contaminants from soil, but soils also tend to bind surfactants strongly which makes their role in contaminant desorption more complex. A greater understanding of the underlying roles played by biosurfactants in microbial physiology and in biodegradative processes is developing through advances in cell and molecular biology.

  19. Production and structure elucidation of di- and oligosaccharide lipids (biosurfactants) from Tsukamurella sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, E; Heckmann, R; Wray, V; Nimtz, M; Lang, S

    1998-11-01

    The bacterium Tsukamurella sp. nov., isolated from soil, was found to produce novel glycolipids when grown on sunflower oil as the sole carbon source. The glycolipids were isolated by chromatography on silica columns and their structures elucidated using a combination of multidimensional NMR and MS techniques. The three main components are 2,3-di-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-1)-alpha-D-glucopyranose, 2,3-di-O-acyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-2)-4,6-di-O-acyl-alpha-D- glucopyranosyl-(1-1)-alpha-D-glucopyranose and 2,3-di-O-acyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-2)-beta-D-galactopyranosyl- (1-6)-4,6-di-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-1)-alpha-D- glucopyranosyl which are linked to fatty acids varying in chain length from C4 to C18. The glycolipids are mainly extracellular but are also found attached to the cell walls. During the cultivation the composition of the glycolipids changed from disaccharide- to tri- and tetrasaccharide lipids. The glycolipids show good surface-active behaviour and have antimicrobial properties.

  20. Functions and potential applications of glycolipid biosurfactants--from energy-saving materials to gene delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Dai; Isoda, Hiroko; Nakahara, Tadaatsu

    2002-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) produced by various microorganisms show unique properties (e.g., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared to their chemical counterparts. The numerous advantages of BS have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries but in environmental protection and energy-saving technology as well. Glycolipid BS are the most promising, due to high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are glycolipid BS produced by a yeast Candida antarctrica, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukemia cells. MEL also show a potential anti-agglomeration effect on ice particles in ice slurry used for cold thermal storage. Recently, the cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BS should broaden its applications in new advanced technologies. The current status of research and development on glycolipid BS, especially their function and potential applications, is discussed.

  1. Biosurfactant production by Azotobacter chroococcum isolated from the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, R; Subramanyam Nambaru, V R M; Jayalakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary characterization of a biosurfactant-producing Azotobacter chroococcum isolated from marine environment showed maximum biomass and biosurfactant production at 120 and 132 h, respectively, at pH 8.0, 38 degrees C, and 30 per thousand salinity utilizing a 2% carbon substrate. It grew and produced biosurfactant on crude oil, waste motor lubricant oil, and peanut oil cake. Peanut oil cake gave the highest biosurfactant production (4.6 mg/mL) under fermentation conditions. The biosurfactant product emulsified waste motor lubricant oil, crude oil, diesel, kerosene, naphthalene, anthracene, and xylene. Preliminary characterization of the biosurfactant using biochemical, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectral analysis indicated that the biosurfactant was a lipopeptide with percentage lipid and protein proportion of 31.3:68.7.

  2. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by viral vectors in clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Biomedical activity of biosurfactants].

    PubMed

    Krasowska, Anna

    2010-07-23

    Biosurfactants, amphiphilic compounds, synthesized by microorganisms have surface, antimicrobial and antitumor properties. Biosurfactants prevent adhesion and biofilms formation by bacteria and fungi on various surfaces. For many years microbial surfactants are used as antibiotics with board spectrum of activity against microorganisms. Biosurfactants act as antiviral compounds and their antitumor activities are mediated through induction of apoptosis. This work presents the current state of knowledge related to biomedical activity of biosurfactants.

  4. Production and Structural Characterization of Lactobacillus helveticus Derived Biosurfactant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepansh; Saharan, Baljeet Singh; Chauhan, Nikhil; Bansal, Anshul; Procha, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    A probiotic strain of lactobacilli was isolated from traditional soft Churpi cheese of Yak milk and found positive for biosurfactant production. Lactobacilli reduced the surface tension of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) from 72.0 to 39.5 mNm−1 pH 7.2 and its critical micelle concentration (CMC) was found to be 2.5 mg mL−1. Low cost production of Lactobacilli derived biosurfactant was carried out at lab scale fermenter which yields 0.8 mg mL−1 biosurfactant. The biosurfactant was found least phytotoxic and cytotoxic as compared to the rhamnolipid and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) at different concentration. Structural attributes of biosurfactant were determined by FTIR, NMR (1H and 13C), UPLC-MS, and fatty acid analysis by GCMS which confirmed the presence of glycolipid type of biosurfactant closely similar to xylolipids. Biosurfactant is mainly constituted by lipid and sugar fractions. The present study outcomes provide valuable information on structural characterization of the biosurfactant produced by L. helveticus MRTL91. These findings are encouraging for the application of Lactobacilli derived biosurfactant as nontoxic surface active agents in the emerging field of biomedical applications. PMID:25506070

  5. Synthesis of biosurfactants and their advantages to microorganisms and mankind.

    PubMed

    Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Makkar, Randhir S; Kaur, Jasminder; Mehta, S K

    2010-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds synthesized by a wide variety of microorganisms. They are molecules that have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains and are capable of lowering the surface tension and the interfacial tension of the growth medium. Biosurfactants possess different chemical structures--lipopeptides, glycolipids, neutral lipids and fatty acids. They are nontoxic biomolecules that are biodegradable. Biosurfactants also exhibit strong emulsification of hydrophobic compounds and form stable emulsions. The low water solubility of these hydrophobic compounds limits their availability to microorganisms, which is a potential problem for bioremediation of contaminated sites. Microbially produced surfactants enhance the bioavailability of these hydrophobic compounds for bioremediation. Therefore, biosurfactant-enhanced solubility of pollutants has potential applications in bioremediation. Not only are the biosurfactants useful in a variety of industrial processes, they are also of vital importance to the microbes in adhesion, emulsification, bioavailability, desorption and defense strategy. These interesting facts are discussed in this chapter.

  6. Biosurfactants in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Dhara P; Cameotra, Swaranjit S

    2013-02-01

    Agricultural productivity to meet growing demands of human population is a matter of great concern for all countries. Use of green compounds to achieve the sustainable agriculture is the present necessity. This review highlights the enormous use of harsh surfactants in agricultural soil and agrochemical industries. Biosurfactants which are reported to be produced by bacteria, yeasts, and fungi can serve as green surfactants. Biosurfactants are considered to be less toxic and eco-friendly and thus several types of biosurfactants have the potential to be commercially produced for extensive applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries. The biosurfactants synthesized by environmental isolates also has promising role in the agricultural industry. Many rhizosphere and plant associated microbes produce biosurfactant; these biomolecules play vital role in motility, signaling, and biofilm formation, indicating that biosurfactant governs plant-microbe interaction. In agriculture, biosurfactants can be used for plant pathogen elimination and for increasing the bioavailability of nutrient for beneficial plant associated microbes. Biosurfactants can widely be applied for improving the agricultural soil quality by soil remediation. These biomolecules can replace the harsh surfactant presently being used in million dollar pesticide industries. Thus, exploring biosurfactants from environmental isolates for investigating their potential role in plant growth promotion and other related agricultural applications warrants details research. Conventional methods are followed for screening the microbial population for production of biosurfactant. However, molecular methods are fewer in reaching biosurfactants from diverse microbial population and there is need to explore novel biosurfactant from uncultured microbes in soil biosphere by using advanced methodologies like functional metagenomics.

  7. Biosurfactants in cosmetics and biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Varvaresou, A; Iakovou, K

    2015-09-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active biomolecules that are produced by various micro-organisms. They show unique properties i.e. lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility compared to their chemical counterparts. Glycolipids and lipopeptides have prompted application in biotechnology and cosmetics due to their multi-functional profile i.e. detergency, emulsifying, foaming and skin hydrating properties. Additionally, some of them can be served as antimicrobials. In this study the current status of research and development on rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, mannosyloerythritol lipids, trehalipids, xylolipids and lipopeptides particularly their commercial application in cosmetics and biopharmaceuticals, is described. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine Trade-Mark-Sign RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic

  9. Marine biosurfactants, I. Screening for biosurfactants among crude oil degrading marine microorganisms from the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Schulz, D; Passeri, A; Schmidt, M; Lang, S; Wagner, F; Wray, V; Gunkel, W

    1991-01-01

    Three bacterial strains of marine origin were isolated during a screening for biosurfactants among n-alkane degrading microorganisms. One strain-identified as Alcaligenes sp. MM1-produced a novel glucose lipid. In the case of Arthrobacter sp. EK 1 the well-known trehalose tetraester was found as major component. From another pure culture classified as Arthrobacter sp. SI 1, extracellular emulsifying agents with properties indicating high molecular weight substances were detected. Furthermore trehalose corynomycolates were found at up to 2 g/l. The isolated biosurfactants showed good interfacial and emulsifying properties.

  10. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, R; Subramanyam Nambaru, V R M; Jayalakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable resources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3L fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (11.6 mg/ml) and biosurfactant production (8.6 mg/ml) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h respectively. Characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that, it is a lipopeptide with chemical composition of protein (50.2%) and lipid (49.8%). The biosurfactant (1 mg/ml) was able to emulsify waste motor lubricant oil, crude oil, peanut oil, kerosene, diesel, xylene, naphthalene and anthracene, comparatively the emulsification activity was higher than the activity found with Triton X-100 (1 mg/ml). Results obtained in the present study showed the possibility of biosurfactant production using renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources. Emulsification activity found with the biosurfactant against different hydrocarbons showed its possible application in bioremediation of environments polluted with various hydrocarbons.

  11. Biosurfactant production by Corynebacterium kutscheri from waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, R; Jayalakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2007-12-01

    Production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable sources. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3-l fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (9.8 mg ml(-l)) and biosurfactant production (6.4 mg ml(-l)) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h, respectively. Chemical characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that it is a glycolipopeptide with chemical composition of carbohydrate (40%), lipid (27%) and protein (29%). The biosurfactant is able to emulsify waste motor lubricant oil, crude oil, peanut oil, kerosene, diesel, xylene, naphthalene and anthracene; the emulsification activity was comparatively higher than the activity found with Triton X-100. This study indicates the possibility of biosurfactant production using renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources like waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Emulsification activity found with the biosurfactant against different hydrocarbons showed the possibility of the application of biosurfactants against diverse hydrocarbon pollution. The data obtained from the study could be useful for large-scale biosurfactant production using economically cheaper substrates. Information obtained in emulsification activity and laboratory-scale experiment on bioremediation inferred that bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites may be treated with biosurfactants or the bacteria that produces it.

  12. Bacterial biosurfactant in enhancing solubility and metabolism of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, N K; Konwar, B K

    2009-10-15

    Biosurfactant can make hydrocarbon complexes more mobile with the potential use in oil recovery, pumping of crude oil and in bioremediation of crude oil contaminant. In the investigation, bacterial isolates capable of utilizing poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like phenanthrene, pyrene and fluorene were used. A gradual decrease of the supplemented hydrocarbons in the culture medium was observed with corresponding increase in bacterial biomass and protein. The medium having the combined application of fluorine and phenanthrene caused better biosurfactant production (0.45 g l(-1)) and (0.38 g l(-1)) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains MTCC7815 and MTCC7814. The biosurfactant from MTCC7815 (41.0 microg ml(-1)) and MTCC7812 (26 microg ml(-1)) exhibited higher solubilization of pyrene; whereas, MTCC8165 caused higher solubilization of phenanthrene; and that of MTCC7812 (24.45 microg ml(-1)) and MTCC8163 (24.49 microg ml(-1)) caused more solubilzation of fluorene. Higher solubilization of pyrene and fluorene by the biosurfactant of MTCC7815 and MTCC7812, respectively enhanced their metabolism causing sustained growth. Biosurfactants were found to be lipopeptide and protein-starch-lipid complex in nature and they could reduce the surface tension of pure water (72 m Nm(-1)) to 35 m Nm(-1). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was also lower than the chemical surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). They differed in quantity and structure. The predominant rhamnolipids present in biosurfactants were Rha-C(8)-C(10) and Rha-C(10)-C(8).

  13. Biosurfactants for microbubble preparation and application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosurfactants can be classified by their chemical composition and their origin. This review briefly describes the type of biosurfactants based on their origin. Some of the widely used biosurfactants are introduced. The current statues and future trends in the production of biosurfactants are discus...

  14. Algal and microbial exopolysaccharides: new insights as biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Michel, José de Jesús; Olmos-Soto, Jorge; Morales-Guerrero, Eduardo Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Currently, efforts are being made to utilize more natural biological systems as alternatives as a way to replace fossil forms of carbon. There is a growing concern at global level to have nontoxic, nonhazardous surface-active agents; contrary to synthetic surfactants, their biological counterparts or biosurfactants play a primary function, facilitating microbial presence in environments dominated by hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. Algal and microbial biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers from marine and deep-sea environments are attracting major interest due to their structural and functional diversity as molecules actives of surface and an alternative biomass to replace fossil forms of carbon. Algal and microbial surfactants are lipid in nature and classified as glycolipids, phospholipids, lipopeptides, natural lipids, fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides. These metabolic bioactive products are applicable in a number of industries and processes, viz., food processing, pharmacology, and bioremediation of oil-polluted environments. This chapter presents an update of the progress and potentialities of the principal producers of exopolysaccharide (EPS)-type biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers, viz., macro- and microalgae (cyanobacteria and diatoms) and bacteria from marine and extreme environments. Particular interest is centered into new sources and applications, viz., marine and deep-sea environments and promissory uses of these EPSs as biosurfactants/emulsifiers and other polymeric roles. The enormous benefits of these molecules encourage their discovery, exploitation, and development of new microbial EPSs that could possess novel industrial importance and corresponding innovations.

  15. Preliminary characterization of biosurfactants produced by microorganisms isolated from refinery wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Emine; Ergene, Aysun

    2010-02-01

    Some bacterial strains isolated from refinery wastewaters were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa RWI, Pseudomonas putida RWII, Pseudomonas fluorescens RWIII and Burkholderia cepacia RWIV, and the biosurfactants produced by these strains were coded as BS-I, BS-II, BS-III and BS-IV, respectively. The bacterial strains were characterized by the following biochemical methods: Gram stain, oxidase activity, indol, lactose and growth at 42 degrees C. Biosurfactant production was evaluated by: emulsification activity, surface tension measurement and critical micelle concentration. Chemical characterization of the biosurfactants was done by: FTIR and analysis of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content. The biosurfactants showed good emulsification activity against different hydrocarbon sources. The initial surface tension of culture broth was determined as 67.3 mN/m, and production of BS-I, BS-II, BS-III and BS-IV lowered this value to 35.9, 49.2, 51.6 and 45.7 mN/m, respectively. The critical micelle concentration of the biosurfactants was found to be in the range 10-50 mg/L. From the results of this study it was observed that the refinery wastewaters are a suitable source for isolation of biosurfactant-producing bacteria, but are not a substrate for biosurfactant production.

  16. Emulsification potential of a newly isolated biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Mahmoud; Mohebali, Ghasemali; Haddadi, Azam; Shakarami, Heidar; Nuhi, Ashrafossadat

    2011-02-01

    An indigenous biosurfactant producing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain TA6 was isolated from Iranian oil contaminated soil using an efficient enrichment and screening method. During growth on sucrose and several hydrocarbon substrates as sole carbon source, the bacterium could produce biosurfactants. As a result of biosurfactant synthesis, the surface tension of the growth medium was reduced from 68mNm(-1) to values below 30mNm(-1). The biosurfactant was capable of forming stable emulsions with various hydrocarbons ranging from pentane to light motor oil. Preliminary chemical characterization revealed that the TA6 biosurfactant consisted of extracellular lipids and glycolipids. The biosurfactant was stable during exposure to high salinity (10% NaCl), elevated temperatures (120°C for 15min) and within a wide pH range (4.0-10.0). The culture broth was effective in recovering up to 70% of the residual oil from oil-saturated sand packs which indicates the potential value of the biosurfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolation and characterization of halophilic Archaea able to produce biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Kebbouche-Gana, S; Gana, M L; Khemili, S; Fazouane-Naimi, F; Bouanane, N A; Penninckx, M; Hacene, H

    2009-05-01

    Halotolerant microorganisms able to live in saline environments offer a multitude of actual or potential applications in various fields of biotechnology. This is why some strains of Halobacteria from an Algerian culture collection were screened for biosurfactant production in a standard medium using the qualitative drop-collapse test and emulsification activity assay. Five of the Halobacteria strains reduced the growth medium surface tension below 40 mN m(-1), and two of them exhibited high emulsion-stabilizing capacity. Diesel oil-in-water emulsions were stabilized over a broad range of conditions, from pH 2 to 11, with up to 35% sodium chloride or up to 25% ethanol in the aqueous phase. Emulsions were stable to three cycles of freezing and thawing. The components of the biosurfactant were determined; it contained sugar, protein and lipid. The two Halobacteria strains with enhanced biosurfactant producers, designated strain A21 and strain D21, were selected to identify by phenotypic, biochemical characteristics and by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The strains have Mg(2+), and salt growth requirements are always above 15% (w/v) salts with an optimal concentration of 15-25%. Analyses of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains suggested that they were halophiles belonging to genera of the family Halobacteriaceae, Halovivax (strain A21) and Haloarcula (strain D21). To our knowledge, this is the first report of biosurfactant production at such a high salt concentration.

  18. Production and Biomedical Applications of Probiotic Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Fariq, Anila; Saeed, Ayesha

    2016-04-01

    Biosurfactants have been widely used for environmental and industrial applications. However, their use in medical field is still limited. Probiotic biosurfactants possess an immense antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, antitumor, and antibiofilm potential. Moreover, they have an additional advantage over conventional microbial surfactants because probiotics are an integral part of normal human microflora and their biosurfactants are innocuous to human. So, they can be effectively exploited for medicinal use. Present review is aimed to discourse the production and biomedical applications of probiotic biosurfactants.

  19. Glycolipid biosurfactants: Potential related biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-10-30

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol-lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. Moreover, their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permits their use in biomedicine as antibacterial, antifungal and hemolytic agents. Their antiviral and antitumor effects enable their use in pharmaceutic as therapeutic agents. Also, glycolipids can inhibit the bioadhesion of pathogenic bacteria enabling their use as anti-adhesive agents and for disruption of biofilm formation and can be used in cosmetic industry. Moreover, they have great potential application in industry as detergents, wetting agents and for flotation. Furthermore, glycolipids can act at the surface and can modulate enzyme activity permitting the enhancement or the inhibition of the activity of certain enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Critical review on biosurfactant analysis, purification and characterization using rhamnolipid as a model biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2017-05-01

    Surfactants are one of the most versatile group of chemicals used in various industrial processes. Their market is competitive, and manufacturers will have to expand surfactant production in ecofriendly and cost effective manner. Increasing interest in biosurfactants led to an intense research for environment friendly and cost-efficient production of biosurfactant. Structural diversity and functional properties of biosurfactants make them an attractive group of compounds for potential use in wide variety of industrial, environmental and biotechnological applications. Screening methods make task easier to obtain potential biosurfactant producing microorganisms. Variety of purification and analytical methods are available for biosurfactant structural characterization. This review aims to compile information on types and properties of biosurfactant, microbial screening methods as well as biosynthesis, extraction, purification and structural characterization of biosurfactant using rhamnolipid as a model biosurfactant. It also describes factors affecting rhamnolipid production. It gives an overview of oil recovery using biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental Applications of Biosurfactants: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna A.; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2011-01-01

    Increasing public awareness of environmental pollution influences the search and development of technologies that help in clean up of organic and inorganic contaminants such as hydrocarbons and metals. An alternative and eco-friendly method of remediation technology of environments contaminated with these pollutants is the use of biosurfactants and biosurfactant-producing microorganisms. The diversity of biosurfactants makes them an attractive group of compounds for potential use in a wide variety of industrial and biotechnological applications. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of advances in the applications of biosurfactants and biosurfactant-producing microorganisms in hydrocarbon and metal remediation technologies. PMID:21340005

  2. Biosurfactants for microbubble preparation and application.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingyi; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Liu, Zengshe; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-17

    Biosurfactants can be classified by their chemical composition and their origin. This review briefly describes various classes of biosurfactants based on their origin and introduces a few of the most widely used biosurfactants. The current status and future trends in biosurfactant production are discussed, with an emphasis on those derived from plants. Following a brief introduction of the properties of microbubbles, recent progress in the application of microbubble technology to molecular imaging, wastewater treatment, and aerobic fermentation are presented. Several studies on the preparation, characterization and applications of biosurfactant-based microbubbles are reviewed.

  3. Environmental applications of biosurfactants: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna A; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2011-01-18

    Increasing public awareness of environmental pollution influences the search and development of technologies that help in clean up of organic and inorganic contaminants such as hydrocarbons and metals. An alternative and eco-friendly method of remediation technology of environments contaminated with these pollutants is the use of biosurfactants and biosurfactant-producing microorganisms. The diversity of biosurfactants makes them an attractive group of compounds for potential use in a wide variety of industrial and biotechnological applications. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of advances in the applications of biosurfactants and biosurfactant-producing microorganisms in hydrocarbon and metal remediation technologies.

  4. Biosurfactants for Microbubble Preparation and Application

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingyi; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Liu, Zengshe; Shiina, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Biosurfactants can be classified by their chemical composition and their origin. This review briefly describes various classes of biosurfactants based on their origin and introduces a few of the most widely used biosurfactants. The current status and future trends in biosurfactant production are discussed, with an emphasis on those derived from plants. Following a brief introduction of the properties of microbubbles, recent progress in the application of microbubble technology to molecular imaging, wastewater treatment, and aerobic fermentation are presented. Several studies on the preparation, characterization and applications of biosurfactant-based microbubbles are reviewed. PMID:21339998

  5. Potential therapeutic applications of biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Rangarajan, Vivek; Sen, Ramkrishna; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have recently emerged as promising molecules for their structural novelty, versatility, and diverse properties that are potentially useful for many therapeutic applications. Mainly due to their surface activity, these molecules interact with cell membranes of several organisms and/or with the surrounding environments, and thus can be viewed as potential cancer therapeutics or as constituents of drug delivery systems. Some types of microbial surfactants, such as lipopeptides and glycolipids, have been shown to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and to disrupt cell membranes causing their lysis through apoptosis pathways. Moreover, biosurfactants as drug delivery vehicles offer commercially attractive and scientifically novel applications. This review covers the current state-of-the-art in biosurfactant research for therapeutic purposes, providing new directions towards the discovery and development of molecules with novel structures and diverse functions for advanced applications.

  6. Recovery of Rhodococcus biosurfactants using methyl tertiary-butyl ether extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, M S; Ivshina, I B; Philp, J C; Christofi, N; Dunbar, S A; Ritchkova, M I

    2001-08-01

    In the present study, we proposed methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) as a solvent for extraction of biosurfactants from Rhodococcus bacterial cultures. After comparison with other well known solvent systems used for biosurfactant extraction, it was found that MTBE was able to extract crude surfactant material with high product recovery (10 g/l), efficiency (critical micelle concentration (CMC), 130-170 mg/l) and good functional surfactant characteristics (surface and interfacial tensions, 29 and 0.9 mN/m, respectively). The isolated surfactant complex contained 10% polar lipids, mostly glycolipids possessing maximal surface activity. Ultrasonic treatment of the extraction mixture increased the proportion of polar lipids in crude extract, resulting in increasing surfactant efficiency. Due to certain characteristics of MTBE, such as relatively low toxicity, biodegradability, ease of downstream recovery, low flammability and explosion safety, the use of this solvent as an extraction agent in industrial scale biosurfactant production is feasible.

  7. Streptococcus thermophilus and its biosurfactants inhibit adhesion by Candida spp. on silicone rubber.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; van der Kuijl-Booij, M; van der Mei, H C

    1997-10-01

    The adhesion of yeasts, two Candida albicans and two Candida tropicalis strains isolated from naturally colonized voice prostheses, to silicone rubber with and without a salivary conditioning film in the absence and presence of adhering Streptococcus thermophilus B, a biosurfactant-releasing dairy isolate, was studied. Coverage of 1 to 4% of the surface of silicone rubber substrata with adhering S. thermophilus B gave significant reductions in the initial yeast adhesion regardless of the presence of a conditioning film. Mechanistically, this interference in yeast adhesion by S. thermophilus B was not due to direct physical effects but to biosurfactant release by the adhering bacteria, because experiments with S. thermophilus B cells that had released their biosurfactants prior to adhesion to silicone rubber and competition with yeasts did not show interference with initial yeast adhesion. The amounts of biosurfactants released were highest for mid-exponential- and early-stationary-phase bacteria (37 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]), but biosurfactants released by stationary-phase bacteria (14 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]) were the most surface active. The crude biosurfactants released were mixtures of various components, with a glycolipid-like component being the most surface active. A lipid-enriched biosurfactant fraction reduced the surface tension of an aqueous solution to about 35 mJ.m-2 at a concentration of only 0.5 mg.ml-1. The amount of biosurfactant released per S. thermophilus B cell was estimated to be sufficient to cover approximately 12 times the area of the cross section of the bacterium, making biosurfactant release a powerful defense weapon in the postadhesion competition of the bacterium with microorganisms such as yeasts. Preadsorption of biosurfactants to the silicone rubber prior to allowing yeasts to adhere was as effective against C. albicans GB 1/2 adhesion as covering 1 to 2% of the silicone rubber surface with adhering S. thermophilus B, but a

  8. Streptococcus thermophilus and its biosurfactants inhibit adhesion by Candida spp. on silicone rubber.

    PubMed Central

    Busscher, H J; van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; van der Kuijl-Booij, M; van der Mei, H C

    1997-01-01

    The adhesion of yeasts, two Candida albicans and two Candida tropicalis strains isolated from naturally colonized voice prostheses, to silicone rubber with and without a salivary conditioning film in the absence and presence of adhering Streptococcus thermophilus B, a biosurfactant-releasing dairy isolate, was studied. Coverage of 1 to 4% of the surface of silicone rubber substrata with adhering S. thermophilus B gave significant reductions in the initial yeast adhesion regardless of the presence of a conditioning film. Mechanistically, this interference in yeast adhesion by S. thermophilus B was not due to direct physical effects but to biosurfactant release by the adhering bacteria, because experiments with S. thermophilus B cells that had released their biosurfactants prior to adhesion to silicone rubber and competition with yeasts did not show interference with initial yeast adhesion. The amounts of biosurfactants released were highest for mid-exponential- and early-stationary-phase bacteria (37 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]), but biosurfactants released by stationary-phase bacteria (14 mg.g of cells-1 [dry weight]) were the most surface active. The crude biosurfactants released were mixtures of various components, with a glycolipid-like component being the most surface active. A lipid-enriched biosurfactant fraction reduced the surface tension of an aqueous solution to about 35 mJ.m-2 at a concentration of only 0.5 mg.ml-1. The amount of biosurfactant released per S. thermophilus B cell was estimated to be sufficient to cover approximately 12 times the area of the cross section of the bacterium, making biosurfactant release a powerful defense weapon in the postadhesion competition of the bacterium with microorganisms such as yeasts. Preadsorption of biosurfactants to the silicone rubber prior to allowing yeasts to adhere was as effective against C. albicans GB 1/2 adhesion as covering 1 to 2% of the silicone rubber surface with adhering S. thermophilus B, but a

  9. Cytotoxic effect of microbial biosurfactants against human embryonic kidney cancerous cell: HEK-293 and their possible role in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2014-11-01

    Two different microbial biosurfactants S9BS and CHBS were isolated from Lysinibacillus fusiformis S9 and Bacillus tequilensis CH. Cytotoxicity effect of these biosurfactants on human embryonic kidney cancerous cell (HEK-293) were studied with the help of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl-)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and morphological changes were observed under inverted microscope. The biosurfactants exhibited positive cytotoxic effect on HEK-293 cell line. It was found that LC50 of S9BS and CHBS were 75 and 100 μg ml(-1), respectively. Further cell cycle and apoptosis analysis of biosurfactant-treated HEK-293 cell line were done by FACS. In this study, cytotoxic effect of glycolipid biosurfactant against HEK-293 cell lines is reported for the first time. Mechanism towards increased membrane permeability of biosurfactant-treated cancer cell may be the incorporation of its lipid moiety into the plasma membrane leading to formation of pores and membrane disruption. Hence, these microbial biosurfactants can prove to be significant biomolecule for cancer treatment.

  10. Biosurfactant-enhanced soil bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaric, N.; Lu, G.; Velikonja, J.

    1995-12-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with organic chemicals is a viable alternative method for clean-up and remedy of hazardous waste sites. The final objective in this approach is to convert the parent toxicant into a readily biodegradable product which is harmless to human health and/or the environment. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil can also efficiently be enhanced by addition or in-situ production of biosufactants. It was generally observed that the degradation time was shortened and particularly the adaptation time for the microbes. More data from our laboratories showed that chlorinated aromatic compounds, such as 2,4-dichlorophenol, a herbicide Metolachlor, as well as naphthalene are degraded faster and more completely when selected biosurfactants are added to the soil. More recent data demonstrated an enhanced biodegradation of heavy hydrocarbons in petrochemical sludges, and in contaminated oil when biosurfactants were present or were added prior to the biodegradation process.

  11. Characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 in the presence of industrial wastes and its application in the biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds in soil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elias J; Rocha e Silva, Nathália Maria P; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Silva, Ricardo O; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2014-05-01

    The bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia CCT6659 cultivated with 2% soybean waste frying oil and 2% corn steep liquor as substrates produced a biosurfactant with potential application in the bioremediation of soils. The biosurfactant was classified as an anionic biomolecule composed of 75% lipids and 25% carbohydrates. Characterization by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H and (13)C NMR) revealed the presence of carbonyl, olefinic and aliphatic groups, with typical spectra of lipids. Four sets of biodegradation experiments were carried out with soil contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds amended with molasses in the presence of an indigenous consortium, as follows: Set 1-soil+bacterial cells; Set 2-soil+biosurfactant; Set 3-soil+bacterial cells+biosurfactant; and Set 4-soil without bacterial cells or biosurfactant (control). Significant oil biodegradation activity (83%) occurred in the first 10 days of the experiments when the biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used together (Set 3), while maximum degradation of the organic compounds (above 95%) was found in Sets 1-3 between 35 and 60 days. It is evident from the results that the biosurfactant alone and its producer species are both capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent.

  12. Chemical characterization of carbohydrate-based biosurfactants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-yield, glycolipid-based biosurfactants are of increasing interest for use in environmentally benign cleaning or emulsifying agents. We have developed a MALDI-TOF/MS screen for the rapid analysis of several types of biosurfactants, including various acylated rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas extracts...

  13. Assessment of the antidiabetic and antilipidemic properties of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Raida; Ben Abdallah-Kolsi, Rihab; Hamden, Khaled; Feki, Abdelfattah El; Chaabouni, Khansa; Makni-Ayadi, Fatma; Sallemi, Fahima; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi-Aydi, Dhouha

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to scrutinize the potential of Bacillus subtilis SPB1biosurfactant, orally administered, for preventing diabetic complications in rats. The findings revealed that, Bacillus subtilis biosurfactant was an effective reducer of α-amylase activity in the plasma. Moreover, this supplement helped protect the β-cells from death and damage. Both the inhibitory action of SPB1 biosurfactant on α-amylase and the protection of the pancreas' β-cells lead to a decrease of the blood glucose levels, consequently antihyperglycemic effect. Interestingly, this lipopeptide biosurfactant modulated key enzyme related to hyperlipidemia as lipase; which leads to the regulation of the lipid profile in serum by the delay in the absorption of LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, and a significant increase in HDL-cholesterol. Histological analyses also showed that it exerted a protective action on the pancreases and efficiently preserved the liver-kidney functions of diabetic rats, evidenced by significant decreases in aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, gamma-glytamyl transpeptidase and lactate deshydrogenase activities in the plasma, as well as in the creatinine and urea contents. Overall, the present study demonstrated that the hypoglycemic and antilipidemic activities exhibited by Bacillus subtilis biosurfactant were effective enough to alleviate induced diabetes in experimental rats. Therefore, SPB1biosurfactant could be considered as a potential strong candidate for the treatment and prevention of diabetes.

  14. Biosurfactant production by the crude oil degrading Stenotrophomonas sp. B-2: chemical characterization, biological activities and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Contreras, María Del Mar; Ammar, Sonda; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    In this work, biosurfactant-producing microorganisms were isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated water collected from Tunisian oilfield. After enrichment and isolation, different bacterial strains were preliminary studied for their biosurfactant/bioemulsifier properties when using crude oil as the unique carbon source. In particular, the isolate strain B-2, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, efficiently emulsified crude oil. The extracellular biosurfactant product from this strain presented an emulsification activity above 70% and a hydrophobicity of 71%. In addition, a diameter of 6 cm was observed in the oil displacement test. The characterization of B-2 strain using 16S rDNA sequencing enables us to find a high degree of similarity with various members of the genus Stenotrophomonas (with a percentage of similarity of 99%). The emulsification activity of Stenotrophomonas biosurfactant B-2 was maintained in a wide range of pH (2 to 6), temperature (4 to 55 °C), and salinity (0 to 50 g L(-1)) conditions. It also enhanced the solubility of phenanthrene in water and could be used in the re-mobilization of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment. In addition, this biosurfactant exhibited antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Infrared spectroscopy suggested potential lipidic and peptidic moieties, and mass spectrometry-based analyses showed that the biosurfactant contains mainly cyclic peptidic structures belonging to the class of diketopiperazines. Therefore, the B-2 strain is a promising biosurfactant-producing microorganism and its derived biosurfactant presents a wide range of industrial applications.

  15. Biosurfactants in Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Urban, Joanna

    At the cellular level, amphipathic molecules characterized by hydrophobic and hydrophilic, or non-polar and polar regions, are common and essential due to life’s aqueous nature and aqueous environment. Single and multicellular lifeforms evolved amphipathic lipid bilayers to segregate external and internal water, and exploit this separation to generate energy, concentrate solutes, extrude or exclude waste and toxic materials, and to create a controlled environment for biomolecular synthesis which is, among other things, the basis of heredity. Threaded through these processes are mixed polarity molecules whose functions rely on amphipathy. Consider transmembrane sensory proteins, electron transport chain proton and sodium motive pumps, flagellar motors and internal membranes as examples. The very molecules that dictate individuality, nucleic acids, are built upon contrasting base pair and sugar phosphate polarities.

  16. Characterisation, surface properties and biological activity of a biosurfactant produced from industrial waste by Candida sphaerica UCP0995 for application in the petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Luna, Juliana M; Rufino, Raquel D; Sarubbo, Leonie A; Campos-Takaki, Galba Maria

    2013-02-01

    The development of less toxic, biodegradable, surfactants, such as biosurfactants, is a key strategy for acquiring environmentally friendly compounds. The aim of the present study was to employ an optimised medium containing 9% ground nut oil refinery residue and 9% corn steep liquor for the production of a biosurfactant by Candida sphaerica. Fermentation was carried out at 28 °C and 200 rpm for 144 h. Biosurfactant yield was 9 g/l. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of the medium to 25 mN/m, with a critical micelle concentration of 0.025%. The product demonstrated stability with regard to surface tension reduction and emulsification in a range of temperatures (5-120 °C) and pH values (2-12) as well as tolerance to high concentrations of NaCl (2-10%). Hydrophobicity tests indicate two possible insoluble substrate uptake mechanisms: direct interfacial uptake and biosurfactant-mediated transfer (cell contact with emulsified or solubilised hydrocarbons). The biosurfactant was characterised as an anionic glycolipid consisting of 70% lipids and 15% carbohydrates and demonstrated no toxicity to the microcrustacean Artemia salina or the vegetables Brassica oleracea, Solanum gilo, Lactuca sativa L. and Brassica oleracea L. The biosurfactant recovered 95% of motor oil adsorbed to a sand sample, demonstrating considerable potential for use in bioremediation processes, especially in the petroleum industry.

  17. Enhanced biosurfactant production through cloning of three genes and role of esterase in biosurfactant release

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants have been reported to utilize a number of immiscible substrates and thereby facilitate the biodegradation of panoply of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Olive oil is one such carbon source which has been explored by many researchers. However, studying the concomitant production of biosurfactant and esterase enzyme in the presence of olive oil in the Bacillus species and its recombinants is a relatively novel approach. Results Bacillus species isolated from endosulfan sprayed cashew plantation soil was cultivated on a number of hydrophobic substrates. Olive oil was found to be the best inducer of biosurfactant activity. The protein associated with the release of the biosurfactant was found to be an esterase. There was a twofold increase in the biosurfactant and esterase activities after the successful cloning of the biosurfactant genes from Bacillus subtilis SK320 into E.coli. Multiple sequence alignment showed regions of similarity and conserved sequences between biosurfactant and esterase genes, further confirming the symbiotic correlation between the two. Biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis SK320 and recombinant strains BioS a, BioS b, BioS c were found to be effective emulsifiers, reducing the surface tension of water from 72 dynes/cm to as low as 30.7 dynes/cm. Conclusion The attributes of enhanced biosurfactant and esterase production by hyper-producing recombinant strains have many utilities from industrial viewpoint. This study for the first time has shown a possible association between biosurfactant production and esterase activity in any Bacillus species. Biosurfactant-esterase complex has been found to have powerful emulsification properties, which shows promising bioremediation, hydrocarbon biodegradation and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21707984

  18. Extracellular aromatic biosurfactant produced by Tsukamurella pseudospumae and T. spumae during growth on n-hexadecane.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Johannes H; Kraft, Axel; Heißler, Stefan; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Schwack, Wolfgang; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-10-10

    Biosurfactants are surface-active agents produced by microorganisms and show increasing significance in various industrial applications. A great variety of these secondary metabolites are described to occur within actinomycetes, amongst trehalose lipids and oligosaccharide lipids produced by the family Tsukamurellaceae. This study reports on the production of not yet described compounds with surface active behavior by non-pathogenic Tsukamurella pseudospumae and Tsukamurella spumae during growth on hydrophobic carbon sources. Extracts of the purified compounds differ in terms of structure and performance properties to other biosurfactants described within their family. Infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of aromatic moieties within the surfactant produced, which to date is only known to occur within phenolic glycolipids of some mycobateria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biological and physicochemical properties of biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus jensenii P6A and Lactobacillus gasseri P65.

    PubMed

    Morais, I M C; Cordeiro, A L; Teixeira, G S; Domingues, V S; Nardi, R M D; Monteiro, A S; Alves, R J; Siqueira, E P; Santos, V L

    2017-09-19

    Lactobacillus species produce biosurfactants that can contribute to the bacteria's ability to prevent microbial infections associated with urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts and the skin. Here, we described the biological and physicochemical properties of biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus jensenii P6A and Lactobacillus gasseri P65. The biosurfactants produced by L. jensenii P6A and L. gasseri P65 reduced the water surface tension from 72 to 43.2 mN m(-1) and 42.5 mN m(-1) as their concentration increased up to the critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of 7.1 and 8.58 mg mL(-1), respectively. Maximum emulsifying activity was obtained at concentrations of 1 and 5 mg mL(-1) for the P6A and P65 strains, respectively. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data revealed that the biomolecules consist of a mixture of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. The gas chromatography-mass spectrum analysis of L. jensenii P6A biosurfactant showed a major peak for 14-methypentadecanoic acid, which was the main fatty acid present in the biomolecule; conversely, eicosanoic acid dominated the biosurfactant produced by L. gasseri P65. Although both biosurfactants contain different percentages of the sugars galactose, glucose and ribose; rhamnose was only detected in the biomolecule produced by L. jensenii P6A. Emulsifying activities were stable after a 60-min incubation at 100 °C, at pH 2-10, and after the addition of potassium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, but not in the presence of sodium chloride. The biomolecules showed antimicrobial activity against clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, with MIC values of 16 µg mL(-1), and against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae at 128 µg mL(-1). The biosurfactants also disrupted preformed biofilms of microorganisms at varying concentrations, being more efficient against E. aerogenes (64%) (P6A biosurfactant), and E. coli (46.4%) and S

  20. Characterization of new biosurfactant produced by Trichosporon montevideense CLOA 72 isolated from dairy industry effluents.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Andrea S; Coutinho, Joana O P A; Júnior, Ary C; Rosa, Carlos A; Siqueira, Ezequias P; Santos, Vera L

    2009-12-01

    The yeast strain CLOA 72 isolated from the effluent of a dairy industry in Brazil and identified as Trichosporon montevideense, was able to grow and produce a glycolipid biosurfactant when cultured on a mineral medium (MM) with sunflower oil as the carbon source. Biosurfactant production was partially growth-associated and maximal emulsification activity was observed at 144 h of cultivation (78.92%). The biosurfactant purified by precipitation with ethanol showed 78.66% emulsifying activity when used in concentrations above 4.5 mg/ml and was able to reduce the surface tension of water to values below 44.9 mN/m. The critical micellar concentration (CMC) was found to be 2.2 mg/ml. The highest emulsifying activity (E(24)) has been observed with vegetable oils, toluene, kerosene, isooctane, cyclohexane, hexane, diesel oil and hexadecane as compared to mineral oil and oleic acid. The biosurfactant also showed good stability during exposure to 100 degrees C for different periods of time (10 to 60 min), to high salinity (30% of NaCl, KCl and NaHCO(3)), and to a wide range of pH values (1-10). The biosurfactant purified by gel filtration chromatography is a glycolipid, with lipid portion containing 16.03% (9Z)-octadec-9-enoic acid, 14.92% hexadecanoic acid, and 9.63% (E) octadec-9-enoic acid and the carbohydrate portion containing mannose (35.29%), xylose (41.99%), arabinose (17.47%), and glucose (5.25%).

  1. Microbial biofilms: biosurfactants as antibiofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; De Rienzo, Mayri A Díaz; Quinn, Gerry A

    2014-12-01

    Current microbial inhibition strategies based on planktonic bacterial physiology have been known to have limited efficacy on the growth of biofilm communities. This problem can be exacerbated by the emergence of increasingly resistant clinical strains. All aspects of biofilm measurement, monitoring, dispersal, control, and inhibition are becoming issues of increasing importance. Biosurfactants have merited renewed interest in both clinical and hygienic sectors due to their potential to disperse microbial biofilms in addition to many other advantages. The dispersal properties of biosurfactants have been shown to rival those of conventional inhibitory agents against bacterial and yeast biofilms. This makes them suitable candidates for use in new generations of microbial dispersal agents and for use as adjuvants for existing microbial suppression or eradication strategies. In this review, we explore aspects of biofilm characteristics and examine the contribution of biologically derived surface-active agents (biosurfactants) to the disruption or inhibition of microbial biofilms.

  2. Biosurfactants: Promising Molecules for Petroleum Biotechnology Advances.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Darne G; Soares Da Silva, Rita de Cássia F; Luna, Juliana M; Rufino, Raquel D; Santos, Valdemir A; Banat, Ibrahim M; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-01-01

    The growing global demand for sustainable technologies that improves the efficiency of petrochemical processes in the oil industry has driven advances in petroleum biotechnology in recent years. Petroleum industry uses substantial amounts of petrochemical-based synthetic surfactants in its activities as mobilizing agents to increase the availability or recovery of hydrocarbons as well as many other applications related to extraction, treatment, cleaning, and transportation. However, biosurfactants have several potential applications for use across the oil processing chain and in the formulations of petrochemical products such as emulsifying/demulsifying agents, anticorrosive, biocides for sulfate-reducing bacteria, fuel formulation, extraction of bitumen from tar sands, and many other innovative applications. Due to their versatility and proven efficiency, biosurfactants are often presented as valuable versatile tools that can transform and modernize petroleum biotechnology in an attempt to provide a true picture of state of the art and directions or use in the oil industry. We believe that biosurfactants are going to have a significant role in many future applications in the oil industries and in this review therefore, we highlight recent important relevant applications, patents disclosures and potential future applications for biosurfactants in petroleum and related industries.

  3. Biosurfactants: Promising Molecules for Petroleum Biotechnology Advances

    PubMed Central

    De Almeida, Darne G.; Soares Da Silva, Rita de Cássia F.; Luna, Juliana M.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Santos, Valdemir A.; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Sarubbo, Leonie A.

    2016-01-01

    The growing global demand for sustainable technologies that improves the efficiency of petrochemical processes in the oil industry has driven advances in petroleum biotechnology in recent years. Petroleum industry uses substantial amounts of petrochemical-based synthetic surfactants in its activities as mobilizing agents to increase the availability or recovery of hydrocarbons as well as many other applications related to extraction, treatment, cleaning, and transportation. However, biosurfactants have several potential applications for use across the oil processing chain and in the formulations of petrochemical products such as emulsifying/demulsifying agents, anticorrosive, biocides for sulfate-reducing bacteria, fuel formulation, extraction of bitumen from tar sands, and many other innovative applications. Due to their versatility and proven efficiency, biosurfactants are often presented as valuable versatile tools that can transform and modernize petroleum biotechnology in an attempt to provide a true picture of state of the art and directions or use in the oil industry. We believe that biosurfactants are going to have a significant role in many future applications in the oil industries and in this review therefore, we highlight recent important relevant applications, patents disclosures and potential future applications for biosurfactants in petroleum and related industries. PMID:27843439

  4. Production and antimicrobial property of glycolipid biosurfactants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial glycolipids such as rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) are an important class of biosurfactants with excellent surface tension-lowering activity. Besides their surfactant- and environment-friendly properties, however, additional value-added property such as bacteriocidal activity is n...

  5. Contributions of biosurfactants to natural or induced bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Lawniczak, Lukasz; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Lukasz

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies dedicated to evaluating the influence of biosurfactants on bioremediation efficiency is constantly growing. Although significant progress regarding the explanation of mechanisms behind biosurfactant-induced effects could be observed, there are still many factors which are not sufficiently elucidated. This corresponds to the fact that although positive influence of biosurfactants is often reported, there are also numerous cases where no or negative effect was observed. This review summarizes the recent finding in the field of biosurfactant-amended bioremediation, focusing mainly on a critical approach towards potential limitations and causes of failure while investigating the effects of biosurfactants on the efficiency of biodegradation and phytoextraction processes. It also provides a summary of successive steps, which should be taken into consideration when designing biosurfactant-related treatment processes.

  6. Simultaneous Production of Biosurfactants and Bacteriocins by Probiotic Lactobacillus casei MRTL3

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepansh; Singh Saharan, Baljeet

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are ubiquitous and well-known commensal bacteria in the human and animal microflora. LAB are extensively studied and used in a variety of industrial and food fermentations. They are widely used for humans and animals as adjuvants, probiotic formulation, and dietary supplements and in other food fermentation applications. In the present investigation, LAB were isolated from raw milk samples collected from local dairy farms of Haryana, India. Further, the isolates were screened for simultaneous production of biosurfactants and bacteriocins. Biosurfactant produced was found to be a mixture of lipid and sugar similar to glycolipids. The bacteriocin obtained was found to be heat stable (5 min at 100°C). Further, DNA of the strain was extracted and amplified by the 16S rRNA sequencing using universal primers. The isolate Lactobacillus casei MRTL3 was found to be a potent biosurfactant and bacteriocin producer. It seems to have huge potential for food industry as a biopreservative and/or food ingredient. PMID:24669225

  7. Microbial biosurfactants as additives for food industries.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jenyffer Medeiros; Stamford, Tânia Lúcia Montenegro; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora; de Luna, Juliana Moura; Rufino, Raquel Diniz; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biosurfactants with high ability to reduce surface and interfacial surface tension and conferring important properties such as emulsification, detergency, solubilization, lubrication and phase dispersion have a wide range of potential applications in many industries. Significant interest in these compounds has been demonstrated by environmental, bioremediation, oil, petroleum, food, beverage, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries attracted by their low toxicity, biodegradability and sustainable production technologies. Despite having significant potentials associated with emulsion formation, stabilization, antiadhesive and antimicrobial activities, significantly less output and applications have been reported in food industry. This has been exacerbated by uneconomical or uncompetitive costing issues for their production when compared to plant or chemical counterparts. In this review, biosurfactants properties, present uses and potential future applications as food additives acting as thickening, emulsifying, dispersing or stabilising agents in addition to the use of sustainable economic processes utilising agro-industrial wastes as alternative substrates for their production are discussed. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Production of a Biosurfactant from Torulopsis bombicola

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D. G.; Paddock, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of carbon sources—carbohydrate and vegetable oil—are necessary to obtain large yields of biosurfactant from Torulopsis bombicola ATCC 22214. Most of the surfactant is produced in the late exponential phase of growth. It is possible to grow the yeast on a single carbon source and then add the other type of substrate, after the exponential growth phase, and cause a burst of surfactant production. This product is a mixture of glycolipids. The maximum yield is 70 g liter−1, or 35% of the weight of the substrate used. An economic comparison demonstrated that this biosurfactant could be produced significantly more cheaply than any of the previously reported microbial surfactants. PMID:16346455

  9. Biosurfactants in cosmetic formulations: trends and challenges.

    PubMed

    Vecino, X; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B; Rodrigues, L R

    2017-01-12

    Cosmetic products play an essential role in everyone's life. People everyday use a large variety of cosmetic products such as soap, shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, skin care, perfume, make-up, among others. The cosmetic industry encompasses several environmental, social and economic impacts that are being addressed through the search for more efficient manufacturing techniques, the reduction of waste and emissions and the promotion of personal hygiene, contributing to an improvement of public health and at the same time providing employment opportunities. The current trend among consumers is the pursuit for natural ingredients in cosmetic products, as many of these products exhibit equal, better or additional benefits in comparison with the chemical-based products. In this sense, biosurfactants are natural compounds with great potential in the formulation of cosmetic products given by their biodegradability and impact in health. Indeed, many of these biosurfactants could exhibit a "prebiotic" character. This review covers the current state-of-the-art of biosurfactant research for cosmetic purposes and further discusses the future challenges for cosmetic applications.

  10. Biosurfactants as green stabilizers for the biological synthesis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph; Manilal, Aseer; Sujith, S

    2011-12-01

    Taking into consideration the needs of greener bioprocesses and novel enhancers for synthesis using microbial processes, biosurfactants, and/or biosurfactant producing microbes are emerging as an alternate source for the rapid synthesis of nanoparticles. A microemulsion technique using an oil-water-surfactant mixture was shown to be a promising approach for nanoparticle synthesis. Biosurfactants are natural surfactants derived from microbial origin composed mostly of sugar and fatty acid moieties, they have higher biodegradability, lower toxicity, and excellent biological activities. The biosurfactant mediated process and microbial synthesis of nanoparticles are now emerging as clean, nontoxic, and environmentally acceptable "green chemistry" procedures. The biosurfactant-mediated synthesis is superior to the methods of bacterial- or fungal-mediated nanoparticle synthesis, since biosurfactants reduce the formation of aggregates due to the electrostatic forces of attraction and facilitate a uniform morphology of the nanoparticles. In this review, we highlight the biosurfactant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles with relevant details including a greener bioprocess, sources of biosurfactants, and biological synthesized nanoparticles based on the available literature and laboratory findings.

  11. Carbohydrate-based renewable biosurfactants: Rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, and novel liamocins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-yield, glycolipid-based biosurfactants are of increasing interest for use in environmentally benign cleaning or emulsifying agents. We have developed a MALDI-TOF/MS screen for the rapid analysis of several types of biosurfactants, including various acylated rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas extracts...

  12. Biosurfactants: promising bioactive molecules for oral-related health applications.

    PubMed

    Elshikh, Mohamed; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-09-01

    Biosurfactants are naturally produced molecules that demonstrate potentially useful properties such as the ability to reduce surface tensions between different phases. Besides having similar properties to their artificial chemical counterparts, they are regarded as environmental friendly, biodegradable and less toxic, which make them desirable candidates for downstream applications. The structure-activity-related properties of the biosurfactants which are directly correlated with potency of the biosurfactants as antimicrobial agents, the ability of the biosurfactants to alter surface energies and their ability to increase bioavailability are particularly what attract researchers to exploit their potential use in the oral-related health applications. Current research into biosurfactant indicates significant future potential for use in cosmetic and therapeutic oral hygiene product formulations and related medical device treatments.

  13. Effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant on solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Shudong; Pi, Yongrui; Bao, Mutai; Zhang, Cong; Zhao, Dongwei; Li, Yiming; Sun, Peiyan; Lu, Jinren

    2015-12-15

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing bacteria, Bacillus Lz-2, was isolated from oil polluted water collected from Dongying Shengli oilfield, China. The factors that influence PAH solubilization such as biosurfactant concentration, pH, ionic strength and temperature were discussed. The results showed that the solubilities of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene increased linearly with the rise of rhamnolipid biosurfactant dose above the biosurfactant critical micelle concentration (CMC). Furthermore, the molar solubilization ratio (MSR) values decreased in the following order: naphthalene>phenanthrene>pyrene. However, the solubility percentage increased and followed the opposite order: pyrene>phenanthrene>naphthalene. The solubilities of PAHs in rhamnolipid biosurfactant solution increased with the rise of pH and ionic strength, and reached the maximum values under the conditions of pH11 and NaCl concentration 8 g · L(-1). The solubility of phenanthrene and pyrene increased with the rise of temperature.

  14. Isolation of biosurfactant producers, optimization and properties of biosurfactant produced by Acinetobacter sp. from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Huang, P T; Zhang, K Y; Ding, F R

    2012-04-01

    To screen and identify biosurfactant producers from petroleum-contaminated soil; to use response surface methodology (RSM) for medium optimization to enhance biosurfactant production; and to study the properties of the newly obtained biosurfactant towards pH, temperature and salinity. We successfully isolated three biosurfactant producers from petroleum-contaminated soil and identified them through 16S rRNA sequence analysis, which exhibit the highest similarities to Acinetobacter beijerinckii (100%), Kocuria marina (99%) and Kineococcus marinus (99%), respectively. A quadratic response model was constructed through RSM designs, leading to a 57·5% increase of the growth-associated biosurfactant production by Acinetobacter sp. YC-X 2 with an optimized medium: beef extract 3·12 g l(-1) ; peptone 20·87 g l(-1) ; NaCl 1·04 g l(-1); and n-hexadecane 1·86 g l(-1). Biosurfactant produced by Acinetobacter sp. YC-X 2 retained its properties during exposure to a wide range of pH values (5-11), high temperatures (up to 121°C) and high salinities [up to 18% (w/v) Na(+) and Ca(2+) ], which was more sensitive to Ca(2+) than Na(+). Two novel biosurfactant producers were isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil. Biosurfactant from Acinetobacter sp. YC-X 2 has good properties to a wide range of pH, high temperature and high salinity, and its production was optimized successfully through RSM. The fact, an increasing demand of high-quality surfactants and the lack of cost-competitive bioprocesses of biosurfactants for commercial utilization, motivates researchers to develop cost-effective strategies for biosurfactant production through isolating new biosurfactant producers with special surface-active properties and optimizing their cultural conditions. Two novel biosurfactant producers in this study will widen our knowledge about this kind of micro-organism. This work is the first application of RSM designs for cultural optimization of biosurfactant produced by Acinetobacter

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOSURFACTANT-MEDIATED OIL RECOVERY IN MODEL POROUS SYSTEMS AND COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF BIOSURFACTANT-MEDIATED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; S.K. Maudgalya; R. Knapp; M. Folmsbee

    2004-05-31

    Current technology recovers only one-third to one-half of the oil that is originally present in an oil reservoir. Entrapment of petroleum hydrocarbons by capillary forces is a major factor that limits oil recovery (1, 3, 4). Hydrocarbon displacement can occur if interfacial tension (IFT) between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases is reduced by several orders of magnitude. Microbially-produced biosurfactants may be an economical method to recover residual hydrocarbons since they are effective at low concentrations. Previously, we showed that substantial mobilization of residual hydrocarbon from a model porous system occurs at biosurfactant concentrations made naturally by B. mojavensis strain JF-1 if a polymer and 2,3-butanediol were present (2). In this report, we include data on oil recovery from Berea sandstone experiments along with our previous data from sand pack columns in order to relate biosurfactant concentration to the fraction of oil recovered. We also investigate the effect that the JF-2 biosurfactant has on interfacial tension (IFT). The presence of a co-surfactant, 2,3-butanediol, was shown to improve oil recoveries possibly by changing the optimal salinity concentration of the formulation. The JF-2 biosurfactant lowered IFT by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that biosurfactant solutions with concentrations ranging from 10 to 60 mg/l in the presence of 0.1 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1 g/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) recovered 10-40% of the residual oil present in Berea sandstone cores. When PHPA was used alone, about 10% of the residual oil was recovered. Thus, about 10% of the residual oil recovered in these experiments was due to the increase in viscosity of the displacing fluid. Little or no oil was recovered at

  16. Interaction of the Lipopeptide Biosurfactant Lichenysin with Phosphatidylcholine Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronel, Jonathan R; Marqués, Ana; Manresa, Ángeles; Aranda, Francisco J; Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-09-26

    Lichenysins produced by Bacillus licheniformis are anionic lipopeptide biosurfactants with cytotoxic, antimicrobial, and hemolytic activities that possess enormous potential for chemical and biological applications. Through the use of physical techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry, small- and wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as molecular dynamics simulations, we report on the interaction of Lichenysin with synthetic phosphatidylcholines differing in hydrocarbon chain length. Lichenysin alters the thermotropic phase behavior of phosphatidylcholines, displaying fluid-phase immiscibility and showing a preferential partitioning into fluid domains. The interlamellar repeat distance of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is modified, affecting both the phospholipid palisade and the lipid/water interface, which also experiences a strong dehydration. Molecular dynamics confirms that Lichenysin is capable of interacting both with the hydrophobic portion of DPPC and with the polar headgroup region, which is of particular relevance to explain much of its properties. The results presented here help to establish a molecular basis for the Lichenysin-induced perturbation of model and biological membranes previously described in the literature.

  17. Substrate dependent production of extracellular biosurfactant by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Mukherjee, Soumen; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a marine microorganism to utilize different carbon substrates for the production of an extracellular biosurfactant was evaluated. Among the several carbon substrates tested for this purpose, production of the crude biosurfactant was found to be highest with glycerol (2.9+/-0.11 g L(-1)) followed by starch (2.5+/-0.11 g L(-1)), glucose (1.16+/-0.11 g L(-1)) and sucrose (0.94+/-0.07 g L(-1)). The crude biosurfactant obtained from glycerol, starch and sucrose media had significantly higher antimicrobial action than those obtained from glucose containing medium. RP-HPLC resolved the crude biosurfactants into several fractions one of which had significant antimicrobial action. The antimicrobial fraction was found in higher concentrations in biosurfactant obtained using glycerol, starch and sucrose as compared to the biosurfactants from glucose medium, thereby explaining higher antimicrobial activity. The carbon substrate was thus found to affect biosurfactant production both in a qualitative and quantitative manner.

  18. Screening of biosurfactants from cloud microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancelme, Martine; Canet, Isabelle; Traikia, Mounir; Uhliarikova, Yveta; Capek, Peter; Matulova, Maria; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets from aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not well understood and a main source of uncertainties in the climate budget today. One of the principal parameters in these processes is the surface tension of atmospheric particles, which can be strongly affected by trace compounds called surfactants. Within a project devoted to bring information on atmospheric surfactants and their effects on cloud droplet formation, we focused on surfactants produced by microorganisms present in atmospheric waters. From our unique collection of microorganisms, isolated from cloud water collected at the Puy-de-Dôme (France),1 we undertook a screening of this bank for biosurfactant producers. After extraction of the supernatants of the pure cultures, surface tension of crude extracts was determined by the hanging drop technique. Results showed that a wide variety of microorganisms are able to produce biosurfactants, some of them exhibiting strong surfactant properties as the resulting tension surface decreases to values less then 35 mN.m-1. Preliminary analytical characterization of biosurfactants, obtained after isolation from overproducing cultures of Rhodococcus sp. and Pseudomonas sp., allowed us to identify them as belonging to two main classes, namely glycolipids and glycopeptides. 1. Vaïtilingom, M.; Attard, E.; Gaiani, N.; Sancelme, M.; Deguillaume, L.; Flossmann, A. I.; Amato, P.; Delort, A. M. Long-term features of cloud microbiology at the puy de Dôme (France). Atmos. Environ. 2012, 56, 88-100. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the French-USA ANR SONATA program and the French-Slovakia programs Stefanik and CNRS exchange.

  19. Heavy metal removal from sediments by biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, C N; Yong, R N; Gibbs, B F

    2001-07-30

    Batch washing experiments were used to evaluate the feasibility of using biosurfactants for the removal of heavy metals from sediments. Surfactin from Bacillus subtilis, rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and sophorolipid from Torulopsis bombicola were evaluated using a metal-contaminated sediment (110mg/kg copper and 3300mg/kg zinc). A single washing with 0.5% rhamnolipid removed 65% of the copper and 18% of the zinc, whereas 4% sophorolipid removed 25% of the copper and 60% of the zinc. Surfactin was less effective, removing 15% of the copper and 6% of the zinc. The technique of ultrafiltration and zeta potential measurements were used to determine the mechanism of metal removal by the surfactants. It was then postulated that metal removal by the biosurfactants occurs through sorption of the surfactant on to the soil surface and complexation with the metal, detachment of the metal from the soil into the soil solution and hence association with surfactant micelles. Sequential extraction procedures were used on the sediment to determine the speciation of the heavy metals before and after surfactant washing. The carbonate and oxide fractions accounted for over 90% of the zinc present in the sediments. The organic fraction constituted over 70% of the copper. Sequential extraction of the sediments after washing with the various surfactants indicated that the biosurfactants, rhamnolipid and surfactin could remove the organically-bound copper and that the sophorolipid could remove the carbonate and oxide-bound zinc. Therefore, heavy metal removal from sediments is feasible and further research will be conducted.

  20. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking.

    PubMed

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-07-01

    Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra- or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish aquaculture.

  1. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking

    PubMed Central

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra-or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish

  2. Trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus actinobacteria with diverse immunomodulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Baeva, Tatiana A; Kochina, Olesia A; Gein, Sergey V; Chereshnev, Valery A

    2015-12-25

    Actinobacteria of the genus Rhodococcus produce trehalolipid biosurfactants with versatile biochemical properties and low toxicity. In recent years, these biosurfactants are increasingly studied as possible biomedical agents with expressed immunological activities. Applications of trehalolipids from Rhodococcus, predominantly cell-bound, in biomedicine are also attractive because their cost drawback could be less significant for high-value products. The review summarizes recent findings in immunomodulatory activities of trehalolipid biosurfactants from nonpathogenic Rhodococcus and related actinobacteria and compares their biomedical potential with well-known immunomodifying properties of trehalose dimycolates from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular mechanisms of trehalolipid interactions with immunocompetent cells are also discussed.

  3. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, J.J.; Han, S.O.; Maudgalya, S.; Mouttaki, H.; Folmsbee, M.; Knapp, R.; Nagle, D.; Jackson, B.E.; Stuadt, M.; Frey, W.

    2003-01-16

    The objectives of this were two fold. First, core displacement studies were done to determine whether microbial processes could recover residual oil at elevated pressures. Second, the importance of biosurfactant production for the recovery of residual oil was studies. In these studies, a biosurfactant-producing, microorganisms called Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 was used. This bacterium produces a cyclic peptide biosurfactant that significantly reduces the interfacial tension between oil and brine (7). The use of a mutant deficient in surfactant production and a mathematical MEOR simulator were used to determine the major mechanisms of oil recovery by these two strains.

  4. Quorum sensing: implications on rhamnolipid biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Dusane, Devendra H; Zinjarde, Smita S; Venugopalan, Vayalam P; McLean, Robert J C; Weber, Mary M; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M

    2010-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has received significant attention in the past few decades. QS describes population density dependent cell to cell communication in bacteria using diffusible signal molecules. These signal molecules produced by bacterial cells, regulate various physiological processes important for social behavior and pathogenesis. One such process regulated by quorum sensing molecules is the production of a biosurfactant, rhamnolipid. Rhamnolipids are important microbially derived surface active agents produced by Pseudomonas spp. under the control of two interrelated quorum sensing systems; namely las and rhl. Rhamnolipids possess antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. They are important in motility, cell to cell interactions, cellular differentiation and formation of water channels that are characteristics of Pseudomonas biofilms. Rhamnolipids have biotechnological applications in the uptake of hydrophobic substrates, bioremediation of contaminated soils and polluted waters. Rhamnolipid biosurfactants are biodegradable as compared to chemical surfactants and hence are more preferred in environmental applications. In this review, we examine the biochemical and genetic mechanism of rhamnolipid production by P. aeruginosa and propose the application of QS signal molecules in enhancing the rhamnolipid production.

  5. Biosurfactant-enhanced solubilization of NAPL mixtures.

    PubMed

    McCray, J E; Bai, G; Maier, R M; Brusseau, M L

    2001-03-01

    Remediation of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) by conventional pump-and-treat methods (i.e., water flushing) is generally considered to be ineffective due to low water solubilities of NAPLs and to mass-transfer constraints. Chemical flushing techniques, such as surfactant flushing, can greatly improve NAPL remediation primarily by increasing the apparent solubility of NAPL contaminants. NAPLs at hazardous waste sites are often complex mixtures. However, the equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass-transfer characteristics between NAPL mixtures and aqueous surfactant solutions are not well understood. This research investigates the equilibrium solubilization behavior of two- and three-component NAPL mixtures (containing akylbenzenes) in biosurfactant solutions. NAPL solubilization is found to be ideal in water (i.e., obeys Raoult's Law), while solubilization in biosurfactant solutions was observed to be nonideal. Specifically, the relatively hydrophobic compounds in the mixture experienced solubility enhancements that were greater than those predicted by ideal enhanced solubilization theory, while the solubility enhancements for the relatively hydrophilic compounds were less than predicted. The degree of nonideality is shown to be a nonlinear function of the NAPL-phase mole fraction. Empirical relationships based on the NAPL-phase mole fraction and/or micelle-aqueous partition coefficients measured in single-component NAPL systems are developed to estimate values for the multicomponent partition coefficients. Empirical relationships that incorporate both the NAPL-phase mole fraction and single-component partition coefficients yield much improved estimates for the multicomponent partition coefficient.

  6. Production of biosurfactant by indigenous isolated bacteria in fermentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fooladi, Tayebeh; Hamid, Aidil Bin Abd; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Moazami, Nasrin; Shafiee, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus pumilus 2IR is a soil isolate bacterium from an Iranian oil field that produces promising yield of biosurfactant in medium E. The production of biosurfactant by strain 2IR has been investigated using different carbon and nitrogen sources. The strain was able to grow and to produce surfactant, reducing the surface tension of the medium from 60mN/m to 31mN/m on glucose after 72 h of cultivation. The strain was able to produce the maximum amount of biosurfactant (0.72 g/l) when potassium nitrate and glucose used as a nitrogen and carbon sources respectively. Production of biosurfactant reaches to highest amount at a C/N ratio of 12.

  7. Oil removal from used sorbents using a biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Wei, Q F; Mather, R R; Fotheringham, A F

    2005-02-01

    Oil spills impose serious damage on the environment. Mechanical recovery by the help of oil sorbents is one of the most important countermeasures in oil spill response. Most sorbents, however, end up in landfills or in incineration after a single use. These options either produce another source of pollution or increase the oil recovery cost. In this study a biosurfactant was used to clean used oil sorbents. This use of biosurfactants is new. Washing parameters tested included sorbent type, washing time, surfactant dosage and temperature. It was found that with biosurfactant washing more than 95% removal of the oil from sorbents was achieved, depending on the washing conditions. Biosurfactants were found to have considerable potential for recycling the used sorbents.

  8. Biosurfactant's role in bioremediation of NAPL and fermentative production.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanket J; Desai, Anjana J

    2010-01-01

    Surfactants and biosurfactants are amphipathic molecules with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition preferentially at the interface between fluid phases that have different degrees of polarity and hydrogen bonding which confers excellent detergency, emulsifying, foaming and dispersing traits, making them most versatile process chemicals. One of the major applications of (bio)surfactants is in environmental bioremediation field. Most synthetic organic compounds present in contaminated soils are only weakly soluble or completely insoluble in water, so they exist in the subsurface as separate liquid phase, often referred as a non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), which poses as threat to environment. Several studies have revealed the use of surfactants for remediation; however, several factors limit the use of surfactants in environmental remediation, mainly persistence of surfactants or their metabolites and thus potentially pose an environmental concern. Biosurfactants may provide a more cost-effective approach for subsurface remediation when used alone or in combination with synthetic surfactants. There are several advantages of biosurfactants when compared to chemical surfactants, mainly biodegradability, low toxicity, biocompatibility and ability to be synthesized from renewable feedstock. Despite having many commercially attractive properties and clear advantages compared with their synthetic counterparts, biosurfactants have not yet been employed extensively in industry because of their low yields and relatively high production and recovery costs. However, the use of mutants and recombinant hyperproducing microorganisms along with the use of cheaper raw materials and optimal growth and production conditions and more efficient recovery processes, the production of biosurfactant can be made economically feasible. Therefore, future research aiming for high-level production of biosurfactants must be focused towards the development of appropriate

  9. Gordonia (nocardia) amarae foaming due to biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Pagilla, K R; Sood, A; Kim, H

    2002-01-01

    Gordonia amarae, a filamentous actinomycete, commonly found in foaming activated sludge wastewater treatment plants was investigated for its biosurfactant production capability. Soluble acetate and paringly soluble hexadecane were used as carbon sources for G. amarae growth and biosurfactant production in laboratory scale batch reactors. The lowest surface tension (critical micelle concentration, CMC) of the cell-free culture broth was 55 dynes/cm when 1,900 mg/L acetate was used as the sole carbon source. The lowest surface tension was less than 40 dynes/cm when either 1% (v/v) hexadecane or a mixture of 1% (v/v) hexadecane and 0.5% (w/v) acetate was used as the carbon source. The maximum biomass concentration (the stationary phase) was achieved after 4 days when acetate was used along with hexadecane, whereas it took about 8 days to achieve the stationary phase with hexadecane alone. The maximum biosurfactant production was 3 x CMC with hexadecane as the sole carbon source, and it was 5 x CMC with the mixture of hexadecane and acetate. Longer term growth studies (approximately 35 days of culture growth) indicated that G. amarae produces biosurfactant in order to solubilize hexadecane, and that adding acetate improves its biosurfactant production by providing readily degradable substrate for initial biomass growth. This research confirms that the foaming problems in activated sludge containing G. amarae in the activated sludge are due to the biosurfactant production by G. amarae when hydrophobic substrates such as hexadecane are present.

  10. Candida tropicalis BPU1, a novel isolate from the rumen of the Malabari goat, is a dual producer of biosurfactant and polyhydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Priji, Prakasan; Unni, K N; Sajith, S; Benjamin, Sailas

    2013-03-01

    This unique study reports a new strain (BPU1) of Candida tropicalis isolated from the rumen of the Malabari goat, showing dual production of biosurfactant and polyhydroxybutyrate. C. tropicalis strain BPU1, a facultative anaerobe, was tuned to become an aerobe in specially designed flask, the Benjamin flask. The puffy circular colonies were smooth, white-to-cream in colour, with pseudo-filaments. The strain fermented glucose, sucrose, maltose and dextrose, but not lactose and cellulose. It assimilated (NH4 )2 SO4 , peptone, glycine and arginine, but not NaNO3 , as the nitrogen source. Interestingly, it utilized groundnut oil (up to 0.3%) in a specially designed basal mineral salt medium (BSM). Its capability for dual production of a biosurfactant and a polyhydroxybutyarate (PHB) was explored by various methods from the BSM-oil medium. Extracted biosurfactant from 6 day-old culture was biochemically characterized as a complex of lipid and carbohydrate with an Rf value of 0.88 by thin layer chromatography. Its PHB production was confirmed by specific staining methods with Nile blue sulphate, Sudan black B and Sudan 3. Briefly, this first-ever report gives ample physical evidence for the dual production of a glycolipid (biosurfactant) and PHB by C. tropicalis strain BPU1 on a specially designed medium, which would open up elaborate research on this yeast.

  11. Biosurfactant-and-bioemulsifier produced by a promising Cunninghamella echinulata isolated from Caatinga soil in the northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade Silva, Nadielly R; Luna, Marcos A C; Santiago, André L C M A; Franco, Luciana O; Silva, Grayce K B; de Souza, Patrícia M; Okada, Kaoru; Albuquerque, Clarissa D C; da Silva, Carlos A Alves; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2014-09-01

    A Mucoralean fungus was isolated from Caatinga soil of Pernambuco, Northeast of Brazil, and was identified as Cunninghamella echinulata by morphological, physiological, and biochemical tests. This strain was evaluated for biosurfactant/bioemulsifier production using soybean oil waste (SOW) and corn steep liquor (CSL) as substrates, added to basic saline solution, by measuring surface tension and emulsifier index and activity. The best results showed the surface water tension was reduced from 72 to 36 mN/m, and an emulsification index (E₂₄) of 80% was obtained using engine oil and burnt engine oil, respectively. A new molecule of biosurfactant showed an anionic charge and a polymeric chemical composition consisting of lipids (40.0% w/w), carbohydrates (35.2% w/w) and protein (20.3% w/w). In addition, the biosurfactant solution (1%) demonstrated its ability for an oil displacement area (ODA) of 37.36 cm², which is quite similar to that for Triton X-100 (38.46 cm²). The stability of the reduction in the surface water tension as well as of the emulsifier index proved to be stable over a wide range of temperatures, in pH, and in salt concentration (4%-6% w/v). The biosurfactant showed an ability to reduce and increase the viscosity of hydrophobic substrates and their molecules, suggesting that it is a suitable candidate for mediated enhanced oil recovery. At the same time, these studies indicate that renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources can be used for important biotechnological processes.

  12. Biosurfactant-and-Bioemulsifier Produced by a Promising Cunninghamella echinulata Isolated from Caatinga Soil in the Northeast of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Nadielly R. Andrade; Luna, Marcos A. C.; Santiago, André L. C. M. A.; Franco, Luciana O.; Silva, Grayce K. B.; de Souza, Patrícia M.; Okada, Kaoru; Albuquerque, Clarissa D. C.; da Silva, Carlos A. Alves; Campos-Takaki, Galba M.

    2014-01-01

    A Mucoralean fungus was isolated from Caatinga soil of Pernambuco, Northeast of Brazil, and was identified as Cunninghamella echinulata by morphological, physiological, and biochemical tests. This strain was evaluated for biosurfactant/bioemulsifier production using soybean oil waste (SOW) and corn steep liquor (CSL) as substrates, added to basic saline solution, by measuring surface tension and emulsifier index and activity. The best results showed the surface water tension was reduced from 72 to 36 mN/m, and an emulsification index (E24) of 80% was obtained using engine oil and burnt engine oil, respectively. A new molecule of biosurfactant showed an anionic charge and a polymeric chemical composition consisting of lipids (40.0% w/w), carbohydrates (35.2% w/w) and protein (20.3% w/w). In addition, the biosurfactant solution (1%) demonstrated its ability for an oil displacement area (ODA) of 37.36 cm2, which is quite similar to that for Triton X-100 (38.46 cm2). The stability of the reduction in the surface water tension as well as of the emulsifier index proved to be stable over a wide range of temperatures, in pH, and in salt concentration (4%–6% w/v). The biosurfactant showed an ability to reduce and increase the viscosity of hydrophobic substrates and their molecules, suggesting that it is a suitable candidate for mediated enhanced oil recovery. At the same time, these studies indicate that renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources can be used for important biotechnological processes. PMID:25257520

  13. Metagenomics for the discovery of novel biosurfactants of environmental interest from marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stephen A; Borchert, Erik; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2015-06-01

    Research focused on the search for new biosurfactants aims to replace chemical surfactants, which while being cost-effective are ecologically undesirable. Metagenomics can lead to discovery of novel biosurfactants, tackling issues of low production yields. Recent successes include the heterologous production of biosurfactants. The dearth of biosurfactants discovered to date through metagenomics is puzzling given that good screening systems and heterologous host systems are available.

  14. Multiple Roles of Biosurfactants in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Satputea, Surekha K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Banat, Ibrahim M; Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Patil, Rajendra H; Gade, Wasudev N

    2016-01-01

    Microbial growth and biofilms formation are a continuous source of contamination on most surfaces with biological, inanimate, natural or man-made. The use of chemical surfactants in daily practice to control growth, presence or adhesion of microorganisms and ultimately the formation of biofilms and biofouling is therefore becoming essential. Synthetic surfactants are, however, not preferred or ideal and biologically derived surface active biosurfactants (BSs) molecules produced mainly by microorganisms are therefore becoming attractive and sought by many industries. The search for innovative and interesting BS molecules that have effective antimicrobial activities and to use as innovative alternatives to chemical surfactants with added antimicrobial value among many other advantages has been ongoing for some time. This review discusses the various roles of BS molecules in association with biofilm formation. Recent updates on several mechanisms involved in biofilm development and control are presented vide this article.

  15. Biosurfactants, bioemulsifiers and exopolysaccharides from marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Satpute, Surekha K; Banat, Ibrahim M; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Chopade, Balu A

    2010-01-01

    Marine biosphere offers wealthy flora and fauna, which represents a vast natural resource of imperative functional commercial grade products. Among the various bioactive compounds, biosurfactant (BS)/bioemulsifiers (BE) are attracting major interest and attention due to their structural and functional diversity. The versatile properties of surface active molecules find numerous applications in various industries. Marine microorganisms such as Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Myroides, Corynebacteria, Bacillus, Alteromonas sp. have been studied for production of BS/BE and exopolysaccharides (EPS). Due to the enormity of marine biosphere, most of the marine microbial world remains unexplored. The discovery of potent BS/BE producing marine microorganism would enhance the use of environmental biodegradable surface active molecule and hopefully reduce total dependence or number of new application oriented towards the chemical synthetic surfactant industry. Our present review gives comprehensive information on BS/BE which has been reported to be produced by marine microorganisms and their possible potential future applications.

  16. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Płaza, Grażyna A.; Chojniak, Joanna; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance. PMID:25110864

  17. New Transfection Agents Based on Liposomes Containing Biosurfactant MEL-A.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Mamoru; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide

    2013-08-16

    Nano vectors are useful tools to deliver foreign DNAs, oligonucleotides, and small interfering double-stranded RNAs (siRNAs) into mammalian cells with gene transfection and gene regulation. In such experiments we have found the liposomes with a biosurfacant mannosylerythriol lipid (MEL-A) are useful because of their high transfer efficiency, and their unique mechanism to transfer genes to target cells with the lowest toxicity. In the present review we will describe our current work, which may contribute to the great advance of gene transfer to target cells and gene regulations. For more than two decades, the liposome technologies have changed dramatically and various methods have been proposed in the fields of biochemistry, cell biology, biotechnology, and so on. In addition, they were towards to pharmaceutics and clinical applications. The liposome technologies were expected to use gene therapy, however, they have not reached a requested goal as of yet. In the present paper we would like to present an approach using a biosurfactant, MEL-A, which is a surface-active compound produced by microorganisms growing on water-insoluble substrates and increases efficiency in gene transfection. The present work shows new transfection agents based on liposomes containing biosurfactant MEL-A.

  18. 40 CFR 180.1245 - Rhamnolipid biosurfactant; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rhamnolipid biosurfactant; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1245 Rhamnolipid biosurfactant; exemption from the requirement of... rhamnolipid biosurfactant when used in accordance with good agricultural practices as a fungicide in or on all...

  19. Mosquitocidal Bacillus amyloliquefaciens: dynamics of growth & production of novel pupicidal biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Geetha, I; Aruna, R; Manonmani, A M

    2014-09-01

    A strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (VCRC B483) producing mosquito larvicidal and pupicidal biosurfactant was isolated from mangrove forest soil. The present study was aimed at studying the kinetics of growth and production of the mosquitocidal biosurfactant by this bacterium. Dynamics of growth, sporulation and production of mosquitocidal biosurfactant were studied by standard microbiological methods. The mosquitocidal biosurfactant was precipitated from the culture supernatant and bioassayed against immature stages of mosquito vectors to determine lethal dose and lethal time. The activity, biological and biochemical properties of the biosurfactant have also been studied. The pupal stages of mosquitoes were found to be more vulnerable to the biosurfactant produced by this bacterium with Anopheles stephensi being the most vulnerable species. The median lethal time (LT 50 ) was found to be 1.23 h when the pupal stages of the above species were exposed to lethal concentration LC 90 (9 µg/ml) dosage of the biosurfactant. Production of biosurfactant was found to increase with incubation time and maximum biomass, maximum quantity of biosurfactant (7.9 mg/ml), maximum biosurfactant activity (6 kBS unit/mg) and maximum mosquitocidal activity (5 µg/ml) were attained by 72 h of growth. The lipopeptide nature of the biosurfactant was confirmed by β-haemolysis, lipase activity, biofilm forming capacity, thermostability and biochemical analysis. The mosquitocidal biosurfactant produced by B. amyloliquefaciens (VCRC B483) may be a prospective alternative molecule for use in mosquito control programmes involving bacterial biopesticides.

  20. Biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01 isolated from spoiled apples: physicochemical and structural characteristics of isolated biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Habib; Hamedi, Mir Manochehr; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ortiz, Antonio; Amanlou, Massoud; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2012-02-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to isolate indigenous bacterial strains with outstanding performance for biosurfactant production from different types of spoiled fruits, food-related products and food processing industries. An isolate was selected from 800 by the highest biosurfactant yield in soybean oil medium and it was identified by 16S rRNA and the two most relevant hypervariable regions of this gene; V3 and V6 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01. The isolate was able to produce 12 g/l of a glycolipid-type biosurfactant and generally less efficient to emulsify vegetable oils compared to hydrocarbons and could emulsify corn and coconut oils more than 50%. However, emulsification index (E(24)) of different hydrocarbons including hexane, toluene, xylene, brake oil, kerosene and hexadecane was between 55.8% and 100%. The surface tension of pure water decreased gradually with increasing biosurfactant concentration to 32.5 mNm(-1) with critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 10.1mg/l. Among all carbon substrates examined, vegetable oils were the most effective on biosurfactant production. Two glycolipid fractions were purified from the biosurfactant crude extracts, and FTIR and ES-MS were used to determine the structure of these compounds. The analysis indicated the presence of three major monorhamnolipid species: R(1)C(10)C(10), R(1)C(10)C(12:1), and R(1)C(10)C(12); as well as another three major dirhamnolipid species: R(2)C(10)C(10), R(2)C(10)C(12:1), and R(2)C(10)C(12). The strain sweep experiment for measuring the linear viscoelastic of biosurfactant showed that typical behavior characteristics of a weak viscoelastic gel, with storage modulus greater than loss modulus at all frequencies examined, both showing some frequency dependence.

  1. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-03-18

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and "green" products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  2. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2016-02-18

    Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens), and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics) constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments.

  3. Optimization of biosurfactant-mediated oil extraction from oil sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chenggang; Wang, Manman; Wang, Yongli; Huang, Zhiyong

    2012-04-01

    Oil extraction from oil sludge with biosurfactant formulas was optimized by a Taguchi orthogonal array design of L16 (4(5)) with five main factors, including biosurfactant type (surfactin, lichenysin, rhamnolipid and emulsan), biosurfactant concentration, pH, salinity and solvent. Oil recoveries obtained with the sixteen batch washing experiments with the selected levels of each factor were processed with Design Expert/SPSS and a specific combination of factors with a predicted oil recovery of 76.81% was obtained. The predicted optimal biosurfactant formula of 2.0g/L rhamnolipid, pH 12.0, 10g/L NaCl, and 5.0g/L n-butanol were validated by a washing experiment that yielded an oil recovery of 74.55%, which was 27.28% higher than the grand average oil recovery of the whole experiment design. Based on the optimum biosurfactant formula, the oil extraction process followed first-order kinetics as the washing rate constant and final oil recovery increased with temperature. These results will be informative and meaningful for the design of oil sludge treatment in industrial application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Luna, Juliana M.; Santos, Valdemir A.; Sarubbo, Leonie A.

    2016-01-01

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and “green” products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries. PMID:26999123

  5. Possibilities and challenges for biosurfactants use in petroleum industry.

    PubMed

    Perfumo, Amedea; Rancich, Ivo; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2010-01-01

    Biosurfactants are a group of microbial molecules identified by their unique capabilities to interact with hydrocarbons. Emulsification and de-emulsification, dispersion, foaming, wetting and coating are some of the numerous surface activities that biosurfactants can achieve when applied within systems such as immiscible liquid/liquid (e.g., oil/water), solid/ liquid (e.g., rock/oil and rock/water) and gas/liquid. Therefore, the possibilities of exploiting these bioproducts in oil-related sciences are vast and made petroleum industry their largest possible market at present. The role of biosurfactants in enhancing oil recovery from reservoirs is certainly the best known; however they can be effectively applied in many other fields from transportation of crude oil in pipeline to the clean-up of oil storage tanks and even manufacturing of fine petrochemicals. When properly used, biosurfactants are comparable to traditional chemical analogues in terms of performances and offer advantages with regard to environment protection/conservation. This chapter aims at providing an up-to-date overview of biosurfactant roles, applications and possible future uses related to petroleum industry.

  6. Biosurfactants Produced by Marine Microorganisms with Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gudiña, Eduardo J.; Teixeira, José A.; Rodrigues, Lígia R.

    2016-01-01

    Marine microorganisms possess unique metabolic and physiological features and are an important source of new biomolecules, such as biosurfactants. Some of these surface-active compounds synthesized by marine microorganisms exhibit antimicrobial, anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm activity against a broad spectrum of human pathogens (including multi-drug resistant pathogens), and could be used instead of existing drugs to treat infections caused by them. In other cases, these biosurfactants show anti-cancer activity, which could be envisaged as an alternative to conventional therapies. However, marine biosurfactants have not been widely explored, mainly due to the difficulties associated with the isolation and growth of their producing microorganisms. Culture-independent techniques (metagenomics) constitute a promising approach to study the genetic resources of otherwise inaccessible marine microorganisms without the requirement of culturing them, and can contribute to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with significant biological activities. This paper reviews the most relevant biosurfactants produced by marine microorganisms with potential therapeutic applications and discusses future perspectives and opportunities to discover novel molecules from marine environments. PMID:26901207

  7. Isolation of Biosurfactant Producing Bacteria From Poultry Breast Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Tashi, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds produced by some microorganisms. Objectives In this study, we collected surface skin samples from breast of poultry (chicken, turkey, and, quail) and screened for biosurfactant-producing bacteria. We also determined the genera of cultured strains. Materials and Methods 33 hemolytic bacterial strains (15, 11, and 7 isolates from chicken, turkey, and quail, respectively) were isolated; oil spreading (OS) and bioemulsifying activities were measured for all isolates. Results Two isolates of chicken (6.06%), three of turkey (9.1%), and three of quail (9.1%) were positive in all examinations (hemolysis, emulsification index (E24) and oil spreading). In total, eight isolates (24.24%) were positive in all examinations, out of them, seven isolates (87.5%) were gram positives, mainly belonged to Bacillus spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. 31 isolates (93.9%) (out of 33 hemolytic isolates) were positive in oil spreading test while only eight isolates (24.24%) were positive in E24 test. Conclusions The results showed that biosurfactant-producing bacteria are distributed in breast skin surface of examined birds. Further investigation about the composition of biosurfactants and phylogenetic determination of biosurfactant producing bacteria is suggested. PMID:24624162

  8. Crude oil biodegradation aided by biosurfactants from Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 or its culture broth.

    PubMed

    Sajna, Kuttuvan Valappil; Sukumaran, Rajeev Kumar; Gottumukkala, Lalitha Devi; Pandey, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the biosurfactants produced by the yeast Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 for enhancing the degradation of crude oil by a model hydrocarbon degrading strain, Pseudomonas putida MTCC 1194. Pseudozyma biosurfactants were supplemented at various concentrations to the P. putida culture medium containing crude oil as sole carbon source. Supplementation of the biosurfactants enhanced the degradation of crude oil by P. putida; the maximum degradation of hydrocarbons was observed with a 2.5 mg L(-1) supplementation of biosurfactants. Growth inhibition constant of the Pseudozyma biosurfactants was 11.07 mg L(-1). It was interesting to note that Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 alone could also degrade diesel and kerosene. Culture broth of Pseudozyma containing biosurfactants resulted up to ∼46% improvement in degradation of C10-C24 alkanes by P. putida. The enhancement in degradation efficiency of the bacterium with the culture broth supplementation was even more pronounced than that with relatively purer biosurfactants.

  9. Foliar penetration enhanced by biosurfactant rhamnolipid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haojing; Shao, Bing; Long, Xuwei; Yao, Yang; Meng, Qin

    2016-09-01

    With recent environmental and health concerns, biosurfactants have obtained increasing interest in replacing conventional surfactants for diverse applications. In agriculture, the use of surfactant in stimulating foliar uptake is mainly for wetting leaf surface, resisting deposition/evaporation, enhancing penetration across cuticular membrane (CM) and translocation. This paper aimed to address the improved foliar uptake by rhamnolipid (RL) in comparison with the currently used alkyl polyglucoside (APG). As found, compared with APG at 900mg/L (1×critical micellar concentration, CMC), RL at a much lower concentration of 50mg/L (1×CMC) showed much better wettability and surface activity, indicative of its high effectiveness as surfactants. Its performance on resistance to deposition and evaporation was at least as same as APG. Moreover, RL could significantly improve the penetration of herbicide glyphosate and other two small water-soluble molecules (phenol red and Fe(2+)) across CM at an equivalent efficiency as APG at 1×CMC. Finally, the greatly enhanced herbicidal actitivity of glyphosate on greenhouse plants confirmed that RL and APG could both enhance the foliar uptake including translocation. Overall, RL should be more applicable than APG in agriculture due to its more promising properties on health/environmental friendliness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial biosurfactant - physiology, biochemistry, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A bacterial soil isolate H-13A was isolated which produces a cellular and extra-cellular glycolipid surfactant. Glycolipid is synthesized only during growth on n-alkanes (C12 ..-->.. C20). The glycolipid contains disaccharide, glycerol, amino sugar, N-acylated, and O-acylated fatty acids. Cellular glycolipid is characterized by saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids; whereas extracellular glycolipid contains saturated fatty acids and 2-hydroxy fatty acids. The hexadecane-derived glycolipid exhibits an interfacial-tension value of 2.0 x 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm at an effective alkane carbon number equivalent to decane. Addition of pentanol as a cosurfactant reduces the interfacial tension to 6.0 x 10/sup -5/ dynes/cm with an effective alkane carbon number equivalent to undecane. The glycolipid is effective in the reduction of heavy crude-oil viscosity by formation of stable oil-in-water emulsions with improved rheological properties. Growth of H-13A on Monagas crude ion results in a 95% reduction in oil viscosity. This glycolipid biosurfactant exhibits applicability to the transport, pipelining, processing, and recovery of heavy crude oils. 18 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  11. Protective and curative effects of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant on high-fat-high-fructose diet induced hyperlipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia and deterioration of liver function in rats.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Raida; Hamden, Khaled; Feki, Abdelfattah El; Chaabouni, Khansa; Makni-Ayadi, Fatma; Kallel, Choumous; Sallemi, Fahima; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi-Aydi, Dhouha

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed to assess the plausible anti-obesity effects of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 crude lipopeptide biosurfactant on high fat high fructose diet-fed rats (HFFD). Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups with the following treatment schedule: normal diet (CD), HFFD, HFFD supplemented with SPB1 biosurfactant from the first day of the experiment (HFFD+Bios1, 10mg/kg/day), HFFD receiving standard drug (HFFD+Torva, 10mg/kg/day) or SPB1 biosurfactant (HFFD+Bios2, 10mg/kg/day) during the last 4 weeks of the study. The results showed an increase in body weight of HFFD by ∼19% as compared to controls (CD). Moreover, serum lipase activity underwent a threefold increase which led to an increase in the levels of total cholesterol (T-Ch), triglycerides (TG) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-Ch) in serum of untreated HFFD, as well as a rise in the calculated atherogenic index (AI). Furthermore, liver dysfunction indices such as AST, ALT, CPK, LDH, GGT, ALP and T-Bilirubins exhibited remarkable increases in serum of HFFD as compared to controls (CD). Whereas, the administration of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant to HFFD improved the body weight gain and serum lipids profile and reverted back near normal the activities of lipase and liver toxicity indicators. In addition, notable protective and curative effects were reported in liver tissues. Overall, these results suggest that the lipopeptides biosynthesized by Bacillus subtilis SPB1 achieved an anti-obesity effect through the inhibition of lipid digestive and liver dysfunction enzymes.

  12. Utilization of sophorolipids as biosurfactants for postemergence herbicides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sophorolipids are carbohydrate-based, amphiphilic biosurfactants produced by several species of the Starmerella yeast clade. Most sophorolipids are partially acetylated sophorose sugars O-ß-glycosidically linked to 17-L-hydroxy-delta9-octadecenoic acid, where typically the acyl carboxyl group forms...

  13. Toxic effect of biosurfactant addition on the biodegradation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Hee; Ahn, Yeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the biosurfactant rhamnolipid on phenanthrene biodegradation and cell growth of phenanthrene degraders was investigated. To compare the effect of rhamnolipid addition, two bacterial strains, 3Y and 4-3, which were isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Korea, were selected. Without the biosurfactant, large amounts of phenanthrene were degraded with both strains at neutral pH, with higher rates of phenanthrene degradation when the cell growth was higher. Upon the addition of 240 mg/L rhamnolipid, the phenanthrene degradation and optical density were reduced, with this inhibitory effect similar for both 3Y and 4-3. To explain this inhibition, the cell growths of both strains were monitored with various concentrations of rhamnolipid, which showed significant toxic effects toward strain 3Y, but was nontoxic toward 4-3. Combining the inhibitory and toxicity results with regard to the biodegradation, different mechanisms can be suggested for each strain. In the biodegradation experiments, the toxicity of rhamnolipid itself mainly was responsible for the inhibitory effect in the case of 3Y, whereas the toxicity of solubilized phenanthrene or the increased toxicity of rhamnolipid in the presence of solubilized phenanthrene could have resulted in the inhibitory effect in the case of 4-3. This study demonstrated that the effectiveness of biosurfactant-enhanced biodegradation can be significantly different depending on the strain, and the toxicity of the biosurfactant should be considered as an important factor.

  14. Identification of potential local isolated for biosurfactant production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiei, Zahra; Yusoff, Wan Mohtar Wan; Hamid, Aidil Abdul; Moazami, Nasrin; Hamzah, Ainon; Fooladi, Taybeh

    2013-11-01

    Biosurfactant are amphiphilic molecule that have received increasing attention in recent years because of their role in the growth of microorganisms on water-insoluble hydrophobic materials such as hydrocarbons as well as their commercial potential in the cosmetics, food, oil recovery and agricultural industries. In this study a potential biosurfactant producing strain was isolated from several soil samples of Terengganu oil refinery, Malaysia and selected during preliminary screening using hemolytic activity, oil spreading and drop collapsed technique. Isolates with at least more than one positive response to these three methods were subjected to complementary screening by measuring surface tension reduction as well as emulsification capacity. The biosurfactant produced by isolated 5M was able to reduced surface tension of culture medium from 60 mN/m to30mN/m. The biochemical and morphological characterization, 16SrRNA gene sequencing showed that the isolated 5M belongs to bacillus groups. The maximum production of biosurfactant by Bacillus 5M was observed after 48 h of incubation.

  15. Biosurfactant technology for remediation of cadmium and lead contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Juwarkar, Asha A; Nair, Anupa; Dubey, Kirti V; Singh, S K; Devotta, Sukumar

    2007-08-01

    This research focuses on column experiments conducted to evaluate the potential of environmentally compatible rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BS2 to remove heavy metals (Cd and Pb) from artificially contaminated soil. Results have shown that di-rhamnolipid removes not only the leachable or available fraction of Cd and Pb but also the bound metals as compared to tap water which removed the mobile fraction only. Washing of contaminated soil with tap water revealed that approximately 2.7% of Cd and 9.8% of Pb in contaminated soil was in freely available or weakly bound forms whereas washing with rhamnolipid removed 92% of Cd and 88% of Pb after 36 h of leaching. This indicated that di-rhamnolipid selectively favours mobilization of metals in the order of Cd>Pb. Biosurfactant specificity observed towards specific metal will help in preferential elution of specific contaminant using di-rhamnolipid. It was further observed that pH of the leachates collected from heavy metal contaminated soil column treated with di-rhamnolipid solution was low (6.60-6.78) as compared to that of leachates from heavy metal contaminated soil column treated with tap water (pH 6.90-7.25), which showed high dissolution of metal species from the contaminated soil and effective leaching of metals with treatment with biosurfactant. The microbial population of the contaminated soil was increased after removal of metals by biosurfactant indicating the decrease of toxicity of metals to soil microflora. This study shows that biosurfactant technology can be an effective and nondestructive method for bioremediation of cadmium and lead contaminated soil.

  16. Characterization of biosurfactant-producing strains of fluorescent pseudomonads in a soilless cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Hultberg, Malin; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Khalil, Sammar; Alsanius, Beatrix

    2008-08-01

    The use of biosurfactants is a promising alternative in biological control of zoospore-producing plant pathogens. In the present study, biosurfactant production by the indigenous population of fluorescent pseudomonads in a soilless plant cultivation system was studied during the growing season. A total of 600 strains was screened and of these 18.5% were observed to produce biosurfactants. Production of both antibiotics and biosurfactant was uncommon among the isolated strains. A selective effect of the cultivation system filter was observed on the biosurfactant-producing strains and these strains were only occasionally observed after the filter, despite having a significantly higher motility than the nonbiosurfactant-producing strains. The majority of biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated from the filter skin, which suggests that this is a suitable surface for inoculation with biocontrol strains.

  17. Physicochemical Properties of Biosurfactant Produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens Grown on Whey Tofu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, V.; Handayani, D. S.; Marliyana, S. D.; Suratmi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The research aims to examine the physicochemical properties of biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Biosurfactant was produced in whey tofu media containing 8 g/L nutrient broth and 5 g/L NaCl which was fermented for 2 days at room temperature. Biosurfactant was identified as rhamnolipids which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 638 mg/L and surface tension of 54 mN/m. The biosurfactant had water in oil (w/o) emulsion type. The biosurfactant was able to decrease the interfacial tension more than 40% for emulsion of water with hexane, pentane, benzene, lubricants or kerosene. The stable emulsions were reached up to 30 days with the E24 value of about 50% when paraffin, toluene, lubricants or palm oil was used as an immiscible compound. Commercial surfactants, such as Triton X-100 and Tween-80 were investigated to compare their emulsification activities and emulsion stabilities with the produced biosurfactant.

  18. Utilization of oleo-chemical industry by-products for biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Garima; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Chopra, Harish Kumar

    2013-11-21

    Biosurfactants are the surface active compounds produced by micro-organisms. The eco-friendly and biodegradable nature of biosurfactants makes their usage more advantageous over chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants encompass the properties of dropping surface tension, stabilizing emulsions, promoting foaming and are usually non- toxic and biodegradable. Biosurfactants offer advantages over their synthetic counterparts in many applications ranging from environmental, food, and biomedical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The important environmental applications of biosurfactants include bioremediation and dispersion of oil spills, enhanced oil recovery and transfer of crude oil. The emphasis of present review shall be with reference to the commercial production, current developments and future perspectives of a variety of approaches of biosurfactant production from the micro-organisms isolated from various oil- contaminated sites and from the by-products of oleo-chemical industry wastes/ by-products viz. used edible oil, industrial residues, acid oil, deodorizer distillate, soap-stock etc.

  19. Application of biosurfactant produced from peanut oil cake by Lactobacillus delbrueckii in biodegradation of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii cultured with peanut oil cake as the carbon source yielded 5.35 mg ml(-1) of biosurfactant production. Five sets of microcosm biodegradation experiments were carried out with crude oil as follows: set 1 - bacterial cells+crude oil, set 2 - bacterial cells+crude oil+fertilizer, set 3 - bacterial cells+crude oil+biosurfactant, set 4 - bacterial cells+crude oil+biosurfactant+fertilizer, set 5 - with no bacterial cells, fertilizer and biosurfactant (control). Maximum degradation of crude oil was observed in set 4 (75%). Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in set 4 was 7% higher degradation level in microcosm experiments. It is evident from the results that biosurfactants alone is capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers.

  20. Utilization of oleo-chemical industry by-products for biosurfactant production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are the surface active compounds produced by micro-organisms. The eco-friendly and biodegradable nature of biosurfactants makes their usage more advantageous over chemical surfactants. Biosurfactants encompass the properties of dropping surface tension, stabilizing emulsions, promoting foaming and are usually non- toxic and biodegradable. Biosurfactants offer advantages over their synthetic counterparts in many applications ranging from environmental, food, and biomedical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The important environmental applications of biosurfactants include bioremediation and dispersion of oil spills, enhanced oil recovery and transfer of crude oil. The emphasis of present review shall be with reference to the commercial production, current developments and future perspectives of a variety of approaches of biosurfactant production from the micro-organisms isolated from various oil- contaminated sites and from the by-products of oleo-chemical industry wastes/ by-products viz. used edible oil, industrial residues, acid oil, deodorizer distillate, soap-stock etc. PMID:24262384

  1. Spray drying as a strategy for biosurfactant recovery, concentration and storage.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Gisely S; Dias, Lívia C; Fernandes, Péricles L; Fernandes, Rita de Cássi R; Borges, Arnaldo C; Kalks, Karlos Hm; Tótola, Marcos R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the use of Spray Drying for concentration and preservation of biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis LBBMA RI4914 isolated from a heavy oil reservoir. Kaolinite and maltodextrin 10DE or 20DE were tested as drying adjuvants. Surface activity of the biosurfactant was analyzed by preparing dilution x surface activity curves of crude biosurfactant, crude biosurfactant plus adjuvants and of the dried products, after their reconstitution in water. The shelf life of the dried products was also evaluated. Spray drying was effective in the recovery and concentration of biosurfactant, while keeping its surface activity. Drying adjuvants were required to obtain a solid product with the desired characteristics. These compounds did not interfere with tensoactive properties of the biosurfactant molecules. The dehydrated product maintained its surfactant properties during storage at room temperature during the evaluation period (120 days), with no detectable loss of activity.

  2. Biodegradation of 4-nitrotoluene with biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2: metabolic pathway, cell surface properties and toxicological characterization.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Debasree; Hazra, Chinmay; Dandi, Navin; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-11-01

    A novel 4-nitrotoluene-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from pesticides contaminated effluent-sediment and identified as Rhodococcus pyridinivorans NT2 based on morphological and biochemical properties and 16S rDNA sequencing. The strain NT2 degraded 4-NT (400 mg l(-1)) with rapid growth at the end of 120 h, reduced surface tension of the media from 71 to 29 mN m(-1) and produced glycolipidic biosurfactants (45 mg l(-1)). The biosurfactant was purified and characterized as trehalose lipids. The biosurfactant was stable in high salinity (10 % w/v NaCl), elevated temperatures (120 °C for 15 min) and a wide pH range (2.0-10.0). The noticeable changes during biodegradation were decreased hydrophobicity; an increase in degree of fatty acid saturation, saturated/unsaturated ratio and cyclopropane fatty acid. Biodegradation of 4-NT was accompanied by the accumulation of ammonium (NH4 (+)) and negligible amount of nitrite ion (NO2 (-)). Product stoichiometry showed a carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) mass balance of 37 and 35 %, respectively. Biodegradation of 4-NT proceeded by oxidation at the methyl group to form 4-nitrobenzoate, followed by reduction and hydrolytic deamination yielding protocatechuate, which was metabolized through β-ketoadipate pathway. In vitro and in vivo acute toxicity assays in adult rat (Rattus norvegicus) showed sequential detoxification and the order of toxicity was 4-NT >4-nitrobenzyl alcohol >4-nitrobenzaldehyde >4-nitrobenzoate > protocatechuate. Taken together, the strain NT2 could be used as a potential bioaugmentation candidate for the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  3. Lipase and biosurfactant from Ochrobactrum intermedium strain MZV101 isolated by washing powder for detergent application.

    PubMed

    Zarinviarsagh, Mina; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhossein; Sadeghi, Hossein

    2017-09-18

    Alkaline thermostable lipase and biosurfactant producing bacteria are very interested at detergent applications, not only because of their eco-friendly characterize, but alsoproduction lipase and biosurfactant by using cheap materials. Ochrobactrum intermedium strain MZV101 was isolated as washing powder resistant, alkaline thermostable lipase and biosurfactant producing bacterium in order to use at detergent applications. O. intermedium strain MZV101 produces was lipase and biosurfactant in the same media with pH 10 and temperature of 60 °C. Washing test and some detergent compatibility character of lipase enzyme and biosurfactant were assayed. The antimicrobial activity evaluated against various bacteria and fungi. Lipase and biosurfactant produced by O. intermedium strain MZV101 exhibited high stability at pH 10-13 and temperature of 70-90 °C, biosurfactant exhibits good stability at pH 9-13 and thermostability in all range. Both lipase and biosurfactant were found to be stable in the presence of different metal ions, detergents and organic solvents. The lipase enzyme extracted using isopropanol with yield of 69.2% and biosurfactant with ethanol emulsification index value of 70.99% and yield of 9.32 (g/l). The single band protein after through from G-50 Sephadex column on SDS-PAGE was calculated to be 99.42 kDa. Biosurfactant O. intermedium strain MZV101 exhibited good antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria and against various bacterial pathogens. Based upon washing test biosurfactant and lipase O. intermedium strain MZV101considered being strong oil removal. The results of this study indicate that isolated lipase and biosurfactant with strong oil removal, antimicrobial activity and good stability could be useful for detergent applications.

  4. Production, Characterization, and Application of Bacillus licheniformis W16 Biosurfactant in Enhancing Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanket J; Al-Wahaibi, Yahya M; Al-Bahry, Saif N; Elshafie, Abdulkadir E; Al-Bemani, Ali S; Al-Bahri, Asma; Al-Mandhari, Musallam S

    2016-01-01

    The biosurfactant production by Bacillus licheniformis W16 and evaluation of biosurfactant based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using core-flood under reservoir conditions were investigated. Previously reported nine different production media were screened for biosurfactant production, and two were further optimized with different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, starch, cane molasses, or date molasses), as well as the strain was screened for biosurfactant production during the growth in different media. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension and interfacial tension to 24.33 ± 0.57 mN m(-1) and 2.47 ± 0.32 mN m(-1) respectively within 72 h, at 40°C, and also altered the wettability of a hydrophobic surface by changing the contact angle from 55.67 ± 1.6 to 19.54°± 0.96°. The critical micelle dilution values of 4X were observed. The biosurfactants were characterized by different analytical techniques and identified as lipopeptide, similar to lichenysin-A. The biosurfactant was stable over wide range of extreme environmental conditions. The core flood experiments showed that the biosurfactant was able to enhance the oil recovery by 24-26% over residual oil saturation (Sor). The results highlight the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactant in wettability alteration and microbial EOR processes.

  5. Characterization and emulsification properties of rhamnolipid and sophorolipid biosurfactants and their applications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu T; Sabatini, David A

    2011-02-18

    Due to their non-toxic nature, biodegradability and production from renewable resources, research has shown an increasing interest in the use of biosurfactants in a wide variety of applications. This paper reviews the characterization of rhamnolipid and sophorolipid biosurfactants based on their hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and their ability to form microemulsions with a range of oils without additives. The use of the biosurfactants in applications such as detergency and vegetable oil extraction for biodiesel application is also discussed. Rhamnolipid was found to be a hydrophilic surfactant while sophorolipid was found to be very hydrophobic. Therefore, rhamnolipid and sophorolipid biosurfactants in mixtures showed robust performance in these applications.

  6. Characterization and Emulsification Properties of Rhamnolipid and Sophorolipid Biosurfactants and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu T.; Sabatini, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their non-toxic nature, biodegradability and production from renewable resources, research has shown an increasing interest in the use of biosurfactants in a wide variety of applications. This paper reviews the characterization of rhamnolipid and sophorolipid biosurfactants based on their hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and their ability to form microemulsions with a range of oils without additives. The use of the biosurfactants in applications such as detergency and vegetable oil extraction for biodiesel application is also discussed. Rhamnolipid was found to be a hydrophilic surfactant while sophorolipid was found to be very hydrophobic. Therefore, rhamnolipid and sophorolipid biosurfactants in mixtures showed robust performance in these applications. PMID:21541055

  7. Optimization Production of Biosurfactant by Pseudomonas putida Using Crude Palm Oil (CPO) as Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, V.; Handayani, D. S.; Masykur, A.; Lindasari

    2017-07-01

    The production of biosurfactant by Pseudomonas putida has been studied. P. putida FNCC 0071 was grown in the nutrient broth medium supplemented with NaCl and crude palm oil (CPO). The effect of CPO concentration and fermentation time on the biosurfactant production were evaluated. The biosurfactant production was evaluated every 24 h for 10 days by optical density, surface tension and emulsification index. The best culture medium was found to be medium containing 5% v/v of CPO with 5 days of incubation time. The biosurfactant was identified as rhamnolipids.

  8. Biosurfactant-enhanced bioremediation of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in creosote contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bezza, Fisseha Andualem; Chirwa, Evans M Nkhalambayausi

    2016-02-01

    The potential for biological treatment of an environment contaminated by complex petrochemical contaminants was evaluated using creosote contaminated soil in ex situ bio-slurry reactors. The efficacy of biosurfactant application and stimulation of in situ biosurfactant production was investigated. The biosurfactant produced was purified and characterised using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Biosurfactant enhanced degradation of PAHs was 86.5% (with addition of biosurfactant) and 57% in controls with no biosurfactant and nutrient amendments after incubation for 45 days. A slight decrease in degradation rate observed in the simultaneous biosurfactant and nutrient, NH4NO3 and KH2PO4, supplemented microcosm can be attributed to preferential microbial consumption of the biosurfactant supplemented. The overall removal of PAHs was determined to be mass transport limited since the dissolution rate caused by the biosurfactant enhanced the bioavailability of the PAHs to the microorganisms. The consortium culture was predominated by the aromatic ring-cleaving species Bacillus stratosphericus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis B30 and its application in enhancing oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Al-Wahaibi, Yahya; Joshi, Sanket; Al-Bahry, Saif; Elshafie, Abdulkadir; Al-Bemani, Ali; Shibulal, Biji

    2014-02-01

    The fermentative production of biosurfactants by Bacillus subtilis strain B30 and the evaluation of biosurfactant based enhanced oil recovery using core-flood were investigated. Different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, starch, date molasses, cane molasses) were tested to determine the optimal biosurfactant production. The isolate B30 produced a biosurfactant that could reduce the surface tension and interfacial tension to 26.63±0.45 mN/m and 3.79±0.27 mN/m, respectively in less than 12h in both glucose or date molasses based media. A crude biosurfactant concentration of 0.3-0.5 g/l and critical micelle dilution (CMD) values of 1:8 were observed. The biosurfactants gave stable emulsions with wide range of hydrocarbons including light and heavy crude oil. The biosurfactants were partially purified and identified as a mixture of lipopeptides similar to surfactin, using high performance thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The biosurfactants were stable over wide range of pH, salinity and temperatures. The crude biosurfactant preparation enhanced light oil recovery by 17-26% and heavy oil recovery by 31% in core-flood studies. The results are indicative of the potential of the strain for the development of ex situ microbial enhanced oil recovery processes using glucose or date molasses based minimal media.

  10. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from marine Streptomyces species B3.

    PubMed

    Khopade, Abhijit; Ren, Biao; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Mahadik, Kakasaheb; Zhang, Lixin; Kokare, Chandrakant

    2012-02-01

    The present study demonstrates the production and properties of a biosurfactant isolated from marine Streptomyces species B3. The production of the biosurfactant was found to be higher in medium containing sucrose and lower in the medium containing glycerol. Yeast extract was the best nitrogen source for the production of the biosurfactant. The isolated biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of water to 29 mN/m. The purified biosurfactant was shown critical micelle concentrations of 110 mg/l. The emulsifying activity and stability of the biosurfactant was investigated at different salinities, pH, and temperature. The biosurfactant was effective at very low concentrations over a wide range of temperature, pH, and salt concentration. The purified biosurfactant was shown strong antimicrobial activity. The biosurfactant was produced from the marine Streptomyces sp. using non-hydrocarbon substrates such as sucrose that was readily available and not required extensive purification procedure. Streptomyces species B3 can be used for microbially enhanced oil recovery process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Production, Characterization, and Application of Bacillus licheniformis W16 Biosurfactant in Enhancing Oil Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sanket J.; Al-Wahaibi, Yahya M.; Al-Bahry, Saif N.; Elshafie, Abdulkadir E.; Al-Bemani, Ali S.; Al-Bahri, Asma; Al-Mandhari, Musallam S.

    2016-01-01

    The biosurfactant production by Bacillus licheniformis W16 and evaluation of biosurfactant based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using core-flood under reservoir conditions were investigated. Previously reported nine different production media were screened for biosurfactant production, and two were further optimized with different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, starch, cane molasses, or date molasses), as well as the strain was screened for biosurfactant production during the growth in different media. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension and interfacial tension to 24.33 ± 0.57 mN m−1 and 2.47 ± 0.32 mN m−1 respectively within 72 h, at 40°C, and also altered the wettability of a hydrophobic surface by changing the contact angle from 55.67 ± 1.6 to 19.54°± 0.96°. The critical micelle dilution values of 4X were observed. The biosurfactants were characterized by different analytical techniques and identified as lipopeptide, similar to lichenysin-A. The biosurfactant was stable over wide range of extreme environmental conditions. The core flood experiments showed that the biosurfactant was able to enhance the oil recovery by 24–26% over residual oil saturation (Sor). The results highlight the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactant in wettability alteration and microbial EOR processes. PMID:27933041

  12. Characterization of a novel biosurfactant produced by marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01.

    PubMed

    Deng, M-C; Li, J; Hong, Y-H; Xu, X-M; Chen, W-X; Yuan, J-P; Peng, J; Yi, M; Wang, J-H

    2016-04-01

    To purify and characterize the biosurfactants produced by Achromobacter sp. HZ01. After fermentation, one biosurfactant was successfully purified from the fermentation broth of strain HZ01 by centrifugation, extraction using ethyl acetate, silica gel chromatography and reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the biosurfactant and the effects of temperatures, pH and salinities on its stability were determined. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, analysis of fatty acids and amino acids and mass spectrometry were used to characterize the biosurfactant. The maximum production yield of the crude biosurfactant reached to 6·84 g l(-1) after incubation for 96 h. Except the favourable adaptability to a wide range of temperatures, pH and salinities, the biosurfactant with a CMC value of 48 mg l(-1) could efficiently emulsify diverse hydrophobic compounds. The chemical formula of this biosurfactant was confirmed to be CH3 -(CH2 )17 -CHO-CH2 -CO-Gly-Gly-Leu-Met-Leu-Leu, in which the oxygen atom of group CHO linked to the last amino acid (Leu), a structure had never been reported before. The purified biosurfactant is a novel cyclic lipopeptide. One novel lipopeptide was purified and characterized. The novel biosurfactant exhibited good potential applications, such as bioremediation. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Sophorolipid biosurfactants: Possible uses as antibacterial and antibiofilm agent.

    PubMed

    Díaz De Rienzo, Mayri A; Banat, Ibrahim M; Dolman, Ben; Winterburn, James; Martin, Peter J

    2015-12-25

    Biosurfactants are amphipathic, surface-active molecules of microbial origin which accumulate at interfaces reducing interfacial tension and leading to the formation of aggregated micellular structures in solution. Some biosurfactants have been reported to have antimicrobial properties, the ability to prevent adhesion and to disrupt biofilm formation. We investigated antimicrobial properties and biofilm disruption using sophorolipids at different concentrations. Growth of Gram negative Cupriavidus necator ATCC 17699 and Gram positive Bacillus subtilis BBK006 were inhibited by sophorolipids at concentrations of 5% v/v with a bactericidal effect. Sophorolipids (5% v/v) were also able to disrupt biofilms formed by single and mixed cultures of B. subtilis BBK006 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 under static and flow conditions, as was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that sophorolipids may be promising compounds for use in biomedical application as adjuvants to other antimicrobial against some pathogens through inhibition of growth and/or biofilm disruption.

  14. Enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons in soil by microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Whan; Kim, Young-Bum; Shin, Jae-Dong; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2010-03-01

    Effectiveness of a microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid, was evaluated in washing and biodegradation of model hydrocarbons and crude oil in soil. Thirty percent of 2-methylnaphthalene was effectively washed and solubilized with 10 g/L of sophorolipid with similar or higher efficiency than that of commercial surfactants. Addition of sophorolipid in soil increased biodegradation of model compounds: 2-methylnaphthalene (95% degradation in 2 days), hexadecane (97%, 6 days), and pristane (85%, 6 days). Also, effective biodegradation method of crude oil in soil was observed by the addition of sophorolipid, resulting in 80% biodegradation of saturates and 72% aromatics in 8 weeks. These results showed the potentials of the microbial biosurfactant, sophorolipid, as an effective surfactant for soil washing and as an in situ biodegradation enhancer.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were re-grown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0

  16. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in residual soybean oil.

    PubMed

    de Lima, C J B; Ribeiro, E J; Sérvulo, E F C; Resende, M M; Cardoso, V L

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PACL strain, isolated from oil-contaminated soil taken from a lagoon, was used to investigate the efficiency and magnitude of biosurfactant production, using different waste frying soybean oils, by submerged fermentation in stirred tank reactors of 6 and 10 l capacities. A complete factorial experimental design was used, with the goal of optimizing the aeration rate (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 vvm) and agitation speed (300, 550, and 800 rpm). Aeration was identified as the primary variable affecting the process, with a maximum rhamnose concentration occurring at an aeration rate of 0.5 vvm. At optimum levels, a maximum rhamnose concentration of 3.3 g/l, an emulsification index of 100%, and a minimum surface tension of 26.0 dynes/cm were achieved. Under these conditions, the biosurfactant production derived from using a mixture of waste frying soybean oil (WFSO) as a carbon source was compared to production when non-used soybean oil (NUSO), or waste soybean oils used to fry specific foods, were used. NUSO produced the highest level of rhamnolipids, although the waste soybean oils also resulted in biosurfactant production of 75-90% of the maximum value. Under ideal conditions, the kinetic behavior and the modeling of the rhamnose production, nutrient consumption, and cellular growth were established. The resulting model predicted data points that corresponded well to the empirical information.

  17. Optimization of liquid-liquid extraction of biosurfactants from corn steep liquor.

    PubMed

    Vecino, X; Barbosa-Pereira, L; Devesa-Rey, R; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the optimization of the operational conditions for the chloroform-based extraction of surface-active compounds from corn steep liquor (CSL) was carried out and the nutritional properties of the remnant aqueous phase (CSL-less biosurfactant) was evaluated as microbial fermentation medium. The optimal conditions to obtain biosurfactants from CSL were as follows: chloroform/CSL ratio 2 (v/v), 56 °C at extraction times >30 min. At the optima conditions, 100 % of biosurfactant extract can be obtained from CSL, obtaining 12.0 ± 0.5 g of biosurfactant extract/Kg of CSL. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the biosurfactant extract was 399.4 mg L(-1). This value is similar to the CMC of cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), a cationic surfactant used in the formulation of nanoparticles. The extraction of biosurfactant can be also carried out at room temperature although in this case, the extraction yield decreased about 15 %. The extraction of surface-active compounds from agroindustrial streams can suppose important advances for the bio-based surfactants industry. Biosurfactants obtained in this work are not only more eco-friendly than chemical detergents but also can be cost competitive with its chemical counterparts. Furthermore, after the extraction of surface-active compounds, CSL-less biosurfactant was found to be suitable as nutritional supplement for lactic acid bacteria, maintaining its nutritional properties in comparison with regular CSL.

  18. Biosurfactants from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus BU03 enhance the solubility and biodegradation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenyong; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2009-03-01

    A thermophilic bacterial strain, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus BU03, with a biosurfactant-producing capability, was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil with an improved procedure which employed the solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), i.e. naphthalene in agar plate, as a selection criterion. Crude biosurfactant was recovered from the culture of BU03 by extraction with n-hexane, and its properties were investigated. Biosurfactants from A. calcoaceticus BU03 constitute a thermo-stable mixture, composed of different agents with surface activities. At their critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 152.4 mg L(-1), the crude biosurfactants produced from A. calcoaceticus BU03 decreased the air-water surface tension to 38.4 mN m(-1). In thermophilic conditions, the emulsifying activity is 2.8 times that of Tween 80. The effects of the biosurfactants produced by A. calcoaceticus on the solubility and biodegradation of PAHs were investigated in batch systems. Biosurfactants produced by A. calcoaceticus BU03 at 25 times their CMC significantly increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and benzo(a)pyrene (B[a]P) to 54.3, 6.33 and 2.08 mg L(-1), respectively. In aqueous system, the biosurfactants at concentrations of 0.5 CMC and 1 CMC slightly enhanced the biodegradation of PHE by a consortium of PAH-degrading microrganisms. Results indicate that biosurfactants from A. calcoaceticus BU03 have potential to enhance the removal of PAHs from contaminated sites.

  19. Comparison of biosurfactant detection methods reveals hydrophobic surfactants and contact-regulated production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biosurfactants are diverse molecules with numerous biological functions and industrial applications. A variety of environments were examined for biosurfactant-producing bacteria using a versatile new screening method. The utility of an atomized oil assay was assessed for a large number of bacteria...

  20. Ex situ treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil using biosurfactants from Lactobacillus pentosus.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Ana Belén; Paradelo, Remigio; Rubinos, David; Devesa-Rey, Rosa; Cruz, José Manuel; Barral, María Teresa

    2011-09-14

    The utilization of biosurfactants for the bioremediation of contaminated soil is not yet well established, because of the high production cost of biosurfactants. Consequently, it is interesting to look for new biosurfactants that can be produced at a large scale, and it can be employed for the bioremediation of contaminated sites. In this work, biosurfactants from Lactobacillus pentosus growing in hemicellulosic sugars solutions, with a similar composition of sugars found in trimming vine shoot hydrolysates, were employed in the bioremediation of soil contaminated with octane. It was observed that the presence of biosurfactant from L. pentosus accelerated the biodegradation of octane in soil. After 15 days of treatment, biosurfactants from L. pentosus reduced the concentration of octane in the soil to 58.6 and 62.8%, for soil charged with 700 and 70,000 mg/kg of hydrocarbon, respectively, whereas after 30 days of treatment, 76% of octane in soil was biodegraded in both cases. In the absence of biosurfactant and after 15 days of incubation, only 1.2 and 24% of octane was biodegraded in soil charged with 700 and 70,000 mg/kg of octane, respectively. Thus, the use of biosurfactants from L. pentosus, as part of a well-designed bioremediation process, can provide mechanisms to mobilize the target contaminants from the soil surface to make them more available to the microbial population.

  1. Response Surface Methodology for Optimizing the Production of Biosurfactant by Candida tropicalis on Industrial Waste Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Darne G.; Soares da Silva, Rita de Cássia F.; Luna, Juliana M.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Santos, Valdemir A.; Sarubbo, Leonie A.

    2017-01-01

    Biosurfactant production optimization by Candida tropicalis UCP0996 was studied combining central composite rotational design (CCRD) and response surface methodology (RSM). The factors selected for optimization of the culture conditions were sugarcane molasses, corn steep liquor, waste frying oil concentrations and inoculum size. The response variables were surface tension and biosurfactant yield. All factors studied were important within the ranges investigated. The two empirical forecast models developed through RSM were found to be adequate for describing biosurfactant production with regard to surface tension (R2 = 0.99833) and biosurfactant yield (R2 = 0.98927) and a very strong, negative, linear correlation was found between the two response variables studied (r = −0.95). The maximum reduction in surface tension and the highest biosurfactant yield were 29.98 mNm−1 and 4.19 gL−1, respectively, which were simultaneously obtained under the optimum conditions of 2.5% waste frying oil, 2.5%, corn steep liquor, 2.5% molasses, and 2% inoculum size. To validate the efficiency of the statistically optimized variables, biosurfactant production was also carried out in 2 and 50 L bioreactors, with yields of 5.87 and 7.36 gL−1, respectively. Finally, the biosurfactant was applied in motor oil dispersion, reaching up to 75% dispersion. Results demonstrated that the CCRD was suitable for identifying the optimum production conditions and that the new biosurfactant is a promising dispersant for application in the oil industry. PMID:28223971

  2. Response Surface Methodology for Optimizing the Production of Biosurfactant by Candida tropicalis on Industrial Waste Substrates.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Darne G; Soares da Silva, Rita de Cássia F; Luna, Juliana M; Rufino, Raquel D; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2017-01-01

    Biosurfactant production optimization by Candida tropicalis UCP0996 was studied combining central composite rotational design (CCRD) and response surface methodology (RSM). The factors selected for optimization of the culture conditions were sugarcane molasses, corn steep liquor, waste frying oil concentrations and inoculum size. The response variables were surface tension and biosurfactant yield. All factors studied were important within the ranges investigated. The two empirical forecast models developed through RSM were found to be adequate for describing biosurfactant production with regard to surface tension (R(2) = 0.99833) and biosurfactant yield (R(2) = 0.98927) and a very strong, negative, linear correlation was found between the two response variables studied (r = -0.95). The maximum reduction in surface tension and the highest biosurfactant yield were 29.98 mNm(-1) and 4.19 gL(-1), respectively, which were simultaneously obtained under the optimum conditions of 2.5% waste frying oil, 2.5%, corn steep liquor, 2.5% molasses, and 2% inoculum size. To validate the efficiency of the statistically optimized variables, biosurfactant production was also carried out in 2 and 50 L bioreactors, with yields of 5.87 and 7.36 gL(-1), respectively. Finally, the biosurfactant was applied in motor oil dispersion, reaching up to 75% dispersion. Results demonstrated that the CCRD was suitable for identifying the optimum production conditions and that the new biosurfactant is a promising dispersant for application in the oil industry.

  3. Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil.

  4. Kocuria marina BS-15 a biosurfactant producing halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salt works in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarafin, Yesurethinam; Donio, Mariathasan Birdilla Selva; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactant screening was made among the eight halophilic bacterial genera isolated from Kovalam solar salt works in Kanyakumari of India. After initial screening, Kocuria sp. (Km), Kurthia sp. (Ku) and Halococcus sp. (Hc) were found to have positive biosurfactant activity. Biosurfactant derived from Kocuria sp. emulsified more than 50% of the crude oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, olive oil and kerosene when compared to the other strains. Further, Kocuria marina BS-15 derived biosurfactant was purified and characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC–MS analysis. The TLC analysis revealed that, the purified biosurfactants belong to the lipopeptide group. The IR spectrum results revealed that functional groups are R2C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 NN, alkenes and N–H. The GC–MS analysis confirmed the compound as Nonanoic acid and Cyclopropane with the retention time of 12.78 and 24.65, respectively. PMID:25473358

  5. Molecular engineering aspects for the production of new and modified biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Koglin, Alexander; Doetsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of considerable industrial value as their high tenside activity in combination with their biocompatibility makes them attractive for many applications. In particular members of the lipopeptide family of biosurfactants contain significant potentials for the pharmaceutical industry due to their intrinsic antibiotic characteristics. The high frequency of lipopeptide (LP) production in common soil microorganisms in combination with the enormous structural diversity of the synthesized biosurfactants has created an abundant natural pool of compounds with potentially interesting properties. Unfortunately, the bioactivity of lipopetides against pathogenic microorganisms is often associated with problematic side effects that restrict or even prevent medically relevant applications. The accumulated knowledge of lipopetide biosynthesis and their frequent structural variations caused by natural genetic rearrangements has therefore motivated numerous approaches in order to manipulate biosurfactant composition and production mechanisms. This chapter will give an overview on current engineering strategies that aim to obtain lipopeptide biosurfactants with redesigned structures and optimized properties.

  6. Rhamnolipid biosurfactants: evolutionary implications, applications and future prospects from untapped marine resource.

    PubMed

    Kiran, George Seghal; Ninawe, Arun Shivanth; Lipton, Anuj Nishanth; Pandian, Vijayalakshmi; Selvin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipid-biosurfactants are known to be produced by the genus Pseudomonas, however recent literature reported that rhamnolipids (RLs) are distributed among diverse microbial genera. To integrate the evolutionary implications of rhamnosyl transferase among various groups of microorganisms, a comprehensive comparative motif analysis was performed amongst bacterial producers. Findings on new RL-producing microorganism is helpful from a biotechnological perspective and to replace infective P. aeruginosa strains which ultimately ensure industrially safe production of RLs. Halotolerant biosurfactants are required for efficient bioremediation of marine oil spills. An insight on the exploitation of marine microbes as the potential source of RL biosurfactants is highlighted in the present review. An economic production process, solid-state fermentation using agro-industrial and industrial waste would increase the scope of biosurfactants commercialization. Potential and prospective applications of RL-biosurfactants including hydrocarbon bioremediation, heavy metal removal, antibiofilm activity/biofilm disruption and greener synthesis of nanoparticles are highlighted in this review.

  7. Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus salmalaya for Lubricating Oil Solubilization and Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Dadrasnia, Arezoo; Ismail, Salmah

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the capability of a biosurfactant produced by a novel strain of Bacillus salmalaya to enhance the biodegradation rates and bioavailability of organic contaminants. The biosurfactant produced by cultured strain 139SI showed high physicochemical properties and surface activity in the selected medium. The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules. Strain 139SI can significantly reduce the surface tension (ST) from 70.5 to 27 mN/m, with a critical micelle concentration of 0.4%. Moreover, lubricating oil at 2% (v/v) was degraded on Day 20 (71.5). Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature. Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes. PMID:26295402

  8. Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus salmalaya for Lubricating Oil Solubilization and Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Dadrasnia, Arezoo; Ismail, Salmah

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the capability of a biosurfactant produced by a novel strain of Bacillus salmalaya to enhance the biodegradation rates and bioavailability of organic contaminants. The biosurfactant produced by cultured strain 139SI showed high physicochemical properties and surface activity in the selected medium. The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules. Strain 139SI can significantly reduce the surface tension (ST) from 70.5 to 27 mN/m, with a critical micelle concentration of 0.4%. Moreover, lubricating oil at 2% (v/v) was degraded on Day 20 (71.5). Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature. Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes.

  9. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant.

  10. Evaluation of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant effects on hyperglycemia, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and kidney function in rats fed on high-fat-high-fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Zouari, Raida; Hamden, Khaled; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Chaabouni, Khansa; Makni-Ayadi, Fatma; Sallemi, Fahima; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi-Aydi, Dhouha

    2017-05-01

    showed that SPB1 lipopeptide biosurfactant presented useful hypoglycemic and antihypertensive properties, and was able to alleviate renal lipid deposition in rats fed on a hypercaloric diet.

  11. Antimicrobial activities of a promising glycolipid biosurfactant from a novel marine Staphylococcus saprophyticus SBPS 15.

    PubMed

    Mani, P; Dineshkumar, G; Jayaseelan, T; Deepalakshmi, K; Ganesh Kumar, C; Senthil Balan, S

    2016-12-01

    Biosurfactants have gained a renewed interest in the recent years for their commercial application in diverse research areas. Recent evidences suggest that the antimicrobial activities exhibited by biosurfactants make them promising molecules for the application in the field of therapeutics. Marine microbes are well known for their unique metabolic and functional properties; however, few reports are available till date regarding their biosurfactant production and antimicrobial potential. In an ongoing survey for bioactive microbial metabolites from microbes isolated from diverse ecological niches, a marine Staphylococcus saprophyticus SBPS 15 isolated from the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal site, Puducherry, India, was identified as a promising biosurfactant producer based on multiple screening methods. This bacterium exhibited growth-dependent biosurfactant production and the recorded yield was 1.345 ± 0.056 g/L (on dry weight basis). The biosurfactant was purified and chemically characterized as a glycolipid with a molecular mass of 606.7 Da, based on TLC, biochemical estimation methods, FT-IR spectrum and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Further, the estimated molecular mass was different from the earlier reports on biosurfactants. This new glycolipid biosurfactant exhibited a board range of pH and temperature stability. Furthermore, it revealed a promising antimicrobial activity against many tested human pathogenic bacterial and fungal clinical isolates. Based on these observations, the isolated biosurfactant from the marine S. saprophyticus revealed board physicochemical stabilities and possess excellent antimicrobial activities which proves its significance for possible use in various therapeutic and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a biosurfactant from the bacterium, S. saprophyticus.

  12. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas fluorescens growing on molasses and its application in phenol degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryantia, Venty; Marliyana, Soerya Dewi; Wulandari, Astri

    2015-12-01

    A molasses based medium for the biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas fluorescens was developed, where the effect of pre-treated of molasses and medium composition were evaluated. Biosurfactant production was followed by measuring optical density (OD), surface tension and emulsifying index (E24) over 12 days of fermentation. The optimum condition for the biosurfactant production was obtained when a medium containing of 8 g/L nutrient broth, 5 g/L NaCl, 1 g/L NH4NO3 and 5% v/v pre-treated molasses with centrifugation was used as media with 3 days of fermentation. The biosurfactant was identified as a rhamnolipid type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 801 mg/L and was able to reduce the surface tension of the water from 80 mN/m to 51 mN/m. The biosurfactants had water in oil (w/o) emulsion type. Biosurfactant was able to emulsify various hydrocarbons, which were able to decrase the interfacial tension about 50-75% when benzyl chloride, anisaldehyde and palm oil were used as immiscible compounds. The biosurfactant exhibited the E24 value of about 50% and the stable emulsion was reached up to 30 days when lubricant was used as an immiscible compound. Up to 68% of phenol was degraded in the presence of biosurfactant within 15 days, whereas only 56% of phenol was degraded in the absence of biosurfactant. Overall, the results exhibited that molasses are recommended for the rhamnolipids production which possessed good surface-active properties and had potential application in the enhancement of phenol degradation.

  13. Marine biosurfactants, II. Production and characterization of an anionic trehalose tetraester from the marine bacterium Arthrobacter sp. EK 1.

    PubMed

    Passeri, A; Lang, S; Wagner, F; Wray, V

    1991-01-01

    Within a screening for biosurfactants we could isolate various n-alkanes utilizing marine bacteria which were capable of synthesizing glycolipids. One strain was identified as Arthrobacter sp. EK 1 which produced trehalose lipids. After purification by column and thick layer chromatography the main fraction, an anionic 2,3,4,2'-trehalose tetraester, was obtained. The chain lengths of fatty acids ranged from 8 up to 14, furthermore succinate could be detected. Since the place of substitution of succinate has so far not been cited in literature, a definitive structural elucidation was carried out chemically by hydroboration and by 1H, 2D1H, 13C and 13C-1H correlation NMR measurements. All investigations confirmed the exact position of succinate at C 2 atom of trehalose. After improvement of growth conditions the production of the trehalose tetraester increased up to 4.8 milligrams during a fermentation in 20 l bioreactor under nitrogen limitation.

  14. Biosurfactants and surfactants interacting with membranes and proteins: Same but different?

    PubMed

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. For several decades they have attracted interest as promising alternatives to current petroleum-based surfactants. Aside from their green profile, they have remarkably low critical micelle concentrations, reduce the air/water surface tension to very low levels and are excellent emulsifiers, all of which make them comparable or superior to their synthetic counterparts. These remarkable physical properties derive from their more complex chemical structures in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are not as clearly separated as chemical surfactants but have a more mosaic distribution of polarity as well as branched or circular structures. This allows the lipopeptide surfactin to adopt spherical structures to facilitate dense packing at interfaces. They are also more complex. Glycolipid BS, e.g. rhamnolipids (RL) and sophorolipids, are produced biologically as mixtures which vary in the size and saturation of the hydrophobic region as well as modifications in the hydrophilic headgroup, such as the number of sugar groups and different levels of acetylation, leading to variable surface-active properties. Their amphiphilicity allows RL to insert easily into membranes at sub-cmc concentrations to modulate membrane structure and extract lipopolysaccharides, leading to extensive biofilm remodeling in vivo, sometimes in collaboration with hydrophobic RL precursors. Thanks to their mosaicity, even anionic BS like RL only bind weakly to proteins and show much lower denaturing potency, even supporting membrane protein refolding. Nevertheless, they can promote protein degradation by proteases e.g. by neutralizing positive charges, which together with their biofilm-combating properties makes them very promising detergent surfactants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  15. Interactions of a bacterial trehalose lipid with phosphatidylglycerol membranes at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio; Aranda, Francisco J

    2014-07-01

    Trehalose lipids are bacterial biosurfactants which present interesting physicochemical and biological properties. These glycolipids have a number of different commercial applications and there is an increasing interest in their use as therapeutic agents. The amphiphilic nature of trehalose lipids points to the membrane as their hypothetical site of action and therefore the study of the interaction between these biosurfactants and biological membranes is critical. In this study, we examine the interactions between a trehalose lipid (TL) from Rhodococcus sp. and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) membranes at low ionic strength, by means of differential scanning calorimetry, light scattering, fluorescence polarization and infrared spectroscopy. We describe that there are extensive interactions between TL and DMPG involving the perturbation of the thermotropic intermediate phase of the phospholipid, the destabilization and shifting of the DMPG gel to liquid crystalline phase transition to lower temperatures, the perturbation of the sample transparency, and the modification of the order of the phospholipid palisade in the gel phase. We also report an increase of fluidity of the phosphatidylglycerol acyl chains and dehydration of the interfacial region of the bilayer. These changes would increase the monolayer negative spontaneous curvature of the phospholipid explaining the destabilizing effect on the intermediate state exerted by this biosurfactant. The observations contribute to get insight into the biological mechanism of action of the biosurfactant and help to understand the properties of the intermediate phase display by DMPG at low ionic strength.

  16. Biosurfactant MEL-A enhances cellular association and gene transfection by cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Saki; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Maitani, Yoshie

    2006-05-30

    Mannnosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A), a biosurfactant produced by microorganisms, has many biological activities. To enhance the gene transfection efficiency of a cationic liposome, we prepared a MEL-liposome (MEL-L) composed of 3beta-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol), dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and MEL-A, and investigated its transfection efficiency in human cervix carcinoma Hela cells. MEL-L was about 40 nm in size, and the MEL-L/plasmid DNA complex (MEL-lipoplex) remained an injectable size (169 nm). MEL-A induced a significantly higher level of gene expression, compared to commercially available Tfx20 and the liposome without MEL-A (Cont-L). Analysis of flow cytometric profiles clearly indicated that the amount of DNA associated with the cells was rapidly increased and sustained by addition of MEL-A to the liposome. Confocal microscopic observation indicated that the MEL-lipoplex distributed widely in the cytoplasm, and the DNA was detected strongly in the cytoplasm and around the nucleus, compared with Cont-L. These results suggested that MEL-A increased gene expression by enhancing the association of the lipoplexes with the cells in serum. MEL-L might prove a remarkable non-viral vector for gene transfection and gene therapy.

  17. Structural characterization of novel sophorolipid biosurfactants from a newly identified species of Candida yeast.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil P J; Ray, Karen J; Vermillion, Karl E; Dunlap, Christopher A; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2012-02-01

    Sophorolipids are a group of O-acylsophorose-based biosurfactants produced by several yeasts of the Starmerella clade. The known sophorolipids are typically partially acetylated 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose (sophorose) O-β-glycosidically linked to 17-L-hydroxy-Δ9-octadecenoic acid, where the acyl carboxyl group often forms a 4″-lactone to the terminal glucosyl residue. In a recent MALDI-TOFMS-based screen for sophorolipid-producing yeasts we identified a new species, Candida sp. NRRL Y-27208, that produces significant amounts of novel sophorolipids. This paper describes the structural characterization of these new compounds, using carbohydrate and lipid analysis, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy. Unlike those reported previously, the NRRL Y-27208 sophorolipids contain an ω-hydroxy-linked acyl group (typically 18-hydroxy-Δ9-octadecenoate), and occur predominantly in a non-lactone, anionic form. In addition, 17 dimeric and trimeric sophoroses were identified by MALDI-TOFMS from this strain. The surfactant-like properties of these sophorolipids have value as potential replacements for petroleum-based detergents and emulsifiers.

  18. Characterization of Bacteria Isolation of Bacteria from Pinyon Rhizosphere, Producing Biosurfactants from Agro-Industrial Waste.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty bacterial strains were isolated from pinyon rhizosphere and screened for biosurfactants production. Among them, six bacterial strains were selected for their potential to produce biosurfactants using two low cost wastes, crude glycerol and lactoserum, as raw material. Both wastes were useful for producing biosurfactants because of their high content in fat and carbohydrates. The six strains were identified by 16S rDNA with an identity percentage higher than 95%, three strains belonged to Enterobacter sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus pumilus and Rhizobium sp. All strains assayed were able to grow and showed halos around the colonies as evidence of biosurfactants production on Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide agar with crude glycerol and lactoserum as substrate. In a mineral salt liquid medium enriched with both wastes, the biosurfactants were produced and collected from free cell medium after 72 h incubation. The biosurfactants produced reduced the surface tension from 69 to 30 mN/m with an emulsification index of diesel at approximately 60%. The results suggest that biosurfactants produced by rhizosphere bacteria from pinyon have promising environmental applications.

  19. Biosurfactants in plant-Pseudomonas interactions and their importance to biocontrol.

    PubMed

    D'aes, Jolien; De Maeyer, Katrien; Pauwelyn, Ellen; Höfte, Monica

    2010-06-01

    Production of biosurfactants is a common feature in bacteria, and in particular in plant-associated species. These bacteria include many plant beneficial and plant pathogenic Pseudomonas spp., which produce primarily cyclic lipopeptide and rhamnolipid type biosurfactants. Pseudomonas-derived biosurfactants are involved in many important bacterial functions. By modifying surface properties, biosurfactants can influence common traits such as surface motility, biofilm formation and colonization. Biosurfactants can alter the bio-availability of exogenous compounds, such as nutrients, to promote their uptake, and of endogenous metabolites, including phenazine antibiotics, resulting in an enhanced biological activity. Antibiotic activity of biosurfactants towards microbes could play a role in intraspecific competition, self-defence and pathogenesis. In addition, bacterial surfactants can affect plants in different ways, either protecting them from disease, or acting as a toxin in a plant-pathogen interaction. Biosurfactants are involved in the biocontrol activity of an increasing number of Pseudomonas strains. Consequently, further insight into the roles and activities of surfactants produced by bacteria could provide means to optimize the use of biological control as an alternative crop protection strategy.

  20. Effect of biosurfactants on the aqueous solubility of PCE and TCE.

    PubMed

    Albino, John D; Nambi, Indumathi M

    2009-12-01

    The effect of biosurfactants on the solubility of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied in batch experiments pertaining to their use for solubilization and mobilization of such contaminants in surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation. Biosurfactants, rhamnolipid and surfactin used in solubility studies were synthesized in our laboratory by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 2297) and Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 2423), respectively. The efficiency of the biosurfactants in solubilizing the chlorinated solvents was compared to that of synthetic surfactants. The Weight Solubilization Ratio (WSR) values for solubilization of PCE and TCE by biosurfactants were very high compared to the values obtained for synthetic surfactants. Surfactin proved to be a better surfactant over rhamnolipid. The WSR of surfactin on solubilization of PCE and TCE were 3.83 and 12.5, respectively, whereas the values obtained for rhamnolipid were 2.06 and 8.36. The solubility of the chlorinated solvents by biosurfactants was considerably affected by the changes in pH. The aqueous solubility of PCE and TCE increased tremendously with decrease in pH. The solubility of biosurfactants was observed to decrease with the pH, favoring partitioning of surfactants into the chlorinated solvents in significant amounts at lower pH. The excessive accumulation of biosurfactants at the interface facilitated interfacial tension reductions resulting in higher solubility of the chlorinated solvents at pH less than 7.

  1. Assessing Bacillus subtilis biosurfactant effects on the biodegradation of petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Montagnolli, Renato Nallin; Lopes, Paulo Renato Matos; Bidoia, Ederio Dino

    2015-01-01

    Microbial pollutant removal capabilities can be determined and exploited to accomplish bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted environments. Thus, increasing knowledge on environmental behavior of different petroleum products can lead to better bioremediation strategies. Biodegradation can be enhanced by adding biosurfactants to hydrocarbon-degrading microorganism consortia. This work aimed to improve petroleum products biodegradation by using a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis. The produced biosurfactant was added to biodegradation assays containing crude oil, diesel, and kerosene. Biodegradation was monitored by a respirometric technique capable of evaluating CO₂ production in an aerobic simulated wastewater environment. The biosurfactant yielded optimal surface tension reduction (30.9 mN m(-1)) and emulsification results (46.90% with kerosene). Biodegradation successfully occurred and different profiles were observed for each substance. Precise mathematical modeling of biosurfactant effects on petroleum degradation profile was designed, hence allowing long-term kinetics prediction. Assays containing biosurfactant yielded a higher overall CO₂ output. Higher emulsification and an enhanced CO2 production dataset on assays containing biosurfactants was observed, especially in crude oil and kerosene.

  2. Utilization of banana peel as a novel substrate for biosurfactant production by Halobacteriaceae archaeon AS65.

    PubMed

    Chooklin, Chanika Saenge; Maneerat, Suppasil; Saimmai, Atipan

    2014-05-01

    In this study, biosurfactant-producing bacteria was evaluated for biosurfactant production by using banana peel as a sole carbon source. From the 71 strains screened, Halobacteriaceae archaeon AS65 produced the highest biosurfactant activity. The highest biosurfactant production (5.30 g/l) was obtained when the cells were grown on a minimal salt medium containing 35 % (w/v) banana peel and 1 g/l commercial monosodium glutamate at 30 °C and 200 rpm after 54 h of cultivation. The biosurfactant obtained by extraction with ethyl acetate showed high surface tension reduction (25.5 mN/m), a small critical micelle concentration value (10 mg/l), thermal and pH stability with respect to surface tension reduction and emulsification activity, and a high level of salt tolerance. The biosurfactant obtained was confirmed as a lipopeptide by using a biochemical test FT-IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry. The crude biosurfactant showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and had the ability to emulsify oil, enhance PAHs solubility, and oil bioremediation.

  3. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant producing bacteria from Persian Gulf (Bushehr provenance).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2014-09-15

    Biosurfactants are surface active materials that are produced by some microorganisms. These molecules increase biodegradation of insoluble pollutants. In this study sediments and seawater samples were collected from the coastline of Bushehr provenance in the Persian Gulf and their biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated. Biosurfactant producing bacteria were isolated by using an enrichment method in Bushnell-Hass medium with diesel oil as the sole carbon source. Five screening tests were used for selection of Biosurfactant producing bacteria: hemolysis in blood agar, oil spreading, drop collapse, emulsification activity and Bacterial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon test (BATH). These bacteria were identified using biochemical and molecular methods. Eighty different colonies were isolated from the collected samples. The most biosurfactant producing isolates related to petrochemical plants of Khark Island. Fourteen biosurfactant producing bacteria were selected between these isolates and 7 isolates were screened as these were predominant producers that belong to Shewanella alga, Shewanella upenei, Vibrio furnissii, Gallaecimonas pentaromativorans, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Psychrobacter namhaensis and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The largest clear zone diameters in oil spreading were observed for G. pentaromativorans strain O15. Also, this strain has the best emulsification activity and reduction of surface tension, suggesting it is the best of thee isolated strains. The results of this study confirmed that there is high diversity of biosurfactant producing bacteria in marine ecosystem of Iran and by application of these bacteria in petrochemical waste water environmental problems can be assisted.

  4. Utilization of sludge palm oil as a novel substrate for biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Wan Nawawi, Wan Mohd Fazli; Jamal, Parveen; Alam, Md Zahangir

    2010-12-01

    This paper introduces sludge palm oil (SPO) as a novel substrate for biosurfactant production by liquid state fermentation. Potential strains of microorganism were isolated from various hydrocarbon-based sources at palm oil mill and screened for biosurfactant production with the help of drop collapse method and surface tension activity. Out of 22 isolates of microorganism, the strain S02 showed the highest bacterial growth with a surface tension of 36.2 mN/m and was therefore, selected as a potential biosurfactant producing microorganism. Plackett-Burman experimental design was employed to determine the important nutritional requirement for biosurfactant production by the selected strain under controlled conditions. Six out of 11 factors of the production medium were found to significantly affect the biosurfactant production. K(2)HPO(4) had a direct proportional correlation with the biosurfactant production while sucrose, glucose, FeSO(4), MgSO(4), and NaNO(3) showed inversely proportional relationship with biosurfactant production in the selected experimental range.

  5. Evaluation of biosurfactant production from various agricultural residues by Lactobacillus pentosus.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Ana Belén; Torrado, Ana María; Barral, María Teresa; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2007-05-30

    The cost of biosurfactant production may be significantly decreased by using inexpensive carbon substrates like agricultural residues. However, scarce information can be found in the literature about the utilization of lignocellulosic residues for obtaining biosurfactants. Usually agricultural residues are field burned, producing various toxic compounds to the atmosphere; so, as an interesting alternative to the traditional field burning of this kind of residue, this work proposes the utilization of agricultural wastes (barley bran, trimming vine shoots, corn cobs, and Eucalyptus globulus chips) for simultaneous lactic acid and biosurfactant production. Previous to this biotechnological process, lignocellulosic residues were hydrolyzed, using H2SO4, under selected conditions and neutralized with CaCO3. Following, Lactobacillus pentosus was employed for the fermentation of hemicellulosic hydrolyzates after nutrient supplementation. Biosurfactants were measured by taking into account the surface tension reduction. The highest value of reduction (21.3 units) was found when using hemicellulosic sugar hydrolyzates obtained from trimming vine shoots, corresponding to 0.71 g of biosurfactant per g of biomass and 25.6 g of lactic acid/L. On the contrary, barley bran husk hydrolyzates only produced 0.28 g of biosurfactant per g of biomass and 33.2 g of lactic acid/L. The differences between biosurfactant production can be attributed to the different compositions of the hydrolyzates.

  6. Biosurfactants during in situ bioremediation: factors that influence the production and challenges in evalution.

    PubMed

    Decesaro, Andressa; Machado, Thaís Strieder; Cappellaro, Ângela Carolina; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Thomé, Antônio; Colla, Luciane Maria

    2017-08-16

    Research on the influence of biosurfactants on the efficiency of in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil is continuously growing. Despite the constant progress in understanding the mechanisms involved in the effects of biosurfactants, there are still many factors that are not sufficiently elucidated. There is a lack of research on autochthonous or exogenous microbial metabolism when biostimulation or bioaugmentation is carried out to produce biosurfactants at contaminated sites. In addition, studies on the application of techniques that measure the biosurfactants produced in situ are needed. This is important because, although the positive influence of biosurfactants is often reported, there are also studies where no effect or negative effects have been observed. This review aimed to examine some studies on factors that can improve the production of biosurfactants in soils during in situ bioremediation. Moreover, this work reviews the methodologies that can be used for measuring the production of these biocomposts. We reviewed studies on the potential of biosurfactants to improve the bioremediation of hydrocarbons, as well as the limitations of methods for the production of these biomolecules by microorganisms in soil.

  7. Isolation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the crude biosurfactant produced by a Lactobacillus paracasei strain isolated in a Portuguese dairy industry was characterized. The minimum surface tension (41.8mN/m) and the critical micelle concentration (2.5mg/ml) obtained were found to be similar to the values previously reported for biosurfactants isolated from other lactobacilli. The biosurfactant was found to be stable to pH changes over a range from 6 to 10, being more effective at pH 7, and showed no loss of surface activity after incubation at 60 degrees C for 120h. Although the biosurfactant chemical composition has not been determined yet, a fraction was isolated through acidic precipitation, which exhibited higher surface activity as compared with the crude biosurfactant. Furthermore, this isolated biosurfactant showed antimicrobial and anti-adhesive activities against several pathogenic microorganisms. In addition, L. paracasei exhibited a strong autoaggregating phenotype, which was maintained after washing and resuspending the cells in PBS, meaning that this attribute must be related to cell surface components and not to excreted factors. The autoaggregation ability exhibited by this strain, together with the antimicrobial and anti-adhesive properties observed for this biosurfactant opens the possibility for its use as an effective probiotic strain.

  8. Rapid screening of surfactant and biosurfactant surface cleaning performance.

    PubMed

    Onaizi, Sagheer A; He, Lizhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2009-08-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and rubisco protein stain were used as tools to screen the effectiveness of detergent formulations in cleaning a protein stain from solid surfaces. Surfactant and biosurfactant-based formulations, with and without added protease, were screened for cleaning performance. Enzyme-free detergent formulations at 1500 ppm total surfactant were insufficient to cause complete surface cleaning, despite the high concentration of surfactant. The cleaning performance of a "home-made" formulation containing 2 ppm subtilisin A (SA) and 2 ppm sodium dodecyl benzyl sulphonate (SDOBS) was as efficient as the best amongst the three enzyme-free 1500 ppm formulations. The cleaning performance of 2 ppm SA in the absence of SDOBS was less effective than the combined formulation, even though 2 ppm SDOBS alone did not cause any protein removal. The observed synergistic performance was attributed to the cooperative mechanisms (chemical and physical attack) by which these two agents act on a rubisco stain. Replacing SDOBS in the enzyme-surfactant formulation with the same amount of surfactin biosurfactant (2 ppm) gave the best rubisco removal of all formulations examined in this study, irrespective of the surface chemistry underlying the protein film. It was found that 75% and 80% of immobilised rubisco stain could be removed from hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, respectively, by the biosurfactant-SA formulation (compared with 60% and 65%, respectively, using the SDOBS-SA formulation). Our results suggest that it may be possible to generate fully renewable biochemical-based cleaning formulations that have superior cleaning performance to existing technologies. In developing optimised formulations, there is a pressing need for chip-based tools similar to that developed in this research.

  9. In Situ Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus Strains Injected into a Limestone Petroleum Reservoir▿

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, N.; Simpson, D. R.; Duncan, K. E.; McInerney, M. J.; Folmsbee, M.; Fincher, T.; Knapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery may be an economic approach for recovery of significant amounts of oil entrapped in reservoirs, but evidence that biosurfactants can be produced in situ at concentrations needed to mobilize oil is lacking. We tested whether two Bacillus strains that produce lipopeptide biosurfactants can metabolize and produce their biosurfactants in an oil reservoir. Five wells that produce from the same Viola limestone formation were used. Two wells received an inoculum (a mixture of Bacillus strain RS-1 and Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii NRRL B-23049) and nutrients (glucose, sodium nitrate, and trace metals), two wells received just nutrients, and one well received only formation water. Results showed in situ metabolism and biosurfactant production. The average concentration of lipopeptide biosurfactant in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells was about 90 mg/liter. This concentration is approximately nine times the minimum concentration required to mobilize entrapped oil from sandstone cores. Carbon dioxide, acetate, lactate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol were detected in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells. Only CO2 and ethanol were detected in the produced fluids of the nutrient-only-treated wells. Microbiological and molecular data showed that the microorganisms injected into the formation were retrieved in the produced fluids of the inoculated wells. We provide essential data for modeling microbial oil recovery processes in situ, including growth rates (0.06 ± 0.01 h−1), carbon balances (107% ± 34%), biosurfactant production rates (0.02 ± 0.001 h−1), and biosurfactant yields (0.015 ± 0.001 mol biosurfactant/mol glucose). The data demonstrate the technical feasibility of microbial processes for oil recovery. PMID:17172458

  10. Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat produces an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Priji, Prakasan; Sajith, Sreedharan; Unni, Kizhakkepowathial Nair; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of a biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a rumen bacterium, and optimization of parameters required for its production. Initial screening of five parameters (pH, temperature, agitation, incubation, and substrate concentration) was carried out employing Plackett-Burman design, which reduced the number of parameters to 3 (pH, temperature, and incubation) according to their significance on the yield of biosurfactant. A suitable statistical model for the production of biosurfactant by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6 was established according to Box-Behnken design, which resulted in 11% increase (at pH 7, 35 °C, incubation 75 h) in the yield (2070 mg L(-1) ) of biosurfactant. The biosurfactant was found stable at a wide range of pH (3-9) with 48 mg L(-1) critical micelle concentration; and maintained over 90% of its emulsification ability even after boiling and in presence of sodium chloride (0.5%). The highest cell hydrophobicity (37%) and emulsification (69%) indices were determined with groundnut oil and kerosene, respectively. The biosurfactant was found to inhibit the growth and adhesion of E. coli and S. aureus significantly. From the phytotoxicity studies, the biosurfactant did not show any adverse effect on the germinating seeds of rice and green gram. The structural characterization of biosurfactant employing orcinol method, thin layer chromatography and FT-IR indicated that it is a rhamnolipid (glycolipid). Thus, Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat is demonstrated as a producer of an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant suitable for application in various industries.

  11. Optimization of cultural conditions for biosurfactant production by Pleurotus djamor in solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Velioglu, Zulfiye; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2015-11-01

    Being eco-friendly, less toxic, more biodegradable and biocompatible, biological surfactants have higher activity and stability compared to synthetic ones. In spite of the fact that there are abundant benefits of biosurfactants over the synthetic congeners, the problem related with the economical and large scale production proceeds. The utilization of several industrial wastes in the production media as substrates reduces the production cost. This current study aims optimization of biosurfactant production conditions by Pleurotus djamor, grown on sunflower seed shell, grape wastes or potato peels as renewable cheap substrates in solid state fermentation. After determination of the best substrate for biosurfactant production, we indicate optimum size and amount of solid substrate, volume of medium, temperature, pH and Fe(2+) concentrations on biosurfactant production. In optimum conditions, by reducing water surface tension to 28.82 ± 0.3 mN/m and having oil displacement diameter of 3.9 ± 0.3 cm, 10.205 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced. Moreover, chemical composition of biosurfactant produced in optimum condition was determined by FTIR. Lastly, laboratory's large-scale production was carried out in optimum conditions in a tray bioreactor designed by us and 8.9 ± 0.5 g/l biosurfactant was produced with a significant surface activity (37.74 ± 0.3 mN/m). With its economical suggestions and applicability of laboratory's large-scale production, this work indicates the possibility of using low cost agro-industrial wastes as renewable substrates for biosurfactant production. Therefore, using economically produced biosurfactant will reduce cost in several applications such as bioremediation, oil recovery and biodegradation of toxic chemicals.

  12. BIODEGRADATION OF PETROLEUM-WASTE BY BIOSURFACTANT-PRODUCING BACTERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; Kamlesh Jangid, K; Krystyna Lukasik, K; Grzegorz Nalecz-Jawecki, G; Topher Berry, T

    2007-05-16

    The degradation of petroleum waste by mixed bacterial cultures which produce biosurfactants: Ralstonia pickettii SRS (BP-20), Alcaligenes piechaudii SRS (CZOR L-1B), Bacillus subtilis (1'- 1a), Bacillus sp. (T-1) and Bacillus sp. (T'-1) was investigated. The total petroleum hydrocarbons were degraded substantially (91 %) by the mixed bacterial culture in 30 days (reaching up to 29 % in the first 72 h). Similarly, the toxicity of the biodegraded petroleum waste decreased 3 times after 30 days as compared to raw petroleum waste. Thus, the mixed bacterial strains effectively clean-up the petroleum waste and they can be used in other bioremediation processes.

  13. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suryanti, Venty Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-08

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  14. Evaluation of biosurfactants grown in corn oil by Rhodococcus rhodochrous on removing of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Pujiastuti, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    The potential application of biosurfactants to remove heavy metal ion from aqueous solution by batch technique was examined. The glycolipids type biosurfactants were grown in a media containing of 20% v/v corn oil with 7 days of fermentation by Rhodococcus rhodochrous. The biosurfactants reduced the surface tension of water of about 51% from 62 mN/m to 30 mN/m. The biosurfactant increased the E24 of water-palm oil emulsion of about 55% from 43% to 97% and could maintain this E24 value of above 50% for up to 9 days. Heavy metal ion removal, in this case cadmium ion, by crude and patially purified biosurfactants has been investigated from aqueous solution at pH 6. Adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 1.74 and 1.82 mg/g, respectively. Additionally, the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by partially purified biosurfactant with 5 and 10 minutes of contact times were 0.79 and 1.34 mg/g, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion by crude biosurfactant was higher than that of by partially purified biosurfactant. The results suggested that the biosurfactant could be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Biosurfactant Producing Bacteria for the Application in Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Niraj; Dasgupta, Sumita; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Gupta, Smita

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, a biosurfactant producing bacterial strain was isolated, screened and identified. Further, various fermentation conditions (such as pH (5-10), incubation period (24-96h) and incubation temperature (20-60 °C) were optimized for maximum production of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant was characterized by measuring emulsification index, foaming characteristics, rhamnolipid detection, interfacial tension between water and oil and stability against pH and temperature for its potential application in oil recovery process. The additional oil recovery for two different sand, sand1 and sand2, was found to be 49% and 38%, respectively.

  16. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery/Advanced Recovery Concepts Awards

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.; Marsh, T.L.; Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; Nagle, Jr., D.P.; Sharma, P.K.; Jackson, B.E.

    2002-05-28

    The objectives of this were two fold. First, core displacement studies were done to determine whether microbial processes could recover residual oil at elevated pressures. Second, the importance of biosurfactant production for the recovery of residual oil was studies. In these studies, a biosurfactant-producing, microorganisms called Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 was used. This bacterium produces a cyclic peptide biosurfactant that significantly reduces the interfacial tension between oil and brine (7). The use of a mutant deficient in surfactant production and a mathematical MEOR simulator were used to determine the major mechanisms of oil recovery by these two strains.

  17. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the

  18. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  19. Development of Microorganisms with Improved Transport and Biosurfactant Activity for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; K.E. Duncan; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; Randy R. Simpson; N.Ravi; D. Nagle

    2005-08-15

    The project had three objectives: (1) to develop microbial strains with improved biosurfactant properties that use cost-effective nutrients, (2) to obtain biosurfactant strains with improved transport properties through sandstones, and (3) to determine the empirical relationship between surfactant concentration and interfacial tension and whether in situ reactions kinetics and biosurfactant concentration meets appropriate engineering design criteria. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns and Berea sandstone cores when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0.1 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1 g/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) recovered 10-40% of residual oil from Berea sandstone cores. Even low biosurfactant concentrations (16 mg/l) mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon (29%). The bio-surfactant lowered IFT by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. A mathematical model that relates oil recovery to biosurfactant concentration was modified to include the stepwise changes in IFT as biosurfactant concentrations changes. This model adequately predicted the experimentally observed changes in IFT as a function of biosurfactant concentration. Theses data show that lipopeptide biosurfactant systems may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic

  20. Occurrence of Biosurfactant Producing Bacillus spp. in Diverse Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sanket J.; Suthar, Harish; Yadav, Amit Kumar; Hingurao, Krushi; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Diversity among biosurfactant producing Bacillus spp. from diverse habitats was studied among 77 isolates. Cluster analysis based on phenotypic characteristics using unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMAs) method was performed. Bacillus isolates possessing high surface tension activity and five reference strains were subjected to amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A correlation between the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Bacillus spp. is explored. Most of the oil reservoir isolates showing high surface activity clustered with B. licheniformis and B. subtilis, the hot water spring isolates clustered in two ingroups, while the petroleum contaminated soil isolates were randomly distributed in all the three ingroups. Present work revealed that diversity exists in distribution of Bacillus spp. from thermal and hydrocarbon containing habitats where majority of organisms belonged to B. licheniformis and B. subtilis group. Isolate B. licheniformis TT42 produced biosurfactant which reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mNm−1 to 28 mNm−1, and 0.05 mNm−1 interfacial tension against crude oil at 80°C. This isolate clustered with B. subtilis and B. licheniformis group on the basis of ARDRA. These findings increase the possibility of exploiting the Bacillus spp. from different habitats and their possible use in oil recovery. PMID:25969778

  1. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs.

  2. Oxygen-controlled Biosurfactant Production in a Bench Scale Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kronemberger, Frederico Araujo; Anna, Lidia Maria Melo Santa; Fernandes, Ana Carolina Loureiro Brito; de Menezes, Reginaldo Ramos; Borges, Cristiano Piacsek; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães

    Rhamnolipids have been pointed out as promising biosurfactants. The most studied microorganisms for the aerobic production of these molecules are the bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. The aim of this work was to produce a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant in a bench-scale bioreactor by one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil environments. To study the microorganism growth and production dependency on oxygen, a nondispersive oxygenation device was developed, and a programmable logic controller (PLC) was used to set the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. Using the data stored in a computer and the predetermined characteristics of the oxygenation device, it was possible to evaluate the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and the specific OUR (SOUR) of this microorganism. These rates, obtained for some different DO concentrations, were then compared to the bacterial growth, to the carbon source consumption, and to the rhamnolipid and other virulence factors production. The SOUR presented an initial value of about 60.0 mg02/gdw h. Then, when the exponential growth phase begins, there is a rise in this rate. After that, the SOUR reduces to about 20.0 mg02/gdw h. The carbon source consumption is linear during the whole process.

  3. Methods for investigating biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers: a review.

    PubMed

    Satpute, Surekha K; Banpurkar, Arun G; Dhakephalkar, Prashant K; Banat, Ibrahim M; Chopade, Balu A

    2010-06-01

    Microorganisms produce biosurfactant (BS)/bioemulsifier (BE) with wide structural and functional diversity which consequently results in the adoption of different techniques to investigate these diverse amphiphilic molecules. This review aims to compile information on different microbial screening methods, surface active products extraction procedures, and analytical terminologies used in this field. Different methods for screening microbial culture broth or cell biomass for surface active compounds production are also presented and their possible advantages and disadvantages highlighted. In addition, the most common methods for purification, detection, and structure determination for a wide range of BS and BE are introduced. Simple techniques such as precipitation using acetone, ammonium sulphate, solvent extraction, ultrafiltration, ion exchange, dialysis, ultrafiltration, lyophilization, isoelectric focusing (IEF), and thin layer chromatography (TLC) are described. Other more elaborate techniques including high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), infra red (IR), gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy (FAB-MS), protein digestion and amino acid sequencing are also elucidated. Various experimental strategies including static light scattering and hydrodynamic characterization for micelles have been discussed. A combination of various analytical methods are often essential in this area of research and a numbers of trials and errors to isolate, purify and characterize various surface active agents are required. This review introduces the various methodologies that are indispensable for studying biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers.

  4. Oxygen-controlled biosurfactant production in a bench scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kronemberger, Frederico de Araujo; Santa Anna, Lidia Maria Melo; Fernandes, Ana Carolina Loureiro Brito; Menezes, Reginaldo Ramos de; Borges, Cristiano Piacsek; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães

    2008-03-01

    Rhamnolipids have been pointed out as promising biosurfactants. The most studied microorganisms for the aerobic production of these molecules are the bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. The aim of this work was to produce a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant in a bench-scale bioreactor by one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil environments. To study the microorganism growth and production dependency on oxygen, a nondispersive oxygenation device was developed, and a programmable logic controller (PLC) was used to set the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. Using the data stored in a computer and the predetermined characteristics of the oxygenation device, it was possible to evaluate the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and the specific OUR (SOUR) of this microorganism. These rates, obtained for some different DO concentrations, were then compared to the bacterial growth, to the carbon source consumption, and to the rhamnolipid and other virulence factors production. The SOUR presented an initial value of about 60.0 mgO(2)/g(DW) h. Then, when the exponential growth phase begins, there is a rise in this rate. After that, the SOUR reduces to about 20.0 mgO(2)/g(DW) h. The carbon source consumption is linear during the whole process.

  5. Biodegradation of diesel oil by a novel microbial consortium: comparison between co-inoculation with biosurfactant-producing strain and exogenously added biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Mnif, Sami; Sahnoun, Rihab; Maktouf, Sameh; Ayedi, Younes; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-10-01

    Bioremediation, involving the use of microorganisms to detoxify or remove pollutants, is the most interesting strategy for hydrocarbon remediation. In this aim, four hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from oil-contaminated soil in Tunisia. They were identified by the 16S rDNA sequence analysis, as Lysinibacillus bronitolerans RI18 (KF964487), Bacillus thuringiensis RI16 (KM111604), Bacillus weihenstephanensis RI12 (KM094930), and Acinetobacter radioresistens RI7 (KJ829530). Moreover, a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis SPB1, confirmed to increase diesel solubility, was tested to increase diesel biodegradation along with co-inoculation with two biosurfactant-producing strains. Culture studies revealed the enhancement of diesel biodegradation by the selected consortium with the addition of SPB1 lipopeptide and in the cases of co-inoculation by biosurfactant-producing strain. In fact, an improvement of about 38.42 and 49.65 % of diesel degradation was registered in the presence of 0.1 % lipopeptide biosurfactant and when culturing B. subtilis SPB1 strain with the isolated consortium, respectively. Furthermore, the best improvement, evaluated to about 55.4 %, was recorded when using the consortium cultured with B. subtilis SPB1 and A. radioresistens RI7 strains. Gas chromatography analyses were correlated with the gravimetric evaluation of the residual hydrocarbons. Results suggested the potential applicability of the selected consortium along with the ex situ- and in situ-added biosurfactant for the effective bioremediation of diesel-contaminated water and soil.

  6. Isolation and selection of new biosurfactant producing bacteria from degraded palm kernel cake under liquid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Parveen; Mir, Shajrat; Alam, Md Zahangir; Wan Nawawi, Wan M Fazli

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds produced by different microorganisms. The aim of this study was to introduce palm kernel cake (PKC) as a novel substrate for biosurfactant production using a potent bacterial strain under liquid state fermentation. This study was primarily based on the isolation and identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria that could utilize palm kernel cake as a new major substrate. Potential bacterial strains were isolated from degraded PKC and screened for biosurfactant production with the help of the drop collapse assay and by analyzing the surface tension activity. From the screened isolates, a new strain, SM03, showed the best and most consistent results, and was therefore selected as the most potent biosurfactant-producing bacterial strain. The new strain was identified as Providencia alcalifaciens SM03 using the Gen III MicroPlate Biolog Microbial Identification System. The yield of the produced biosurfactant was 8.3 g/L.

  7. Wastewater treatment enhancement by applying a lipopeptide biosurfactant to a lignocellulosic biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ameneiro, M; Vecino, X; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B

    2015-10-20

    In this work, a natural lipopeptide biosurfactant obtained from corn steep liquor was included in the formulation of a lignocellulosic biocomposite used for the treatment of wastewater. The results obtained indicate that the dye sorption capacity of the hydrogel containing hydrolysed vineyard pruning waste can be significantly promoted via surfactant modification using natural detergents. The elimination of dye compounds and the removal of sulphates were increased around 10% and 62%, respectively, when the biocomposite modified with biosurfactant was used. This outcome can be intrinsically related to the rougher, rounder, more compact and better-emulsified sphere achieved after the addition of the lipopeptide biosurfactant. The bioadsorption process followed a pseudo-second order kinetic model and both intraparticle diffusion and liquid film diffusion were involved in the bioadsorption mechanism. Therefore, the utilisation of biosurfactants shows great potential in the formulation of eco-friendly adsorbents for environmental application.

  8. Biosurfactant-enhanced removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chin-Chi; Huang, Yi-Chien; Wei, Yu-Hong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2009-08-15

    A screening method was developed to evaluate the oil removal capability of biosurfactants for oil-contaminated soils collected from a heavy oil-polluted site. The ability of removing total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) from soil by two biosurfactants was identified and compared with that of synthetic surfactants. The results show that biosurfactants exhibited much higher TPH removal efficiency than the synthetic ones examined. By using 0.2 mass% of rhamnolipids, surfactin, Tween 80, and Triton X-100, the TPH removal for the soil contaminated with ca. 3,000 mg TPH/kg dry soil was 23%, 14%, 6%, and 4%, respectively, while removal efficiency increased to 63%, 62%, 40%, and 35%, respectively, for the soil contaminated with ca. 9000 mg TPH/kg dry soil. The TPH removal efficiency also increased with an increase in biosurfactant concentration (from 0 to 0.2 mass%) but it did not vary significantly for the contact time of 1 and 7 days.

  9. Application of biosurfactant from Sphingobacterium spiritivorum AS43 in the biodegradation of used lubricating oil.

    PubMed

    Noparat, Pongsak; Maneerat, Suppasil; Saimmai, Atipan

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the application of biosurfactant from Sphingobacterium spiritivorum AS43 using molasses as a substrate and fertilizer to enhance the biodegradation of used lubricating oil (ULO). The cell surface hydrophobicity of bacteria, the emulsification activity, and the biodegradation efficiency of ULO were measured. The bacterial adhesion in the hydrocarbon test was used to denote the cell surface hydrophobicity of the used bacterial species. The results indicate a strong correlation between cell surface hydrophobicity, emulsification activity, and the degree of ULO biodegradation. The maximum degradation of ULO (62 %) was observed when either 1.5 % (w/v) of biosurfactant or fertilizer was added. The results also revealed that biosurfactants alone are capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizer. The data indicate the potential for biosurfactant production by using low-cost substrate for application in the bioremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons or oils.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; D.P. Nagle, Jr.; Kathleen Duncan; N. Youssef; M.J. Folmsbee; S. Maudgakya

    2003-06-26

    Biosurfactants enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation by increasing apparent aqueous solubility or affecting the association of the cell with poorly soluble hydrocarbon. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. One pore volume of cell-free culture fluid with 900 mg/l of the biosurfactant, 10 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1000 mg/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer mobilized 82% of the residual hydrocarbon. Consistent with the high residual oil recoveries, we found that the bio-surfactant lowered the interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. The lipopeptide biosurfactant system may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Previously, we reported that Proteose peptone was necessary for anaerobic growth and biosurfactant production by B. mojavensis JF-2. The data gathered from crude purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose peptone suggested that it consisted of nucleic acids; however, nucleic acid bases, nucleotides or nucleosides did not replace the requirement for Proteose Peptone. Further studies revealed that salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, Echerichia coli DNA and synthetic DNA replaced the requirement for Proteose peptone. In addition to DNA, amino acids and nitrate were required for anaerobic growth and vitamins further improved growth. We now have a defined medium that can be used to manipulate growth and biosurfactant

  11. Application of lipopeptide biosurfactant isolated from a halophile: Bacillus tequilensis CH for inhibition of biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arun Kumar; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mall, Gangotri; Panda, Himadri Tanaya; Sukla, Lala Behari; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-11-01

    Biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules having hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties produced by various microorganisms. These molecules trigger the reduction of surface tension or interfacial tension in liquids. A biosurfactant-producing halophile was isolated from Lake Chilika, a brackish water lake of Odisha, India (19°41'39″N, 85°18'24″E). The halophile was identified as Bacillus tequilensis CH by biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and assigned accession no. KC851857 by GenBank. The biosurfactant produced by B. tequilensis CH was partially characterized as a lipopeptide using thin-layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The minimum effective concentration of a biosurfactant for inhibition of pathogenic biofilm (Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans) on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was found to be 50 μg ml(-1). This finding has potential for a variety of applications.

  12. Characterization of Biosurfactant Produced during Degradation of Hydrocarbons Using Crude Oil As Sole Source of Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C.; Deka, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Production and spillage of petroleum hydrocarbons which is the most versatile energy resource causes disastrous environmental pollution. Elevated oil degrading performance from microorganisms is demanded for successful microbial remediation of those toxic pollutants. The employment of biosurfactant-producing and hydrocarbon-utilizing microbes enhances the effectiveness of bioremediation as biosurfactant plays a key role by making hydrocarbons bio-available for degradation. The present study aimed the isolation of a potent biosurfactant producing indigenous bacteria which can be employed for crude oil remediation, along with the characterization of the biosurfactant produced during crude oil biodegradation. A potent bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG1 (identified by 16s rDNA sequencing) was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil that could efficiently produce biosurfactant by utilizing crude oil components as the carbon source, thereby leading to the enhanced degradation of the petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain PG1 could degrade 81.8% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) after 5 weeks of culture when grown in mineral salt media (MSM) supplemented with 2% (v/v) crude oil as the sole carbon source. GCMS analysis of the treated crude oil samples revealed that P. aeruginosa PG1 could potentially degrade various hydrocarbon contents including various PAHs present in the crude oil. Biosurfactant produced by strain PG1 in the course of crude oil degradation, promotes the reduction of surface tension (ST) of the culture medium from 51.8 to 29.6 mN m−1, with the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 56 mg L−1. FTIR, LC-MS, and SEM-EDS studies revealed that the biosurfactant is a rhamnolipid comprising of both mono and di rhamnolipid congeners. The biosurfactant did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect to mouse L292 fibroblastic cell line, however, strong antibiotic activity against some pathogenic bacteria and fungus was observed. PMID:28275373

  13. Characterization of Biosurfactant Produced during Degradation of Hydrocarbons Using Crude Oil As Sole Source of Carbon.

    PubMed

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Production and spillage of petroleum hydrocarbons which is the most versatile energy resource causes disastrous environmental pollution. Elevated oil degrading performance from microorganisms is demanded for successful microbial remediation of those toxic pollutants. The employment of biosurfactant-producing and hydrocarbon-utilizing microbes enhances the effectiveness of bioremediation as biosurfactant plays a key role by making hydrocarbons bio-available for degradation. The present study aimed the isolation of a potent biosurfactant producing indigenous bacteria which can be employed for crude oil remediation, along with the characterization of the biosurfactant produced during crude oil biodegradation. A potent bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG1 (identified by 16s rDNA sequencing) was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil that could efficiently produce biosurfactant by utilizing crude oil components as the carbon source, thereby leading to the enhanced degradation of the petroleum hydrocarbons. Strain PG1 could degrade 81.8% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) after 5 weeks of culture when grown in mineral salt media (MSM) supplemented with 2% (v/v) crude oil as the sole carbon source. GCMS analysis of the treated crude oil samples revealed that P. aeruginosa PG1 could potentially degrade various hydrocarbon contents including various PAHs present in the crude oil. Biosurfactant produced by strain PG1 in the course of crude oil degradation, promotes the reduction of surface tension (ST) of the culture medium from 51.8 to 29.6 mN m(-1), with the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 56 mg L(-1). FTIR, LC-MS, and SEM-EDS studies revealed that the biosurfactant is a rhamnolipid comprising of both mono and di rhamnolipid congeners. The biosurfactant did not exhibit any cytotoxic effect to mouse L292 fibroblastic cell line, however, strong antibiotic activity against some pathogenic bacteria and fungus was observed.

  14. Optimization of low-cost biosurfactant production from agricultural residues through response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ebadipour, N; Lotfabad, T Bagheri; Yaghmaei, S; RoostaAzad, R

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds capable of reducing surface tension and interfacial tension. Biosurfactants are produced by various microorganisms. They are promising replacements for chemical surfactants because of biodegradability, nontoxicity, and their ability to be produced from renewable sources. However, a major obstacle in producing biosurfactants at the industrial level is the lack of cost-effectiveness. In the present study, by using corn steep liquor (CSL) as a low-cost agricultural waste, not only is the production cost reduced but a higher production yield is also achieved. Moreover, a response surface methodology (RSM) approach through the Box-Behnken method was applied to optimize the biosurfactant production level. The results found that biosurfactant production was improved around 2.3 times at optimum condition when the CSL was at a concentration of 1.88 mL/L and yeast extract was reduced to 25 times less than what was used in a basic soybean oil medium (SOM). The predicted and experimental values of responses were in reasonable agreement with each other (Pred-R(2) = 0.86 and adj-R(2) = 0.94). Optimization led to a drop in raw material price per unit of biosurfactant from $47 to $12/kg. Moreover, the biosurfactant product at a concentration of 84 mg/L could lower the surface tension of twice-distilled water from 72 mN/m to less than 28 mN/m and emulsify an equal volume of kerosene by an emulsification index of (E24) 68% in a two-phase mixture. These capabilities made these biosurfactants applicable in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR), hydrocarbon remediation, and all other petroleum industry surfactant applications.

  15. Production of Biosurfactants by Pseudomonas Species for Application in the Petroleum Industry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Aparecida M; Silva, Aline F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2017-02-01

      The production of surfactants by microorganisms has become an attractive option in the treatment of oil-contaminated environments because biosurfactants are biodegradable and less toxic than synthetic surfactants, although production costs remain high. With the aim of reducing the cost of biosurfactant production, three strains of Pseudomonas (designated P1, P2, and P3) were cultivated in a low-cost medium containing molasses and corn steep liquor as substrates. Following the selection of the best producer (P3), a rotational central composite design (RCCD) was used to determine the influence of substrates concentration on surface tension and biosurfactant yield. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of water to 27.5 mN/m, and its CMC was determined to be 600 mg/L. The yield was 4.0 g/L. The biosurfactant demonstrated applicability under specific environmental conditions and was able to remove 80 to 90% of motor oil adsorbed to sand. The properties of the biosurfactant suggest its potential application in bioremediation of hydrophobic pollutants.

  16. Biosurfactant-producing strains in enhancing solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Hang; Chen, Xuehua; Liu, Na; Bao, Suriguge

    2014-07-01

    Three biosurfactant-producing strains designated as BS-1, BS-3, and BS-4 were screened out from crude oil-contaminated soil using a combination of surface tension measurement and oil spreading method. Thin layer chromatography and infrared analysis indicated that the biosurfactants produced by the three strains were lipopeptide, glycolipid, and phospholipid. The enhancement of solubilization and biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater employing biosurfactant-producing strains was investigated. The three strain mixtures led to more solubilization of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater, and the solubilization rate was 10.5 mg l−1. The combination of biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains exhibited a higher biodegradation efficiency of 85.4 % than the petroleum-degrading strains (71.2 %). Biodegradation was enhanced the greatest with biosurfactant-producing strains and petroleum-degrading strains in a ratio of 1:1. Fluorescence microscopy images illustrate that the oil dispersed into smaller droplets and emulsified in the presence of biosurfactant-producing strains, which attached to the oil. Thus, the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater was enhanced.

  17. Characterization of biosurfactants from indigenous soil bacteria recovered from oil contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Govind; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Three bacterial isolates (G1, G2 and G3) characterized as Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, Lysinibacillus fusiformis and Bacillus safensis were recovered from contaminated soil of oil refinery. These bacterial isolates produced biosurfactants in MSM medium in stationary phase. Biosurfactants were characterized on the basis of their emulsifying properties with petrol, diesel, mobil oil and petrol engine oil. Reduction in surface tension (below 40 mN m(-1)) and blood hemolysis were also included in biosurfactants characterization. Emulsification indices of G1, G2 and G3 were in the range of 98.82, 23.53 and 58.82 for petrol; 29.411,1.05 and 70.588 for diesel; 35.31, 2.93 and 17.60 for mobil oil and 35.284, 58.82 and 17.647 for petrol engine oil respectively. Dry weight of the extracted biosurfactant was 4.6, 1.4 and 2.4 g I(-1) for G1, G2 and G3 respectively. Structural analysis of the biosurfactants by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed significant differences in the bonding pattern of individual biosurfactant.

  18. Biosurfactant Production by Cultivation of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 in Semidefined Glucose/Casein-Based Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; de Oliveira, Kátia Silva; Kobayashi, Márcio Junji; Vessoni Penna, Thereza Christina; Converti, Attilio

    Biosurfactants are proteins with detergent, emulsifier, and antimicrobial actions that have potential application in environmental applications such as the treatment of organic pollutants and oil recovery. Bacillus atrophaeus strains are nonpathogenic and are suitable source of biosurfactants, among which is surfactin. The aim of this work is to establish a culture medium composition able to stimulate biosurfactants production by B. atrophaeus ATCC 9372. Batch cultivations were carried out in a rotary shaker at 150 rpm and 35°C for 24 h on glucose- and/or casein-based semidefined culture media also containing sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate, and soy flour. The addition of 14.0 g/L glucose in a culture medium containing 10.0 g/L of casein resulted in 17 times higher biosurfactant production (B max=635.0 mg/L). Besides, the simultaneous presence of digested casein (10.0 g/L), digested soy flour (3.0 g/L), and glucose (18.0 g/L) in the medium was responsible for a diauxic effect during cell growth. Once the diauxie started, the average biosurfactants concentration was 16.8% less than that observed before this phenomenon. The capability of B. atrophaeus strain to adapt its own metabolism to use several nutrients as energy sources and to preserve high levels of biosurfactants in the medium during the stationary phase is a promising feature for its possible application in biological treatments.

  19. Biosurfactant production by cultivation of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 in semidefined glucose/casein-based media.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Luiz Carlos Martins; de Oliveira, Kátia Silva; Kobayashi, Márcio Junji; Penna, Thereza Christina Vessoni; Converti, Attilio

    2007-04-01

    Biosurfactants are proteins with detergent, emulsifier, and antimicrobial actions that have potential application in environmental applications such as the treatment of organic pollutants and oil recovery. Bacillus atrophaeus strains are nonpathogenic and are suitable source of biosurfactants, among which is surfactin. The aim of this work is to establish a culture medium composition able to stimulate biosurfactants production by B. atrophaeus ATCC 9372. Batch cultivations were carried out in a rotary shaker at 150 rpm and 35 degrees C for 24 h on glucose-and/or casein-based semidefined culture media also containing sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate, and soy flour. The addition of 14.0 g/L glucose in a culture medium containing 10.0 g/L of casein resulted in 17 times higher biosurfactant production (B(max)=635.0 mg/L). Besides, the simultaneous presence of digested casein (10.0 g/L), digested soy flour (3.0 g/L), and glucose (18.0 g/L) in the medium was responsible for a diauxic effect during cell growth. Once the diauxie started, the average biosurfactants concentration was 16.8% less than that observed before this phenomenon. The capability of B. atrophaeus strain to adapt its own metabolism to use several nutrients as energy sources and to preserve high levels of biosurfactants in the medium during the stationary phase is a promising feature for its possible application in biological treatments.

  20. Screening of biosurfactant-producing bacteria from offshore oil and gas platforms in North Atlantic Canada.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qinhong; Zhang, Baiyu; Chen, Bing; Song, Xing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Cao, Tong

    2015-05-01

    From offshore oil and gas platforms in North Atlantic Canada, crude oil, formation water, drilling mud, treated produced water and seawater samples were collected for screening potential biosurfactant producers. In total, 59 biosurfactant producers belong to 4 genera, namely, Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Halomonas, and Pseudomonas were identified and characterized. Phytogenetic trees based on 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (16S rDNA) were constructed with isolated strains plus their closely related strains and isolated strains with biosurfactant producers in the literature, respectively. The distributions of the isolates were site and medium specific. The richness, diversity, and evenness of biosurfactant producer communities in oil and gas platform samples have been analyzed. Diverse isolates were found with featured properties such as effective reduction of surface tension, producing biosurfactants at high rate and stabilization of water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsion. The producers and their corresponding biosurfactants had promising potential in applications such as offshore oil spill control, enhancing oil recovery and soil washing treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated sites.

  1. The inhibitory effect of a Lactobacillus acidophilus derived biosurfactant on biofilm producer Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhfard, Maliheh; Kermanshahi, Rouha Kasra; Shahandashti, Roya Vahedi; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Teimourian, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Serratia marcescens is one of the nosocomial pathogen with the ability to form biofilm which is an important feature in the pathogenesis of S. marcescens. The aim of this study was to determine the anti-adhesive properties of a biosurfactant isolated from Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, on S. marcescens strains. Materials and Methods: Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 was selected as a probiotic strain for biosurfactant production. Anti-adhesive activities was determined by pre-coating and co- incubating methods in 96-well culture plates. Results: The FTIR analysis of derived biosurfactant revealed the composition as protein component. Due to the release of such biosurfactants, L. acidophilus was able to interfere with the adhesion and biofilm formation of the S. marcescens strains. In co-incubation method, this biosurfactant in 2.5 mg/ml concentration showed anti-adhesive activity against all tested strains of S. marcescens (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our results show that the anti-adhesive properties of L. acidophilus biosurfactant has the potential to be used against microorganisms responsible for infections in the urinary, vaginal and gastrointestinal tracts, as well as skin, making it a suitable alternative to conventional antibiotics. PMID:26730335

  2. Optimization and characterization of biosurfactant production from marine Vibrio sp. strain 3B-2

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoke; Wang, Caixia; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A biosurfactant-producing bacterium, designated 3B-2, was isolated from marine sediment and identified as Vibrio sp. by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The culture medium composition was optimized to increase the capability of 3B-2 for producing biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant was characterized in terms of protein concentration, surface tension, and oil-displacement efficiency. The optimal medium for biosurfactant production contained: 0.5% lactose, 1.1% yeast extract, 2% sodium chloride, and 0.1% disodium hydrogen phosphate. Under optimal conditions (28°C), the surface tension of crude biosurfactant could be reduced to 41 from 71.5 mN/m (water), while its protein concentration was increased to up to 6.5 g/L and the oil displacement efficiency was improved dramatically at 6.5 cm. Two glycoprotein fractions with the molecular masses of 22 and 40 kDa were purified from the biosurfactant, which held great potential for applications in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation. PMID:26441908

  3. Biosurfactant Production by a Soil Pseudomonas Strain Growing on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Deziel, E.; Paquette, G.; Villemur, R.; Lepine, F.; Bisaillon, J.

    1996-01-01

    The capacity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-utilizing bacteria to produce biosurfactants was investigated. Twenty-three bacteria isolated from a soil contaminated with petroleum wastes were able to form clearing zones on mineral salt agar plates sprayed with solutions of PAHs. Naphthalene and phenanthrene were utilized as sole substrates. Biosurfactant production was detected by surface tension lowering and emulsifying activities from 10 of these strains grown in an iron-limited salt medium supplemented with high concentrations of dextrose or mannitol, as well as with naphthalene or phenanthrene. Glycolipid determinations showed that in cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 19SJ on naphthalene, the maximal productivity of biosurfactants was delayed compared with that in cultures grown on mannitol. However, when small amounts of biosurfactants and naphthalene degradation intermediates were present at the onset of the cultivation, the delay was markedly shortened. Production of biosurfactants was accompanied by an increase in the aqueous concentration of naphthalene, indicating that the microorganism was promoting the solubility of its substrate. Detectable amounts of glycolipids were also produced on phenanthrene. This is the first report of biosurfactant production resulting from PAH metabolism. PMID:16535330

  4. Optimization of environmental factors for improved production of rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RS29 on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Rashmi Rekha; Deka, Suresh; Deka, Manab; Sarma, Hemen

    2012-08-01

    A biosurfactant producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa RS29 (identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis) with good foaming and emulsification properties has been isolated from crude oil contaminated sites. Optimization of different environmental factors was carried out with an objective to achieve maximum production of biosurfactant. Production of biosurfactant was estimated in terms of surface tension reduction and emulsification (E24) index. It was recorded that the isolated strain produced highest biosurfactant after 48 h of incubation at 37.5 °C, with a pH range of 7-8 and at salinity <0.8% (w/v). Ammonium nitrate used in the experiment was the best nitrogen source for the growth of biomass of P. aeruginosa RS29. On the other hand sodium and potassium nitrate enhanced the production of biosurfactant (Surface tension, 26.3 and 26.4 mN/m and E24 index, 80 and 79% respectively). The CMC of the biosurfactant was 90 mg/l. Maximum biomass (6.30 g/l) and biosurfactant production (0.80 g/l) were recorded at an optimal C/N ratio of 12.5. Biochemical analysis and FTIR spectra confirmed that the biosurfactant was rhamnolipid in nature. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of C(8) and C(10) fatty acid components in the purified biosurfactant.

  5. Production and characterisation of glycolipid biosurfactant by Halomonas sp. MB-30 for potential application in enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Dhasayan, Asha; Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant-producing Halomonas sp. MB-30 was isolated from a marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa, and its potency in crude oil recovery from sand pack column was investigated. The biosurfactant produced by the strain MB-30 reduced the surface tension to 30 mN m(-1) in both glucose and hydrocarbon-supplemented minimal media. The critical micelle concentration of biosurfactant obtained from glucose-based medium was at 0.25 mg ml(-1) at critical micelle dilution 1:10. The chemical structure of glycolipid biosurfactant was characterised by infrared spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The emulsification activity of MB-30 biosurfactant was tested with different hydrocarbons, and 93.1 % emulsification activity was exhibited with crude oil followed by kerosene (86.6 %). The formed emulsion was stable for up to 1 month. To identify the effectiveness of biosurfactant for enhanced oil recovery in extreme environments, the interactive effect of pH, temperature and salinity on emulsion stability with crude oil and kerosene was evaluated. The stable emulsion was formed at and above pH 7, temperature >80 °C and NaCl concentration up to 10 % in response surface central composite orthogonal design model. The partially purified biosurfactant recovered 62 % of residual crude oil from sand pack column. Thus, the stable emulsifying biosurfactant produced by Halomonas sp. MB-30 could be used for in situ biosurfactant-mediated enhanced oil recovery process and hydrocarbon bioremediation in extreme environments.

  6. Partial characterization of biosurfactant from Lactobacillus pentosus and comparison with sodium dodecyl sulphate for the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Moldes, A B; Paradelo, R; Vecino, X; Cruz, J M; Gudiña, E; Rodrigues, L; Teixeira, J A; Domínguez, J M; Barral, M T

    2013-01-01

    The capability of a cell bound biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus, to accelerate the bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was compared with a synthetic anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS-). The biosurfactant produced by the bacteria was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that clearly indicates the presence of OH and NH groups, C=O stretching of carbonyl groups and NH nebding (peptide linkage), as well as CH2-CH3 and C-O stretching, with similar FTIR spectra than other biosurfactants obtained from lactic acid bacteria. After the characterization of biosurfactant by FTIR, soil contaminated with 7,000 mg Kg(-1) of octane was treated with biosurfactant from L. pentosus or SDS. Treatment of soil for 15 days with the biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus led to a 65.1% reduction in the hydrocarbon concentration, whereas SDS reduced the octane concentration to 37.2% compared with a 2.2% reduction in the soil contaminated with octane in absence of biosurfactant used as control. Besides, after 30 days of incubation soil with SDS or biosurfactant gave percentages of bioremediation around 90% in both cases. Thus, it can be concluded that biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus accelerates the bioremediation of octane-contaminated soil by improving the solubilisation of octane in the water phase of soil, achieving even better results than those reached with SDS after 15-day treatment.

  7. Partial Characterization of Biosurfactant from Lactobacillus pentosus and Comparison with Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate for the Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Moldes, A. B.; Paradelo, R.; Vecino, X.; Cruz, J. M.; Gudiña, E.; Rodrigues, L.; Teixeira, J. A.; Domínguez, J. M.; Barral, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    The capability of a cell bound biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus, to accelerate the bioremediation of a hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, was compared with a synthetic anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate SDS-). The biosurfactant produced by the bacteria was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that clearly indicates the presence of OH and NH groups, C=O stretching of carbonyl groups and NH nebding (peptide linkage), as well as CH2–CH3 and C–O stretching, with similar FTIR spectra than other biosurfactants obtained from lactic acid bacteria. After the characterization of biosurfactant by FTIR, soil contaminated with 7,000 mg Kg−1 of octane was treated with biosurfactant from L. pentosus or SDS. Treatment of soil for 15 days with the biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus led to a 65.1% reduction in the hydrocarbon concentration, whereas SDS reduced the octane concentration to 37.2% compared with a 2.2% reduction in the soil contaminated with octane in absence of biosurfactant used as control. Besides, after 30 days of incubation soil with SDS or biosurfactant gave percentages of bioremediation around 90% in both cases. Thus, it can be concluded that biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus accelerates the bioremediation of octane-contaminated soil by improving the solubilisation of octane in the water phase of soil, achieving even better results than those reached with SDS after 15-day treatment. PMID:23691515

  8. Optimization of extraction conditions and fatty acid characterization of Lactobacillus pentosus cell-bound biosurfactant/bioemulsifier.

    PubMed

    Vecino, Xanel; Barbosa-Pereira, Letricia; Devesa-Rey, Rosa; Cruz, José M; Moldes, Ana B

    2015-01-01

    There is currently much interest in the use of natural biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers, mainly in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. However, there are no studies on the optimization of the extraction conditions of cell-bound biosurfactants. In this work, a biosurfactant with emulsifier properties was extracted from Lactobacillus pentosus cells, under different extraction conditions, and characterized. During extraction, the most influential independent variable, concerning the emulsifying capacity of biosurfactant, was the operation time, followed by temperature and salt concentration. Biosurfactant from L. pentosus was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the composition of fatty acids was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The hydrophobic chain of the biosurfactant from L. pentosus comprises 548 g kg(-1) linoelaidic acid (C18:2), 221 g kg(-1) oleic or elaidic acid (C18:1), 136 g kg(-1) palmitic acid (C16) and 95 g kg(-1) stearic acid (C18). In addition, emulsions of water and rosemary oil were stabilized with a biosurfactant produced by L. pentosus and compared with emulsions stabilized with polysorbate 20. The optimum extraction conditions of biosurfactant were achieved at 45 °C at 120 min and using 9 g kg(-1) of salt. In all the assays biosurfactant from L. pentosus yielded more stable emulsions and higher emulsion volumes than polysorbate 20. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Optimization of biosurfactant production in soybean oil by rhodococcus rhodochrous and its utilization in remediation of cadmium-contaminated solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, Venty; Hastuti, Sri; Andriani, Dewi

    2016-02-01

    Biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus rhodochrous in soybean oil was developed, where the effect of medium composition and fermentation time were evaluated. The optimum condition for biosurfactant production was achieved when a medium containing 30 g/L TSB (tryptic soy broth) and 20% v/v soybean oil was used as media with 7 days of fermentation. Biosurfactant was identified as glycolipids type biosurfactant which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 896 mg/L. The biosurfactant had oil in water emulsion type and was able to reduce the surface tension of palm oil about 52% which could stabilize the emulsion up to 12 days. The batch removal of cadmium metal ion by crude and partially purified biosurfactants have been examined from synthetic aqueous solution at pH 6. The results exhibited that the crude biosurfactant had a much better adsorption ability of Cd(II) than that of partially purified biosurfactant. However, it was found that there was no significant difference in the adsorption of Cd(II) with 5 and 10 minutes of contact time. The results indicated that the biosurfactant could be used in remediation of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous solution.

  10. Advances in utilization of renewable substrates for biosurfactant production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules that have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties which partition preferentially at the interfaces such as liquid/liquid, gas/liquid or solid/liquid interfaces. Such characteristics enable emulsifying, foaming, detergency and dispersing properties. Their low toxicity and environmental friendly nature and the wide range of potential industrial applications in bioremediation, health care, oil and food processing industries makes them a highly sought after group of chemical compounds. Interest in them has also been encouraged because of the potential advantages they offer over their synthetic counterparts in many fields spanning environmental, food, biomedical, petrochemical and other industrial applications. Their large scale production and application however are currently restricted by the high cost of production and by the limited understanding of their interactions with cells and with the abiotic environment. In this paper, we review the current knowledge and latest advances in the search for cost effective renewable agro industrial alternative substrates for their production. PMID:21906330

  11. Evaluation of a lipopeptide biosurfactant from Bacillus natto TK-1 as a potential source of anti-adhesive, antimicrobial and antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ling; Yang, Wen-Yan; Lu, Mei-Fang

    2009-01-01

    A lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus natto TK-1 has a strong surface activity. The biosurfactant was found to be an anti-adhesive agent against several bacterial strains, and also showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. The biosurfactant induced a significant reduction in tumor cells viability in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24031375

  12. Characterization of Biosurfactant Produced by Bacillus licheniformis TT42 Having Potential for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Harish; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus licheniformis TT42 produced a low-molecular weight anionic biosurfactant that reduced the surface tension of water from 72 to 27 mN/m and the interfacial tension from 12 to 0.05 mN/m against crude oil. We have earlier reported significant enhancement in oil recovery in laboratory sand pack columns and core flood studies, by biosurfactant-TT42 compared to standard strain, Bacillus mojavensis JF2. In the context of this application of the biosurfactant-TT42, its characterization was deemed important. In the preliminary studies, the biosurfactant-TT42 was found to be functionally stable at under conditions of temperature, pH, and salinity generally prevalent in oil reservoirs. Furthermore, the purified biosurfactant-TT42 was found to have a CMC of 22 mg/l. A newly developed activity staining TLC method was used for the purification of biosurfactant-TT42. Structural characterization of biosurfactant-TT42 using TLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), GC-MS, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF suggested that it was a mixture of lipopeptide species, all having a common hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptide head with the sequence, Gln-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu-Val-Asp-Leu/Ileu-Leu/Ileu linked to hydrophobic tails of different lengths of 3β-OH-fatty acids bearing 1043, 1057 and 1071 Da molecular weight, where 3β-OH-C19 fatty acid was predominant. This is the longest chain length of fatty acids reported in a lipopeptide.

  13. Scale up and application of biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis in Enhanced Oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Amani, Hossein; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza; Sarrafzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Haghighi, Manouchehr; Soudi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-09-01

    There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the scale up of biosurfactant production. In order to develop suitable technology of commercialization, carrying out tests in shake flasks and bioreactors was essential. A reactor with integrated foam collector was designed for biosurfactant production using Bacillus subtilis isolated from agricultural soil. The yield of biosurfactant on biomass (Y(p/x)), biosurfactant on sucrose (Y(p/s)), and the volumetric production rate (Y) for shake flask were obtained about 0.45 g g(-1), 0.18 g g(-1), and 0.03 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The best condition for bioreactor was 300 rpm and 1.5 vvm, giving Y(x/s), Y(p/x), Y(p/s), and Y of 0.42 g g(-1), 0.595 g g(-1), 0.25 g g(-1), and 0.057 g l(-1) h(-1), respectively. The biosurfactant maximum production, 2.5 g l(-1), was reached in 44 h of growth, which was 28% better than the shake flask. The obtained volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) values at optimum conditions in the shake flask and the bioreactor were found to be around 0.01 and 0.0117 s(-1), respectively. Comparison of K(L)a values at optimum conditions shows that biosurfactant production scaling up from shake flask to bioreactor can be done with K(L) a as scale up criterion very accurately. Nearly 8% of original oil in place was recovered using this biosurfactant after water flooding in the sand pack.

  14. Lipopeptide biosurfactant from Bacillus thuringiensis pak2310: A potential antagonist against Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R; Jayapradha, R

    2015-03-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effects of a biosurfactant obtained from a novel Bacillus thuringiensis on Fusarium oxysporum to determine the morphological changes in the structure of the fungi and its biofilm in the presence of the biosurfactant and to evaluate the toxicity of the biosurfactant on HEp-2 human epithelial cell lines. The strain was screened and isolated from petroleum contaminated soil based on the E24 emulsification index. The biosurfactant was produced on glycerol, extracted using chloroform:methanol system and purified using HPLC. The purified fraction showing both surface activity (emulsification and oil-spread activity) and anti-fusarial activity (agar well diffusion method) was studied using FT-IR and MALDI-TOF MS, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC) were determined using dilution method. The effect of biosurfactant on the morphology of Fusarium oxysporum was monitored using light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (for biofilm). The purified surfactant showed the presence of functional groups like that of surfactin in the FT-IR spectra and MALDI-TOF MS estimated the molecular weight as 700Da. The MIC and BIC were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.5mg/mL, respectively. The molecule was also non-toxic to HEp-2 cell lines at 10× MIC. A non-toxic and effective anti-Fusarium biosurfactant, that is both safe for human use and to the environment, has been characterized. The growth and metabolite production using glycerol (major byproduct of biodiesel and soap industries) also adds up to the efficiency and ecofriendly nature of this biosurfactant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Production and partial characterization of biosurfactant produced by Streptomyces sp. R1.

    PubMed

    Zambry, Nor Syafirah; Ayoib, Adilah; Md Noh, Nur Asshifa; Yahya, Ahmad Ramli Mohd

    2017-04-07

    The present study focused on developing a wild-type actinomycete isolate as a model for a non-pathogenic filamentous producer of biosurfactants. A total of 33 actinomycetes isolates were screened and their extracellular biosurfactants production was evaluated using olive oil as the main substrate. Out of 33 isolates, 32 showed positive results in the oil spreading technique (OST). All isolates showed good emulsification activity (E24) ranging from 84.1 to 95.8%. Based on OST and E24 values, isolate R1 was selected for further investigation in biosurfactant production in an agitated submerged fermentation. Phenotypic and genotypic analyses tentatively identified isolate R1 as a member of the Streptomyces genus. A submerged cultivation of Streptomyces sp. R1 was carried out in a 3-L stirred-tank bioreactor. The influence of impeller tip speed on volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (k L a), growth, cell morphology and biosurfactant production was observed. It was found that the maximum biosurfactant production, indicated by the lowest surface tension measurement (40.5 ± 0.05 dynes/cm) was obtained at highest k L a value (50.94 h(-1)) regardless of agitation speed. The partially purified biosurfactant was obtained at a concentration of 7.19 g L(-1), characterized as a lipopeptide biosurfactant and was found to be stable over a wide range of temperature (20-121 °C), pH (2-12) and salinity [5-20% (w/v) of NaCl].

  16. Improvement of bread dough quality by Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant addition: optimized extraction using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Besbes, Souheil; Ellouze-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2013-09-01

    Statistically based experimental designs were applied to Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant extraction. The extracted biosurfactant was tested as an additive in dough formulation. The Plackett-Burman screening method showed that methanol volume, agitation speed and operating temperature affect biosurfactant extraction. The effect was studied and adjusted using response surface methodology. The optimal values were identified as 5 mL methanol, 180 rpm and 25 °C, yielding predicted responses of 2.1 ± 0.06 for the purification factor and 87.47% ± 1.58 for the retention yield. Study of the incorporation of purified lipopeptide powder into the dough preparation in comparison with a commercial surfactant - soya lecithin - reveal that SPB1 biosurfactant significantly improves the textural properties of dough (hardness, springiness, cohesion and adhesion) especially at 0.5 g kg⁻¹. At the same concentration (0.5 g kg⁻¹), the effect of SPB1 biosurfactant was more pronounced than that of soya lecithin. Also, this biosurfactant considerably enhanced the gas retention capacity in the course of fermentation. These results show that SPB1 biosurfactant could be of great interest in the bread-making industry. A method for preparative extraction of lipopeptide biosurfactant with methanol as the extraction solvent has been effectively established. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Anti-adhesion activity of two biosurfactants produced by Bacillus spp. prevents biofilm formation of human bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rivardo, F; Turner, R J; Allegrone, G; Ceri, H; Martinotti, M G

    2009-06-01

    In this work, two biosurfactant-producing strains, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis, have been characterized. Both strains were able to grow at high salinity conditions and produce biosurfactants up to 10% NaCl. Both extracted-enriched biosurfactants showed good surface tension reduction of water, from 72 to 26-30 mN/m, low critical micelle concentration, and high resistance to pH and salinity. The potential of the two lipopeptide biosurfactants at inhibiting biofilm adhesion of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated by using the MBEC device. The two biosurfactants showed interesting specific anti-adhesion activity being able to inhibit selectively biofilm formation of two pathogenic strains. In particular, Escherichia coli CFT073 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 biofilm formation was decreased of 97% and 90%, respectively. The V9T14 biosurfactant active on the Gram-negative strain was ineffective against the Gram-positive and the opposite for the V19T21. This activity was observed either by coating the polystyrene surface or by adding the biosurfactant to the inoculum. Two fractions from each purified biosurfactant, obtained by flash chromatography, fractions (I) and (II), showed that fraction (II), belonging to fengycin-like family, was responsible for the anti-adhesion activity against biofilm of both strains.

  18. Enhancement of Bacillus subtilis Lipopeptide Biosurfactants Production through Optimization of Medium Composition and Adequate Control of Aeration.

    PubMed

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia

    2011-01-01

    Interest in biosurfactants has increased considerably in recent years, as they are potentially used in many commercial applications in petroleum, pharmaceuticals, biomedical, and food processing industries. Since improvement of their production was of great importance to reduce the final coast, cultural conditions were analyzed to optimize biosurfactants production from Bacillus subtilis SPB1 strain. A high yield of biosurfactants was obtained from a culture of B. subtilis using carbohydrate substrate as a carbon source; among carbohydrates, glucose enhanced the best surfactin production. The optimum glucose concentration was 40 g/L. Higher amount of biosurfactants was obtained using 5 g/L of urea as organic nitrogen source and applying C/N ratio of 7 with ammonium chloride as inorganic nitrogen source. The highest amount of biosurfactants was recorded with the addition of 2% kerosene. Moreover, it was shown, using an automated full-controlled 2.6 L fermenter, that aeration of the medium, which affected strongly the growth regulated biosurfactants synthesis by the producing cell. So that, low or high aerations lead to a decrease of biosurfactants synthesis yields. It was found that when using dissolved oxygen saturation of the medium at 30%, biosurfactants production reached 4.92 g/L.

  19. The effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on model bacterial strains and isolates from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia; Sotirova, Anna; Galabova, Danka

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the effect of rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens on bacterial strains, laboratory strains, and isolates from industrial wastewater was investigated. It was shown that biosurfactant, depending on the concentration, has a neutral or detrimental effect on the growth and protein release of model Gram (+) strain Bacillus subtilis 168. The growth and protein release of model Gram (-) strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1390 was not influenced by the presence of biosurfactant in the medium. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant at the used concentrations supported the growth of some slow growing on hexadecane bacterial isolates, members of the microbial community. Changes in cell surface hydrophobicity and permeability of some Gram (+) and Gram (-) isolates in the presence of rhamnolipid biosurfactant were followed in experiments in vitro. It was found that bacterial cells treated with biosurfactant became more or less hydrophobic than untreated cells depending on individual characteristics and abilities of the strains. For all treated strains, an increase in the amount of released protein was observed with increasing the amount of biosurfactant, probably due to increased cell permeability as a result of changes in the organization of cell surface structures. The results obtained could contribute to clarify the relationships between members of the microbial community as well as suggest the efficiency of surface properties of rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Pseudomonas fluorescens making it potentially applicable in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted environments.

  20. Candida lipolytica UCP0988 Biosurfactant: Potential as a Bioremediation Agent and in Formulating a Commercial Related Product

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Danyelle K. F.; Resende, Ana H. M.; de Almeida, Darne G.; Soares da Silva, Rita de Cássia F.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Luna, Juliana M.; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Sarubbo, Leonie A.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential application of the biosurfactant from Candida lipolytica grown in low-cost substrates, which has previously been produced and characterized under optimized conditions as an adjunct material to enhance the remediation processes of hydrophobic pollutants and heavy metals generated by the oil industry and propose the formulation of a safe and stable remediation agent. In tests carried out with seawater, the crude biosurfactant demonstrated 80% oil spreading efficiency. The dispersion rate was 50% for the biosurfactant at a concentration twice that of the CMC. The biosurfactant removed 70% of motor oil from contaminated cotton cloth in detergency tests. The crude biosurfactant also removed 30–40% of Cu and Pb from standard sand, while the isolated biosurfactant removed ~30% of the heavy metals. The conductivity of solutions containing Cd and Pb was sharply reduced after biosurfactants' addition. A product was prepared through adding 0.2% potassium sorbate as preservative and tested over 120 days. The formulated biosurfactant was analyzed for emulsification and surface tension under different pH values, temperatures, and salt concentrations and tested for toxicity against the fish Poecilia vivipara. The results showed that the formulation had no toxicity and did not cause significant changes in the tensoactive capacity of the biomolecule while maintaining activity demonstrating suitability for potential future commercial product formulation. PMID:28507538

  1. Involvement of phenazines and biosurfactants in biocontrol of Pythium myriotylum root rot on cocoyam by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a was isolated from the rhizosphere of the tropical tuber crop cocoyam and produces both phenazines and cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) biosurfactants. CMR12a was shown to be an efficient biocontrol agent of P. myriotylum on cocoyam. To assess the importance of phenazine and biosurfact...

  2. Influence of biosurfactants on mass transfer, biodegradation, and transport of mixed wastes in multiphase systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M., Brusseau, M.L.

    1997-01-17

    The overall results of this project suggest that is situ treatment with biosurfactants has the potential to be an effective,economical, and nontoxic remediation technology. Specifically, we have demonstrated that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant may be used to increase the apparent solubility and biodegradation rate of organic compounds.

  3. Dataset on potential large scale production of biosurfactant using Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Heryani, Hesty; Putra, Meilana Dharma

    2017-08-01

    Surfactants are very important in industry. The cost of commercial surfactant production is still high and the surfactant demand is constantly increasing. Microbial production of surfactant known as biosurfactant shows commercial potency. Utilization of Bacillus sp. strain on glucose fermentation for biosurfactant production was then studied. This type of microbe was isolated from soil contaminated with palm oil. The selection of the strain was based on its ability to form emulsifying zone around the colony and its capability to grow compared with those for commercial bacteria of Bacillus pumilus JCM 2508. The results showed a potentially promising strain with high biosurfactant yields and low surface tension. For further scale-up development, the microbe performance in a fermentor was compared with those in a flask and a proposed model to predict the kinetic profiles of cell mass, biosurfactant and surface tension were also described. The data presented here are related to the research article entitled "Kinetic study and modeling of biosurfactant production using Bacillus sp." (Heryani and Putra, 2017) [1].

  4. The colloid hematite particle migration through the unsaturated porous bed at the presence of biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Agnieszka; Sznajder, Izabela; Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2017-07-01

    Colloidal particles have an ability to sorb heavy metals, metalloids, and organic compounds (e.g. biosurfactants) present in soil and groundwater. The pH and ionic strength changes may promote release of such particles causing potential contaminant transport. Therefore, it is very important to know how a colloid particle-mineral particle and colloid-mineral-biosurfactant system behaves in the natural environment. They can have negative impact on the environment and human health. This study highlighted the influence of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the transport of colloidal hematite (α-Fe2O3) through porous bed (materials collected from the Szklary and Zloty Stok solid waste heaps from Lower Silesia, Poland). Experiments were conducted using column set in two variants: colloid solution with porous bed and porous bed with adsorbed biosurfactants, in the ionic strengths of 5 × 10(-4) and 5 × 10(-3) M KCl. The zeta potential of mineral materials and colloidal hematite, before and after adsorption of biosurfactant, was determined. Obtained results showed that reduction in ionic strength facilitates colloidal hematite transport through the porous bed. The mobility of colloidal hematite was higher when the rhamnolipid adsorbed on the surface of mineral grain.

  5. Biosurfactants production by yeasts using soybean oil and glycerol as low cost substrate.

    PubMed

    Accorsini, Fábio Raphael; Mutton, Márcia Justino Rossini; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes Macedo; Benincasa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Biosurfactants are bioactive agents that can be produced by many different microorganisms. Among those, special attention is given to yeasts, since they can produce many types of biosurfactants in large scale, using several kinds of substrates, justifying its use for industrial production of those products. For this production to be economically viable, the use of residual carbon sources is recommended. The present study isolated yeasts from soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons and assessed their capacity for producing biosurfactants in low cost substrates. From a microbial consortium enriched, seven yeasts were isolated, all showing potential for producing biosurfactants in soybean oil. The isolate LBPF 3, characterized as Candida antarctica, obtained the highest levels of production - with a final production of 13.86 g/L. The isolate LBPF 9, using glycerol carbon source, obtained the highest reduction in surface tension in the growth medium: approximately 43% of reduction after 24 hours of incubation. The products obtained by the isolates presented surfactant activity, which reduced water surface tension to values that varied from 34 mN/m, obtained from the product of isolates LBPF 3 and 16 LBPF 7 (respectively characterized as Candida antarctica and Candida albicans) to 43 mN/m from the isolate LPPF 9, using glycerol as substrate. The assessed isolates all showed potential for the production of biosurfactants in conventional sources of carbon as well as in agroindustrial residue, especially in glycerol.

  6. Simultaneous production of lipases and biosurfactants by submerged and solid-state bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Colla, Luciane Maria; Rizzardi, Juliana; Pinto, Marta Heidtmann; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2010-11-01

    Lipases and biosurfactants are compounds produced by microorganisms generally involved in the metabolization of oil substrates. However, the relationship between the production of lipases and biosurfactants has not been established yet. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the correlation between production of lipases and biosurfactants by submerged (SmgB) and solid-state bioprocess (SSB) using Aspergillus spp., which were isolated from a soil contaminated by diesel oil. SSB had the highest production of lipases, with lipolytic activities of 25.22U, while SmgB had 4.52U. The production of biosurfactants was not observed in the SSB. In the SmgB, correlation coefficients of 91% and 87% were obtained between lipolytic activity and oil in water and water in oil emulsifying activities, respectively. A correlation of 84% was obtained between lipolytic activity and reduction of surface tension in the culture medium. The surface tension decreased from 50 to 28mNm(-1) indicating that biosurfactants were produced in the culture medium.

  7. Stability and emulsifying capacity of biosurfactants obtained from lignocellulosic sources using Lactobacillus pentosus.

    PubMed

    Portilla-Rivera, O; Torrado, A; Domínguez, J M; Moldes, A B

    2008-09-10

    Lactobacillus pentosus grown on sugars from agricultural residues produces biosurfactants with emulsifying properties that could facilitate the bioremediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The biosurfactans obtained after growing L. pentosus cells on distilled grape marc hydrolyzates gave values of relative emulsion volume (EV) close to 50%, being stable after 72 h when gasoline or kerosene were employed. These EV values were higher than those achieved using commercial surfactin (14.1% for gasoline and 27.2% for kerosene). Moreover, assays carried out with kerosene showed that L. pentosus produced biosurfactants from distilled grape marc hydrolyzates with the highest stabilizing capacity value (ES) to maintain the emulsion (99%) followed by biosurfactants produced from hazelnut shell hydrolyzates (97%). These data are comparable with those obtained using sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS (87.7%), whereas surfactin only gave an ES value of 65.4%. Consequently, this work shows that utilization of low-cost feedstock agricultural residues as substrates for producing biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers is possible thus removing obstacles for the wide-scale industrial application of biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers.

  8. Biosurfactant produced from Actinomycetes nocardiopsis A17: Characterization and its biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Samrat; Ghosh, Mandakini; Chakraborti, Srijita; Jana, Sougata; Sen, Kalyan Kumar; Kokare, Chandrakant; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-08-01

    This investigation aims to isolate an Actinomycetes strain producing a biosurfactant from the unexplored region of industrial and coal mine areas. Actinomycetes are selected for this study as their novel chemistry was not exhausted and they have tremendous potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. The biosurfactant was characterized and further needed to be utilized for pharmaceutical dosage form. Isolation, purification, screening, and characterization of the Actinomycetes A17 were done followed by its fermentation in optimized conditions. The cell-free supernatant was used for the extraction of the biosurfactant and precipitated by cold acetone. The dried precipitate was purified by TLC and the emulsification index, surface tension and CMC were determined. The isolated strain with preferred results was identified as Actinomycetes nocardiopsis A17 with high foam-forming properties. It gives lipase, amylase, gelatinase, and protease activity. The emulsification index was found to be 93±0.8 with surface tension 66.67 dyne/cm at the lowest concentration and cmc 0.6 μg/ml. These biosurfactants were characterized by Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Therefore, it can be concluded that the biosurfactant produced by Actinomycetes nocardiopsis sp. strain A17 was found to have satisfactory results with high surface activity and emulsion-forming ability.

  9. Kinetic study of biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 grown in clarified cashew apple juice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Darlane Wellen Freitas; França, Italo Waldimiro Lima; Félix, Anne Kamilly Nogueira; Martins, João Jeferson Lima; Giro, Maria Estela Aparecida; Melo, Vânia Maria M; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2013-01-01

    In this work a low cost medium for the production of a biosurfactant by Bacillus subtilis LAMI005 and the kinetics of surfactin production considering the effect of initial substrate concentration were investigated. First, cashew apple juice supplementation for optimal production of biosurfactant by B. subtilis LAMI005 was studied. The medium formulated with clarified cashew apple juice and distilled water, supplemented with 1.0 g/L of (NH(4))(2)SO(4), proved to be the best among the nutrients evaluated. The crude biosurfactant had the ability to decrease the surface tension of water to 30 dyne/cm, with a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 63.0 mg/L. Emulsification experiments indicated that this biosurfactant effectively emulsified kerosene (IE(24)=67%) and soybean oil (IE(24)=64%). Furthermore, the emulsion stability was always very high. It was shown by biochemical analysis, IR spectra, that there is no qualitative differences in the composition of the crude biosurfactant from a standard sample of surfactin from B. subtilis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biosurfactant and Degradative Enzymes Mediated Crude Oil Degradation by Bacterium Bacillus subtilis A1

    PubMed Central

    Parthipan, Punniyakotti; Preetham, Elumalai; Machuca, Laura L.; Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the biodegradation of the crude oil by the potential biosurfactant producing Bacillus subtilis A1 was investigated. The isolate had the ability to synthesize degradative enzymes such as alkane hydroxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase at the time of biodegradation of hydrocarbon. The biosurfactant producing conditions were optimized as pH 7.0, temperature 40°C, 2% sucrose and 3% of yeast extract as best carbon and nitrogen sources for maximum production of biosurfactant (4.85 g l-1). Specifically, the low molecular weight compounds, i.e., C10–C14 were completely degraded, while C15–C19 were degraded up to 97% from the total hydrocarbon pools. Overall crude oil degradation efficiency of the strain A1 was about 87% within a short period of time (7 days). The accumulated biosurfactant from the biodegradation medium was characterized to be lipopeptide in nature. The strain A1 was found to be more robust than other reported biosurfactant producing bacteria in degradation efficiency of crude oil due to their enzyme production capability and therefore can be used to remove the hydrocarbon pollutants from contaminated environment. PMID:28232826

  11. Bioremediation of multi-metal contaminated soil using biosurfactant - a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Juwarkar, Asha A; Dubey, Kirti V; Nair, Anupa; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2008-03-01

    An unconventional nutrient medium, distillery spent wash (1:3) diluted) was used to produce di-rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BS2. This research further assessed the potential of the biosurfactant as a washing agent for metal removal from multimetal contaminated soil (Cr-940 ppm; Pb-900 ppm; Cd-430 ppm; Ni-880 ppm; Cu-480 ppm). Out of the treatments of contaminated soil with tap water and rhamnolipid biosurfactant, the latter was found to be potent in mobilization of metal and decontamination of contaminated soil. Within 36 hours of leaching study, di-rhamnolipid as compared to tap water facilitated 13 folds higher removal of Cr from the heavy metal spiked soil whereas removal of Pb and Cu was 9-10 and 14 folds higher respectively. Leaching of Cd and Ni was 25 folds higher from the spiked soil. This shows that leaching behavior of biosurfactant was different for different metals. The use of wastewater for production of biosurfactant and its efficient use in metal removal make it a strong applicant for bioremediation.

  12. Biosurfactant and Degradative Enzymes Mediated Crude Oil Degradation by Bacterium Bacillus subtilis A1.

    PubMed

    Parthipan, Punniyakotti; Preetham, Elumalai; Machuca, Laura L; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the biodegradation of the crude oil by the potential biosurfactant producing Bacillus subtilis A1 was investigated. The isolate had the ability to synthesize degradative enzymes such as alkane hydroxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase at the time of biodegradation of hydrocarbon. The biosurfactant producing conditions were optimized as pH 7.0, temperature 40°C, 2% sucrose and 3% of yeast extract as best carbon and nitrogen sources for maximum production of biosurfactant (4.85 g l(-1)). Specifically, the low molecular weight compounds, i.e., C10-C14 were completely degraded, while C15-C19 were degraded up to 97% from the total hydrocarbon pools. Overall crude oil degradation efficiency of the strain A1 was about 87% within a short period of time (7 days). The accumulated biosurfactant from the biodegradation medium was characterized to be lipopeptide in nature. The strain A1 was found to be more robust than other reported biosurfactant producing bacteria in degradation efficiency of crude oil due to their enzyme production capability and therefore can be used to remove the hydrocarbon pollutants from contaminated environment.

  13. Biosurfactants production by yeasts using soybean oil and glycerol as low cost substrate

    PubMed Central

    Accorsini, Fábio Raphael; Mutton, Márcia Justino Rossini; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes Macedo; Benincasa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Biosurfactants are bioactive agents that can be produced by many different microorganisms. Among those, special attention is given to yeasts, since they can produce many types of biosurfactants in large scale, using several kinds of substrates, justifying its use for industrial production of those products. For this production to be economically viable, the use of residual carbon sources is recommended. The present study isolated yeasts from soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons and assessed their capacity for producing biosurfactants in low cost substrates. From a microbial consortium enriched, seven yeasts were isolated, all showing potential for producing biosurfactants in soybean oil. The isolate LBPF 3, characterized as Candida antarctica, obtained the highest levels of production - with a final production of 13.86 g/L. The isolate LBPF 9, using glycerol carbon source, obtained the highest reduction in surface tension in the growth medium: approximately 43% of reduction after 24 hours of incubation. The products obtained by the isolates presented surfactant activity, which reduced water surface tension to values that varied from 34 mN/m, obtained from the product of isolates LBPF 3 and 16 LBPF 7 (respectively characterized as Candida antarctica and Candida albicans) to 43 mN/m from the isolate LPPF 9, using glycerol as substrate. The assessed isolates all showed potential for the production of biosurfactants in conventional sources of carbon as well as in agroindustrial residue, especially in glycerol. PMID:24031810

  14. Thermodynamic and structural changes associated with the interaction of a dirhamnolipid biosurfactant with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Marina; Aranda, Francisco J; Espuny, María J; Marqués, Ana; Teruel, José A; Manresa, Angeles; Ortiz, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of a dirhamnolipid biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with bovine serum albumin was studied by means of various physical techniques. Binding of the biosurfactant to bovine serum albumin was first characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry, showing that one or two molecules of dirhamnolipid, in the monomer state, bound to one molecule of the protein with high affinity. These results were confirmed by surface tension measurements in the absence and presence of bovine serum albumin. As seen by differential scanning calorimetry, dirhamnolipid shifted the temperature of the thermal unfolding of bovine serum albumin toward higher values, thus increasing the stability of the protein on heating. The impact of dirhamnolipid on the structure of the native protein was low, since most of the secondary structure remained unaffected upon interaction with the biosurfactant, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. However, 2D correlation infrared spectroscopy indicated that the sequence of temperature-induced structural changes in native bovine serum albumin was modified by the presence of the biosurfactant. The consequences of these results in relation to possible applications of these dirhamnolipid biosurfactants for protein studies are discussed.

  15. Comparing the effect of biosurfactant and chemical surfactant on bubble hydrodynamics in a flotation column.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanran; Yang, Jingjing; Lei, Shaomin; Wang, Xinbing

    2013-01-01

    Bubble hydrodynamics is fundamental to the performance of the flotation process widely used in the separation industry. To compare the effect of biosurfactants and chemical synthetic surfactants on bubble hydrodynamics in the flotation process, the motion of a single bubble and the size distribution of bubble swarms in various surfactants (rhamnolipid, tea saponin and Triton X-100) solutions were observed directly using a high-speed video camera in a laboratory scale flotation column. Bubble trajectory, dimensions, velocity and size distribution were then determined through image analysis. The results indicated that the addition of biosurfactants had the same significant effects on bubble motion and size distribution as chemosynthetic surfactants. The biosurfactant effect on bubble behavior was also found to depend on their type and concentration. In general, the effect of tea saponin was stronger than another biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) used in the present study. The present findings implied that some biosurfactants like tea saponin can replace chemosynthetic surfactants in controlling bubble behavior in flotation operation. This will contribute to promoting the use of green environmentally friendly flotation agents in the separation industry.

  16. Inhibition of initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis by biosurfactants from Lactobacillus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Velraeds, M M; van der Mei, H C; Reid, G; Busscher, H J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, 15 Lactobacillus isolates were found to produce biosurfactants in the mid-exponential and stationary growth phases. The stationary-phase biosurfactants from lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469, Lactobacillus fermentum B54, and Lactobacillus acidophilus RC14 were investigated further to determine their capacity to inhibit the initial adhesion of uropathogenic Enterococcus faecalis 1131 to glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The initial deposition rate of E. faecalis to glass with an adsorbed biosurfactant layer from L. acidophilus RC14 or L. fermentum B54 was significantly decreased by approximately 70%, while the number of adhering enterococci after 4 h of adhesion was reduced by an average of 77%. The surface activity of the biosurfactants and their activity inhibiting the initial adhesion of E. faecalis 1131 were retained after dialysis (molecular weight cutoff, 6,000 to 8,000) and freeze-drying. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the freeze-dried biosurfactants from L. acidophilus RC14 and L. fermentum B54 were richest in protein, while those from L. casei subsp. rhamnosus 36 and ATCC 7469 had relatively high polysaccharide and phosphate contents. PMID:8787394

  17. Effect of unconventional carbon sources on biosurfactant production and its application in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana; Joshi, Nidhi; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-11-01

    The potential of an alkaliphilic bacterium Klebsiella sp. strain RJ-03, to utilize different unconventional carbon sources for the production of biosurfactant was evaluated. The biosurfactant produced using corn powder, potato peel powder, Madhuca indica and sugarcane bagasse containing medium, exhibited significantly higher viscosity and maximum reduction in surface tension as compared to other substrates. Among several carbon substrates tested, production of biosurfactant was found to be the highest with corn powder (15.40 ± 0.21 g/l) as compared to others. The comparative chemical characterization of purified biosurfactant was done using advance analytical tools such as NMR, FT-IR, SEM, GPC, MALDI TOF-TOF MS, GC-MS, TG and DSC. Analyses indicated variation in the functional groups, monosaccharide composition, molecular mass, thermostability. Higher yield with cheaper raw materials, noteworthy stress tolerance of CP-biosurfactant toward pH and salt as well as compatibility with chemical surfactants and detergents revealed its potential for commercialization and application in bioremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential production of biosurfactants under electric field supplied to clayey soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, L.; Elektorowicz, M.

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of the introduction of nutrients and bacteria into clayey soil using electrokinetic methodology makes bioremediation more popular. However, biodegradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is limited by their low solubility. The potential production of biosurfactants in clayey soil under the electric field was presented in this study. The electrokinetic cell tests were carried out to investigate the production of biosurfactants in the contaminated soil and soil without contaminants. The results showed that there was 1.5 times higher production in the soil contaminated by phenanthrene than that without it. In the middle of the electrokinetic cell, there are more biosurfactants produced than at the anode and the cathode areas. It was observed that there was migration of micelles with the electromigration and electroosmosis. In spite of the anionic properties of biosurfactant, the movement of the micelle was only partially directed to the anode. It was also observed that the electroosmosic flow transported micelles to the cathode. The results suggested the possibility of production of biosurfactants under the electric field and uniform distribution in the subsoil. The results could find a direct applicability in the enhanced remediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  19. Characterization of biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus spp. and their activity against oral streptococci biofilm.

    PubMed

    Ciandrini, Eleonora; Campana, Raffaella; Casettari, Luca; Perinelli, Diego R; Fagioli, Laura; Manti, Anita; Palmieri, Giovanni Filippo; Papa, Stefano; Baffone, Wally

    2016-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can interfere with pathogens through different mechanisms; one is the production of biosurfactants, a group of surface-active molecules, which inhibit the growth of potential pathogens. In the present study, biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938, Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS-1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, and Lactobacillus paracasei B21060 were dialyzed (1 and 6 kDa) and characterized in term of reduction of surface tension and emulsifying activity. Then, aliquots of the different dialyzed biosurfactants were added to Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811 in the culture medium during the formation of biofilm on titanium surface and the efficacy was determined by agar plate count, biomass analyses, and flow cytometry. Dialyzed biosurfactants showed abilities to reduce surface tension and to emulsifying paraffin oil. Moreover, they significantly inhibited the adhesion and biofilm formation on titanium surface of S. mutans and S. oralis in a dose-dependent way, as demonstrated by the remarkable decrease of cfu/ml values and biomass production. The antimicrobial properties observed for dialyzed biosurfactants produced by the tested lactobacilli opens future prospects for their use against microorganisms responsible of oral diseases.

  20. Effects of Au/Fe and Fe nanoparticles on Serratia bacterial growth and production of biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Vipulanandan, Cumaraswamy

    2013-10-01

    The overall objective of this study was to compare the effects of Au/Fe and Fe nanoparticles on the growth and performance of Serratia Jl0300. The nanoparticle effect was quantified not only by the bacterial growth on agar plate after 1 hour interaction with the nanoparticles, but also by its production of a biosurfactant from used vegetable oil. The nanoparticles were prepared using the foam method. The concentrations of the nanoparticles used for the bacterial interaction study were varied from 1 mg/L to 1 g/L. The test results showed that the effect of nanoparticles on the bacterial growth and biosurfactant production varied with nanoparticle type, concentrations, and interaction time with the bacteria. Au/Fe nanoparticles didn't show toxicity to Serratia after short time (1 h) exposure, while during 8 days fermentation Au/Fe nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Serratia as well as the biosurfactant production when the concentration of the nanoparticles was higher than 10mg/L. Fe nanoparticles showed inhibition effects to bacterial growth both after short time and long time interaction with Serratia, as well as to biosurfactant production when its concentration was higher than 100 mg/L. Based on the trends observed in this study, analytical models have been developed to predict the bacterial growth and biosurfactant production with varying concentrations of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coal induced production of a rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas stutzeri, isolated from the formation water of Jharia coalbed.

    PubMed

    Singh, Durgesh Narain; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri was isolated form an enrichment of perchlorate reducing bacteria from the formation water collected from an Indian coalbed which solubilized coal and produced copious amount of biosurfactant when coal was added to the medium. It produced maximum biosurfactant with lignite coal followed by olive oil and soybean oil which was able to emulsify several aromatic hydrocarbons including kerosene oil, diesel oil, hexane, toluene etc. Haemolytic test, growth inhibition of Bacillus subtilis and FTIR analysis showed rhamnolipid nature of the biosurfactant. The stability of the coal induced biosurfactant in pH range of 4-8 and up to 25% NaCl concentration and 100 °C temperature suggests that due to its ability to produce biosurfactant and solubilize coal P. stutzeri may be useful in the coalbed for in situ biotransformation of coal into methane and in the bioremediation of PAHs from oil contaminated sites including marine environments.

  2. Biosurfactant activity, heavy metal tolerance and characterization of Joostella strain A8 from the Mediterranean polychaete Megalomma claparedei (Gravier, 1906).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Carmen; Michaud, Luigi; Graziano, Marco; De Domenico, Emilio; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf; Lo Giudice, Angelina

    2015-08-01

    The effect of heavy metals on the activity of biosurfactants produced by Joostella strain A8 from the polychaete Megalomma claparedei was investigated. Biosurfactant activity was first improved by evaluating the influence of abiotic parameters. Higher E(24) indices were achieved at 25 °C in mineral salt medium supplemented with 2 % glucose, 3 % sodium chloride (w/v) and 0.1 % ammonium chloride (w/v). Considerable surface tension reduction was never recorded. Heavy metal tolerance was preliminarily assayed by plate diffusion method resulting in the order of toxicity Cd > Cu > Zn. The activity of biosurfactants was then evaluated in the presence of heavy metals at different concentrations in liquid cultures that were incubated under optimal conditions for biosurfactant activity. The production of stable emulsions resulted generally higher in the presence of metals. These findings suggest that biosurfactant production could represent a bacterial adaptive strategy to defend cells from a stress condition derived from heavy metals in the bulk environment.

  3. Evidence for a role of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the spoilage of fresh aerobically stored chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Glen E; Bentley, Jessica A; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-08-01

    Fresh chicken meat is a fat-rich environment and we therefore hypothesised that production of biosurfactants to increase bioavailability of fats may represent one way in which spoilage bacteria might enhance the availability of nutrients. Numbers of Pseudomonas were determined on a total of 20 fresh and 20 spoiled chicken thighs with skin. A total of 400 randomly isolated Pseudomonas colonies from fresh (200) and spoiled (200) chicken were screened for the presence of biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant producing strains represented 5% and 72% of the Pseudomonas spp. isolates from fresh (mean count 2.3 log(10) cfu g(-1)) and spoiled (mean count 7.4 log(10) cfu g(-1)) chicken skin, respectively. Partially-purified biosurfactants derived from a subgroup of four Pseudomonasfluorescens strains obtained through the screening process were subsequently used to investigate the role that the addition of these compounds plays in the spoilage of aerobically stored chicken. Emulsification potential of the four selected biosurfactants was measured against a range of hydrocarbons and oils. All four biosurfactants displayed a greater ability to emulsify rendered chicken fat than hydrocarbons (paraffin liquid, toluene and hexane) and oils (canola, olive, sunflower and vegetable). Storage trials (4 °C) of chicken meat treated with the four selected biosurfactants revealed a significantly greater (P < 0.05) total aerobic count in biosurfactant treated samples, as compared to untreated samples on each day (0, 1, 2, 3) of storage. For biosurfactant treated samples the greatest increase in total aerobic count (1.3-1.7 log(10) cfu g(-1)) occurred following one day of incubation. These results indicate that biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas spp. may play an important role in the spoilage of aerobically stored chicken meat by making nutrients more freely available and providing strains producing them with a competitive advantage.

  4. Production of surface-active lipids by Corynebacterium lepus.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D G; Zajic, J E; Gerson, D F

    1979-01-01

    Corynebacterium lepus was grown in 20-liter batch fermentations with kerosene as the sole carbon source. Critical micelle concentration measurements indicated the production of appreciable quantities of biosurfactants. This surface activity of the culture medium was due to lipids, which were extracted and identified. Samples of C. lepus whole broth were taken during a fermentation and monitored for surface tension, amount of surfactant present, and lipid content. The changes in the surfactant measured correlated with concentration changes of several surface-active lipids. An early dramatic increase in surfactant concentration was attributed to the production of a mixture of corynomycolic acids (beta-hydroxy alpha-branched fatty acids). Surface activity at the end of the fermentation was due to a lipopeptide containing corynomycolic acids plus small amounts of several phospholipids and neutral lipids which were identified by thin-layer chromatography. PMID:760639

  5. Evaluation of biosurfactant obtained from Lactobacillus pentosus as foaming agent in froth flotation.

    PubMed

    Vecino, X; Devesa-Rey, R; Cruz, J M; Moldes, A B

    2013-10-15

    This study analyzes the kinetics of sediment sorption on two chemical surfactants (Tween 20 and SDS) and a biotechnologically produced surfactant (obtained from Lactobacillus pentosus). Biosurfactants were produced by fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars from vineyard pruning waste supplied as a substrate to L. pentosus. Results obtained showed that almost no SDS was adsorbed onto the sediments, whereas Tween 20 and biosurfactants from L. pentosus were absorbed after a few minutes. Kinetic models revealed that adsorption of surfactant onto riverbed sediments is governed not only by an intra-particle diffusion model (evaluated by the Weber and Morris model), but also by surface reaction models (evaluated by first, second, third order equations and Elovich equation), showing the best fit when employing the Elovich model. The adsorption properties showed by biosurfactant from L. pentosus onto sediments present it as a potential foaming agent in froth flotation.

  6. The activity of silver against Escherichia coli biofilm is increased by a lipopeptide biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Turner, Raymond Joseph; Ceri, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Biological contamination of surfaces, both in industry and in health care, plays an important role as a potential vector of disease transmission. Metals have been described to be effective antibiofilm agents, and the efficacy of silver ions as a disinfectant has been known for centuries. The activity of AgNO3 combined with the lipopeptide biosurfactant V9T14 has been studied against a preformed Escherichia coli biofilm on the Calgary Biofilm Device. Results indicated that the activity of silver can be synergistically enhanced by the presence of V9T14, both allowing for a reduction in the quantity of silver used and for greater antimicrobial activity. The concentration of silver needed to obtain this reduction in the silver-biosurfactant solution was from 129- to 258-fold less than the concentration of silver alone. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a synergistic interaction between a lipopeptide biosurfactant and silver has been observed.

  7. Glycolipids produced by Rouxiella sp. DSM 100043 and isolation of the biosurfactants via foam-fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Johannes H; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Hansen, Silla H; Völp, Annika R; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Kühl, Boris; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Luy, Burkhard; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms produce a great variety of secondary metabolites that feature surface active and bioactive properties. Those possessing an amphiphilc molecular structure are also termed biosurfactant and are of great interest due to their often unique properties. Rouxiella sp. DSM 100043 is a gram negative enterobacter isolated from peat-bog soil and described as a new biosurfactant producing species in this study. Rouxiella sp. produces glycolipids, biosurfactants with a carbohydrate moiety in its structure. This study characterizes the composition of glycolipids with different hydrophobicities that have been produced during cultivation in a bioreactor and been extracted and purified from separated foam. Using two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the hydrophilic moieties are elucidated as glucose with various acylation sites and as talose within the most polar glycolipids. The presence of 3' hydroxy lauroleic acid as well as myristic and myristoleic acid has been detected.

  8. Optimizing Carbon/Nitrogen Ratio for Biosurfactant Production by a Bacillus subtilis Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. R.; Silva, A. J. R.; de Franca, F. P.; Cardoso, V. L.; Sérvulo, E. F. C.

    A Bacillus subtilis strain isolated from contaminated soil from a refinery has been screened for biosurfactant production in crystal sugar (sucrose) with different nitrogen sources (NaNO3' (NH4)2SO4' urea, and residual brewery yeast). The highest reduction in surface tension was achieved with a 48-h fermentation of crystal sugar and ammonium nitrate. Optimization of carbon/nitrogen ratio (3,9, and 15) and agitation rate (50, 150, and 250 rpm) for biosurfactant production was carried out using complete factorial design and response surface analysis. The condition of C/N 3 and 250 rpm allowed the maximum increase in surface activity of biosurfactant. A suitable model has been developed, having presented great accordance experimental data. Preliminary characterization of the bioproduct suggested it to be a lipopeptide with some isomers differing from those of a commercial surfactin.

  9. Applications of Biosurfactants in the Petroleum Industry and the Remediation of Oil Spills

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rita de Cássia F. S.; Almeida, Darne G.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Luna, Juliana M.; Santos, Valdemir A.; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are important energy resources. However, petroleum is also a major pollutant of the environment. Contamination by oil and oil products has caused serious harm, and increasing attention has been paid to the development and implementation of innovative technologies for the removal of these contaminants. Biosurfactants have been extensively used in the remediation of water and soil, as well as in the main stages of the oil production chain, such as extraction, transportation, and storage. This diversity of applications is mainly due to advantages such as biodegradability, low toxicity and better functionality under extreme conditions in comparison to synthetic counterparts. Moreover, biosurfactants can be obtained with the use of agro-industrial waste as substrate, which helps reduce overall production costs. The present review describes the potential applications of biosurfactants in the oil industry and the remediation of environmental pollution caused by oil spills. PMID:25029542

  10. Applications of biosurfactants in the petroleum industry and the remediation of oil spills.

    PubMed

    de Cássia F S Silva, Rita; Almeida, Darne G; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie Asfora

    2014-07-15

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are important energy resources. However, petroleum is also a major pollutant of the environment. Contamination by oil and oil products has caused serious harm, and increasing attention has been paid to the development and implementation of innovative technologies for the removal of these contaminants. Biosurfactants have been extensively used in the remediation of water and soil, as well as in the main stages of the oil production chain, such as extraction, transportation, and storage. This diversity of applications is mainly due to advantages such as biodegradability, low toxicity and better functionality under extreme conditions in comparison to synthetic counterparts. Moreover, biosurfactants can be obtained with the use of agro-industrial waste as substrate, which helps reduce overall production costs. The present review describes the potential applications of biosurfactants in the oil industry and the remediation of environmental pollution caused by oil spills.

  11. Production of Biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Grown on Cashew Apple Juice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Maria V. P.; Souza, Maria C. M.; Benedicto, Sofia C. L.; Bezerra, Márcio S.; Macedo, Gorete R.; Saavedra Pinto, Gustavo A.; Gonçalves, Luciana R. B.

    In this work, the ability of biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in batch cultivation using cashew apple juice (CAJ) and mineral media was evaluated. P. aeruginosa was cultivated in CAJ, which was supplemented with peptone (5.0 g/L) and nutritive broth. All fermentation assays were performed in Erlenmeyer flasks containing 300 mL, incubated at 30°C and 150 rpm. Cell growth (biomass and cell density), pH, and superficial tension were monitored vs time. Surface tension was reduced by 10.58 and 41% when P. aeruginosa was cultivated in nutrient broth and CAJ supplemented with peptone, respectively. These results indicated that CAJ is an adequate medium for growth and biosurfactant production. Best results of biosurfactant production were obtained when CAJ was supplemented with peptone.

  12. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Abdullah, Shakila; Salim, Mohd Razman

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 "Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30" (Fulazzaky et al., 2015) [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments.

  13. Enhanced bioremediation of crude oil utilizing lipophilic fertilizers combined with biosurfactants and molasses.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulou, Maria; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2008-11-01

    Many research studies have demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of fertilization with nitrogen and phosphorus to combat oil spills in marine environments. Rapid dilution of water-soluble nutrients can be overcome by oleophilic formulations that retain optimal nutrient concentrations at the oil-water interface where biodegradation occurs. Previous work has demonstrated that biodegradation processes are enhanced by the addition of lipophilic fertilizers of natural origin (uric acid and lecithin). In this work, we examined the effectiveness of these nutrients in combination with biosurfactants (rhamnolipids) and molasses (source of C and vitamins) to enhance the biodegradation by naturally occurring microorganisms. It was found that the use of biosurfactants resulted in an increased removal of petroleum hydrocarbons (96% removal of C19-C34 n-alkanes within a period of 18 days) as well as in a reduction of the lag phase (almost 80% removal was achieved within the first week of biosurfactant application).

  14. Production of lipopeptide biosurfactants by Bacillus atrophaeus 5-2a and their potential use in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhui; Xue, Quanhong; Gao, Hui; Lai, Hangxian; Wang, Ping

    2016-10-03

    Lipopeptides are known as promising microbial surfactants and have been successfully used in enhancing oil recovery in extreme environmental conditions. A biosurfactant-producing strain, Bacillus atrophaeus 5-2a, was recently isolated from an oil-contaminated soil in the Ansai oilfield, Northwest China. In this study, we evaluated the crude oil removal efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by B. atrophaeus 5-2a and their feasibility for use in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The production of biosurfactants by B. atrophaeus 5-2a was tested in culture media containing eight carbon sources and nitrogen sources. The production of a crude biosurfactant was 0.77 g L(-1) and its surface tension was 26.52 ± 0.057 mN m(-1) in a basal medium containing brown sugar (carbon source) and urea (nitrogen source). The biosurfactants produced by the strain 5-2a demonstrated excellent oil spreading activity and created a stable emulsion with paraffin oil. The stability of the biosurfactants was assessed under a wide range of environmental conditions, including temperature (up to 120 °C), pH (2-13), and salinity (0-50 %, w/v). The biosurfactants were found to retain surface-active properties under the extreme conditions. Additionally, the biosurfactants were successful in a test to simulate microbial enhanced oil recovery, removing 90.0 and 93.9 % of crude oil adsorbed on sand and filter paper, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the biosurfactants were a mixture of lipopeptides, which are powerful biosurfactants commonly produced by Bacillus species. The study highlights the usefulness of optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources and their effects on the biosurfactants production and further emphasizes on the potential of lipopeptide biosurfactants produced by B. atrophaeus 5-2a for crude oil removal. The favorable properties of the lipopeptide biosurfactants make them good candidates for application in the bioremediation of oil

  15. Solubilization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Single and Binary Mixed Rhamnolipid-Sophorolipid Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Song, Dandan; Liang, Shengkang; Yan, Lele; Shang, Yujun; Wang, Xiuli

    2016-07-01

    Biosurfactants are promising additives for surfactant enhanced remediation (SER) technologies due to their low toxicity and high biodegradability. To develop green and efficient additives for SER, the aqueous solubility enhancements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) by rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) biosurfactants were investigated in single and binary mixed systems. The solubilization capacities were quantified in terms of the solubility enhancement factor, molar solubilization ratio (MSR), and micelle-water partition coefficient (). Rughbin's model was applied to evaluate the interaction parameters (β) in the mixed RL-SL micelles. The solubility of the PAHs increased linearly with the glycolipid concentration above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) in both single and mixed systems. Binary RL-SL mixtures exhibited greater solubilization than individual glycolipids. At a SL molar fraction of 0.7 to 0.8, the solubilization capacity was the greatest, and the MSR and reached their maximum values, and β values became positive. These results suggest that the two biosurfactants act synergistically to increase the solubility of the PAHs. The solubilization capacity of the RL-SL mixtures increased with increasing temperature and decreased with increasing salinity. The aqueous solubility of phenanthrene reached a maximum value at pH of 5.5. Moreover, the mixed RL-SL systems exhibited a strong ability to solubilize PAHs, even in the presence of heavy metal ions. These mixed biosurfactant systems have the potential to improve the performance of SER technologies using biosurfactants to solubilize hydrophobic organic contaminants by decreasing the applied biosurfactant concentration, which reduces the costs of remediation.

  16. High-Level Culturability of Epiphytic Bacteria and Frequency of Biosurfactant Producers on Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Adrien Y.; Do, Paulina T.; Sbodio, Adrian; Suslow, Trevor V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To better characterize the bacterial community members capable of biosurfactant production on leaves, we distinguished culturable biosurfactant-producing bacteria from nonproducers and used community sequencing to compare the composition of these distinct cultured populations with that from DNA directly recovered from leaves. Communities on spinach, romaine, and head lettuce leaves were compared with communities from adjacent samples of soil and irrigation source water. Soil communities were poorly described by culturing, with recovery of cultured representatives from only 21% of the prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (>0.2% reads) identified. The dominant biosurfactant producers cultured from soil included bacilli and pseudomonads. In contrast, the cultured communities from leaves are highly representative of the culture-independent communities, with over 85% of the prevalent OTUs recovered. The dominant taxa of surfactant producers from leaves were pseudomonads as well as members of the infrequently studied genus Chryseobacterium. The proportions of bacteria cultured from head lettuce and romaine leaves that produce biosurfactants were directly correlated with the culture-independent proportion of pseudomonads in a given sample, whereas spinach harbored a wider diversity of biosurfactant producers. A subset of the culturable bacteria in irrigation water also became enriched on romaine leaves that were irrigated overhead. Although our study was designed to identify surfactant producers on plants, we also provide evidence that most bacteria in some habitats, such as agronomic plant surfaces, are culturable, and these communities can be readily investigated and described by more classical culturing methods. IMPORTANCE The importance of biosurfactant production to the bacteria that live on waxy leaf surfaces as well as their ability to be accurately assessed using culture-based methodologies was determined by interrogating epiphytic populations by

  17. Production of biosurfactant from a new and promising strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Santa Anna, L M; Sebastian, G V; Pereira, N; Alves, T L; Menezes, E P; Freire, D M

    2001-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 strain, isolated from the water of oil production in Sergipe, Northeast Brazil, was evaluated as a potential rhamnolipid type of biosurfactant producer. The production of biosurfactants was investigated using different carbon sources (n-hexadecane, paraffin oil, glycerol, and babassu oil) and inoculum concentrations (0.0016-0.008 g/L). The best results were obtained with glycerol as the substrate and an initial cell concentration of 0.004 g/L. A C:N ratio of 22.8 led to the greatest production of rhamnolipids (1700 mg/L) and efficiency (1.18 g of rhamnolipid/g of dry wt).

  18. Bacterial biosurfactants, and their role in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

    PubMed

    Khire, J M

    2010-01-01

    Surfactants are chemically synthesized surface-active compounds widely used for large number of applications in various industries. During last few years there is increase demand of biological surface-active compounds or biosurfactants which are produced by large number of microorganisms as they exert biodegradability, low toxicity and widespread application compared to chemical surfactants. They can be used as emulsifiers, de-emulsifiers, wetting agents, spreading agents, foaming agents, functional food ingredients and detergents. Various experiments at laboratory scale on sand-pack columns and field trials have successfully indicated effectiveness of biosurfactants in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  19. Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

    2007-09-30

    The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific objectives

  20. [Antiadhesive potencial of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Gritsenko, N A; Konon, A D; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants (surface-active substances, SAS) with different degree of purification on attachment of bacteria (Escherichia coli IEM-1, Bacillus subtilis BT-2, Proteus vulgaris BT-1, Staphylococcus aureus BMC-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P-55, Enterobacter cloacae AC-22, Erwinia aroidaeae B-433), yeasts (Candida albicans D-6) and fungi (Aspergillus niger P-3, Fusarium culmorum T-7) to the abiotic surfaces (glass, plastic, ceramics, steel, linoleum) was studied. The dependence of microorganisms adhesion on degree of SAS purification (supernatant, purified SAS solution), SAS concentration (0,04-1,25 mg/ml), type of surface and test-cultures was established. The adhesion of majority investigated bacterial cells after treatment of abiotic surfaces with supernatant of cultural liquid with SAS concentration 0,06-0,25 mg/ml was on the average 20-45, yeasts C. albicans D-6--30-75% and was less than that purified SAS solution with the same concentration. Higher antiadhesive activity of supernatant as compared to purified SAS solution testifies to possibility of exception of the expensive stage of isolation and purification at obtaining of preparations with antiadhesive properties.

  1. Cost effective technologies and renewable substrates for biosurfactants' production.

    PubMed

    Banat, Ibrahim M; Satpute, Surekha K; Cameotra, Swaranjit S; Patil, Rajendra; Nyayanit, Narendra V

    2014-01-01

    Diverse types of microbial surface active amphiphilic molecules are produced by a range of microbial communities. The extraordinary properties of biosurfactant/bioemulsifier (BS/BE) as surface active products allows them to have key roles in various field of applications such as bioremediation, biodegradation, enhanced oil recovery, pharmaceutics, food processing among many others. This leads to a vast number of potential applications of these BS/BE in different industrial sectors. Despite the huge number of reports and patents describing BS and BE applications and advantages, commercialization of these compounds remain difficult, costly and to a large extent irregular. This is mainly due to the usage of chemically synthesized media for growing producing microorganism and in turn the production of preferred quality products. It is important to note that although a number of developments have taken place in the field of BS industries, large scale production remains economically challenging for many types of these products. This is mainly due to the huge monetary difference between the investment and achievable productivity from the commercial point of view. This review discusses low cost, renewable raw substrates, and fermentation technology in BS/BE production processes and their role in reducing the production cost.

  2. Analysis of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by methylene blue complexation.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2009-04-01

    Rhamnolipids, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, represent an important group of biosurfactants having various industrial, environmental, and medical applications. Current methods for rhamnolipid quantification involve the use of strong hazardous acids/chemicals, indirect measurement of the concentration of sugar moiety, or require the availability of expensive equipment (HPLC-MS). A safer, easier method that measures the whole rhamnolipid molecules would significantly enhance strain selection, metabolic engineering, and process development for economical rhamnolipid production. A semi-quantitative method was reported earlier to differentiate between the rhamnolipid-producing and non-producing strains using agar plates containing methylene blue and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). In this study, a rapid and simple method for rhamnolipid analysis was developed by systematically investigating the complexation of rhamnolipids and methylene blue, with and without the presence of CTAB. The method relies on measuring the absorbance (at 638 nm) of the rhamnolipid-methylene blue complex that partitions into the chloroform phase. With P. aeruginosa fermentation samples, the applicability of this method was verified by comparison of the analysis results with those obtained from the commonly used anthrone reaction technique.

  3. Removal of Mercury by Foam Fractionation Using Surfactin, a Biosurfactant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Reddy, A. Satyanarayana; Chen, Chien-Yen; Li, Wun Rong; Tseng, Min-Jen; Liu, Hung-Tsan; Pan, Wei; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Atla, Shashi B.

    2011-01-01

    The separation of mercury ions from artificially contaminated water by the foam fractionation process using a biosurfactant (surfactin) and chemical surfactants (SDS and Tween-80) was investigated in this study. Parameters such as surfactant and mercury concentration, pH, foam volume, and digestion time were varied and their effects on the efficiency of mercury removal were investigated. The recovery efficiency of mercury ions was highly sensitive to the concentration of the surfactant. The highest mercury ion recovery by surfactin was obtained using a surfactin concentration of 10 × CMC, while recovery using SDS required < 10 × CMC and Tween-80 >10 × CMC. However, the enrichment of mercury ions in the foam was superior with surfactin, the mercury enrichment value corresponding to the highest metal recovery (10.4%) by surfactin being 1.53. Dilute solutions (2-mg L−1 Hg2+) resulted in better separation (36.4%), while concentrated solutions (100 mg L−1) enabled only a 2.3% recovery using surfactin. An increase in the digestion time of the metal solution with surfactin yielded better separation as compared with a freshly-prepared solution, and an increase in the airflow rate increased bubble production, resulting in higher metal recovery but low enrichment. Basic solutions yielded higher mercury separation as compared with acidic solutions due to the precipitation of surfactin under acidic conditions. PMID:22174661

  4. The anionic biosurfactant rhamnolipid does not denature industrial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jens K; Pihl, Rasmus; Møller, Anders H; Madsen, Anne T; Otzen, Daniel E; Andersen, Kell K

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. Their combination of useful properties and sustainable production make them promising industrial alternatives to petrochemical and oleochemical surfactants. Here we compare the impact of the anionic BS rhamnolipid (RL) and the conventional/synthetic anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the structure and stability of three different commercially used enzymes, namely the cellulase Carezyme® (CZ), the phospholipase Lecitase Ultra® (LT) and the α-amylase Stainzyme® (SZ). Our data reveal a fundamental difference in their mode of interaction. SDS shows great diversity of interaction toward the different enzymes. It efficiently unfolds both LT and CZ, but LT is unfolded by SDS through formation of SDS clusters on the enzyme well below the cmc, while CZ is only unfolded by bulk micelles and on average binds significantly less SDS than LT. SDS binds with even lower stoichiometry to SZ and leads to an increase in thermal stability. In contrast, RL does not affect the tertiary or secondary structure of any enzyme at room temperature, has little impact on thermal stability and only binds detectably (but at low stoichiometries) to SZ. Furthermore, all enzymes maintain activity at both monomeric and micellar concentrations of RL. We conclude that RL, despite its anionic charge, is a surfactant that does not compromise the structural integrity of industrially relevant enzymes. This makes RL a promising alternative to current synthetic anionic surfactants in a wide range of commercial applications.

  5. Boolean Models of Biosurfactants Production in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Adrien; Rossignol, Gaelle; Comet, Jean-Paul; Bernot, Gilles; Guespin-Michel, Jannine; Merieau, Annabelle

    2012-01-01

    Cyclolipopeptides (CLPs) are biosurfactants produced by numerous Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. CLP production is known to be regulated at least by the GacA/GacS two-component pathway, but the full regulatory network is yet largely unknown. In the clinical strain MFN1032, CLP production is abolished by a mutation in the phospholipase C gene () and not restored by complementation. Their production is also subject to phenotypic variation. We used a modelling approach with Boolean networks, which takes into account all these observations concerning CLP production without any assumption on the topology of the considered network. Intensive computation yielded numerous models that satisfy these properties. All models minimizing the number of components point to a bistability in CLP production, which requires the presence of a yet unknown key self-inducible regulator. Furthermore, all suggest that a set of yet unexplained phenotypic variants might also be due to this epigenetic switch. The simplest of these Boolean networks was used to propose a biological regulatory network for CLP production. This modelling approach has allowed a possible regulation to be unravelled and an unusual behaviour of CLP production in P. fluorescens to be explained. PMID:22303435

  6. The anionic biosurfactant rhamnolipid does not denature industrial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jens K.; Pihl, Rasmus; Møller, Anders H.; Madsen, Anne T.; Otzen, Daniel E.; Andersen, Kell K.

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. Their combination of useful properties and sustainable production make them promising industrial alternatives to petrochemical and oleochemical surfactants. Here we compare the impact of the anionic BS rhamnolipid (RL) and the conventional/synthetic anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the structure and stability of three different commercially used enzymes, namely the cellulase Carezyme® (CZ), the phospholipase Lecitase Ultra® (LT) and the α-amylase Stainzyme® (SZ). Our data reveal a fundamental difference in their mode of interaction. SDS shows great diversity of interaction toward the different enzymes. It efficiently unfolds both LT and CZ, but LT is unfolded by SDS through formation of SDS clusters on the enzyme well below the cmc, while CZ is only unfolded by bulk micelles and on average binds significantly less SDS than LT. SDS binds with even lower stoichiometry to SZ and leads to an increase in thermal stability. In contrast, RL does not affect the tertiary or secondary structure of any enzyme at room temperature, has little impact on thermal stability and only binds detectably (but at low stoichiometries) to SZ. Furthermore, all enzymes maintain activity at both monomeric and micellar concentrations of RL. We conclude that RL, despite its anionic charge, is a surfactant that does not compromise the structural integrity of industrially relevant enzymes. This makes RL a promising alternative to current synthetic anionic surfactants in a wide range of commercial applications. PMID:25941516

  7. Combinatorial effect of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AG1 biosurfactant and Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 toxin on Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Boukedi, Hanen; Dammak, Mariam; Kilani-Feki, Olfa; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahya; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Tounsi, Slim

    2017-03-01

    Spodoptera littoralis, one of the most serious and destructive agricultural pests in the world, is very susceptible to Vip3 toxin. In order to develop a new efficient bioinsecticide and to prevent the development of resistance by the target pest, insecticidal activity of biosurfactant produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AG1 was evaluated against S. littoralis. Bioassays revealed the susceptibility of the first instar larvae of this pest to AG1 biosurfactant with an LC50 of 245ng/cm(2). Moreover, the histopathology examination of the larval midgut treated by AG1 biosurfactant showed vacuolization, necrosis and disintegration of the basement membrane. Binding experiments revealed that the AG1 biosurfactant recognized three putative receptors located in the brush border membrane vesicles of S. littoralis with sizes of 91, 72 and 64kDa. Competition assays using biotinylated metabolites indicated that AG1 biosurfactant and Vip3Aa16 toxin did not compete for the same S. littoralis receptors. When combined, AG1 biosurfactant and Vip3Aa16 showed an additive effect against S. littoralis larvae. These findings suggested that B. amyloliquefaciens AG1 biosurfactant could be a promising biocontrol agent to eradicate S. littoralis and to prevent resistance development by this pest.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of nutrient ratios on biosurfactant production by Serratia marcescens using a Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Carrillo, T; Martínez-García, X; Zapata-Peñasco, I; Castorena-Cortés, G; Reyes-Avila, J; Mayol-Castillo, M; Olguín-Lora, P

    2011-09-01

    The strain SmSA, identified as Serratia marcescens and known as a biosurfactant producer, was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil from Veracruz, México. The interactions among the C/N, C/Mg and C/Fe ratios have not been examined for this microorganism. In this work was evaluated the effect of these nutrients at three levels using a mineral medium with glucose as the carbon source. A Box-Behnken experimental design was utilised to maximise biosurfactant production, which was assessed by oil spreading and surface tension tests. The treatment with C/N=5, C/Fe=26,000 and C/Mg=30 showed the best result since the surface tension was reduced to 30 mN m(-1). The multiple regression and response surface analyses indicated that the interaction between C/N and C/Mg had the utmost effect on the reduction of surface tension and biosurfactant production. The conditions of the best treatment were used to scale up biosurfactant production in a 3L bioreactor giving a yield of 4.1 gL(-1) of pure biosurfactant. It was found that the biosurfactant was mainly produced in the exponential phase and decreased the surface tension to 31 mN m(-1). The contact between the biosurfactant with heavy oil (15° API) increased its displacement from 9.3 to 18 cm.

  9. First report of a lipopeptide biosurfactant from thermophilic bacterium Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus MK01 newly isolated from municipal landfill site.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Hakimeh; Abdoli, Mahya; Hajfarajollah, Hamidreza; Samie, Nima; Alidoust, Leila; Abbasi, Habib; Fooladi, Jamshid; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2014-07-01

    A biosurfactant-producing thermophile was isolated from the Kahrizak landfill of Tehran and identified as a bacterium belonging to the genus Aneurinibacillus. A thermostable lipopeptide-type biosurfactant was purified from the culture medium of this bacterium and showed stability in the temperature range of 20-90 °C and pH range of 5-10. The produced biosurfactant could reduce the surface tension of water from 72 to 43 mN/m with a CMC of 1.21 mg/mL. The strain growing at a temperature of 45 °C produces a substantial amount of 5 g/L of biosurfactant in the medium supplemented with sunflower oil as the sole carbon source. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the biosurfactant production using sunflower oil, sodium nitrate, and yeast extract as variables. The optimization resulted in 6.75 g/L biosurfactant production, i.e., 35% improved as compared to the unoptimized condition. Thin-layer chromatography, FTIR spectroscopy, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical composition analysis confirmed the lipopeptide structure of the biosurfactant.

  10. Combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant enhanced biodegradation of polycylic armotic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil-water systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-He; Xiao, Huining; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

    2014-09-01

    This study systematically investigated the interactive effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) on the biodegradation of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil-water systems. The degradations of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were fitted well with first order kinetic model and the degradation rates were in proportion to the concentration of biosurfactant. In addition, the degradation enhancement of PHE was higher than that of PYR. The addition of soil DOM itself at an environmental level would inhibit the biodegradation of PAHs. However, in the system with co-existence of DOM and biosurfactant, the degradation of PAHs was higher than that in only biosurfactant addition system, which may be attributed to the formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex micelles. Furthermore, under the combined conditions, the degradation of PAH increased with the biosurfactant concentration, and the soil DOM added system showed slightly higher degradation than the compost DOM added system, indicating that the chemical structure and composition of DOM would also affect the bioavailability of PAHs. The study result may broaden knowledge of biosurfactant enhanced bioremediation of PAHs contaminated soil and groundwater.

  11. Biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial action of lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by heavy metal tolerant strain Bacillus cereus NK1.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Muthu Irulappan; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Gracerosepat, Raja; Srisakthi, Kandasamy; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2011-07-01

    Biosurfactants are worthful microbial amphiphilic molecules with efficient surface-active and biological properties applicable to several industries and processes. Among them lipopeptides represent a class of microbial surfactants with increasing scientific, therapeutic and biotechnological interests. A heavy metal tolerant Bacillus strain has been isolated and the biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial activity of biosurfactant produced by the strain have been studied. Biosurfactant production was confirmed by the conventional screening methods including hemolytic activity, drop collapsing test, oil displacement test, emulsification and lipase production assays. The biosurfactant produced by this strain was a lipopeptide and exhibited strong surface activity. The biosurfactant has been characterized using FTIR, TLC and HPLC. The minimum active dose of this biosurfactant when compared with the other chemical surfactants was found as 0.150±0.06 μg. The critical micelle concentration was found to be 45 mg/l. The biosurfactant was found to be stable and active over a wide range of pH, temperature and NaCl concentration. It was also able to emulsify a wide range of hydrocarbons and oils thereby extending its application for the bioremediation of oil contaminated sites. The biosurfactant exhibited significant reduction in biofilm formation by pathogens and showed potent antimicrobial activity against various gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi. Agar diffusion assay for heavy metal resistance showed that the isolate was resistant to ferrous, lead and zinc. Considering the biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial property of biosurfactant, it can be utilized as a potential therapeutic molecule for numerous microbial infections. The heavy metal resistance of the strain can also be harnessed as an invaluable biological tool for in situ bioremediation.

  12. Agro-Industrial Wastes for Production of Biosurfactant by Bacillus subtilis ANR 88 and Its Application in Synthesis of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Ashwini N.; Baikar, Vishakha V.; Ravi Kumar, D. V.; Deopurkar, Rajendra L.

    2017-01-01

    Biosurfactants, surface-active amphiphilic compounds, despite having a wide range of applications, have a high cost of production, which severely restricts their use. For cheaper production of biosurfactant, we investigated the potential of the indigenously isolated biosurfactant producing organism, Bacillus subtilis ANR 88, to grow on different cheap carbon sources (molasses, whey, and extracts of potato peels, orange peels, banana peels, and bagasse). We found that, B. subtilis ANR 88 used significant amounts of total sugar to produce cell biomass and biosurfactant. The biosurfactant production in minimal medium containing glucose as sole source of carbon was 0.207 g/l and the same with molasses as carbon source was 0.241 g/l. With whey as carbon source, isolate failed to produce biosurfactant. Amongst the extracts of the agro-wastes, the extracts of bagasse and orange peels gave 0.127 and 0.089 g/l of biosurfactant respectively. One-variable-at-a-time (OVAT) studies carried out to optimize the production of biosurfactant by B. subtilis ANR 88 resulted into maximum biosurfactant yield of 0.513 g/l in medium: molasses 4%, ammonium ferric citrate 0.25%, pH 7. Plackett–Burman design based statistical method for optimization increased the production of biosurfactant to 0.746 g/l, which is 3.6-fold of that produced on glucose. The biosurfactant produced by B. subtilis ANR 88 was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR); it showed that the biosurfactant contained alkyl as well as peptide groups. The biosurfactant of B. subtilis ANR 88 was found effective in the synthesis of silver as well as gold nanoparticles in the total absence of conventional chemical reducing agents. Interestingly, nanoparticles produced were almost uniform in their size and shapes i.e., spherical silver (4–18 nm) and hexagonal gold nanoparticles (40–60 nm), as evident in TEM images. PMID:28392783

  13. Agro-Industrial Wastes for Production of Biosurfactant by Bacillus subtilis ANR 88 and Its Application in Synthesis of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rane, Ashwini N; Baikar, Vishakha V; Ravi Kumar, V; Deopurkar, Rajendra L

    2017-01-01

    Biosurfactants, surface-active amphiphilic compounds, despite having a wide range of applications, have a high cost of production, which severely restricts their use. For cheaper production of biosurfactant, we investigated the potential of the indigenously isolated biosurfactant producing organism, Bacillus subtilis ANR 88, to grow on different cheap carbon sources (molasses, whey, and extracts of potato peels, orange peels, banana peels, and bagasse). We found that, B. subtilis ANR 88 used significant amounts of total sugar to produce cell biomass and biosurfactant. The biosurfactant production in minimal medium containing glucose as sole source of carbon was 0.207 g/l and the same with molasses as carbon source was 0.241 g/l. With whey as carbon source, isolate failed to produce biosurfactant. Amongst the extracts of the agro-wastes, the extracts of bagasse and orange peels gave 0.127 and 0.089 g/l of biosurfactant respectively. One-variable-at-a-time (OVAT) studies carried out to optimize the production of biosurfactant by B. subtilis ANR 88 resulted into maximum biosurfactant yield of 0.513 g/l in medium: molasses 4%, ammonium ferric citrate 0.25%, pH 7. Plackett-Burman design based statistical method for optimization increased the production of biosurfactant to 0.746 g/l, which is 3.6-fold of that produced on glucose. The biosurfactant produced by B. subtilis ANR 88 was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR); it showed that the biosurfactant contained alkyl as well as peptide groups. The biosurfactant of B. subtilis ANR 88 was found effective in the synthesis of silver as well as gold nanoparticles in the total absence of conventional chemical reducing agents. Interestingly, nanoparticles produced were almost uniform in their size and shapes i.e., spherical silver (4-18 nm) and hexagonal gold nanoparticles (40-60 nm), as evident in TEM images.

  14. Lipid Profile

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  15. Biophysical Effects of a Polymeric Biosurfactant in Candida krusei and Candida albicans Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriella Freitas; Dos Santos Pinto, Bruna Lorrana; Souza, Eliene Batista; Viana, José Lima; Zagmignan, Adrielle; Dos Santos, Julliana Ribeiro Alves; Santos, Áquila Rodrigues Costa; Tavares, Priscila Batista; Denadai, Ângelo Márcio Leite; Monteiro, Andrea Souza

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a polymeric biosurfactant produced by Trichosporon montevideense CLOA72 in the adhesion of Candida albicans and Candida krusei cells to human buccal epithelial cells and its interference in biofilm formation by these strains. The biofilm inhibition by biosurfactant (25 mg/mL) in C. krusei and C. albicans in polystyrene was reduced up to 79.5 and 85 %, respectively. In addition, the zeta potential and hydrodynamic diameter of the yeasts altered as a function of the biosurfactant concentration added to the cell suspension. The changes in the cell surface characteristics and the interface modification can contribute to the inhibition of the initial adherence of yeasts cells to the surface. In addition, the analyses of the biofilm matrix and planktonic cell surfaces demonstrated differences in carbohydrate and protein concentrations for the two studied strains, which may contribute to the modulation of cell adhesion or consolidation of biofilms, especially in C. krusei. This study suggests a possible application of the of CLOA72 biosurfactant in inhibiting the adhesion and formation of biofilms on biological surfaces by yeasts of the Candida genus.

  16. Synergistic effect of lipopeptide biosurfactant with antibiotics against Escherichia coli CFT073 biofilm.

    PubMed

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Turner, Raymond Joseph; Ceri, Howard

    2011-04-01

    Biofilms are microcolonies of microbes adherent to biotic and abiotic surfaces, often responsible for chronic infections and medical device contamination. Escherichia coli is one of the prevalent pathogens involved in uropathogenic infections and contamination of catheters. A biosurfactant produced by Bacillus licheniformis V9T14 was tested alone and in association with various antibiotics against a mature 24-h uropathogenic E. coli CFT073 biofilm. Biofilm was grown on polystyrene pegs of a Calgary Biofilm Device, providing a tool to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial agents. Antibiotics tested were ampicillin, cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin, tobramycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (19:1). Biosurfactant alone at the concentrations tested was not able to remove the adherent cells of the pre-formed biofilm. However, the difference between the effect of antibiotic alone and in combination with the biosurfactant was significant and exceeded 1log(10) (90%) reduction in most cases. Results of this study indicate that V9T14 biosurfactant in association with antibiotics leads to a synergistic increase in the efficacy of antibiotics in biofilm killing, and in some combinations leads to total eradication of E. coli CFT073 biofilm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Sophorolipid biosurfactant against bacteria relevant to tooth caries and skin hygiene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sophorolipid (SL) is glycolipid biosurfactant produced by yeast. Its general antimicrobial activity was previously reported. In this paper, we present the antimicrobial activity of SL specifically against oral and skin bacteria. Using a microplate to continuously monitor cell growth, we found com...

  18. Structural characterization of novel sophorolipid biosurfactants from a newly-identified species of Candida yeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sophorolipids are a group of O-acylsophorose-based biosurfactants produced by several yeasts of the Starmerella clade. The known sophorolipids are typically partially acetylated 2-O-ß-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucopyranose (sophorose) ß-O-glycosidically-linked to 17-L-hydroxy-delta-9-octadecenoic aci...

  19. Effects of biosurfactants on the viability and proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Cristina; Gudiña, Eduardo J; Lima, Cristovao F; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactants are molecules with surface activity produced by microorganisms that can be used in many biomedical applications. The anti-tumour potential of these molecules is being studied, although results are still scarce and few data are available regarding the mechanisms underlying such activity. In this work, the anti-tumour activity of a surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis 573 and a glycoprotein (BioEG) produced by Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei A20 was evaluated. Both biosurfactants were tested against two breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MDA-MB-231, and a non-tumour fibroblast cell line (MC-3 T3-E1), specifically regarding cell viability and proliferation. Surfactin was found to decrease viability of both breast cancer cell lines studied. A 24 h exposure to 0.05 g l(-1) surfactin led to inhibition of cell proliferation as shown by cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Similarly, exposure of cells to 0.15 g l(-1) BioEG for 48 h decreased cancer cells' viability, without affecting normal fibroblasts. Moreover, BioEG induced the cell cycle arrest at G1 for both breast cancer cell lines. The biosurfactant BioEG was shown to be more active than surfactin against the studied breast cancer cells. The results gathered in this work are very promising regarding the biosurfactants potential for breast cancer treatment and encourage further work with the BioEG glycoprotein.

  20. Characterization of a Soybean Oil-based Biosurfactant and Evaluation of its Ability to Form Microbubbles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper characterizes the physio-chemical properties of the soybean oil (SBO)-based polymeric surfactant, Palozengs R-004 (hereafter referred to as R-004). The surface activity of R-004 is comparable to the reported activities of biosurfactants produced by microorganisms and higher than some of ...

  1. Biosurfactant production by a CO2 sequestering Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Smita; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain ISTS2, produced biosurfactant when enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as carbon source was evaluated for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and biosurfactant production. CO2 sequestration efficiency of the bacterium was determined by enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Biosurfactant production ability at 100 mM NHCO3 and 5% CO2 was screened by surface and interfacial tension measurement, emulsification stability test, hydrophobicity test, contact angle measurement, bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon and purified by silica gel column (60-120 mesh). Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the crude biosurfactant of ISTS2 were composed of lipopeptides and free fatty acids (FA) and its hydrophobic fraction contained five kinds of fatty acids (FA) with chain lengths of C14-C19. Thus Bacillus sp. strain IST2 can be used as a cleaner bioprocess for the utilization of industrial CO2 as alternate substrate.

  2. Screening of biosurfactant producers from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sources in cold marine environments.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qinhong; Zhang, Baiyu; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Lin, Weiyun; Cao, Tong

    2014-09-15

    An overview of literature about isolating biosurfactant producers from marine sources indicated no such producers have been reported form North Atlantic Canada. Water and sediment samples were taken from petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal and offshore areas in this region. Either n-hexadecane or diesel was used as the sole carbon source for the screening. A modified colony-based oil drop collapsing test was used to cover sessile biosurfactant producers. Fifty-five biosurfactant producers belong to genera of Alcanivorax, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Streptomyces were isolated. The first three genera were established after 1980s with interesting characteristics and limited relevant publications. Some of the 55 isolated strains were found with properties such as greatly reducing surface tension, stabilizing emulsion and producing flocculant. Isolates P6-4P and P1-5P were selected to demonstrate the performance of biosurfactant production, and were found to reduce the surface tension of water to as low as 28 dynes/cm.

  3. Biosurfactant-mediated biodegradation of straight and methyl-branched alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Accidental oil spills and waste disposal are important sources for environmental pollution. We investigated the biodegradation of alkanes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 55925 in relation to a rhamnolipid surfactant produced by the same bacterial strain. Results showed that the linear C11-C21 compounds in a heating oil sample degraded from 6% to 100%, whereas the iso-alkanes tended to be recalcitrant unless they were exposed to the biosurfactant; under such condition total biodegradation was achieved. Only the biodegradation of the commercial C12-C19 alkanes could be demonstrated, ranging from 23% to 100%, depending on the experimental conditions. Pristane (a C19 branched alkane) only biodegraded when present alone with the biosurfactant and when included in an artificial mixture even without the biosurfactant. In all cases the biosurfactant significantly enhanced biodegradation. The electron scanning microscopy showed that cells depicted several adaptations to growth on hydrocarbons, such as biopolymeric spheres with embedded cells distributed over different layers on the spherical surfaces and cells linked to each other by extracellular appendages. Electron transmission microscopy revealed transparent inclusions, which were associated with hydrocarbon based-culture cells. These patterns of hydrocarbon biodegradation and cell adaptations depended on the substrate bioavailability, type and length of hydrocarbon. PMID:21906343

  4. Optimization of crude oil degradation by Dietzia cinnamea KA1, capable of biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Kavynifard, Amirarsalan; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhossein; Ghasempour, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was isolation and characterization of a crude oil degrader and biosurfactant-producing bacterium, along with optimization of conditions for crude oil degradation. Among 11 isolates, 5 were able to emulsify crude oil in Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) among which one isolate, named KA1, showed the highest potency for growth rate and biodegradation. The isolate was identified as Dietzia cinnamea KA1 using morphological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The optimal conditions were 510 mM NaCl, pH 9.0, 35 °C, and minimal requirement of 46.5 mM NH4 Cl and 2.10 mM NaH2 PO4 . Gravimetric test and Gas chromatography-Mass spectroscopy technique (GC-MS) showed that Dietzia cinnamea KA1 was able to utilize and degrade 95.7% of the crude oil after 5 days, under the optimal conditions. The isolate was able to grow and produce biosurfactant when cultured in MSM supplemented with crude oil, glycerol or whey as the sole carbon sources, but bacterial growth was occurred using molasses with no biosurfactant production. This is the first report of biosurfactant production by D. cinnamea using crude oil, glycerol and whey and the first study to report a species of Dietzia degrading a wide range of hydrocarbons in a short time.

  5. Screening of novel microorganisms for biosurfactant and biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Sonica; Singh, B P; Lal, Mehi; Ma, Khan; Hussain, Touseef; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kaushik, S K; Kumar, Satish

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, 95 isolates of bacteria were tested for their biosurfactant as well as biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans. The results revealed that only 15.8% isolates showed biosurfactant activity. The emulsification index ranged from 0-68% and 24.2% isolates showed positive reaction for biosurfactant properties. In emulsification assay and oil spreading test, 18.95% and 5.26% isolates, respectively scored positive for biosurfactant production. Among all, only five isolates were found effective against P. infestans, for biocontrol properties. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-1 showed 62.22% inhibition zone after 72 hrs while P. aeruginosa-3 showed 46.42%. Forty-eight hrs old culture supernatants were highly effective in food-poisoning test, tuber slice test and detached leaf method against P. infestans. In whole potato plant test, bacterial cell based formulation, culture supernatant and bacterial cell suspension of P. aeruginosa-1 showed 10.42%, 9.94% and 17.96% diseases severity respectively, as against 53.96% in control. This isolate holds promise as biological control agent against P. infestans in field.

  6. The influence of vegetable oils on biosurfactant production by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Cristina; De Araújo, Alvaro A; Pastore, Glaucia M

    2002-01-01

    The production of biosurfactant, a surface-active compound, by two Serratia marcescensstrains was tested on minimal culture medium supplemented with vegetable oils, considering that it is well known that these compounds stimulate biosurfactant production. The vegetable oils tested included soybean, olive, castor, sunflower, and coconut fat. The results showed a decrease in surface tension of the culture medium without oil from 64.54 to 29.57, with a critical micelle dilution (CMD(-1)) and CMD(-2) of 41.77 and 68.92 mN/m, respectively. Sunflower oil gave the best results (29.75 mN/m) with a CMD(-1) and CMD-2 of 36.69 and 51.41 mN/m, respectively. Sunflower oil contains about 60% of linoleic acid. The addition of linoleic acid decreased the surface tension from 53.70 to 28.39, with a CMD(-1) of 29.72 and CMD(-2) of 37.97, suggesting that this fatty acid stimulates the biosurfactant production by the LB006 strain. In addition, the crude precipitate surfactant reduced the surface tension of water from 72.00 to 28.70 mN/m. These results suggest that the sunflower oil's linoleic acid was responsible for the increase in biosurfactant production by the LB006 strain.

  7. Halotolerant, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus species potentially useful for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jenneman, G.E.; McInerney, M.J.; Knapp, R.M.; Clark, J.B.; Feero, J.M.; Revus, D.E.; Menzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A biosurfactant-producing Bacillus licheniformis was isolated from oil-field injection water with properties potentially useful for in situ enhanced oil recovery. Conventional miscible flooding procedures use expensive synthetic detergents such as petroleum sulfonates that precipitate in high NaCl brines and adsorb to rock surfaces. The Bacillus sp. produced a biosurfactant when grown at 40 C in a sucrose mineral salts medium containing 5% NaCl. The biosurfactant was produced during the log phase of growth in the presence or absence of either crude oil or hexadecane. The surface tension of a 5% NaCl solution decreased from 74.0 mN/m to 27 mN/m when the surfactant was added. Interfacial tension of a 5% NaCl brine/octane mixture was as low as 0.43 mN/m when measured by a spinning drop tensiometer. The surfactant was extracted by acid precipitation at a pH of 2.0. The extracted surfactant exhibited optimal surface tension-lowering ability in 4-5% NaCl solutions between pH's of 6.0 to 10.0. The addition of calcium up to 340 mg/liter and incubation temperatures up to 100 C did not alter appreciably the surfactant activity. Mobilization of crude oil and oil bank formation occurred in a sandpack column after addition of the biosurfactant. 16 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Characterization of glycolipid biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Arutchelvi, J; Doble, M

    2010-07-01

    To isolate and characterize the biosurfactant-producing micro-organism from petroleum-contaminated soil as well as to determine the biochemical properties of the biosurfactant. A novel rhamnolipid-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GenBank accession number GQ241355) strain was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil. Surface active compound was separated by solvent extraction of the acidified culture supernatant. The extract was able to reduce the surface tension of water from 72 to 44 mN m(-1) at a critical micelle concentration of 11.27 +/- 1.85 mg l(-1). It showed better activity (based on microdilution method) against Gram-positive (or= 125 mg ml(-1)) with mild toxicity (HC(50)- 38 +/- 8.22 microg ml(-1)) to red blood cells. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of aliphatic chain, hydroxyl groups, ester and glycosidic bonds. Presence of nineteen rhamnolipid homologues with variation in chain length and saturation was revealed from liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The results indicate that the isolated biosurfactant has a novel combination of rhamnolipid congeners with unique properties. This study provides a biosurfactant, which can be used as a biocontrol agent against phytopathogens (Fusarium proliferatum NCIM 1105 and Aspergillus niger NCIM 596) and exploited for biomedical applications.

  9. Utilization of Paneer Whey Waste for Cost-Effective Production of Rhamnolipid Biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Patowary, Rupshikha; Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Kalita, Mohan Chandra; Deka, Suresh

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed at isolating rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing bacteria that could utilize paneer whey, an abundant waste source as sole medium for the production purpose. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, SR17, was isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil that could efficiently utilize paneer whey for rhamnolipid production and reduce surface tension of the medium from 52 to 26.5 mN/m. The yield of biosurfactant obtained was 2.7 g/l, upgraded to 4.8 g/l when supplemented with 2 % glucose and mineral salts. Biochemical, FTIR, and LC-MS analysis revealed that extracted biosurfactant is a combination of both mono and di-rhamnolipid congeners. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was measured to be 110 mg/l. Emulsification activity of the biosurfactant against n-hexadecane, olive oil, kerosene, diesel oil, engine oil, and crude oil were found to be 83, 88, 81, 92, 86, and 100 %, respectively. The rhamnolipid was detected to be non-toxic against mouse fibroblastic cell line L292.

  10. Media optimization for biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 2794: artificial intelligence versus a statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Moumita P; Vaidya, Bhalchandra K; Desai, Kiran M; Joshi, Renuka M; Nene, Sanjay N; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2009-05-01

    This paper entails a comprehensive study on production of a biosurfactant from Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 2794. Two optimization techniques--(1) artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and (2) response surface methodology (RSM)--were used for media optimization in order to enhance the biosurfactant yield by Rhodococcus erythropolis MTCC 2794. ANN and RSM models were developed, incorporating the quantity of four medium components (sucrose, yeast extract, meat peptone, and toluene) as independent input variables and biosurfactant yield [calculated in terms of percent emulsification index (% EI(24))] as output variable. ANN-GA and RSM were compared for their predictive and generalization ability using a separate data set of 16 experiments, for which the average quadratic errors were approximately 3 and approximately 6%, respectively. ANN-GA was found to be more accurate and consistent in predicting optimized conditions and maximum yield than RSM. For the ANN-GA model, the values of correlation coefficient and average quadratic error were approximately 0.99 and approximately 3%, respectively. It was also shown that ANN-based models could be used accurately for sensitivity analysis. ANN-GA-optimized media gave about a 3.5-fold enhancement in biosurfactant yield.

  11. Surface forces and properties of foam films from rhamnolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R; Exerowa, D

    2007-10-31

    Foam films are considered as a convenient model to study the interaction behaviour and surface properties of microbial rhamnolipid type biosurfactants. The Scheludko-Exerowa microinterferometric methodology of film thickness measurements is employed for experimental studies of microscopic foam films formed from aqueous solutions of a single rhamnolipid Rh1 (with one rhamnosyl head group) and of mixtures of rhamnolipid surfactants Rh1 and Rh2 (with two rhamnosyl head groups) at ratios Rh2/Rh1=1.2 and Rh2/Rh1=0.69. The measurements of the equilibrium thickness (h) of the obtained films as a function of surfactant concentration (Cs) and electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (C el) determine the conditions for obtaining common, common black and Newton black films. The saturation values of the diffuse electric layer potential phi 0 approximately 60 mV for the Rh1.2 and phi 0 approximately 94 mV for the Rh0.69 common films conform the ionic character of the rhamnolipids. The h(C el) curves of the rhamnolipid foam films and the directly measured disjoining pressure (Pi(h)) isotherms indicate the ranges of action of the DLVO and non-DLVO surface forces. The obtained foam film parameters allow their practical use in ecology and in various technological processes where rhamnolipid surfactants are used. Experiments with model lung surfactant (Infasurf) foam films with rhamnolipid added outline a perspective for the potential application of the foam film for investigating the effect of rhamnolipids on human alveoli.

  12. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsions using biosurfactants: Rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Long; McClements, David Julian

    2016-10-01

    Nanoemulsions are used in the food, cosmetics, personal care and pharmaceutical industries to provide desirable optical, textural, stability, and delivery characteristics. In many industrial applications, it is desirable to formulate nanoemulsions using natural ingredients so as to develop label-friendly products. Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants isolated from certain microorganisms using fermentation processes. They are glycolipids that have a polar head consisting of rhamnose units and a non-polar tail consisting of a hydrocarbon chain. In this study, the interfacial characteristics of this natural surfactant at medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil-water interfaces were characterized, and its ability to form nanoemulsions was compared to that of another natural surfactant (quillaja saponins). The influence of rhamnolipid concentration, homogenization pressure, and oil type on the mean droplet diameter of emulsions produced by microfluidization was determined. Rhamnolipids were highly effective at forming small droplets (d32<0.15μm) at low surfactant-to-oil ratios (SOR<1:10) for MCT oil. Rhamnolipids could also be used to form small droplets using long chain triglyceride oils, such as corn and fish oil. Rhamnolipid-coated droplets were stable to aggregation over a range of pH values (5-9), salt concentrations (<100mM NaCl) and temperatures (20-90°C). However, droplet aggregation was observed at highly acidic (pH 2-4) and high ionic strength (200-500mM NaCl) conditions. These effects were attributed to a reduction in electrostatic repulsion at low pH and high salt levels. Rhamnolipid-coated droplets had a high negative charge at neutral pH that decreased in magnitude with decreasing pH. These results indicate that rhamnolipids are effective natural surfactants that may be able to replace synthetic surfactants in certain commercial applications.

  13. Magnetic biocatalysts and their uses to obtain biodiesel and biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    López, Carmen; Cruz-Izquierdo, Alvaro; Picó, Enrique A; García-Bárcena, Teresa; Villarroel, Noelia; Llama, María J; Serra, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    Nanobiocatalysis, as the synergistic combination of nanotechnology and biocatalysis, is rapidly emerging as a new frontier of biotechnology. The use of immobilized enzymes in industrial applications often presents advantages over their soluble counterparts, mainly in view of stability, reusability and simpler operational processing. Because of their singular properties, such as biocompatibility, large and modifiable surface and easy recovery, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are attractive super-paramagnetic materials that serve as a support for enzyme immobilization and facilitate separations by applying an external magnetic field. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) have several benefits in the context of industrial applications since they can be cheaply and easily prepared from unpurified enzyme extracts and show improved storage and operational stability against denaturation by heat and organic solvents. In this work, by using the aforementioned advantages of MNPs of magnetite and CLEAs, we prepared two robust magnetically-separable types of nanobiocatalysts by binding either soluble enzyme onto the surface of MNPs functionalized with amino groups or by cross-linking aggregates of enzyme among them and to MNPs to obtain magnetic CLEAs. For this purpose the lipase B of Candida antarctica (CALB) was used. The hydrolytic and biosynthetic activities of the resulting magnetic nanobiocatalysts were assessed in aqueous and organic media. Thus, the hydrolysis of triglycerides and the transesterification reactions to synthesize biodiesel and biosurfactants were studied using magnetic CLEAs of CALB. The efficiency and easy performance of this magnetic biocatalysis validates this proof of concept and sets the basis for the application of magnetic CLEAs at industrial scale.

  14. Magnetic biocatalysts and their uses to obtain biodiesel and biosurfactants

    PubMed Central

    López, Carmen; Cruz-Izquierdo, Álvaro; Picó, Enrique A.; García-Bárcena, Teresa; Villarroel, Noelia; Llama, María J.; Serra, Juan L.

    2014-01-01

    Nanobiocatalysis, as the synergistic combination of nanotechnology and biocatalysis, is rapidly emerging as a new frontier of biotechnology. The use of immobilized enzymes in industrial applications often presents advantages over their soluble counterparts, mainly in view of stability, reusability and simpler operational processing. Because of their singular properties, such as biocompatibility, large and modifiable surface and easy recovery, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are attractive super-paramagnetic materials that serve as a support for enzyme immobilization and facilitate separations by applying an external magnetic field. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) have several benefits in the context of industrial applications since they can be cheaply and easily prepared from unpurified enzyme extracts and show improved storage and operational stability against denaturation by heat and organic solvents. In this work, by using the aforementioned advantages of MNPs of magnetite and CLEAs, we prepared two robust magnetically-separable types of nanobiocatalysts by binding either soluble enzyme onto the surface of MNPs functionalized with amino groups or by cross-linking aggregates of enzyme among them and to MNPs to obtain magnetic CLEAs. For this purpose the lipase B of Candida antarctica (CALB) was used. The hydrolytic and biosynthetic activities of the resulting magnetic nanobiocatalysts were assessed in aqueous and organic media. Thus, the hydrolysis of triglycerides and the transesterification reactions to synthesize biodiesel and biosurfactants were studied using magnetic CLEAs of CALB. The efficiency and easy performance of this magnetic biocatalysis validates this proof of concept and sets the basis for the application of magnetic CLEAs at industrial scale. PMID:25207271

  15. Effect of bio-surfactant on municipal solid waste composting process.

    PubMed

    Xi, Bei-Dou; Liu, Hong-Liang; Huang, G H; Zhang, Bai-Yu; Qin, Xiao-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Bio-surfactant is a new type of surfactant that is produced in microbial metabolism. Adding bio-surfactant during composting process, especially to those contain some toxic substances, has been proved to be a promising way. In this study, Strains III (2), a bacterial with high activity to produce bio-surfactant, were isolated firstly. Following comparison experiments with and without adding Strains III (2), namely Run 1 and Run R, were conducted, respectively. The experimental results showed that, by adding Strains III (2), the surface tension could reduce from 46.5 mN/m to 39.8 mN/m and the corresponding time to maintain the surface tension under 50 mN/ m could prolong from 60 h to 90 h. The oxygen uptake rate and total accumulated oxygen consumption with Stains III (2) were both higher than those without Strains III (2), while the accumulation of H2S in outlet gas was reduced to around 50% of Run R. Moreover, two additional experiments were also carried out to examine the effects of strains coming from different systems. One is adding Strains III (2) with a dose of 0.4% (Run 2), and the other is seedling commercial Strains at the same conditions, the composting experiments showed that: Run 2 was more effective than Run 3, because the commercial Strains can be suppressed significantly in a complex composting system with different pH, high temperature and some of metals. The bio-surfactant was also added into the solid waste, which contained some toxic substances, the corresponding results showed that the remove rate of Hg and sodium pentachlorophenolate (PCP-Na) could be improved highly. Thus, the microenvironment, reactionrate and composting quality could be enhanced effectively by adding bio-surfactant to the composting process.

  16. Production of Lipopeptide Biosurfactant by a Marine Nesterenkonia sp. and Its Application in Food Industry

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, George S.; Priyadharsini, Sethu; Sajayan, Arya; Priyadharsini, Gopal B.; Poulose, Navya; Selvin, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Biosurfactants are smart biomolecules which have wide spread application in medicines, processed foods, cosmetics as well as in bioremediation. In food industry, biosurfactants are used as emulsion stabilizing agents, antiadhesives, and antimicrobial/antibiofilm agents. Nowadays biosurfactant demands in industries has increased tremendously and therefore new bacterial strains are being explored for large scale production of biosurfactants. In this study, an actinobacterial strain MSA31 was isolated from a marine sponge Fasciospongia cavernosa which showed high activity in biosurfactant screening assays such as drop collapsing, oil displacement, lipase and emulsification. Lipopeptide produced by MSA31 was found to be thermostable which was evident in differential scanning calorimetry analysis. The spectral data obtained in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of aliphatic groups combined with peptide moiety which is a characteristic feature of lipopeptides. The stability index of lipopeptide MSA31 revealed “halo-alkali and thermal tolerant biosurfactant” which can be used in the food industry. Microtiter plate assay showed 125 μg/ml of lipopeptide was effective in reducing the biofilm formation activity of pathogenic multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The confocal laser scanning microscopic images provided further evidences that lipopeptide MSA31 was an effective antibiofilm agent. The antioxidant activity of lipopeptide MSA31 may be due to the presence of unsaturated fatty acid present in the molecule. The brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay showed lipopeptide MSA31 was non-toxic and can be used as food additives. Incorporation of lipopeptide MSA31 in muffin showed improved organoleptic qualities compared to positive and negative control. This study provides a valuable input for this lipopeptide to be used in food industry as an effective emulsifier, with good antioxidant activity and as a protective agent against S. aureus. PMID

  17. Purification and characterization of biosurfactant produced by Bacillus licheniformis Y-1 and its application in remediation of petroleum contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boqun; Liu, Jinpeng; Ju, Meiting; Li, Xiaojing; Yu, Qilin

    2016-06-15

    In our previous research, a petroleum degrading bacteria strain Bacillus licheniformis Y-1 was obtained in Dagang Oilfield which had the capability of producing biosurfactant. This biosurfactant was isolated and purified in this work. The biosurfactant produced by strain Y-1 had the capability to decrease the surface tension of water from 74.66 to 27.26mN/m, with the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 40mg/L. The biosurfactant performed not only excellent stabilities against pH, temperature and salinity, but also great emulsifying activities to different kinds of oil, especially the crude oil. According to the results of FT-IR spectrum and (1)H NMR spectrum detection, the surfactant was determined to be a cyclic lipopeptide. Furthermore, through the addition of surfactant, the effect of petroleum contaminated soil remediation by fungi got a significant improvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Production and characterization of lipopeptide biosurfactant by a sponge-associated marine actinomycetes Nocardiopsis alba MSA10.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, R; Seghal Kiran, G; Hema, T A; Selvin, Joseph; Rajeetha Raviji, T; Shanmughapriya, S

    2009-10-01

    A sponge-associated marine actinomycetes Nocardiopsis alba MSA10 was screened and evaluated for the production of biosurfactant. Biosurfactant production was confirmed by conventional screening methods including hemolytic activity, drop collapsing test, oil displacement method, lipase production and emulsification index. The active compound was extracted with three solvents including ethyl acetate, diethyl ether and dichloromethane. The diethyl ether extract was fractionated by TLC and semi-preparative HPLC to isolate the pure compound. In TLC, a single discrete spot was obtained with the R (f) 0.60 and it was extrapolated as valine. Based on the chemical characterization, the active compound was partially confirmed as lipopeptide. The optimum production was attained at pH 7, temperature 30 degrees C, and 1% salinity with glucose and peptone supplementation as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Considering the biosurfactant production potential of N. alba, the strain could be developed for large-scale production of lipopeptide biosurfactant.

  19. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TSBSO 3.8, a biosurfactant-producing strain with biotechnological potential for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Souza, Pamella Macedo; de Araújo, Livia Vieira; Barros, Thalita Gonçalves; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães; Seldin, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    A screening for biosurfactant-producing bacteria was conducted with 217 strains that were isolated from environmental samples contaminated with crude oil and/or petroleum derivatives. Although 19 promising biosurfactant producers were detected, strain TSBSO 3.8, which was identified by molecular methods as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, drew attention for its production of a high-activity compound that presented an emulsification activity of 63% and considerably decreased surface (28.5 mN/m) and interfacial (11.4 mN/m) tensions in Trypticase Soy Broth culture medium. TSBSO 3.8 growth and biosurfactant production were tested under different physical and chemical conditions to evaluate its biotechnological potential. Biosurfactant production occurred between 0.5% and 7% NaCl, at pH values varying from 6 to 9 and temperatures ranging from 28 to 50 °C. Moreover, biosurfactant properties remained the same after autoclaving at 121 °C for 15 min. The biosurfactant was also successful in a test to simulate microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the surface active compound was a surfactin, known as a powerful biosurfactant that is commonly produced by Bacillus species. The production of a high-efficiency biosurfactant, under some physical and chemical conditions that resemble those experienced in an oil production reservoir, such as high salinities and temperatures, makes TSBSO 3.8 an excellent candidate and creates good expectations for its application in MEOR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of soybean oil refinery wastes through recycling them for producing biosurfactant using Pseudomonas aeruginosa MR01.

    PubMed

    Partovi, Maryam; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Roostaazad, Reza; Bahmaei, Manochehr; Tayyebi, Shokoufe

    2013-06-01

    Biosurfactant production through a fermentation process involving the biodegradation of soybean oil refining wastes was studied. Pseudomonas aeruginosa MR01 was able to produce extracellular biosurfactant when it was cultured in three soybean oil refinement wastes; acid oil, deodorizer distillate and soapstock, at different carbon to nitrogen ratios. Subsequent fermentation kinetics in the three types of waste culture were also investigated and compared with kinetic behavior in soybean oil medium. Biodegradation of wastes, biosurfactant production, biomass growth, nitrate consumption and the number of colony forming units were detected in four proposed media, at specified time intervals. Unexpectedly, wastes could stimulate the biodegradation activity of MR01 bacterial cells and thus biosurfactant synthesis beyond that of the refined soybean oil. This is evident from higher yields of biodegradation and production, as revealed in the waste cultures (Ydeg|(Soybean oil) = 53.9 % < Ydeg|(wastes) and YP/S|(wastes) > YP/S|(Soybean oil) = 0.31 g g(-1), respectively). Although production yields were approximately the same in the three waste cultures (YP/S|(wastes) =/~ 0.5 g g(-1)), microbial activity resulted in higher yields of biodegradation (96.5 ± 1.13 %), maximum specific growth rate (μ max = 0.26 ± 0.02 h(-1)), and biosurfactant purity (89.6 %) with a productivity of 14.55 ± 1.10 g l(-1), during the bioconversion of soapstock into biosurfactant. Consequently, applying soybean oil soapstock as a substrate for the production of biosurfactant with commercial value has the potential to provide a combination of economical production with environmental protection through the biosynthesis of an environmentally friendly (green) compound and reduction of waste load entering the environment. Moreover, this work inferred spectrophotometry as an easy method to detect rhamnolipids in the biosurfactant products.

  1. Structural and physicochemical characterization of crude biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SP4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pornsunthorntawee, Orathai; Wongpanit, Panya; Chavadej, Sumaeth; Abe, Masahiko; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SP4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in Thailand, was used to produce a biosurfactant from a nutrient broth with palm oil as the carbon source. The key components of the crude biosurfactant were fractionated by using HPLC-ELSD technique. With the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, in combination with (1)H NMR and MS analyses, chemical structures of the fractionated components of the crude biosurfactant were identified as rhamnolipid species. When compared to synthetic surfactants, including Pluronic F-68, which is a triblock nonionic surfactant containing poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide), and sodium dodecyl sulfate, the crude biosurfactant showed comparable physicochemical properties, in terms of the surface activities. The crude biosurfactant reduced the surface tension of pure water to 29.0 mN/m with a critical micelle concentration of approximately 200 mg/l, and it exhibited good thermal and pH stability. The crude biosurfactant also formed stable water-in-oil microemulsions with crude oil and various types of vegetable oils, but not with short-chain hydrocarbons.

  2. Carbon spectrum utilization by an indigenous strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514: Production, characterization and surface active properties of biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J; Upasani, Vivek N

    2016-12-01

    The present research work was undertaken with a mandate to study carbon spectrum utilization and structural characterization of biosurfactant produced by indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIM 5514, which showed unique properties to utilize a large number of carbon sources effectively for production of biosurfactant, although glucose was the best carbon substrate. In Bushnell-Hass medium supplemented with glucose (1%, w/v), 3.178±0.071g/l biosurfactant was produced by this isolate in 96h. The biosurfactant produced showed surface tension and emulsification activity values from 29.14±0.05 to 62.29±0.13mN/m and 88.50±1.96 to 15.40±0.91%, respectively. Toluene showed highest emulsification activity followed by kerosene. However, kerosene exhibited emulsion stability for 30days. Biosurfactant was characterized as a mixture of di-rhamnolipid (Rha-Rha-C10-C14:1) and mono-rhamnolipid (Rha-C8-C10) by FTIR, ESI-MS and LC-MS techniques. High biosurfactant yield opens up doors for the isolate to find utility in various industries.

  3. Isolation and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by a new and promising strain of Oleomonas sagaranensis AT18.

    PubMed

    Saimmai, Atipan; Rukadee, Onkamon; Onlamool, Theerawat; Sobhon, Vorasan; Maneerat, Suppasil

    2012-10-01

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from mangrove sediment in southern Thailand. Isolates were screened for biosurfactant production by using the surface tension test. The highest reduction of surface tension was achieved with a bacterial strain which was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Oleomonas sagaranensis AT18. It has also been investigated using different carbon and nitrogen sources. It showed that the strain was able to grow and reduce the surface tension of the culture supernatant to 25 mN/m. In all 5.30 g of biosurfactant yield was obtained after 54 h of cultivation by using molasses and NaNO₃ as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The biosurfactant recovery by chloroform:methanol extraction showed a small critical micelle concentration value (8 mg/l), thermal and pH stability with respect to surface tension reduction. It also showed emulsification activity and a high level of salt concentration. The biosurfactant obtained was confirmed as a glycolipid by using a biochemical test, FT-IR and mass spectra. The crude biosurfactant showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and also had the ability to emulsify oil and enhance PAHs solubility.

  4. A Novel Biosurfactant Produced by Aureobasidium pullulans L3-GPY from a Tiger Lily Wild Flower, Lilium lancifolium Thunb.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Shik; Lee, In Kyoung; Yun, Bong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Yeast biosurfactants are important biotechnological products in the food industry, and they have medical and cosmeceutical applications owing to their specific modes of action, low toxicity, and applicability. Thus, we have isolated and examined biosurfactant-producing yeast for various industrial and medical applications. A rapid and simple method was developed to screen biosurfactant-producing yeasts for high production of eco-friendly biosurfactants. Using this method, several potential niches of biosurfactant-producing yeasts, such as wild flowers, were investigated. We successfully selected a yeast strain, L3-GPY, with potent surfactant activity from a tiger lily, Lilium lancifolium Thunb. Here, we report the first identification of strain L3-GPY as the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans. In addition, we isolated a new low-surface-tension chemical, designated glycerol-liamocin, from the culture supernatant of strain L3-GPY through consecutive chromatography steps, involving an ODS column, solvent partition, silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, and an ODS Sep-Pak cartridge column. The chemical structure of glycerol-liamocin, determined by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, indicates that it is a novel compound with the molecular formula C33H62O12. Furthermore, glycerol-liamocin exhibited potent biosurfactant activity (31 mN/m). These results suggest that glycerol-liamocin is a potential novel biosurfactantfor use in various industrial applications. PMID:25849549

  5. Evaluation of orange peel for biosurfactant production by Bacillus licheniformis and their ability to degrade naphthalene and crude oil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arthala Praveen; Janardhan, Avilala; Viswanath, Buddolla; Monika, Kallubai; Jung, Jin-Young; Narasimha, Golla

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium was isolated from mangrove soil and was identified as Bacillus licheniformis (KC710973). The potential of a mangrove microorganism to utilize different natural waste carbon substrates for biosurfactant production and biodegradation of hydrocarbons was evaluated. Among several substrates used in the present study, orange peel was found to be best substrate of biosurfactant yield with 1.796 g/L and emulsification activity of 75.17 % against diesel. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of biosurfactant compound revealed that the isolated biosurfactant is in lipopeptide nature. The (1)H-NMR of the extracted biosurfactant from B. licheniformis has a doublet signal at 0.8-0.9 ppm corresponding to six hydrogen atoms suggests the presence of a terminal isopropyl group. The spectra showed two main regions corresponding to resonance of α-carbon protons (3.5-5.5 ppm) and side-chain protons (0.25-3.0 ppm). All the data suggests that the fatty acid residue is from lipopeptide. From the biodegradation studies, it concluded that the biosurfactant produced by B. licheniformis further can add to its value as an ecofriendly and biodegradable product.

  6. Electrokinetic-Enhanced Remediation of Phenanthrene-Contaminated Soil Combined with Sphingomonas sp. GY2B and Biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weijia; Guo, Chuling; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Xujun; Wei, Yanfu; Lu, Guining; Dang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Electrokinetic-microbial remediation (EMR) has emerged as a promising option for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils. The aim of this study was to enhance degradation of phenanthrene (Phe)-contaminated soils using EMR combined with biosurfactants. The electrokinetic (EK) remediation, combined with Phe-degrading Sphingomonas sp. GY2B, and biosurfactant obtained by fermentation of Pseudomonas sp. MZ01, degraded Phe in the soil with an efficiency of up to 65.1 % at the anode, 49.9 % at the cathode after 5 days of the treatment. The presence of biosurfactants, electricity, and a neutral electrolyte stimulated the growth of the degrading bacteria as shown by a rapid increase in microbial biomass with time. The electrical conductivity and pH changed little during the course of the treatment, which benefitted the growth of microorganisms and the remediation of Phe-contaminated soil. The EMR system with the addition of biosurfactant had the highest Phe removal, demonstrating the biosurfactant may enhance the bioavailability of Phe and the interaction with the microorganism. This study suggests that the EMR combined with biosurfactants can be used to enhance in situ bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils.

  7. Mobilization and co-transport of pyrene in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2 biosurfactants in sandy soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance, P.; Lapointe, M.

    1998-12-31

    Washing technologies are currently applied for the remediation of contaminated soils. The efficiency of biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to mobilize some hydrocarbons sorbed on soils has already been demonstrated. However, few studies have been made to define optimal procedures for the injection of these rhamnolipids in soil. This study examines (1) the efficiency of the biosurfactants produced by P. aeruginosa UG2 to mobilize pyrene from a contaminated sandy loam as compared to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS); (2) the injection procedures that might affect the efficiency of pyrene mobilization using UG2 biosurfactants; and (3) the co-transport of UG2 biosurfactants and pyrene. Based on the experimental results, it would be advantageous to use a high UG2 biosurfactant concentration, a high pore water velocity, and possibly a flow interruption of more than 15 h in order to reduce the injected volume and the duration of the treatment required. The 0.25% UG2 biosurfactant concentration greatly enhanced pyrene transport and could facilitate contaminant recovery.

  8. Screening of cloud microorganisms isolated at the Puy de Dôme (France) station for the production of biosurfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Pascal; Canet, Isabelle; Sancelme, Martine; Wirgot, Nolwenn; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    A total of 480 microorganisms collected from 39 clouds sampled at the Puy de Dôme station (alt. 1465 m; 45°46'19'' N, 2°57'52'' E; Massif Central, France) were isolated and identified. This unique collection was screened for biosurfactant (surfactants of microbial origin) production by measuring the surface tension (σ) of the crude extracts, comprising the supernatants of the pure cultures, using the pendant drop technique. The results showed that 41 % of the tested strains were active producers (σ < 55 mN m-1), with 7 % being extremely active (σ < 30 mN m-1). The most efficient biosurfactant producers (σ < 45 mN m-1) belong to a few bacterial genera (Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas) from the Υ-Proteobacteria class (78 %) and a yeast genus (Udeniomyces) from the Basidiomycota phylum (11 %). Some Bacillus strains from the Firmicutes phylum were also active but represented a small fraction of the collected population. Strains from the Actinobacteria phylum in the collection examined in the present study showed moderate biosurfactant production (45<σ < 55 mN m-1). Pseudomonas (Υ-Proteobacteria), the most frequently detected genus in clouds, with some species issued from the phyllosphere, was the dominant group for the production of biosurfactants. We observed some correlations between the chemical composition of cloud water and the presence of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms, suggesting the "biogeography" of this production. Moreover, the potential impact of the production of biosurfactants by cloud microorganisms on atmospheric processes is discussed.

  9. Effect of biosurfactant and fertilizer on biodegradation of crude oil by marine isolates of Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Thavasi, Rengathavasi; Jayalakshmi, Singaram; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of fertilizers and biosurfactants on biodegradation of crude oil by three marine bacterial isolates; Bacillus megaterium, Corynebacterium kutscheri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five sets of experiments were carried out in shake flask and microcosm conditions with crude oil as follows: Set 1-only bacterial cells added (no fertilizer and biosurfactant), Set 2-with additional fertilizer only, Set 3-with additional biosurfactant only, Set 4-with added biosurfactant+fertilizer, Set 5-with no bacterial cells added (control), all the above experimental sets were incubated for 168 h. The biosurfactant+fertilizer added Set 4, resulted in maximum crude oil degradation within shake flask and microcosm conditions. Among the three bacterial isolates, P. aeruginosa and biosurfactant produced by this strain resulted in maximum crude oil degradation compared to the other two bacterial strains investigated. Interestingly, when biosurfactant and bacterial cells were used (Set 3), significant oil biodegradation activity occurred and the difference between this treatment and that in Set 4 with added fertilizer+biosurfactant were only 4-5% higher degradation level in shake flask and 3.2-7% in microcosm experiments for all three bacterial strains used. It is concluded that, biosurfactants alone capable of promoting biodegradation to a large extent without added fertilizers, which will reduce the cost of bioremediation process and minimizes the dilution or wash away problems encountered when water soluble fertilizers used during bioremediation of aquatic environments.

  10. Production, characterization, and antifungal activity of a biosurfactant produced by Rhodotorula babjevae YS3.

    PubMed

    Sen, Suparna; Borah, Siddhartha Narayan; Bora, Arijit; Deka, Suresh

    2017-05-30

    Sophorolipids are one of the most promising glycolipid biosurfactants and have been successfully employed in bioremediation and various other industrial sectors. They have also been described to exhibit antimicrobial activity against different bacterial species. Nevertheless, previous literature pertaining to the antifungal activity of sophorolipids are limited indicating the need for further research to explore novel strains with wide antimicrobial activity. A novel yeast strain, Rhodotorula babjevae YS3, was recently isolated from an agricultural field in Assam, Northeast India. This study was primarily emphasized at the characterization and subsequent evaluation of antifungal activity of the sophorolipid biosurfactant produced by R. babjevae YS3. The growth kinetics and biosurfactant production by R. babjevae YS3 was evaluated by cultivation in Bushnell-Haas medium containing glucose (10% w/v) as the sole carbon source. A reduction in the surface tension of the culture medium from 70 to 32.6 mN/m was observed after 24 h. The yield of crude biosurfactant was recorded to be 19.0 g/l which might further increase after optimization of the growth parameters. The biosurfactant was characterized to be a heterogeneous sophorolipid (SL) with both lactonic and acidic forms after TLC, FTIR and LC-MS analyses. The SL exhibited excellent oil spreading and emulsifying activity against crude oil at 38.46 mm(2) and 100% respectively. The CMC was observed to be 130 mg/l. The stability of the SL was evaluated over a wide range of pH (2-10), salinity (2-10% NaCl) and temperature (at 120 °C for time intervals of 30 up to 120 min). The SL was found to retain surface-active properties under the extreme conditions. Additionally, the SL exhibited promising antifungal activity against a considerably broad group of pathogenic fungi viz. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium verticilliodes, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi, Corynespora cassiicola, and Trichophyton rubrum. The

  11. Structural Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity of a Biosurfactant Obtained From Bacillus pumilus DSVP18 Grown on Potato Peels

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Gupta, Sonam; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Pruthi, Parul; Pruthi, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biosurfactants constitute a structurally diverse group of surface-active compounds derived from microorganisms. They are widely used industrially in various industrial applications such as pharmaceutical and environmental sectors. Major limiting factor in biosurfactant production is their production cost. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate biosurfactant production under laboratory conditions with potato peels as the sole source of carbon source. Materials and Methods: A biosurfactant-producing bacterial strain (Bacillus pumilus DSVP18, NCBI GenBank accession no. GQ865643) was isolated from motor oil contaminated soil samples. Biochemical characteristics of the purified biosurfactant were determined and its chemical structure was analyzed. Stability studies were performed and biological activity of the biosurfactant was also evaluated. Results: The strain, when grown on modified minimal salt media supplemented with 2% potato peels as the sole carbon source, showed the ability to reduce Surface Tension (ST) value of the medium from 72 to 28.7 mN/m. The isolated biosurfactant (3.2 ± 0.32 g/L) was stable over a wide range of temperatures (20 - 120 ºC), pH (2-12) and salt concentrations (2 - 12%). When characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, it was found to be a lipopeptide in nature, which was further confirmed by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass peak 1044.60) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data showed that the isolated biosurfactant at the concentration range of 30 - 35 µg/ml had strong antimicrobial activity when tested against standard strains of Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Paenibacillus larvae. Conclusions: Potato peels were proved to be potentially useful substrates for biosurfactant production by B. pumilus DSVP18. The strain possessed a

  12. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  13. Biosurfactant assisted recovery of the C5-C11 hydrocarbon fraction from oily sludge using biosurfactant producing consortium culture of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nkhalambayausi Chirwa, Evans M; Mampholo, Chidinyane T; Fayemiwo, Oluwademilade M; Bezza, Fisseha A

    2017-03-10

    A biosurfactant producing culture of bacteria was isolated from an automobile engine oil dump site which was later used as an inoculum in batch and continuous flow oil recovery from oily sludge. Initially, an emulsion of oily sludge was prepared by mixing 5% m/v solids: 21% v/v bituminous sludge: 77% v/v water. The isolated cultures were added to vessels with stable emulsions to facilitate the separation of oil droplets from the sludge matrix. In batches with live cultures, up to 35% oil recovery was achieved after incubation for 10 days. Further investigations were conducted in a semi-continuous feed, fed-batch plug flow reactor (FB-PFR) system. Up to 99.7% was achieved in the FB-PFR after operation for 10 days, much higher than the recovery achieved in the pure batch systems where only 35% oil was recovered after incubation for 10 days. The improved performance in the FB-PFR was attributed to differential separation of particles under variable velocity along the reactor. The culture in the reactor was predominated by Klebsiellae, Enterobacteriaceae and Bacilli throughout the experiment. A crude biosurfactant produced by the cultures was partially purified and analyzed using the liquid chromatograph coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) which showed that the molecular structure of the biosurfactant produced closely matched the structure of lipopeptides identified in earlier studies. This process is aimed at recovering useful oil from oily waste sludge with the added advantage of degrading aromatic organic impurities in the oil to produce a cleaner oil product. The further advantage of the FB-PFR system was that, the bacteria discharged together with effluent sludge residue further degraded chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the treated sludge thereby reducing the polluting potential of the final disposed sludge.

  14. Biofilm lifestyle enhances diesel bioremediation and biosurfactant production in the Antarctic polyhydroxyalkanoate producer Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    PubMed

    Tribelli, Paula M; Di Martino, Carla; López, Nancy I; Raiger Iustman, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    Diesel is a widely distributed pollutant. Bioremediation of this kind of compounds requires the use of microorganisms able to survive and adapt to contaminated environments. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium with a remarkable survival capability associated to polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production. This strain was used to investigate the effect of cell growth conditions--in biofilm versus shaken flask cultures--as well as the inocula characteristics associated with PHAs accumulation, on diesel degradation. Biofilms showed increased cell growth, biosurfactant production and diesel degradation compared with that obtained in shaken flask cultures. PHA accumulation decreased biofilm cell attachment and enhanced biosurfactant production. Degradation of long-chain and branched alkanes was observed in biofilms, while in shaken flasks only medium-chain length alkanes were degraded. This work shows that the PHA accumulating bacterium P. extremaustralis can be a good candidate to be used as hydrocarbon bioremediation agent, especially in extreme environments.

  15. Aqueous phase partitioning of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers by biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa WH-2.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suman; Singh, Partapbir; Raj, Mayil; Chadha, Bhupinder Singh; Saini, Harvinder Singh

    2009-11-15

    The different isomers of technical-grade hexachlorocyclohexane (t-HCH) including the insecticidal gamma-isomer, commonly known as lindane, have been reported to be toxic, carcinogenic and endocrine disrupters. The spatial arrangements of the chlorine atoms on different isomers and low aqueous phase solubility contribute to their persistence in environment, beta-HCH being the most resistance to transformation. The biosurfactant preparation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate WH-2 was evaluated for its ability to improve the aqueous phase partitioning of different isomers of HCH-muck. Further, the ability of biosurfactant preparation to emulsify HCH and n-hexadecane was checked under different conditions, usually characteristic of sites contaminated with pollutants viz. wide range of pH, temperature, and salinity. The data obtained from this study will be helpful in designing suitable bioremediation strategies for huge stock piles of HCH-muck and sites polluted by reckless use/disposal of HCH-isomers.

  16. Laccase bioelectrocatalyst at a steroid-type biosurfactant-modified carbon nanotube interface.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Masato; Sasaki, Aiko; Togami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Achieving oxygen reduction at high positive potentials with fast heterogeneous electron transfer is desirable for the biocathode of fuel cells based on enzymes. Here, we present an effective interface for obtaining direct electron transfer from a laccase (Lac)-based cathode for O2 reduction, starting from a potential very close to the redox equilibrium potential of the oxygen/water couple. The interface between Lac and single-walled carbon nanotubes was improved by modification with the steroid biosurfactant sodium cholate. The heterogeneous electron-transfer rate between the type-1 Cu site of Lac and the modified electrode was determined to be 3000 s(-1). The electron-transfer rate was sensitive to the side chain of the steroid biosurfactant, and the rate decreased more than 10-fold when sodium deoxycholate was used as the side chain.

  17. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are “green” amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS – lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents. PMID:25904907

  18. Biosurfactant production from marine hydrocarbon-degrading consortia and pure bacterial strains using crude oil as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Eleftheria; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Korkakaki, Emmanouela; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BSs) are "green" amphiphilic molecules produced by microorganisms during biodegradation, increasing the bioavailability of organic pollutants. In this work, the BS production yield of marine hydrocarbon degraders isolated from Elefsina bay in Eastern Mediterranean Sea has been investigated. The drop collapse test was used as a preliminary screening test to confirm BS producing strains or mixed consortia. The community structure of the best consortia based on the drop collapse test was determined by 16S-rDNA pyrotag screening. Subsequently, the effect of incubation time, temperature, substrate and supplementation with inorganic nutrients, on BS production, was examined. Two types of BS - lipid mixtures were extracted from the culture broth; the low molecular weight BS Rhamnolipids and Sophorolipids. Crude extracts were purified by silica gel column chromatography and then identified by thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results indicate that BS production yield remains constant and low while it is independent of the total culture biomass, carbon source, and temperature. A constant BS concentration in a culture broth with continuous degradation of crude oil (CO) implies that the BS producing microbes generate no more than the required amount of BSs that enables biodegradation of the CO. Isolated pure strains were found to have higher specific production yields than the complex microbial marine community-consortia. The heavy oil fraction of CO has emerged as a promising substrate for BS production (by marine BS producers) with fewer impurities in the final product. Furthermore, a particular strain isolated from sediments, Paracoccus marcusii, may be an optimal choice for bioremediation purposes as its biomass remains trapped in the hydrocarbon phase, not suffering from potential dilution effects by sea currents.

  19. Inhibition of Candida albicans CC biofilms formation in polystyrene plate surfaces by biosurfactant produced by Trichosporon montevideense CLOA72.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Andrea S; Miranda, Tatiana T; Lula, Ivana; Denadai, Ângelo M L; Sinisterra, Rubén D; Santoro, Marcelo M; Santos, Vera L

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of glycolipid-type biosurfactant produced by Trichosporon montevideense CLOA72 in the formation of biofilms in polystyrene plate surfaces by Candida albicans CC isolated from the apical tooth canal. Biofilm formation was reduced up to 87.4% with use of biosurfactant at 16 mg/ml concentration. It has been suggested that the interaction with the cell or polystyrene plate surface could ultimately be responsible for these actions. Therefore, the interaction of C. albicans CC cells with the biosurfactant, as well as the corresponding thermodynamic parameters, have been determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and zeta potential measurements. This process is endothermic (((int)H°=+1284±5 cal/mg OD(600)) occurring with a high increase of entropy (T((int)S°=+10635 cal/mg OD(600)). The caloric energy rate data released during the titulation indicates saturation of the cell-biosurfactant at 1.28 mg/ml OD(600). Also, the zeta potential of the cell surface was monitored as a function of the biosurfactant concentration added to cell suspension showing partial neutralization of net surface charge, since the value of zeta potential ranged from -16 mV to -6 mV during the titration. The changes of cell surface characteristics can contribute to the inhibition of initial adherence of cells of C. albicans in surface. The CMC of the purified biosurfactant produced from T. montevideense CLOA72 is 2.2 mg/ml, as determined both by ITC dilution experiments and by surface tension measurements. This biomolecule did not presented any cytotoxic effect in HEK 293A cell line at concentrations of 0.25-1 mg/ml. This study suggests a possible application of the referred biosurfactant in inhibiting the formation of biofilms on plastic surfaces by C. albicans.

  20. A Novel Glycolipid Biosurfactant Confers Grazing Resistance upon Pantoea ananatis BRT175 against the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Derek D. N.; Nickzad, Arvin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pantoea is a versatile genus of bacteria with both plant- and animal-pathogenic strains, some of which have been suggested to cause human infections. There is, however, limited knowledge on the potential determinants used for host association and pathogenesis in animal systems. In this study, we used the model host Dictyostelium discoideum to show that isolates of Pantoea ananatis exhibit differential grazing susceptibility, with some being resistant to grazing by the amoebae. We carried out a high-throughput genetic screen of one grazing-resistant isolate, P. ananatis BRT175, using the D. discoideum pathosystem to identify genes responsible for the resistance phenotype. Among the 26 candidate genes involved in grazing resistance, we identified rhlA and rhlB, which we show are involved in the biosynthesis of a biosurfactant that enables swarming motility in P. ananatis BRT175. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), the biosurfactant was shown to be a glycolipid with monohexose-C10-C10 as the primary congener. We show that this novel glycolipid biosurfactant is cytotoxic to the amoebae and is capable of compromising cellular integrity, leading to cell lysis. The production of this biosurfactant may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and could contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE The genetic factors used for host interaction by the opportunistic human pathogen Pantoea ananatis are largely unknown. We identified two genes that are important for the production of a biosurfactant that confers grazing resistance against the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that the biosurfactant, which exhibits cytotoxicity toward the amoebae, is a glycolipid that incorporates a hexose rather than rhamnose. The production of this biosurfactant may confer a competitive advantage in the environment and could potentially contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. PMID

  1. Diverse effects of a biosurfactant from Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231 on the adhesion of resting and growing bacteria to polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Kuyukina, Maria S; Ivshina, Irena B; Korshunova, Irina O; Stukova, Galina I; Krivoruchko, Anastasiya V

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a trehalolipid biosurfactant produced by Rhodococcus ruber IEGM 231 on the bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on the surface of polystyrene microplates. The adhesion of Gram-positive (Arthrobacter simplex, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacterium linens, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescencens) bacteria correlated differently with the cell hydrophobicity and surface charge. In particular, exponentially growing bacterial cells with increased hydrophobicities adhered stronger to polystyrene compared to more hydrophilic stationary phase cells. Also, a moderate correlation (0.56) was found between zeta potential and adhesion values of actively growing bacteria, suggesting that less negatively charged cells adhered stronger to polystyrene. Efficient biosurfactant concentrations (10-100 mg/L) were determined, which selectively inhibited (up to 76 %) the adhesion of tested bacterial cultures, however without inhibiting their growth. The biosurfactant was more active against growing bacteria rather than resting cells, thus showing high biofilm-preventing properties. Contact angle measurements revealed more hydrophilic surface of the biosurfactant-covered polystyrene compared to bare polystyrene, which allowed less adhesion of hydrophobic bacteria. Furthermore, surface free-energy calculations showed a decrease in the Wan der Waals (γ(LW)) component and an increase in the acid-based (γ(AB)) component caused by the biosurfactant coating of polysterene. However, our results suggested that the biosurfactant inhibited the adhesion of bacteria independently on their surface charges. AFM scanning revealed three-type biosurfactant structures (micelles, cord-like assemblies and large vesicles) formed on glass, depending on concentrations used, that could lead to diverse anti-adhesive effects against different bacterial species.

  2. Biosurfactant-biopolymer driven microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) and its optimization by an ANN-GA hybrid technique.

    PubMed

    Dhanarajan, Gunaseelan; Rangarajan, Vivek; Bandi, Chandrakanth; Dixit, Abhivyakti; Das, Susmita; Ale, Kranthikiran; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2017-08-20

    A lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by marine Bacillus megaterium and a biopolymer produced by thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis were tested for their application potential in the enhanced oil recovery. The crude biosurfactant obtained after acid precipitation effectively reduced the surface tension of deionized water from 70.5 to 28.25mN/m and the interfacial tension between lube oil and water from 18.6 to 1.5mN/m at a concentration of 250mgL(-1). The biosurfactant exhibited a maximum emulsification activity (E24) of 81.66% against lube oil. The lipopeptide micelles were stabilized by addition of Ca(2+) ions to the biosurfactant solution. The oil recovery efficiency of Ca(2+) conditioned lipopeptide solution from a sand-packed column was optimized by using artificial neural network (ANN) modelling coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) optimization. Three important parameters namely lipopeptide concentration, Ca(2+) concentration and solution pH were considered for optimization studies. In order to further improve the recovery efficiency, a water soluble biopolymer produced by Bacillus licheniformis was used as a flooding agent after biosurfactant incubation. Upon ANN-GA optimization, 45% tertiary oil recovery was achieved, when biopolymer at a concentration of 3gL(-1) was used as a flooding agent. Oil recovery was only 29% at optimal conditions predicted by ANN-GA, when only water was used as flooding solution. The important characteristics of biopolymers such as its viscosity, pore plugging capabilities and bio-cementing ability have also been tested. Thus, as a result of biosurfactant incubation and biopolymer flooding under the optimal process conditions, a maximum oil recovery of 45% was achieved. Therefore, this study is novel, timely and interesting for it showed the combined influence of biosurfactant and biopolymer on solubilisation and mobilization of oil from the soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genomic and chemical insights into biosurfactant production by the mangrove-derived strain Bacillus safensis CCMA-560.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Daniela Ferreira; de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; de Souza Galaverna, Renan; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Greenfield, Paul; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Melo, Itamar Soares; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Midgley, David; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2015-04-01

    Many Bacillus species can produce biosurfactant, although most of the studies on lipopeptide production by this genus have been focused on Bacillus subtilis. Surfactants are broadly used in pharmaceutical, food and petroleum industry, and biological surfactant shows some advantages over the chemical surfactants, such as less toxicity, production from renewable, cheaper feedstocks and development of novel recombinant hyperproducer strains. This study is aimed to unveil the biosurfactant metabolic pathway and chemical composition in Bacillus safensis strain CCMA-560. The whole genome of the CCMA-560 strain was previously sequenced, and with the aid of bioinformatics tools, its biosurfactant metabolic pathway was compared to other pathways of closely related species. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and high-resolution TOF mass spectrometry (MS) were used to characterize the biosurfactant molecule. B. safensis CCMA-560 metabolic pathway is similar to other Bacillus species; however, some differences in amino acid incorporation were observed, and chemical analyses corroborated the genetic results. The strain CCMA-560 harbours two genes flanked by srfAC and srfAD not present in other Bacillus spp., which can be involved in the production of the analogue gramicidin. FTIR and MS showed that B. safensis CCMA-560 produces a mixture of at least four lipopeptides with seven amino acids incorporated and a fatty acid chain with 14 carbons, which makes this molecule similar to the biosurfactant of Bacillus pumilus, namely, pumilacidin. This is the first report on the biosurfactant production by B. safensis, encompassing the investigation of the metabolic pathway and chemical characterization of the biosurfactant molecule.

  4. Production and characterization of microbial biosurfactants for potential use in oil-spill remediation.

    PubMed

    Marti, M E; Colonna, W J; Patra, P; Zhang, H; Green, C; Reznik, G; Pynn, M; Jarrell, K; Nyman, J A; Somasundaran, P; Glatz, C E; Lamsal, B P

    2014-02-05

    Two biosurfactants, surfactin and fatty acyl-glutamate, were produced from genetically-modified strains of Bacillus subtilis on 2% glucose and mineral salts media in shake-flasks and bioreactors. Biosurfactant synthesis ceased when the main carbohydrate source was completely depleted. Surfactin titers were ∼30-fold higher than fatty acyl-glutamate in the same medium. When bacteria were grown in large aerated bioreactors, biosurfactants mostly partitioned to the foam fraction, which was recovered. Dispersion effectiveness of surfactin and fatty acyl-glutamate was evaluated by measuring the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR). The CMC values for surfactin and fatty acyl-glutamate in double deionized distilled water were 0.015 and 0.10 g/L, respectively. However, CMC values were higher, 0.02 and 0.4 g/L for surfactin and fatty acyl-glutamate, respectively, in 12 parts per thousand Instant Ocean®[corrected].sea salt, which has been partly attributed to saline-induced conformational changes in the solvated ionic species of the biosurfactants. The DORs for surfactin and fatty acyl-glutamate were 1:96 and 1:12, respectively, in water. In Instant Ocean® solutions containing 12 ppt sea salt, these decreased to 1:30 and 1:4, respectively, suggesting reduction in oil dispersing efficiency of both surfactants in saline. Surfactant toxicities were assessed using the Gulf killifish, Fundulus grandis, which is common in estuarine habitats of the Gulf of Mexico. Surfactin was 10-fold more toxic than fatty acyl-glutamate. A commercial surfactant, sodium laurel sulfate, had intermediate toxicity. Raising the salinity from 5 to 25 ppt increased the toxicity of all three surfactants; however, the increase was the lowest for fatty acyl-glutamate.

  5. Biosurfactant production from novel air isolate NITT6L: screening, characterization and optimization of media.

    PubMed

    Vanavil, Balakrishnan; Perumalsamy, Muthiah; Rao, Ambati Seshagiri

    2013-09-28

    In this paper, an air isolate (NITT6L) has been screened based on hemolytic activity, emulsification activity, drop collapsing test, and oil displacement test, as well as lipase activity. It was found that strain NITT6L was able to reduce the surface tension of the medium from 61.5 to 39.83 mN/m and could form stable emulsions with tested vegetable oils. Morphological, biochemical, 16S rRNA sequencing analyses, and fatty acid methyl ester analysis using gas chromatography confirmed that the air isolate under study was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Characterization of the biosurfactant using agar double diffusion assay revealed that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature, and CTAB-methylene blue assay and Molisch test revealed its glycolipid nature. The FT-IR spectrum confirmed that the crude biosurfactant was a rhamnolipid. Using unoptimized medium containing sucrose as the carbon source, the isolate was found to produce 0.3 mg/ml of rhamnolipid in batch cultivation (shake flask) at 37°C and pH 7. Optimization of the medium components was carried out using design of experiments and the yield of rhamnolipid has been enhanced to 4.6 mg/ml in 72 h of fermentation.

  6. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter. PMID:26869357

  7. Effect of biosurfactants on laccase production and phenol biodegradation in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Fang; Yuan, Xing-Zhong; Zhong, Hua; Liu, Zhi-Feng; Li, Hui; Jiang, Li-Li; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2011-05-01

    The effects of two biosurfactants, tea saponin (TS) and rhamnolipid (RL), on the production of laccase and the degradation of phenol by P. simplicissimum were investigated in solid-state fermentation consisting of rice straw, rice bran, and sawdust. Firstly, the effects of phenol on the fermentation process were studied in the absence of surfactants. Then, a phenol concentration of 3 mg/g in the fermentation was selected for detailed research with the addition of biosurfactants. The results showed that TS and RL at different concentrations had stimulative effects on the enzyme activity of laccase. The highest laccase activities during the fermentation were enhanced by 163.7%, 68.2%, and 23.3% by TS at concentrations of 0.02%, 0.06%, and 0.10%, respectively. As a result of the enhanced laccase activity, the efficiency of phenol degradation was also improved by both biosurfactants. RL caused a significant increase of fungal biomass in the early stage of the fermentation, while TS had an inhibitory effect in the whole process. These results indicated that RL could mitigate the negative effects of phenol on fungal growth and consequently improve laccase production and phenol degradation. TS was potentially applicable to phenol-polluted solid-state fermentation.

  8. Metagenomic discovery of novel enzymes and biosurfactants in a slaughterhouse biofilm microbial community.

    PubMed

    Thies, Stephan; Rausch, Sonja Christina; Kovacic, Filip; Schmidt-Thaler, Alexandra; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Daniel, Rolf; Streit, Wolfgang; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-06-08

    DNA derived from environmental samples is a rich source of novel bioactive molecules. The choice of the habitat to be sampled predefines the properties of the biomolecules to be discovered due to the physiological adaptation of the microbial community to the prevailing environmental conditions. We have constructed a metagenomic library in Escherichia coli DH10b with environmental DNA (eDNA) isolated from the microbial community of a slaughterhouse drain biofilm consisting mainly of species from the family Flavobacteriaceae. By functional screening of this library we have identified several lipases, proteases and two clones (SA343 and SA354) with biosurfactant and hemolytic activities. Sequence analysis of the respective eDNA fragments and subsequent structure homology modelling identified genes encoding putative N-acyl amino acid synthases with a unique two-domain organisation. The produced biosurfactants were identified by NMR spectroscopy as N-acyltyrosines with N-myristoyltyrosine as the predominant species. Critical micelle concentration and reduction of surface tension were similar to those of chemically synthesised N-myristoyltyrosine. Furthermore, we showed that the newly isolated N-acyltyrosines exhibit antibiotic activity against various bacteria. This is the first report describing the successful application of functional high-throughput screening assays for the identification of biosurfactant producing clones within a metagenomic library.

  9. Investigation of the release of PAHs from artificially contaminated sediments using cyclolipopeptidic biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Portet-Koltalo, F; Ammami, M T; Benamar, A; Wang, H; Le Derf, F; Duclairoir-Poc, C

    2013-10-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be preponderant in contaminated sediments and understanding how they are sorbed in the different mineral and organic fractions of the sediment is critical for effective removal strategies. For this purpose, a mixture of seven PAHs was studied at the sediment/water interface and sorption isotherms were obtained. The influence of various factors on the sorption behavior of PAHs was evaluated, such as the nature of minerals, pH, ionic strength and amount of organic matter. Afterwards, the release of PAHs from the sediment by surfactants was investigated. The effectiveness of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was compared to natural biosurfactants, of cyclolipopeptidic type (amphisin and viscosin-like mixture), produced by two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. The desorption of PAHs (from naphthalene to pyrene), from the highly retentive kaolinite fraction, could be favored by adding SDS or amphisin, but viscosin-like biosurfactants were only effective for 2-3 ring PAHs desorption (naphthalene to phenanthrene). Moreover, while SDS favors the release of all the target PAHs from a model sediment containing organic matter, the two biosurfactants tested were only effective to desorb the lowest molecular weight PAHs (naphthalene to fluorene).

  10. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  11. Biosurfactants as demulsifying agents for oil recovery from oily sludge--performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chirwa, Evans M N; Mampholo, Tshepo; Fayemiwo, Oluwademilade

    2013-01-01

    The oil producing and petroleum refining industries dispose of a significant amount of oily sludge annually. The sludge typically contains a mixture of oil, water and solid particles in the form of complex slurry. The oil in the waste sludge is inextractible due to the complex composition and complex interactions in the sludge matrix. The sludge is disposed of on land or into surface water bodies thereby creating toxic conditions or depleting oxygen required by aquatic animals. In this study, a fumed silica mixture with hydrocarbons was used to facilitate stable emulsion ('Pickering' emulsion) of the oily sludge. The second step of controlled demulsification and separation of oil and sludge into layers was achieved using either a commercial surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)) or a cost-effective biosurfactant from living organisms. The demulsification and separation of the oil layer using the commercial surfactant SDS was achieved within 4 hours after stopping mixing, which was much faster than the 10 days required to destabilise the emulsion using crude biosurfactants produced by a consortium of petrochemical tolerant bacteria. The recovery rate with bacteria could be improved by using a more purified biosurfactant without the cells.

  12. Biosurfactants' Production from Renewable Natural Resources: Example of Innovativeand Smart Technology in Circular Bioeconomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpute, Surekha K.; Płaza, Grażyna A.; Banpurkar, Arun G.

    2017-03-01

    A strong developed bio-based industrial sector will significantly reduce dependency on fossil resources, help the countries meet climate change targets, and lead to greener and more environmental friendly growth. The key is to develop new technologies to sustainably transform renewable natural resources into bio-based products and biofuels. Biomass is a valuable resource and many parameters need to be taken in to account when assessing its use and the products made from its. The bioeconomy encompass the production of renewable biological resources and their conversion into food, feed and bio-based products (chemicals, materials and fuels) via innovative and efficient technologies provided by industrial biotechnology. The paper presents the smart and efficient way to use the agro-industrial, dairy and food processing wastes for biosurfactant's production. Clarification processes are mandatory to use the raw substrates for microbial growth as well as biosurfactant production for commercial purposes. At the same time it is very essential to retain the nutritional values of those cheap substrates. Broad industrial perspectives can be achieved when quality as well as the quantity of the biosurfactant is considered in great depth. Since substrates resulting from food processing, dairy, animal fat industries are not explored in great details; and hence are potential areas which can be explored thoroughly.

  13. Emulsification and antioxidation of biosurfactant extracts from Chinese medicinal herbs fermentation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyeh; Lin, Tachen; Shieh, Youmin

    2015-10-01

    Much attention has been paid to biosurfactants produced using microorganisms, but little direct evidence for the development of natural biosurfactants combined with Chinese medicinal herbs are available. We investigated the emulsification and antioxidation of biosurfactant extracts from Chinese medicinal herb fermentation (BECMHF) in vitro and their application in water retention capacity and the skin prick and allergy test (SPAT) index for skin cells. The results showed that the water retention capacity of BECMHF was positively associated with the emulsification index. The SPAT index of 8 Chinese medicinal herbs was 0 at a 1% or 2% concentration, suggesting no sensitivity or adverse effects on the skin cells. Eight BECMHFs produced using Alcaligenes piechaudii CC-ESB2 exhibited antioxidant capabilities, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and superoxide scavenging activity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity at a concentration of 10 mg/ml. The mechanism involved inhibitory effects on nitrite, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs) generation. BECMHFs exhibit favorable antioxidative properties in health food and satisfactory emulsifying and moisturizing characteristics in cosmetic formulations, which have potential applications in the health food and cosmetic industries, respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oil degradation and biosurfactant production by the deep sea bacterium Dietzia maris As-13-3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Cai, Bobo; Shao, Zongze

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations of extreme environments have revealed numerous bioactive natural products. However, biosurfactant-producing strains from deep sea extreme environment are largely unknown. Here, we show that Dietzia maris As-13-3 isolated from deep sea hydrothermal field could produce di-rhamnolipid as biosurfactant. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the purified di-rhamnolipid was determined to be 120 mgL−1, and it lowered the surface tension of water from 74 ± 0.2 to 38 ± 0.2 mN m−1. Further, the alkane metabolic pathway-related genes and di-rhamnolipid biosynthesis-related genes were also analyzed by the sequencing genome of D. maris As-13-3 and quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), respectively. Q-PCR analysis showed that all these genes were induced by n-Tetradecane, n-Hexadecane, and pristane. To the best of our knowledge, this is first report about the complete pathway of the di-rhamnolipid synthesis process in the genus Dietzia. Thus, our study provided the insights into Dietzia in respects of oil degradation and biosurfactant production, and will help to evaluate the potential of Dietzia in marine oil removal. PMID:25566224

  15. Adsorption of a biosurfactant on surfaces to enhance the disinfection of surfaces contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Meylheuc, T; Renault, M; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    2006-05-25

    The effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (PAH) on the inactivation of adherent Listeria monocytogenes LO28 cells were examined. The surfaces tested were stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) conditioned or not with an anionic biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Dilution-neutralization methods were used to assess the effectiveness of sanitizer solutions on planktonic and adherent cells. Tests were performed on L. monocytogenes cultivated at 37 degrees Celsius (body temperature) or 20 degrees Celsius (ambient temperature). The results demonstrated that i) a total deficiency in nutrients induced by the incubation of cells in 0.15 M NaCl favored the action of NaOCl and PAH on planktonic cells; ii) by reducing the number of cells adhering to stainless steel, pre-conditioning of the surface with the biosurfactant reduced the level of contamination of the surface and thus favored the bactericidal activities of the disinfectants; and iii) the weak binding energies involved in the adsorption of the biosurfactant on PTFE surfaces resulted in there being no reduction by the polymer of the surface contamination. Furthermore, this study confirmed that adherent cells exhibited increased resistance to the actions of the disinfectants when compared to the resistance of planktonic cells.

  16. Physicochemical characterization of biosurfactant and its potential to remove oil from soil and cotton cloth.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2012-08-01

    An alkaliphilic bacterium, Klebsiella sp. strain RJ-03, produced a biosurfactant, which showed low viscosity with pseudoplastic rheological behavior and exhibited emulsification activity with oils and hydrocarbons. The biosurfactant has excellent oil removing efficiency as compared to chemical surfactants. The isolated biosurfactant has compatibility with detergents and enhanced oil removing efficiency from soil and cotton cloths. It comprised of sugar, uronic acid, protein and sulfate. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of six monosaccharides (w/w), glucose (6.65%), galactose (23.98%), rhamnose (14.94%), mannose (17.54%), fucose (9.47%) and 6-O-Me-galactose (1.4%). It is a high molecular weight, thermostable biopolymer showing degradation above 300 °C. Positive ion reflector mode of MALDI TOF-TOF MS analysis revealed series of low and mid range mass peaks (m/z) corresponding to mono-, di-, tri- and oligo-saccharides content. The NMR, FT-IR, EDX-SEM, AFM and PSD analysis confirmed the presence of functional groups, bonds, elements and particle size respectively.

  17. Supporting data for identification of biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluent

    PubMed Central

    Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Abdullah, Shakila; Salim, Mohd Razman

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from agro-food industrial effluet. The identification of the potential bacterial strain using a polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA gene analysis was closely related to Serratia marcescens with its recorded strain of SA30 “Fundamentals of mass transfer and kinetics for biosorption of oil and grease from agro-food industrial effluent by Serratia marcescens SA30” (Fulazzaky et al., 2015) [1]; however, many biochemical tests have not been published yet. The biochemical tests of biosurfactant production, haemolytic assay and cell surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the beneficial strain of biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Here we do share data collected from the biochemical tests to get a better understanding of the use of Serratia marcescens SA30 to degrade oil, which contributes the technical features of strengthening the biological treatment of oil-contaminated wastewater in tropical environments. PMID:27077083

  18. Metagenomic discovery of novel enzymes and biosurfactants in a slaughterhouse biofilm microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Thies, Stephan; Rausch, Sonja Christina; Kovacic, Filip; Schmidt-Thaler, Alexandra; Wilhelm, Susanne; Rosenau, Frank; Daniel, Rolf; Streit, Wolfgang; Pietruszka, Jörg; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-01-01

    DNA derived from environmental samples is a rich source of novel bioactive molecules. The choice of the habitat to be sampled predefines the properties of the biomolecules to be discovered due to the physiological adaptation of the microbial community to the prevailing environmental conditions. We have constructed a metagenomic library in Escherichia coli DH10b with environmental DNA (eDNA) isolated from the microbial community of a slaughterhouse drain biofilm consisting mainly of species from the family Flavobacteriaceae. By functional screening of this library we have identified several lipases, proteases and two clones (SA343 and SA354) with biosurfactant and hemolytic activities. Sequence analysis of the respective eDNA fragments and subsequent structure homology modelling identified genes encoding putative N-acyl amino acid synthases with a unique two-domain organisation. The produced biosurfactants were identified by NMR spectroscopy as N-acyltyrosines with N-myristoyltyrosine as the predominant species. Critical micelle concentration and reduction of surface tension were similar to those of chemically synthesised N-myristoyltyrosine. Furthermore, we showed that the newly isolated N-acyltyrosines exhibit antibiotic activity against various bacteria. This is the first report describing the successful application of functional high-throughput screening assays for the identification of biosurfactant producing clones within a metagenomic library. PMID:27271534

  19. Enhanced octadecane dispersion and biodegradation by a Pseudomonas rhamnolipid surfactant (biosurfactant).

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Miller, R M

    1992-01-01

    A microbial surfactant (biosurfactant) was investigated for its potential to enhance bioavailability and, hence, the biodegradation of octadecane. The rhamnolipid biosurfactant used in this study was extracted from culture supernatants after growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 in phosphate-limited proteose peptone-glucose-ammonium salts medium. Dispersion of octadecane in aqueous solutions was dramatically enhanced by 300 mg of the rhamnolipid biosurfactant per liter, increasing by a factor of more than 4 orders of magnitude, from 0.009 to > 250 mg/liter. The relative enhancement of octadecane dispersion was much greater at low rhamnolipid concentrations than at high concentrations. Rhamnolipid-enhanced octadecane dispersion was found to be dependent on pH and shaking speed. Biodegradation experiments done with an initial octadecane concentration of 1,500 mg/liter showed that 20% of the octadecane was mineralized in 84 h in the presence of 300 mg of rhamnolipid per liter, compared with only 5% octadecane mineralization when no surfactant was present. These results indicate that rhamnolipids may have potential for facilitating the bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrocarbons having limited water solubility. PMID:1444363

  20. The use of biosurfactants for the removal of metals from oil-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Yong, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    The addition of biodegradable biosurfactants is a potential solution for heavy metal and oil removal from soil. Batch soil washing of a contaminated soil was performed using three different types of biosurfactants, surfactin, a rhamnolipid and a sophorolipid and an oil-contaminated soil containing 890 mg/kg zinc, 420 mg/kg copper, with 12.6% oil and grease content. Water alone removed insignificant amounts of zinc and copper. Highest levels of zinc removal were obtained using 12% rhamnolipid (19.5% of the zinc) and 4% sophorolipid with 0.7% HCl (15.8% of the zinc). Whereas copper was removed most efficiently (greater than 25%) with 12% rhamnolipid or with 2% rhamnolipid with 1% NaOH. Significant amounts were also removed with 4% sophorolipid and 0.25% surfactin, both in combination with NaOH, which alone removed only 5% copper and 2% zinc. Sequential extraction was used to determine the speciation of metals among the exchangeable, carbonate, oxide, organic and residual fractions of the soil. The carbonate and oxide fractions accounted for over 90% of the zinc present in the soil. The organic fraction in the soil constituted over 70% of the copper. Removal of copper during soil washing by the rhamnolipid is mostly from the organic phase, whereas zinc removal was from the oxide fraction. In conclusion, the results clearly indicated the feasibility of removing the metals with the anionic biosurfactants tested even though the exchangeable metal fractions are very low.

  1. Biosurfactant as a Promoter of Methane Hydrate Formation: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Arora, Amit; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Kumar, Rajnish; Balomajumder, Chandrajit; Singh, Anil Kumar; Santhakumari, B; Kumar, Pushpendra; Laik, Sukumar

    2016-02-12

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) are solid non-stoichiometric compounds often regarded as a next generation energy source. Successful commercialization of NGH is curtailed by lack of efficient and safe technology for generation, dissociation, storage and transportation. The present work studied the influence of environment compatible biosurfactant on gas hydrate formation. Biosurfactant was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain A11 and was characterized as rhamnolipids. Purified rhamnolipids reduced the surface tension of water from 72 mN/m to 36 mN/m with Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of 70 mg/l. Use of 1000 ppm rhamnolipids solution in C type silica gel bed system increased methane hydrate formation rate by 42.97% and reduced the induction time of hydrate formation by 22.63% as compared to water saturated C type silica gel. Presence of rhamnolipids also shifted methane hydrate formation temperature to higher values relative to the system without biosurfactant. Results from thermodynamic and kinetic studies suggest that rhamnolipids can be applied as environment friendly methane hydrate promoter.

  2. Utilization of palm oil decanter cake as a novel substrate for biosurfactant production from a new and promising strain of Ochrobactrum anthropi 2/3.

    PubMed

    Noparat, Pongsak; Maneerat, Suppasil; Saimmai, Atipan

    2014-03-01

    A biosurfactant-producing bacterium, isolate 2/3, was isolated from mangrove sediment in the south of Thailand. It was evaluated as a potential biosurfactant producer. The highest biosurfactant production (4.52 g/l) was obtained when the cells were grown on a minimal salt medium containing 25 % (v/v) palm oil decanter cake and 1 % (w/v) commercial monosodium glutamate as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. After microbial cultivation at 30 °C in an optimized medium for 96 h, the biosurfactant produced was found to reduce the surface tension of pure water to 25.0 mN/m with critical micelle concentrations of 8.0 mg/l. The stability of the biosurfactant at different salinities, pH and temperature and also its emulsifying activity was investigated. It is an effective surfactant at very low concentrations over a wide range of temperatures, pH and salt concentrations. The biosurfactant obtained was confirmed as a glycolipid type biosurfactant by using a biochemical test, fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, MNR and mass spectrometry. The crude biosurfactant showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and also had the ability to emulsify oil and enhance polyaromatic hydrocarbons solubility.

  3. Characterization and properties of biosurfactants produced by a newly isolated strain Bacillus methylotrophicus DCS1 and their applications in enhancing solubility of hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Jemil, Nawel; Ben Ayed, Hanen; Hmidet, Noomen; Nasri, Moncef

    2016-11-01

    Six biosurfactant-producing bacteria were isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Sfax, Tunisia. Isolates were screened for biosurfactant production by different conventional methods including hemolytic activity, surface tension reduction, drop-collapsing and oil displacement tests. All these screening tests show that all the isolates behave differently. Among the isolated bacteria, DCS1 strain was selected for further studies based on its highest activities and it was identified as Bacillus methylotrophicus DCS1. This strain was found to be a potent producer of biosurfactant when cultivated in mineral-salts medium supplemented with diesel oil (2 %, v/v) as a sole carbon source. Physicochemical properties and stability of biosurfactants synthesized by B. methylotrophicus DCS1 were investigated. The produced biosurfactants DCS1, from Landy medium, possess high surface activity that could lower the surface tension of water to a value of 31 from 72 mN m(-1) and have a critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 100 mg L(-1). Compared with SDS and Tween 80, biosurfactants showed excellent emulsification activities against different hydrocarbon substrates and high solubilization efficiency towards diesel oil. Biosurfactants DCS1 showed good stability in a wide range of temperature, pH and salinity. These results suggested that biosurfactants produced by B. methylotrophicus DCS1 could be an alternative to chemically synthesized surfactants for use in bioremediation processes to enhance the solubility of hydrophobic compounds.

  4. Synergistic effect of thermophilic temperature and biosurfactant produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus BU03 on the biodegradation of phenanthrene in bioslurry system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenyong; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan Woon-Chung

    2011-06-15

    This study aimed at investigating the synergistic effect of temperature and biosurfactant on the biodegradation of phenanthrene in bioslurry. Bench-scale bioslurry experiments were conducted at 25 and 55°C. The desorption rate coefficients of phenanthrene (K(des)) obtained using the pseudo-first order model were 0.0026 and 0.0035 kg mg(-1)h(-1) at 25 and 55°C, respectively. Addition of 1500 mg L(-1) biosurfactant, produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus BU03, marginally increased the K(des) at 25°C since most of biosurfactant was sorbed onto soil; however, significantly increased the K(des) to 0.0087 kg mg(-1)h(-1) at 55°C as the thermophilic temperature reduced the adsorption of the biosurfactant onto soil and subsequently enhanced the desorption of phenanthrene. The biodegradation of phenanthrene well fitted pseudo-first order kinetics based on the assumption that biodegradation was limited by the desorption. About 78.7% of phenanthrene was degraded in 30 days at 25°C; and addition of biosurfactant did not affect the biodegradation. However, addition of the biosurfactant or inoculation of A. calcoaceticus BU03 at 55°C significantly enhanced the biodegradation by increasing the K(des). Results indicate that synergistic application of thermophilic temperature and biosurfactant or inoculation of biosurfactant producing microorganisms is an effective and innovative method to enhance the efficiency of PAH degradation in bioslurry system.

  5. Enrichment and identification of biosurfactant-producing oil field microbiota utilizing electron acceptors other than oxygen and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kryachko, Yuriy; Semler, Diana; Vogrinetz, John; Lemke, Markus; Links, Matthew G; McCarthy, E Luke; Haug, Brenda; Hemmingsen, Sean M

    2016-08-10

    Microorganisms indigenous to an oil reservoir were grown in media containing either sucrose or proteins in four steel vessels under anoxic conditions at 30°C and 8.3MPa for 30days, to enrich biosurfactant producers. Fermentation of substrate was possible in the protein-containing medium and either fermentation or respiration through reduction of sulfate occurred in the sucrose-containing medium. Growth of microorganisms led to 3.4-5.4-fold surface tension reduction indicating production of biosurfactants in amounts sufficient for enhancement of gas-driven oil recovery. Analysis of sequenced cpn60 amplicons showed that Pseudomonas sp. highly similar to biosurfactant producing P. fluorescens and to Pseudomonas sp. strain TKP predominated, and a bacterium highly similar to biosurfactant producing Bacillus mojavensis was present in vessels. Analysis of 16S rDNA amplicons allowed only genus-level identification of these bacteria. Thus, cpn60-amplicon analysis was a more relevant tool for identification of putative biosurfactant producers than 16S rDNA-amplicon analysis. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodegradation of endosulfan isomers and its metabolite endosulfate by two biosurfactant producing bacterial strains of Bordetella petrii.

    PubMed

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the investigation was to study the biodegradation of endosulfan isomers and its major metabolite endosulfate by two biosurfactant producing bacterial strains of Bordetella petrii. The significance of the study is to evaluate the capability of biosurfactant producing bacterial strains in enhancing the bioavailability of endosulfan. Sixty bacterial strains were isolated from the endosulfan degrading bacterial consortium and were screened for endosulfan degradation and biosurfactant production. Among those, two strains Bordetella petrii I GV 34 (Gene bank Accession No KJ02262) and Bordetella petrii II GV 36 (Gene bank Accession No KJ022625) were capable of degrading endosulfan with simultaneous biosurfactant production. Bordetella petrii I degraded 89% of α and 84% of β isomers of endosulfan whereas Bordetella petrii II degraded 82% of both the isomers. Both the strains were able to reduce the surface tension up to 19.6% and 21.4% with a minimum observed surface tension of 45 Dynes/cm and 44 Dynes/cm, respectively. The study revealed that the strains have the potential to enhance the degradation endosulfan residues in contaminated sites and water by biosurfactant production.

  7. Formulation of a Commercial Biosurfactant for Application as a Dispersant of Petroleum and By-Products Spilled in Oceans

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Bruno G.; Brito, Juliana G. M.; Brasileiro, Pedro P. F.; Rufino, Raquel D.; Luna, Juliana M.; Santos, Valdemir A.; Sarubbo, Leonie A.

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills in oceans cause irreparable damage to marine life and harm the coastal populations of affected areas. It is therefore fundamental to develop treatment strategies for such spills. Currently, chemical dispersants have been used during oil spills, although these agents have been increasingly restricted due to their toxic potential. Thus, the aim of the present study was to formulate a biodegradable commercial biosurfactant for application as a dispersant. Biosurfactants are scientifically known biomolecules produced by microorganisms capable of allowing water-oil interaction. Thus, a biosurfactant was produced by the yeast Candida bombicola URM 3718 cultivated in industrial waste and formulated with the addition of a potassium sorbate preservative for fractionated sterilization (tyndallization) and the combination of fluent vaporization with the preservative. After formulation, samples were stored for 120 days, followed by surface tension, emulsification and oil dispersant tests in sea water. The results were promising for the biosurfactant formulated with the preservative, which demonstrated stability and an absence of toxicity in experiments with a marine indicator. The commercial biosurfactant was tested at different pH values, temperatures and in the presence of salt, demonstrating potential industrial application at a cost compatible with the environmental field. The formulation process developed in this research was patented in the Brazilian National Intellectual Property Institute (patent number BR1020140179631). PMID:27803697

  8. Biosurfactant production by Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil and its physico-chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Nalini, S; Parthasarathi, R

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize and optimize the growth media for biosurfactant production from Serratia rubidaea SNAU02 isolated from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil from Cuddalore district, Tamilnadu, India. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea SNAU02, was able to reduce the surface tension to 34.4 mN m(-1) in MSM medium. The biosurfactant was characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The GC-MS analysis shows that dirhamnolipid was detected in abundance as predominant congener than monorhamnolipid. The response surface methodology (RSM) -central composite design (CCD) was performed to optimize the media for biosurfactant production. The maximum emulsification index was obtained under the optimal condition of 29.31 g L(-1) mannitol; 2.06 g L(-1) yeast extract, medium pH 6.97 and 5.69 g L(-1) NaCl. The biosurfactant produced by S. rubidaea recovered 92% of used engine oil adsorbed to a sand sample, suggested the potential application in microbial enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of a novel biosurfactant producing Pseudomonas koreensis lineage that is endemic to Cuatro Ciénegas Basin.

    PubMed

    Toribio, Jeiry; Escalante, Ana E; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; González-González, Andrea; Zavala, Sergio; Souza, Valeria; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work is the taxonomic characterization of three biosurfactant-producing bacterial isolates from the Churince system at Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB) in the Mexican State of Coahuila, and the study of the possible role of biosurfactant production in their ecology and evolution. We determined that these isolates belong to a Pseudomonas koreensis lineage endemic to CCB, using standard taxonomical techniques, phylogenetic analysis of three chromosomal loci and phenotypic characterization. This new lineage has the distinct capacity to produce a biosurfactant when compared with previously reported P. koreensis isolates recovered from agricultural soils in Korea. We present evidence suggesting that the biosurfactant secreted by CCB P. koreensis strains is involved in their ability to compete with a CCB Exiguobacterium aurantiacum strain (m5-66) used as a model organism in competition experiments. Furthermore, the ethyl acetate extract of culture supernatant of CCB P. koreensis strains results in growth inhibition not only of E. aurantiacum m5-66, but also of a Bacillus subtilis type strain (ATCC6633). Based on these results we propose that the production of biosurfactant could be of ecological importance and could play a role in the separation of the P. koreensis CCB lineage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. An efficient biosurfactant-producing bacterium Selenomonas ruminantium CT2, isolated from mangrove sediment in south of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Saimmai, Atipan; Onlamool, Theerawat; Sobhon, Vorasan; Maneerat, Suppasil

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactant-producing bacteria, isolate CT2, was isolated from mangrove sediment in the south of Thailand. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene from isolate CT2 showed 100 % similarity with Selenomonas ruminantium. The highest biosurfactant production (5.02 g/l) was obtained when the cells were grown on minimal salt medium containing 15 g/l molasses and 1 g/l commercial monosodium glutamate supplemented with 1 g/l NaCl, 0.1 g/l leucine, 5 % (v/v) inoculum size at 30 °C and 150 rpm after 54 h of cultivation. The biosurfactant obtained by extraction with ethyl acetate showed high surface tension reduction (25.5 mN/m), a small CMC value (8 mg/l), thermal and pH stability with respect to surface tension reduction and emulsification activity and a high level of salt tolerance. The biosurfactant obtained was confirmed as a lipopeptide by using a biochemical test, FT-IR, MNR and mass spectrometry. The crude biosurfactant showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and also had the ability to emulsify oil and enhance PAHs solubility.

  11. Investigation of Antimicrobial Activity and Statistical Optimization of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 Biosurfactant Production in Solid-State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Mnif, Ines; Kammoun, Radhouan; Ayadi, Imen; Saadaoui, Imen; Maktouf, Sameh; Chaabouni-Ellouze, Semia

    2012-01-01

    During the last years, several applications of biosurfactants with medical purposes have been reported. Biosurfactants are considered relevant molecules for applications in combating many diseases. However, their use is currently extremely limited due to their high cost in relation to that of chemical surfactants. Use of inexpensive substrates can drastically decrease its production cost. Here, twelve solid substrates were screened for the production of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant and the maximum yield was found with millet. A Plackett-Burman design was then used to evaluate the effects of five variables (temperature, moisture, initial pH, inoculum age, and inoculum size). Statistical analyses showed that temperature, inoculum age, and moisture content had significantly positive effect on SPB1 biosurfactant production. Their values were further optimized using a central composite design and a response surface methodology. The optimal conditions of temperature, inoculum age, and moisture content obtained under the conditions of study were 37°C, 14 h, and 88%, respectively. The evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of this compound was carried out against 11 bacteria and 8 fungi. The results demonstrated that this biosurfactant exhibited an important antimicrobial activity against microorganisms with multidrug-resistant profiles. Its activity was very effective against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus xylosus, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumonia, and so forth. PMID:22536017

  12. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSVP20 isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and its physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Adgaba, Nuru; Khan, Khalid Ali; Pruthi, Vikas; Al-Waili, Noori

    2015-11-01

    Among 348 microbial strains isolated from petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, five were selected for their ability to produce biosurfactant based on battery of screening assay including hemolytic activity, surface tension reduction, drop collapse assay, emulsification activity, and cell surface hydrophobicity studies. Of these, bacterial isolate DSVP20 was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCBI GenBank accession no. GQ865644) based on biochemical characterization and the 16S rDNA analysis, and it was found to be a potential candidate for biosurfactant production. Maximum biosurfactant production recorded by P. aeruginosa DSVP20 was 6.7 g/l after 72 h at 150 rpm and at a temperature of 30 °C. Chromatographic analysis and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) revealed that it was a glycolipid in nature which was further confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Bioremediation studies using purified biosurfactant showed that P. aeruginosa DSVP20 has the ability to degrade eicosane (97%), pristane (75%), and fluoranthene (47%) when studied at different time intervals for a total of 7 days. The results of this study showed that the P. aeruginosa DSVP20 and/or biosurfactant produced by this isolate have the potential role in bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  13. The impact of the Bacillus subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant on the midgut histology of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and determination of its putative receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Boukedi, Hanen; Elleuch, Mouna; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Tounsi, Slim

    2012-02-01

    SPB1 is a Bacillus subtilis strain producing a lipopeptide biosurfactant. The insecticidal activity of this biosurfactant was evaluated against the Egyptian cotton leaf worm (Spodoptera littoralis). It displayed toxicity with an LC(50) of 251 ng/cm(2). The histopathological changes occurred in the larval midgut of S. littoralis treated with B. subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant were vesicle formation in the apical region, cellular vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells and their boundaries. Ligand-blotting experiments with S. littoralis brush border membrane vesicles showed binding of SPB1 biosurfactant to a protein of 45 kDa corresponding to its putative receptor. The latter differs in molecular size from those recognized by Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1C toxins, commonly known by their activity against S. littoralis. This result wires the application of B. subtilis biosurfactant for effective control of S. littoralis larvae, particularly in the cases where S. littoralis will develop resistance against B. thuringiensis toxins.

  14. Treatment of diesel- and kerosene-contaminated water by B. subtilis SPB1 biosurfactant-producing strain.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ayedi, Younes; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of hydrocarbon utilization by B. subtilis SPB1, a biosurfactant-producing strain. Microbial growth, biosurfactant production, and hydrocarbon biodegradation were studied in a liquid mineral medium, supplemented with 2% hydrocarbons in both the absence and in the presence of 0.1% yeast extract. Preliminary studies showed that maximum growth was registered with a 2% hydrocarbon solution. Results showed that the addition of yeast extract greatly stimulated microbial growth and thus induced biosurfactant production. Furthermore, biodegradation efficiencies were higher in the presence of yeast extract. Kerosene fuel was more recalcitrant to biodegradation than diesel oil. This study's findings suggest that the addition of an organic nitrogen source stimulates tension-active agents' production, which emulsifies hydrophobic compounds and enhances their biodegradation and microbial growth.

  15. Biosurfactant produced by novel Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 with biodegradation of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenjie; Du, Zhifeng; Cui, Qingfeng; Dong, Hao; Wang, Fuyi; He, Panqing; Tang, YongChun

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have threatened the environment due to toxicity and poor bioavailability. Interest in degradation of these hazardous materials by biosurfactant-producing bacteria has been steadily increasing in recent years. In this work, a novel biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 was isolated to degrade a wide range of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Production of lipopeptide biosurfactant was observed in all biodegradable studies. These lipopeptides were purified and identified by C18 RP-HPLC system and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Results of structural analysis showed that these lipopeptides generated from different hydrocarbons were classified to be surfactin, fengycin and lichenysin. Heavy-oil sludge washing experiments demonstrated that lipopeptides produced by Pseudomonas sp. WJ6 have 92.46% of heavy-oil washing efficiency. The obtained results indicate that this novel bacterial strain and its lipopeptides have great potentials in the environmental remediation and petroleum recovery.

  16. Production of a new glycolipid biosurfactant from marine Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 in solid-state cultivation.

    PubMed

    Kiran, G Seghal; Thomas, T Anto; Selvin, Joseph

    2010-06-15

    Considering the need of potential biosurfactant producers and economic production processes using industrial waste, the present study aims to develop solid-state culture (SSC) of a marine actinobacterium for biosurfactant production. A potential biosurfactant producer Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 was isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra. Among the substrates screened, wheat bran increased the production significantly (E(24) 25%) followed by oil seed cake and industrial waste such as tannery pretreated sludge, treated molasses (distillery waste) and pretreated molasses. Enhanced biosurfactant production was achieved under SSC conditions using kerosene as carbon source, beef extract as nitrogen source and wheat bran as substrate. The maximum production of biosurfactant by MSA04 occurred at a C/N ratio of 0.5 envisaging that a higher amount of nitrogen source is required by the strain compared to that of the carbon source. The kerosene and beef extract interactively increase the production and a stable production was attained with the influence of both factors independently. A significant interactive influence of secondary control factors such as copper sulfate and inoculum size was validated in response surface methods-based experiments. The surface active compound produced by MSA04 was characterized as glycolipid with a hydrophobic non-polar hydrocarbon chain (nonanoic acid methyl ester) and hydrophilic sugar, 3-acetyl 2,5 dimethyl furan. In conclusion, the strain N. lucentensis MSA04 was a potential source of glycolipid biosurfactant, could be used for the development of bioremediation processes in the marine environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Milk lipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Milk fat conveys a number of desirable qualities to food, and various lipid components contribute to human nutrition and health. Over 96% of milk lipids consist of triacylglycerols, which contain a variety of fatty acids. Di- and monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, sterols, and phospho-, glyco-,...

  18. Preliminary study : optimization of pH and salinity for biosurfactant production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in diesel fuel and crude oil medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhwani, A. Z. N.; Nurlaila, H. S.; Ferdinand, F. D. K.; Fachria, R.; Hasan, A. E. Z.; Yani, M.; Setyawati, I.; Suryani

    2017-03-01

    Biosurfactant is secondary metabolite surface active compound produced by microorganisms which is nontoxic and eco-friendly. Microorganism producing biosurfactant that is quite potential to use in many applications is from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Good quality of biosurfactant production from microbes is supported by the suitable nutrients and environmental factors. The aim of this research was to obtain preliminary o data upon the optimum pH and salinity for the production of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in diesel fuel and crude oil medium. P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 cultured in diesel fuel and crude oil as carbon source showed biosurfactant activity. P.aeruginosa-derived biosurfactant was capable to form stable emulsion for 24 hours (EI24) in hydrocarbons n-hexane solutions. The particular biosurfactant showed EI24 highest value at pH 7 (31.02%) and 1% NaCl (24.00%) when P. aeruginosa was grown in 10% diesel fuel medium in mineral salt solution. As for the media crude oil, the highest EI24 value was at pH 6 (52.16%) and 1% NaCl (33.30%).

  19. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics.

  20. Effects of the combination between bio-surfactant product types and washing times on the removal of crude oil in nonwoven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triawan, Agus; Ni'matuzahroh, Supriyanto, Agus

    2017-06-01

    This research aimed to characterize bio-surfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis 3KP, Pseudomonas putida T1-8, Micrococcus sp. L II 61 and Acinetobacter sp. P 2(1) and to investigate its combination's effects on the removal of crude oil in nonwoven fabric with different washing times vary from 12, 24 to 36 hours. The production of bio-surfactants was done on Synthetic Mineral Water mixed with molasses 4% within four days. The bio-surfactant products were characterized by measuring the Surface Tension (ST) (mN/m) and Emulsion Activity (EA) (%). Oil removal experiment was done by mixing 10 mL bio-surfactant with nonwoven fabric that contains crude oil into 50 mL bottle inside a shaker. The removed crude oil was extracted with n-hexane and measured gravimetrically. The results were then being analyzed with two ways ANOVA and Duncan test. Bio-surfactant produced by four bacteria has variations of Surface Tension and Emulsion Activity values. Bio-surfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis 3KP and Pseudomonas putida T1-8 showed the increasing of crude oil removal as washing times increase, while bio-surfactant produced by Micrococcus sp. L II 61 and Acinetobacter sp. P2(1) showed the decreasing result at 36 hours. However, the combination that showed the best result was Acinetobacter sp. P 2(1) at 24 hours valued 65,3%.

  1. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Huang, Guo-he; An, Chun-jiang; Wei, Jia

    2011-06-15

    The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  2. Microemulsion synthesis of silver nanoparticles using biosurfactant extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MKVIT3 strain and comparison of their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Das, Moonjit; Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Malipeddi, Himaja

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, an efficient biosurfactant producing bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa MKVIT3 was isolated from an oil logging area in Vellore district of Tamil Nadu, India. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis was performed for the identification of different congeners present in the extracted biosurfactant. The column purified biosurfactant was used to stabilise the formation of silver nanoparticles (NP) using borohydrate reduction in reverse micelles. The silver NP were characterised using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, Powder-XRD TEM analysis and zeta potential. A comparative study of the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxic efficacy was done for the extracted purified biosurfactant and the silver NP. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the biosurfactant revealed the presence of five rhamnolipid congeners. The synthesised silver NP showed the characteristic absorption peak in UV-vis at 440 nm. Powder-XRD and TEM analysis revealed the average particle size of the NP as 17.89 ± 8.74 nm as well as their cubic structure. Zeta potential value of -30.9 mV suggested that the silver NPs are stable in the suspension. Comparative study of the antimicrobial activity revealed that the silver NP are more potent than the biosurfactant in inhibiting the growth of microbes. Cytotoxic activity revealed that the biosurfactant are more effective than the synthesised silver NP.

  3. Analysis of biosurfactants from industrially viable Pseudomonas strain isolated from crude oil suggests how rhamnolipids congeners affect emulsification property and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Palashpriya; Yang, Xin-Ping; Ma, Luyan Z.

    2014-01-01

    Rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced mainly by Pseudomonas sp. had been reported to possess a wide range of potential industrial application. These biosurfactants are produced as monorhamnolipid (MRL) and di-rhamnolipid (DRL) congeners. The present study deals with rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by three bacterial isolates from crude oil. Biosurfactants produced by one of the strains (named as IMP67) was found to be very efficacious based on its critical micelle concentration value and hydrocarbon emulsification property. Strikingly, antimicrobial, and anti-biofilm potential of this biosurfactant were higher than biosurfactants produced by other two strains. Thin layer chromatography analysis and rhamnose quantification showed that the rhamnolipids of IMP67 had more MRL congeners than biosurfactants of the other two strains. Emulsification and antimicrobial actions were affected by manual change of MRL and DRL congener proportions. Increase of MRL proportion enhanced emulsification index and antimicrobial property to Gram negative bacteria. This result indicated that the ratio of MRL and DRL affected the emulsification potentials of rhamnolipids, and suggested that high emulsification potentials might enhance rhamnolipids to penetrate the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. In line with this finding, rhamnolipids of IMP67 also reduced the MIC of some antibiotics against bacteria, suggesting their synergistic role with the antibiotics. PMID:25566212

  4. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Eliandra M; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H; Tondo, Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves' stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves.

  5. Biosurfactant Produced by Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 Can Increase Adherence and Resistance to Sanitizers on Lettuce Leaves (Lactuca sativa L., cichoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Eliandra M.; Beilke, Luniele; Kochhann, Marília; Sarzi, Diana H.; Tondo, Eduardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis SE86 is an important foodborne pathogen in Southern Brazil and it is able to produce a biosurfactant. However, the importance of this compound for the microorganism is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 on adherence to slices of lettuce leaves and on resistance to sanitizers. First, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 in order to determine the amount of biosurfactant produced. Subsequently, lettuce leaves were inoculated with S. Enteritidis SE86 with and without the biosurfactant, and the adherence and bacterial resistance to different sanitization methods were evaluated. S. Enteritidis SE86 produced biosurfactant after 16 h (emulsification index of 11 to 52.15 percent, P < 0.05) and showed greater adherence capability and resistance to sanitization methods when the compound was present. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that S. Enteritidis was able to adhere, form lumps, and invade the lettuce leaves’ stomata in the presence of the biosurfactant. Results indicated that the biosurfactant produced by S. Enteritidis SE86 contributed to adherence and increased resistance to sanitizers when the microorganism was present on lettuce leaves. PMID:26834727

  6. Green synthesis and characterization of cuprous oxide nanoparticles in presence of a bio-surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, M.; Giri, G.

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report a facile green synthesis of Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) using copper sulfate as precursor salt and hydrazine hydrate as reducing agent in presence of bio-surfactant (i.e. leaves extract of arka — a perennial shrub) at 60 to 70 °C in an aqueous medium. A broad band centered at 460 nm in absorption spectrum reveals the formation of surfactant stabilized Cu2O NPs. X-ray diffraction pattern of the surfactant stabilized NPs suggests the formation of only Cu2O phase in assistance of a bio-surfactant with the crystallite size of ˜8 nm. A negative zeta potential of -12 mV at 8.0 pH in surfactant stabilized Cu2O NPs hints non-bonding electron transfer from O-atom of saponin to the surface of NP. Red-shift in the vibrational band (Cu-O stretching) of Cu2O from 637 cm-1 to 640 cm-1 in presence of bio-surfactant suggests an interfacial interaction between NPs and O-atoms of -OH groups of saponin present in the plant (i.e. Calotropis gigantean) extract. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra, a decrease in binding energy of both 2p3/2 and 2p1/2 bands in Cu2O with saponin molecules as compared to bulk Cu atom reveals a charge transfer interaction between NP and saponin surfactant molecules. Transmission electron microscopy images show crystalline nature of Cu2O NPs with an fcc lattice.

  7. A novel biosurfactant, 2-acyloxyethylphosphonate, isolated from waterblooms of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Kunimitsu; Morrison, Louise F; Codd, Geoffrey A; Metcalf, James S; Sano, Tomoharu; Takagi, Hiroo; Kubo, Takuya

    2006-07-22

    A novel biosurfactant, 2-acyloxyethylphosphonate, was isolated from waterblooms of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Its structure was elucidated by chemical degradation and HRFABMS, GC/EI-MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectral analyses. The surfactant contained one mole of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate and one mole of fatty acid, with hexadecanoic acid accounting for 84.1% of the total fatty acid content. The structure was confirmed by synthesis of 2-oleoyloxyethylphosphonate from ethylene oxide, phosphorus acid and oleic acid chloride. Considering the isolated surfactant molecule as hexadecanoyloxyethylphosphonic acid (mw. 364), the critical micelle concentration (CMC) was about 22 mM.

  8. Production of a Lipopeptide Biosurfactant by a Novel Bacillus sp. and Its Applicability to Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Varadavenkatesan, Thivaharan; Murty, Vytla Ramachandra

    2013-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds derived from varied microbial sources including bacteria and fungi. They are secreted extracellularly and have a wide range of exciting properties for bioremediation purposes. They also have vast applications in the food and medicine industry. With an objective of isolating microorganisms for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, the study involved screening of organisms from an oil-contaminated site. Morphological, biochemical, and 16S rRNA analysis of the most promising candidate revealed it to be Bacillus siamensis, which has been associated with biosurfactant production, for the first time. Initial fermentation studies using mineral salt medium supplemented with crude oil resulted in a maximum biosurfactant yield of 0.64 g/L and reduction of surface tension to 36.1 mN/m at 96 h. Characterization studies were done using thin layer chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. FTIR spectra indicated the presence of carbonyl groups, alkyl bonds, and C-H and N-H stretching vibrations, typical of peptides. The extracted biosurfactant was stable at extreme temperatures, pH, and salinity. Its applicability to EOR was further verified by conducting sand pack column studies that yielded up to 60% oil recovery.

  9. Novel rhamnolipid biosurfactants produced by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3.

    PubMed

    Nie, Maiqian; Yin, Xihou; Ren, Chunyan; Wang, Yang; Xu, Feng; Shen, Qirong

    2010-01-01

    A novel rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain NY3 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil samples. Strain NY3 was characterized by its extraordinary capacity to produce structurally diverse rhamnolipids. A total of 25 rhamnolipid components and 37 different parent molecular ions, representing various metal ion adducts (Na(+), 2Na(+) and K(+)), were detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among these compounds are ten new rhamnolipids. In addition to its biosurfactant production, strain NY3 was shown to be capable of efficient degradation of PAHs as well as synergistic improvement in the degradation of high molecular weight PAHs by its biosurfactant. These findings have added novel members to the rhamnolipid group and expanded current knowledge regarding the diversity and productive capability of rhamnolipid biosurfactants from a single specific strain with variation of only one carbon source. Additionally, this paper lays the foundation for improvement in the yield of NY3BS and study of the degradation pathway(s) of PAHs in P. aeruginosa strain NY3.

  10. Novel characteristics of sophorolipids, yeast glycolipid biosurfactants, as biodegradable low-foaming surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshihiko; Ryu, Mizuyuki; Oda, Yuka; Igarashi, Keisuke; Nagatsuka, Asami; Furuta, Taro; Sugiura, Masaki

    2009-08-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs) are a family of glycolipid type biosurfactants, which are largely produced by the non-pathogenic yeast, Candida bombicola. In order to investigate the possibility of SLs for industrial use, here we examined the interfacial activities, cytotoxicity and biodegradability of SLs, and compared these properties with those of two lipopeptide type biosurfactants (surfactin and arthrofactin), sodium laurate (soap, SP) and four kinds of chemically synthesized surfactants including two block-copolymer nonionic surfactants (BPs), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (AE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). It was indicated that SLs had extremely low-foaming properties and high detergency comparable with commercially available low-foaming BPs. These interfacial activities of SLs were maintained under 100 ppm water hardness. Cytotoxicity of SLs on human keratinocytes was the same as surfactin, which has already been commercialized as cosmetic material, but higher than BPs. Moreover, biodegradability of SLs using the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals (301C, Modified MITI Test) displayed that SLs can be classified as "readily" biodegradable chemicals, which are defined as chemicals that are degraded 60% within 28 days under specified test methods. We observed 61% degradation of SLs on the eighth day of cultivation. Our results indicate that SLs are low-foaming surfactants with high detergency, which also exhibit both low cytotoxicity and readily biodegradable properties.

  11. [Remediation of Cu-Pb-contaminated loess soil by leaching with chelating agent and biosurfactant].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jian-Tao; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Li; Yang, Ya-Ti

    2013-04-01

    Because of its strong chelation, solubilization characteristics, the chelating agents and biosurfactant are widely used in remediation of heavy metals and organic contaminated soils. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid (CIT) and dirhamnolipid (RL2) were selected as the eluent. Batch experiments and column experiments were conducted to investigate the leaching effect of the three kinds of eluent, as well as the mixture of biosurfactant and chelating agent for Cu, Pb contaminated loess soil. The results showed that the leaching efficiencies of different eluent on Cu, Pb contaminated loess soil followed the sequence of EDTA > CIT > RL2. At an eluent concentration of 0.02 mol x L(-1), the Cu leaching efficiency was 62.74% (EDTA), 52.28% (CIT) and 15.35% (RL2), respectively; the Pb leaching efficiency was 96.10% (EDTA), 23.08% (CIT) and 14.42% (RL2), respectively. When the concentration of RL2 was 100 CMC, it had synergistic effects on the other two kinds of chelating agent in Cu leaching, and when the concentration of RL2 was 200 CMC, it had antagonism effects. The effect of RL2 on EDTA in Pb leaching was similar to that in Cu leaching. Pb leaching by CIT was inhibited in the presence of RL2. EDTA and CIT could effectively remove Cu and Pb in exchangeable states, adsorption states, carbonate salts and organic bound forms; RL2 could effectively remove Cu and Pb in exchangeable and adsorbed states.

  12. Optimization of biosurfactant production from Vibrio sp. BSM-30 isolated in tropical waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zengjian; Li, Min; Zhang, Yuxiu

    2017-01-01

    The strain BSM-30 (Vibrio sp.), isolated from Chinese tropical waters, could be a biosurfactant producing bacteria according with results obtained by the oil spreading method. The culture conditions for biosurfactant production were tested respectively such as inoculation (2%,6%,10%,14% as setting), shaking speed(120 r/min,150 r/min,180 r/min as setting), temperature (25°C,30°C,35°C as setting), pH (7,8,9 as setting), salinity (1.5%, 2.5%, 3.0%, 4.5%, 5.5% as setting), which results showed that the best culture conditions for BS production were 10% inoculation quantity, 180 r/min, 25°C, pH 8, and 3.5% salinity. The optimization of carbon sources (20g/ of glucose, 20g/L of starch, 20g/L of paraffin oil 20g/L of diesel, 20g/L of oil as setting) and nitrogen sources (6g/L of NaNO3,7.1g/L of KNO3,5.6g/L of NH4NO3,9.3g/L of (NH4)2SO4, 4.2g/L of CO(NH2)2 as setting) were also tested, which results showed that the best nitrogen source and carbon source were (NH4) 2SO4 and soluble starch.

  13. Enhanced Biological Control of Phytophthora Blight of Pepper by Biosurfactant-Producing Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Özyilmaz, Ümit; Benlioglu, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas isolates from different crop plants were screened for in vitro growth inhibition of Phytophthora capsici and production of biosurfactant. Two in vivo experiments were performed to determine the efficacy of selected Pseudomonas strains against Phytophthora blight of pepper by comparing two fungicide treatments [acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and ASM + mefenoxam]. Bacterial isolates were applied by soil drenching (1 × 109 cells/ml), ASM (0.1 μg a.i./ml) and ASM + mefenoxam (0.2 mg product/ml) were applied by foliar spraying, and P. capsici inoculum was incorporated into the pot soil three days after treatments. In the first experiment, four Pseudomonas strains resulted in significant reduction from 48.4 to 61.3% in Phytophthora blight severity. In the second experiment, bacterial treatments combining with olive oil (5 mL per plant) significantly enhanced biological control activity, resulting in a reduction of disease level ranging from 56.8 to 81.1%. ASM + mefenoxam was the most effective treatment while ASM alone was less effective in both bioassays. These results indicate that our Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (6L10, 6ba6 and 3ss9) that have biosurfactant-producing abilities are effective against P. capsici on pepper, and enhanced disease suppression could be achieved when they were used in combination with olive oil. PMID:25288970

  14. BioSurfDB: knowledge and algorithms to support biosurfactants and biodegradation studies.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge S; Araújo, Wydemberg; Lopes Sales, Ana Isabela; Brito Guerra, Alaine de; Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla da; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F; Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil extraction, transportation and use provoke the contamination of countless ecosystems. Therefore, bioremediation through surfactants mobilization or biodegradation is an important subject, both economically and environmentally. Bioremediation research had a great boost with the recent advances in Metagenomics, as it enabled the sequencing of uncultured microorganisms providing new insights on surfactant-producing and/or oil-degrading bacteria. Many research studies are making available genomic data from unknown organisms obtained from metagenomics analysis of oil-contaminated environmental samples. These new datasets are presently demanding the development of new tools and data repositories tailored for the biological analysis in a context of bioremediation data analysis. This work presents BioSurfDB, www.biosurfdb.org, a curated relational information system integrating data from: (i) metagenomes; (ii) organisms; (iii) biodegradation relevant genes; proteins and their metabolic pathways; (iv) bioremediation experiments results, with specific pollutants treatment efficiencies by surfactant producing organisms; and (v) a biosurfactant-curated list, grouped by producing organism, surfactant name, class and reference. The main goal of this repository is to gather information on the characterization of biological compounds and mechanisms involved in biosurfactant production and/or biodegradation and make it available in a curated way and associated with a number of computational tools to support studies of genomic and metagenomic data.

  15. Lipopeptide biosurfactant production bacteria Acinetobacter sp. D3-2 and its biodegradation of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mutai; Pi, Yongrui; Wang, Lina; Sun, Peiyan; Li, Yiming; Cao, Lixin

    2014-04-01

    In this work, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium D3-2 isolated from petroleum contaminated soil samples was investigated for its potential effect in biodegradation of crude oil. The strain was identified as Acinetobacter sp. D3-2 based on morphological, biochemical and phylogenetic analysis. The optimum environmental conditions for growth of the bacteria were determined to be pH 8.0, with a NaCl concentration of 3.0% (w/v) at 30 °C. Acinetobacter sp. D3-2 could utilize various hydrocarbon substrates as the sole carbon and energy source. From this study, we also found that the strain had the ability to produce biosurfactant, with the production of 0.52 g L(-1). The surface tension of the culture broth was decreased from 48.02 to 26.30 mN m(-1). The biosurfactant was determined to contain lipopeptide compounds based on laboratory analyses. By carrying out a crude oil degradation assay in an Erlenmeyer flask experiment and analyzing the hydrocarbon removal rate using gas chromatography, we found that Acinetobacter sp. D3-2 could grow at 30 °C in 3% NaCl solution with a preferable ability to degrade 82% hydrocarbons, showing that bioremediation does occur and plays a profound role during the oil reparation process.

  16. BioSurfDB: knowledge and algorithms to support biosurfactants and biodegradation studies

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jorge S.; Araújo, Wydemberg; Lopes Sales, Ana Isabela; de Brito Guerra, Alaine; da Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.; Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil extraction, transportation and use provoke the contamination of countless ecosystems. Therefore, bioremediation through surfactants mobilization or biodegradation is an important subject, both economically and environmentally. Bioremediation research had a great boost with the recent advances in Metagenomics, as it enabled the sequencing of uncultured microorganisms providing new insights on surfactant-producing and/or oil-degrading bacteria. Many research studies are making available genomic data from unknown organisms obtained from metagenomics analysis of oil-contaminated environmental samples. These new datasets are presently demanding the development of new tools and data repositories tailored for the biological analysis in a context of bioremediation data analysis. This work presents BioSurfDB, www.biosurfdb.org, a curated relational information system integrating data from: (i) metagenomes; (ii) organisms; (iii) biodegradation relevant genes; proteins and their metabolic pathways; (iv) bioremediation experiments results, with specific pollutants treatment efficiencies by surfactant producing organisms; and (v) a biosurfactant-curated list, grouped by producing organism, surfactant name, class and reference. The main goal of this repository is to gather information on the characterization of biological compounds and mechanisms involved in biosurfactant production and/or biodegradation and make it available in a curated way and associated with a number of computational tools to support studies of genomic and metagenomic data. Database URL: www.biosurfdb.org PMID:25833955

  17. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    PubMed

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds.

  19. A comparison of effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics and biosurfactants on established bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gerry A; Maloy, Aaron P; Banat, Malik M; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2013-11-01

    Current antibiofilm solutions based on planktonic bacterial physiology have limited efficacy in clinical and occasionally environmental settings. This has prompted a search for suitable alternatives to conventional therapies. This study compares the inhibitory properties of two biological surfactants (rhamnolipids and a plant-derived surfactant) against a selection of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol and kanamycin). Testing was carried out on a range of bacterial physiologies from planktonic and mixed bacterial biofilms. Rhamnolipids (Rhs) have been extensively characterised for their role in the development of biofilms and inhibition of planktonic bacteria. However, there are limited direct comparisons with antimicrobial substances on established biofilms comprising single or mixed bacterial strains. Baseline measurements of inhibitory activity using planktonic bacterial assays established that broad-spectrum antibiotics were 500 times more effective at inhibiting bacterial growth than either Rhs or plant surfactants. Conversely, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass of established single bacterial biofilms by 74-88 and 74-98 %, respectively. Only kanamycin showed activity against biofilms of Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were also ineffective against a complex biofilm of marine bacteria; however, Rhs and plant biosurfactants reduced biofilm biomass by 69 and 42 %, respectively. These data suggest that Rhs and plant-derived surfactants may have an important role in the inhibition of complex biofilms.

  20. The hygroscopic biosurfactant syringafactin produced by Pseudomonas syringae enhances fitness on leaf surfaces during fluctuating humidity.

    PubMed

    Burch, Adrien Y; Zeisler, Viktoria; Yokota, Kenji; Schreiber, Lukas; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-07-01

    Biosurfactant production by bacteria on leaf surfaces is poorly documented, and its role in this habitat has not been explored. Therefore, we investigated the production and fitness benefits of syringafactin by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a on leaves. Syringafactin largely adsorbed to the waxy leaf cuticle both when topically applied and when produced by cells on plants. Syringafactin increased the rate of diffusion of water across isolated cuticles and attracted water to hydrophobic surfaces exposed to high relative humidity due to its hygroscopic properties. While a wild-type and syringafactin mutant exhibited similar fitness on bean leaves incubated in static conditions, the fitness of the wild-type strain was higher under fluctuating humidity conditions typical of field conditions. When co-inoculated onto either the host plant bean or the non-host plant romaine lettuce, the proportion of viable wild-type cells recovered from plants relative to that of a mutant unable to produce syringafactin increased 10% over 10 days. The number of disease lesions incited by the wild-type strain on bean was also significantly higher than that of the syringafactin mutant. The production of hygroscopic biosurfactants on waxy leaf surfaces apparently benefits bacteria by both attracting moisture and facilitating access to nutrients. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. On the use of biosurfactants for the removal of heavy metals from oil-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Yong, R.N.; Gibbs, B.F.

    1999-05-01

    The feasibility of using biodegradable biosurfactants to remove heavy metals from an oil-contaminated soil was evaluated by batch washes with surfactin, a rhamnolipid and a sophorolipid. The soil contained 890 mg/kg of zinc and 420 mg/kg of copper with a 12.6% oil and grease content. Highest levels of zinc removal were obtained using 12% rhamnolipid and 4% sophorolipid/0.7% HCl. Highest copper removal rates were achieved with 12% rhamnolipid or with 2% rhamnolipid/1% NaOH or 0.25% surfactin/1% NaOH. A series of five batch washes removed 70% of the copper with 0.1% surfactin/1% NaOH while 4% sophorolipid/0.7% HCl was able to remove 100% of the zinc. Sequential extraction procedures showed that the carbonate and oxide fractions accounted for over 90% of the zinc present in the soil and the organic fraction in the soil constituted over 70% of the copper. Sequential extraction of the soil after washing with the surfactin or rhamnolipid indicated that these surfactants could remove the organically-bound copper and that the sophorolipid with acid could remove the carbonate and oxide-bound zinc. In conclusion, the results clearly indicated the feasibility of removing the metals with the anionic biosurfactants tested even though the exchangeable metal fractions were very low.

  2. Characterisation and antimicrobial activity of biosurfactant extracts produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Thando; Rautenbach, Marina; Vosloo, Johann Arnold; Khan, Sehaam; Khan, Wesaal

    2017-12-01

    Biosurfactants are unique secondary metabolites, synthesised non-ribosomally by certain bacteria, fungi and yeast, with their most promising applications as antimicrobial agents and surfactants in the medical and food industries. Naturally produced glycolipids and lipopeptides are found as a mixture of congeners, which increases their antimicrobial potency. Sensitive analysis techniques, such as liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, enable the fingerprinting of different biosurfactant congeners within a naturally produced crude extract. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ST34 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ST5, isolated from wastewater, were screened for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant compounds were solvent extracted and characterised using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results indicated that B. amyloliquefaciens ST34 produced C13-16 surfactin analogues and their identity were confirmed by high resolution ESI-MS and UPLC-MS. In the crude extract obtained from P. aeruginosa ST5, high resolution ESI-MS linked to UPLC-MS confirmed the presence of di- and monorhamnolipid congeners, specifically Rha-Rha-C10-C10 and Rha-C10-C10, Rha-Rha-C8-C10/Rha-Rha-C10-C8 and Rha-C8-C10/Rha-C10-C8, as well as Rha-Rha-C12-C10/Rha-Rha-C10-C12 and Rha-C12-C10/Rha-C10-C12. The crude surfactin and rhamnolipid extracts also retained pronounced antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms, including antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. In addition, the rapid solvent extraction combined with UPLC-MS of the crude samples is a simple and powerful technique to provide fast, sensitive and highly specific data on the characterisation of biosurfactant compounds.

  3. Epidermal lipids.

    PubMed

    Wertz, P W

    1992-06-01

    Epidermal lipids play important roles in cell structure, in control of growth and differentiation, in determining cohesion and desquamation, and in formation and function of a permeability barrier. Knowledge of the structures and composition of the epidermal lipids is important for understanding these functions. The lipids present in epidermis include phospholipids, monohexosylceramides, ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, cholesterol sulfate, triglycerides, and fatty acids. The phospholipids are major structural components of the plasma membranes and membranous organelles in the viable and differentiating keratinocytes. In addition, phospholipids serve in several transmembranal signaling processes and as a reservoir for arachidonic acid, the precursor of the eicosanoids. Monohexosylceramides are thought to function in the assembly of lamellar bodies, and in the final stage of differentiation are converted to a structurally heterogenous mixture of ceramides in the intercellular space of the stratum corneum and to a unique ceramide covalently attached to the corneocyte surface. The mixture of lipids in the stratum corneum, composed principally of ceramides, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and fatty acids, prevents desiccation and limits the penetration of a variety of noxious environmental agents. The stratum corneum lipids represent a major product of epidermal differentiation, and free sphingosine liberated from ceramides in this terminally differentiated compartment may provide a feedback mechanism for the regulation of the differentiation process.

  4. Improved biosurfactant production by Bacillus subtilis SPB1 mutant obtained by random mutagenesis and its application in enhanced oil in a sand system.

    PubMed

    Bouassida, Mouna; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2017-07-31

    Biosurfactants or microbial surfactants are surface-active biomolecules that are produced by a variety of microorganisms. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of the environmental bioremediation as well as the petroleum industry and the enhanced oil recovery. However, the major bottlenecks in biosurfactant production are yield increase and cost reduction. Improving the bioindustrial production processes relies on many issues such as the use of cheap raw materials, the optimization of medium-culture conditions and selecting hyperproducing strains. The present work aimed to obtain a mutant with higher biosurfactant production through mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis SPB1 using a combination of UV irradiation and nitrous acid treatment. Following mutagenesis and screening on blood agar and subsequent formation of halos, the mutated strains were examined for emulsifying activity of their culture broth. A mutant designated Bacillus subtilis M2 produced biosurfactant at concentration twice higher than the parent strain. The potential of this biosurfactant for industrial uses was shown by studying its stability to environmental stresses such as pH and temperature and its applicability in oil recovery process. It was practically stable at high temperature and at a wide range of pH and it recovered above 90 % of motor oil adsorbed to a sand sample.

  5. Lipid Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mashaghi, Samaneh; Jadidi, Tayebeh; Koenderink, Gijsje; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that covers a vast and diverse array of devices and machines derived from engineering, physics, materials science, chemistry and biology. These devices have found applications in biomedical sciences, such as targeted drug delivery, bio-imaging, sensing and diagnosis of pathologies at early stages. In these applications, nano-devices typically interface with the plasma membrane of cells. On the other hand, naturally occurring nanostructures in biology have been a source of inspiration for new nanotechnological designs and hybrid nanostructures made of biological and non-biological, organic and inorganic building blocks. Lipids, with their amphiphilicity, diversity of head and tail chemistry, and antifouling properties that block nonspecific binding to lipid-coated surfaces, provide a powerful toolbox for nanotechnology. This review discusses the progress in the emerging field of lipid nanotechnology. PMID:23429269

  6. Production of Enzymes from Agroindustrial Wastes by Biosurfactant-Producing Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco Fábio Cavalcante; Simiqueli, Ana Paula Resende; de Andrade, Cristiano José; Pastore, Gláucia Maria

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Bacillus are the source of several enzymes of current industrial interest. Hydrolases, such as amylases, proteases, and lipases, are the main enzymes consumed worldwide and have applications in a wide range of products and industrial processes. Fermentation processes by Bacillus subtilis using cassava wastewater as a substrate are reported in the technical literature; however, the same combination of microorganisms and this culture medium is limited or nonexistent. In this paper, the amylase, protease, and lipase production of ten Bacillus subtilis strains previously identified as biosurfactant producers in cassava wastewater was evaluated. The LB1a and LB5a strains were selected for analysis using a synthetic medium and cassava wastewater and were identified as good enzyme producers, especially of amylases and proteases. In addition, the enzymatic activity results indicate that cassava wastewater was better than the synthetic medium for the induction of these enzymes. PMID:23533780

  7. Purification and antitumour activity of a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus natto TK-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ling; Cai, Ping; Yang, Wen-Yan; Lu, Mei-Fang; Huang, Guo-Wei

    2009-02-01

    An antitumour lipopeptide biosurfactant purified from Bacillus natto TK-1 was able to inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast-cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase release showed no significant difference between MCF-7 cells treated with lipopeptide and untreated controls. The antitumour activity of the lipopeptide in MCF-7 cells was associated with cell apoptosis determined by typical morphological changes and sub-G(1) peak in cell growth-phase distribution. The cell cycle was arrested at G(2)/M phase. In addition, the caspase activity assay revealed that lipopeptide-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was associated with caspase 3.

  8. Oil recovery from refinery oily sludge using a rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Lu, Mang; Yang, Qin; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Chen, Rong

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a rhamnolipid biosurfactant-producing strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa F-2, was used to recover oil from refinery oily sludge in laboratory and pilot-scale experiments. The optimum values of carbon to nitrogen ratio, temperature, sludge-water ratio and inoculum size for oil recovery were determined as 10, 35 °C, 1:4 and 4%, respectively. An oil recovery of up to 91.5% was obtained with the equipping of draft tubes during the field pilot-scale studies. The results showed that strain F-2 has the potential for industrial applications and may be used in oil recovery from oily sludge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Auto-production of biosurfactants reverses the coffee ring effect in a bacterial system

    PubMed Central

    Sempels, Wouter; De Dier, Raf; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of material at the edge of evaporating droplets, known as the ‘coffee ring effect’, is caused by a radially outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is common to a wide array of systems including colloidal and bacterial systems. The role of surfactants in counteracting these coffee ring depositions is related to the occurrence of local vortices known as Marangoni eddies. Here we show that these swirling flows are universal, and not only lead to a uniform deposition of colloids but also occur in living bacterial systems. Experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest that the auto-production of biosurfactants has an essential role in creating a homogeneous deposition of the bacteria upon drying. Moreover, at biologically relevant conditions, intricate time-dependent flows are observed in addition to the vortex regime, which are also effective in reversing the coffee ring effect at even lower surfactant concentrations. PMID:23612298

  10. Biosurfactants and increased bioavailability of sorbed organic contaminants: Measurements using a biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Applegate, B.; Saylor, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrophobic materials that sorb onto the soil matrix is very difficult due to reduced microbial (bio)availability. Following biosurfactant addition, we have measured an increase in contaminant bioavailability by using a lux biosensor. Direct microbial bioavailability was determined by using a genetically engineered microbial bioreporter strain of Pseudomonas putida. This strain was engineered so the lux genes, which code for light production, are transcriptionally fused with genes that code for contaminant degradation and are thus induced in the presence of specific compounds. By using a bioreporter we can quantify the actual microbial bioavailability of the contaminants and compare it to concentrations measured by other analytical methods (e.g. gas chromatograph). It is possible that these values are not equal to each other. Thus, bioremediation rates may not be accurately predicted if bioavailability is not considered.

  11. Auto-production of biosurfactants reverses the coffee ring effect in a bacterial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempels, Wouter; de Dier, Raf; Mizuno, Hideaki; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The deposition of material at the edge of evaporating droplets, known as the ‘coffee ring effect’, is caused by a radially outward capillary flow. This phenomenon is common to a wide array of systems including colloidal and bacterial systems. The role of surfactants in counteracting these coffee ring depositions is related to the occurrence of local vortices known as Marangoni eddies. Here we show that these swirling flows are universal, and not only lead to a uniform deposition of colloids but also occur in living bacterial systems. Experiments on Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest that the auto-production of biosurfactants has an essential role in creating a homogeneous deposition of the bacteria upon drying. Moreover, at biologically relevant conditions, intricate time-dependent flows are observed in addition to the vortex regime, which are also effective in reversing the coffee ring effect at even lower surfactant concentrations.

  12. Targeted killing of myofibroblasts by biosurfactant di-rhamnolipid suggests a therapy against scar formation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Jiang, Lifang; Shao, Huawei; You, Chuangang; Zhang, Guoliang; Ding, Sitong; Bian, Tingwei; Han, Chunmao; Meng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Pathological myofibroblasts are often involved in skin scarring via generating contractile force and over-expressing collagen fibers, but no compound has been found to inhibit the myofibroblasts without showing severe toxicity to surrounding physiological cells. Here we report that di-rhamnolipid, a biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, showed potent effects on scar therapy via a unique mechanism of targeted killing the myofibroblasts. In cell culture, the fibroblasts-derived myofibroblasts were more sensitive to di-rhamnolipid toxicity than fibroblasts at a concentration-dependent manner, and could be completely inhibited of their specific functions including α-SMA expression and collagen secretion/contraction. The anti-fibrotic function of di-rhamnolipid was further verified in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar models by presenting the significant reduction of scar elevation index, type I collagen fibers and α-SMA expression. In this regard, di-rhamnolipid treatment could be suggested as a therapy against skin scarring. PMID:27901027

  13. Computational study of elements of stability of a four-helix bundle protein biosurfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Andrea; Connors, Natalie K.; Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; Oelmeier, Stefan A.; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Biosurfactants are surface-active molecules produced principally by microorganisms. They are a sustainable alternative to chemically-synthesized surfactants, having the advantages of being non-toxic, highly functional, eco-friendly and biodegradable. However they are currently only used in a few industrial products due to costs associated with production and purification, which exceed those for commodity chemical surfactants. DAMP4, a member of a four-helix bundle biosurfactant protein family, can be produced in soluble form and at high yield in Escherichia coli, and can be recovered using a facile thermal phase-separation approach. As such, it encompasses an interesting synergy of biomolecular and chemical engineering with prospects for low-cost production even for industrial sectors. DAMP4 is highly functional, and due to its extraordinary thermal stability it can be purified in a simple two-step process, in which the combination of high temperature and salt leads to denaturation of all contaminants, whereas DAMP4 stays stable in solution and can be recovered by filtration. This study aimed to characterize and understand the fundamental drivers of DAMP4 stability to guide further process and surfactant design studies. The complementary use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulation revealed a broad pH and temperature tolerance for DAMP4, with a melting point of 122.4 °C, suggesting the hydrophobic core as the major contributor to thermal stability. Simulation of systematically created in silico variants of DAMP4 showed an influence of number and location of hydrophilic mutations in the hydrophobic core on stability, demonstrating a tolerance of up to three mutations before a strong loss in stability occurred. The results suggest a consideration of a balance of stability, functionality and kinetics for new designs according to their application, aiming for maximal functionality but at adequate stability to allow for cost-efficient production using thermal

  14. Comparing effectiveness of rhamnolipid biosurfactant with a quaternary ammonium salt surfactant for hydrate anti-agglomeration.

    PubMed

    York, J Dalton; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2008-01-24

    Natural gas is projected to be the premium fuel of the 21st century because of availability, as well as economical and environmental considerations. Natural gas is coproduced with water from the subsurface forming gas hydrates. Hydrate formation may result in shutdown of onshore and offshore operations. Industry practice has been usage of alcohols--which have undesirable environmental impacts--to affect bulk-phase properties and inhibit hydrate formation. An alternative to alcohols is changing the surface properties through usage of polymers and surfactants, effective at 0.5-3 wt % of coproduced water. One group of low-dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHI) are kinetic inhibitors, which affect nucleation rate and growth. A second group of LDHI are anti-agglomerants, which prevent agglomeration of small hydrate crystallites. Despite great potential, reported work on hydrate anti-agglomeration is very limited. In this paper, our focus is on the use of two vastly different surfactants as anti-agglomerants. We use a model oil, water, and tetrahydrofuran as a hydrate-forming species. We examine the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium salt (i.e., quat). Visual observation measurements show that a small concentration of the quat (0.01%) can prevent agglomeration. However, a quat is not a green chemical and therefore may be undesirable. We show that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant can be effective to a concentration of 0.05 wt %. One difference between the two surfactants is the stability of the water-in-oil emulsions created. The biosurfactant forms a less stable emulsion, which makes it very desirable for hydrate application.

  15. Bacillus spp. Isolated from Puba as a Source of Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Perez, Karla J; Viana, Jaime Dos Santos; Lopes, Fernanda C; Pereira, Jamile Q; Dos Santos, Daniel M; Oliveira, Jamil S; Velho, Renata V; Crispim, Silvia M; Nicoli, Jacques R; Brandelli, Adriano; Nardi, Regina M D

    2017-01-01

    Several products of industrial interest are produced by Bacillus, including enzymes, antibiotics, amino acids, insecticides, biosurfactants and bacteriocins. This study aimed to investigate the potential of two bacterial isolates (P5 and C3) from puba, a regional fermentation product from cassava, to produce multiple substances with antimicrobial and surface active properties. Phylogenetic analyses showed close relation of isolates P5 and C3 with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus thuringiensis, respectively. Notably, Bacillus sp. P5 showed antimicrobial activity against pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus, in addition to antifungal activity. The presence of genes encoding pre-subtilosin (sboA), malonyl CoA transacylase (ituD), and the putative transcriptional terminator of surfactin (sfp) were detected in Bacillus sp. P5, suggesting the production of the bacteriocin subtilosin A and the lipopeptides iturin A and surfactin by this strain. For Bacillus sp. C3 the presence of sboA and spas (subtilin) genes was observed by the first time in members of B. cereus cluster. Bacillus sp. P5 showed emulsifying capability on mineral oil, soybean biodiesel and toluene, while Bacillus sp. C3 showed emulsifying capability only on mineral oil. The reduction of the surface tension in culture medium was also observed for strain P5, confirming the production of surface-active compounds by this bacterium. Monoprotonated molecular species and adducts of sodium and potassium ions of surfactin, iturin, and fengycin were detected in the P5 culture medium. Comparative MS/MS spectra of the peak m/z 1030 (C14 surfactin A or C15 surfactin B [M+Na](+)) and peak m/z 1079 (C15 iturin [M+Na](+)) showed the same fragmentation profile of standards, confirming the molecular identification. In conclusion, Bacillus sp. P5 showed the best potential for the production of antifungal, antibacterial, and biosurfactant substances.

  16. Bacillus spp. Isolated from Puba as a Source of Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Lipopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Karla J.; Viana, Jaime dos Santos; Lopes, Fernanda C.; Pereira, Jamile Q.; dos Santos, Daniel M.; Oliveira, Jamil S.; Velho, Renata V.; Crispim, Silvia M.; Nicoli, Jacques R.; Brandelli, Adriano; Nardi, Regina M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Several products of industrial interest are produced by Bacillus, including enzymes, antibiotics, amino acids, insecticides, biosurfactants and bacteriocins. This study aimed to investigate the potential of two bacterial isolates (P5 and C3) from puba, a regional fermentation product from cassava, to produce multiple substances with antimicrobial and surface active properties. Phylogenetic analyses showed close relation of isolates P5 and C3 with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus thuringiensis, respectively. Notably, Bacillus sp. P5 showed antimicrobial activity against pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus, in addition to antifungal activity. The presence of genes encoding pre-subtilosin (sboA), malonyl CoA transacylase (ituD), and the putative transcriptional terminator of surfactin (sfp) were detected in Bacillus sp. P5, suggesting the production of the bacteriocin subtilosin A and the lipopeptides iturin A and surfactin by this strain. For Bacillus sp. C3 the presence of sboA and spas (subtilin) genes was observed by the first time in members of B. cereus cluster. Bacillus sp. P5 showed emulsifying capability on mineral oil, soybean biodiesel and toluene, while Bacillus sp. C3 showed emulsifying capability only on mineral oil. The reduction of the surface tension in culture medium was also observed for strain P5, confirming the production of surface-active compounds by this bacterium. Monoprotonated molecular species and adducts of sodium and potassium ions of surfactin, iturin, and fengycin were detected in the P5 culture medium. Comparative MS/MS spectra of the peak m/z 1030 (C14 surfactin A or C15 surfactin B [M+Na]+) and peak m/z 1079 (C15 iturin [M+Na]+) showed the same fragmentation profile of standards, confirming the molecular identification. In conclusion, Bacillus sp. P5 showed the best potential for the production of antifungal, antibacterial, and biosurfactant substances. PMID:28197131

  17. Monitoring of oil pollution at Gemsa Bay and bioremediation capacity of bacterial isolates with biosurfactants and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    El-Sheshtawy, H S; Khalil, N M; Ahmed, W; Abdallah, R I

    2014-10-15

    Fifteen crude oil-degrading bacterial isolates were isolated from an oil-polluted area in Gemsa Bay, Red Sea, Egypt. Two bacterial species showed the highest growth rate on crude oil hydrocarbons. From an analysis of 16S rRNA sequences, these isolates were identified as Pseudomonas xanthomarina KMM 1447 and Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588. Gas Chromatographic (GC) analysis of the crude oil remaining in the culture medium after one week at 30°C showed that the optimum biodegradation of crude petroleum oil was demonstrated at 50% in medium containing biosurfactant with two types of nanoparticles separately and two bacterial species. The complete degradation of some different members of polyaromatics and the percentage biodegradation of other polyaromatics increased in microcosm containing two different types of nanoparticles with biosurfactant after 7 days. In conclusion, these bacterial strains may be useful for the bioremediation process in the Gemsa Bay, Red Sea decreasing oil pollution in this marine ecosystem.

  18. Malachite green bioremoval by a newly isolated strain Citrobacter sedlakii RI11; enhancement of the treatment by biosurfactant addition.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Fendri, Raouia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-01-01

    Citrobacter sedlackii RI11, isolated from acclimated textile effluent after selective enrichment on synthetic dyes, was assessed for malachite green (MG) biotreatment potency. Results indicate that this bacterium has potential for use in effective treatment of MG contaminated wastewaters under shaking conditions at neutral and alkaline pH value, characteristic of typical textile effluents. Also, the newly isolated strain can tolerate higher doses of dye and decolorize up to 1,000 mg/l of dye. When used as microbial surfactant to enhance MG biodecolorization, Bacillus subtilis SPB1-derived lipopeptide accelerated the decolorization rate and maximized the decolorization efficiency at an optimal concentration of biosurfactant of about 0.075%. Studies ensured that MG removal by this strain could be due to biodegradation and/or adsorption. Results on germination potencies of different seeds using the treated dyes under different conditions favor the use of SPB1 biosurfactant for the treatment of MG.

  19. Adsorption on stainless steel surfaces of biosurfactants produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria: consequence on the bioadhesive behavior of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Meylheuc, Thierry; Methivier, Christophe; Renault, Margareth; Herry, Jean-Marie; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Noëlle

    2006-10-01

    The ability of adsorbed biosurfactants (Pf and Lb) obtained from gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens) or gram-positive bacterium (Lactobacillus helveticus) to inhibit adhesion of four listerial strains to stainless steel was investigated. These metallic surfaces were characterized using the following complementary analytical techniques: contact-angle measurements (CAM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarization modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Contact-angles with polar liquids (water and formamide) indicated that the stainless steel surface covered with adsorbed biosurfactant was more hydrophilic and electron-donating than bare stainless steel. The surface characterization by XPS and PM-IRRAS revealed that conditioning the stainless steel changes the substrate in two ways, by modifying the surface alloy composition and by leaving an thin adsorbed organic layer. AFM observations enabled to say that the layer covered entirely the surface and was probably thicker (with patches) in the case of Pf-conditioned surfaces compared to the Lb-conditioned ones, which seemed to be less homogeneous. Though the added layer was thin, significant chemical changes were observed that can account for drastic modifications in the surface adhesive properties. As a matter of fact, adhesion tests showed that both used biosurfactants were effective by decreasing strongly the level of contamination of stainless steel surfaces by the four strains of Listeria monocytogenes. The more important decrease concerned the CIP104794 and CIP103573 strains (>99.7%) on surface conditioned by L. helveticus biosurfactant. A less reduced phenomenon (75.2%) for the CIP103574 strain on stainless steel with absorbed biosurfactant from P. fluorescens was observed. Whatever the strain of L. monocytogenes and the biosurfactant used, this antiadhesive biologic coating reduced both total adhering flora and viable and

  20. Biogeographical distribution analysis of hydrocarbon degrading and biosurfactant producing genes suggests that near-equatorial biomes have higher abundance of genes with potential for bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge S; Araújo, Wydemberg J; Figueiredo, Ricardo M; Silva-Portela, Rita C B; de Brito Guerra, Alaine; da Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla; Minnicelli, Carolina; Carlos, Aline Cardoso; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Freitas, Ana Teresa; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F

    2017-07-27

    Bacterial and Archaeal communities have a complex, symbiotic role in crude oil bioremediation. Their biosurfactants and degradation enzymes have been in the spotlight, mainly due to the awareness of ecosystem pollution caused by crude oil accidents and their use. Initially, the scientific community studied the role of individual microbial species by characterizing and optimizing their biosurfactant and oil degradation genes, studying their individual distribution. However, with the advances in genomics, in particular with the use of New-Generation-Sequencing and Metagenomics, it is now possible to have a macro view of the complex pathways related to the symbiotic degradation of hydrocarbons and surfactant production. It is now possible, although more challenging, to obtain the DNA information of an entire microbial community before automatically characterizing it. By characterizing and understanding the interconnected role of microorganisms and the role of degradation and biosurfactant genes in an ecosystem, it becomes possible to develop new biotechnological approaches for bioremediation use. This paper analyzes 46 different metagenome samples, spanning 20 biomes from different geographies obtained from different research projects. A metagenomics bioinformatics pipeline, focused on the biodegradation and biosurfactant-production pathways, genes and organisms, was applied. Our main results show that: (1) surfactation and degradation are correlated events, and therefore should be studied together; (2) terrestrial biomes present more degradation genes, especially cyclic compounds, and less surfactation genes, when compared to water biomes; and (3) latitude has a significant influence on the diversity of genes involved in biodegradation and biosurfactant production. This suggests that microbiomes found near the equator are richer in genes that have a role in these processes and thus have a higher biotechnological potential. In this work we have focused on the

  1. Production and characterization of rhamnolipid biosurfactant from waste frying coconut oil using a novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa D.

    PubMed

    George, S; Jayachandran, K

    2013-02-01

    To improve biosurfactant production economics by the utilization of potential low-cost materials. In an attempt to utilize cost-effective carbon sources in the fermentative production of biosurfactants, various pure and waste frying oils were screened by a standard biosurfactant producing strain. Considering the regional significance, easy availability and the economical advantages, waste frying coconut oil was selected as the substrate for further studies. On isolation of more competent strains that could use waste frying coconut oil efficiently as a carbon source, six bacterial strains were isolated on cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-methylene blue agar plate, from a soil sample collected from the premises of a coconut oil mill. Among these, Pseudomonas aeruginosa D was selected as the potential producer of rhamnolipid. Spectrophotometric method, TLC, methylene blue active substance assay, drop collapse technique, surface tension measurement by Du Nouy ring method and emulsifying test confirmed the rhamnolipid producing ability of the selected strain and various process parameters were optimized for the production of maximum amount of biosurfactant. Rhamnolipid components purified and separated by ethyl acetate extraction, preparative silica gel column chromatography, HPLC and TLC were characterized by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry as a mixture of dirhamnolipids and monorhamnolipids. The rhamnolipid homologues detected were Rha-Rha-C(10) -C(10) , Rha-C(12) -C(10) and Rha-C(10) -C(8) /Rha-C(8) -C(10) . These results indicated the possibility of waste frying coconut oil to be used as a very effective alternate substrate for the economic production of rhamnolipid by a newly isolated Ps. aeruginosa D. Results of this study throws light on the alternate use of already used cooking oil as high-energy source for producing a high value product like rhamnolipid. This would provide options for the food industry other than the recycling and reuse of waste frying

  2. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  3. Simultaneous valorization and biocatalytic upgrading of heavy vacuum gas oil by the biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdy El-Said; Awadh, Maysoon N; Obuekwe, Christian; El Nayal, Ashraf M

    2017-07-11

    Heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) is a complex and viscous hydrocarbon stream that is produced as the bottom side product from the vacuum distillation units in petroleum refineries. HVGO is conventionally treated with thermochemical process, which is costly and environmentally polluting. Here, we investigate two petroleum biotechnology applications, namely valorization and bioupgrading, as green approaches for valorization and upgrading of HVGO. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa AK6U strain grew on 20% v/v of HVGO as a sole carbon and sulfur source. It produced rhamnolipid biosurfactants in a growth-associated mode with a maximum crude biosurfactants yield of 10.1 g l(-1) , which reduced the surface tension of the cell-free culture supernatant to 30.6 mN m(-1) within 1 week of incubation. The rarely occurring dirhamnolipid Rha-Rha-C12 -C12 dominated the congeners' profile of the biosurfactants produced from HVGO. Heavy vacuum gas oil was recovered from the cultures and abiotic controls and the maltene fraction was extracted for further analysis. Fractional distillation (SimDist) of the biotreated maltene fraction showed a relative decrease in the high-boiling heavy fuel fraction (BP 426-565 °C) concomitant with increase in the lighter distillate diesel fraction (BP 315-426 °C). Analysis of the maltene fraction revealed compositional changes. The number-average (Mn) and weight-average (Mw) molecular weights, as well as the absolute number of hydrocarbons and sulfur heterocycles were higher in the biotreated maltene fraction of HVGO. These findings suggest that HVGO can be potentially exploited as a carbon-rich substrate for production of the high-value biosurfactants by P. aeruginosa AK6U and to concomitantly improve/upgrade its chemical composition. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Ángeles, Martínez-Toledo; Refugio, Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2013-01-01

    In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus), P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients). The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils) supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = −0.54; p < 0.019) between TPH concentration (mg/kg) and surface tension (mN/m), When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = −0.64; p < 0.009) was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil. PMID:24294259

  5. Effects of sludge retention time and biosurfactant on the treatment of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in a petrochemical industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Sponza, D T; Gok, O

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory-scale aerobic activated sludge reactor (AASR) system was employed to investigate the effects of sludge retention time (SRT) on the removal of three polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with low benzene rings [(acenaphthene (ACT), fluorene (FLN) and phenanthrene (PHE)] and six PAHs with high benzene rings [(benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DahA), benzo[g,h,i]perylene (BghiP)] in the presence of rhamnolipid (RD), emulsan (EM) and surfactine (SR) biosurfactants. This study showed that biosurfactants enhance the PAH biodegradation by increasing the biomass growth. RD exhibits a better performance than the other biosurfactants in the removal of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and PAHs. At a RD concentration of 15 mg/L aerobic treatment for 25 days, SRT was enough to remove over 95% of total PAHs, and COD(dis). Under the same conditions 75% of COD originating from the inert organics (COD(inert)) and 96% of COD originating from the inert soluble microbial products (COD(imp)) were removed. At 25 days SRT and 15 mg/L RD concentration, about 88% of PAHs were biodegraded by the AASR system, 4% were accumulated in the system, 3% were released in the effluent, and 5% remained in the waste sludge.

  6. Application of biosurfactants and periodic voltage gradient for enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metals and PAHs in dredged marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Ammami, M T; Portet-Koltalo, F; Benamar, A; Duclairoir-Poc, C; Wang, H; Le Derf, F

    2015-04-01

    Dredged harbor sediment co-contaminated by heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was subjected to enhanced electrokinetic treatments, using a mixture of a chelating agent (citric acid CA) and a surfactant as additives in the processing fluids. We tested various operating conditions (at 1 V cm(-1)): different CA concentrations, applying a periodic voltage gradient, pre-conditioning the sediment with the additives, and replacing the synthetic surfactant Tween 20 (TW20) by biosurfactants. Increasing the CA concentration was favorable for both metal and PAH removal. Applying a periodic voltage gradient associated to a low concentration of CA and TW20 provided the best results for Zn, Cd and Pb removal and also for removal of the 16 priority PAHs. Promising results were obtained with solutions containing rhamnolipids (0.028%) and a viscosin-like biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfa7B (0.025%), associated to a periodic voltage gradient. Although the rhamnolipid and the viscosin-like compounds involved a higher electrical current than TW20, metals were less removed from the sediment. The electroosmotic flow was lower when we used biosurfactants, hence a less effective effect on PAH removal.

  7. Biosurfactant from red ash trees enhances the bioremediation of PAH contaminated soil at a former gasworks site.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Warren; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent contaminants that accumulate in soil, sludge and on vegetation and are produced through activities such as coal burning, wood combustion and in the use of transport vehicles. Naturally occurring surfactants have been known to enhance PAH-removal from soil by improving PAH solubilization thereby increasing PAH-microbe interactions. The aim of this research was to determine if a biosurfactant derived from the leaves of the Australian red ash (Alphitonia excelsa) would enhance bioremediation of a heavily PAH-contaminated soil and to determine how the microbial community was affected. Results of GC-MS analysis show that the extracted biosurfactant was significantly more efficient than the control in regards to the degradation of total 16 US EPA priority PAHs (78.7% degradation compared to 62.0%) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) (92.9% degradation compared to 44.3%). Furthermore the quantification of bacterial genes by qPCR analysis showed that there was an increase in the number of gene copies associated with Gram positive PAH-degrading bacteria. The results suggest a commercial potential for the use of the Australian red ash tree as a source of biosurfactant for use in the accelerated degradation of hydrocarbons.

  8. Biosurfactant-producing yeast isolated from Calyptogena soyoae (deep-sea cold-seep clam) in the deep sea.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Nagahama, Takahiko; Morita, Tomotake; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai; Hatada, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    We describe a detailed structure determination of biosurfactant produced by Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62, which was newly isolated from Calyptogena soyoae (deep-sea cold-seep clam, Shirouri-gai) at 1156 m in Sagami bay. P. hubeiensis SY62 was taxonomically slightly different from the P. hubeiensis type strain, which produces biosurfactants. Glycolipid production by the strain was also slightly different from those of previously reported strains. BS productivity was estimated to be around 30 g/l from the weight of the crude extract. At least five different spots of glycolipid biosurfactants (BSs) were detected by TLC. Results of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies indicated the major product, namely MEL-C (4-O-[4'-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alka(e)noil-beta-d-mannopyranosyl]-d-erythritol), as a promising BS. By further structural determination, the major fatty acids of MEL-C were estimated to be saturated C(6), C(10), and C(12) acids, which were shorter than those of previously reported MEL-C. Furthermore, (1)H-NMR spectra implied the presence of C(2) acids as acyl groups. According to surface tension determination, the novel MEL-C showed larger critical micelle concentration (1.1x10(-5) M) than conventional MEL-C which bound C(10) and C(12) acids (9.1x10(-6) M). From these results, shorter fatty acids would confer hydrophilicity onto the novel MEL-C.

  9. Biosurfactant and enzyme mediated crude oil degradation by Pseudomonas stutzeri NA3 and Acinetobacter baumannii MN3.

    PubMed

    Parthipan, Punniyakotti; Elumalai, Punniyakotti; Sathishkumar, Kuppusamy; Sabarinathan, Devaraj; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2017-10-01

    The present study focuses on the optimization of biosurfactant (BS) production using two potential biosurfactant producer Pseudomonas stutzeri NA3 and Acinetobacter baumannii MN3 and role of enzymes in the biodegradation of crude oil. The optimal conditions for P. stutzeri NA3 and A. baumannii MN3 for biodegradation were pH of 8 and 7; temperature of 30 and 40 °C, respectively. P. stutzeri NA3 and A. baumannii MN3 produced 3.81 and 4.68 g/L of BS, respectively. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry confirmed that BS was mainly composed of fatty acids. Furthermore, the role of the degradative enzymes, alkane hydroxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase and laccase on biodegradation of crude oil are explained. Maximum biodegradation efficiency (BE) was recorded for mixed consortia (86%) followed by strain P. stutzeri NA3 (84%). Both bacterial strains were found to be vigorous biodegraders of crude oil than other biosurfactant-producing bacteria due to their enzyme production capabilities and our results suggests that the bacterial isolates can be used for effective degradation of crude oil within short time periods.

  10. Application of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis regulatory protein PhaR as a bio-surfactant and bactericidal agent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Kun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Shi-Yan; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-06-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), a family of diverse bio-polyesters, are produced by many bacteria as an energy and carbon storage material. PHA synthesis regulatory protein PhaR was reported to attach on the surface of intracellular PHA granules for convenience of synthesis regulation. PhaR was found to have an amphiphilic property. However, no study was conducted to exploit this property for applications as bio-surfactant and bactericide agent. Purified PhaR showed a higher emulsification ability than that of the widely used chemical surfactants including SDS, Tween 20, sodium oleate, and liquefied detergent (LD). PhaR also showed a higher emulsification ability than bio-surfactants rhamnose and PHA granules associated protein termed phasin or PhaP. Non-purified PhaR, namely, the native inclusion bodies and cell lysates, also demonstrated to be an excellent surfactant. PhaR was found highly stable even at 95 °C. In addition, PhaR was revealed to be a promising bactericidal agent against Gram positive and negative bacteria. PhaR can be conveniently produced by recombinant Escherichia coli. It has shown to be a bio-surfactant with excellent emulsification ability and strong bactericidal capacity at elevated temperature as high as 95 °C. Therefore, PhaR could be used in areas including food, beverage, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and characterization of biosurfactant production under extreme environmental conditions by alkali-halo-thermophilic bacteria from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Abdelmoneim, T S; Almaghrabi, O A

    2015-07-01

    Twenty three morphologically distinct microbial colonies were isolated from soil and sea water samples, which were collected from Jeddah region, Saudi Arabia for screening of the most potent biosurfactant strains. The isolated bacteria were selected by using different methods as drop collapse test, oil displacement test, blue agar test, blood hemolysis test, emulsification activity and surface tension. The results showed that the ability of Virgibacillus salarius to grow and reduce surface tension under a wide range of pH, salinities and temperatures gives bacteria isolate an advantage in many applications such as pharmaceutical, cosmetics, food industries and bioremediation in marine environment. The biosurfactant production by V. salarius decreased surface tension and emulsifying activity (30 mN/m and 80%, respectively). In addition to reducing the production cost of biosurfactants by tested several plant-derived oils such as jatropha oil, castor oils, jojoba oil, canola oil and cottonseed oil. In this respect the feasibility to reusing old frying oil of sunflower for production rhamnolipids and sophorolipids, their use that lead to solve many ecological and industrial problems.

  12. Sulfur source-mediated transcriptional regulation of the rhlABC genes involved in biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas sp. strain AK6U.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael; El Nayal, Ashraf M; Ramadan, Ahmed R; Abotalib, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Despite the nutritional significance of sulfur, its influence on biosurfactants production has not been sufficiently studied. We investigated the expression of key biosurfactants production genes, rhlABC, in cultures of Pseudomonas sp. AK6U grown with inorganic or organic sulfur sources. AK6U grew with either inorganic sulfate (MgSO4), dibenzothiophene (DBT), or DBT-sulfone as a sole sulfur source in the presence of glucose as a carbon source. The AK6U cultures produced variable amounts of biosurfactants depending on the utilized sulfur source. Biosurfactants production profile of the DBT cultures was significantly different from that of the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The last two cultures were very similar in terms of biosurfactants productivity. Biosurfactants yield in the DBT cultures (1.3 g/L) was higher than that produced by the DBT-sulfone (0.5 g/L) and the inorganic sulfate (0.44 g/L) cultures. Moreover, the surface tension reduction in the DBT cultures (33 mN/m) was much stronger than that measured in the DBT-sulfone (58 mN/m) or inorganic sulfate (54 mN/m) cultures. RT-qPCR revealed variations in the expression levels of the rhlABC genes depending on the sulfur source. The DBT cultures had higher expression levels for the three genes as compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. There was no significant difference in the expression profiles between the DBT-sulfone and the MgSO4 cultures. The increased expression of rhlC in the DBT cultures is indicative for production of higher amounts of dirhamnolipids compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The gene expression results were in good agreement with the biosurfactants production yields and surface tension measurements. The sulfur source mediates a fine-tuned mechanism of transcriptional regulation of biosurfactants production genes. Our findings can have an impact on industrial production of biosurfactants and other biotechnological processes like

  13. Sulfur source-mediated transcriptional regulation of the rhlABC genes involved in biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas sp. strain AK6U

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; El Nayal, Ashraf M.; Ramadan, Ahmed R.; Abotalib, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Despite the nutritional significance of sulfur, its influence on biosurfactants production has not been sufficiently studied. We investigated the expression of key biosurfactants production genes, rhlABC, in cultures of Pseudomonas sp. AK6U grown with inorganic or organic sulfur sources. AK6U grew with either inorganic sulfate (MgSO4), dibenzothiophene (DBT), or DBT-sulfone as a sole sulfur source in the presence of glucose as a carbon source. The AK6U cultures produced variable amounts of biosurfactants depending on the utilized sulfur source. Biosurfactants production profile of the DBT cultures was significantly different from that of the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The last two cultures were very similar in terms of biosurfactants productivity. Biosurfactants yield in the DBT cultures (1.3 g/L) was higher than that produced by the DBT-sulfone (0.5 g/L) and the inorganic sulfate (0.44 g/L) cultures. Moreover, the surface tension reduction in the DBT cultures (33 mN/m) was much stronger than that measured in the DBT-sulfone (58 mN/m) or inorganic sulfate (54 mN/m) cultures. RT-qPCR revealed variations in the expression levels of the rhlABC genes depending on the sulfur source. The DBT cultures had higher expression levels for the three genes as compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. There was no significant difference in the expression profiles between the DBT-sulfone and the MgSO4 cultures. The increased expression of rhlC in the DBT cultures is indicative for production of higher amounts of dirhamnolipids compared to the DBT-sulfone and inorganic sulfate cultures. The gene expression results were in good agreement with the biosurfactants production yields and surface tension measurements. The sulfur source mediates a fine-tuned mechanism of transcriptional regulation of biosurfactants production genes. Our findings can have an impact on industrial production of biosurfactants and other biotechnological processes like

  14. Effect of Fe nanoparticle on growth and glycolipid biosurfactant production under solid state culture by marine Nocardiopsis sp. MSA13A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential element in several pathways of microbial metabolism, and therefore low iron toxicity is expected on the usage of Fe nanoparticles (NPs). This study aims to determine the effect of Fe NPs on biosurfactant production by marine actinobacterium Nocardiopsis sp. MSA13A under solid state culture. Foam method was used in the production of Fe NPs which were long and fiber shaped in nature. Results The SEM observation showed non toxic nature of Fe NPs as no change in the morphology of the filamentous structure of Nocardiopsis MSA13A. The production of biosurfactant by Nocardiopsis MSA13A under solid state culture supplemented with Fe NPs increased to 80% over control. The biosurfactant produced by Nocardiopsis MSA13A was characterized as glycolipid derivative which effectively disrupted the pre-formed biofilm of Vibrio pathogen. Conclusion The use of metal NPs as supplement would reduce the impact of non-metallic ions of the metal salts in a fermentation process. This would ultimately useful to achieve greener production process for biosurfactants. The present results are first report on the optimization of biosurfactant production under SSC using Fe NPs. PMID:24885470

  15. Use of biosurfactants from urban wastes compost in textile dyeing and soil remediation.

    PubMed

    Montoneri, Enzo; Boffa, Vittorio; Savarino, Piero; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio; Micheletti, Luca; Gianotti, Carlo; Chiono, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    A compost isolated humic acid-like (cHAL) material was pointed out in previous work for its potential as auxiliary in chemical technology. Its potential is based on its relatively low 0.4gL(-1) critical micellar concentration (cmc) in water, which enables cHAL to enhance the water solubility of hydrophobic substances, like phenanthrene, when used at higher concentrations than 0.4gL(-1). This material could be obtained from a 1:1 v/v mixture of municipal solid and lignocellulosic wastes composted for 15 days. The compost, containing 69.3% volatile solids, 39.6% total organic C and 21C/N ratio, was extracted for 24h at 65 degrees C under N2 with aqueous 0.1molL(-1) NaOH and 0.1molL(-1) Na4P2O7, and the solution was acidified to separate the precipitated cHAL in 12% yield from soluble carbohydrates and other humic and non-humic substances. In this work two typical applications of surfactants, i.e., textile dyeing (TD) and soil remediation by washing (SW), were chosen as grounds for testing the performance of the cHAL biosurfactant against the one of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), which is a well established commercial synthetic surfactant. The TD trials were carried out with nylon 6 microfiber and a water insoluble dye, while the SW tests were performed with two soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) for several decades. Performances were rated in the TD experiments based on the fabric colour intensity (DeltaE) and uniformity (sigmaDeltaE), and in the SW experiments based on the total hydrocarbons concentration (CWPAH) and on the residual surfactant (Cre) concentrations in the washing solution equilibrated with the contaminated soils. The results show that both cHAL and SDS exhibit enhanced performance when applied above their cmc values. However, while in the TD case a significant performance effect was observed at the surfactants cmc value, in the SW case the required surfactants concentration values were equivalent to 25-125xcmc for cHAL and to

  16. Using Biosurfactants Produced from Agriculture Process Waste Streams to Improve Oil Recovery in Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Johnson; Mehdi Salehi; Karl Eisert; Sandra Fox

    2009-01-07

    This report describes the progress of our research during the first 30 months (10/01/2004 to 03/31/2007) of the original three-year project cycle. The project was terminated early due to DOE budget cuts. This was a joint project between the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) at the University of Kansas and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective was to evaluate the use of low-cost biosurfactants produced from agriculture process waste streams to improve oil recovery in fractured carbonate reservoirs through wettability mediation. Biosurfactant for this project was produced using Bacillus subtilis 21332 and purified potato starch as the growth medium. The INL team produced the biosurfactant and characterized it as surfactin. INL supplied surfactin as required for the tests at KU as well as providing other microbiological services. Interfacial tension (IFT) between Soltrol 130 and both potential benchmark chemical surfactants and crude surfactin was measured over a range of concentrations. The performance of the crude surfactin preparation in reducing IFT was greater than any of the synthetic compounds throughout the concentration range studied but at low concentrations, sodium laureth sulfate (SLS) was closest to the surfactin, and was used as the benchmark in subsequent studies. Core characterization was carried out using both traditional flooding techniques to find porosity and permeability; and NMR/MRI to image cores and identify pore architecture and degree of heterogeneity. A cleaning regime was identified and developed to remove organic materials from cores and crushed carbonate rock. This allowed cores to be fully characterized and returned to a reproducible wettability state when coupled with a crude-oil aging regime. Rapid wettability assessments for crushed matrix material were developed, and used to inform slower Amott wettability tests. Initial static absorption experiments exposed limitations in the use of HPLC and TOC to determine

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Immobilized Biosurfactant Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Grown on Cassava Industrial Wastewater into Activated Allophane as an Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanti, V.; Widjonarko, D. M.; Windrawati; Widyaningsih, V.

    2017-02-01

    The immobilization of biosurfactant into activated allophane has been conducted with mass ratio of biosurfactant:allophane of 1:5; 1:7 and 1:10 and contact time of 24 and 48 h. The optimum condition for immobilization was reached when the mass ratio of biosurfactant: allophane of 1:10 with the contact time of 24 h was applied. The result yielded the immobilization product having the specific surface area of 82.42 m2/g and the surface acidity of 9.12 mmol/g. A better adsorbent has been produced. In respect to the activated allophane, there was a decreasing of specific surface area about 20% and increasing of surface acidity value about 120%.

  18. Study of the synergistic effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on the surface-active properties of biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus pentosus.

    PubMed

    Bello, Xanel Vecino; Devesa-Rey, Rosa; Cruz, José Manuel; Moldes, Ana Belén

    2012-02-08

    Many studies have investigated the effects of pH, temperature, and salinity on the surface-active properties of various surfactants, although in most cases the variables have been studied separately, without considering the effects of any interactions between them. In the present study, a Box-Behnken factorial design was applied to study the effects of pH, temperature, and salinity on the surface-active properties of a biosurfactant produced by Lactobacillus pentosus. The data obtained enabled development of a second-order model describing the interrelationships between operational and experimental variables, by equations including linear, interaction, and quadratic terms. The variable that had the greatest effect on the surface-active properties of the biosurfactant was pH. Moreover, at pH 3-5.5, decreases in salinity and temperature acted synergistically, reducing the surface tension of the biosurfactant; at pH 8, the same effect was observed with increasing salinity and temperature.

  19. Microbial products (biosurfactant and extracellular chromate reductase) of marine microorganism are the potential agents reduce the oxidative stress induced by toxic heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gnanamani, A; Kavitha, V; Radhakrishnan, N; Suseela Rajakumar, G; Sekaran, G; Mandal, A B

    2010-09-01

    The present study demonstrates hexavalent chromium reduction and trivalent chromium tolerance behavior of marine Bacillus sp., MTCC 5514 through its extracellular enzyme reductase and biosurfactants production. The isolate reduces 10-2000 mg/L of hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium with in 24-96 h respectively and the release of extracellular chromium reductase, found responsible for the reduction. Upon reduction, the concentration of trivalent chromium in the medium found comparatively less. Experimental results reveal, biosurfactants activity found responsible for the less concentration of Cr(III). Hypothetically, trivalent chromium upon formation get entrapped in the micelle of biosurfactants, prevents microbial cells from exposure towards trivalent chromium. Thus, the chosen isolate exhibit tolerance and growth with the increasing concentration of chromium.

  20. Classifying Surfactants with Respect to Their Effect on Lipid Membrane Order

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Mozhgan; Kurdi, Mustafa; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    We propose classifying surfactants with respect to their effect on membrane order, which is derived from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of DPH. This may help in understanding why certain surfactants, including biosurfactants such as antimicrobial lipopeptides and saponins, often show a superior performance to permeabilize and lyse membranes and/or a better suitability for membrane protein solubilization. Micelle-forming surfactants induce curvature stress in membranes that causes disordering and, finally, lysis. Typical detergents such as C12EO8, octyl glucoside, SDS, and lauryl maltoside initiate membrane lysis after reaching a substantial, apparently critical extent of disordering. In contrast, the fungicidal lipopeptides surfactin, fengycin, and iturin from Bacillus subtilis QST713 as well as digitonin, CHAPS, and lysophosphatidylcholine solubilize membranes without substantial, overall disordering. We hypothesize they disrupt the membrane locally due to a spontaneous segregation from the lipid and/or packing defects and refer to them as heterogeneously perturbing. This may account for enhanced activity, selectivity, and mutual synergism of antimicrobial biosurfactants and reduced destabilization of membrane proteins by CHAPS or digitonin. Triton shows the pattern of a segregating surfactant in the presence of cholesterol. PMID:22325272

  1. Biosurfactant production and surface translocation are regulated by PlcR in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 under low-nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Somers, Eileen B; Lereclus, Didier; Ghelardi, Emilia; Wong, Amy C Lee

    2007-11-01

    Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 can respond to nutrient changes by adopting different forms of surface translocation. The B. cereus ATCC 14579 DeltaplcR mutant, but not the wild type, formed dendritic (branched) patterns on EPS [a low-nutrient medium that contains 7.0 g K(2)HPO(4), 3.0 g KH(2)PO(4), 0.1 g MgSO(4).7H(2)O, 0.1 g (NH(4))(2)SO(4), 0.01 g CaCl(2), 0.001 g FeSO(4), 0.1 g NaCl, 1.0 g glucose, and 125 mg yeast extract per liter] containing 0.7% agar. The dendritic patterns formed by sliding translocation of nonflagellated cells are enhanced under low-nutrient conditions and require sufficient production of a biosurfactant, which appears to be repressed by PlcR. The wild-type and complemented strains failed to slide on the surface of EPS agar because of the production of low levels of biosurfactant. Precoating EPS agar surfaces with surfactin (a biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis) or biosurfactant purified from the DeltaplcR mutant rescued the ability of the wild-type and complemented strains to slide. When grown on a nutrient-rich medium like Luria-Bertani agar, both the wild-type and DeltaplcR mutant strains produced flagella. The wild type was hyperflagellated and elongated and exhibited swarming behavior, while the DeltaplcR mutant was multiflagellated and the cells often formed long chains but did not swarm. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses suggested that the biosurfactant purified from the DeltaplcR mutant was a lipopeptide and had a mass of 1,278.1722 (m/z). This biosurfactant has hemolytic activity and inhibited the growth of several gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Antioxidant and antiproliferative potential of biosurfactants isolated from Lactobacillus casei and their anti-biofilm effect in oral Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Dallel, Ines; Noumi, Emira; Kadmi, Yassine; Hentati, Hajer; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Mastouri, Maha

    2017-03-01

    Biosurfactants also called bioemulsifiers are amphipathic compounds produced by many microorganisms that allow them to exhibit a wide range of biological activities. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant and antiproliferative potential of biosurfactants isolated from Lactobacillus casei and to assess their anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities against oral opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains. The antioxidant activity of biosurfactant was evaluated using the in vitro scavenging ability on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. The antiproliferative activity was determined on epithelial cell line (HEp-2) by the Methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay. The anti-adhesive and antibiofilm activity against S. aureus strains were achieved using crystal violet staining. Our results revealed that the DPPH scavenging activity of biosurfactants at 5.0 mg/mL concentration is between 74.6 and 77.3%. Furthermore, biosurfactants showed antiproliferative potency against studied epithelial cells as judged by IC50 and its value ranged from 109.1 ± 0.84 mg/mL to 129.7 ± 0.52 mg/mL. The results of the growth inhibition indicate that biosurfactant BS-LBl was more effective against oral S. aureus strains 9P and 29P with an IC50 of 1.92 ± 0.26 mg/mL and 2.16 ± 0.12 mg/mL respectively. Moreover, both biosurfactants displayed important antibiofilm activity with eradication percentages ranging from 80.22 ± 1.33% to 86.21 ± 2.94% for the BS-LBl, and from 53.38 ± 1.77% to 64.42 ± 2.09% for the BS-LZ9. Our findings demonstrate that biosurfactants from L. casei strains exhibited considerable antioxidant and antiproliferative potencies and were able to inhibit oral S. aureus strains with important antibiofilm efficacy. They could have a promising role in the prevention of oral diseases.

  3. Leaching heavy metals in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash with chelator/biosurfactant mixed solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    The chelator [S,S]-ethylene diamine disuccinic acid, citric acid, and biosurfactant saponin are selected as leaching agents. In this study, the leaching effect of saponin mixed with either ethylene diamine disuccinic acid or citric acid on the levels of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash is investigated. Results indicate that saponin separately mixed with ethylene diamine disuccinic acid and citric acid exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect on copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium leaching from fly ash. However, saponin and ethylene diamine disuccinic acid mixed solution exhibits a synergistic solubilisation effect that is superior to that of a saponin and citric acid mixed solution. The extraction rate of heavy metal in fly ash leached with a saponin and chelator mixed solution is related to the pH of the leaching solution, and the optimal range of the pH is suggested to be approximately neutral. After leaching with a saponin and chelator mixed solution, copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium contents significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the extractable or acid-soluble and reducible fractions. By adopting the proposed approach, the leaching concentrations of copper, zinc, lead, and cadmium in treated fly ash are in accordance with Standard for Pollution Control on the Security Landfill Site for Hazardous Wastes GB18598-2001.

  4. Antibacterial properties of biosurfactants against selected Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Díaz De Rienzo, Mayri A; Stevenson, Paul; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial properties and ability to disrupt biofilms of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids, sophorolipids) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in the presence and absence of selected organic acids were investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% v/v, and the growth of Escherichia coli NCTC 10418 was also inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% and 0.1% v/v, respectively. Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by rhamnolipids, sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >0.5% v/v of all three; the same effect was observed with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144. The ability to attach to surfaces and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, E. coli NCTC 10418 and B. subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by sophorolipids (1% v/v) in the presence of caprylic acid (0.8% v/v). In the case of S. aureus ATCC 9144, the best results were obtained using caprylic acid on its own. It was concluded that sophorolipids are promising compounds for the inhibition/disruption of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms and this activity can be enhanced by the presence of booster compounds such as caprylic acid.

  5. [Electricity generation of surplus sludge microbial fuel cell enhanced by biosurfactant].

    PubMed

    Peng, Hai-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun; Yi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of biosurfactant (rhamnolipid/TSS, 0.3 g x g(-1)) on the characteristics of electricity generation by surplus sludge microbial fuel cell (SSMFC) and the reduction of surplus sludge were discussed. In the control group, the electrogenesis cycle was 20 d, the maximal power density was 236.84 mW x m(-2), the coulomb efficiency was 5.7%, and the TCOD, TSS and VSS removal efficiency was 58.5%, 56.7% and 66.3%, respectively. In the experimental group, the electrogenesis cycle was 35 d, the coulomb efficiency was 11.8%, the maximal power density was 516. 67 mW x m(-2) which was increased by 118. 15% as compared to the control group, and the TCOD, TSS and VSS removal efficiency was 58.5% , 56.7% and 66.3%, which raised by 104.5%, 96.2% and 98.5% as compared to the control group, respectively. With the operation of the system, the output voltage of control group and experimental group kept stable for a period of time before gradually reduced, the SCOD, protein and soluble sugar concentrations of surplus sludge first increased and then decreased. This study demonstrated that the addition of rhamnolipid enhanced the electricity generation of SSMFC with simultaneous promotion of sludge reduction.

  6. Self-assembly in dilute mixtures of non-ionic and anionic surfactants and rhamnolipd biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Liley, J R; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Stevenson, P S; Banat, I M; Marchant, R; Rudden, M; Terry, A; Grillo, I

    2017-02-01

    The self-assembly of dilute aqueous solutions of a ternary surfactant mixture and rhamnolipid biosurfactant/surfactant mixtures has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. In the ternary surfactant mixture of octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, C12E8, sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate, LAS, and sodium dioxyethylene monododecyl sulfate, SLES, small globular interacting micelles are observed over the entire composition and concentration range studied. The modelling of the scattering data strongly supports the assumption that the micelle compositions are close to the solution compositions. In the 5-component rhamnolipid/surfactant mixture of the mono-rhamnose, R1, di-rhamnose, R2, rhamnolipids with C12E8/LAS/SLES, globular micelles are observed over much of the concentration and composition range studied. However, for solutions relatively rich in rhamnolipid and LAS, lamellar/micellar coexistence is observed. The transition from globular to more planar structures arises from a synergistic packing in the 5 component mixture. It is not observed in the individual components nor in the ternary C12E8/LAS/SLES mixture at these relatively low concentrations. The results provide an insight into how synergistic packing effects can occur in the solution self-assembly of complex multi-component surfactant mixtures, and give rise to an unexpected evolution in the phase behaviour.

  7. [BIOCONVERSION OF CRUDE GLYCEROL AND MOLASSES MIXTURE IN BIOSURFACTANTS OF NOCARDIA VACCINII IMB B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Kudrya, N V; Shevchuk, T A; Beregova, K A; Iutynska, G O

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of replacing glucose and pure glycerol in mixed substrates for surtace-active substances (SAS, biosurfactants) biosynthesis of Nocardia vaccinii IMB B-7405 on molasses (sugar production waste) and crude glycerol (by-product of biodiesel production) was established. It was established that the increasing concentration of crude glycerol to 6% in mixture with 1.0% molasses was accompanied by increase of amount of SAS synthesized more than twice, and the increasing content of molasses to 3.0% in mixture with 1.0% crude glycerol--by some decrease in the level of surfactant as compared to that in a medium containing 1.0% monosubstrates. It was shown that the increasing concentration of sodium nitrate to 2-fold in medium cultivation of N. vaccinii IMB B-7405 allowed to increase to 7.0% content of grude glycerol in mixture with 1.0% molasses. Under such conditions of cultivation concentration of exocellular SAS synthesized was 7,5 g/l, that to 1,3 fold higher than in basic medium with a lower content of nitrogen source.

  8. Production of biosurfactant using different hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas aeruginosa EBN-8 mutant.

    PubMed

    Raza, Zulfiqar Ali; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Khalid, Zafar M; Rehman, Asma

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation dealt with the use of previously isolated and studied gamma-ray mutant strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa EBN-8 for the production of biosurfactant by using different hydrocarbon substrates viz. n-hexadecane, paraffin oil and kerosene oil, provided in minimal medium, as the sole carbon and energy sources. The batch experiments were conducted in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks, containing 50 mL minimal salt media supplemented with 1% (w/v) hydrocarbon substrate, inoculated by EBN-8 and incubated at 37 degrees C and 100 rpm in an orbital shaker. The sampling was done on 24 h basis for 10 d. The surface tension of cell-free culture broth decreased from 53 to 29 mN/m after 3 and 4 d of incubation when the carbon sources were paraffin oil and n-hexadecane, respectively. The largest reduction in interfacial tension from 26 to 0.4 mN/m was observed with n-hexadecane, while critical micelle dilution was obtained as 50 x CMC for paraffin oil as carbon source. When grown on n-hexadecane and paraffin oil, the EBN-8 mutant strain gave 4.1 and 6.3 g of the rhamnolipids/L, respectively. These surface-active substances subsequently allowed the hydrocarbon substrates to disperse readily as emulsion in aqueous phase.

  9. A Biosurfactant-Sophorolipid Acts in Synergy with Antibiotics to Enhance Their Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Joshi-Navare, Kasturi; Prabhune, Asmita

    2013-01-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs), biosurfactants with antimicrobial properties, have been tried to address the problem of antibiotic resistance. The synergistic action of SL and antibiotics was checked using standard microdilution and spread plate methods. With Staphylococcus aureus, SL-tetracycline combination achieved total inhibition before 4 h of exposure while tetracycline alone couldnot achieve total inhibition till the end of 6 h. The inhibition caused by exposure of bacterium to SL-tetracycline mixture was ~25% more as compared to SL alone. In spite of known robustness of gram-negative bacteria, SL-cefaclor mixture proved to be efficient against Escherichia coli which showed ~48% more inhibition within 2 h of exposure as compared to cefaclor alone. Scanning electron microscopy of the cells treated with mixture revealed bacterial cell membrane damage and pore formation. Moreover, SLs being a type of asymmetric bola, they are expected to form self-assemblies with unique functionality. This led to the speculation that SLs being amphiphilic in nature can span through the structurally alike cell membrane and facilitate the entry of drug molecules. PMID:24089681

  10. Micelles versus Ribbons: How Congeners Drive the Self-Assembly of Acidic Sophorolipid Biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Dhasaiyan, Prabhu; Le Griel, Patrick; Roelants, Sophie; Redant, Emile; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Prevost, Sylvain; Prasad, B L V; Baccile, Niki

    2017-03-17

    Sophorolipids (SLs), a class of microbially derived biosurfactants, are reported by different research groups to have different self-assembled structures (either micelles or giant ribbons) under the same conditions. Here we explore the reasons behind these contradictory results and attribute these differences to the role of specific congeners that are present in minute quantities. We show that a sample composed of a majority of oleic acid (C18:1) sophorolipid in the presence of only 0.5 % (or more) of congeners with stearic acid (C18:0) or linoleic acid (C18:2) results in the formation of micelles that are stable over long periods of time. Conversely, the presence of only 10 to 15 % of congeners with a stearic acid chain gives fibrillar structures instead of micelles. To study the mechanisms responsible, oleic acid SLs devoid of any other congeners were prepared. Very interestingly, this sample can self-assemble into either micelles or fibers depending on minute modifications to the self-assembly conditions. The findings are supported by light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy under cryogenic conditions, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Equilibrium, hysteresis and kinetics of cadmium desorption from sodium-feldspar using rhamnolipid biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Aşçi, Yeliz; Açikel, Unsal; Açikel, Yeşim Sağ

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the sorption/desorption equilibruim and the desorption kinetics of Cd by rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Na-feldspar as a soil component were investigated. The linear, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms adequately fitted the equilibrium sorption data with regression coefficients ranging from 0.9836 - 0.9879. However, both the sorption/desorption equilibria were well characterized by the Freundlich model. The extent of hysteresis was quantified based on the differences obtained from sorption and desorption isotherms regarding the quantity of Cd(II) sorbed, the Freundlich exponent, concentration-dependent metal distribution coefficients, and the irreversibility index based on the metal distribution coefficient. The kinetics of desorption of Cd from Na-feldspar was investigated using 77 mM rhamnolipid and at pH 6.8. The first-order, an empirical first-order desorption model (two-coefficient), Lagergren-pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich models were used to describe the kinetic data to estimate the rate constants. To determine the rate-controlling step, the intra-particle diffusion model was also applied to the desorption process. The desorption kinetics of Cd(II) on Na-feldspar was represented better by the pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich equations with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9941- 0.9982 than by first-order equations. The rate-controlling stage was suggested to be mainly the surface reaction mechanism.

  12. Microbial degradation of four crude oil by biosurfactant producing strain Rhodococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Pi, Yongrui; Chen, Bing; Bao, Mutai; Fan, Fuqiang; Cai, Qinhong; Ze, Lv; Zhang, Baiyu

    2017-05-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis M-25, one of the representative biosurfactant producers, performed effectively during the biodegradation of four crude oil. The microbial degradation efficiency is positively relevant to the API of the crude oil. The chemical dispersant Corexit 9500A did not enhance the biodegradation of the petroleum hydrocarbons during the experimental period. 70.7% of the N-4 oil was degraded after 30days, while in the Corexit 9500A plus sample the biodegradation removal was 42.8%. The Corexit-derived compounds were metabolized by M-25 at the same time of the petroleum hydrocarbons biodegrading. Neither biodegradation nor chemical dispersion process has almost no effect on the biomarker (m/z=231). The saturated methyl-branched fatty acids increased from 37.3%, to 49.4%, when M-25 was exposed with the N-4 crude oil. Similarly, the saturated methyl-branched fatty acids in the membrane of N3-2P increased from 20.25% to 44.1%, when exposed it with the N-4 crude oil.

  13. Interaction of a biosurfactant, Surfactin with a cationic Gemini surfactant in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Garamus, Vasil M; Liu, Fang; Xiao, Jingwen; Eckerlebe, Helmut; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Mu, Bozhong; Zou, Aihua

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between biosurfactant Surfactin and cationic Gemini surfactant ethanediyl-1,3-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (abbreviated as 12-3-12) was investigated using turbidity, surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Analysis of critical micelle concentration (CMC) values in Surfactin/12-3-12 mixture indicates that there is synergism in formation of mixed Surfactin/12-3-12 micelles. Although Surfactin and 12-3-12 are oppositely charged in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH7.4), there are no precipitates observed at the concentrations below the CMC of Surfactin/12-3-12 system. However, at the concentration above CMC value, the Surfactin/12-3-12 mixture is severely turbid with high 12-3-12 content. DLS and SANS measurements follow the size and shape changes of mixed Surfactin/12-3-12 aggregates from small spherical micelles via elongated aggregates to large bulk complexes with increasing fraction of Gemini surfactant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biological Activities of a Mixture of Biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis and Alkaline Lipase from Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Pereira de Quadros, Cedenir; Cristina Teixeira Duarte, Marta; Maria Pastore, Gláucia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the antimicrobial effects of a mixture of a biosurfactant from Bacillus subtilis and an alkaline lipase from Fusarium oxysporum (AL/BS mix) on several types of microorganisms, as well as their abilities to remove Listeria innocua ATCC 33093 biofilm from stainless steel coupons. The AL/BS mix had a surface tension of around 30 mN.m-1, indicating that the presence of alkaline lipase did not interfere in the surface activity properties of the tensoactive component. The antimicrobial activity of the AL/BS mix was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) micro-assays. Among all the tested organisms, the presence of the mixture only affected the growth of B. subtilis CCT 2576, B. cereus ATCC 10876 and L. innocua. The most sensitive microorganism was B. cereus (MIC 0.013 mg.mL-1). In addition, the effect of the sanitizer against L. innocua attached to stainless steel coupons was determined by plate count after vortexing. The results showed that the presence of the AL/BS mix improved the removal of adhered cells relative to treatment done without the sanitizer, reducing the count of viable cells by 1.72 log CFU.cm-2. However, there was no significant difference between the sanitizers tested and an SDS detergent standard (p<0.05). PMID:24031642

  15. Solubilization of saikosaponin a by ginsenoside Ro biosurfactant in aqueous solution: mesoscopic simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xingxing; Shi, Xinyuan; Wang, Yuguang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2012-10-15

    Ginsenoside Ro (Ro), a natural anionic biosurfactant derived from ginseng, has been found to markedly increase the solubility of saikosaponin a (SSa), which is the active ingredient of Radix Bupleuri. SSa is minimally soluble in water. To determine the mechanism by which Ro solubilizes SSa, the self-assembly behavior of Ro and the phase behavior of blended Ro and SSa systems were studied by mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The simulation results show that Ro can form vesicles via the closure of oblate membranes. At low concentrations, SSa molecules are solubilized in the palisade layer of the Ro vesicles. At high concentrations, they interact with Ro molecules to form mixed vesicles with Ro adsorbing on the surfaces of the vesicles. The evaluation of the SSa solubilization process reveals that, at low concentrations, Ro aggregates preferentially to form vesicles, which then absorb SSa into themselves. However, at high concentrations, SSa first self-aggregates and then dissolves. This is because the solubilization behavior of Ro shifts the precipitation-dissolution equilibrium in the direction of dissolution. These results of the simulations are consistent with those of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosurfactant production by halotolerant Rhodococcus fascians from Casey Station, Wilkes Land, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Gesheva, Victoria; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vasileva-Tonkova, Evgenia

    2010-08-01

    Isolate A-3 from Antarctic soil in Casey Station, Wilkes Land, was characterized for growth on hydrocarbons. Use of glucose or kerosene as a sole carbon source in the culture medium favoured biosynthesis of surfactant which, by thin-layer chromatography, indicated the formation of a rhamnose-containing glycolipid. This compound lowered the surface tension at the air/water interface to 27 mN/m as well as inhibited the growth of B. subtilis ATCC 6633 and exhibited hemolytic activity. A highly hydrophobic surface of the cells suggests that uptake occurs via a direct cell-hydrocarbon substrate contact. Strain A-3 is Gram-positive, halotolerant, catalase positive, urease negative and has rod-coccus shape. Its cell walls contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. Phylogenetic analysis based on comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain A-3 is closely related to Rhodococcus fascians with which it shares 100% sequence similarity. This is the first report on rhamnose-containing biosurfactant production by Rhodococcus fascians isolated from Antarctic soil.

  17. Glycolipid Biosurfactants Activate, Dimerize, and Stabilize Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase in a pH-Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jens Kvist; Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Andersen, Camilla Bertel; Nedergaard Pedersen, Jannik; Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-08-15

    We present a study of the interactions between the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TlL) and the two microbially produced biosurfactants (BSs), rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL). Both RL and SL are glycolipids; however, RL is anionic, while SL is a mixture of anionic and non-ionic species. We investigate the interactions of RL and SL with TlL at pH 6 and 8 and observe different effects at the two pH values. At pH 8, neither RL nor SL had any major effect on TlL stability or activity. At pH 6, in contrast, both surfactants increase TlL's thermal stability and fluorescence and activity measurements indicate interfacial activation of TlL, resulting in 3- and 6-fold improved activity in SL and RL, respectively. Nevertheless, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals binding of only a few BS molecules per lipase. Size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering suggest formation of TlL dimers with binding of small amounts of either RL or SL at the dimeric interface, forming an elongated complex. We conclude that RL and SL are compatible with TlL and constitute promising green alternatives to traditional surfactants.

  18. Solubilization properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by saponin, a plant-derived biosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Yang, Juanjuan; Lou, Linjie; Zhu, Lizhong

    2011-05-01

    The enhanced solubilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by saponin, a plant-derived non-ionic biosurfactant, was investigated. The results indicated that the solubilization capabilities of saponin for PAHs were greater than some representative synthetic non-ionic surfactants and showed strong dependence on solution pH and ionic strength. The molar solubilization ratio (MSR) of saponin for phenanthrene was about 3-6 times of those of the synthetic non-ionic surfactants, and decreased by about 70% with the increase of solution pH from 4.0 to 8.0, but increased by approximately 1 times with NaCl concentration increased from 0.01 to 1.0 M. Heavy metal ions can enhance saponin solubilization for phenanthrene and the corresponding MSR values increased by about 25% with the presence of 0.01 M of Cd2+ or Zn2+. Saponin is more effective in enhancing PAHs solubilization than synthetic non-ionic surfactants and has potential application in removing organic pollutants from contaminated soils.

  19. Screening for biosurfactant production by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-transforming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Avila-Arias, H; Avellaneda, H; Garzón, V; Rodríguez, G; Arbeli, Z; Garcia-Bonilla, E; Villegas-Plazas, M; Roldan, F

    2017-08-01

    To isolate and identify TNT-transforming cultures from explosive-contaminated soils with the ability to produce biosurfactants. Bacteria (pure and mixed cultures) were selected based on their ability to transform TNT in minimum media with TNT as the sole nitrogen source and an additional carbon source. TNT-transforming bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. TNT transformation rates were significantly lower when no additional carbon or nitrogen sources were added. Surfactant production was enabled by the presence of TNT. Fourteen cultures were able to transform the explosive (>50%); of these, five showed a high transformation capacity (>90%), and six produced surfactants. All explosive-transforming cultures contained Proteobacteria of the genera Achromobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Pseudomonas, Sphingobium, Raoultella, Rhizobium and Methylopila. These cultures transformed TNT when an additional carbon source was added. Remarkably, Achromobacter spanius S17 and Pseudomonas veronii S94 have high TNT transformation rates and are surfactant producers. TNT is a highly toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic nitroaromatic explosive; therefore, bioremediation to eliminate or mitigate its presence in the environment is essential. TNT-transforming cultures that produce surfactants are a promising method for remediation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that links surfactant production and TNT transformation by bacteria. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Aggregation behaviour of a dirhamnolipid biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Marina; Aranda, Francisco J; Espuny, María J; Marqués, Ana; Teruel, José A; Manresa, Angeles; Ortiz, Antonio

    2007-03-01

    The process of micelle formation, along with the formation of higher order aggregates, is described for a dirhamnolipid extracellular biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. As determined by surface tension measurements, at pH 7.4 the CMC of dirhamnolipid is 0.110 mM, whereas at pH 4.0 it falls to 0.010 mM, indicating that the negatively charged diRL has a much higher CMC value than the neutral species. Centrifugation and dynamic light scattering measurements show formation of larger aggregates at concentrations above the CMC. These aggregates have been shown by electron microscopy to be mainly multilamellar vesicles of heterogeneous size. X-ray scattering gave a value of 32 A for the interlamellar repeat distance of these vesicles. Taking into account the experimental data, a molecular modelling of the dirhamnolipid moiety has been carried out, which details the size of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic portions, and suggests the possible intermolecular interactions responsible for the stabilisation of dirhamnolipid aggregates. The relevance of this aggregation behaviour is discussed with respect to the molecular basis of its activities.

  1. Natural attenuation and biosurfactant-stimulated bioremediation of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Débora M; Chagas-Spinelli, Alessandra C O; Gavazza, Sávia; Florencio, Lourdinha; Kato, Mario T

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated the bioremediation, by natural attenuation (NA) and by natural attenuation stimulated (SNA) using a rhamnolipid biosurfactant, of estuarine sediments contaminated with diesel oil. Sediment samples (30 cm) were put into 35 cm glass columns, and the concentrations of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency were monitored for 111 days. Naphthalene percolated through the columns more than the other PAHs, and, in general, the concentrations of the lower molecular weight PAHs, consisting of two and three aromatic rings, changed during the first 45 days of treatment, whereas the concentrations of the higher molecular weight PAHs, consisting of four, five, and six rings, were more stable. The higher molecular weight PAHs became more available after 45 days, in the deeper parts of the columns (20-30 cm). Evidence of degradation was observed only for some compounds, such as pyrene, with a total removal efficiency of 82 and 78 % in the NA and SNA treatments, respectively, but without significant difference. In the case of total PAH removal, the efficiencies were significantly different of 82 and 67 %, respectively.

  2. Biotechnological production of phenyllactic acid and biosurfactants from trimming vine shoot hydrolyzates by microbial coculture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pazo, Noelia; Salgado, José Manuel; Cortés-Diéguez, Sandra; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Coculture fermentations show advantages for producing food additives from agroindustrial wastes, considering that different specified microbial strains are combined to improve the consumption of mixed sugars obtained by hydrolysis. This technology dovetails with both the growing interest of consumers towards the use of natural food additives and with stricter legislations and concern in developed countries towards the management of wastes. The use of this technology allows valorization of both cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions of trimming vine shoots for the production of lactic acid (LA), phenyllactic acid (PLA), and biosurfactants (BS). This work compares the study of the potential of hemicellulosic and cellulosic fractions of trimming vine shoots as cheaper and renewable carbon sources for PLA and BS production by independent or coculture fermentations. The highest LA and PLA concentrations, 43.0 g/L and 1.58 mM, respectively, were obtained after 144 h during the fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) carried out by cocultures of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus. Additionally, cell-bond BS decreased the surface tension (ST) in 17.2 U; meanwhile, cell-free supernatants (CFS) showed antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes with inhibition halos of 12.1±0.6 mm and 11.5±0.9 mm, respectively.

  3. Effects of biosurfactant-producing bacteria on biodegradation and transport of phenanthrene in subsurface soil.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae-Soo; Cha, Daniel K; Radosevich, Mark; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surfactant-producing microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, on phenanthrene (PHE) biodegradation by two different PHE-degrading bacteria (Isolate P5-2 and Pseudomonas strain R) in soil. Phenanthrene mineralization experiments were conducted with soils inoculated with one of PHE-degraders and/or the surfactant-producer. Influence of co-inoculation with the surfactant-producing bacteria on phenanthrene transport and biodegradation was also examined in soil columns. P. strain R mineralized phenanthrene faster and to a greater extent than Isolate P5-2 in the test soil. Co-inoculation with the surfactant-producing bacteria significantly enhanced phenanthrene biodegradation by P. strain R but it did not affect the biodegradation by Isolate P5-2 in both batch and column systems. Production of biosurfactants by P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 was negligible under the given conditions. This study demonstrated that bioaugmentation with surfactant-producing bacteria could enhance in situ bioremediation of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the beneficial effect of the bioaugmentation depended on types of PAH-degrading microorganisms present.

  4. Synergistic foaming and surface properties of a weakly interacting mixture of soy glycinin and biosurfactant stevioside.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhi-Li; Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yuan, Yang; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-07-16

    The adsorption of the mixtures of soy glycinin (11S) with a biosurfactant stevioside (STE) at the air-water interface was studied to understand its relation with foaming properties. A combination of several techniques such as dynamic surface tension, dilatational rheology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used. In the presence of intermediate STE concentrations (0.25-0.5%), the weak binding of STE with 11S in bulk occurred by hydrophobic interactions, which could induce conformational changes of 11S, as evidenced by fluorescence and ITC. Accordingly, the strong synergy in reducing surface tension and the plateau in surface elasticity for mixed 11S-STE layers formed from the weakly interacting mixtures were clearly observed. This effect could be explained by the complexation with STE, which might facilitate the partial dissociation and further unfolding of 11S upon adsorption, thus enhancing the protein-protein and protein-STE interfacial interactions. These surface properties were positively reflected in foams produced by the weakly interacting system, which exhibited good foaming capacity and considerable stability probably due to better response to external stresses. However, at high STE concentrations (1-2%), as a consequence of the interface dominated by STE due to the preferential adsorption of STE molecules, the surface elasticity of layers dramatically decreased, and the resultant foams became less stable.

  5. Metal removal from contaminated soil and sediments by the biosurfactant surfactin

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, C.N.; Yong, R.N.; Gibbs, B.F.; James, S.; Bennett, H.P.J.

    1999-11-01

    Batch soil washing experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using surfactin from Bacillus subtilis, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, for the removal of heavy metals from a contaminated soil and sediments. The soil contained high levels of metals and hydrocarbons (890 mg/kg of zinc, 420 mg/kg of copper, and 12.6% oil and grease), and the sediments contained 110 mg/kg of copper and 3,300 mg/kg of zinc. The contaminated soil was spiked to increase the level of copper, zinc, and cadmium to 550, 1,200, and 2,000 mg/kg, respectively. Water alone removed minimal amounts of copper and zinc (less than 1%). Results showed that 0.25% surfactin/1% NaOH could remove 25% of the copper and 6% of the zinc from the soil and 15% of the copper and 6% of the zinc from the sediments. A series of five washings of the soil with 0.25% surfactin (1% NaOH) was able to remove 70% of the copper and 22% of the zinc. The technique of ultrafiltration and the measurement of octanol-water partitioning and {zeta}-potential were used to determine the mechanism of metal removal by surfactin. It was indicated that surfactin was able to remove the metals by sorption at the soil interphase and metal complexation, followed by desorption of the metal through interfacial tension lowering and fluid forces and finally complexation of the metal with the micelles.

  6. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF CARBONATE ROCK MEDIATED BY BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCED FROM HIGH-STARCH AGRICULTURAL EFFLUENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi Salehi; Stephen Johnson; Gregory Bala; Jenn-Tai Liang

    2006-09-01

    Surfactants can be used to alter wettability of reservoir rock, increasing spontaneous imbibition and thus improving oil yields. Commercial synthetic surfactants are often prohibitively expensive and so a crude preparation of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, from Bacillus subtilis grown on high-starch industrial and agricultural effluents has been proposed as an economical alternative. To assess the effectiveness of the surfactin, it is compared to commercially available surfactants. In selecting a suitable benchmark surfactant, two metrics are examined: the ability of the surfactants to alter wettability at low concentrations, and the degree to which they are absorbed onto reservoir matrix. We review the literature to survey the adsorption models that have been developed to describe surfactant adsorption in porous media. These models are evaluated using the experimental data from this study. Crushed carbonate rock samples are cleaned and aged in crude oil. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of commercial anionic surfactants and surfactin is assessed using a two-phase separation; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption the rock is determined.

  7. Poly(dimethyl siloxane) surface modification with biosurfactants isolated from probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S; Alves, P; Santos, A C; Matos, C M; Oliveiros, B; Gonçalves, S; Gudiña, E; Rodrigues, L R; Teixeira, J A; Gil, M H

    2011-09-15

    Depending on the final application envisaged for a given biomaterial, many surfaces must be modified before use. The material performance in a biological environment is mainly mediated by its surface properties that can be improved using suitable modification methods. The aim of this work was to coat poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) surfaces with biosurfactants (BSs) and to evaluate how these compounds affect the PDMS surface properties. BSs isolated from four probiotic strains (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus A, and Streptococcus thermophilus B) were used. Bare PDMS and PDMS coated with BSs were characterized by contact angle measurements, infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The influence of the surface modifications on the materials blood compatibility was studied through thrombosis and hemolysis assays. The cytotoxicity of these materials was tested against rat peritoneal macrophages. AFM results demonstrated the successful coating of the surfaces. Also, by contact angle measurements, an increase of the coated surfaces hydrophilicity was seen. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated a decrease of the silicon content at the surface, and ATR-FTIR results showed the presence of BS characteristic groups as a consequence of the modification. All the studied materials revealed no toxicity and were found to be nonhemolytic. The proposed approach for the modification of PDMS surfaces was found to be effective and opens new possibilities for the application of these surfaces in the biomedical field.

  8. Spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Tyler, Arwen I I; Barriga, Hanna M G; Bramble, Jonathan P; Law, Robert V; Brooks, Nicholas J; Seddon, John M; Ces, Oscar; O'Shea, Paul

    2017-10-03

    An assay to study the spontaneous charged lipid transfer between lipid vesicles is described. A donor/acceptor vesicle system is employed, where neutrally charged acceptor vesicles are fluorescently labelled with the electrostatic membrane probe Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE). Upon addition of charged donor vesicles, transfer of negatively charged lipid occurs, resulting in a fluorescently detectable change in the membrane potential of the acceptor vesicles. Using this approach we have studied the transfer properties of a range of lipids, varying both the headgroup and the chain length. At the low vesicle concentrations chosen, the transfer follows a first-order process where lipid monomers are transferred presumably through the aqueous solution phase from donor to acceptor vesicle. The rate of transfer decreases with increasing chain length which is consistent with energy models previously reported for lipid monomer vesicle interactions. Our assay improves on existing methods allowing the study of a range of unmodified lipids, continuous monitoring of transfer and simplified experimental procedures.

  9. Multiscale modeling of lipids and lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P

    2005-12-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is applied for simulations of lipids and lipid assemblies on mesoscale. First, molecular dynamics simulation of initially disordered system of lipid molecules in water within all-atomic model was carried out. On the next stage, structural data obtained from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to build a coarse-grained (ten sites) lipid model, with effective interaction potentials computed by the inverse Monte Carlo method. Finally, several simulations of the coarse-grained model on longer length- and time-scale were performed, both within Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations: a periodical sample of lipid molecules ordered in bilayer, a free sheet of such bilayer without periodic boundary conditions, formation of vesicle from a plain membrane, process of self-assembly of lipids randomly dispersed in volume. It was shown that the coarse-grained model, developed exclusively from all-atomic simulation data, reproduces well all the basic features of lipids in water solution.

  10. Accumulation of High-Value Lipids in Single-Cell Microorganisms: A Mechanistic Approach and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years attention has been focused on the utilization of microorganisms as alternatives for industrial and nutritional applications. Considerable research has been devoted to techniques for growth, extraction, and purification of high-value lipids for their use as biofuels and biosurfactants as well as high-value metabolites for nutrition and health. These successes argue that the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the microbial biosynthesis of such molecules, which are far from being completely understood, now will yield spectacular opportunities for industrial scale biomolecular production. There are important additional questions to be solved to optimize the processing strategies to take advantage of the assets of microbial lipids. The present review describes the current state of knowledge regarding lipid biosynthesis, accumulation, and transport mechanisms present in single-cell organisms, specifically yeasts, microalgae, bacteria, and archaea. Similarities and differences in biochemical pathways and strategies of different microorganisms provide a diverse toolset to the expansion of biotechnologies for lipid production. This paper is intended to inspire a generation of lipid scientists to insights that will drive the biotechnologies of microbial production as uniquely enabling players of lipid biotherapeutics, biofuels, biomaterials, and other opportunity areas into the 21st century. PMID:24628496

  11. Genome Sequence of Cobetia sp. Strain MM1IDA2H-1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Biosurfactant-Producing Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ibacache-Quiroga, Claudia; Canales, Christian; Charifeh, Mariam; Dinamarca, M Alejandro

    2017-04-13

    Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 is a marine bacterium isolated from seawater samples that uses the heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene as the sole carbon source and produces a biosurfactant that inhibits bacterial quorum sensing. The Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1 genome was sequenced, processed, assembled, and annotated for basic and applied studies.

  12. Effect of medium components on the production of a biosurfactant from Candida tropicalis applied to the removal of hydrophobic contaminants in soil.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ranielly M; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; de Souza, José Edson G; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2010-05-01

    The influence of medium constituents on the production of biosurfactants by Candida tropicalis cultivated in waste frying oil was investigated according to a fractional factorial 2(5-1) design. The combined effect of the C/N(inorganic), C/Fe, C/Mg, and C/P ratios and yeast extract on surface tension reduction, biosurfactant yield, emulsification activity, and biomass were studied. The highest biosurfactant yield was reached when low C/Mg and low C/P ratio variables were combined, while the cell growth was favored by increasing the nitrogen concentration. The highest surface tension net decrease, on the other hand, was observed at low yeast extract concentration, low C/Fe, and high C/P ratios. Emulsification indices against lubrication and automobile waste oil of approximately 65 to 95% were observed. The crude biosurfactant produced in the medium--formulated with 2% waste frying oil, 0.067% NH4Cl, 0.025% MgSO4.7H2O, 0.067% KH2PO4, and 0.0026% FeCl3.6H2O--removed approximately 78 to 97% of the petroleum and motor oil adsorbed in sand samples.

  13. Genome Sequence of Cobetia sp. Strain MM1IDA2H-1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Biosurfactant-Producing Marine Bacterium