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Sample records for biosynthesis enzyme leads

  1. A Conserved Ethylene Biosynthesis Enzyme Leads to Andromonoecy in Two Cucumis Species

    PubMed Central

    Boualem, Adnane; Troadec, Christelle; Kovalski, Irina; Sari, Marie-Agnes; Perl-Treves, Rafael; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2009-01-01

    Andromonoecy is a widespread sexual system in angiosperms, characterized by plants carrying both male and bisexual flowers. Monoecy is characterized by the presence of both male and female flowers on the same plant. In cucumber, these sexual forms are controlled by the identity of the alleles at the M locus. In melon, we recently showed that the transition from monoecy to andromonoecy result from a mutation in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) gene, CmACS-7. To isolate the andromonoecy gene in cucumber we used a candidate gene approach in combination with genetical and biochemical analysis. We demonstrated co-segregation of CsACS2, a close homolog of CmACS-7, with the M locus. Sequence analysis of CsACS2 in cucumber accessions identified four CsACS2 isoforms, three in andromonoecious and one in monoecious lines. To determine whether the andromonoecious phenotype is due to a loss of ACS enzymatic activity, we expressed the four isoforms in Escherichia coli and assayed their activity in vitro. Like in melon, the isoforms from the andromonoecious lines showed reduced to no enzymatic activity and the isoform from the monoecious line was active. Consistent with this, the mutations leading andromonoecy were clustered in the active site of the enzyme. Based on this, we concluded that active CsACS2 enzyme leads to the development of female flowers in monoecious lines, whereas a reduction of enzymatic activity yields hermaphrodite flowers. Consistent with this, CsACS2, like CmACS-7 in melon, is expressed specifically in carpel primordia of buds determined to develop carpels. Following ACS expression, inter-organ communication is likely responsible for the inhibition of stamina development. In both melon and cucumber, flower unisexuality seems to be the ancestral situation, as the majority of Cucumis species are monoecious. Thus, the ancestor gene of CmACS-7/CsACS2 likely have controlled the stamen development before speciation of Cucumis sativus (cucumber

  2. Effect of lead treatment on medicarpin accumulation and on the gene expression of key enzymes involved in medicarpin biosynthesis in Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ghelich, Sima; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Soltani, Bahram Mohammad; Niknam, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is the most common heavy metal contaminant in the environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of Pb treatment on medicarpin production and accumulation in Medicago sativa L. To this aim, 7- and 30-day-old plants were treated with 0, 120, 240, 500, and 1,000 μM Pb during 10 days. The content of medicarpin was determined by HPLC, and the extent of medicarpin production was deduced from the result of semiquantitative RT-PCR performed on PAL, CHS, and VR genes. HPLC results indicated that medicarpin concentration has been reduced in the roots, while its exudation to the culture medium has been increased. RT-PCR results indicated that the transcript levels of PAL, CHS, and VR genes have not been affected following Pb stress in seedlings. At the vegetative stage, transcript levels of PAL and CHS genes have been reduced in the roots. However, the transcript level of VR gene increased at 120 and 240 μM Pb, while it decreased at higher concentrations. In the shoot, the transcript levels of PAL, CHS, and VR genes were increased following increased concentration of lead in the medium. Overall, q-PCR results suggest that medicarpin biosynthesis has been induced in the shoots and reduced in the roots of the plants treated with a toxic concentration of Pb.

  3. Carbon extension in peptidylnucleoside biosynthesis by radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Edward A.; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Nikkomycins and polyoxins are antifungal peptidylnucleoside (PN) antibiotics active against human and plant pathogens. Here, we report that during PN biosynthesis in Streptomyces cacaoi and Streptomyces tendae, the C5′-extension of the nucleoside essential for downstream structural diversification is catalyzed by a conserved radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme, PolH or NikJ. This is distinct from the nucleophilic mechanism reported for antibacterial nucleosides and represents a novel mechanism of nucleoside natural product biosynthesis. PMID:27642865

  4. EFFECT OF PANCREOZYMIN ON RAT PANCREATIC ENZYME BIOSYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Reggio, H.; Cailla-Deckmyn, H.; Marchis-Mouren, G.

    1971-01-01

    Pancreatic enzyme secretion in rats anesthesized by pentobarbital was stimulated by intravenous perfusion of the hormone pancreozymin, as indicated by a decreased amylase level in the pancreas and by specific, fine structural changes observed in an electron microscope. Rates of protein synthesis were determined by pulse labeling. Amylase, total protein, and valine were purified from pancreas and counted. Pancreozymin promotes an 8 to 10 times increase in the rate of biosynthesis of pancreatic enzymes, as compared to rats similarly anesthesized but without hormone. This stimulation effect is obtained very rapidly (2 hr) and is not inhibited by actinomycin D. Secretin alone has no effect, whereas pentobarbital is inhibitory. PMID:5112644

  5. Divergent mechanisms of iron-containing enzymes for hydrocarbon biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Courtney E; Grant, Job L; Amaya, Jose A; Ratigan, Steven C; Hsieh, Chun H; Manley, Olivia M; Makris, Thomas M

    2017-04-01

    Increasing levels of energy consumption, dwindling resources, and environmental considerations have served as compelling motivations to explore renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels, including enzymatic routes for hydrocarbon synthesis. Phylogenetically diverse species have long been recognized to produce hydrocarbons, but many of the enzymes responsible have been identified within the past decade. The enzymatic conversion of Cn chain length fatty aldehydes (or acids) to Cn-1 hydrocarbons, alkanes or alkenes, involves a C-C scission reaction. Surprisingly, the enzymes involved in hydrocarbon synthesis utilize non-heme mononuclear iron, dinuclear iron, and thiolate-ligated heme cofactors that are most often associated with monooxygenation reactions. In this review, we examine the mechanisms of several enzymes involved in hydrocarbon biosynthesis, with specific emphasis on the structural and electronic changes that enable this functional switch.

  6. Genes and enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis in halotolerant methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Reshetnikov, Alexander S; Khmelenina, Valentina N; Mustakhimov, Ildar I; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidine carboxylic acid) is a widely distributed compatible solute accumulated by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms to prevent osmotic stress in highly saline environments. Ectoine as a highly water keeping compound stabilizing biomolecules and whole cells can be used in scientific work, cosmetics, and medicine. Detailed understanding of the organization/regulation of the ectoine biosynthetic pathway in various producers is an active area of research. Here we review current knowledge on some genetic and enzymatic aspects of ectoine biosynthesis in halophilic and halotolerant methanotrophs. By using PCR methodology, the genes coding for the specific enzymes of ectoine biosynthesis, diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), DABA acetyltransferase (EctA), and ectoine synthase (EctC), were identified in several methanotrophic species. Organization of these genes in either ectABC or ectABC-ask operons, the latter additionally encoding aspartate kinase isozyme (Ask), correlated well with methanotroph halotolerance and intracellular ectoine level. A new gene, ectR1 encoding the MarR-like transcriptional regulatory protein EctR1, negatively controlling transcription of ectoine biosynthetic genes was found upstream of ectABC-ask operon in Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z. The ectR-like genes were also found in halotolerant methanol utilizers Methylophaga alcalica and Methylophaga thalassica as well as in several genomes of nonmethylotrophic species. The His(6)-tagged DABA acetyltransferases from Mm. alcaliphilum, M. alcalica, and M. thalassica were purified and the enzyme properties were found to correlate with the ecophysiologies of these bacteria. All these discoveries should be very helpful for better understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of this important natural compound, and for the targeted metabolic engineering of its producers.

  7. Molybdenum enzymes, their maturation and molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) biosynthesis is an ancient, ubiquitous, and highly conserved pathway leading to the biochemical activation of molybdenum. Moco is the essential component of a group of redox enzymes, which are diverse in terms of their phylogenetic distribution and their architectures, both at the overall level and in their catalytic geometry. A wide variety of transformations are catalyzed by these enzymes at carbon, sulfur and nitrogen atoms, which include the transfer of an oxo group or two electrons to or from the substrate. More than 50 molybdoenzymes were identified in bacteria to date. In molybdoenzymes Mo is coordinated to a dithiolene group on the 6-alkyl side chain of a pterin called molybdopterin (MPT). The biosynthesis of Moco can be divided into four general steps in bacteria: 1) formation of the cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate, 2) formation of MPT, 3) insertion of molybdenum into molybdopterin to form Moco, and 4) additional modification of Moco with the attachment of GMP or CMP to the phosphate group of MPT, forming the dinucleotide variant of Moco. This review will focus on molybdoenzymes, the biosynthesis of Moco, and its incorporation into specific target proteins focusing on Escherichia coli. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  8. Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Metabolites in Lead Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Sylvie E.; Wienkers, Larry C.; Lampe, Jed N.

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are a versatile superfamily of heme-containing monooxygenases, perhaps best known for their role in the oxidation of xenobiotic compounds. However, due to their unique oxidative chemistry, CYPs are also important in natural product drug discovery and in the generation of active metabolites with unique therapeutic properties. New tools for the analysis and production of CYP metabolites, including microscale analytical technologies and combinatorial biosynthesis, are providing medicinal chemists with the opportunity to use CYPs as a novel platform for lead discovery and development. In this review, we will highlight some of the recent examples of drug leads identified from CYP metabolites and the exciting possibilities of using CYPs as catalysts for future drug discovery. PMID:25797999

  9. Maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration biosynthesis enzymes in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Dalli, Jesmond; Vlasakov, Iliyan; Riley, Ian R.; Rodriguez, Ana R.; Spur, Bernd W.; Chiang, Nan; Serhan, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are central in coordinating immune responses, tissue repair, and regeneration, with different subtypes being associated with inflammation-initiating and proresolving actions. We recently identified a family of macrophage-derived proresolving and tissue regenerative molecules coined maresin conjugates in tissue regeneration (MCTR). Herein, using lipid mediator profiling we identified MCTR in human serum, lymph nodes, and plasma and investigated MCTR biosynthetic pathways in human macrophages. With human recombinant enzymes, primary cells, and enantiomerically pure compounds we found that the synthetic maresin epoxide intermediate 13S,14S-eMaR (13S,14S-epoxy- 4Z,7Z,9E,11E,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was converted to MCTR1 (13R-glutathionyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) by LTC4S and GSTM4. Incubation of human macrophages with LTC4S inhibitors blocked LTC4 and increased resolvins and lipoxins. The conversion of MCTR1 to MCTR2 (13R-cysteinylglycinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) was catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in human macrophages. Biosynthesis of MCTR3 was mediated by dipeptidases that cleaved the cysteinyl-glycinyl bond of MCTR2 to give 13R-cysteinyl, 14S-hydroxy-4Z,7Z,9E,11E,13R,14S,16Z,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid. Of note, both GSTM4 and GGT enzymes displayed higher affinity to 13S,14S-eMaR and MCTR1 compared with their classic substrates in the cysteinyl leukotriene metabolome. Together these results establish the MCTR biosynthetic pathway and provide mechanisms in tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:27791009

  10. Characterization and modification of enzymes in the 2-ketoisovalerate biosynthesis pathway of Ralstonia eutropha H16

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, JN; Brigham, CJ; Plassmeier, JK; Sinskey, AJ

    2014-08-01

    2-Ketoisovalerate is an important cellular intermediate for the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids as well as other important molecules, such as pantothenate, coenzyme A, and glucosinolate. This ketoacid can also serve as a precursor molecule for the production of biofuels, pharmaceutical agents, and flavor agents in engineered organisms, such as the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. The biosynthesis of 2-ketoisovalerate from pyruvate is carried out by three enzymes: acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS, encoded by ilvBH), acetohydroxyacid isomeroreductase (AHAIR, encoded by ilvC), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (DHAD, encoded by ilvD). In this study, enzymatic activities and kinetic parameters were determined for each of the three R. eutropha enzymes as heterologously purified proteins. AHAS, which serves as a gatekeeper for the biosynthesis of all three branched-chain amino acids, demonstrated the tightest regulation through feedback inhibition by l-valine (IC50 = 1.2 mM), l-isoleucine (IC50 = 2.3 mM), and l-leucine (IC50 = 5.4 mM). Intermediates in the valine biosynthesis pathway also exhibit feedback inhibitory control of the AHAS enzyme. In addition, AHAS has a very weak affinity for pyruvate (K-M = 10.5 mu M) and is highly selective towards 2-ketobutyrate (R = 140) as a second substrate. AHAIR and DHAD are also inhibited by the branched-chain amino acids, although to a lesser extent when compared to AHAS. Experimental evolution and rational site-directed mutagenesis revealed mutants of the regulatory subunit of AHAS (IlvH) (N11S, T34I, A36V, T104S, N11F, G14E, and N29H), which, when reconstituted with wild-type IlvB, lead to AHAS having reduced valine, leucine, and isoleucine sensitivity. The study of the kinetics and inhibition mechanisms of R. eutropha AHAS, AHAIR, and DHAD has shed light on interactions between these enzymes and the products they produce; it, therefore, can be used to engineer R. eutropha strains with optimal production of 2

  11. Biogenesis of ER subdomains containing DGAT2, an enzyme involved in industrial oil biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) are enzymes that catalyze the committed step in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis by transferring a fatty acyl group from the acyl-CoA pool to the sn-3 position of diacylglycerol. The substrate specificity and overall activity of these enzymes play a key role...

  12. Isolation of a Microsomal Enzyme System Involved in Glucosinolate Biosynthesis from Seedlings of Tropaeolum majus L.

    PubMed Central

    Du, L.; Halkier, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro system that converts phenylalanine to phenylacetaldoxime in the biosynthesis of the glucosinolate glucotropaeolin has been established in seedlings of Tropaeolum majus L. exposed to the combined treatment of jasmonic acid, ethanol, and light. The treatment resulted in a 9-fold induction, compared with untreated, dark-grown seedlings, of de novo biosynthesis measured as incorporation of radioactively labeled phenylalanine into glucotropaeolin. Formation of the inhibitory degradation product benzylisothiocyanate during tissue homogenization was prevented by inactivation of the thioglucosidase myrosinase by addition of 100 mM ascorbic acid to the isolation buffer. This allowed the isolation of a biosynthetically active microsomal preparation from the induced T. majus plant material. The enzyme, which catalyzes the conversion of phenylalanine to the corresponding oxime, was sensitive to cytochrome P450 inhibitors, indicating the involvement of a cytochrome P450 in the biosynthetic pathway. It has previously been shown that the oxime-producing enzyme in the biosynthesis of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate in Sinapis alba L. is dependent on cytochrome P450, whereas the oxime-producing enzymes in Brassica species have been suggested to be flavin monooxygenases or peroxidase-type enzymes. The result with T. majus provides additional experimental documentation for a similarity between the enzymes converting amino acids into the corresponding oximes in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates and cyanogenic glucosides. PMID:12226332

  13. Function and distribution of bilin biosynthesis enzymes in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2008-10-01

    Bilins are open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules essential for light-harvesting and/or sensing in many photosynthetic organisms. While they serve as chromophores in phytochrome-mediated light-sensing in plants, they additionally function in light-harvesting in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptomonads. Associated to phycobiliproteins a variety of bile pigments is responsible for the specific light-absorbance properties of the organisms enabling efficient photosynthesis under different light conditions. The initial step of bilin biosynthesis is the cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases (HO) to afford the first linear molecule biliverdin. This reaction is ubiquitously found also in non-photosynthetic organisms. Biliverdin is then further reduced by site specific reductases most of them belonging to the interesting family of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs)-a new family of radical oxidoreductases. In recent years much progress has been made in the field of heme oxygenases but even more in the widespread family of FDBRs, revealing novel biochemical FDBR activities, new crystal structures and new ecological aspects, including the discovery of bilin biosynthesis genes in wild marine phage populations. The aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the recent progress in this field and to highlight the new and remaining questions.

  14. Enzyme mechanisms: Flexibility leads to function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L.

    2014-03-01

    ATP synthase is an important enzyme for the storage and release of energy in cells. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry has now been used to study its structure, revealing important mechanistic details about its operation and regulation.

  15. Analysis of the alcABC operon encoding alcaligin biosynthesis enzymes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1997-07-18

    We previously cloned a B. bronchiseptica (Bb) genomic DNA fragment that complements a Bb alcaligin biosynthesis mutant, and reported the identification of a gene, alcA, with predicted protein sequence similarity to siderophore biosynthesis enzymes from other organisms. In the present study we show that further nt sequencing of this region revealed two open reading frames (ORFs) 3' to alcA that encode putative proteins AlcB and AlcC, with significant sequence similarity to the aerobactin biosynthesis enzymes IucB and IucC, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the three ORFs are encoded on a single transcript, and that this operon is repressed at the transcriptional level by Fe. Primer extension analysis placed the transcriptional start point (tsp) 35 nt from the 5' end of the Fur consensus sequence and 188 nt from the putative start of translation of AlcA.

  16. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed.

  17. Biosynthesis of rare hexoses using microorganisms and related enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zijie; Gao, Yahui; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rare sugars, referred to as monosaccharides and their derivatives that rarely exist in nature, can be applied in many areas ranging from foodstuffs to pharmaceutical and nutrition industry, or as starting materials for various natural products and drug candidates. Unfortunately, an important factor restricting the utilization of rare sugars is their limited availability, resulting from limited synthetic methods. Nowadays, microbial and enzymatic transformations have become a very powerful tool in this field. This article reviews the biosynthesis and enzymatic production of rare ketohexoses, aldohexoses and sugar alcohols (hexitols), including D-tagatose, D-psicose, D-sorbose, L-tagatose, L-fructose, 1-deoxy-L-fructose, D-allose, L-glucose, L-talose, D-gulose, L-galactose, L-fucose, allitol, D-talitol, and L-sorbitol. New systems and robust catalysts resulting from advancements in genomics and bioengineering are also discussed. PMID:24367410

  18. Inhibitors of the peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes MurA-F.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Sosič, Izidor; Sink, Roman; Gobec, Stanislav

    2014-08-01

    The widespread emergence of resistant bacterial strains is becoming a serious threat to public health. This thus signifies the need for the development of new antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action. Continuous efforts in the design of novel antibacterials remain one of the biggest challenges in drug development. In this respect, the Mur enzymes, MurA-F, that are involved in the formation of UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide can be genuinely considered as promising antibacterial targets. This review provides an in-depth insight into the recent developments in the field of inhibitors of the MurA-F enzymes. Special attention is also given to compounds that act as multiple inhibitors of two, three or more of the Mur enzymes. Moreover, the reasons for the lack of preclinically successful inhibitors and the challenges to overcome these hurdles in the next years are also debated.

  19. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  20. The genes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin and thiamin diphosphate in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential molecule for all living organisms. Its major biologically active derivative is thiamin diphosphate, which serves as a cofactor for several enzymes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Important new functions for thiamin and its phosphate esters have recently been suggested, e.g. in gene expression regulation by influencing mRNA structure, in DNA repair after UV illumination, and in the protection of some organelles against reactive oxygen species. Unlike higher animals, which rely on nutritional thiamin intake, yeasts can synthesize thiamin de novo. The biosynthesis pathways include the separate synthesis of two precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine diphosphate and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole phosphate, which are then condensed into thiamin monophosphate. Additionally, yeasts evolved salvage mechanisms to utilize thiamin and its dephosphorylated late precursors, 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole, from the environment. The current state of knowledge on the discrete steps of thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts is far from satisfactory; many intermediates are postulated only by analogy to the much better understood biosynthesis process in bacteria. On the other hand, the genetic mechanisms regulating thiamin biosynthesis in yeasts are currently under extensive exploration. Only recently, the structures of some of the yeast enzymes involved in thiamin biosynthesis, such as thiamin diphosphokinase and thiazole synthase, were determined at the atomic resolution, and mechanistic proposals for the catalysis of particular biosynthetic steps started to emerge.

  1. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Fernando D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  2. Enzyme overexpression – an exercise toward understanding regulation of heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jianping; Song, Tianyi; Lindahl, Ulf; Li, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of heparan sulfate (HS) involves conversion of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) to L-iduronic acid (IdoA) units catalyzed by glucuronyl C5-epimerase (Hsepi). IdoA units are the favored substrate for 2-O-sulfotransferase (2OST). We used HEK293 cells as a model to investigate the effects of overexpression of these enzymes on HS structure. Overexpression of Hsepi alone resulted in an unexpected increase in HS chain length. A Hsepi point-mutant (Y168A), devoid of catalytic activity, failed to affect chain length. Moreover, the effect of Hsepi overexpression on HS chain length was abolished by simultaneous overexpression of 2OST. These findings raise novel aspects on regulation of HS biosynthesis. We propose a hypothetical enzyme-binding protein (EBP) with distinct, specific and partly overlapping binding sites, the interactions of which will determine levels of enzymes available to the biosynthetic process. PMID:27511124

  3. The Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: biosynthesis and methods for enzyme discovery.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-06-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are an example of the vast diversity of secondary metabolites with great therapeutic promise. The identification of novel compounds in this group with over 300 known structures continues to be an area of active study. The recent identification of norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase (N4OMT), an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic enzyme, and the assembly of transcriptomes for Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus and Lycoris aurea highlight the potential for discovery of Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic genes with new technologies. Recent technical advances of interest include those in enzymology, next generation sequencing, genetic modification, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS).

  4. Functional Characterization of CYP716 Family P450 Enzymes in Triterpenoid Biosynthesis in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, Shuhei; Seki, Hikaru; Shimizu, Yuko; Fukushima, Ery O; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Triterpenoids are a group of structurally diverse specialized metabolites that frequently show useful bioactivities. These chemicals are biosynthesized from the common precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene in plants. The carbon skeletons produced by oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) are usually modified by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) and UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases. These biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the structural diversification of plant triterpenoids. Until now, many P450 enzymes have been characterized as triterpenoid oxidases. Among them, the CYP716 family P450 enzymes, which have been isolated from a wide range of plant families, seem to contribute to the triterpenoid structural diversification. Many CYP716 family P450 enzymes have been characterized as the multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidases, which oxidize α-amyrin and β-amyrin to the widely distributed triterpenoids ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most important solanaceous crops in the world. However, little information is known regarding its triterpenoid biosynthesis. To understand the mechanism of triterpenoid biosynthesis in tomato, we focused on the function of CYP716 family enzymes as triterpenoid oxidases. We isolated all six CYP716 family genes from the Micro-Tom cultivar of tomato, and functionally characterized them in the heterologous yeast expression system. The in vivo enzymatic assays showed that CYP716A44 and CYP716A46 exhibited the ordinary C-28 oxidation activity against α-amyrin and β-amyrin to produce ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Interestingly, one CYP716E subfamily enzyme, CYP716E26, exhibited the previously unreported C-6β hydroxylation activity against β-amyrin to produce a rare bioactive triterpenoid, daturadiol (olean-12-ene-3β,6β-diol). To determine the roles of the CYP716 family genes in tomato triterpenoid biosynthesis, we analyzed the gene expression and triterpenoid accumulation patterns in

  5. Functional Characterization of CYP716 Family P450 Enzymes in Triterpenoid Biosynthesis in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Yasumoto, Shuhei; Seki, Hikaru; Shimizu, Yuko; Fukushima, Ery O.; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2017-01-01

    Triterpenoids are a group of structurally diverse specialized metabolites that frequently show useful bioactivities. These chemicals are biosynthesized from the common precursor 2,3-oxidosqualene in plants. The carbon skeletons produced by oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) are usually modified by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) and UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases. These biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the structural diversification of plant triterpenoids. Until now, many P450 enzymes have been characterized as triterpenoid oxidases. Among them, the CYP716 family P450 enzymes, which have been isolated from a wide range of plant families, seem to contribute to the triterpenoid structural diversification. Many CYP716 family P450 enzymes have been characterized as the multifunctional triterpene C-28 oxidases, which oxidize α-amyrin and β-amyrin to the widely distributed triterpenoids ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most important solanaceous crops in the world. However, little information is known regarding its triterpenoid biosynthesis. To understand the mechanism of triterpenoid biosynthesis in tomato, we focused on the function of CYP716 family enzymes as triterpenoid oxidases. We isolated all six CYP716 family genes from the Micro-Tom cultivar of tomato, and functionally characterized them in the heterologous yeast expression system. The in vivo enzymatic assays showed that CYP716A44 and CYP716A46 exhibited the ordinary C-28 oxidation activity against α-amyrin and β-amyrin to produce ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively. Interestingly, one CYP716E subfamily enzyme, CYP716E26, exhibited the previously unreported C-6β hydroxylation activity against β-amyrin to produce a rare bioactive triterpenoid, daturadiol (olean-12-ene-3β,6β-diol). To determine the roles of the CYP716 family genes in tomato triterpenoid biosynthesis, we analyzed the gene expression and triterpenoid accumulation patterns in

  6. Pyrimidine Salvage Enzymes Are Essential for De Novo Biosynthesis of Deoxypyrimidine Nucleotides in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Hu, Zeping; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma brucei possess both de novo and salvage routes for the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. Consequently, they do not require salvageable pyrimidines for growth. Thymidine kinase (TK) catalyzes the formation of dTMP and dUMP and is one of several salvage enzymes that appear redundant to the de novo pathway. Surprisingly, we show through analysis of TK conditional null and RNAi cells that TK is essential for growth and for infectivity in a mouse model, and that a catalytically active enzyme is required for its function. Unlike humans, T. brucei and all other kinetoplastids lack dCMP deaminase (DCTD), which provides an alternative route to dUMP formation. Ectopic expression of human DCTD resulted in full rescue of the RNAi growth phenotype and allowed for selection of viable TK null cells. Metabolite profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed a buildup of deoxypyrimidine nucleosides in TK depleted cells. Knockout of cytidine deaminase (CDA), which converts deoxycytidine to deoxyuridine led to thymidine/deoxyuridine auxotrophy. These unexpected results suggested that T. brucei encodes an unidentified 5'-nucleotidase that converts deoxypyrimidine nucleotides to their corresponding nucleosides, leading to their dead-end buildup in TK depleted cells at the expense of dTTP pools. Bioinformatics analysis identified several potential candidate genes that could encode 5’-nucleotidase activity including an HD-domain protein that we show catalyzes dephosphorylation of deoxyribonucleotide 5’-monophosphates. We conclude that TK is essential for synthesis of thymine nucleotides regardless of whether the nucleoside precursors originate from the de novo pathway or through salvage. Reliance on TK in the absence of DCTD may be a shared vulnerability among trypanosomatids and may provide a unique opportunity to selectively target a diverse group of pathogenic single-celled eukaryotes with a single drug. PMID:27820863

  7. A review of starch-branching enzymes and their role in amylopectin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Starch-branching enzymes (SBEs) are one of the four major enzyme classes involved in starch biosynthesis in plants and algae, and their activities play a crucial role in determining the structure and physical properties of starch granules. SBEs generate α-1,6-branch linkages in α-glucans through cleavage of internal α-1,4 bonds and transfer of the released reducing ends to C-6 hydroxyls. Starch biosynthesis in plants and algae requires multiple isoforms of SBEs and is distinct from glycogen biosynthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes which uses a single branching enzyme (BE) isoform. One of the unique characteristics of starch structure is the grouping of α-1,6-branch points in clusters within amylopectin. This is a feature of SBEs and their interplay with other starch biosynthetic enzymes, thus facilitating formation of the compact water-insoluble semicrystalline starch granule. In this respect, the activity of SBE isoforms is pivotal in starch granule assembly. SBEs are structurally related to the α-amylase superfamily of enzymes, sharing three domains of secondary structure with prokaryotic Bes: the central (β/α)8 -barrel catalytic domain, an NH2 -terminal domain involved in determining the size of α-glucan chain transferred, and the C-terminal domain responsible for catalytic capacity and substrate preference. In addition, SBEs have conserved plant-specific domains, including phosphorylation sites which are thought to be involved in regulating starch metabolism. SBEs form heteromeric protein complexes with other SBE isoforms as well as other enzymes involved in starch synthesis, and assembly of these protein complexes is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SBEIIb is found in multienzyme complexes with isoforms of glucan-elongating starch synthases, and these protein complexes are implicated in amylopectin cluster formation. This review presents a comparative overview of plant SBEs and includes a review of their properties

  8. Diphthamide biosynthesis requires an Fe-S enzyme-generated organic radical

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Xuling; Torelli, Andrew T.; Lee, Michael; Dzikovski, Boris; Koralewski, Rachel M.; Wang, Eileen; Freed, Jack; Krebs, Carsten; Ealick, Steven E.; Lin, Hening

    2010-01-01

    Summary Archaeal and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 contain a unique posttranslationally modified histidine residue called “diphthamide”, the target of diphtheria toxin. The biosynthesis of diphthamide were proposed to involve three steps, with the first step being the formation of a C-C bond between the histidine residue and the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). However, details of the biosynthesis have remained unknown. Here we present structural and biochemical evidence showing that the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in the archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii uses a novel iron-sulfur cluster enzyme, Dph2. Dph2 is a homodimer and each monomer contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical data suggest that unlike the enzymes in the radical SAM superfamily, Dph2 does not form the canonical 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical. Instead, it breaks the Cγ,Met-S bond of SAM and generates a 3-amino-3-carboxylpropyl radical. This work suggests that Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 represents a novel SAM-dependent [4Fe-4S]-containing enzyme that catalyzes unprecedented chemistry. PMID:20559380

  9. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  10. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  11. The Catalytic Machinery of a Key Enzyme in Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Ronald E.; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Blanco, Julio; Moore, Roger A.; Liu, Xuying; Arachea, Buenafe T.; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.

    2013-02-28

    The aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is essential for all microbial life but is absent in mammals. Characterizing the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in this pathway can identify new protein targets for the development of antibiotics with unique modes of action. The enzyme aspartate {beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes an early branch point reaction in the aspartate pathway. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural studies of ASADH from various microbial species have been used to elucidate mechanistic details and to identify essential amino acids involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and enzyme regulation. Important structural and functional differences have been found between ASADHs isolated from these bacterial and fungal organisms, opening the possibility for developing species-specific antimicrobial agents that target this family of enzymes.

  12. Radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme catalyzed thioether bond formation in sactipeptide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Flühe, Leif; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2013-08-01

    Sactipeptides represent a new emerging class of ribosomally assembled and posttranslationally modified peptides that show diverse bioactivities. Their common hallmark is an intramolecular thioether bond that crosslink the sulfur atom of a cysteine residue with the α-carbon of an acceptor amino acid. This review summarizes recent achievements concerning the biosynthesis of sactipeptides in general and with special focus on the common enzymatic radical SAM mechanism leading to the thioether linkage formation. In addition this mechanism is compared to the mechanism of thioether bond formation during lanthipeptide biosynthesis and to other radical based thioether bond forming reactions.

  13. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  14. Structure and Mechanism of Enzymes Involved in Biosynthesis and Breakdown of the Phosphonates Fosfomycin, Dehydrophos, and Phosphinothricin

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the mechanistic and structural information on enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis and breakdown of naturally occurring phosphonates. This review focuses on these recent developments with an emphasis on those enzymes that have been characterized crystallographically in the past five years, including proteins involved in the biosynthesis of phosphinothricin, fosfomycin, and dehydrophos and proteins involved in resistance mechanisms. PMID:20854789

  15. Identifying the Minimal Enzymes Required for Biosynthesis of Epoxyketone Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Joyce; Zhu, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors have attracted much interest due to their potential as anti-cancer drugs. While the biosynthetic gene clusters for several peptidyl epoxyketone natural products have recently been identified, the enzymatic logic involved in the formation of the terminal epoxyketone pharmacophore has been relatively unexplored. Here, we report the identification of the minimal set of enzymes from the eponemycin gene cluster necessary for the biosynthesis of novel metabolites containing a terminal epoxyketone pharmacophore in Escherichia coli, a versatile and fast-growing heterologous host. This set of enzymes includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), and an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) homolog. In addition to the in vivo functional reconstitution of these enzymes in E. coli, in vitro studies of the eponemycin NRPS and 13C-labeled precursor feeding experiments were performed to advance the mechanistic understanding of terminal epoxyketone formation. PMID:26477320

  16. Construction of a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Fang, Baishan

    2016-01-01

    Systems that can regulate and coordinate the expression of multiple enzymes for metabolic regulation and synthesis of important drug intermediates are poorly explored. In this work, a strategy for constructing a tunable multi-enzyme-coordinate expression system for biosynthesis of chiral drug intermediates was developed and evaluated by connecting protein-protein expressions, regulating the strength of ribosome binding sites (RBS) and detecting the system capacity for producing chiral amino acid. Results demonstrated that the dual-enzyme system had good enantioselectivity, low cost, high stability, high conversion rate and approximately 100% substrate conversion. This study has paved a new way of exploring metabolic mechanism of functional genes and engineering whole cell-catalysts for synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids or chiral amino acids. PMID:27456301

  17. Yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUCCA, a key enzyme in auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Suzuki, Hiromi; Gyohda, Atsuko; Takaoka, Chihiro; Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Sachiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Tatsuya; Kato, Jun-Ichi; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2014-02-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), an auxin plant hormone, is biosynthesized from tryptophan. The indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway, involving the tryptophan aminotransferase TAA1 and YUCCA (YUC) enzymes, was recently found to be a major IAA biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis. TAA1 catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to IPyA, and YUC produces IAA from IPyA. Using a chemical biology approach with maize coleoptiles, we identified 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (yucasin) as a potent inhibitor of IAA biosynthesis in YUC-expressing coleoptile tips. Enzymatic analysis of recombinant AtYUC1-His suggested that yucasin strongly inhibited YUC1-His activity against the substrate IPyA in a competitive manner. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis YUC1 over-expression lines (35S::YUC1) demonstrated that yucasin acts in IAA biosynthesis catalyzed by YUC. In addition, 35S::YUC1 seedlings showed resistance to yucasin in terms of root growth. A loss-of-function mutant of TAA1, sav3-2, was hypersensitive to yucasin in terms of root growth and hypocotyl elongation of etiolated seedlings. Yucasin combined with the TAA1 inhibitor l-kynurenine acted additively in Arabidopsis seedlings, producing a phenotype similar to yucasin-treated sav3-2 seedlings, indicating the importance of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway in root growth and leaf vascular development. The present study showed that yucasin is a potent inhibitor of YUC enzymes that offers an effective tool for analyzing the contribution of IAA biosynthesis via the IPyA pathway to plant development and physiological processes.

  18. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  19. Inhibition of isoprene biosynthesis pathway enzymes by phosphonates, bisphosphonates, and diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Oldfield, Eric

    2004-10-07

    We have investigated the docking of a variety of inhibitors and substrates to the isoprene biosynthesis pathway enzymes farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), isopentenyl diphosphate/dimethylallyl diphosphate isomerase (IPPI) and deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) using the Lamarckian genetic alogorithm program, AutoDock. The docked ligand structures are predicted with a approximately 0.8 A rms deviation from the structures determined crystallographically. The errors found are a function of the number of atoms in the ligand (R = 0.91, p < 0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, on the resolution of the crystallographic structure (R = 0.70, p < 0.008). The structures of three isoprenoid diphosphates docked to the FPPS enzyme reveal strong electrostatic interactions with Mg(2+), lysine and arginine active site residues. Similar results are obtained with the docking of four IPPI inhibitors to the IPPI enzyme. The DXR substrate, deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate, is found to dock to Mn(2+)-NADPH-DXR in an almost identical manner as does the inhibitor fosimdomycin to Mn(2+)-DXR (ligand heavy atom rms deviation = 0.90 A) and is poised to interact with NADPH. Bisphosphonate inhibitors are found to bind to the allylic binding sites in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic FPPSs, in good accord with recent crystallographic results (a 0.4 A rms deviation from the X-ray structure with the E. coli enzyme). Overall, these results show for the first time that the geometries of a broad variety of phosphorus-containing inhibitors and substrates of isoprene biosynthesis pathway enzymes can be well predicted by using computational methods, which can be expected to facilitate the design of novel inhibitors of these enzymes.

  20. Molecular basis of HHQ biosynthesis: molecular dynamics simulations, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PQS (PseudomonasQuinolone Signal) and its precursor HHQ are signal molecules of the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system. They explicate their role in mammalian pathogenicity by binding to the receptor PqsR that induces virulence factor production and biofilm formation. The enzyme PqsD catalyses the biosynthesis of HHQ. Results Enzyme kinetic analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor experiments were used to determine mechanism and substrate order of the biosynthesis. Comparative analysis led to the identification of domains involved in functionality of PqsD. A kinetic cycle was set up and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular bases of the kinetics of PqsD. Trajectory analysis, pocket volume measurements, binding energy estimations and decompositions ensured insights into the binding mode of the substrates anthraniloyl-CoA and β-ketodecanoic acid. Conclusions Enzyme kinetics and SPR experiments hint at a ping-pong mechanism for PqsD with ACoA as first substrate. Trajectory analysis of different PqsD complexes evidenced ligand-dependent induced-fit motions affecting the modified ACoA funnel access to the exposure of a secondary channel. A tunnel-network is formed in which Ser317 plays an important role by binding to both substrates. Mutagenesis experiments resulting in the inactive S317F mutant confirmed the importance of this residue. Two binding modes for β-ketodecanoic acid were identified with distinct catalytic mechanism preferences. PMID:23916145

  1. Hepatotoxicity of piperazine designer drugs: up-regulation of key enzymes of cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Arbo, Marcelo Dutra; Melega, Simone; Stöber, Regina; Schug, Markus; Rempel, Eugen; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Cadenas, Cristina; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Carmo, Helena; Hengstler, Jan G

    2016-12-01

    The piperazine derivatives most frequently consumed for recreational purposes are 1-benzylpiperazine, 1-(3,4-methylenedioxybenzyl) piperazine, 1-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl) piperazine and 1-(4-methoxyphenyl) piperazine. Generally, they are consumed as capsules, tablets or pills but also in powder or liquid forms. Currently, the precise mechanism by which piperazine designer drugs induce hepatotoxicity and whether they act by a common pathway is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a gene array study with rat hepatocytes incubated with the four designer drugs. Non-cytotoxic concentrations were chosen that neither induce a decrease in reduced glutathione or ATP depletion. Analysis of the gene array data showed a large overlap of gene expression alterations induced by the four drugs. This 'piperazine designer drug consensus signature' included 101 up-regulated and 309 down-regulated probe sets (p < 0.05; FDR adjusted). In the up-regulated genes, GO groups of cholesterol biosynthesis represented a dominant overrepresented motif. Key enzymes of cholesterol biosynthesis up-regulated by all four piperazine drugs include sterol C4-methyloxidase, isopentyl-diphosphate-Δ-isomerase, Cyp51A1, squalene epoxidase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Additionally, glycoprotein transmembrane nmb, which participates in cell adhesion processes, and fatty acid desaturase 1, an enzyme that regulates unsaturation of fatty acids, were also up-regulated by the four piperazine designer drugs. Regarding the down-regulated probe sets, only one gene was common to all four piperazine derivatives, the betaine-homocysteine-S-methyltransferase 2. Analysis of transcription factor binding sites of the 'piperazine designer drug consensus signature' identified the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1) as strongly overrepresented in the up-regulated genes. SREBP transcription factors are known to regulate multiple genes of cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, the present

  2. Dissection of goadsporin biosynthesis by in vitro reconstitution leading to designer analogues expressed in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Taro; Yamashita, Kona; Goto, Yuki; Shimomura, Morito; Hayashi, Shohei; Asamizu, Shumpei; Sugai, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Haruo; Suga, Hiroaki; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2017-02-01

    Goadsporin (GS) is a member of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), containing an N-terminal acetyl moiety, six azoles and two dehydroalanines in the peptidic main chain. Although the enzymes involved in GS biosynthesis have been defined, the principle of how the respective enzymes control the specific modifications remains elusive. Here we report a one-pot synthesis of GS using the enzymes reconstituted in the `flexible' in vitro translation system, referred to as the FIT-GS system. This system allows us to readily prepare not only the precursor peptide from its synthetic DNA template but also 52 mutants, enabling us to dissect the modification determinants of GodA for each enzyme. The in vitro knowledge has also led us to successfully produce designer GS analogues in vivo. The methodology demonstrated in this work is also applicable to other RiPP biosynthesis, allowing us to rapidly investigate the principle of modification events with great ease.

  3. Dissection of goadsporin biosynthesis by in vitro reconstitution leading to designer analogues expressed in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Taro; Yamashita, Kona; Goto, Yuki; Shimomura, Morito; Hayashi, Shohei; Asamizu, Shumpei; Sugai, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Haruo; Suga, Hiroaki; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Goadsporin (GS) is a member of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), containing an N-terminal acetyl moiety, six azoles and two dehydroalanines in the peptidic main chain. Although the enzymes involved in GS biosynthesis have been defined, the principle of how the respective enzymes control the specific modifications remains elusive. Here we report a one-pot synthesis of GS using the enzymes reconstituted in the ‘flexible' in vitro translation system, referred to as the FIT–GS system. This system allows us to readily prepare not only the precursor peptide from its synthetic DNA template but also 52 mutants, enabling us to dissect the modification determinants of GodA for each enzyme. The in vitro knowledge has also led us to successfully produce designer GS analogues in vivo. The methodology demonstrated in this work is also applicable to other RiPP biosynthesis, allowing us to rapidly investigate the principle of modification events with great ease. PMID:28165449

  4. Multifaceted regulations of gateway enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-12-11

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders a vast variety of aromatic metabolites critically important for their growth, development, and environmental adaptation. Some of these aromatic compounds have high economic value. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway; it diverts the central flux of carbon from primary metabolism to the synthesis of myriad phenolics. Over the decades, many studies have shown that exquisite regulatory mechanisms at multiple levels control the transcription and the enzymatic activity of PALs. In this review, we present a current overview on our understanding of the complicated regulatory mechanisms governing PAL's activity; we particularlymore » highlight recent progresses in unraveling its post-translational modifications, its metabolite feedback regulation, and its enzyme organization.« less

  5. Multifaceted regulations of gateway enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2014-12-11

    Phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants engenders a vast variety of aromatic metabolites critically important for their growth, development, and environmental adaptation. Some of these aromatic compounds have high economic value. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is the first committed enzyme in the pathway; it diverts the central flux of carbon from primary metabolism to the synthesis of myriad phenolics. Over the decades, many studies have shown that exquisite regulatory mechanisms at multiple levels control the transcription and the enzymatic activity of PALs. In this review, we present a current overview on our understanding of the complicated regulatory mechanisms governing PAL's activity; we particularly highlight recent progresses in unraveling its post-translational modifications, its metabolite feedback regulation, and its enzyme organization.

  6. A continuous fluorescence displacement assay for BioA: An enzyme involved in biotin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel J.; Shi, Ce; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Manjunatha, Ujjini; Sham, Yuk Y.; Thomas, David D.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2011-01-01

    Cofactor biosynthetic pathways represent a rich source of potential antibiotic targets. The second step in biotin biosynthesis is performed by BioA, a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme. This enzyme has been confirmed as a candidate target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, the current bioassay used to measure BioA activity is cumbersome and low-throughput. Here we describe the design, development and optimization of a continuous coupled fluorescence displacement assay to measure BioA activity. In this coupled assay, BioD converts the product of the BioA–catalyzed reaction into dethiobiotin, which is subsequently detected by displacement of a fluorescently labeled dethiobiotin probe from streptavidin. The assay was further adapted to a high-throughput screening format and validated against the LOPAC library. PMID:21621502

  7. Cell-Free Phospholipid Biosynthesis by Gene-Encoded Enzymes Reconstituted in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Andrew; Noga, Marek J.; de Graaf, Paul; Westerlaken, Ilja; Yildirim, Esengul; Danelon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The goal of bottom-up synthetic biology culminates in the assembly of an entire cell from separate biological building blocks. One major challenge resides in the in vitro production and implementation of complex genetic and metabolic pathways that can support essential cellular functions. Here, we show that phospholipid biosynthesis, a multiple-step process involved in cell membrane homeostasis, can be reconstituted starting from the genes encoding for all necessary proteins. A total of eight E. coli enzymes for acyl transfer and headgroup modifications were produced in a cell-free gene expression system and were co-translationally reconstituted in liposomes. Acyl-coenzyme A and glycerol-3-phosphate were used as canonical precursors to generate a variety of important bacterial lipids. Moreover, this study demonstrates that two-step acyl transfer can occur from enzymes synthesized inside vesicles. Besides clear implications for growth and potentially division of a synthetic cell, we postulate that gene-based lipid biosynthesis can become instrumental for ex vivo and protein purification-free production of natural and non-natural lipids. PMID:27711229

  8. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase, an essential enzyme in bacterial lysine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Rupp, Bernhard; Pavelka, Martin S; Jacobs, William R; Sacchettini, James C

    2003-05-16

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysA gene encodes the enzyme meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DAPDC), a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes the final step in the lysine biosynthetic pathway converting meso-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) to l-lysine. The lysA gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been established as essential for bacterial survival in immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that de novo biosynthesis of lysine is essential for in vivo viability. Drugs targeted against DAPDC could be efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the three-dimensional structure of DAPDC from M. tuberculosis complexed with reaction product lysine and the ternary complex with PLP and lysine in the active site has been determined. The first structure of a DAPDC confirms its classification as a fold type III PLP-dependent enzyme. The structure shows a stable 2-fold dimer in head-to-tail arrangement of a triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel-like alpha/beta domain and a C-terminal beta sheet domain, similar to the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) fold family. PLP is covalently bound via an internal aldimine, and residues from both domains and both subunits contribute to the binding pocket. Comparison of the structure with eukaryotic ODCs, in particular with a di-fluoromethyl ornithine (DMFO)-bound ODC from Trypanosoma bruceii, indicates that corresponding DAP-analogues might be potential inhibitors for mycobacterial DAPDCs.

  9. Structural Basis of Regiospecificity of a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme in Antibiotic Fosfomycin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Danny; Dey, Mishtu; Higgins, Luke J.; Yan, Feng; Liu, Hung-wen; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2011-08-29

    Hydroxypropylphosphonic acid epoxidase (HppE) is an unusual mononuclear iron enzyme that uses dioxygen to catalyze the oxidative epoxidation of (S)-2-hydroxypropylphosphonic acid (S-HPP) in the biosynthesis of the antibiotic fosfomycin. Additionally, the enzyme converts the R-enantiomer of the substrate (R-HPP) to 2-oxo-propylphosphonic acid. To probe the mechanism of HppE regiospecificity, we determined three X-ray structures: R-HPP with inert cobalt-containing enzyme (Co(II)-HppE) at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution; R-HPP with active iron-containing enzyme (Fe(II)-HppE) at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution; and S-HPP-Fe(II)-HppE in complex with dioxygen mimic NO at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. These structures, along with previously determined structures of S-HPP-HppE, identify the dioxygen binding site on iron and elegantly illustrate how HppE is able to recognize both substrate enantiomers to catalyze two completely distinct reactions.

  10. The Structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the First Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Siderophore Mycobactin, Reveals It To Be a Salicylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2006-01-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 Å, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis. PMID:16923875

  11. The structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin, reveals it to be a salicylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2006-09-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 A, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis.

  12. Involvement of a lipoxygenase-like enzyme in abscisic Acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Bell, E; Mullet, J E

    1992-07-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that abscisic acid (ABA) is derived from 9'-cis-neoxanthin or 9'-cis-violaxanthin with xanthoxin as an intermediate. (18)O-labeling experiments show incorporation primarily into the side chain carboxyl group of ABA, suggesting that oxidative cleavage occurs at the 11, 12 (11', 12') double bond of xanthophylls. Carbon monoxide, a strong inhibitor of heme-containing P-450 monooxygenases, did not inhibit ABA accumulation, suggesting that the oxygenase catalyzing the carotenoid cleavage step did not contain heme. This observation, plus the ability of lipoxygenase to make xanthoxin from violaxanthin, suggested that a lipoxygenase-like enzyme is involved in ABA biosynthesis. To test this idea, the ability of several soybean (Glycine max L.) lipoxygenase inhibitors (5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and naproxen) to inhibit stress-induced ABA accumulation in soybean cell culture and soybean seedlings was determined. All lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly inhibited ABA accumulation in response to stress. These results suggest that the in vivo oxidative cleavage reaction involved in ABA biosynthesis requires activity of a nonheme oxygenase having lipoxygenase-like properties.

  13. Crystal structure of FadD32, an enzyme essential for mycolic acid biosynthesis in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Gu, Shoujin; Fleming, Joy; Bi, Lijun

    2015-12-02

    Fatty acid degradation protein D32 (FadD32), an enzyme required for mycolic acid biosynthesis and essential for mycobacterial growth, has recently been identified as a valid and promising target for anti-tuberculosis drug development. Here we report the crystal structures of Mycobacterium smegmatis FadD32 in the apo and ATP-bound states at 2.4 Å and 2.25 Å resolution, respectively. FadD32 consists of two globular domains connected by a flexible linker. ATP binds in a cleft at the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains and its binding induces significant local conformational changes in FadD32. The binding sites of meromycolic acid and phosphopantetheine are identified by structural comparison with other members of the adenylating enzyme superfamily. These results will improve our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of FadD32 and help in the design of inhibitors of this essential enzyme.

  14. Haem Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzymes in Circulating Cells of Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Miguel D.; Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; Carrera-Quintanar, Lucrecia; Capó, Xavier; Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; García-Diz, Luis; Roche, Enrique; Murcia, María A.; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the expression pattern of haem biosynthesis enzymes in circulating cells of patients affected by two types of porphyria (acute intermittent, AIP, and variegate porphyria, VP), together with the antioxidant enzyme pattern in AIP in order to identify a possible situation of oxidative stress. Sixteen and twelve patients affected by AIP and VP, respectively, were analysed with the same numbers of healthy matched controls. Erythrocytes, neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from blood, and RNA and proteins were extracted for quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot analysis, respectively. Porhobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene and protein expression was analysed. Antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression were additionally determined in blood cells, together with protein carbonyl content in plasma. PBMCs isolated from AIP patients presented low mRNA levels of PBGD when compared to controls, while PBMCs isolated from VP patients presented a decrease in PPOX mRNA. PPOX protein content was higher in AIP patients and lower in VP patients, compared to healthy controls. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, PBMCs and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) presented statistically significant higher activity in AIP patients compared to controls, while catalase activity tended to be lower in these patients. No differences were observed regarding antioxidant gene expression in white blood cells. Circulating cells in AIP and VP patients present altered expression of haem biosynthetic enzymes, which could be useful for the differential diagnosis of these two types of porphyria in certain difficult cases. AIP patients present a condition of potential oxidative stress similar to VP patients, evidenced by the post-transcriptional activation of SOD and possible catalase impairment. PMID:27788171

  15. Functional Expression of Enterobacterial O-Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Enzymes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Messner, Paul; Whitfield, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The expression of heterologous bacterial glycosyltransferases is of interest for potential application in the emerging field of carbohydrate engineering in gram-positive organisms. To assess the feasibility of using enzymes from gram-negative bacteria, the functional expression of the genes wbaP (formerly rfbP), wecA (formerly rfe), and wbbO (formerly rfbF) from enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide O-polysaccharide biosynthesis pathways was examined in Bacillus subtilis. WbaP and WecA are initiation enzymes for O-polysaccharide formation, catalyzing the transfer of galactosyl 1-phosphate from UDP-galactose and N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphate from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively, to undecaprenylphosphate. The WecA product (undecaprenylpyrophosphoryl GlcNAc) is used as an acceptor to which the bifunctional wbbO gene product sequentially adds a galactopyranose and a galactofuranose residue from the corresponding UDP sugars to form a lipid-linked trisaccharide. Genes were cloned into the shuttle vectors pRB374 and pAW10. In B. subtilis hosts, the genes were effectively transcribed under the vegII promoter control of pRB374, but the plasmids were susceptible to rearrangements and deletion. In contrast, pAW10-based constructs, in which genes were cloned downstream of the tet resistance cassette, were stable but yielded lower levels of enzyme activity. In vitro glycosyltransferase assays were performed in Escherichia coli and B. subtilis, using membrane preparations as sources of enzymes and endogenous undecaprenylphosphate as an acceptor. Incorporation of radioactivity from UDP-α-d-14C-sugar into reaction products verified the functionality of WbaP, WecA, and WbbO in either host. Enzyme activities in B. subtilis varied between 20 and 75% of those measured in E. coli. PMID:12324313

  16. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  17. NGS Transcriptomes and Enzyme Inhibitors Unravel Complexity of Picrosides Biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex. Benth.

    PubMed

    Shitiz, Kirti; Sharma, Neha; Pal, Tarun; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder S

    2015-01-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal herb valued for iridoid glycosides, Picroside-I (P-I) and Picroside-II (P-II), which have several pharmacological activities. Genetic interventions for developing a picroside production platform would require knowledge on biosynthetic pathway and key control points, which does not exist as of today. The current study reports that geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) moiety is mainly contributed by the non-mevalonate (MEP) route, which is further modified to P-I and P-II through phenylpropanoid and iridoid pathways, in total consisting of 41 and 35 enzymatic steps, respectively. The role of the MEP pathway was ascertained through enzyme inhibitors fosmidomycin and mevinolin along with importance of other integrating pathways using glyphosate, aminooxy acetic acid (AOA) and actinomycin D, which overall resulted in 17%-92% inhibition of P-I accumulation. Retrieval of gene sequences for enzymatic steps from NGS transcriptomes and their expression analysis vis-à-vis picrosides content in different tissues/organs showed elevated transcripts for twenty genes, which were further shortlisted to seven key genes, ISPD, DXPS, ISPE, PMK, 2HFD, EPSPS and SK, on the basis of expression analysis between high versus low picrosides content strains of P. kurroa so as to eliminate tissue type/ developmental variations in picrosides contents. The higher expression of the majority of the MEP pathway genes (ISPD, DXPS and ISPE), coupled with higher inhibition of DXPR enzyme by fosmidomycin, suggested that the MEP route contributed to the biosynthesis of P-I in P. kurroa. The outcome of the study is expected to be useful in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of picrosides. Possible key genes contributing to picroside biosynthesis have been identified with potential implications in molecular breeding and metabolic engineering of P. kurroa.

  18. NGS Transcriptomes and Enzyme Inhibitors Unravel Complexity of Picrosides Biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurroa Royle ex. Benth

    PubMed Central

    Shitiz, Kirti; Sharma, Neha; Pal, Tarun; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder S.

    2015-01-01

    Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal herb valued for iridoid glycosides, Picroside-I (P-I) and Picroside-II (P-II), which have several pharmacological activities. Genetic interventions for developing a picroside production platform would require knowledge on biosynthetic pathway and key control points, which does not exist as of today. The current study reports that geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) moiety is mainly contributed by the non-mevalonate (MEP) route, which is further modified to P-I and P-II through phenylpropanoid and iridoid pathways, in total consisting of 41 and 35 enzymatic steps, respectively. The role of the MEP pathway was ascertained through enzyme inhibitors fosmidomycin and mevinolin along with importance of other integrating pathways using glyphosate, aminooxy acetic acid (AOA) and actinomycin D, which overall resulted in 17%-92% inhibition of P-I accumulation. Retrieval of gene sequences for enzymatic steps from NGS transcriptomes and their expression analysis vis-à-vis picrosides content in different tissues/organs showed elevated transcripts for twenty genes, which were further shortlisted to seven key genes, ISPD, DXPS, ISPE, PMK, 2HFD, EPSPS and SK, on the basis of expression analysis between high versus low picrosides content strains of P. kurroa so as to eliminate tissue type/ developmental variations in picrosides contents. The higher expression of the majority of the MEP pathway genes (ISPD, DXPS and ISPE), coupled with higher inhibition of DXPR enzyme by fosmidomycin, suggested that the MEP route contributed to the biosynthesis of P-I in P. kurroa. The outcome of the study is expected to be useful in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of picrosides. Possible key genes contributing to picroside biosynthesis have been identified with potential implications in molecular breeding and metabolic engineering of P. kurroa. PMID:26658062

  19. The LS locus of pea encodes the gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme ent-kaurene synthase A.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, T; Swain, S M; Reid, J B; Sun, T; Kamiya, Y

    1997-03-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are hormones required for several aspects of plant development, including internode elongation and seed development in pea (Pisum sativum L.). The first committed step in the GA biosynthesis pathway is the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to ent-kaurene via copalyl diphosphate (CDP). These two reactions are catalyzed by the cyclases ent-kaurene synthase A (KSA) and ent-kaurene synthase B (KSB), respectively. Previous genetic and biochemical analysis of the GA-responsive ls-1 mutant of pea suggested that GA levels are reduced in a developmental- and organ-specific manner due to reduced GA biosynthesis. Analysis of cellfree enzyme preparations from WT and ls-1 embryos at contact point reveals that ls-1 reduces the activity of KSA but not KSB. To characterize the ls-1 mutation in more detail, a cDNA coding for a pea KSA was cloned and shown to be encoded by the LS locus. The ls-1 mutation results from an intronic G to A substitution that causes impaired RNA splicing. To determine the activity of the KSAs encoded by the LS and ls-1 alleles, a new in vitro assay for combined KSA and KSB activity has been developed using the KSB gene of pumpkin. Using recombinant WT KSA and KSB fusion proteins, GGDP is converted to ent-kaurene in vitro. Based on the sequence of RT-PCR products, three different truncated KSA proteins are predicted to exist in ls-1 plants. The most abundant mutant KSA protein does not possess detectable activity in vitro. Nevertheless, the ls-1 allele is not null and is able to encode at least a partially functional KSA since a more severe is allele has been identified. The ls-1 mutation has played a key role in identifying a role for GAs in pea seed development in the first few days after fertilization, but not in older seeds. KSA expression in seeds is developmentally regulated and parallels overall GA biosynthesis, suggesting that KSA expression may play an important role in the regulation of GA biosynthesis and seed

  20. Neu-Laxova syndrome is a heterogeneous metabolic disorder caused by defects in enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Hidalgo, Rocio; Schanze, Denny; Kariminejad, Ariana; Nordgren, Ann; Kariminejad, Mohamad Hasan; Conner, Peter; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Nilsson, Daniel; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Wedell, Anna; Freyer, Christoph; Wredenberg, Anna; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kayserili, Hülya; Elcioglu, Nursel; Ghaderi-Sohi, Siavash; Goodarzi, Payman; Setayesh, Hamidreza; van de Vorst, Maartje; Steehouwer, Marloes; Pfundt, Rolph; Krabichler, Birgit; Curry, Cynthia; MacKenzie, Malcolm G; Boycott, Kym M; Gilissen, Christian; Janecke, Andreas R; Hoischen, Alexander; Zenker, Martin

    2014-09-04

    Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a recognizable pattern of severe malformations leading to prenatal or early postnatal lethality. Homozygous mutations in PHGDH, a gene involved in the first and limiting step in L-serine biosynthesis, were recently identified as the cause of the disease in three families. By studying a cohort of 12 unrelated families affected by NLS, we provide evidence that NLS is genetically heterogeneous and can be caused by mutations in all three genes encoding enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Consistent with recently reported findings, we could identify PHGDH missense mutations in three unrelated families of our cohort. Furthermore, we mapped an overlapping homozygous chromosome 9 region containing PSAT1 in four consanguineous families. This gene encodes phosphoserine aminotransferase, the enzyme for the second step in L-serine biosynthesis. We identified six families with three different missense and frameshift PSAT1 mutations fully segregating with the disease. In another family, we discovered a homozygous frameshift mutation in PSPH, the gene encoding phosphoserine phosphatase, which catalyzes the last step of L-serine biosynthesis. Interestingly, all three identified genes have been previously implicated in serine-deficiency disorders, characterized by variable neurological manifestations. Our findings expand our understanding of NLS as a disorder of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway and suggest that NLS represents the severe end of serine-deficiency disorders, demonstrating that certain complex syndromes characterized by early lethality could indeed be the extreme end of the phenotypic spectrum of already known disorders.

  1. Cooperation of two bifunctional enzymes in the biosynthesis and attachment of deoxysugars of the antitumor antibiotic mithramycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guojun; Pahari, Pallab; Kharel, Madan K; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Haining; Van Lanen, Steven G; Rohr, Jürgen

    2012-10-15

    Two bifunctional enzymes cooperate in the assembly and the positioning of two sugars, D-olivose and D-mycarose, of the anticancer antibiotic mithramycin. MtmC finishes the biosynthesis of both sugar building blocks depending on which MtmGIV activity is supported. MtmGIV transfers these two sugars onto two structurally distinct acceptor substrates. The dual function of these enzymes explains two essential but previously unidentified activities.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Sterol Biosynthesis Inhibitors: Morphophysiological Alterations Leading to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Rafael Luis; Soares, Maurilio José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs) ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC50/72 h) or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC100/24 h). Incubation with inhibitors at the EC50/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC50/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC100/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP), culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the “point of no return” in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite. PMID:23383204

  3. Characterisation of the First Enzymes Committed to Lysine Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael D. W.; Billakanti, Jagan M.; Wason, Akshita; Keller, Sabrina; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Atkinson, Sarah C.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Pearce, Frederick Grant

    2012-01-01

    In plants, the lysine biosynthetic pathway is an attractive target for both the development of herbicides and increasing the nutritional value of crops given that lysine is a limiting amino acid in cereals. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) and dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR) catalyse the first two committed steps of lysine biosynthesis. Here, we carry out for the first time a comprehensive characterisation of the structure and activity of both DHDPS and DHDPR from Arabidopsis thaliana. The A. thaliana DHDPS enzyme (At-DHDPS2) has similar activity to the bacterial form of the enzyme, but is more strongly allosterically inhibited by (S)-lysine. Structural studies of At-DHDPS2 show (S)-lysine bound at a cleft between two monomers, highlighting the allosteric site; however, unlike previous studies, binding is not accompanied by conformational changes, suggesting that binding may cause changes in protein dynamics rather than large conformation changes. DHDPR from A. thaliana (At-DHDPR2) has similar specificity for both NADH and NADPH during catalysis, and has tighter binding of substrate than has previously been reported. While all known bacterial DHDPR enzymes have a tetrameric structure, analytical ultracentrifugation, and scattering data unequivocally show that At-DHDPR2 exists as a dimer in solution. The exact arrangement of the dimeric protein is as yet unknown, but ab initio modelling of x-ray scattering data is consistent with an elongated structure in solution, which does not correspond to any of the possible dimeric pairings observed in the X-ray crystal structure of DHDPR from other organisms. This increased knowledge of the structure and function of plant lysine biosynthetic enzymes will aid future work aimed at improving primary production. PMID:22792278

  4. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  5. Biosynthesis of lead nanoparticles by the aquatic water fern, Salvinia minima Baker, when exposed to high lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Castro-Longoria, E; Trejo-Guillén, K; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Avalos-Borja, M; Andrade-Canto, S B; Leal-Alvarado, D A; Santamaría, J M

    2014-02-01

    Salvinia minima Baker is a small floating aquatic fern that is efficient for the removal and storage of heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. In this study, we report that lead removal by S. minima causes large accumulation of lead inside the cells in the form of nanoparticles (PbNPs). The accumulation pattern of lead was analyzed in both, submerged root-like modified fronds (here named "roots"), and in its aerial leaf-like fronds ("leaves"). Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the biosynthesis of PbNPs by the plant. In both, roots and leaves, PbNPs were found to accumulate almost exclusively at the cell wall and closely associated to the cell membrane. Two types of PbNPs shapes were found in cells of both tissues, those associated to the cell wall were quasi-spherical with 17.2±4.2 nm of diameter, while those associated to the cell membrane/cytoplasm were elongated. Elongated particles were 53.7±29.6 nm in length and 11.1±2.4 nm wide. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) results indicate that cellulose, lignin and pectin are the major components that may be acting as the reducing agents for lead ions; these findings strongly suggest the potential use of this fern to further explore the bio-assisted synthesis of heavy metal nanostructures.

  6. Nonmevalonate terpene biosynthesis enzymes as antiinfective drug targets: substrate synthesis and high-throughput screening methods.

    PubMed

    Illarionova, Victoria; Kaiser, Johannes; Ostrozhenkova, Elena; Bacher, Adelbert; Fischer, Markus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix

    2006-11-10

    The nonmevalonate isoprenoid pathway is an established target for antiinfective drug development. This paper describes high-throughput methods for the screening of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase (IspC protein), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol synthase (IspD protein), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase (IspE protein), and 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase (IspF protein) against large compound libraries. The assays use up to three auxiliary enzymes. They are all monitored photometrically at 340 nm and are robust as documented by Z-factors of >or=0.86. 13C NMR assays designed for hit verification via direct detection of the primary reaction product are also described. Enzyme-assisted methods for the preparation, on a multigram scale, of isoprenoid biosynthesis intermediates required as substrates for these assays are reported. Notably, these methods enable the introduction of single or multiple 13C labels as required for NMR-monitored assays. The preparation of 4-diphosphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate in multigram quantities is described for the first time.

  7. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Alazmi, Meshari; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/. PMID:27131375

  8. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Alazmi, Meshari; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin

    2016-07-08

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/.

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes involved in stylopine biosynthesis in Eschscholzia californica.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Nobuhiro; Iwasa, Kinuko; Sato, Fumihiko

    2007-02-01

    (S)-stylopine is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of benzophenanthridine alkaloids, such as sanguinarine. Stylopine biosynthesis involves the sequential formation of two methylenedioxy bridges. Although the methylenedioxy bridge-forming P450 (CYP719) involved in berberine biosynthesis has been cloned from Coptis japonica[Ikezawa N, Tanaka M, Nagayoshi M, Shinkyo R, Sakaki T, Inouye K & Sato F (2003) J Biol Chem278, 38557-38565], no information is available regarding the genes for methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes in stylopine biosynthesis. Two cytochrome P450 cDNAs involved in stylopine biosynthesis were isolated using degenerate primers designed for C. japonica CYP719 from cultured Eschscholzia californica cells. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that both CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 had stylopine synthase activity to catalyze methylenedioxy bridge-formation from cheilanthifoline to stylopine, but not cheilanthifoline synthase activity to convert scoulerine to cheilanthifoline. Functional differences and expression patterns of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 were examined to investigate their physiological roles in stylopine biosynthesis. Enzymatic analysis showed that CYP719A2 had high substrate affinity only toward (R,S)-cheilanthifoline, whereas CYP719A3 had high affinity toward three similar substrates (R,S)-cheilanthifoline, (S)-scoulerine, and (S)-tetrahydrocolumbamine. An expression analysis in E. californica plant tissues showed that CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 exhibited expression patterns similar to those of three stylopine biosynthetic genes (CYP80B1, berberine bridge enzyme, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine : 3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase), whereas the specific expression of CYP719A3 in root was notable. Treatment of E. californica seedlings with methyl jasmonate resulted in the coordinated induction of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 genes. The physiological roles of CYP719A2 and CYP719A3 in stylopine biosynthesis are

  10. Deciphering the Substrate Specificity of SbnA, the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Staphyloferrin B Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus assembles the siderophore, staphyloferrin B, from l-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (l-Dap), α-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Recently, SbnA and SbnB were shown to produce l-Dap and α-ketoglutarate from O-phospho-l-serine (OPS) and l-glutamate. SbnA is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme with homology to O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylases; however, SbnA utilizes OPS instead of O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), and l-glutamate serves as a nitrogen donor instead of a sulfide. In this work, we examined how SbnA dictates substrate specificity for OPS and l-glutamate using a combination of X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of SbnA crystals incubated with OPS revealed the structure of the PLP-α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Formation of the intermediate induced closure of the active site pocket by narrowing the channel leading to the active site and forming a second substrate binding pocket that likely binds l-glutamate. Three active site residues were identified: Arg132, Tyr152, Ser185 that were essential for OPS recognition and turnover. The Y152F/S185G SbnA double mutant was completely inactive, and its crystal structure revealed that the mutations induced a closed form of the enzyme in the absence of the α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Lastly, l-cysteine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of SbnA by forming a nonproductive external aldimine with the PLP cofactor. These results suggest a regulatory link between siderophore and l-cysteine biosynthesis, revealing a potential mechanism to reduce iron uptake under oxidative stress. PMID:26794841

  11. Deciphering the Substrate Specificity of SbnA, the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Staphyloferrin B Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Liu, Yunan; Lee, Mathew S F; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2016-02-16

    Staphylococcus aureus assembles the siderophore, staphyloferrin B, from l-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (l-Dap), α-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Recently, SbnA and SbnB were shown to produce l-Dap and α-ketoglutarate from O-phospho-l-serine (OPS) and l-glutamate. SbnA is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme with homology to O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylases; however, SbnA utilizes OPS instead of O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), and l-glutamate serves as a nitrogen donor instead of a sulfide. In this work, we examined how SbnA dictates substrate specificity for OPS and l-glutamate using a combination of X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of SbnA crystals incubated with OPS revealed the structure of the PLP-α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Formation of the intermediate induced closure of the active site pocket by narrowing the channel leading to the active site and forming a second substrate binding pocket that likely binds l-glutamate. Three active site residues were identified: Arg132, Tyr152, Ser185 that were essential for OPS recognition and turnover. The Y152F/S185G SbnA double mutant was completely inactive, and its crystal structure revealed that the mutations induced a closed form of the enzyme in the absence of the α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Lastly, l-cysteine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of SbnA by forming a nonproductive external aldimine with the PLP cofactor. These results suggest a regulatory link between siderophore and l-cysteine biosynthesis, revealing a potential mechanism to reduce iron uptake under oxidative stress.

  12. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zavala, A; Del Razo, L M; García-Vargas, G G; Aguilar, C; Borja, V H; Albores, A; Cebrián, M E

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 microg As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized.

  13. Effect of Enzyme Inhibitors on Terpene Trilactones Biosynthesis and Gene Expression Profiling in Ginkgo biloba Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Tong, Hui; Wang, Mingxuan; Zhu, Jianhua; Zi, Jiachen; Song, Liyan; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-12-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of terpene trilactones of Ginkgo biloba is unclear. In this present study, suspension cultured cells of G. biloba were used to explore the regulation of the mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways in response to specific enzyme inhibitors (lovastatin and clomazone). The results showed that the biosynthesis of bilobalide was more highly correlated with the MVA pathway, and the biosynthesis of ginkgolides was more highly correlated with the MEP pathway. Meanwhile, according to the results, it could be speculated that bilobalide might be a product of ginkgolide metabolism.

  14. Biosynthesis of coral settlement cue tetrabromopyrrole in marine bacteria by a uniquely adapted brominase-thioesterase enzyme pair.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Abrahim; Agarwal, Vinayak; Diethelm, Stefan; Rahman, Imran; Schorn, Michelle A; Sneed, Jennifer M; Louie, Gordon V; Whalen, Kristen E; Mincer, Tracy J; Noel, Joseph P; Paul, Valerie J; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-04-05

    Halogenated pyrroles (halopyrroles) are common chemical moieties found in bioactive bacterial natural products. The halopyrrole moieties of mono- and dihalopyrrole-containing compounds arise from a conserved mechanism in which a proline-derived pyrrolyl group bound to a carrier protein is first halogenated and then elaborated by peptidic or polyketide extensions. This paradigm is broken during the marine pseudoalteromonad bacterial biosynthesis of the coral larval settlement cue tetrabromopyrrole (1), which arises from the substitution of the proline-derived carboxylate by a bromine atom. To understand the molecular basis for decarboxylative bromination in the biosynthesis of 1, we sequenced two Pseudoalteromonas genomes and identified a conserved four-gene locus encoding the enzymes involved in its complete biosynthesis. Through total in vitro reconstitution of the biosynthesis of 1 using purified enzymes and biochemical interrogation of individual biochemical steps, we show that all four bromine atoms in 1 are installed by the action of a single flavin-dependent halogenase: Bmp2. Tetrabromination of the pyrrole induces a thioesterase-mediated offloading reaction from the carrier protein and activates the biosynthetic intermediate for decarboxylation. Insights into the tetrabrominating activity of Bmp2 were obtained from the high-resolution crystal structure of the halogenase contrasted against structurally homologous halogenase Mpy16 that forms only a dihalogenated pyrrole in marinopyrrole biosynthesis. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the proposed substrate-binding pocket of Bmp2 led to a reduction in the degree of halogenation catalyzed. Our study provides a biogenetic basis for the biosynthesis of 1 and sets a firm foundation for querying the biosynthetic potential for the production of 1 in marine (meta)genomes.

  15. Biosynthesis of coral settlement cue tetrabromopyrrole in marine bacteria by a uniquely adapted brominase–thioesterase enzyme pair

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Abrahim; Agarwal, Vinayak; Diethelm, Stefan; Rahman, Imran; Schorn, Michelle A.; Sneed, Jennifer M.; Louie, Gordon V.; Whalen, Kristen E.; Mincer, Tracy J.; Noel, Joseph P.; Paul, Valerie J.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Halogenated pyrroles (halopyrroles) are common chemical moieties found in bioactive bacterial natural products. The halopyrrole moieties of mono- and dihalopyrrole-containing compounds arise from a conserved mechanism in which a proline-derived pyrrolyl group bound to a carrier protein is first halogenated and then elaborated by peptidic or polyketide extensions. This paradigm is broken during the marine pseudoalteromonad bacterial biosynthesis of the coral larval settlement cue tetrabromopyrrole (1), which arises from the substitution of the proline-derived carboxylate by a bromine atom. To understand the molecular basis for decarboxylative bromination in the biosynthesis of 1, we sequenced two Pseudoalteromonas genomes and identified a conserved four-gene locus encoding the enzymes involved in its complete biosynthesis. Through total in vitro reconstitution of the biosynthesis of 1 using purified enzymes and biochemical interrogation of individual biochemical steps, we show that all four bromine atoms in 1 are installed by the action of a single flavin-dependent halogenase: Bmp2. Tetrabromination of the pyrrole induces a thioesterase-mediated offloading reaction from the carrier protein and activates the biosynthetic intermediate for decarboxylation. Insights into the tetrabrominating activity of Bmp2 were obtained from the high-resolution crystal structure of the halogenase contrasted against structurally homologous halogenase Mpy16 that forms only a dihalogenated pyrrole in marinopyrrole biosynthesis. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the proposed substrate-binding pocket of Bmp2 led to a reduction in the degree of halogenation catalyzed. Our study provides a biogenetic basis for the biosynthesis of 1 and sets a firm foundation for querying the biosynthetic potential for the production of 1 in marine (meta)genomes. PMID:27001835

  16. Tyrosine Hydroxylation in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis Is Performed by Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Beets (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Sunnadeniya, Rasika; Bean, Alexander; Brown, Matthew; Akhavan, Neda; Hatlestad, Gregory; Gonzalez, Antonio; Symonds, V Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow and red-violet betalain plant pigments are restricted to several families in the order Caryophyllales, where betacyanins play analogous biological roles to anthocyanins. The initial step in betalain biosynthesis is the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form L-DOPA. Using gene expression experiments in beets, yeast, and Arabidopsis, along with HPLC/MS analysis, the present study shows that two novel cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5, and the previously described CYP76AD1 can perform this initial step. Co-expressing these CYP450s with DOPA 4,5-dioxygenase in yeast, and overexpression of these CYP450s in yellow beets show that CYP76AD1 efficiently uses L-DOPA leading to red betacyanins while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 lack this activity. Furthermore, CYP76AD1 can complement yellow beetroots to red while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 cannot. Therefore CYP76AD1 uniquely performs the beet R locus function and beets appear to be genetically redundant for tyrosine hydroxylation. These new functional data and ancestral character state reconstructions indicate that tyrosine hydroxylation alone was the most likely ancestral function of the CYP76AD alpha and beta groups and the ability to convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA evolved later in the alpha group.

  17. Tyrosine Hydroxylation in Betalain Pigment Biosynthesis Is Performed by Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Beets (Beta vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Sunnadeniya, Rasika; Bean, Alexander; Brown, Matthew; Akhavan, Neda; Hatlestad, Gregory; Gonzalez, Antonio; Symonds, V. Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Yellow and red-violet betalain plant pigments are restricted to several families in the order Caryophyllales, where betacyanins play analogous biological roles to anthocyanins. The initial step in betalain biosynthesis is the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form L-DOPA. Using gene expression experiments in beets, yeast, and Arabidopsis, along with HPLC/MS analysis, the present study shows that two novel cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5, and the previously described CYP76AD1 can perform this initial step. Co-expressing these CYP450s with DOPA 4,5-dioxygenase in yeast, and overexpression of these CYP450s in yellow beets show that CYP76AD1 efficiently uses L-DOPA leading to red betacyanins while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 lack this activity. Furthermore, CYP76AD1 can complement yellow beetroots to red while CYP76AD6 and CYP76AD5 cannot. Therefore CYP76AD1 uniquely performs the beet R locus function and beets appear to be genetically redundant for tyrosine hydroxylation. These new functional data and ancestral character state reconstructions indicate that tyrosine hydroxylation alone was the most likely ancestral function of the CYP76AD alpha and beta groups and the ability to convert L-DOPA to cyclo-DOPA evolved later in the alpha group. PMID:26890886

  18. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids: a bifunctional IspDF enzyme from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Rohdich, Felix; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gräwert, Tobias; Hecht, Stefan; Bacher, Adelbert; Hunter, William N

    2004-07-01

    In the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the conversion of 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate into its cyclic diphosphate proceeds via nucleotidyl intermediates and is catalyzed by the products of the ispD, ispE and ispF genes. An open reading frame of Campylobacter jejuni with similarity to the ispD and ispF genes of Escherichia coli was cloned into an expression vector directing the formation of a 42 kDa protein in a recombinant E. coli strain. The purified protein was shown to catalyze the transformation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate into 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol and the conversion of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate into 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate at catalytic rates of 19 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1) and 7 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1), respectively. Both enzyme-catalyzed reactions require divalent metal ions. The C. jejuni enzyme does not catalyze the formation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 3,4-cyclophosphate from 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol, a side reaction catalyzed in vitro by the IspF proteins of E. coli and Plasmodium falciparum. Comparative genomic analysis show that all sequenced alpha- and epsilon-proteobacteria have fused ispDF genes. These bifunctional proteins are potential drug targets in several human pathogens (e.g. Helicobacter pylori, C. jejuni and Treponema pallidum).

  19. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis of Homocitrate Synthase, an Essential Enzyme in Lysine Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Couture, Jean-François; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-12

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first and committed step in lysine biosynthesis in many fungi and certain Archaea and is a potential target for antifungal drugs. Here we report the crystal structure of the HCS apoenzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and two distinct structures of the enzyme in complex with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). The structures reveal that HCS forms an intertwined homodimer stabilized by domain-swapping between the N- and C-terminal domains of each monomer. The N-terminal catalytic domain is composed of a TIM barrel fold in which 2-OG binds via hydrogen bonds and coordination to the active site divalent metal ion, whereas the C-terminal domain is composed of mixed {alpha}/{beta} topology. In the structures of the HCS apoenzyme and one of the 2-OG binary complexes, a lid motif from the C-terminal domain occludes the entrance to the active site of the neighboring monomer, whereas in the second 2-OG complex the lid is disordered, suggesting that it regulates substrate access to the active site through its apparent flexibility. Mutations of the active site residues involved in 2-OG binding or implicated in acid-base catalysis impair or abolish activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, these results yield new insights into the structure and catalytic mechanism of HCSs and furnish a platform for developing HCS-selective inhibitors.

  20. Evolution of Ubiquinone Biosynthesis: Multiple Proteobacterial Enzymes with Various Regioselectivities To Catalyze Three Contiguous Aromatic Hydroxylation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Ludovic; Loiseau, Laurent; Barras, Frédéric; Schneider, Dominique; Junier, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitous ATP synthase uses an electrochemical gradient to synthesize cellular energy in the form of ATP. The production of this electrochemical gradient relies on liposoluble proton carriers like ubiquinone (UQ), which is used in the respiratory chains of eukaryotes and proteobacteria. The biosynthesis of UQ requires three hydroxylation reactions on contiguous positions of an aromatic ring. In Escherichia coli, each of three UQ flavin monooxygenases (FMOs), called UbiF, UbiH, and UbiI, modifies a single position of the aromatic ring. This pattern of three hydroxylation reactions/three proteins has been accepted as a paradigm in UQ biology. Using a phylogenetic analysis, we found that UbiF, UbiH, and UbiI are detected only in a small fraction of proteobacteria, and we identified two new types of UQ FMOs: UbiM, which is distributed in members of the alpha, beta, and gamma classes of proteobacteria, and UbiL, which is restricted to members of the alphaproteobacteria. Remarkably, the ubiL and ubiM genes were found in genomes with fewer than three UQ hydroxylase-encoding genes. We demonstrated, using biochemical approaches, that UbiL from Rhodospirillum rubrum and UbiM from Neisseria meningitidis hydroxylate, respectively, two and three positions of the aromatic ring during UQ biosynthesis. We conclude that bacteria have evolved a large repertoire of hydroxylase combinations for UQ biosynthesis, including pathways with either three specialist enzymes or pathways with one or two generalist enzymes of broader regioselectivity. The emergence of the latter is potentially related to genome reduction events. IMPORTANCE UQ, a key molecule for cellular bioenergetics that is conserved from proteobacteria to humans, appeared in an ancestral proteobacterium more than 2 billion years ago. UQ biosynthesis has been studied only in a few model organisms, and thus, the diversity of UQ biosynthesis pathways is largely unknown. In the work reported here, we conducted a

  1. Structural Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Biosynthesis Enzymes 7,8-Diaminopelargonic Acid Synthase and Dethiobiotin Synthetase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanghamitra; Lane, James M.; Lee, Richard E.; Rubin, Eric J.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) depends on biotin synthesis for survival during infection. In the absence of biotin, disruption of the biotin biosynthesis pathway results in cell death rather than growth arrest, an unusual phenotype for an Mtb auxotroph. Humans lack the enzymes for biotin production, making the proteins of this essential Mtb pathway promising drug targets. To this end, we have determined the crystal structures of the second and third enzymes of the Mtb biotin biosynthetic pathway, 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid synthase (DAPAS) and dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS), at respective resolutions of 2.2 Å and 1.85 Å. Superimposition of the DAPAS structures bound either to the SAM analog sinefungin or to 7-keto-8-aminopelargonic acid (KAPA) allowed us to map the putative binding site for the substrates and to propose a mechanism by which the enzyme accommodates their disparate structures. Comparison of the DTBS structures bound to the substrate 7,8-diaminopelargonic acid (DAPA) or to ADP and the product dethiobiotin (DTB) permitted derivation of an enzyme mechanism. There are significant differences between the Mtb enzymes and those of other organisms; the Bacillus subtilis DAPAS, presented here at a high resolution of 2.2 Å, has active site variations and the Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori DTBS have alterations in their overall folds. We have begun to exploit the unique characteristics of the Mtb structures to design specific inhibitors against the biotin biosynthesis pathway in Mtb. PMID:20565114

  2. Oxygen Availability for Porphyrin Biosynthesis Enzymes Determines the Production of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Shimpei; Matsumoto, Kentaro; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Ogura, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a precursor of porphyrin, is specifically converted to the fluorescent substance protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in tumors to be used as a prodrug for photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, decreases the efficacy of ALA-based photodynamic therapy and diagnosis. This decrease results from the excretion of porphyrin precursor coproporphyrinogen III (CPgenIII), an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PpIX. However, the mechanism of CPgenIII excretion during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we revealed the importance of mitochondrial respiration for the production of PpIX during hypoxia. Porphyrin concentrations were estimated in human gastric cancer cell lines by HPLC. Expression levels of porphyrin biosynthesis genes were measured by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting. Blockage of porphyrin biosynthesis was an oxygen-dependent phenomenon resulting from decreased PpIX production in mitochondria under hypoxic conditions. PpIX production was increased by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration complexes, which indicates that the enzymes of porphyrin biosynthesis compete with respiration complexes for molecular oxygen. Our results indicate that targeting the respiration complexes is a rationale for enhancing the effect of ALA-mediated treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26717566

  3. Altered expression and activities of enzymes involved in thiamine diphosphate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under oxidative and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kujda, Marta; Wolak, Natalia; Kozik, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) serves as a cofactor for enzymes engaged in pivotal carbohydrate metabolic pathways, which are known to be modulated under stress conditions to ensure the cell survival. Recent reports have proven a protective role of thiamine (vitamin B(1)) in the response of plants to abiotic stress. This work aimed at verifying a hypothesis that also baker's yeast, which can synthesize thiamine de novo similarly to plants and bacteria, adjust thiamine metabolism to adverse environmental conditions. Our analyses on the gene expression and enzymatic activity levels generally showed an increased production of thiamine biosynthesis enzymes (THI4 and THI6/THI6), a TDP synthesizing enzyme (THI80/THI80) and a TDP-requiring enzyme, transketolase (TKL1/TKL) by yeast subjected to oxidative (1 mM hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic (1 M sorbitol) stress. However, these effects differed in magnitude, depending on yeast growth phase and presence of thiamine in growth medium. A mutant thi4Δ with increased sensitivity to oxidative stress exhibited enhanced TDP biosynthesis as compared with the wild-type strain. Similar tendencies were observed in mutants yap1Δ and hog1Δ defective in the signaling pathways of the defense against oxidative and osmotic stress, respectively, suggesting that thiamine metabolism can partly compensate damages of yeast general defense systems.

  4. Relationship of ethylene biosynthesis to volatile production, related enzymes, and precursor availability in apple peel and flesh tissues.

    PubMed

    Defilippi, Bruno G; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Kader, Adel A

    2005-04-20

    Regulation of ethylene biosynthesis or action has a major effect on volatiles production in apples. To understand the biochemical processes involved, we used Greensleeves apples from a transgenic line with a high suppression of ethylene biosynthesis. The study was focused at the level of the aroma volatile-related enzymes, including alcohol acyltransferase (AAT), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and lipoxygenase (LOX) and at the level of amino acids and fatty acids as aroma volatile precursors in peel and flesh tissues. In general, volatile production, enzyme activity levels, and precursor availability were higher in the peel than the flesh and were differentially affected by ethylene regulation. AAT enzyme activity showed a clear pattern concomitant with ethylene regulation. Contrarily, ADH and LOX seem to be independent of ethylene modulation. Isoleucine, an important precursor of aroma compounds including 2-methylbutanoate esters, showed a major increase in the peel during ripening and responded significantly to ethylene regulation. Other important aroma volatiles precursors, like linoleic and linolenic acid, showed an accumulation during ripening associated with increases in aldehydes. The significance of these changes in relation to aroma volatile production is discussed.

  5. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine β-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control.

  6. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2013-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine β-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  7. Biosynthesis of the [FeFe] Hydrogenase H Cluster: A Central Role for the Radical SAM Enzyme HydG.

    PubMed

    Suess, Daniel L M; Kuchenreuther, Jon M; De La Paz, Liliana; Swartz, James R; Britt, R David

    2016-01-19

    Hydrogenase enzymes catalyze the rapid and reversible interconversion of H2 with protons and electrons. The active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenase is the H cluster, which consists of a [4Fe-4S]H subcluster linked to an organometallic [2Fe]H subcluster. Understanding the biosynthesis and catalytic mechanism of this structurally unusual active site will aid in the development of synthetic and biological hydrogenase catalysts for applications in solar fuel generation. The [2Fe]H subcluster is synthesized and inserted by three maturase enzymes-HydE, HydF, and HydG-in a complex process that involves inorganic, organometallic, and organic radical chemistry. HydG is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) family of enzymes and is thought to play a prominent role in [2Fe]H subcluster biosynthesis by converting inorganic Fe(2+), l-cysteine (Cys), and l-tyrosine (Tyr) into an organometallic [(Cys)Fe(CO)2(CN)](-) intermediate that is eventually incorporated into the [2Fe]H subcluster. In this Forum Article, the mechanism of [2Fe]H subcluster biosynthesis is discussed with a focus on how this key [(Cys)Fe(CO)2(CN)](-) species is formed. Particular attention is given to the initial metallocluster composition of HydG, the modes of substrate binding (Fe(2+), Cys, Tyr, and SAM), the mechanism of SAM-mediated Tyr cleavage to CO and CN(-), and the identification of the final organometallic products of the reaction.

  8. Acetylglutamate synthase in Neurospora crassa: characterization, localization, and genetic behavior of a regulatory enzyme of arginine biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the characterization and localization of the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis in Neurospora crassa. A radioactive assay was developed to detect this enzyme whereby radioactive substrate and product molecules could be separated by ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme was found to have a pH optimum of 9.0 and K/sub m/ values for glutamate and acetyl-CoA of approximately 4.7 and 0.45 mM, respectively. The enzyme was shown to be feedback inhibited by arginine. Half-maximal inhibition was observed at 0.13 mM arginine, a concentration which is similar to be in vivo cytosolic concentration of 0.2 mM. Arginine was found to act as a competitive inhibitor with respect to acetyl-CoA. Acetylglutamate synthase was localized to the mitochondrion. However, in contrast to the mitochondrial matrix location of the other ornithine biosynthetic enzymes, this enzyme was found to reside on the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  9. Steroidomimetic aminomethyl spiroacetals as novel inhibitors of the enzyme Δ8,7-sterol isomerase in cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krojer, Melanie; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz

    2014-02-01

    Grundmann's ketone is converted to a spiroacetal containing a 5-hydroxymethyl-5-nitro-1,3-dioxane moiety whose hydroxymethyl group can be esterified or directly substituted with primary and secondary amines. Among the resulting aminomethyl spiroacetals, several ones bearing diamino residues were found to be inhibitors of the enzyme Δ8,7-isomerase in cholesterol biosynthesis. The complex bicyclic building block derived from Grundmann's ketone could be replaced by a properly substituted tetraline scaffold, without noteworthy loss in activity. This opens the opportunity to perform further structural modifications for the design of new steroidomimetic inhibitors of human Δ8,7-isomerase.

  10. Deep sequencing of Lotus corniculatus L. reveals key enzymes and potential transcription factors related to the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hua, Wenping; Wang, Jian; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Xu, Ziqin; Wang, Zhezhi

    2013-04-01

    Lotus corniculatus L. is used worldwide as a forage crop due to its abundance of secondary metabolites and its ability to grow in severe environments. Although the entire genome of L. corniculatus var. japonicus R. is being sequenced, the differences in morphology and production of secondary metabolites between these two related species have led us to investigate this variability at the genetic level, in particular the differences in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our goal is to use the resulting information to develop more valuable forage crops and medicinal materials. Here, we conducted Illumina/Solexa sequencing to profile the transcriptome of L. corniculatus. We produced 26,492,952 short reads that corresponded to 2.38 gigabytes of total nucleotides. These reads were then assembled into 45,698 unigenes, of which a large number associated with secondary metabolism were annotated. In addition, we identified 2,998 unigenes based on homology with L. japonicus transcription factors (TFs) and grouped them into 55 families. Meanwhile, a comparison of four tag-based digital gene expression libraries, built from the flowers, pods, leaves, and roots, revealed distinct patterns of spatial expression of candidate unigenes in flavonoid biosynthesis. Based on these results, we identified many key enzymes from L. corniculatus which were different from reference genes of L. japonicus, and five TFs that are potential enhancers in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results provide initial genetics resources that will be valuable in efforts to manipulate the flavonoid metabolic pathway in plants.

  11. Mechanism and inhibition of human UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, the key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Chia Shin; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Yeh

    2016-01-01

    The bifunctional enzyme UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase/ManNAc kinase (GNE) plays a key role in sialic acid production. It is different from the non-hydrolyzing enzymes for bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and it is feed-back inhibited by the downstream product CMP-Neu5Ac. Here the complex crystal structure of the N-terminal epimerase part of human GNE shows a tetramer in which UDP binds to the active site and CMP-Neu5Ac binds to the dimer-dimer interface. The enzyme is locked in a tightly closed conformation. By comparing the UDP-binding modes of the non-hydrolyzing and hydrolyzing UDP-GlcNAc epimerases, we propose a possible explanation for the mechanistic difference. While the epimerization reactions of both enzymes are similar, Arg113 and Ser302 of GNE are likely involved in product hydrolysis. On the other hand, the CMP-Neu5Ac binding mode clearly elucidates why mutations in Arg263 and Arg266 can cause sialuria. Moreover, full-length modelling suggests a channel for ManNAc trafficking within the bifunctional enzyme. PMID:26980148

  12. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  13. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  14. Structure-activity relationships of new cyanothiophene inhibitors of the essential peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzyme MurF.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Turk, Samo; Sosič, Izidor; Knez, Damijan; Randall, Christopher P; Barreteau, Hélène; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa; O'Neill, Alex J; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier; Gobec, Stanislav

    2013-08-01

    Peptidoglycan is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, and enzymes involved in its biosynthesis represent validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. MurF catalyzes the final intracellular peptidoglycan biosynthesis step: the addition of D-Ala-D-Ala to the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-meso-DAP (or L-Lys). As MurF has no human counterpart, it represents an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial drugs. Using recently published cyanothiophene inhibitors of MurF from Streptococcus pneumoniae as a starting point, we designed and synthesized a series of structurally related derivatives and investigated their inhibition of MurF enzymes from different bacterial species. Systematic structural modifications of the parent compounds resulted in a series of nanomolar inhibitors of MurF from S. pneumoniae and micromolar inhibitors of MurF from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Some of the inhibitors also show antibacterial activity against S. pneumoniae R6. These findings, together with two new co-crystal structures, represent an excellent starting point for further optimization toward effective novel antibacterials.

  15. An enzyme in yeast mitochondria that catalyzes a step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis also functions in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed Central

    Zelenaya-Troitskaya, O; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    1995-01-01

    The yeast mitochondrial high mobility group protein Abf2p is required, under certain growth conditions, for the maintenance of wild-type (rho+) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have identified a multicopy suppressor of the mtDNA instability phenotype of cells with a null allele of the ABF2 gene (delta abf2). The suppressor is a known gene, ILV5, encoding the mitochondrial protein, acetohydroxy acid reductoisomerase, which catalyzes a step in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. Efficient suppression occurs with just a 2- to 3-fold increase in ILV5 copy number. Moreover, in delta abf2 cells with a single copy of ILV5, changes in mtDNA stability correlate directly with changes in conditions that are known to affect ILV5 expression. Wild-type mtDNA is unstable in cells with an ILV5 null mutation (delta ilv5), leading to the production of mostly rho- petite mutants. The instability of rho+ mtDNA in delta ilv5 cells is not simply a consequence of a block in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis, since mtDNA is stable in cells with a null allele of the ILV2 gene, which encodes another enzyme of that pathway. The most severe instability of rho+ mtDNA is observed in cells with null alleles of both ABF2 and ILV5. We suggest that ILV5 encodes a bifunctional protein required for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis and for the maintenance of rho+ mtDNA. Images PMID:7621838

  16. Canceling effect leads temperature insensitivity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular enzymes are important for decomposition of many macromolecules abundant in soil such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and proteins (Allison et al., 2010; Chen et al., 2012). The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition is the most crucial parameter for prediction of the effects of global warming on carbon cycle. Temperature responses of biological systems are often expressed as a Q10 functions; The Q10 describes how the rate of a chemical reaction changes with a temperature increase for 10 °C The aim of this study was to test how the canceling effect will change with variation in temperature interval, during short-term incubation. We additionally investigated, whether canceling effect occurs in a broad range of concentrations (low to high) and whether it is similar for the set of hydrolytic enzymes within broad range of temperatures. To this end, we performed soil incubation over a temperature range of 0-40°C (with 5°C steps). We determined the activities of three enzymes involved in plant residue decomposition: β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase, which are commonly measured as enzymes responsible for degrading cellulose (Chen et al., 2012), and xylanase, which degrades xylooligosaccharides (short xylene chain) in to xylose, thus being responsible for breaking down hemicelluloses (German et al., 2011). Michaelis-Menten kinetics measured at each temperature allowed to calculate Q10 values not only for the whole reaction rates, but specifically for maximal reaction rate (Vmax) and substrate affinity (Km). Subsequently, the canceling effect - simultaneous increase of Vmax and Km with temperature was analyzed within 10 and 5 degree of temperature increase. Three temperature ranges (below 10, between 15 and 25, and above 30 °C) clearly showed non-linear but stepwise increase of temperature sensitivity of all three enzymes and allowed to conclude for predominance of psychrophilic, mesophilic and thermophilic

  17. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27031227

  18. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  19. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Finn P.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  20. 25. Steenbock symposium -- Biosynthesis and function of metal clusters for enzymes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This symposium was held June 10--14, 1997 in Madison, Wisconsin. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on biochemistry of enzymes that have an affinity for metal clusters. Attention is focused on the following: metal clusters involved in energy conservation and remediation; tungsten, molybdenum, and cobalt-containing enzymes; Fe proteins, and Mo-binding proteins; nickel enzymes; and nitrogenase.

  1. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  2. Loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE Leads to Mediator-Dependent Inhibition of Soluble Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Nyffeler, Kayleigh; Chapple, Clint

    2015-01-01

    Phenylpropanoids are phenylalanine-derived specialized metabolites and include important structural components of plant cell walls, such as lignin and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as ultraviolet and visible light-absorbing pigments, such as hydroxycinnamate esters (HCEs) and anthocyanins. Previous work has revealed a remarkable degree of plasticity in HCE biosynthesis, such that most Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with blockages in the pathway simply redirect carbon flux to atypical HCEs. In contrast, the ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) mutant accumulates greatly reduced levels of HCEs, suggesting that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis may be repressed in response to the loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE (F5H) activity. Here, we show that in fah1 mutant plants, the activity of HCE biosynthetic enzymes is not limiting for HCE accumulation, nor is phenylpropanoid flux diverted to the synthesis of cell wall components or flavonol glycosides. We further show that anthocyanin accumulation is also repressed in fah1 mutants and that this repression is specific to tissues in which F5H is normally expressed. Finally, we show that repression of both HCE and anthocyanin biosynthesis in fah1 mutants is dependent on the MED5a/5b subunits of the transcriptional coregulatory complex Mediator, which are similarly required for the repression of lignin biosynthesis and the stunted growth of the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant reduced epidermal fluorescence8. Taken together, these observations show that the synthesis of HCEs and anthocyanins is actively repressed in a MEDIATOR-dependent manner in Arabidopsis fah1 mutants and support an emerging model in which MED5a/5b act as central players in the homeostatic repression of phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26048881

  3. Enzymes for ecdysteroid biosynthesis: their biological functions in insects and beyond.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Ryusuke; Niwa, Yuko S

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones are responsible for the coordinated regulation of many aspects of biological processes in multicellular organisms. Since the last century, many studies have identified and characterized steroidogenic enzymes in vertebrates, including mammals. However, much less is known about invertebrate steroidogenic enzymes. In the last 15 years, a number of steroidogenic enzymes and their functions have been characterized in ecdysozoan animals, especially in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this review, we summarize the latest knowledge of enzymes crucial for synthesizing ecdysteroids, the principal insect steroid hormones. We also discuss the functional conservation and diversity of ecdysteroidogenic enzymes in other insects and even non-insect species, such as nematodes, vertebrates, and lower eukaryotes.

  4. Homologs of the Rml Enzymes from Salmonella enterica Are Responsible for dTDP-β-l-Rhamnose Biosynthesis in the Gram-Positive Thermophile Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus DSM 10155

    PubMed Central

    Graninger, Michael; Kneidinger, Bernd; Bruno, Katharina; Scheberl, Andrea; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The glycan chains of the surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein from the gram-positive, thermophilic bacterium Aneurinibacillus (formerly Bacillus) thermoaerophilus strain DSM 10155 are composed of l-rhamnose- and d-glycero-d-manno-heptose-containing disaccharide repeating units which are linked to the S-layer polypeptide via core structures that have variable lengths and novel O-glycosidic linkages. In this work we investigated the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of thymidine diphospho-l-rhamnose (dTDP-l-rhamnose) and their specific properties. Comparable to lipopolysaccharide O-antigen biosynthesis in gram-negative bacteria, dTDP-l-rhamnose is synthesized in a four-step reaction sequence from dTTP and glucose 1-phosphate by the enzymes glucose-1-phosphate thymidylyltransferase (RmlA), dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB), dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose 3,5-epimerase (RmlC), and dTDP-4-dehydrorhamnose reductase (RmlD). The rhamnose biosynthesis operon from A. thermoaerophilus DSM 10155 was sequenced, and the genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Compared to purified enterobacterial Rml enzymes, the enzymes from the gram-positive strain show remarkably increased thermostability, a property which is particularly interesting for high-throughput screening and enzymatic synthesis. The closely related strain A. thermoaerophilus L420-91T produces d-rhamnose- and 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose-containing S-layer glycan chains. Comparison of the enzyme activity patterns in A. thermoaerophilus strains DSM 10155 and L420-91T for l-rhamnose and d-rhamnose biosynthesis indicated that the enzymes are differentially expressed during S-layer glycan biosynthesis and that A. thermoaerophilus L420-91T is not able to synthesize dTDP-l-rhamnose. These findings confirm that in each strain the enzymes act specifically on S-layer glycoprotein glycan formation. PMID:12147463

  5. Effect of CMV infection and high temperatures on the enzymes involved in raffinose family oligosaccharide biosynthesis in melon plants.

    PubMed

    Gil, Lidor; Ben-Ari, Julius; Turgeon, Robert; Wolf, Shmuel

    2012-07-01

    Ultrastructural and molecular studies have provided experimental evidence for the classification of cucurbits as symplastic loaders, mainly translocating the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) raffinose and stachyose. Earlier studies established that cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) infection causes a significant increase in the sucrose-to-RFO ratio in the phloem sap of melon plants. The alteration in phloem sap sugar composition was associated with upregulation of CmSUT1 transcript within the vascular bundles. The current research aimed to explore the effect of CMV infection on the enzymes involved in symplastic phloem loading and RFO biosynthesis. Viral infection did not affect the activity of either raffinose or stachyose synthases in source leaves, but caused upregulation of the respective transcripts. Interestingly, activity of galactinol synthase was higher in CMV-infected leaves, associated with upregulation of CmGAS2. A significant increase in CmGAS2 expression in source leaves of melon plants exposed to high temperatures indicated that this response is common for both biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the effect of CMV or heat stress on phloem sap sugar composition is not due to alteration in RFO biosynthesis.

  6. Diversity of ABBA Prenyltransferases in Marine Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509: Promiscuous Enzymes for the Biosynthesis of Mixed Terpenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Leipoldt, Franziska; Zeyhle, Philipp; Kulik, Andreas; Kalinowski, Jörn; Heide, Lutz; Kaysser, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids are arguably the largest and most diverse family of natural products, featuring prominently in e.g. signalling, self-defence, UV-protection and electron transfer. Prenyltransferases are essential players in terpenoid and hybrid isoprenoid biosynthesis that install isoprene units on target molecules and thereby often modulate their bioactivity. In our search for new prenyltransferase biocatalysts we focused on the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509, a particularly rich source of meroterpenoid chemistry. Sequencing and analysis of the genome of Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509 revealed seven putative phenol/phenazine-specific ABBA prenyltransferases, and one putative indole-specific ABBA prenyltransferase. To elucidate the substrate specificity of the ABBA prenyltransferases and to learn about their role in secondary metabolism, CnqP1 –CnqP8 were produced in Escherichia coli and incubated with various aromatic and isoprenoid substrates. Five of the eight prenyltransferases displayed enzymatic activity. The efficient conversion of dihydroxynaphthalene derivatives by CnqP3 (encoded by AA958_24325) and the co-location of AA958_24325 with genes characteristic for the biosynthesis of THN (tetrahydroxynaphthalene)-derived natural products indicates that the enzyme is involved in the formation of debromomarinone or other naphthoquinone-derived meroterpenoids. Moreover, CnqP3 showed high flexibility towards a range of aromatic and isoprenoid substrates and thus represents an interesting new tool for biocatalytic applications. PMID:26659564

  7. Elucidation of Xylem-Specific Transcription Factors and Absolute Quantification of Enzymes Regulating Cellulose Biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Parker, Jennifer; Li, Wei; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-02

    Cellulose, the main chemical polymer of wood, is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature.1 The ability to perturb the abundance and structure of cellulose microfibrils is of critical importance to the pulp and paper industry as well as for the textile, wood products, and liquid biofuels industries. Although much has been learned at the transcript level about the biosynthesis of cellulose, a quantitative understanding at the proteome level has yet to be established. The study described herein sought to identify the proteins directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis during wood formation in Populus trichocarpa along with known xylem-specific transcription factors involved in regulating these key proteins. Development of an effective discovery proteomic strategy through a combination of subcellular fractionation of stem differentiating xylem tissue (SDX) with recently optimized FASP digestion protocols, StageTip fractionation, as well as optimized instrument parameters for global proteomic analysis using the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer resulted in the deepest proteomic coverage of SDX protein from P. trichocarpa with 9,146 protein groups being identified (1% FDR). Of these, 20 cellulosic/hemicellulosic enzymes and 43 xylem-specific transcription factor groups were identified. Finally, selection of surrogate peptides led to an assay for absolute quantification of 14 cellulosic proteins in SDX of P. trichocarpa.

  8. Substrate Specificity and Diastereoselectivity of Strictosidine Glucosidase, a Key Enzyme in Monoterpene Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M. Carmen; Chen, Shi; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted. PMID:18061449

  9. Substrate specificity and diastereoselectivity of strictosidine glucosidase, a key enzyme in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, Nancy; Wu, Jia Xin; McCoy, Elizabeth; Galan, M Carmen; Chen, Shi; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2008-05-15

    Strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) from Catharanthus roseus catalyzes the deglycosylation of strictosidine, an intermediate from which thousands of monoterpene indole alkaloids are derived. The steady-state kinetics of SGD with a variety of strictosidine analogs revealed the substrate preferences of this enzyme at two key positions of the strictosidine substrate. Additionally, SGD from C. roseus turns over both strictosidine and its stereoisomer vincoside, indicating that although this enzyme prefers the naturally occurring diastereomer, the enzyme is not completely diastereoselective. The implications of the substrate specificity of SGD in metabolic engineering efforts of C. roseus are highlighted.

  10. Mitochondrial ClpX activates a key enzyme for heme biosynthesis and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kardon, Julia R.; Yien, Yvette Y.; Huston, Nicholas C.; Branco, Diana S.; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Paw, Barry H.; Baker, Tania A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mitochondrion maintains and regulates its proteome with chaperones primarily inherited from its bacterial endosymbiont ancestor. Among these chaperones is the AAA+ unfoldase ClpX, an important regulator of prokaryotic physiology with poorly defined function in the eukaryotic mitochondrion. We observed phenotypic similarity in S. cerevisiae genetic interaction data between mitochondrial ClpX (mtClpX) and genes contributing to heme biosynthesis, an essential mitochondrial function. Metabolomic analysis revealed that 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the first heme precursor, is five-fold reduced in yeast lacking mtClpX activity, and total heme is reduced by half. mtClpX directly stimulates ALA synthase in vitro by catalyzing incorporation of its cofactor, pyridoxal phosphate. This activity is conserved in mammalian homologs; additionally, mtClpX depletion impairs vertebrate erythropoiesis, which requires massive upregulation of heme biosynthesis to supply hemoglobin. mtClpX therefore is a widely conserved stimulator of an essential biosynthetic pathway, and employs a previously unrecognized mechanism for AAA+ unfoldases. PMID:25957689

  11. Molecular and Genetic Analyses of Drosophila Prat, Which Encodes the First Enzyme of De Novo Purine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Drosophila Prat gene encodes phosphoribosylamidotransferase (PRAT), the enzyme that performs the first committed step of the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis pathway. Using information from amino acid sequence alignments of PRAT from other organisms, a polymerase chain reaction-based approach was employed to clone Prat. Amino acid sequence alignment of Drosophila PRAT with PRAT from bacteria, yeast, and vertebrates indicates that it is most identical (at least 60%) to the vertebrate PRATs. It shares putative amino-terminal propeptide and ironbinding domains seen only in Bacillus subtilis and vertebrate PRATs. Prat was localized to the right arm of chromosome 3 at polytene band 84E1-2. Owing to the fact that this region had been well characterized previously, Prat was localized to a 30-kilobase region between two deficiency break-points. By making the prediction that Prat would have a similar ``purine syndrome'' phenotype as mutations in the genes ade2 and ade3, which encode enzymes downstream in the pathway, five alleles of Prat were isolated. Three of the alleles were identified as missense mutations. A comparison of PRAT enzyme activity with phenotype in three of the mutants indicates that a reduction to 40% of the wild-type allele's activity is sufficient to cause the purine syndrome, suggesting that PRAT activity is limiting in Drosophila. PMID:8150282

  12. Flavonol Glucoside and Antioxidant Enzyme Biosynthesis Affected by Mycorrhizal Fungi in Various Cultivars of Onion (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Mollavali, Mohanna; Bolandnazar, Saheb Ali; Schwarz, Dietmar; Rohn, Sascha; Riehle, Peer; Zaare Nahandi, Fariborz

    2016-01-13

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of mycorrhizal symbiosis on qualitative characteristics of onion (Allium cepa L.). For this reason, five onion cultivars with different scale color and three different strains of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Diversispora versiformis, Rhizophagus intraradices, Funneliformis mosseae) were used. Red cultivars, mainly 'Red Azar-shahr', showed the highest content in vitamin C, flavonols, and antioxidant enzymes. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased total phenolic, pyruvic acid, and vitamin C of onion plants. Considerable increase was observed in quercetin-4'-O-monoglucoside and isorhamnetin-4'-O-monoglucoside content in plants inoculated with Diversispora versiformis, but quercetin-3,4'-O-diglucoside was not significantly influenced. Analyses for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and antioxiodant enzyme activities such as polyphenol oxidase (PPO), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) revealed that all except PPO were enhanced by mycorrhizal inoculation. Overall, these findings suggested that mycorrhizal inoculation influenced biosynthesis of flavonol glucosides and antioxidant enzymes by increasing nutrient uptake or by induction of the plant defense system.

  13. Synthetic Biology for Cell-Free Biosynthesis: Fundamentals of Designing Novel In Vitro Multi-Enzyme Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Gaspar; Gerngross, Daniel; Roberts, Tania M; Panke, Sven

    2016-10-19

    Cell-free biosynthesis in the form of in vitro multi-enzyme reaction networks or enzyme cascade reactions emerges as a promising tool to carry out complex catalysis in one-step, one-vessel settings. It combines the advantages of well-established in vitro biocatalysis with the power of multi-step in vivo pathways. Such cascades have been successfully applied to the synthesis of fine and bulk chemicals, monomers and complex polymers of chemical importance, and energy molecules from renewable resources as well as electricity. The scale of these initial attempts remains small, suggesting that more robust control of such systems and more efficient optimization are currently major bottlenecks. To this end, the very nature of enzyme cascade reactions as multi-membered systems requires novel approaches for implementation and optimization, some of which can be obtained from in vivo disciplines (such as pathway refactoring and DNA assembly), and some of which can be built on the unique, cell-free properties of cascade reactions (such as easy analytical access to all system intermediates to facilitate modeling).

  14. Structure of ALD1, a plant-specific homologue of the universal diaminopimelate aminotransferase enzyme of lysine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Vladimir; Edelman, Marvin; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Kirma, Menny; Galili, Gad

    2013-02-01

    Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DAP-AT) is an enzyme in the lysine-biosynthesis pathway. Conversely, ALD1, a close homologue of DAP-AT in plants, uses lysine as a substrate in vitro. Both proteins require pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) for their activity. The structure of ALD1 from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtALD1) was solved at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Comparison of AtALD1 with the previously solved structure of A. thaliana DAP-AT (AtDAP-AT) revealed similar interactions with PLP despite sequence differences within the PLP-binding site. However, sequence differences between the binding site of AtDAP-AT for malate, a purported mimic of substrate binding, and the corresponding site in AtALD1 led to different interactions. This suggests that either the substrate itself, or the substrate-binding mode, differs in the two proteins, supporting the known in vitro findings.

  15. A new enzyme involved in the control of the stereochemistry in the decalin formation during equisetin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Nogawa, Toshihiko; Hirota, Hiroshi; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Takahashi, Shunji; Ahn, Jong Seog; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    Tetramic acid containing a decalin ring such as equisetin and phomasetin is one of the characteristic scaffolds found in fungal bioactive secondary metabolites. Polyketide (PKS)-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) hybrid enzyme is responsible for the synthesis of the polyketide scaffold conjugated with an amino acid. PKS-NRPS hybrid complex programs to create structural diversity in the polyketide backbone have begun to be investigated, yet mechanism of control of the stereochemistry in a decalin formation via a Diels-Alder cycloaddition remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that fsa2, which showed no homology to genes encoding proteins of known function, in the fsa cluster responsible for equisetin and fusarisetin A biosynthesis in Fusarium sp. FN080326, is involved in the control of stereochemistry in decalin formation via a Diels-Alder reaction in the equisetin biosynthetic pathway.

  16. Epoxomicin and Eponemycin Biosynthesis Involves gem-Dimethylation and an Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase-Like Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zettler, Judith; Zubeil, Florian; Kulik, Andreas; Grond, Stephanie; Kaysser, Leonard

    2016-05-03

    The α',β'-epoxyketone moiety of proteasome inhibitors confers high binding specificity to the N-terminal threonine in catalytic proteasome β-subunits. We recently identified the epoxomicin and eponemycin biosynthetic gene clusters and have now conducted isotope-enriched precursor feeding studies and comprehensive gene deletion experiments to shed further light on their biosynthetic pathways. Leucine and two methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine were readily incorporated into the epoxyketone warhead, suggesting decarboxylation of the thioester intermediate. Formation of the α',β'-epoxyketone is likely mediated by conserved acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-like enzymes, as indicated by complete loss of epoxomicin and eponemycin production in the respective knockout mutants. Our results clarify crucial questions in the formation of epoxyketone compounds and lay the foundation for in vitro biochemical studies on the biosynthesis of this pharmaceutically important class of proteasome inhibitors.

  17. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  18. Streptothricin biosynthesis is catalyzed by enzymes related to nonribosomal peptide bond formation.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, M A; Vallín, C; Malpartida, F

    1997-01-01

    In a search for strains producing biocides with a wide spectrum of activity, a new strain was isolated. This strain was taxonomically characterized as Streptomyces rochei F20, and the chemical structure of the bioactive product extracted from its fermentation broth was determined to be a mixture of streptothricins. From a genomic library of the producer strain prepared in the heterologous host Streptomyces lividans, a 7.2-kb DNA fragment which conferred resistance to the antibiotic was isolated. DNA sequencing of 5.2 kb from the cloned fragment revealed five open reading frames (ORFs) such that ORF1, -2, -3, and -4 were transcribed in the same direction while ORF5 was convergently arranged. The deduced product of ORF1 strongly resembled those of genes involved in peptide formation by a nonribosomal mechanism; the ORF2 product strongly resembled that of mphA and mphB isolated from Escherichia coli, which determines resistance to several macrolides by a macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase activity; the ORF3 product had similarities with several hydrolases; and the ORF5 product strongly resembled streptothricin acetyltransferases from different gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. ORF5 was shown to be responsible for acetyl coenzyme A-dependent streptothricin acetylation. No similarities in the databases for the ORF4 product were found. Unlike other peptide synthases, that for streptothricin biosynthesis was arranged as a multienzymatic system rather than a multifunctional protein. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2 (and to a lesser degree, of ORF3) abolishes antibiotic biosynthesis, suggesting their involvement in the streptothricin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9371436

  19. Regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis: effect of glucose on activities of various glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, R L; Lewis, D F

    1984-01-01

    Catabolism of carbohydrates has been implicated in the regulation of aflatoxin synthesis. To characterize this effect further, the activities of various enzymes associated with glucose catabolism were determined in Aspergillus parasiticus organisms that were initially cultured in peptone-mineral salts medium and then transferred to glucose-mineral salts and peptone-mineral salts media. After an initial increase in activity, the levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, mannitol dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase were lowered in the presence of glucose. Phosphofructokinase activity was greater in the peptone-grown mycelium, but fructose diphosphatase was largely unaffected by carbon source. Likewise, carbon source had relatively little effect on the activities of pyruvate kinase, malic enzyme, isocitrate-NADP dehydrogenase, and isocitrate-NAD dehydrogenase. The results suggest that glucose may, in part, regulate aflatoxin synthesis via a carbon catabolite repression of NADPH-generating and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. PMID:6091545

  20. Structure and function of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, J.-L.; Austin, M.B.; Stewart, C.; Noel, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    As a major component of plant specialized metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways provide anthocyanins for pigmentation, flavonoids such as flavones for protection against UV photodamage, various flavonoid and isoflavonoid inducers of Rhizobium nodulation genes, polymeric lignin for structural support and assorted antimicrobial phytoalexins. As constituents of plant-rich diets and an assortment of herbal medicinal agents, the phenylpropanoids exhibit measurable cancer chemopreventive, antimitotic, estrogenic, antimalarial, antioxidant and antiasthmatic activities. The health benefits of consuming red wine, which contains significant amounts of 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol) and other phenylpropanoids, highlight the increasing awareness in the medical community and the public at large as to the potential dietary importance of these plant derived compounds. As recently as a decade ago, little was known about the three-dimensional structure of the enzymes involved in these highly branched biosynthetic pathways. Ten years ago, we initiated X-ray crystallographic analyses of key enzymes of this pathway, complemented by biochemical and enzyme engineering studies. We first investigated chalcone synthase (CHS), the entry point of the flavonoid pathway, and its close relative stilbene synthase (STS). Work soon followed on the O-methyl transferases (OMTs) involved in modifications of chalcone, isoflavonoids and metabolic precursors of lignin. More recently, our groups and others have extended the range of phenylpropanoid pathway structural investigations to include the upstream enzymes responsible for the initial recruitment of phenylalanine and tyrosine, as well as a number of reductases, acyltransferases and ancillary tailoring enzymes of phenylpropanoid-derived metabolites. These structure–function studies collectively provide a comprehensive view of an important aspect of phenylpropanoid metabolism. More specifically, these atomic resolution

  1. Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme from Meyerozyma guilliermondii and its potential in biosynthesis of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Jin-Song; Dong, Ting-Ting; Liu, Ting-Ting; Li, Heng; Dou, Wen-Fang; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-03-11

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is an important platform chemical in organic synthesis. Traditionally, 3-HP was produced by chemical methods and fermentation process. In this work, a novel enzymatic method was developed for green synthesis of 3-HP. A yeast strain harboring nitrile-hydrolyzing enzyme was newly isolated from environmental samples using 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3-HPN) as the sole nitrogen source. It was identified to be Meyerozyma guilliermondii CGMCC12935 by sequencing of the 18S ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacer, together with analysis of the morphology characteristics. The catalytic properties of M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells were determined, and the optimum activity was achieved at 55 °C and pH 7.5. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity towards nitriles, especially 3-HPN, aminoacetonitrile and 3-cyanopyridine. The presence of Ag(+), Pb(2+) and excess substrate inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas 5% (v/v) ethyl acetate had a positive effect on the enzyme activity. M. guilliermondii CGMCC12935 resting cells by addition of 3% glucose could thoroughly hydrolyze 500 mM 3-HPN into 3-HP within 100 h and the maximal accumulative production of 3-HP reached 216.33 mM, which was over twofolds than the control group with no additional glucose. And this work would lay the foundation for biological production of 3-HP in industry.

  2. Investigation of the Enzymes Involved in Lantibiotic Biosynthesis: Lacticin 481 and Haloduracin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihnken, Leigh Anne Furgerson

    2009-01-01

    Lantibiotics are cyclic peptides that exhibit a range of biological properties, including antimicrobial activity. They are ribosomally-synthesized as linear precursor peptides that consist of two regions, an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal propeptide (or structural) region. The structural region undergoes extensive enzyme-catalyzed…

  3. Molecular architecture of DesI: a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of desosamine.

    PubMed

    Burgie, E Sethe; Holden, Hazel M

    2007-08-07

    Desosamine is a 3-(dimethylamino)-3,4,6-trideoxyhexose found, for example, in such macrolide antibiotics as erthyromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. The efficacies of these macrolide antibiotics are markedly reduced in the absence of desosamine. In the bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae, six enzymes are required for the production of dTDP-desosamine. The focus of this X-ray crystallographic analysis is the third enzyme in the pathway, a PLP-dependent aminotransferase referred to as DesI. The structure of DesI was solved in complex with its product, dTDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose, to a nominal resolution of 2.1 A. Each subunit of the dimeric enzyme contains 12 alpha-helices and 14 beta-strands. Three cis-peptides are observed in each subunit, Phe 330, Pro 332, and Pro 339. The two active sites of the enzyme are located in clefts at the subunit/subunit interface. Electron density corresponding to the bound product clearly demonstrates a covalent bond between the amino group of the product and C-4' of the PLP cofactor. Interestingly, there are no hydrogen-bonding interactions between the protein and the dideoxyglucosyl group of the product (within 3.2 A). The only other sugar-modifying aminotransferase whose structure is known in the presence of product is PseC from Helicobacter pylori. This enzyme, as opposed to DesI, catalyzes amino transfer to the axial position of the sugar. A superposition of the two active sites for these proteins reveals that the major differences in ligand binding occur in the orientations of the deoxyglucosyl and phosphoryl groups. Indeed, the nearly 180 degrees difference in hexose orientation explains the equatorial versus axial amino transfer exhibited by DesI and PseC, respectively.

  4. Structural Insights into the Quaternary Catalytic Mechanism of Hexameric Human Quinolinate Phosphoribosyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in de novo NAD Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyung-Seop; Gyun Kim, Tae; Kim, Mun-Kyoung; Bu Kang, Gil; Youn Kang, Jung; Lee, Jung-Gyu; Yop An, Jun; Ryoung Park, Kyoung; Lee, Youngjin; Jun Im, Young; Hyuck Lee, Jun; Hyun Eom, Soo

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) catalyses the production of nicotinic acid mononucleotide, a precursor of de novo biosynthesis of the ubiquitous coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. QPRT is also essential for maintaining the homeostasis of quinolinic acid in the brain, a possible neurotoxin causing various neurodegenerative diseases. Although QPRT has been extensively analysed, the molecular basis of the reaction catalysed by human QPRT remains unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of hexameric human QPRT in the apo form and its complexes with reactant or product. We found that the interaction between dimeric subunits was dramatically altered during the reaction process by conformational changes of two flexible loops in the active site at the dimer-dimer interface. In addition, the N-terminal short helix α1 was identified as a critical hexamer stabilizer. The structural features, size distribution, heat aggregation and ITC studies of the full-length enzyme and the enzyme lacking helix α1 strongly suggest that human QPRT acts as a hexamer for cooperative reactant binding via three dimeric subunits and maintaining stability. Based on our comparison of human QPRT structures in the apo and complex forms, we propose a drug design strategy targeting malignant glioma. PMID:26805589

  5. The Starch-Debranching Enzymes Isoamylase and Pullulanase Are Both Involved in Amylopectin Biosynthesis in Rice Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Akiko; Fujita, Naoko; Harada, Kyuya; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Satoh, Hikaru; Nakamura, Yasunori

    1999-01-01

    The activities of the two types of starch debranching enzymes, isoamylase and pullulanase, were greatly reduced in endosperms of allelic sugary-1 mutants of rice (Oryza sativa), with the decrease more pronounced for isoamylase than for pullulanase. However, the decrease in isoamylase activity was not related to the magnitude of the sugary phenotype (the proportion of the phytoglycogen region of the endosperm), as observed with pullulanase. In the moderately mutated line EM-5, the pullulanase activity was markedly lower in the phytoglycogen region than in the starch region, and isoamylase activity was extremely low or completely lost in the whole endosperm tissue. These results suggest that both debranching enzymes are involved in amylopectin biosynthesis in rice endosperm. We presume that isoamylase plays a predominant role in amylopectin synthesis, but pullulanase is also essential or can compensate for the role of isoamylase in the construction of the amylopectin multiple-cluster structure. It is highly possible that isoamylase was modified in some sugary-1 mutants such as EM-273 and EM-5, since it was present in significant and trace amounts, respectively, in these mutants but was apparently inactive. The results show that the Sugary-1 gene encodes the isoamylase gene of the rice genome. PMID:10517831

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Perilla frutescens cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the later steps of perillaldehyde biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yumi; Ito, Michiho

    2017-02-01

    Perilla produces the cyclohexanoid monoterpene perillaldehyde as a major constituent of an essential oil that is accumulated in its glandular trichomes. Perillaldehyde is a marker compound for quality control of soyo and has biological activities such as antibacterial, sedative, or vasodilatory effects. The predicted perillaldehyde formation involves the cyclization of geranyl diphosphate, hydroxylation, and oxidation, and cytochrome P450 plays a crucial role in perillaldehyde biosynthesis. In this study, a cytochrome P450-type enzyme with perillyl alcohol and perillaldehyde synthase activities was isolated by analyzing an expressed sequence tag library from several oil types of pure lines of perilla. A recombinant protein with a sequence that was highly specific for the type of perillaldehyde was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and evaluated by an in vitro enzymatic reaction. The recombinant protein catalyzed the hydroxylation and oxidation of limonene to perillyl alcohol and perillaldehyde. Cytochrome P450 limonene-7-hydroxylase cDNA from Perilla frutescens has been previously isolated. The cytochrome P450 isolated in this study shares 37% amino-acid identity with the previously isolated enzyme; however, it may have different characteristics.

  7. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  8. Genome mining in Amycolatopsis balhimycina for ferredoxins capable of supporting cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Geib, Nina; Weber, Tilmann; Wörtz, Tanja; Zerbe, Katja; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Robinson, John A

    2010-05-01

    Ferredoxins are required to supply electrons to the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in cross-linking reactions during the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics balhimycin and vancomycin. However, the biosynthetic gene clusters for these antibiotics contain no ferredoxin- or ferredoxin reductase-like genes. In a search for potential ferredoxin partners for these P450s, here, we report an in silico analysis of the draft genome sequence of the balhimycin producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina, which revealed 11 putative Fe-S-containing ferredoxin genes. We show that two members (balFd-V and balFd-VII), produced as native-like holo-[3Fe-4S] ferredoxins in Escherichia coli, could supply electrons to the P450 OxyB (CYP165B) from both A. balhimycina and the vancomycin producer Amycolatopsis orientalis, and support in vitro turnover of peptidyl carrier protein-bound peptide substrates into monocyclic cross-linked products. These results show that ferredoxins encoded in the antibiotic-producing strain can act in a degenerate manner in supporting the catalytic functions of glycopeptide biosynthetic P450 enzymes from the same as well as heterologous gene clusters.

  9. Substrate-Tuned Catalysis of the Radical S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Enzyme NosL Involved in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2015-07-27

    NosL is a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme that converts L-Trp to 3-methyl-2-indolic acid, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of a thiopeptide antibiotic nosiheptide. In this work we investigated NosL catalysis by using a series of Trp analogues as the molecular probes. Using a benzofuran substrate 2-amino-3-(benzofuran-3-yl)propanoic acid (ABPA), we clearly demonstrated that the 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical-mediated hydrogen abstraction in NosL catalysis is not from the indole nitrogen but likely from the amino group of L-Trp. Unexpectedly, the major product of ABPA is a decarboxylated compound, indicating that NosL was transformed to a novel decarboxylase by an unnatural substrate. Furthermore, we showed that, for the first time to our knowledge, the dAdo radical-mediated hydrogen abstraction can occur from an alcohol hydroxy group. Our study demonstrates the intriguing promiscuity of NosL catalysis and highlights the potential of engineering radical SAM enzymes for novel activities.

  10. Structural basis for redox sensitivity in Corynebacterium glutamicum diaminopimelate epimerase: an enzyme involved in l-lysine biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Diaminopimelate epimerase (DapF) is one of the crucial enzymes involved in l-lysine biosynthesis, where it converts l,l-diaminopimelate (l,l-DAP) into d,l-DAP. DapF is also considered as an attractive target for the development of antibacterial drugs. Here, we report the crystal structure of DapF from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgDapF). Structures of CgDapF obtained under both oxidized and reduced conditions reveal that the function of CgDapF is regulated by redox-switch modulation via reversible disulfide bond formation between two catalytic cysteine residues. Under oxidized condition, two catalytic cysteine residues form a disulfide bond; these same cysteine residues exist in reduced form under reduced condition. Disulfide bond formation also induces a subsequent structural change in the dynamic catalytic loop at the active site, which results in open/closed conformational change at the active site. We also determined the crystal structure of CgDapF in complex with its product d,l-DAP, and elucidated how the enzyme recognizes its substrate l,l-DAP as a substrate. Moreover, the structure in complex with the d,l-DAP product reveals that CgDapF undergoes a large open/closed domain movement upon substrate binding, resulting in a completely buried active site with the substrate bound. PMID:28176858

  11. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  12. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: a novel pathway for the early steps leading to isopentenyl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, M; Knani, M; Simonin, P; Sutter, B; Sahm, H

    1993-10-15

    Incorporation of 13C-labelled glucose, acetate, pyruvate or erythrose allowed the determination of the origin of the carbon atoms of triterpenoids of the hopane series and/or of the ubiquinones from several bacteria (Zymomonas mobilis, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Escherichia coli and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris) confirmed our earlier results obtained by incorporation of 13C-labelled acetate into the hopanoids of other bacteria and led to the identification of a novel biosynthetic route for the early steps of isoprenoid biosynthesis. The C5 framework of isoprenic units results most probably (i) from the condensation of a C2 unit derived from pyruvate decarboxylation (e.g. thiamine-activated acetaldehyde) on the C-2 carbonyl group of a triose phosphate derivative issued probably from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and not from pyruvate and (ii) from a transposition step. Although this hypothetical biosynthetic pathway resembles that of L-valine biosynthesis, this amino acid or its C5 precursors could be excluded as intermediates in the formation of isoprenic units.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glucosyl-3-Phosphoglycerate Synthase: Structure of a Key Enzyme in Methylglucose Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Empadinhas, Nuno; Albuquerque, Luciana; Sá-Moura, Bebiana; da Costa, Milton S.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculosis constitutes today a serious threat to human health worldwide, aggravated by the increasing number of identified multi-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its causative agent, as well as by the lack of development of novel mycobactericidal compounds for the last few decades. The increased resilience of this pathogen is due, to a great extent, to its complex, polysaccharide-rich, and unusually impermeable cell wall. The synthesis of this essential structure is still poorly understood despite the fact that enzymes involved in glycosidic bond synthesis represent more than 1% of all M. tuberculosis ORFs identified to date. One of them is GpgS, a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) with low sequence homology to any other GTs of known structure, which has been identified in two species of mycobacteria and shown to be essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis. To further understand the biochemical properties of M. tuberculosis GpgS, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the apo enzyme, as well as of its ternary complex with UDP and 3-phosphoglycerate, by X-ray crystallography, to a resolution of 2.5 and 2.7 Å, respectively. GpgS, the first enzyme from the newly established GT-81 family to be structurally characterized, displays a dimeric architecture with an overall fold similar to that of other GT-A-type glycosyltransferases. These three-dimensional structures provide a molecular explanation for the enzyme's preference for UDP-containing donor substrates, as well as for its glucose versus mannose discrimination, and uncover the structural determinants for acceptor substrate selectivity. Glycosyltransferases constitute a growing family of enzymes for which structural and mechanistic data urges. The three-dimensional structures of M. tuberculosis GpgS now determined provide such data for a novel enzyme family, clearly establishing the molecular determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis, while providing an experimental

  14. Cloning and early expression pattern of two melatonin biosynthesis enzymes in the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, Robin; Boeuf, Gilles; Fuentes, Michael; Gehring, Walter J; Falcón, Jack

    2007-05-01

    Melatonin biosynthesis from serotonin involves the sequential activation of the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT). Photoperiod synchronizes a daily rhythm in pineal and retinal melatonin secretion through controlling AANAT activity. Teleost fish possess two Aanat, one expressed in the retina (AANAT1) and the other expressed in the pineal gland (AANAT2). We report here the full-length cloning of Aanat1, Aanat2, SmHiomt and Otx5 (orthodenticle homeobox homolog 5) in the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, Sm), a flatfish belonging to an evolutionary recent group of Teleost. The temporal expression pattern of the genes investigated is consistent with the idea that OTX5 is needed for photoreceptor specification, and that the pineal gland differentiates before the retina. SmAanat2 expression remained pineal specific during the period of time investigated, whereas SmOtx5 and SmHiomt expressions were seen in both the retina and pineal gland. Our results do not support the existence of a second SmHiomt, as is the case for SmAanat. Neither SmAanat2 nor SmHiomt mRNAs displayed cyclic accumulation in the pineal organ of embryos and larvae maintained under a light-dark cycle from fertilization onward. This is in marked contrast with the situation observed with zebrafish Aanat2, indicating that the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of the pineal melatonin system have been modified during the evolution of Teleost.

  15. Accumulation of cynaropicrin in globe artichoke and localization of enzymes involved in its biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eljounaidi, K; Comino, C; Moglia, A; Cankar, K; Genre, A; Hehn, A; Bourgaud, F; Beekwilder, J; Lanteri, S

    2015-10-01

    Globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) belongs to the Asteraceae family, in which one of the most biologically significant class of secondary metabolites are sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). In globe artichoke the principal STL is the cynaropicrin, which contributes to approximately 80% of its characteristic bitter taste. Cynaropicrin content was assessed in globe artichoke tissues and was observed to accumulate in leaves of different developmental stages. In the receptacle, a progressive decrease was observed during inflorescence development, while the STL could not be detected in the inflorescence bracts. Almost undetectable amounts were found in the roots and inflorescence stems at the commercial stage. Cynaropicrin content was found to correlate with expression of genes encoding CcGAS, CcGAO and CcCOS, which are involved in the STL biosynthesis. A more detailed study of leaf material revealed that cynaropicrin predominantly accumulates in the trichomes, and not in the apoplastic cavity fluids. Analysis of the promoter regions of CcGAO and CcCOS revealed the presence of L1-box motifs, which confers trichome-specific expression in Arabidopsis, suggesting that cynaropicrin is not only stored but also synthesized in trichomes. A transient expression of GFP fusion proteins was performed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants: the CcGAS fluorescence signal was located in the cytoplasm while the CcGAO and CcCOS localized to the endoplasmatic reticulum.

  16. PqsBC, a Condensing Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Steffen Lorenz; Li, Chan; Prasetya, Fajar; Saleem, Muhammad; Dreveny, Ingrid; Williams, Paul; Hennecke, Ulrich; Emsley, Jonas; Fetzner, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a number of alkylquinolone-type secondary metabolites best known for their antimicrobial effects and involvement in cell-cell communication. In the alkylquinolone biosynthetic pathway, the β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase III (FabH)-like enzyme PqsBC catalyzes the condensation of octanoyl-coenzyme A and 2-aminobenzoylacetate (2-ABA) to form the signal molecule 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone. PqsBC, a potential drug target, is unique for its heterodimeric arrangement and an active site different from that of canonical FabH-like enzymes. Considering the sequence dissimilarity between the subunits, a key question was how the two subunits are organized with respect to the active site. In this study, the PqsBC structure was determined to a 2 Å resolution, revealing that PqsB and PqsC have a pseudo-2-fold symmetry that unexpectedly mimics the FabH homodimer. PqsC has an active site composed of Cys-129 and His-269, and the surrounding active site cleft is hydrophobic in character and approximately twice the volume of related FabH enzymes that may be a requirement to accommodate the aromatic substrate 2-ABA. From physiological and kinetic studies, we identified 2-aminoacetophenone as a pathway-inherent competitive inhibitor of PqsBC, whose fluorescence properties could be used for in vitro binding studies. In a time-resolved setup, we demonstrated that the catalytic histidine is not involved in acyl-enzyme formation, but contributes to an acylation-dependent increase in affinity for the second substrate 2-ABA. Introduction of Asn into the PqsC active site led to significant activity toward the desamino substrate analog benzoylacetate, suggesting that the substrate 2-ABA itself supplies the asparagine-equivalent amino function that assists in catalysis. PMID:26811339

  17. Structure and Mechanism of ORF36, an Amino Sugar Oxidizing Enzyme in Everninomicin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vey, Jessica L.; Al-Mestarihi, Ahmad; Hu, Yunfeng; Funk, Michael A.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M.

    2010-12-07

    Everninomicin is a highly modified octasaccharide that belongs to the orthosomycin family of antibiotics and possesses potent Gram-positive antibiotic activity, including broad-spectrum efficacy against multidrug resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Among its distinctive structural features is a nitro sugar, L-evernitrose, analogues of which decorate a variety of natural products. Recently, we identified a nitrososynthase enzyme encoded by orf36 from Micromonospora carbonacea var. africana that mediates the flavin-dependent double oxidation of synthetically generated thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-L-epi-vancosamine to the corresponding nitroso sugar. Herein, we utilize a five-enzyme in vitro pathway both to verify that ORF36 catalyzes oxidation of biogenic TDP-L-epi-vancosamine and to determine whether ORF36 exhibits catalytic competence for any of its biosynthetic progenitors, which are candidate substrates for nitrososynthases in vivo. Progenitors solely undergo single-oxidation reactions and terminate in the hydroxylamine oxidation state. Performing the in vitro reactions in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} establishes that molecular oxygen, rather than oxygen from water, is incorporated into ORF36-generated intermediates and products and identifies an off-pathway product that correlates with the oxidation product of a progenitor substrate. The 3.15 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of ORF36 reveals a tetrameric enzyme that shares a fold with acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and class D flavin-containing monooxygenases, including the nitrososynthase KijD3. However, ORF36 and KijD3 have unusually open active sites in comparison to these related enzymes. Taken together, these studies map substrate determinants and allow the proposal of a minimal monooxygenase mechanism for amino sugar oxidation by ORF36.

  18. VTC4 is a bifunctional enzyme that affects myoinositol and ascorbate biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Torabinejad, Javad; Donahue, Janet L; Gunesekera, Bhadra N; Allen-Daniels, Matthew J; Gillaspy, Glenda E

    2009-06-01

    Myoinositol synthesis and catabolism are crucial in many multiceullar eukaryotes for the production of phosphatidylinositol signaling molecules, glycerophosphoinositide membrane anchors, cell wall pectic noncellulosic polysaccharides, and several other molecules including ascorbate. Myoinositol monophosphatase (IMP) is a major enzyme required for the synthesis of myoinositol and the breakdown of myoinositol (1,4,5)trisphosphate, a potent second messenger involved in many biological activities. It has been shown that the VTC4 enzyme from kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) has similarity to IMP and can hydrolyze l-galactose 1-phosphate (l-Gal 1-P), suggesting that this enzyme may be bifunctional and linked with two potential pathways of plant ascorbate synthesis. We describe here the kinetic comparison of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) recombinant VTC4 with d-myoinositol 3-phosphate (d-Ins 3-P) and l-Gal 1-P. Purified VTC4 has only a small difference in the V(max)/K(m) for l-Gal 1-P as compared with d-Ins 3-P and can utilize other related substrates. Inhibition by either Ca(2+) or Li(+), known to disrupt cell signaling, was the same with both l-Gal 1-P and d-Ins 3-P. To determine whether the VTC4 gene impacts myoinositol synthesis in Arabidopsis, we isolated T-DNA knockout lines of VTC4 that exhibit small perturbations in abscisic acid, salt, and cold responses. Analysis of metabolite levels in vtc4 mutants showed that less myoinositol and ascorbate accumulate in these mutants. Therefore, VTC4 is a bifunctional enzyme that impacts both myoinositol and ascorbate synthesis pathways.

  19. Transcriptome Sequencing of Gynostemma pentaphyllum to Identify Genes and Enzymes Involved in Triterpenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengtong; Qian, Jieying; Lan, Xiuwan; Chao, Naixia; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    G. pentaphyllum (Gynostemma pentaphyllum), a creeping herbaceous perennial with many important medicinal properties, is widely distributed in Asia. Gypenosides (triterpenoid saponins), the main effective components of G. pentaphyllum, are well studied. FPS (farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase), SS (squalene synthase), and SE (squalene epoxidase) are the main enzymes involved in the synthesis of triterpenoid saponins. Considering the important medicinal functions of G. pentaphyllum, it is necessary to investigate the transcriptomic information of G. pentaphyllum to facilitate future studies of transcriptional regulation. After sequencing G. pentaphyllum, we obtained 50,654,708 unigenes. Next, we used RPKM (reads per kilobases per million reads) to calculate expression of the unigenes and we performed comparison of our data to that contained in five common databases to annotate different aspects of the unigenes. Finally, we noticed that FPS, SS, and SE showed differential expression of enzymes in DESeq. Leaves showed the highest expression of FPS, SS, and SE relative to the other two tissues. Our research provides transcriptomic information of G. pentaphyllum in its natural environment and we found consistency in unigene expression, enzymes expression (FPS, SS, and SE), and the distribution of gypenosides content in G. pentaphyllum. Our results will enable future related studies of G. pentaphyllum. PMID:28097124

  20. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nannemann, David P; Birmingham, William R; Scism, Robert A; Bachmann, Brian O

    2011-05-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. 'Directed evolution' is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaigns in generating enzymes with improved catalytic parameters for new substrates from the last decade, excluding studies that aimed to select for only improved physical properties and those that lack kinetic characterization. An analysis of the trends of methodologies and their success rates from 81 qualifying examples in the literature reveals the average fold improvement for k (cat) (or V (max)), K (m) and k (cat)/K (m) to be 366-, 12- and 2548-fold, respectively, whereas the median fold improvements are 5.4, 3 and 15.6. Further analysis by enzyme class, library-generation methodology and screening methodology explores relationships between successful campaigns and the methodologies employed.

  1. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  2. Assessing directed evolution methods for the generation of biosynthetic enzymes with potential in drug biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nannemann, David P; Birmingham, William R; Scism, Robert A; Bachmann, Brian O

    2011-01-01

    To address the synthesis of increasingly structurally diverse small-molecule drugs, methods for the generation of efficient and selective biological catalysts are becoming increasingly important. ‘Directed evolution’ is an umbrella term referring to a variety of methods for improving or altering the function of enzymes using a nature-inspired twofold strategy of mutagenesis followed by selection. This article provides an objective assessment of the effectiveness of directed evolution campaigns in generating enzymes with improved catalytic parameters for new substrates from the last decade, excluding studies that aimed to select for only improved physical properties and those that lack kinetic characterization. An analysis of the trends of methodologies and their success rates from 81 qualifying examples in the literature reveals the average fold improvement for kcat (or Vmax), Km and kcat/Km to be 366-, 12- and 2548-fold, respectively, whereas the median fold improvements are 5.4, 3 and 15.6. Further analysis by enzyme class, library-generation methodology and screening methodology explores relationships between successful campaigns and the methodologies employed. PMID:21644826

  3. Propiconazole enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras famesylation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic ...

  4. A two-component enzyme complex is required for dolichol biosynthesis in tomato.

    PubMed

    Brasher, Megan I; Surmacz, Liliana; Leong, Bryan; Pitcher, Jocelyn; Swiezewska, Ewa; Pichersky, Eran; Akhtar, Tariq A

    2015-06-01

    Dolichol plays an indispensable role in the N-glycosylation of eukaryotic proteins. As proteins enter the secretory pathway they are decorated by a 'glycan', which is preassembled onto a membrane-anchored dolichol molecule embedded within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Genetic and biochemical evidence in yeast and animals indicate that a cis-prenyltransferase (CPT) is required for dolichol synthesis, but also point to other factor(s) that could be involved. In this study, RNAi-mediated suppression of one member of the tomato CPT family (SlCPT3) resulted in a ~60% decrease in dolichol content. We further show that the involvement of SlCPT3 in dolichol biosynthesis requires the participation of a distantly related partner protein, designated as CPT-binding protein (SlCPTBP), which is a close homolog of the human Nogo-B receptor. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that SlCPT3 and its partner protein interact in vivo and that both SlCPT3 and SlCPTBP are required to complement the growth defects and dolichol deficiency of the yeast dolichol mutant, rer2∆. Co-expression of SlCPT3 and SlCPTBP in yeast and in E. coli confirmed that dolichol synthase activity strictly requires both proteins. Finally, organelle isolation and in vivo localization of fluorescent protein fusions showed that both SlCPT3 and SlCPTBP localize to the ER, the site of dolichol accumulation and synthesis in eukaryotes.

  5. Domain Organization in Candida glabrata THI6, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Thiamin Biosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-15

    THI6 is a bifunctional enzyme found in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of THI6 catalyzes the ligation of the thiamin thiazole and pyrimidine moieties to form thiamin phosphate, and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the phosphorylation of 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole in a salvage pathway. In prokaryotes, thiamin phosphate synthase and 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase are separate gene products. Here we report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic THI6 along with several complexes that characterize the active sites responsible for the two chemical reactions. THI6 from Candida glabrata is a homohexamer in which the six protomers form a cage-like structure. Each protomer is composed of two domains, which are structurally homologous to their monofunctional bacterial counterparts. Two loop regions not found in the bacterial enzymes provide interactions between the two domains. The structures of different protein-ligand complexes define the thiazole and ATP binding sites of the 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole kinase domain and the thiazole phosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate binding sites of the thiamin phosphate synthase domain. Our structural studies reveal that the active sites of the two domains are 40 {angstrom} apart and are not connected by an obvious channel. Biochemical studies show 4-methyl-5-hydroxyethylthiazole phosphate is a substrate for THI6; however, adenosine diphospho-5{beta}-ethyl-4-methylthiazole-2-carboxylic acid, the product of THI4, is not a substrate for THI6. This suggests that an unidentified enzyme is necessary to produce the substrate for THI6 from the THI4 product.

  6. Identification and characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fui-Ching; Cheng, Qi; Saha, Kaushik; Heinemann, Ilka U; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Smith, Alison G

    2008-03-01

    UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase; EC 4.2.1.75) is the enzyme responsible for the formation of uroporphyrinogen III, the precursor of all cellular tetrapyrroles including haem, chlorophyll and bilins. Although UROS genes have been cloned from many organisms, the level of sequence conservation between them is low, making sequence similarity searches difficult. As an alternative approach to identify the UROS gene from plants, we used functional complementation, since this does not require conservation of primary sequence. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was constructed in which the HEM4 gene encoding UROS was deleted. This mutant was transformed with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library in a yeast expression vector and two colonies were obtained that could grow in the absence of haem. The rescuing plasmids encoded an ORF (open reading frame) of 321 amino acids which, when subcloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, was able to complement an E. coli hemD mutant defective in UROS. Final proof that the ORF encoded UROS came from the fact that the recombinant protein expressed with an N-terminal histidine-tag was found to have UROS activity. Comparison of the sequence of AtUROS (A. thaliana UROS) with the human enzyme found that the seven invariant residues previously identified were conserved, including three shown to be important for enzyme activity. Furthermore, a structure-based homology search of the protein database with AtUROS identified the human crystal structure. AtUROS has an N-terminal extension compared with orthologues from other organisms, suggesting that this might act as a targeting sequence. The precursor protein of 34 kDa translated in vitro was imported into isolated chloroplasts and processed to the mature size of 29 kDa. Confocal microscopy of plant cells transiently expressing a fusion protein of AtUROS with GFP (green fluorescent protein) confirmed that AtUROS was targeted exclusively to chloroplasts in vivo.

  7. Characterization of Two Late-Stage Enzymes Involved in Fosfomycin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Philip; Ulrich, Emily C.; Chekan, Jonathan R.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    The broad-spectrum phosphonate antibiotic fosfomycin is currently in use for clinical treatment of infections caused by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative uropathogens. The antibiotic is biosynthesized by various streptomycetes, as well as by pseudomonads. Notably, the biosynthetic strategies used by the two genera share only two steps: the first step in which the primary metabolite phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is converted to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy), and the terminal step in which 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) is converted to fosfomycin. Otherwise, distinct enzymatic paths are employed. Here, we biochemically confirm the last two steps in the fosfomycin biosynthetic pathway of Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123, showing that Psf3 carries out the reduction of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (2-OPP) to (S)-2-HPP, followed by the Psf4-catalyzed epoxidation of (S)-2-HPP to fosfomycin. Psf4 can also accept (R)-2-HPP as a substrate, but instead performs an oxidation to make 2-OPP. We show that the combined activities of Psf3 and Psf4 can be used to convert racemic 2-HPP to fosfomycin in an enantioconvergent process. X-ray structures of each enzyme with bound substrates provide insights into the stereospecificity of each conversion. These studies shed light into the reaction mechanisms of the terminal two enzymes in a distinct pathway employed by pseudomonads for the production of a potent antimicrobial agent. PMID:27977135

  8. Functional balance between enzymes in malonyl-CoA pathway for 3-hydroxypropionate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changshui; Ding, Yamei; Zhang, Rubing; Liu, Huizhou; Xian, Mo; Zhao, Guang

    2016-03-01

    3-Hydroxypropionate (3HP) is an important platform chemical, and four 3HP biosynthetic routes were reported, in which the malonyl-CoA pathway has some expected advantages but presented the lowest 3HP yield. Here, we demonstrated that this low yield was caused by a serious functional imbalance between MCR-C and MCR-N proteins, responsible for the two-step reduction of malonyl-CoA to 3HP. Then we minimized the enzyme activity imbalance by directed evolution of rate-limiting enzyme MCR-C and fine tuning of MCR-N expression level. Combined with culture conditions optimization, our engineering approaches increased the 3HP titer 270-fold, from 0.15 g/L to 40.6 g/L, representing the highest 3HP production via malonyl-CoA pathway so far. This study not only significantly improved the 3HP productivity of recombinant Escherichia coli strain, but also proved the importance of metabolic balance in a multistep biosynthetic pathway, which should be always considered in any metabolic engineering study.

  9. Biosynthesis of the earthy odorant geosmin by a bifunctional Streptomyces coelicolor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiaoyang; He, Xiaofei; Cane, David E

    2007-11-01

    Geosmin is responsible for the characteristic odor of moist soil, as well as off-flavors in drinking water and foodstuffs. Geosmin is generated from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP, 2) by an enzyme that is encoded by the SCO6073 gene in the soil organism Streptomyces coelicolor A32 (ref. 3). We have now shown that the recombinant N-terminal half of this protein catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent cyclization of FPP to germacradienol and germacrene D, while the highly homologous C-terminal domain, previously thought to be catalytically silent, catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent conversion of germacradienol to geosmin. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that the N- and C-terminal domains each harbor a distinct, independently functioning active site. A mutation in the N-terminal domain of germacradienol-geosmin synthase of a catalytically essential serine to alanine results in the conversion of FPP to a mixture of sesquiterpenes that includes an aberrant product identified as isolepidozene, which was previously suggested to be an enzyme-bound intermediate in the cyclization of FPP to germacradienol.

  10. Characterization of Two Late-Stage Enzymes Involved in Fosfomycin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Philip; Ulrich, Emily C; Chekan, Jonathan R; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Nair, Satish K

    2017-02-17

    The broad-spectrum phosphonate antibiotic fosfomycin is currently in use for clinical treatment of infections caused by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative uropathogens. The antibiotic is biosynthesized by various streptomycetes, as well as by pseudomonads. Notably, the biosynthetic strategies used by the two genera share only two steps: the first step in which primary metabolite phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) is converted to phosphonopyruvate (PnPy) and the terminal step in which 2-hydroxypropylphosphonate (2-HPP) is converted to fosfomycin. Otherwise, distinct enzymatic paths are employed. Here, we biochemically confirm the last two steps in the fosfomycin biosynthetic pathway of Pseudomonas syringae PB-5123, showing that Psf3 performs the reduction of 2-oxopropylphosphonate (2-OPP) to (S)-2-HPP, followed by the Psf4-catalyzed epoxidation of (S)-2-HPP to fosfomycin. Psf4 can also accept (R)-2-HPP as a substrate but instead performs an oxidation to make 2-OPP. We show that the combined activities of Psf3 and Psf4 can be used to convert racemic 2-HPP to fosfomycin in an enantioconvergent process. X-ray structures of each enzyme with bound substrates provide insights into the stereospecificity of each conversion. These studies shed light on the reaction mechanisms of the two terminal enzymes in a distinct pathway employed by pseudomonads for the production of a potent antimicrobial agent.

  11. Lead and PCB's in canvasback ducks: Relationship between enzyme levels and residues in blood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Perry, M.C.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples were taken for two successive years from canvasback ducks trapped in the Chesapeake Bay. The first winter (1972?1973) five plasma enzymes known to respond to organochlorine poisoning were examined. Abnormal enzyme elevations suggested that 20% of the population sampled (23/115 ducks) might contain organochlorine contaminants, but no residue analyses were performed. The second winter (1974) two of the same enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase, and a third enzyme known to be specifically inhibited by lead, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, were assayed in 95 blood samples. Blood residues of organochlorine compounds and of lead were determined in representative samples, and the correlations between residue levels and enzyme changes were examined. The enzyme bioassays in 1974 indicated that lead was a more prevalent environmental contaminant than organochlorine compounds in canvasback ducks; 17% of the blood samples had less than one-half of the normal delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, but only 11% exhibited abnormal aspartate aminotransferase or lactate dehydrogenase activities. These findings were confirmed by residue analyses that demonstrated lead concentrations four times higher than background levels, but only relatively low organochlorine concentrations. There was a highly significant inverse correlation between delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity and blood lead concentrations (P<0.01), and a weaker but significant correlation between plasma aspartate aminotransferase activity and blood PCB concentrations (P<0.05). It was apparent that delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in the blood provided a sensitive and precise estimate of lead contamination in waterfowl. In canvasback ducks 200 ppb of lead in the blood caused a 75% decrease in delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, a magnitude of enzyme inhibition that disturbs heme synthesis and is regarded as detrimental in humans.

  12. Structure of an Aspergillus fumigatus old yellow enzyme (EasA) involved in ergot alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Annemarie S.; Ellis, Ashley L.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus fumigatus old yellow enzyme (OYE) EasA reduces chano­clavine-I aldehyde to dihydrochanoclavine aldehyde and works in conjunction with festuclavine synthase at the branchpoint for ergot alkaloid pathways. The crystal structure of the FMN-loaded EasA was determined to 1.8 Å resolution. The active-site amino acids of OYE are conserved, supporting a similar mechanism for reduction of the α/β-unsaturated aldehyde. The C-terminal tail of one monomer packs into the active site of a monomer in the next asymmetric unit, which is most likely to be a crystallization artifact and not a mechanism of self-regulation. PMID:25286934

  13. Three-dimensional structure of 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase, an enzyme involved in tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nar, H; Huber, R; Heizmann, C W; Thöny, B; Bürgisser, D

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of rat liver 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 20.4% at 2.3 A resolution. 6-Pyruvoyl tetrahydrobiopterin synthase catalyses the conversion of dihydroneopterin triphosphate to 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin, the second of three enzymatic steps in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin from GTP. The functional enzyme is a hexamer of identical subunits. The 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase monomer folds into a sequential, four-stranded, antiparallel beta-sheet with a 25 residue, helix-containing insertion between strands 1 and 2 at the bottom of the molecule, and a segment between strands 2 and 3 forming a pair of antiparallel helices, layered on one side of the beta-sheet. Three 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase monomers form an unusual 12-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel by tight association between the N- and C-terminal beta-strands of two adjacent subunits. The barrel encloses a highly basic pore of 6-12 A diameter. Two trimers associate in a head-to-head fashion to form the active enzyme complex. The substrate-binding site is located close to the trimer-trimer interface and comprises residues from three monomers: A, A' and B. A metal-binding site in the substrate-binding pocket is formed by the three histidine residues 23, 48 and 50 from one 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase subunit. Close to the metal, but apparently not liganding it, are residues Cys42, Glu133 (both from A) and His89 (from B), which might serve as proton donors and acceptors during catalysis. Images PMID:8137809

  14. S-adenosyl-methionine-dependent methyltransferases: highly versatile enzymes in biocatalysis, biosynthesis and other biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Struck, Anna-Winona; Thompson, Mark L; Wong, Lu Shin; Micklefield, Jason

    2012-12-21

    S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) is a universal biological cofactor that is found in all branches of life where it plays a critical role in the transfer of methyl groups to various biomolecules, including DNA, proteins and small-molecule secondary metabolites. The methylation process thus has important implications in various disease processes and applications in industrial chemical processing. This methyl transfer is catalysed by SAM-dependent methyltransferases (MTases), which are by far the largest groups of SAM-dependent enzymes. A significant amount is now known regarding the structural biology and enzymology of these enzymes, and, consequently, there is now significant scope for the development of new MTases and SAM analogues for applications from biomolecular imaging to biocatalytic industrial processes. This review will focus on current efforts in the manipulation of class I and V SAM-dependent MTases and the use of synthetic SAM analogues, which together offer the best prospects for rational redesign towards biotechnological applications. Firstly, metabolic engineering of organisms incorporating small-molecule MTases is discussed; this can be applied in a variety of areas from the industrial bioprocessing of flavourants and antibiotics to frontier research in biofuel production and bioremediation. Secondly, the application of MTases in combination with SAM analogues is reviewed; this allows the tagging of proteins and oligonucleotides with moieties other than the methyl group. Such tagging allows the isolation of the tagged biomolecule and aids its visualisation by a range of analytical methods. The review then summarises the potential advantages of MTase-mediated chemistry and offers some future perspectives on downstream applications.

  15. Identification, functional characterization, and regulation of the enzyme responsible for floral (E)-nerolidol biosynthesis in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Green, Sol A; Chen, Xiuyin; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels J; Matich, Adam J; Wang, Mindy Y; Bunn, Barry J; Yauk, Yar-Khing; Atkinson, Ross G

    2012-03-01

    Flowers of the kiwifruit species Actinidia chinensis produce a mixture of sesquiterpenes derived from farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) and monoterpenes derived from geranyl diphosphate (GDP). The tertiary sesquiterpene alcohol (E)-nerolidol was the major emitted volatile detected by headspace analysis. Contrastingly, in solvent extracts of the flowers, unusually high amounts of (E,E)-farnesol were observed, as well as lesser amounts of (E)-nerolidol, various farnesol and farnesal isomers, and linalool. Using a genomics-based approach, a single gene (AcNES1) was identified in an A. chinensis expressed sequence tag library that had significant homology to known floral terpene synthase enzymes. In vitro characterization of recombinant AcNES1 revealed it was an enzyme that could catalyse the conversion of FDP and GDP to the respective (E)-nerolidol and linalool terpene alcohols. Enantiomeric analysis of both AcNES1 products in vitro and floral terpenes in planta showed that (S)-(E)-nerolidol was the predominant enantiomer. Real-time PCR analysis indicated peak expression of AcNES1 correlated with peak (E)-nerolidol, but not linalool accumulation in flowers. This result, together with subcellular protein localization to the cytoplasm, indicated that AcNES1 was acting as a (S)-(E)-nerolidol synthase in A. chinensis flowers. The synthesis of high (E,E)-farnesol levels appears to compete for the available pool of FDP utilized by AcNES1 for sesquiterpene biosynthesis and hence strongly influences the accumulation and emission of (E)-nerolidol in A. chinensis flowers.

  16. Homology modeling and dynamics study of aureusidin synthase--an important enzyme in aurone biosynthesis of snapdragon flower.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Pavadai; Liu, Hsuan-Liang

    2011-08-01

    Aurones, a class of plant flavonoids, provide bright yellow color on some important ornamental flowers, such as cosmos, coreopsis, and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). Recently, it has been elucidated that aureusidin synthase (AUS), a homolog of plant polyphenol oxidase (PPO), plays a key role in the yellow coloration of snapdragon flowers. In addition, it has been shown that AUS is a chalcone-specific PPO specialized for aurone biosynthesis. AUS gene has been successfully demonstrated as an attractive tool to engineer yellow flowers in blue flowers. Despite these biological studies, the structural basis for the specificity of substrate interactions of AUS remains elusive. In this study, we performed homology modeling of AUS using Grenache PPO and Sweet potato catechol oxidase (CO). An AUS-inhibitor was then developed from the initial homology model based on the CO and subsequently validated. We performed a thorough study between AUS and PTU inhibitor by means of interaction energy, which indicated the most important residues in the active site that are highly conserved. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and ligand-bound complex showed that complex is relatively stable than apo and the active sites of both systems are flexible. The results from this study provide very helpful information to understand the structure-function relationships of AUS.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of queD from Bacillus subtilis, an enzyme involved in queuosine biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicmil, Nenad Shi, Lu

    2008-02-01

    B. subtilis queD was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A diffraction data set was collected to a resolution of 3.6 Å. QueD (previously named ykvK) is one of several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the hypermodified nucleoside queuosine. Queuosine is incorporated into tRNA at position 34 of four tRNAs: tRNA{sup His}, tRNA{sup Asp}, tRNA{sup Asn} and tRNA{sup Tyr}. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of queD are described here. The recombinant protein from Bacillus subtilis was overproduced in Escherichia coli and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method from 25% PEG 600, 100 mM NaCl and sodium citrate buffer pH 5.5 at 291 K. The crystals diffract to 3.6 Å resolution and belong to the cubic space group F4{sub 1}32, with unit-cell parameter a = 240.88 Å.

  18. Biosynthesis of the red antibiotic, prodigiosin, in Serratia: identification of a novel 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole (MAP) assembly pathway, definition of the terminal condensing enzyme, and implications for undecylprodigiosin biosynthesis in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Neil R; Simonsen, Henrik T; Ahmed, Raef A A; Goldet, Gabrielle; Slater, Holly; Woodley, Louise; Leeper, Finian J; Salmond, George P C

    2005-05-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of the red-pigmented antibiotic, prodigiosin, produced by Serratia sp. is known to involve separate pathways for the production of the monopyrrole, 2-methyl-3-n-amyl-pyrrole (MAP) and the bipyrrole, 4-methoxy-2,2'-bipyrrole-5-carbaldehyde (MBC) which are then coupled in the final condensation step. We have previously reported the cloning, sequencing and heterologous expression of the pig cluster responsible for prodigiosin biosynthesis in two Serratia sp. In this article we report the creation of in-frame deletions or insertions in every biosynthetic gene in the cluster from Serratia sp. ATCC 39006. The biosynthetic intermediates accumulating in each mutant have been analysed by LC-MS, cross-feeding and genetic complementation studies. Based on these results we assign specific roles in the biosynthesis of MBC to the following Pig proteins: PigI, PigG, PigA, PigJ, PigH, PigM, PigF and PigN. We report a novel pathway for the biosynthesis of MAP, involving PigD, PigE and PigB. We also report a new chemical synthesis of MAP and one of its precursors, 3-acetyloctanal. Finally, we identify the condensing enzyme as PigC. We reassess the existing literature and discuss the significance of the results for the biosynthesis of undecylprodigiosin by the Red cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

  19. Cloning and characterization of the Streptomyces peucetius dnrQS genes encoding a daunosamine biosynthesis enzyme and a glycosyl transferase involved in daunorubicin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S L; Liu, X; Ferguson, J; Hutchinson, C R

    1995-01-01

    The dnrQS genes from the daunorubicin producer Streptomyces peucetius were characterized by DNA sequencing, complementation analysis, and gene disruption. The dnrQ gene is required for daunosamine biosynthesis, and dnrS appears to encode a glycosyltransferase for the addition of the 2,3,6-trideoxy-3-aminohexose, daunosamine, to epsilon-rhodomycinone. PMID:7592454

  20. PpASCL, a moss ortholog of anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzymes, is a hydroxyalkylpyrone synthase involved in an evolutionarily conserved sporopollenin biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Kim, Sung Soo; Posehn, Sarah E; Jepson, Christina; Kim, Sun Young; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Wee, Andrew G H; Douglas, Carl J; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2011-12-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. Recently, several Arabidopsis genes, including polyketide synthase A (PKSA), which encodes an anther-specific chalcone synthase-like enzyme (ASCL), have been shown to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis. The genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens contains putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis sporopollenin biosynthesis genes. We analyzed available P.patens expressed sequence tag (EST) data for putative moss orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes of sporopollenin biosynthesis and studied the enzymatic properties and reaction mechanism of recombinant PpASCL, the P.patens ortholog of Arabidopsis PKSA. We also generated structure models of PpASCL and Arabidopsis PKSA to study their substrate specificity. Physcomitrella patens orthologs of Arabidopsis genes for sporopollenin biosynthesis were found to be expressed in the sporophyte generation. Similarly to Arabidopsis PKSA, PpASCL condenses hydroxy fatty acyl-CoA esters with malonyl-CoA and produces hydroxyalkyl α-pyrones that probably serve as building blocks of sporopollenin. The ASCL-specific set of Gly-Gly-Ala residues predicted by the models to be located at the floor of the putative active site is proposed to serve as the opening of an acyl-binding tunnel in ASCL. These results suggest that ASCL functions together with other sporophyte-specific enzymes to provide polyhydroxylated precursors of sporopollenin in a pathway common to land plants.

  1. Heterologous expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of raucaffricine glucosidase, a plant enzyme specifically involved in Rauvolfia alkaloid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Martin; Panjikar, Santosh; Barleben, Leif; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Raucaffricine glucosidase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the plant Rauvolfia serpentina, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG4000 as precipitant. The crystals diffract to 2.3 Å resolution and belong to space group I222. Raucaffricine glucosidase (RG) is an enzyme that is specifically involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloids from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina. After heterologous expression in Escherichia coli cells, crystals of RG were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 0.3 M ammonium sulfate, 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 buffer and 11% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group I222 and diffract to 2.30 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 102.8, b = 127.3, c = 215.8 Å.

  2. Effect of lead (Pb) exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) with reference to heme biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Arun J; Bhagwat, Vinod R; Patil, Jyotsna A; Dongre, Nilima N; Ambekar, Jeevan G; Jailkhani, Rama; Das, Kusal K

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma of battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) who were occupationally exposed to lead (Pb) over a long period of time (about 15 years). This study was also aimed to determine the Pb intoxication resulted in a disturbance of heme biosynthesis in BMW group. The blood Pb level of BMW group (n = 28) was found to be in the range of 25.8 - 78.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 53.63 + 16.98) whereas in Pb unexposed control group (n = 35) the range was 2.8 - 22.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 12.52 + 4.08). The blood level (Pb-B) and urinary lead level (Pb-U) were significantly increased in BMW group as compared to unexposed control. Though activated d- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activities in BMW group did not show any significant change when compared to control group but activated / non activated erythrocyte - ALAD activities in BMW group showed a significant increase. Erythrocyte- zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), urinary daminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) and porphobilinogen (PBG-U) of BMW groups elevated significantly as compared to control. A positive correlation (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) between Pb-B and ALA-U were found in BMW group but no such significant correlation (r = 0.02, p> 1.0) were observed in control group. Hematological study revealed a significant decrease of hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (%) and other blood indices and a significant increase of total leucocytes count in BMW group in comparison to control group. The serum MDA content was significantly increased (p < 0.001) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as erythrocyte- SOD (p < 0.001) and erythrocytecatalase (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced in BMW group as compared to control group. A positive correlation (r = 0.45, p < 0.02) between Pb-B and serum MDA level was observed in BMW group (Pb-B range 25.8 - 78.0 microg / d

  3. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, David Allen

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  4. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  5. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Identification of Lead Compounds Targeting the Cathepsin B-Like Enzyme of Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Marie; Schroeder, Joerg; Heckeroth, Anja R.; Noack, Sandra; Gassel, Michael; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine peptidases have been implicated in the development and pathogenesis of Eimeria. We have identified a single-copy cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase gene in the genome database of Eimeria tenella (EtCatB). Molecular modeling of the predicted protein suggested that it differs significantly from host enzymes and could be a good drug target. EtCatB was expressed and secreted as a soluble, active, glycosylated mature enzyme from Pichia pastoris. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme confirmed that it is cathepsin B-like. Screening of a focused library against the enzyme identified three inhibitors (a nitrile, a thiosemicarbazone, and an oxazolone) that can be used as leads for novel drug discovery against Eimeria. The oxazolone scaffold is a novel cysteine peptidase inhibitor; it may thus find widespread use. PMID:22143531

  7. The Elicitation of Ethylene Biosynthesis by a Trichoderma Xylanase Is Not Related to the Cell Wall Degradation Activity of the Enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, A.; Fuchs, Y.; Anderson, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    A [beta]-1,4-endoxylanase (EIX) isolated from Trichoderma viride elicits plant defense responses in certain tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cultivars in addition to its xylan degradation activity. It was not clear whether elicitation occurs by cell wall fragments released by the enzymic activity or by the xylanase protein interacting directly with the plant cells. We used protoplasts isolated from tobacco leaves to test whether the cell wall is required for the stimulation of ethylene biosynthesis by EIX. Protoplasts of tobacco (cv Xanthi) responded to treatment with the EIX, as indicated by an increased production of ethylene and the loss of protoplast viability. Protoplasts prepared from ethylene-pretreated leaves produced more ethylene and had higher rates of cell death in response to EIX than protoplasts prepared from nonethylene-treated leaves. Protoplasts of an EIX-insensitive cultivar of tobacco (Hicks) were insensitive to high concentrations of EIX. The addition of a crude cell wall preparation to protoplasts during incubation with EIX did not enhance the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by nonsaturating as well as saturating concentrations of EIX. These data indicate that the xylanase activity of EIX is unrelated to the elicitation of ethylene biosynthesis through the production of some cell wall fragment, since the protein per se appears capable of eliciting ethylene biosynthesis in protoplasts. PMID:12231909

  8. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes.

  9. CYP719B1 is salutaridine synthase, the C-C phenol-coupling enzyme of morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Andreas; Rolf, Megan; Ziegler, Jörg; Díaz Chávez, María Luisa; Huang, Fong-Chin; Kutchan, Toni M

    2009-09-04

    Morphine is a powerful analgesic natural product produced by the opium poppy Papaver somniferum. Although formal syntheses of this alkaloid have been reported, the morphine molecule contains five stereocenters and a C-C phenol linkage that to date render a total synthesis of morphine commercially unfeasible. The C-C phenol-coupling reaction along the biosynthetic pathway to morphine in opium poppy is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450-dependent oxygenase salutaridine synthase. We report herein on the identification of salutaridine synthase as a member of the CYP719 family of cytochromes P450 during a screen of recombinant cytochromes P450 of opium poppy functionally expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells. Recombinant CYP719B1 is a highly stereo- and regioselective enzyme; of forty-one compounds tested as potential substrates, only (R)-reticuline and (R)-norreticuline resulted in formation of a product (salutaridine and norsalutaridine, respectively). To date, CYP719s have been characterized catalyzing only the formation of a methylenedioxy bridge in berberine biosynthesis (canadine synthase, CYP719A1) and in benzo[c]phenanthridine biosynthesis (stylopine synthase, CYP719A14). Previously identified phenol-coupling enzymes of plant alkaloid biosynthesis belong only to the CYP80 family of cytochromes. CYP719B1 therefore is the prototype for a new family of plant cytochromes P450 that catalyze formation of a phenol-couple.

  10. Biosynthesis of Sesterterpenes, Head-to-Tail Triterpenes, and Sesquarterpenes in Bacillus clausii: Identification of Multifunctional Enzymes and Analysis of Isoprenoid Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Daijiro; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Mizuki; Totsuka, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sato, Tsutomu

    2015-06-15

    We performed functional analysis of recombinant enzymes and analysis of isoprenoid metabolites in Bacillus clausii to gain insights into the biosynthesis of rare terpenoid groups of sesterterpenes, head-to-tail triterpenes, and sesquarterpenes. We have identified an (all-E)-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (E-IDS) homologue as a trifunctional geranylfarnesyl diphosphate (GFPP)/hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP)/heptaprenyl diphosphate (HepPP) synthase. In addition, we have redefined the function of a tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue as that of a trifunctional sesterterpene/triterpene/sesquarterpene synthase. This study has revealed that GFPP, HexPP, and HepPP, intermediates of two isoprenoid pathways (acyclic terpenes and menaquinones), are biosynthesized by one trifunctional E-IDS. In addition, GFPP/HexPP and HepPP are the primary substrates for the biosynthesis of acyclic terpenes and menaquinone-7, respectively.

  11. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus capsule biosynthesis pathway in vitro: characterization of the UDP-GlcNAc C6 dehydratases CapD and CapE and identification of enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjin; Ulm, Hannah; Rausch, Marvin; Li, Xue; O'Riordan, Katie; Lee, Jean C; Schneider, Tanja; Müller, Christa E

    2014-11-01

    Polysaccharide capsules significantly contribute to virulence of invasive pathogens, and inhibition of capsule biosynthesis may offer a valuable strategy for novel anti-infective treatment. We purified and characterized the enzymes CapD and CapE of the Staphylococcus aureus serotype 5 biosynthesis cluster, which catalyze the first steps in the synthesis of the soluble capsule precursors UDP-D-FucNAc and UDP-L-FucNAc, respectively. CapD is an integral membrane protein and was obtained for the first time in a purified, active form. A capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based method applying micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) coupled with UV detection at 260 nm was developed for functional characterization of the enzymes using a fused-silica capillary, electrokinetic injection, and dynamic coating with polybrene at pH 12.4. The limits of detection for the CapD and CapE products UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-α-D-xylo-hex-4-ulose and UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-β-L-arabino-hex-4-ulose, respectively, were below 1 μM. Using this new, robust and sensitive method we performed kinetic studies for CapD and CapE and screened a compound library in search for enzyme inhibitors. Several active compounds were identified and characterized, including suramin (IC50 at CapE 1.82 μM) and ampicillin (IC50 at CapD 40.1 μM). Furthermore, the cell wall precursors UDP-D-MurNAc-pentapeptide and lipid II appear to function as inhibitors of CapD enzymatic activity, suggesting an integrated mechanism of regulation for cell envelope biosynthesis pathways in S. aureus. Corroborating the in vitro findings, staphylococcal cells grown in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin displayed drastically reduced CP production. Our studies contribute to a profound understanding of the capsule biosynthesis in pathogenic bacteria. This approach may lead to the identification of novel anti-virulence and antibiotic drugs.

  12. Effects of lead on the activities of antioxidant enzymes in watercress, Nasturtium officinale R. Br.

    PubMed

    Keser, Gonca; Saygideger, Saadet

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the oxidative effects of lead with increased concentrations by the determination of antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and ascorbate peroxidase (AP)) and lipid peroxidation levels in the stem and leaves of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) which was exposed to lead acetate, Pb (CH3COOH)2 regime with concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200, 250, and 500 mg/L Pb in a hydroponic culture. After 14 days, accumulation of lipid peroxidation in stems and leaves and changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes were determined spectrophotometrically. The maximum accumulation was observed in the highest concentration group. In this group, lipid peroxidation levels were three times higher than the control group in the stem and leaves. The highest induction in SOD and GR activities were determined at 200 mg/L Pb group in stem, whereas CAT and AP activities were higher than other groups at the concentration of 250 and 100 mg/L Pb, respectively. The increase in CAT activity was found to be greater than GR, SOD, and AP activities in stems of watercress under Pb treatment. Both lead accumulation and antioxidant enzyme responses were higher in stems than in leaves. The results of the present study suggested that the induction in antioxidant responses could be occurring as an adaptive mechanism to the oxidative potential of lead accumulation.

  13. Manganese-induced regulations in growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in fragrant rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Ashraf, Umair; Tian, Hua; Mo, Zhaowen; Pan, Shenggang; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Duan, Meiyang; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-06-01

    Micro-nutrient application is essential for normal plant growth while a little is known about manganese (Mn)-induced regulations in morpho-physiological attributes, aroma formation and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2-AP) biosynthesis in aromatic rice. Present study aimed to examine the influence of four levels of Mn i.e., Mn1 (100 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn2 (150 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), Mn3 (200 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)), and Mn4 (250 mg MnSO4 pot(-1)) on the growth, yield formation, quality characters, rice aroma and enzyme involved in 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline biosynthesis in two fragrant rice cultivars i.e., Meixiangzhan and Nongxiang 18. Pots without Mn application were served as control (Ck). Each pot contained 15 kg of soil. Effects on agronomic characters, quality attributes, 2-AP contents and enzymes involved in 2-AP biosynthesis have been studied in early and late season rice. Results depicted that Mn improved rice growth, yield and related characters, and some quality attributes significantly. It further up-regulated proline, pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) (precursors of 2-AP), soluble proteins and activities of proline dehydrogenase (ProDH), Δ(1) pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid synthetase (P5CS) ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) that led to enhanced 2-AP production in rice grains. Moreover, higher Mn levels resulted in increased grain Mn contents in both rice cultivars. Along with growth and yield improvement, Mn application significantly improved rice aromatic contents. Overall, Nongxiang 18 accumulated more 2-AP contents than Meixiangzhan in both seasons under Mn application. This study further explored the importance of Mn in rice aroma formation and signifies that micro-nutrients can play significant roles in rice aroma synthesis; however, intensive studies at molecular levels are still needed to understand the exact mechanisms of Mn to improve rice aroma formation.

  14. Biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Lactobacillus casei gene for the D-alanine-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, M P; Neuhaus, F C

    1992-01-01

    The D-alanine-activating enzyme (Dae; EC 6.3.2.4) encoded by the dae gene from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469 is a cytosolic protein essential for the formation of the D-alanyl esters of membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. The gene has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli, an organism which does not possess Dae activity. The open reading frame is 1,518 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 55.867 kDa, a value in agreement with the 56 kDa obtained by electrophoresis. A putative promoter and ribosome-binding site immediately precede the dae gene. A second open reading frame contiguous with the dae gene has also been partially sequenced. The organization of these genetic elements suggests that more than one enzyme necessary for the biosynthesis of D-alanyl-lipoteichoic acid may be present in this operon. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the dae gene identified three regions with significant homology to proteins in the following groups of ATP-utilizing enzymes: (i) the acid-thiol ligases, (ii) the activating enzymes for the biosynthesis of enterobactin, and (iii) the synthetases for tyrocidine, gramicidin S, and penicillin. From these comparisons, a common motif (GXXGXPK) has been identified that is conserved in the 19 protein domains analyzed. This motif may represent the phosphate-binding loop of an ATP-binding site for this class of enzymes. A DNA fragment (1,568 nucleotides) containing the dae gene and its putative ribosome-binding site has been subcloned and expressed in E. coli. Approximately 0.5% of the total cell protein is active Dae, whereas 21% is in the form of inclusion bodies. The isolation of this minimal fragment without a native promoter sequence provides the basis for designing a genetic system for modulating the D-alanine ester content of lipoteichoic acid. PMID:1385594

  15. Post-translational enzyme modification by the phosphopantetheinyl transferase is required for lysine and penicillin biosynthesis but not for roquefortine or fatty acid formation in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Ullán, Ricardo V; Velasco-Conde, Tania; Godio, Ramiro P; Teijeira, Fernando; Vaca, Inmaculada; Feltrer, Raúl; Kosalková, Katarina; Mauriz, Elba; Martín, Juan F

    2008-10-15

    NRPSs (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases) and PKSs (polyketide synthases) require post-translational phosphopantetheinylation to become active. This reaction is catalysed by a PPTase (4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase). The ppt gene of Penicillium chrysogenum, encoding a protein that shares 50% similarity with the stand-alone large PPTases, has been cloned. This gene is present as a single copy in the genome of the wild-type and high-penicillin-producing strains (containing multiple copies of the penicillin gene cluster). Amplification of the ppt gene produced increases in isopenicillin N and benzylpenicillin biosynthesis. A PPTase-defective mutant (Wis54-PPT(-)) was obtained. It required lysine and lacked pigment and penicillin production, but it still synthesized normal levels of roquefortine. The biosynthesis of roquefortine does not appear to involve PPTase-mediated modification of the synthesizing enzymes. The PPT(-) mutant did not require fatty acids, which indicates that activation of the fatty acid synthase is performed by a different PPTase. Complementation of Wis54-PPT(-) with the ppt gene restored lysine biosynthesis, pigmentation and penicillin production, which demonstrates the wide range of processes controlled by this gene.

  16. The Two-step Biosynthesis of Cyclic Peptides from Linear Precursors in a Member of the Plant Family Caryophyllaceae Involves Cyclization by a Serine Protease-like Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Carla J. S.; Pujara, Pareshkumar T.; Reed, Darwin W.; Chiwocha, Shiela; Zhang, Haixia; Covello, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    Caryophyllaceae-type cyclic peptides (CPs) of 5–12 proteinogenic amino acids occur in 10 plant families. In Saponaria vaccaria (Caryophyllaceae), they have been shown to be formed from linear peptide precursors derived from ribosomal translation. There is also evidence for such precursors in other members of the Caryophyllaceae, Rutaceae, and Linaceae families. The biosynthesis of CP in the developing seeds of S. vaccaria was investigated with respect to the enzymes involved in precursor processing. Through biochemical assays with seed extracts and synthetic peptides, an enzyme named oligopeptidase 1 (OLP1) was found that catalyzes the cleavage of intermediates at the N terminus of the incipient CP. A second enzyme, peptide cyclase 1 (PCY1), which was separated chromatographically from OLP1, was found to act on the product of OLP1, giving rise to a cyclic peptide and concomitant removal of a C-terminal flanking sequence. PCY1 was partially purified, and using the methods of proteomics, a full-length cDNA clone encoding an enzyme matching the properties of PCY1 was obtained. The substrate specificity of purified recombinant PCY1, believed to be the first cloned plant enzyme whose function is peptide cyclization, was tested with synthetic peptides. The results are discussed in the light of CP biosynthetic systems of other organisms. PMID:23486480

  17. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal region of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, a key protein in the biosynthesis of ethylene, results in catalytically hyperactive, monomeric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Mattoo, A K

    1994-03-04

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase is a key enzyme regulating biosynthesis of the plant hormone ethylene. The expression of an enzymatically active, wound-inducible tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. cv Pik-Red) ACC synthase (485 amino acids long) in a heterologous Escherichia coli system allowed us to study the importance of hypervariable COOH terminus in enzymatic activity and protein conformation. We constructed several deletion mutants of the gene, expressed these in E. coli, purified the protein products to apparent homogeneity, and analyzed both conformation and enzyme kinetic parameters of the wild-type and truncated ACC syntheses. Deletion of the COOH terminus through Arg429 results in complete inactivation of the enzyme. Deletion of 46-52 amino acids from the COOH terminus results in an enzyme that has nine times higher affinity for the substrate S-adenosylmethionine than the wild-type enzyme. The highly efficient, truncated ACC synthase was found to be a monomer of 52 +/- 1.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration, whereas the wild-type ACC synthase, analyzed under similar conditions, is a dimer. These results demonstrate that the non-conserved COOH terminus of ACC synthase affects its enzymatic function as well as dimerization.

  18. A cis/trans Test of the Effect of the First Enzyme for Histidine Biosynthesis on Regulation of the Histidine Operon

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, John S.; Ballesteros, Antonio O.; Meyers, Marilyn; Soria, Marco; Goldberger, Robert F.

    1973-01-01

    Previous studies showed that when triazolalanine was added to a derepressed culture of a histidine auxotroph, repression of the histidine operon occurred as though histidine had been added (6). However, when triazolalanine was added to a derepressed culture of a strain with a mutation in the first gene of the histidine operon which rendered the first enzyme for histidine biosynthesis resistant to inhibition by histidine, repression did not occur. The studies reported here represent a cis/trans test of this effect of mutations to feedback resistance. Using specially constructed merodiploid strains, we were able to show that the wild-type allele is dominant to the mutant (feedback resistant) allele and that the effect operates in trans. We conclude that the enzyme encoded by the first gene of the histidine operon exerts its regulatory effect on the operon not by acting locally at its site of synthesis, but by acting as a freely diffusible protein. PMID:4572718

  19. Exploring the Chemical Space around 8-Mercaptoguanine as a Route to New Inhibitors of the Folate Biosynthesis Enzyme HPPK

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Sandeep; Barlow, Nicholas; Dolezal, Olan; Hattarki, Meghan K.; Newman, Janet; Peat, Thomas S.; Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D.

    2013-01-01

    As the second essential enzyme of the folate biosynthetic pathway, the potential antimicrobial target, HPPK (6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase), catalyzes the Mg2+-dependant transfer of pyrophosphate from the cofactor (ATP) to the substrate, 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin. Recently, we showed that 8-mercaptoguanine (8-MG) bound at the substrate site (KD ∼13 µM), inhibited the S. aureus enzyme (SaHPPK) (IC50 ∼ 41 µM), and determined the structure of the SaHPPK/8-MG complex. Here we present the synthesis of a series of guanine derivatives, together with their HPPK binding affinities, as determined by SPR and ITC analysis. The binding mode of the most potent was investigated using 2D NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The results indicate, firstly, that the SH group of 8-MG makes a significant contribution to the free energy of binding. Secondly, direct N9 substitution, or tautomerization arising from N7 substitution in some cases, leads to a dramatic reduction in affinity due to loss of a critical N9-H···Val46 hydrogen bond, combined with the limited space available around the N9 position. The water-filled pocket under the N7 position is significantly more tolerant of substitution, with a hydroxyl ethyl 8-MG derivative attached to N7 (compound 21a) exhibiting an affinity for the apo enzyme comparable to the parent compound (KD ∼ 12 µM). In contrast to 8-MG, however, 21a displays competitive binding with the ATP cofactor, as judged by NMR and SPR analysis. The 1.85 Å X-ray structure of the SaHPPK/21a complex confirms that extension from the N7 position towards the Mg2+-binding site, which affords the only tractable route out from the pterin-binding pocket. Promising strategies for the creation of more potent binders might therefore include the introduction of groups capable of interacting with the Mg2+ centres or Mg2+ -binding residues, as well as the development of bitopic inhibitors featuring 8-MG linked to a moiety

  20. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  1. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  2. Biosynthesis of Hemes.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2007-04-01

    This review is concerned specifically with the structures and biosynthesis of hemes in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. However, inasmuch as all tetrapyrroles share a common biosynthetic pathway, much of the material covered here is applicable to tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in other organisms. Conversely, much of the available information about tetrapyrrole biosynthesis has been gained from studies of other organisms, such as plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and anoxygenic phototrophs, which synthesize large quantities of these compounds. This information is applicable to E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. Hemes play important roles as enzyme prosthetic groups in mineral nutrition, redox metabolism, and gas-and redox-modulated signal transduction. The biosynthetic steps from the earliest universal precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), to protoporphyrin IX-based hemes constitute the major, common portion of the pathway, and other steps leading to specific groups of products can be considered branches off the main axis. Porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (PBGS; also known as ALA dehydratase) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation of two ALA molecules to form PBG, with the release of two molecules of H2O. Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPX) catalyzes the removal of six electrons from the tetrapyrrole macrocycle to form protoporphyrin IX in the last biosynthetic step that is common to hemes and chlorophylls. Several lines of evidence converge to support a regulatory model in which the cellular level of available or free protoheme controls the rate of heme synthesis at the level of the first step unique to heme synthesis, the formation of GSA by the action of GTR.

  3. Effect of environmental exposures to lead and cadmium on human lymphocytic detoxifying enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, S.J.; Narurkar, L.M.; Narurkar, M.V. )

    1994-09-01

    Lead (Pb) is among the most toxic heavy elements in the atmosphere. Aerosol lead enters the human blood stream by way of the respiratory tract and indirectly, by surface disposition in the alimentary tract followed by adsorption. Lead pollution is also known to occur through its presence in petrol, pain, glazed vessels and solder. Atmospheric lead pollution may be predominantly high around factories manufacturing Pb alloys. Lead toxicity is associated with inhibition of [alpha]-aminolevulinic acid dehydrase (ALAD) activity, rise in the blood porphyrin, inhibition of ATPase in erthrocytes, decreased blood haemoglobin and anemia. Elevated lead concentrations in pregnant women have been shown to cause hypertension and birth defects. Lead is also known to interact with other elements such as Fe, Zn, Ca and Cu in biological systems. Cadmium (Cd) is not essential for human body. It enters the human environment as a contaminant. Human intake of Cd is chiefly through the food chain (about 400-500 [mu]g/wk). Analysis of neuropsy material shows that smokers accumulate much more Cd than nonsmokers. Chronic Cd poisoning produces proteinuere and affects the proximal tubules of kidney, causing the formation of kidney stones. The reported hypertensive effect of Cd in man has been associated with high Cd/Zn ratio in kidney. Studies on air pollution have shown that Cd concentration in air could be positively correlated with heart disease, hypertension and arteriosclerosis. The present investigation was aimed at assessing the usefulness of human lymphocytic detoxicating enzyme activities and their ratios in an assessment of human health-risks during environmental exposures to Pb and Cd. The human subjects investigated comprised those exposed to highly contaminated lead and cadmium areas in the state of Maharashtra, India. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Self-cytoplasmic DNA upregulates the mutator enzyme APOBEC3A leading to chromosomal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Mussil, Bianka; Laude, Hélène; Caval, Vincent; Berry, Noémie; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Thiers, Valérie; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-18

    Foreign and self-cytoplasmic DNA are recognized by numerous DNA sensor molecules leading to the production of type I interferons. Such DNA agonists should be degraded otherwise cells would be chronically stressed. Most human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases can initiate catabolism of cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA. Using the human myeloid cell line THP-1 with an interferon inducible APOBEC3A gene, we show that cytoplasmic DNA triggers interferon α and β production through the RNA polymerase III transcription/RIG-I pathway leading to massive upregulation of APOBEC3A By catalyzing C→U editing in single stranded DNA fragments, the enzyme prevents them from re-annealing so attenuating the danger signal. The price to pay is chromosomal DNA damage in the form of CG→TA mutations and double stranded DNA breaks which, in the context of chronic inflammation, could drive cells down the path toward cancer.

  5. Cytochrome P450 3A Enzymes Catalyze the O6-Demethylation of Thebaine, a Key Step in Endogenous Mammalian Morphine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kramlinger, Valerie M; Alvarado Rojas, Mónica; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Guengerich, F Peter

    2015-08-14

    Morphine, first characterized in opium from the poppy Papaver somniferum, is one of the strongest known analgesics. Endogenous morphine has been identified in several mammalian cells and tissues. The synthetic pathway of morphine in the opium poppy has been elucidated. The presence of common intermediates in plants and mammals suggests that biosynthesis occurs through similar pathways (beginning with the amino acid L-tyrosine), and the pathway has been completely delineated in plants. Some of the enzymes in the mammalian pathway have been identified and characterized. Two of the latter steps in the morphine biosynthesis pathway are demethylation of thebaine at the O(3)- and the O(6)-positions, the latter of which has been difficult to demonstrate. The plant enzymes responsible for both the O(3)-demethylation and the O(6)-demethylation are members of the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family. Previous studies showed that human cytochrome P450 (P450) 2D6 can catalyze thebaine O(3)-demethylation. We report that demethylation of thebaine at the O(6)-position is selectively catalyzed by human P450s 3A4 and 3A5, with the latter being more efficient, and rat P450 3A2. Our results do not support O(6)-demethylation of thebaine by an Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. In rat brain microsomes, O(6)-demethylation was inhibited by ketoconazole, but not sulfaphenazole, suggesting that P450 3A enzymes are responsible for this activity in the brain. An alternate pathway to morphine, oripavine O(6)-demethylation, was not detected. The major enzymatic steps in mammalian morphine synthesis have now been identified.

  6. The effect of haem biosynthesis inhibitors and inducers on intestinal iron absorption and liver haem biosynthetic enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Laftah, A.H.; Simpson, R.J. Peters, T.J.; Raja, K.B.

    2008-06-15

    The relation between haem biosynthesis and intestinal iron absorption is not well understood, we therefore investigated the effect of compounds that alter haem metabolism on duodenal iron absorption. CD1 mice were treated with either an inhibitor (succinyl acetone (SA)) or stimulator (2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (AIA)) of haem biosynthesis. 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) dehydratase and urinary ALA and porphobilinogen (PBG) levels, were determined. Intestinal iron absorption was assayed with in vivo and in vitro techniques. Liver hepcidin (Hamp1) and duodenal iron transporter mRNA levels were measured using RT-PCR. AIA caused increased hepatic ALA synthase (1.6-fold) and ALA dehydratase (1.4-fold, both p < 0.005) activities and increased urinary ALA and PBG excretion (2.1- and 1.4-fold, p < 0.005, p < 0.05, respectively). In vivo intestinal iron absorption was reduced to 49% of control (p < 0.005). Mice treated with SA showed decreased urinary ALA and PBG levels (75 and 55% control, both p < 0.005) and reductions in both ALA synthase and ALA dehydratase activities (77 and 56% control, p < 0.05, p < 0.005, respectively) in the liver. Liver and duodenal haem and cytochrome oxidase levels were not significantly decreased. Iron absorption was enhanced (1.26-fold, p < 0.05) and hepatic Hamp1 mRNA was reduced (53% of control, p < 0.05). In vitro duodenal iron uptake after mice were injected with SA also demonstrated an increase in Fe(III) reduction and uptake (1.27- and 1.41-fold, p < 0.01 respectively). Simultaneous injections of SA and ALA blocked the enhancing effect on iron absorption seen with SA alone. We conclude that alterations in haem biosynthesis can influence iron absorption and in particular, the intermediate ALA seems to be an inhibitor of iron absorption.

  7. A rice semi-dwarf gene, Tan-Ginbozu (D35), encodes the gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme, ent-kaurene oxidase.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hironori; Tatsumi, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Otomo, Kazuko; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Kitano, Hidemi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Ichihara, Shigeyuki; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2004-03-01

    A rice (Oryza sativa L.) semi-dwarf cultivar, Tan-Ginbozu (d35Tan-Ginbozu), contributed to the increase in crop productivity in Japan in the 1950s. Previous studies suggested that the semi-dwarf stature of d35Tan-Ginbozu is caused by a defective early step of gibberellin biosynthesis, which is catalyzed by ent-kaurene oxidase (KO). To study the molecular characteristics of d35Tan-Ginbozu, we isolated 5 KO-like (KOL) genes from the rice genome, which encoded proteins highly homologous to Arabidopsis and pumpkin KOs. The genes (OsKOL1 to 5) were arranged as tandem repeats in the same direction within a 120 kb sequence. Expression analysis revealed that OsKOL2 and OsKOL4 were actively transcribed in various organs, while OsKOL1 and OsKOL5 were expressed only at low levels; OsKOL3 may be a pseudogene. Sequence analysis and complementation experiments demonstrated that OsKOL2 corresponds to D35. Homozygote with null alleles of D35 showed a severe dwarf phenotype; therefore, d35Tan-Ginbozu is a weak allele of D35. Introduction of OsKOL4 into d35Tan-Ginbozu did not rescue its dwarf phenotype, indicating that OsKOL4 is not involved in GA biosynthesis. OsKOL4 and OsKOL5 are likely to take part in phytoalexin biosynthesis, because their expression was promoted by UV irradiation and/or elicitor treatment. Comparing d35Tan-Ginbozu with other high yielding cultivars, we discuss strategies to produce culm architectures suitable for high crop yield by decreasing GA levels.

  8. Importance of the Long-Chain Fatty Acid Beta-Hydroxylating Cytochrome P450 Enzyme YbdT for Lipopeptide Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis Strain OKB105

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Noha H.; Wofford, Neil; McInerney, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus species produce extracellular, surface-active lipopeptides such as surfactin that have wide applications in industry and medicine. The steps involved in the synthesis of 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates needed for surfactin biosynthesis are not understood. Cell-free extracts of Bacillus subtilis strain OKB105 synthesized lipopeptide biosurfactants in presence of l-amino acids, myristic acid, coenzyme A, ATP, and H2O2, which suggested that 3-hydroxylation occurs prior to CoA ligation of the long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). We hypothesized that YbdT, a cytochrome P450 enzyme known to beta-hydroxylate LCFAs, functions to form 3-hydroxy fatty acids for lipopeptide biosynthesis. An in-frame mutation of ybdT was constructed and the resulting mutant strain (NHY1) produced predominantly non-hydroxylated lipopeptide with diminished biosurfactant and beta-hemolytic activities. Mass spectrometry showed that 95.6% of the fatty acids in the NHY1 biosurfactant were non-hydroxylated compared to only ∼61% in the OKB105 biosurfactant. Cell-free extracts of the NHY1 synthesized surfactin containing 3-hydroxymyristic acid from 3-hydroxymyristoyl-CoA at a specific activity similar to that of the wild type (17 ± 2 versus 17.4 ± 6 ng biosurfactant min−1·ng·protein−1, respectively). These results showed that the mutation did not affect any function needed to synthesize surfactin once the 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA substrate was formed and that YbdT functions to supply 3-hydroxy fatty acid for surfactin biosynthesis. The fact that YbdT is a peroxidase could explain why biosurfactant production is rarely observed in anaerobically grown Bacillus species. Manipulation of LCFA specificity of YbdT could provide a new route to produce biosurfactants with activities tailored to specific functions. PMID:21673922

  9. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  10. Beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide induced activation of four enzymes responsible for N-p-coumaroyloctopamine biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv.) tuber tissue.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Miyagawa, H; Ueno, T

    2000-01-01

    Potato tuber disks, when treated with laminarin, a beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide from Laminaria digitata, accumulate a hydroxycinnamoyl amide compound, N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO). The biosynthesis of p-CO was investigated by feeding experiments, in order to show that the precursors of N-p-coumaroyl and octopamine moieties of p-CO are L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, respectively. The treatment of potato tuber tissue with laminarin resulted in elevated activities of four enzymes which are putatively involved in p-CO biosynthesis: phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5), 4-hydroxycinnamic acid:CoA ligase (4CL; EC 6.2.1.12), hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-(hydroxycinnamoyl)transferase (THT; EC 2.3.1.110) and tyrosine decarboxylase (TyrDC; EC 4.1.1.25). Among these, the response of TyrDC was specific to laminarin treatment, thus indicating that the regulation of TyrDC activity is critical for the accumulation of p-CO in potato tuber tissue.

  11. Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis, is localized at the pericycle of the root.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Hayashi, A; Amano, Y; Kohno, J; Iwanari, H; Usuda, S; Yamada, Y

    1991-03-05

    Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H; EC 1.14.11.11) catalyzes the first reaction in the biosynthetic pathway from hyoscyamine to scopolamine in several solanaceous plants. Four monoclonal antibodies were raised against H6H purified from cultured roots of Hyoscyamus niger. The IgG1 antibody mAb5 inhibited H6H activities present in cell-free extracts of H. niger roots and specifically recognized 38-40-kDa proteins from six different scopolamine-producing plant species in Western blot analysis after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The other three monoclonal antibodies all recognized SDS-denatured H6H protein from Hyoscyamus species, but did not bind to native H6H. Western blot analysis of protein extracts from various tissues of H. niger using these antibodies showed that H6H is abundant in cultured roots, present in plant roots, but absent in leaf, stem, calyx, cultured cells, and cultured shoots. Immunohistochemical studies using monoclonal antibody and immunogold-silver enhancement detected H6H only in the pericycle cells of the young root in several scopolamine-producing plants. Mature roots that underwent secondary growth and lacked the pericycle did not react with the antibody. This pericycle-specific localization of scopolamine biosynthesis provides an anatomical explanation for the tissue-specific biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids and may be important for translocation of tropane alkaloids from the root to the aerial parts.

  12. Biosynthesis of the High-Value Plant Secondary Product Benzyl Isothiocyanate via Functional Expression of Multiple Heterologous Enzymes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feixia; Yang, Han; Wang, Limin; Yu, Bo

    2016-12-16

    Plants produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites that are highly nutraceutically and pharmaceutically important. Isothiocyanates, which are found abundantly in cruciferous vegetables, are believed to reduce the risk of several types of cancers and cardiovascular diseases. The challenges arising from the structural diversity and complex chemistry of these compounds have spurred great interest in producing them in large amounts in microbes. In this study, we aimed to synthesize benzyl isothiocyanate in Escherichia coli via gene mining, pathway engineering, and protein modification. Two chimeric cytochrome P450 enzymes were constructed and functionally expressed in E. coli. The E. coli cystathionine β-lyase was used to replace the plant-derived C-S lyase; its active form cannot be expressed in E. coli. Suitable desulfoglucosinolate:PAPS sulfotransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Col-0 and myrosinase from Brevicoryne brassicae were successfully mined from the database. Biosynthesis of benzyl isothiocyanate by the combined expression of the optimized enzymes in vitro was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. This study provided a proof of concept for the production of benzyl isothiocyanate by microbially produced enzymes and, importantly, laid the groundwork for further metabolic engineering of microbial cells for the production of isothiocyanates.

  13. Biosynthesis of the enzymes of the cellulase system by T. Reesei QM 9414 in the presence of sophorose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritzali, M.

    1982-12-01

    As conventional, nonrenewable energy sources are rapidly depleted and it was necessary to search for alternative sources of energy. It was increasingly apparent that biomass and waste are alternatives well worth exploring. The sources of biomass and wastes that considered for conversion to useful products are quite diverse, but the most abundant constituent of almost every type is cellulose. Cellulose is cleanly converted to soluble fermentable sugars enzymatically, and cellulose enzymes were isolated from a number of microbial sources. It is generally agreed that the most effective system of enzymes for the conversion of cellulose to glucose is produced by species of the imperfect fungus Trichoderma. The mutant organism Trichoderma reesei QM 9414 is among the best producers of high levels of enzymes; these are extracellular and have carbonhydrate covalently bound to the peptide. Trichoderma produces three types of enzymes which, in a sequential and cooperative manner, convert cellulose to soluble oligosaccharides and glucose.

  14. Insights into substrate specificity of geranylgeranyl reductases revealed by the structure of digeranylgeranylglycerophospholipid reductase from Thermoplasma acidophilum, an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Eguchi, Tadashi; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Rife, Christopher L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Weekes, Dana; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Archaeal membrane lipids consist of branched, saturated hydrocarbons distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes. Digeranylgeranylglycerophospholipid reductase (DGGR) catalyzes the hydrogenation process that converts unsaturated 2,3-di-O-geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate to saturated 2,3-di-O-phytanylglyceryl phosphate as a critical step in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids. The saturation of hydrocarbon chains confers the ability to resist hydrolysis and oxidation and helps archaea withstand extreme conditions. DGGR is a member of the geranylgeranyl reductase (GGR) family that is also widely distributed in bacteria and plants, where the family members are involved in the biosynthesis of photosynthetic pigments. We have determined the crystal structure of DGGR from the thermophilic heterotrophic archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum at 1.6 Å resolution, in complex with FAD and a bacterial lipid. The DGGR structure can be assigned to the well-studied, para-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) SCOP superfamily of flavoproteins that include many aromatic hydroxylases and other enzymes with diverse functions. In the DGGR complex, FAD adopts the IN conformation (closed) previously observed in other PHBH flavoproteins. DGGR contains a large substrate-binding site that extends across the entire ligand-binding domain. Electron density corresponding to a bacterial lipid was found within this cavity. The cavity consists of a large opening that tapers down to two narrow curved tunnels that closely mimic the shape of the preferred substrate. We identified a sequence motif, PxxYxWxFP, that defines a specificity pocket in the structure and precisely aligns the double bond of the geranyl group with respect to the FAD cofactor, thus providing a structural basis for the substrate specificity of GGRs. DGGR is likely to share a common mechanism with other PHBH enzymes in which FAD switches between two conformations that correspond to the reductive and oxidative half

  15. Echinomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Nakazawa, Takehito; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    Echinomycin is an antitumor antibiotic secondary metabolite isolated from streptomycetes, whose core structure is biosynthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). The echinomycin biosynthetic pathway was successfully reconstituted in Escherichia coli. NRPS often contains a thioesterase domain at its C terminus for cyclorelease of the elongating peptide chain. Those thioesterase domains were shown to exhibit significant substrate tolerance. More recently, an oxidoreductase Ecm17, which forms the disulfide bridge in triostin A, was characterized. Surprisingly, an unrelated disulfide-forming enzyme GliT for gliotoxin biosynthesis was also able to catalyze the same reaction, providing another example of broad substrate specificity in secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes. Those promiscuous catalysts can be a valuable tool in generating diversity in natural products analogs we can produce heterologously.

  16. Improved mortality of the Formosan subterranean termite by fungi, when amended with cuticle-degrading enzymes or eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formosan subterranean termites (FST) were exposed to spores of the fungus Beauveria pseudobassiana (Bpb) strain 8046 to determine virulence of the fungus. Once Bpb was determined to cause mortality of FST it was combined with enzymes capable of degrading the insect cuticle to measure the potential ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of tryptophan transaminase and indolepyruvate C-methyltransferase. Enzymes involved in indolmycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Speedie, M K; Hornemann, U; Floss, H G

    1975-10-10

    Two enzymes, tryptophan transaminase and indolepyruvate C-methyltransferase, which are active in the initial steps of the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic indolmycin, have been detected and partially purified from cell-free extracts of Streptomyces griseus. The transaminase has been purified 3-fold by ammonium sulfate fractionation. At this stage of purification, it catalyzes the alpha-ketoglutarate and pyridoxal phosphate-dependent transamination of L-tryptophan, 3-methyltryptophan, L-pphenylalanine, and L-tyrosine. The C-methyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to position 3 of the aliphatic side chain of indolepyruvate. No cofactors are required. The C-methyltransferase has been purified 110-fold by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, DEAE-Sephadex column chromotography, and Bio-Gel A-5m gel filtration. The enzyme has a broad pH optimum of 7.5 to 8.5. A molecular weight of 55,000 +/- 5,000 has been determined by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration with reference proteins and a molecular weight of 58,000 +/- 8,000 has been determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The enzyme is relatively stable at temperatures of 0-5 degrees but is destroyed by freezing or by heating. The C-methyltransferase is inhibited strongly by the thiol reagents p-chloromercuribenzoate and N-ethylmaleimide. The Zn2+ and Fe2+ chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2'-bipyridine also inhibit the enzyme activity but EDTA does not. Michaelis-Menten constants have been determined for the 110-fold purified enzyme as 1.2 X 10(-5) M for S-adenosylmethionine and 4.8 X 10(-6) M for indolepyruvate. The enzyme activity in the crude extract is inhibited competitively by indolmycin (Ki equals 2.3 mM) and L-tryptophan (Ki equals 0.17 mM), but these effects are not observed after the enzyme has been passed through the Sephades G-150 column during purification. The crude extract is capable of methylating phenylpyruvate and p

  18. Silencing of sterol glycosyltransferases modulates the withanolide biosynthesis and leads to compromised basal immunity of Withania somnifera

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gaurav; Tiwari, Manish; Singh, Surendra Pratap; Singh, Surendra; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Sterol glycosyltransferases (SGTs) catalyse transfer of glycon moiety to sterols and their related compounds to produce diverse glyco-conjugates or steryl glycosides with different biological and pharmacological activities. Functional studies of SGTs from Withania somnifera indicated their role in abiotic stresses but details about role under biotic stress are still unknown. Here, we have elucidated the function of SGTs by silencing SGTL1, SGTL2 and SGTL4 in Withania somnifera. Down-regulation of SGTs by artificial miRNAs led to the enhanced accumulation of withanolide A, withaferin A, sitosterol, stigmasterol and decreased content of withanoside V in Virus Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) lines. This was further correlated with increased expression of WsHMGR, WsDXR, WsFPPS, WsCYP710A1, WsSTE1 and WsDWF5 genes, involved in withanolide biosynthesis. These variations of withanolide concentrations in silenced lines resulted in pathogen susceptibility as compared to control plants. The infection of Alternaria alternata causes increased salicylic acid, callose deposition, superoxide dismutase and H2O2 in aMIR-VIGS lines. The expression of biotic stress related genes, namely, WsPR1, WsDFS, WsSPI and WsPR10 were also enhanced in aMIR-VIGS lines in time dependent manner. Taken together, our observations revealed that a positive feedback regulation of withanolide biosynthesis occurred by silencing of SGTLs which resulted in reduced biotic tolerance. PMID:27146059

  19. Impaired small-bowel barrier integrity in the presence of lumenal pancreatic digestive enzymes leads to circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Erik B; Alsaigh, Tom; Chang, Marisol; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2012-08-01

    In bowel ischemia, impaired mucosal integrity may allow intestinal pancreatic enzyme products to become systemic and precipitate irreversible shock and death. This can be attenuated by pancreatic enzyme inhibition in the small-bowel lumen. It is unresolved, however, whether ischemically mediated mucosal disruption is the key event allowing pancreatic enzyme products systemic access and whether intestinal digestive enzyme activity in concert with increased mucosal permeability leads to shock in the absence of ischemia. To test this possibility, the small intestinal lumen of nonischemic rats was perfused for 2 h with either digestive enzymes, a mucin disruption strategy (i.e., mucolytics) designed to increase mucosal permeability, or both, and animals were observed for shock. Digestive enzymes perfused included trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, amylase, and lipase. Control (n = 6) and experimental animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes only (n = 6) or single enzymes (n = 3 for each of the five enzyme groups) maintained stable hemodynamics. After mucin disruption using a combination of enteral N-acetylcysteine, atropine, and increased flow rates, rats (n = 6) developed mild hypotension (P < 0.001 compared with groups perfused with pancreatic enzymes only after 90 min) and increased intestinal permeability to intralumenally perfused fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 20 kd (P < 0.05) compared with control and enzyme-only groups, but there were no deaths. All animals perfused with both digestive enzymes and subjected to mucin disruption (n = 6) developed hypotension and increased intestinal permeability (P < 0.001 after 90 min). Pancreatic enzymes were measured in the intestinal wall of both groups subjected to mucin disruption, but not in the enzyme-only or control groups. Depletion of plasma protease inhibitors was found only in animals perfused with pancreatic enzymes plus mucin disruption, implicating increased permeability and intralumenal pancreatic enzyme egress

  20. The transcription of l-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase, a key enzyme for biosynthesis of ascorbate, during development of Persian sturgeon Acipenser persicus.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Arash; Farahmand, Hamid; Mahjoubi, Frouzandeh; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Leskinen, Piia; Rytkönen, Kalle; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2011-04-01

    l-Gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase (GULO) is a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of ascorbate, which is essential for several cellular functions. In the present study, mRNA expression of GULO gene was evaluated during the early development of Persian sturgeon. First, because there are no comparative studies that have established suitable quantitative real-time PCR reference genes in sturgeons for any physiological conditions, we evaluated six candidate reference genes (ACTB, RPL13, UBQ, RPL6, GAPDH and EF1A) during the early development of Persian sturgeon. The most stable mRNA expression was obtained with RPL6 and ACTB, whereas the least stable was RPL13. After normalization using RPL6, ACTB and RPL6/ACTB combination, the mRNA expression of GULO was highest at the embryonic stage (2days before hatching; P<0.05) and started to decline from hatching of larvae to the rest of the developmental time-points. This suggests that the vitamin C requirements are highest during early life stages, and it is likely that the changes in GULO mRNA expression are associated with changes in GULO enzyme activity.

  1. Identification of UGT84A13 as a candidate enzyme for the first committed step of gallotannin biosynthesis in pedunculate oak (Quercus robur).

    PubMed

    Mittasch, Juliane; Böttcher, Christoph; Frolova, Nadezhda; Bönn, Markus; Milkowski, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    A cDNA encoding the ester-forming hydroxybenzoic acid glucosyltransferase UGT84A13 was isolated from a cDNA library of Quercus robur swelling buds and young leaves. The enzyme displayed high sequence identity to resveratrol/hydroxycinnamate and hydroxybenzoate/hydroxycinnamate glucosyltransferases from Vitis species and clustered to the phylogenetic group L of plant glucosyltransferases, mainly involved in the formation of 1-O-β-D-glucose esters. In silico transcriptome analysis confirmed expression of UGT84A13 in Quercus tissues which were previously shown to exhibit UDP-glucose:gallic acid glucosyltransferase activity. UGT84A13 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli as N-terminal His-tagged protein. In vitro kinetic measurements with the purified recombinant enzyme revealed a clear preference for hydroxybenzoic acids as glucosyl acceptor in comparison to hydroxycinnamic acids. Of the preferred in vitro substrates, protocatechuic, vanillic and gallic acid, only the latter and its corresponding 1-O-ß-D-glucose ester were found to be accumulated in young oak leaves. This indicates that in planta UGT84A13 catalyzes the formation of , 1-O-galloyl-ß-D-glucose, the first committed step of gallotannin biosynthesis.

  2. Sterol Side Chain Reductase 2 Is a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Cholesterol, the Common Precursor of Toxic Steroidal Glycoalkaloids in Potato[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Satoru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Yasumoto, Shuhei; Seki, Hikaru; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Muranaka, Toshiya; Saito, Kazuki; Umemoto, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) contain α-solanine and α-chaconine, two well-known toxic steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs). Sprouts and green tubers accumulate especially high levels of SGAs. Although SGAs were proposed to be biosynthesized from cholesterol, the biosynthetic pathway for plant cholesterol is poorly understood. Here, we identify sterol side chain reductase 2 (SSR2) from potato as a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and related SGAs. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, we determined that potato SSR2 (St SSR2) reduces desmosterol and cycloartenol to cholesterol and cycloartanol, respectively. These reduction steps are branch points in the biosynthetic pathways between C-24 alkylsterols and cholesterol in potato. Similar enzymatic results were also obtained from tomato SSR2. St SSR2-silenced potatoes or St SSR2-disrupted potato generated by targeted genome editing had significantly lower levels of cholesterol and SGAs without affecting plant growth. Our results suggest that St SSR2 is a promising target gene for breeding potatoes with low SGA levels. PMID:25217510

  3. The Involvement of Two P450 Enzymes, CYP83B1 and CYP83A1, in Auxin Homeostasis and Glucosinolate Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Søren; Feyereisen, René

    2001-01-01

    The first committed step in the biosynthesis of indole glucosinolates is the conversion of indole-3-acetaldoxime into an indole-3-S-alkyl-thiohydroximate. The initial step in this conversion is catalyzed by CYP83B1 in Arabidopsis (S. Bak, F.E. Tax, K.A. Feldmann, D.A. Galbraith, R. Feyereisen [2001] Plant Cell 13: 101–111). The knockout mutant of the CYP83B1 gene (rnt1-1) shows a strong auxin excess phenotype and are allelic to sur-2. CYP83A1 is the closest relative to CYP83B1 and shares 63% amino acid sequence identity. Although expression of CYP83A1 under control of its endogenous promoter in the rnt1-1 background does not prevent the auxin excess and indole glucosinolate deficit phenotype caused by the lack of the CYP83B1 gene, ectopic overexpression of CYP83A1 using a 35S promoter rescues the rnt1-1 phenotype. CYP83A1 and CYP83B1 heterologously expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells show marked differences in their substrate specificity. Both enzymes convert indole-3-acetaldoxime to a thiohydroximate adduct in the presence of NADPH and a nucleophilic thiol donor. However, indole-3-acetaldoxime has a 50-fold higher affinity toward CYP83B1 than toward CYP83A1. Both enzymes also metabolize the phenylalanine- and tyrosine-derived aldoximes. Enzyme kinetic comparisons of CYP83A1 and CYP83B1 show that indole-3-acetaldoxime is the physiological substrate for CYP83B1 but not for CYP83A1. Instead, CYP83A1 catalyzes the initial conversion of aldoximes to thiohydroximates in the synthesis of glucosinolates not derived from tryptophan. The two closely related CYP83 subfamily members therefore are not redundant. The presence of putative auxin responsive cis-acting elements in the CYP83B1 promoter but not in the CYP83A1 promoter supports the suggestion that CYP83B1 has evolved to selectively metabolize a tryptophan-derived aldoxime intermediate shared with the pathway of auxin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:11553739

  4. Evolutionary view of acyl-CoA diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a key enzyme in neutral lipid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Triacylglycerides (TAGs) are a class of neutral lipids that represent the most important storage form of energy for eukaryotic cells. DGAT (acyl-CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.20) is a transmembrane enzyme that acts in the final and committed step of TAG synthesis, and it has been proposed to be the rate-limiting enzyme in plant storage lipid accumulation. In fact, two different enzymes identified in several eukaryotic species, DGAT1 and DGAT2, are the main enzymes responsible for TAG synthesis. These enzymes do not share high DNA or protein sequence similarities, and it has been suggested that they play non-redundant roles in different tissues and in some species in TAG synthesis. Despite a number of previous studies on the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes, which have emphasized their importance as potential obesity treatment targets to increase triacylglycerol accumulation, little is known about their evolutionary timeline in eukaryotes. The goal of this study was to examine the evolutionary relationship of the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes across eukaryotic organisms in order to infer their origin. Results We have conducted a broad survey of fully sequenced genomes, including representatives of Amoebozoa, yeasts, fungi, algae, musses, plants, vertebrate and invertebrate species, for the presence of DGAT1 and DGAT2 gene homologs. We found that the DGAT1 and DGAT2 genes are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotes and are readily identifiable in all the major eukaryotic groups and genomes examined. Phylogenetic analyses of the DGAT1 and DGAT2 amino acid sequences revealed evolutionary partitioning of the DGAT protein family into two major DGAT1 and DGAT2 clades. Protein secondary structure and hydrophobic-transmembrane analysis also showed differences between these enzymes. The analysis also revealed that the MGAT2 and AWAT genes may have arisen from DGAT2 duplication events. Conclusions In this study, we identified several DGAT1 and DGAT2 homologs in eukaryote taxa

  5. Effect of Vitamin D3 on Biosynthesis of Estrogen in Porcine Granulosa Cells via Modulation of Steroidogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So-Hye; Lee, Jae-Eon; An, Sung-Min; Shin, Ye Young; Hwang, Dae Youn; Yang, Seung Yun; Cho, Seong-Keun; An, Beum-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D3 is a fat-soluble secosteroid responsible for enhancing intestinal absorption of calcium, iron, and other materials. Vitamin D3 deficiency, therefore, can cause health problems such as metabolic diseases, and bone disorder. Female sex hormones including estrogen and progesterone are biosynthesized mainly in the granulosa cells of ovary. In this study, we isolated granulosa cells from porcine ovary and cultured for the experiments. In order to examine the effect of vitamin D3 on the ovarian granulosa cells, the mRNA and protein levels of genes were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot assay. The production of estrogen from the granulosa cells was also measured by the ELISA assay. Genes associated with follicle growth were not significantly altered by vitamin D3. However, it increases expression of genes involved in the estrogen-biosynthesis. Further, estrogen concentrations in porcine granulosa cell-cultured media increased in response to vitamin D3. These results showed that vitamin D3 is a powerful regulator of sex steroid hormone production in porcine granulosa cells, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency may result in inappropriate sexual development of industrial animals and eventually economic loss. PMID:28133513

  6. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  7. Overproduction of the first three enzymes of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis in Drosophila cells resistant to N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate.

    PubMed

    Laval, M; Azou, Y; Giorgi, D; Rosset, R

    1986-04-01

    Drosophila cells were treated in vitro with N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA) which is a specific inhibitor of aspartate transcarbamylase, the second enzyme of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. By stepwise selection using increasing amounts of this inhibitor, PALA-resistant (PALAr) stable clones have been isolated. Enzymatic activities of aspartate transcarbamylase, carbamyl phosphate synthetase and dihydro-orotase, borne by the same multifunctional protein, CAD, are increased 6-12-fold in these resistant clones compared with parental cells. The aspartate transcarbamylase in PALAr cells is shown by physical, kinetic and immunological criteria to be normal. The data from immunotitration and immunoblotting experiments indicate that the increased enzyme activities result from the overproduction of CAD.

  8. Entamoeba histolytica: solubilization and biochemical characterization of dolichol phosphate mannose synthase, an essential enzyme in glycoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Villagómez-Castro, J C; Calvo-Méndez, C; Vargas-Rodríguez, L; Flores-Carreón, A; López-Romero, E

    1998-02-01

    Sequential treatment of trophozoite membranes with the nonionic detergents Brij 35 and Igepal CA-630 released a soluble fraction that efficiently catalyzed the transfer of mannose from GDP-Man into a mannolipid that was identified as dolichol phosphate mannose (Dol-P-Man) by several criteria. The transfer reaction occurred only in the presence of exogenously added dolichol monophosphate (Dol-P). Plots of enzyme velocity versus Dol-P and GDP-Man concentrations revealed sigmoidal and hyperbolic kinetics, respectively. Values of S0.5 for Dol-P and K(m) for GDP-Man were 15 micrograms/ml and 4.1 microM, respectively. The solubilized fraction failed to transfer the label into other products such as lipid-linked oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. The optimum pH was 7.5-8.0 in potassium phosphate or Tris/HCl buffers and the enzyme required either Mg2+ or Mn2+. The latter was more effective but in a narrower range of concentrations. The transferase was inhibited by a number of nucleotides the strongest being GMP, GDP, and GTP. When assayed in the reverse direction, however, the enzyme catalyzed the transfer of mannose from Dol-P-Man back into GDP-Man as a function of increasing concentrations of GDP. Mg2+ was a better activator of the reverse reaction than Mn2+, which reached up to 60% at 2 mM GDP. These results suggest that some of the enzyme catalytic properties may change depending on the direction of the transfer reaction.

  9. Mannosylglucosylglycerate biosynthesis in the deep-branching phylum Planctomycetes: characterization of the uncommon enzymes from Rhodopirellula baltica

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Sofia; d'Avó, Ana Filipa; Mingote, Ana; Lamosa, Pedro; da Costa, Milton S.; Costa, Joana

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for the rare compatible solute mannosylglucosylglycerate (MGG) accumulated by Rhodopirellula baltica, a marine member of the phylum Planctomycetes, has been elucidated. Like one of the pathways used in the thermophilic bacterium Petrotoga mobilis, it has genes coding for glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and mannosylglucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (MGPG) synthase (MggA). However, unlike Ptg. mobilis, the mesophilic R. baltica uses a novel and very specific MGPG phosphatase (MggB). It also lacks a key enzyme of the alternative pathway in Ptg. mobilis – the mannosylglucosylglycerate synthase (MggS) that catalyses the condensation of glucosylglycerate with GDP-mannose to produce MGG. The R. baltica enzymes GpgS, MggA, and MggB were expressed in E. coli and characterized in terms of kinetic parameters, substrate specificity, temperature and pH dependence. This is the first characterization of genes and enzymes for the synthesis of compatible solutes in the phylum Planctomycetes and for the synthesis of MGG in a mesophile. PMID:23921581

  10. [Cloning and expression of the key enzyme hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase gene (DaH6H) in scopolamine biosynthesis of Datura arborea].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Hou, Yan-ling; Li, Xiao; Xia, Ke; Liao, Zhi-hua

    2015-10-01

    Hyoscyamine 6 beta-hydroxylase (H6H) is the last rate-limiting enzyme directly catalyzing the formation of scopolamine in tropane alkaloids (TAs) biosynthesis pathway. It is the primary target gene in the genetic modification of TAs metabolic pathway. Full-length cDNA and gDNA sequences of a novel H6H gene were cloned from Datura arborea (DaH6H, GenBank accession numbers for cDNA and gDNA are KR006981 and KR006983, respectively). Nucleotide sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 1375 bp encoding 347 amino acids in the cDNA of DaH6H, while the gDNA of DaH6H contains four exons and three introns, with the highest similarity to the gDNA of H6H from D. stramonium. DaH6H also exhibited the most identity of 90.5% with DsH6H in amino acids and harbored conserved 2-oxoglutarate binding motif and two iron binding motifs. The expression level of DaH6H was highest in the mature leaf, followed by the secondary root, and with no expression in the primary root based on qPCR analysis. Its expression was inhibited by MeJA. DaH6H was expressed in E. coli and a 39 kD recombinant protein was detected in SDS-PAGE. Comparison of the contents of scopolamine and hyoscyamine in various TAs-producing plants revealed that D. arborea was one of the rare scopolamine predominant plants. Cloning of DaH6H gene will allow more research in the molecular regulatory mechanism of TAs biosynthesis in distinct plants and provide a new candidate gene for scopolamine metabolic engineering.

  11. Construction of a Gene Knockout System for Application in Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T, Exemplified by the S-Layer Glycan Biosynthesis Initiation Enzyme WsfP▿

    PubMed Central

    Zarschler, Kristof; Janesch, Bettina; Zayni, Sonja; Schäffer, Christina; Messner, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T is covered by an oblique surface layer (S-layer) composed of glycoprotein subunits. The S-layer O-glycan is a polymer of [→3)-β-d-Galp-(1[α-d-Glcp-(1→6)]→4)-β-d-ManpNAc-(1→] repeating units that is linked by an adaptor of -[GroA-2→OPO2→4-β-d-ManpNAc-(1→4)]→3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→3)-α-l-Rhap-(1→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→ to specific tyrosine residues of the S-layer protein. For elucidation of the mechanism governing S-layer glycan biosynthesis, a gene knockout system using bacterial mobile group II intron-mediated gene disruption was developed. The system is further based on the sgsE S-layer gene promoter of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a and on the Geobacillus-Bacillus-Escherichia coli shuttle vector pNW33N. As a target gene, wsfP, encoding a putative UDP-Gal:phosphoryl-polyprenol Gal-1-phosphate transferase, representing the predicted initiation enzyme of S-layer glycan biosynthesis, was disrupted. S-layer protein glycosylation was completely abolished in the insertional P. alvei CCM 2051T wsfP mutant, according to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis evidence and carbohydrate analysis. Glycosylation was fully restored by plasmid-based expression of wsfP in the glycan-deficient P. alvei mutant, confirming that WsfP initiates S-layer protein glycosylation. This is the first report on the successful genetic manipulation of bacterial S-layer protein glycosylation in vivo, including transformation of and heterologous gene expression and gene disruption in the model organism P. alvei CCM 2051T. PMID:19304819

  12. Cloning and functional analysis of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) genes encoding a key enzyme during abscisic acid biosynthesis from peach and grape fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Leng, Ping; Zhang, Guanglian; Li, Xiangxin

    2009-08-15

    Ripening and senescence are generally controlled by ethylene in climacteric fruits like peaches, and the ripening process of grape, a non-climacteric fruit, may have some relationship to abscisic acid (ABA) function. In order to better understand the role of ABA in ripening and senescence of these two types of fruits, we cloned the 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) gene that encodes a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis from peaches and grapes using an RT-PCR approach. The NCED gene fragments were cloned from peaches (PpNCED1and PpNCED2, each 740bp) and grapes (VVNCED1, 741bp) using degenerate primers designed based on the conserved amino acids sequence of NCEDs in other plants. PpNCED1 showed 78.54% homology with PpNCED2, 74.90% homology with VVNCED1, and both showed high homology to NCEDs from other plants. The expression patterns of PpNCED1 and VVNCED1 were very similar. Both were highly expressed at the beginning of ripening when ABA content becomes high. The maximum ABA preceded ethylene production in peach fruit. ABA in the grape gradually increased from the beginning of ripening and reached the highest level at 20d before the harvest stage. However, ethylene remained at low levels during the entire process of fruit development, including ripening and senescence. ABA content, and ripening and softening of both types of fruits, were promoted or delayed by exogenous ABA or Fluridone (or NDGA) treatment. The roles of ABA and ethylene in the later ripening of fruit are complex. Based on results obtained in this study, we concluded that PpNCED1 and VVNCED1 initiate ABA biosynthesis at the beginning of fruit ripening, and that ABA accumulation might play a key role in the regulation of ripeness and senescence of both peach and grape fruits.

  13. A Greenhouse Study on Lead Uptake and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Vetiver Grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) as a Function of Lead Concentration and Soil Physico-Chemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andra, S. P.; Datta, R.; Sarkar, D.; Saminathan, S. K.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic non-essential metal that can cause permanent learning disabilities, retardation, mental and behavioral problems in children. Lead accumulation in soils result from weathering, chipping, scraping, sanding and sand blasting of housing structures constructed prior to 1978, bearing lead-based paint. The primary objective of this study is to develop a cost-effective, chelate-assisted phytoremediation for cleaning up lead contaminated soils. Soils are a unique environment of diverse physical and chemical characteristics that influence the extent of phytoavailable (labile) Pb forms. The success of phytoremediation strategy depends on the physiological/ biochemical tolerance of the plants to lipid peroxidation induced by Pb at sub-lethal levels. Oxidative challenge is alleviated by antioxidant compounds, but more importantly by the induction of antioxidant enzymes, which are crucial for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and terminating lipid peroxidation chain reaction. A column study was conducted in a temperature and humidity-controlled greenhouse setting to assess the extent of Pb phytoextraction and antioxidant response in a lead accumulator, vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides). Treatments consisted of a randomized block arrangement of 4 soil types (Immokalee, Pahokee Muck, Tobosa, and Millhopper) and 3 soil Pb concentrations [normal - 400 mg/kg lead (following federal soil standards for lead), moderate - 800 mg/kg lead, and excessive - 1200 mg/kg lead] in 4 replicates. At the end of 6 months, selected columns were amended with a biodegradable chelating agent, ethylenediamene disuccinate (10 mmol/ kg EDDS), to mobilize Pb and enhance Pb uptake by vetiver. Total and exchangeable (labile) Pb were correlated with phytoextracted Pb, and levels of antioxidant enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the root and shoot tissues of vetiver grass. Results indicate that Pb uptake and antioxidant

  14. Distribution of creatine, guanidinoacetate and the enzymes for their biosynthesis in the animal kingdom. Implications for phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Van Pilsum, J F; Stephens, G C; Taylor, D

    1972-01-01

    1. The distribution of creatine and the creatine-synthesizing enzymes in the animal kingdom has been investigated. Creatine was found in tissues of all vertebrates examined, and in various invertebrates from phyla Annelida, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata, subphylum Cephalochordata. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes, arginine-glycine transamidinase and guanidinoacetate methylpherase, were not detected in the hagfish or in any of the invertebrates, including those in which creatine was found, with the exception that transamidinase activities were detected in the amphioxus and salt water clam; however, these activities are considered to be artifacts for reasons mentioned in the text. Additional evidence that the hagfish and various creatine-containing invertebrates could not synthesize creatine was the observation that these animals did not convert one or the other of the likely precursors of creatine (arginine and glycine) into creatine, in vivo. Further, the inability of these animals to synthesize creatine is correlated with the observations that all animals tested were able to abstract creatine from their aqueous environment. 2. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes were detected in the sea lamprey and in all but a few of the other vertebrates examined. Neither activity could be detected in the sharks and rays (cartilaginous fish), buffalo fish (bony fish) or the snapping turtle. Transamidinase or guanidinoacetate methylpherase activity could not be found in the salamander or garter snake, respectively. 3. The results obtained with the lamprey are in direct contrast with those obtained with the hagfish (both subphylum Agnatha, class Cyclostomata). The lamprey had the ability to synthesize creatine and did not abstract creatine from lake water. The hagfish did not have any apparent ability to synthesize creatine and did abstract creatine from sea water. The present report thus supports the theory that the myxinoid (hagfish

  15. Distribution of creatine, guanidinoacetate and the enzymes for their biosynthesis in the animal kingdom. Implications for phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Van Pilsum, John F.; Stephens, Grover C.; Taylor, Dorris

    1972-01-01

    1. The distribution of creatine and the creatine-synthesizing enzymes in the animal kingdom has been investigated. Creatine was found in tissues of all vertebrates examined, and in various invertebrates from phyla Annelida, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata, subphylum Cephalochordata. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes, arginine–glycine transamidinase and guanidinoacetate methylpherase, were not detected in the hagfish or in any of the invertebrates, including those in which creatine was found, with the exception that transamidinase activities were detected in the amphioxus and salt water clam; however, these activities are considered to be artifacts for reasons mentioned in the text. Additional evidence that the hagfish and various creatine-containing invertebrates could not synthesize creatine was the observation that these animals did not convert one or the other of the likely precursors of creatine (arginine and glycine) into creatine, in vivo. Further, the inability of these animals to synthesize creatine is correlated with the observations that all animals tested were able to abstract creatine from their aqueous environment. 2. The activities of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes were detected in the sea lamprey and in all but a few of the other vertebrates examined. Neither activity could be detected in the sharks and rays (cartilaginous fish), buffalo fish (bony fish) or the snapping turtle. Transamidinase or guanidinoacetate methylpherase activity could not be found in the salamander or garter snake, respectively. 3. The results obtained with the lamprey are in direct contrast with those obtained with the hagfish (both subphylum Agnatha, class Cyclostomata). The lamprey had the ability to synthesize creatine and did not abstract creatine from lake water. The hagfish did not have any apparent ability to synthesize creatine and did abstract creatine from sea water. The present report thus supports the theory that the myxinoid

  16. Lead (Pb)-inhibited radicle emergence in Brassica campestris involves alterations in starch-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Gurpreet; Batish, Daizy R; Kohli, Ravinder K

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal released into the natural environment and known to cause oxidative damage and alter antioxidant mechanism in plants. However, not much is known about the interference of Pb with the biochemical processes and carbohydrate metabolism during seed germination. We, therefore, investigated the effect of Pb (50-500 μM) upon biochemical alterations in germinating seeds (at 24-h stage) of Brassica campestris L. Pb treatment significantly enhanced protein and carbohydrate contents that increased by ~43% and 200%, respectively, at 500-μM Pb over control. In contrast, the activities of starch/carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes--α-amylases, β-amylases, acid invertases, and acid phosphatases--decreased by ~54%, 60%, 74%, and 52%, respectively, over control. Activities of peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases, involved in stress acclimation, however, increased by ~1.2- to 3.9-folds and 0.4- to 1.4-folds upon 50-500-μM Pb treatment. Pb enhanced oxidizing ability by 10 to 16.7 times over control suggesting interference with emerging root's oxidizing capacity. The study concludes that Pb exposure inhibits radicle emergence from B. campestris by interfering with the biochemical processes linked to protein and starch metabolism.

  17. The rice dwarf virus P2 protein interacts with ent-kaurene oxidases in vivo, leading to reduced biosynthesis of gibberellins and rice dwarf symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shifeng; Gao, Feng; Cao, Xuesong; Chen, Mao; Ye, Gongyin; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2005-12-01

    The mechanisms of viral diseases are a major focus of biology. Despite intensive investigations, how a plant virus interacts with host factors to cause diseases remains poorly understood. The Rice dwarf virus (RDV), a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, causes dwarfed growth phenotypes in infected rice (Oryza sativa) plants. The outer capsid protein P2 is essential during RDV infection of insects and thus influences transmission of RDV by the insect vector. However, its role during RDV infection within the rice host is unknown. By yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we report that P2 of RDV interacts with ent-kaurene oxidases, which play a key role in the biosynthesis of plant growth hormones gibberellins, in infected plants. Furthermore, the expression of ent-kaurene oxidases was reduced in the infected plants. The level of endogenous GA1 (a major active gibberellin in rice vegetative tissues) in the RDV-infected plants was lower than that in healthy plants. Exogenous application of GA3 to RDV-infected rice plants restored the normal growth phenotypes. These results provide evidence that the P2 protein of RDV interferes with the function of a cellular factor, through direct physical interactions, that is important for the biosynthesis of a growth hormone leading to symptom expression. In addition, the interaction between P2 and rice ent-kaurene oxidase-like proteins may decrease phytoalexin biosynthesis and make plants more competent for virus replication. Moreover, P2 may provide a novel tool to investigate the regulation of GA metabolism for plant growth and development.

  18. Production of M-/GM-group aflatoxins catalyzed by the OrdA enzyme in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimiko; Chihaya, Naomi; Hatabayashi, Hidemi; Kito, Masako; Hoshino, Sachiko; Zeng, Hongmei; Cai, Jingjing; Nakajima, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    Aspergillus parasiticus produces the minor aflatoxins M(1) (AFM(1)), M(2) (AFM(2)), GM(1) (AFGM(1)), and GM(2) (AFGM(2)), as well as the major aflatoxins B(1) (AFB(1)), B(2) (AFB(2)), G(1) (AFG(1)), and G(2) (AFG(2)). Feeding of A. parasiticus with aspertoxin (12c-hydroxyOMST) caused AFM(1) and AFGM(1), and cell-free experiments using the microsomal fraction of A. parasiticus and aspertoxin caused production of AFM(1), indicating that aspertoxin is a precursor of AFM(1) and AFGM(1). Feeding of the same fungus with O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) caused AFM(1) and AFGM(1) together with AFB(1) and AFG(1); feeding with dihydroOMST (DHOMST) caused AFM(2) and AFGM(2) together with AFB(2) and AFG(2). Incubation of either the microsomal fraction or OrdA enzyme-expressing yeast with OMST caused production of aspertoxin together with AFM(1) and AFB(1). These results demonstrated that the OrdA enzyme catalyzes both 12c-hydroxylation reaction from OMST to aspertoxin and the successive reaction from aspertoxin to AFM(1). In contrast, feeding of the fungus with AFB(1) did not produce any AFM(1), demonstrating that M-/GM-aflatoxins are not produced from B-/G-aflatoxins. Furthermore, AFM(1) together with AFB(1) and AFG(1) was also produced from 11-hydroxyOMST (HOMST) in feeding experiment of A. parasiticus, whereas no aflatoxins were produced when used the ordA deletion mutant. These results demonstrated that OrdA enzyme can also catalyze 12c-hydroxylation of HOMST to produce 11-hydroxyaspertoxin, which serves as a precursor for the production of AFM(1) and AFGM(1). The same pathway may work for the production of AFM(2) and AFGM(2) from DHOMST and dihydroHOMST through the formation of dihydroaspertoxin and dihydro-11-hydroxyaspertoxin, respectively.

  19. Plants with increased expression of ent-kaurene oxidase are resistant to chemical inhibitors of this gibberellin biosynthesis enzyme.

    PubMed

    Swain, Stephen M; Singh, Davinder P; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T

    2005-02-01

    The gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway includes the three-step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid, catalyzed by the enzyme ent-kaurene oxidase (KO). Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the KO cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, with or without a translational fusion to a modified green fluorescent protein (GFP), are very similar to wild-type (WT) plants under normal growth conditions. In contrast, when WT and 35S:KO (or 35S:KO-GFP) seeds, seedlings or pollen tubes are grown in the presence of chemical inhibitors of KO, such as paclobutrazol and uniconazole, plants with increased KO expression are partially resistant to the effects of these inhibitors. In combination with the observation that decreased KO levels increase the sensitivity to KO inhibitors, the 35S:KO phenotypes demonstrate that the modification of KO enzyme levels could be used to create transgenic crop plants with altered KO inhibitor response. These results also suggest that the KO gene could be used as a selectable marker for plant regeneration based on resistance to KO inhibitors. Finally, the observation that pollen tubes expressing 35S:KO or 35S:KO-GFP have decreased sensitivity to KO inhibitors provides further evidence for a physiological role for GAs in pollen tube elongation.

  20. Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate

    PubMed Central

    Andexer, Jennifer N.; Kendrew, Steven G.; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Lazos, Orestis; Foster, Teresa A.; Zimmermann, Anna-Sophie; Warneck, Tony D.; Suthar, Dipen; Coates, Nigel J.; Koehn, Frank E.; Skotnicki, Jerauld S.; Carter, Guy T.; Gregory, Matthew A.; Martin, Christine J.; Moss, Steven J.; Leadlay, Peter F.; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-01-01

    The macrocyclic polyketides FK506, FK520, and rapamycin are potent immunosuppressants that prevent T-cell proliferation through initial binding to the immunophilin FKBP12. Analogs of these molecules are of considerable interest as therapeutics in both metastatic and inflammatory disease. For these polyketides the starter unit for chain assembly is (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid derived from the shikimate pathway. We show here that the first committed step in its formation is hydrolysis of chorismate to form (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. This chorismatase activity is encoded by fkbO in the FK506 and FK520 biosynthetic gene clusters, and by rapK in the rapamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Purified recombinant FkbO (from FK520) efficiently catalyzed the chorismatase reaction in vitro, as judged by HPLC-MS and NMR analysis. Complementation using fkbO from either the FK506 or the FK520 gene cluster of a strain of S. hygroscopicus specifically deleted in rapK (BIOT-4010) restored rapamycin production, as did supplementation with (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. Although BIOT-4010 produced no rapamycin, it did produce low levels of BC325, a rapamycin analog containing a 3-hydroxybenzoate starter unit. This led us to identify the rapK homolog hyg5 as encoding a chorismatase/3-hydroxybenzoate synthase. Similar enzymes in other bacteria include the product of the bra8 gene from the pathway to the terpenoid natural product brasilicardin. Expression of either hyg5 or bra8 in BIOT-4010 led to increased levels of BC325. Also, purified Hyg5 catalyzed the predicted conversion of chorismate into 3-hydroxybenzoate. FkbO, RapK, Hyg5, and Bra8 are thus founder members of a previously unrecognized family of enzymes acting on chorismate. PMID:21383123

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme of the human small intestine. Subunit and quaternary structure, biosynthesis and membrane association.

    PubMed Central

    Naim, H Y

    1992-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was isolated from detergent-derived extracts of human intestinal brush-border membranes (BBMs) by immunoprecipitation using a monoclonal antibody. Analysis of the immunoprecipitates by SDS/PAGE revealed a polypeptide of apparent M(r) 184,000 under reducing and non-reducing conditions, indicating that ACE does not contain intermolecular disulphide bridges. The quaternary structure of ACE was examined using cross-linking experiments with dithiobis[succinimidylpropionate] (DSP) and density gradient centrifugation on sucrose gradients. Both approaches demonstrated that ACE is assembled in the membrane as a monomer. By contrast, the control glycoprotein aminopeptidase N (ApN) exists as a dimer. Biosynthetic labelling experiments in intestinal tissue explants demonstrated that the 184,000-M(r) protein is generated from a single-polypeptide, mannose-rich precursor of ACE (M(r) 175,000) by modification of the carbohydrate side-chains in the Golgi apparatus. The mode of association of the mature form of the enzyme with BBMs was investigated by hydrophobic labelling of right-side-out brush-border vesicles with the photoactivatable carbene-generating reagent 125I-labelled 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m[formylamino]phenyl)diazirine (125I-labelled TID), followed by treatment with trypsin at dilutions that do not cause substantial degradation of ACE. These studies demonstrated that ACE is associated with the membrane via a hydrophobic segment. Furthermore, treatment of 35S-labelled inside-out membrane vesicles with trypsin revealed that ACE possesses a cytoplasmic tail, and therefore has a transmembraneous orientation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1326943

  2. Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate.

    PubMed

    Andexer, Jennifer N; Kendrew, Steven G; Nur-e-Alam, Mohammad; Lazos, Orestis; Foster, Teresa A; Zimmermann, Anna-Sophie; Warneck, Tony D; Suthar, Dipen; Coates, Nigel J; Koehn, Frank E; Skotnicki, Jerauld S; Carter, Guy T; Gregory, Matthew A; Martin, Christine J; Moss, Steven J; Leadlay, Peter F; Wilkinson, Barrie

    2011-03-22

    The macrocyclic polyketides FK506, FK520, and rapamycin are potent immunosuppressants that prevent T-cell proliferation through initial binding to the immunophilin FKBP12. Analogs of these molecules are of considerable interest as therapeutics in both metastatic and inflammatory disease. For these polyketides the starter unit for chain assembly is (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohex-1-enecarboxylic acid derived from the shikimate pathway. We show here that the first committed step in its formation is hydrolysis of chorismate to form (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. This chorismatase activity is encoded by fkbO in the FK506 and FK520 biosynthetic gene clusters, and by rapK in the rapamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Purified recombinant FkbO (from FK520) efficiently catalyzed the chorismatase reaction in vitro, as judged by HPLC-MS and NMR analysis. Complementation using fkbO from either the FK506 or the FK520 gene cluster of a strain of S. hygroscopicus specifically deleted in rapK (BIOT-4010) restored rapamycin production, as did supplementation with (4R,5R)-4,5-dihydroxycyclohexa-1,5-dienecarboxylic acid. Although BIOT-4010 produced no rapamycin, it did produce low levels of BC325, a rapamycin analog containing a 3-hydroxybenzoate starter unit. This led us to identify the rapK homolog hyg5 as encoding a chorismatase/3-hydroxybenzoate synthase. Similar enzymes in other bacteria include the product of the bra8 gene from the pathway to the terpenoid natural product brasilicardin. Expression of either hyg5 or bra8 in BIOT-4010 led to increased levels of BC325. Also, purified Hyg5 catalyzed the predicted conversion of chorismate into 3-hydroxybenzoate. FkbO, RapK, Hyg5, and Bra8 are thus founder members of a previously unrecognized family of enzymes acting on chorismate.

  3. Physico-Chemical Condition Optimization during Biosynthesis lead to development of Improved and Catalytically Efficient Gold Nano Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Madhuree; Mishra, Aradhana; Pandey, Shipra; Singh, Satyendra Pratap; Chaudhry, Vasvi; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Shukla, Shatrunajay; Kakkar, Poonam; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles has gained great attention in making the process cost-effective and eco-friendly, but there are limited reports which describe the interdependency of physical parameters for tailoring the dimension and geometry of nanoparticles during biological synthesis. In the present study, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) of various shapes and sizes were obtained by modulating different physical parameters using Trichoderma viride filtrate. The particles were characterized on the basis of visual observation, dynamic light scattering, UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X ray diffraction. While the size varied from 2–500 nm, the shapes obtained were nanospheres, nanotriangles, nanopentagons, nanohexagons, and nanosheets. Changing the parameters such as pH, temperature, time, substrate, and culture filtrate concentration influenced the size and geometry of nanoparticles. Catalytic activity of the biosynthesized GNP was evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy and confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol which was strongly influenced by their structure and dimension. Common practices for biodegradation are traditional, expensive, require large amount of raw material, and time taking. Controlling shapes and sizes of nanoparticles could revolutionize the process of biodegradation that can remove all the hurdles in current scenario. PMID:27273371

  4. The Ternary Complex of PrnB (the Second Enzyme in the Pyrrolnitrin Biosynthesis Pathway), Tryptophan, and Cyanide Yields New Mechanistic Insights into the Indolamine Dioxygenase Superfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (3-chloro-4-(2′-nitro-3′-chlorophenyl)pyrrole) is a broad-spectrum antifungal compound isolated from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia. Four enzymes (PrnA, PrnB, PrnC, and PrnD) are required for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis from tryptophan. PrnB rearranges the indole ring of 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and eliminates the carboxylate group. PrnB shows robust activity in vivo, but in vitro activity for PrnB under defined conditions remains undetected. The structure of PrnB establishes that the enzyme belongs to the heme b-dependent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) family. We report the cyanide complex of PrnB and two ternary complexes with both l-tryptophan or 7-Cl-l-tryptophan and cyanide. The latter two complexes are essentially identical and mimic the likely catalytic ternary complex that occurs during turnover. In the cyanide ternary complexes, a loop previously disordered becomes ordered, contributing to the binding of substrates. The conformations of the bound tryptophan substrates are changed from that seen previously in the binary complexes. In l-tryptophan ternary complex, the indole ring now adopts the same orientation as seen in the PrnB binary complexes with other tryptophan substrates. The amide and carboxylate group of the substrate are orientated in a new conformation. Tyr321 and Ser332 play a key role in binding these groups. The structures suggest that catalysis requires an l-configured substrate. Isothermal titration calorimetry data suggest d-tryptophan does not bind after cyanide (or oxygen) coordinates with the distal (or sixth) site of heme. This is the first ternary complex with a tryptophan substrate of a member of the tryptophan dioxygenase superfamily and has mechanistic implications. PMID:20421301

  5. Suppression of 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase, Which Encodes a Key Enzyme in Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis, Alters Fruit Texture in Transgenic Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Ling; Ren, Jie; Cui, Mengmeng; Wang, Yanping; Ji, Kai; Li, Ping; Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Dai, Shengjie; Duan, Chaorui; Wu, Yan; Leng, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall catabolism during fruit ripening is under complex control and is key for fruit quality and shelf life. To examine the role of abscisic acid (ABA) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening, we suppressed SlNCED1, which encodes 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ABA. To suppress SlNCED1 specifically in tomato fruits, and thus avoid the pleiotropic phenotypes associated with ABA deficiency, we used an RNA interference construct driven by the fruit-specific E8 promoter. ABA accumulation and SlNCED1 transcript levels in the transgenic fruit were down-regulated to between 20% and 50% of the levels measured in the control fruit. This significant reduction in NCED activity led to a down-regulation in the transcription of genes encoding major cell wall catabolic enzymes, specifically polygalacturonase (SlPG), pectin methyl esterase (SlPME), β-galactosidase precursor mRNA (SlTBG), xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (SlXET), endo-1,4-β-cellulose (SlCels), and expansin (SlExp). This resulted in an increased accumulation of pectin during ripening. In turn, this led to a significant extension of the shelf life to 15 to 29 d compared with a shelf life of only 7 d for the control fruit and an enhancement of fruit firmness at the mature stage by 30% to 45%. In conclusion, ABA affects cell wall catabolism during tomato fruit ripening via down-regulation of the expression of major catabolic genes (SlPG, SlPME, SlTBG, SlXET, SlCels, and SlExp). PMID:22108525

  6. Molecular Insight into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis of Baeyer–Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Frame Modifying Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent Mithramycin

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) have been shown to play key roles for the biosynthesis of important natural products. MtmOIV, a homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent BVMO, catalyzes the key frame-modifying steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway, including an oxidative C-C bond cleavage, by converting its natural substrate premithramycin B into mithramycin DK, the immediate precursor of mithramycin. The drastically improved protein structure of MtmOIV along with the high-resolution structure of MtmOIV in complex with its natural substrate premithramycin B are reported here, revealing previously undetected key residues that are important for substrate recognition and catalysis. Kinetic analyses of selected mutants allowed us to probe the substrate binding pocket of MtmOIV, and also to discover the putative NADPH binding site. This is the first substrate-bound structure of MtmOIV providing new insights into substrate recognition and catalysis, which paves the way for the future design of a tailored enzyme for the chemo-enzymatic preparation of novel mithramycin analogues. PMID:23992662

  7. Maize Homologs of Hydroxycinnamoyltransferase, a Key Enzyme in Lignin Biosynthesis, Bind the Nucleotide Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Rp1 Proteins to Modulate the Defense Response1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan-Feng; He, Yijian; Strauch, Renee; Olukolu, Bode A.; Nielsen, Dahlia; Li, Xu; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, most disease resistance genes encode nucleotide binding Leu-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR) upon pathogen recognition. The maize (Zea mays) NLR protein Rp1-D21 derives from an intragenic recombination between two NLRs, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2, and confers an autoactive HR in the absence of pathogen infection. From a previous quantitative trait loci and genome-wide association study, we identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism locus highly associated with variation in the severity of Rp1-D21-induced HR. Two maize genes encoding hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT; a key enzyme involved in lignin biosynthesis) homologs, termed HCT1806 and HCT4918, were adjacent to this single-nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we show that both HCT1806 and HCT4918 physically interact with and suppress the HR conferred by Rp1-D21 but not other autoactive NLRs when transiently coexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Other maize HCT homologs are unable to confer the same level of suppression on Rp1-D21-induced HR. The metabolic activity of HCT1806 and HCT4918 is unlikely to be necessary for their role in suppressing HR. We show that the lignin pathway is activated by Rp1-D21 at both the transcriptional and metabolic levels. We derive a model to explain the roles of HCT1806 and HCT4918 in Rp1-mediated disease resistance. PMID:26373661

  8. Molecular Insight into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Frame-Modifying Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent Mithramycin

    SciTech Connect

    Bosserman, Mary A.; Downey, Theresa; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2014-02-14

    Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) have been shown to play key roles for the biosynthesis of important natural products. MtmOIV, a homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent BVMO, catalyzes the key frame-modifying steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway, including an oxidative C–C bond cleavage, by converting its natural substrate premithramycin B into mithramycin DK, the immediate precursor of mithramycin. The drastically improved protein structure of MtmOIV along with the high-resolution structure of MtmOIV in complex with its natural substrate premithramycin B are reported here, revealing previously undetected key residues that are important for substrate recognition and catalysis. Kinetic analyses of selected mutants allowed us to probe the substrate binding pocket of MtmOIV and also to discover the putative NADPH binding site. This is the first substrate-bound structure of MtmOIV providing new insights into substrate recognition and catalysis, which paves the way for the future design of a tailored enzyme for the chemo-enzymatic preparation of novel mithramycin analogues.

  9. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  10. Role of Nγ-Acetyldiaminobutyrate as an Enzyme Stabilizer and an Intermediate in the Biosynthesis of Hydroxyectoine

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, David; Borges, Nuno; Vargas, Carmen; Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Santos, Helena

    1999-01-01

    Strain CHR63 is a salt-sensitive mutant of the moderately halophilic wild-type strain Halomonas elongata DSM 3043 that is affected in the ectoine synthase gene (ectC). This strain accumulates large amounts of Nγ-acetyldiaminobutyrate (NADA), the precursor of ectoine (D. Cánovas, C. Vargas, F. Iglesias-Guerra, L. N. Csonka, D. Rhodes, A. Ventosa, and J. J. Nieto, J. Biol. Chem. 272:25794–25801, 1997). Hydroxyectoine, ectoine, and glucosylglycerate were also identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as cytoplasmic organic solutes in this mutant. Accumulation of NADA, hydroxyectoine, and ectoine was osmoregulated, whereas the levels of glucosylglycerate decreased at higher salinities. The effect of the growth stage on the accumulation of solutes was also investigated. NADA was purified from strain CHR63 and was shown to protect the thermolabile enzyme rabbit muscle lactate dehydrogenase against thermal inactivation. The stabilizing effect of NADA was greater than the stabilizing effect of ectoine or potassium diaminobutyrate. A 1H NMR analysis of the solutes accumulated by the wild-type strain and mutants CHR62 (ectA::Tn1732) and CHR63 (ectC::Tn1732) indicated that H. elongata can synthesize hydroxyectoine by two different pathways—directly from ectoine or via an alternative pathway that converts NADA into hydroxyectoine without the involvement of ectoine. PMID:10473374

  11. Lysine biosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa): study of enzymes and nitrogen-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Varisi, Vanderlei A; Camargos, Liliane S; Aguiar, Leandro F; Christofoleti, Renata M; Medici, Leonardo O; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.2.4), homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH, EC 1.1.1.3) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) were isolated and partially purified from immature Chenopodium quinoa Willd seeds. Enzyme activities were studied in the presence of the aspartate-derived amino acids lysine, threonine and methionine and also the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine (AEC), at 1 mM and 5 mM. The results confirmed the existence of, at least, two AK isoenzymes, one inhibited by lysine and the other inhibited by threonine, the latter being predominant in quinoa seeds. HSDH activity was also shown to be partially inhibited by threonine, whereas some of the activity was resistant to the inhibitory effect, indicating the presence of two isoenzymes, one resistant and another sensitive to threonine inhibition. Only one DHDPS isoenzyme highly sensitive to lysine inhibition was detected. The results suggest that the high concentration of lysine observed in quinoa seeds is possibly due to a combined effect of increased lysine synthesis and accumulation in the soluble form and/or as protein lysine. Nitrogen assimilation was also investigated and based on nitrate content, nitrate reductase activity, amino acid distribution and ureide content, the leaves were identified as the predominant site of nitrate reduction in this plant species. The amino acid profile analysis in leaves and roots also indicated an important role of soluble glutamine as a nitrogen transporting compound.

  12. Crystal Structure of 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase, A Crucial Enzyme for Isoprenoids Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Usunow, G.; Busch, G.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a common precursor for the synthesis of all isoprenoids, which have important functions in living organisms. IPP is produced by the mevalonate pathway in archaea, fungi, and animals. In contrast, IPP is synthesized by a mevalonate-independent pathway in most bacteria, algae, and plant plastids. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the first and the rate-limiting step of the mevalonate-independent pathway and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibiotics, antimalarials, and herbicides. We report here the first structural information on DXS, from Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans, in complex with the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The structure contains three domains (I, II, and III), each of which bears homology to the equivalent domains in transketolase and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. However, DXS has a novel arrangement of these domains as compared with the other enzymes, such that the active site of DXS is located at the interface of domains I and II in the same monomer, whereas that of transketolase is located at the interface of the dimer. The coenzyme TPP is mostly buried in the complex, but the C-2 atom of its thiazolium ring is exposed to a pocket that is the substrate-binding site. The structures identify residues that may have important roles in catalysis, which have been confirmed by our mutagenesis studies.

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy for murine mucopolysaccharidosis type VII leads to improvements in behavior and auditory function.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, L H; Erway, L C; Vogler, C A; Sly, W S; Nicholes, A; Grubb, J; Holmberg, S W; Levy, B; Sands, M S

    1998-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII; Sly syndrome) is one of a group of lysosomal storage diseases that share many clinical features, including mental retardation and hearing loss. Lysosomal storage in neurons of the brain and the associated behavioral abnormalities characteristic of a murine model of MPS VII have not been shown to be corrected by either bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. However, intravenous injections of recombinant beta-glucuronidase initiated at birth reduce the pathological evidence of disease in MPS VII mice. In this study we present evidence that enzyme replacement initiated at birth improved the behavioral performance and reduced hearing loss in MPS VII mice. Enzyme-treated MPS VII mice performed similarly to normal mice and significantly better than mock- treated MPS VII mice in every phase of the Morris Water Maze test. In addition, the auditory function of treated MPS VII mice was dramatically improved, and was indistinguishable from normal mice. These data indicate that some of the learning, memory, and hearing deficits can be prevented in MPS VII mice if enzyme replacement therapy is initiated early in life. These data also provide functional correlates to the biochemical and histopathological improvements observed after enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:9525982

  14. The time enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in fish: Day/night expressions of three aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase genes in three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Kulczykowska, Ewa; Kleszczyńska, Agnieszka; Gozdowska, Magdalena; Sokołowska, Ewa

    2017-03-16

    In vertebrates, aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT; EC 2.3.1.87) is a time-keeping enzyme in melatonin (Mel) biosynthesis. Uniquely in fish, there are several AANAT isozymes belonging to two AANAT subfamilies, AANAT1 and AANAT2, which are encoded by distinct genes. The different substrate preferences, kinetics and spatial expression patterns of isozymes indicate that they may have different functions. In the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), there are three genes encoding three AANAT isozymes. In this study, for the first time, the levels of aanat1a, aanat1b and aanat2 mRNAs are measured by absolute RT-qPCR in the brain, eye, skin, stomach, gut, heart and kidney collected at noon and midnight. Melatonin levels are analysed by HPLC with fluorescence detection in homogenates of the brain, eye, skin and kidney. The levels of aanats mRNAs differ significantly within and among organs. In the brain, eye, stomach and gut, there are day/night variations in aanats mRNAs levels. The highest levels of aanat1a and aanat1b mRNAs are in the eye. The extremely high expressions of these genes which are reflected in the highest Mel concentrations at this site at noon and midnight strongly suggest that the eye is an important source of the hormone in the three-spined sticklebacks. A very low level of aanat2 mRNA in all organs may suggest that AANAT1a and/or AANAT1b are principal isozymes in the three-spine sticklebacks. A presence of the isozymes of defined substrate preferences provides opportunity for control of acetylation of amines by modulation of individual aanat expression and permits the fine-tuning of indolethylamines and phenylethylamines metabolism to meet the particular needs of a given organ.

  15. The biosynthesis of cutin and suberin as an alternative source of enzymes for the production of bio-based chemicals and materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred

    2009-06-01

    Oxygenated fatty acids such as ricinoleic acid and vernolic acid can serve in the industry as synthons for the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals and polymers traditionally produced by chemical conversion of petroleum derivatives. Oxygenated fatty acids can also be useful to synthesize specialty chemicals such as cosmetics and aromas. There is thus a strong interest in producing these fatty acids in seed oils (triacylglycerols) of crop species. In the last 15 years or so, much effort has been devoted to isolate key genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis of oxygenated fatty acids and to express them in the seeds of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana or crop species. An often overlooked but rich source of enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of oxygenated fatty acids and their esterification to glycerol is the biosynthetic pathways of the plant lipid polyesters cutin and suberin. These protective polymers found in specific tissues of all higher plants are composed of a wide variety of oxygenated fatty acids, many of which have not been reported in seed oils (e.g. saturated omega-hydroxy fatty acids and alpha,omega-diacids). The purpose of this mini-review is to give an overview of the recent advances in the biosynthesis of cutin and suberin and discuss their potential utility in producing specific oxygenated fatty acids for specialty chemicals. Special emphasis is given to the role played by specific acyltransferases and P450 fatty acid oxidases. The use of plant surfaces as possible sinks for the accumulation of high value-added lipids is also highlighted.

  16. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil.

  17. Impairments in enzyme activity and biosynthesis of brush border-associated hydrolases in human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells infected by members of the Afa/Dr family of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, I; Bernet-Camard, M F; Rousset, M; Servin, A L

    2001-05-01

    Wild-type diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) harbouring afimbrial adhesin (Afa) or fimbrial Dr and F1845 adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) apically infecting the human intestinal epithelial cells promote injuries in the brush border of the cells. We report here that infection by Afa/Dr DAEC wild-type strains C1845 and IH11128 in polarized human fully differentiated Caco-2/TC7 cells dramatically impaired the enzyme activity of functional brush border-associated proteins sucrase-isomaltase (SI) and dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP IV). Blockers of the transduction signal molecules, previously found to be active against the Afa/Dr DAEC-induced cytoskeleton injury, were inactive against the Afa/Dr-induced decrease in sucrase enzyme activity. In parallel, Afa/Dr DAEC infection promotes the blockade of the biosynthesis of SI and DPP IV without affection enzyme stability. The observation that no changes occurred in mRNA levels of SI and DPP IV upon infection suggested that the decrease in biosynthesis probably resulted from a decrease in the translation rate. When the cells were infected with recombinant E. coli strains expressing homologous adhesins of the wild-type strains, neither a decrease in sucrase and DPP IV enzyme activities nor an inhibition of enzyme biosynthesis were observed. In conclusion, taken together, these data give new insights into the mechanisms by which the wild-type Afa/Dr DAEC strains induce functional injuries in polarized fully differentiated human intestinal cells. Moreover, the results revealed that other pathogenic factor(s) distinct from the Afa/Dr adhesins may play(s) a crucial role in this mechanism of pathogenicity.

  18. Genome-Directed Lead Discovery: Biosynthesis, Structure Elucidation, and Biological Evaluation of Two Families of Polyene Macrolactams against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Christopher J; Donia, Mohamed S; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; Ray, Debalina; Raskatov, Jevgenij A; Green, Richard E; McKerrow, James H; Fischbach, Michael A; Linington, Roger G

    2015-10-16

    Marine natural products are an important source of lead compounds against many pathogenic targets. Herein, we report the discovery of lobosamides A-C from a marine actinobacterium, Micromonospora sp., representing three new members of a small but growing family of bacterially produced polyene macrolactams. The lobosamides display growth inhibitory activity against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei (lobosamide A IC50 = 0.8 μM), the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). The biosynthetic gene cluster of the lobosamides was sequenced and suggests a conserved cluster organization among the 26-membered macrolactams. While determination of the relative and absolute configurations of many members of this family is lacking, the absolute configurations of the lobosamides were deduced using a combination of chemical modification, detailed spectroscopic analysis, and bioinformatics. We implemented a "molecules-to-genes-to-molecules" approach to determine the prevalence of similar clusters in other bacteria, which led to the discovery of two additional macrolactams, mirilactams A and B from Actinosynnema mirum. These additional analogs have allowed us to identify specific structure-activity relationships that contribute to the antitrypanosomal activity of this class. This approach illustrates the power of combining chemical analysis and genomics in the discovery and characterization of natural products as new lead compounds for neglected disease targets.

  19. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home Find a Lead-Safe Certified firm Before you renovate Before you buy or rent a home built before 1978 Test your home's drinking water Test for lead in paint, dust or soil ...

  20. LUDI: rule-based automatic design of new substituents for enzyme inhibitor leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Hans-Joachim

    1992-12-01

    Recent advances in a new method for the de novo design of enzyme inhibitors are reported. A new set of rules to define the possible nonbonded contacts between protein and ligand is presented. This method was derived from published statistical analyses of nonbonded contacts in crystal packings of organic molecules and has been implemented in the recently described computer program LUDI. Moreover, LUDI can now append a new substituent onto an already existing ligand. Applications are reported for the design of inhibitors of HIV protease and dihydrofolate reductase. The results demonstrate that LUDI is indeed capable of designing new ligands with improved binding when compared to the reference compound.

  1. Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, Charles; Balan, Venkatech; Dale, Bruce E.; Elander, Richard; Falls, Matthew; Hames, Bonnie; Holtzapple, Mark; Ladisch, Michael R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mosier, Nathan; Pallapolu, Venkata R.; Shi, Jian; Warner, Ryan E.

    2011-06-16

    Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), sulfur dioxide (SO2), liquid hot water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments were applied to Alamo, Dacotah, and Shawnee switchgrass. Application of the same analytical methods and material balance approaches facil-itated meaningful comparisons of glucose and xylose yields from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Use of a common supply of cellulase, beta-glucosidase, and xylanase also eased comparisons. All pretreatments enhanced sugar recovery from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis substantially compared to untreated switchgrass. Adding beta-glucosidase was effective early in enzy-matic hydrolysis while cellobiose levels were high but had limited effect on longer term yields at the enzyme loadings applied. Adding xylanase improved yields most for higher pH pretreatments where more xylan was left in the solids. Harvest time had more impact on performance than switchgrass variety, and microscopy showed changes in different features could impact performance by different pretreatments.

  2. Differential response of orthologous L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferases (DapL) to enzyme inhibitory antibiotic lead compounds.

    PubMed

    McKinnie, Shaun M K; Rodriguez-Lopez, Eva M; Vederas, John C; Crowther, Jennifer M; Suzuki, Hironori; Dobson, Renwick C J; Leustek, Thomas; Triassi, Alexander J; Wheatley, Matthew S; Hudson, André O

    2014-01-01

    L,L-Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) is an enzyme required for the biosynthesis of meso-diaminopimelate (m-DAP) and L-lysine (Lys) in some bacteria and photosynthetic organisms. m-DAP and Lys are both involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan (PG) and protein synthesis. DapL is found in specific eubacterial and archaeal lineages, in particular in several groups of pathogenic bacteria such as Leptospira interrogans (LiDapL), the soil/water bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum (VsDapL) and the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrDapL). Here we present the first comprehensive inhibition study comparing the kinetic activity of DapL orthologs using previously active small molecule inhibitors formerly identified in a screen with the DapL of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDapL), a flowering plant. Each inhibitor is derived from one of four classes with different central structural moieties: a hydrazide, a rhodanine, a barbiturate, or a thiobarbituate functionality. The results show that all five compounds tested were effective at inhibiting the DapL orthologs. LiDapL and AtDapL showed similar patterns of inhibition across the inhibitor series, whereas the VsDapL and CrDapL inhibition patterns were different from that of LiDapL and AtDapL. CrDapL was found to be insensitive to the hydrazide (IC₅₀ >200 μM). VsDapL was found to be the most sensitive to the barbiturate and thiobarbiturate containing inhibitors (IC₅₀ ∼5 μM). Taken together, the data shows that the homologs have differing sensitivities to the inhibitors with IC₅₀ values ranging from 4.7 to 250 μM. In an attempt to understand the basis for these differences the four enzymes were modeled based on the known structure of AtDapL. Overall, it was found that the enzyme active sites were conserved, although the second shell of residues close to the active site were not. We conclude from this that the altered binding patterns seen in the inhibition studies may be a consequence of the inhibitors forming

  3. Functional redundancy of CDP-ethanolamine and CDP-choline pathway enzymes in phospholipid biosynthesis: ethanolamine-dependent effects on steady-state membrane phospholipid composition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T P; Skinner, H B; Bankaitis, V A

    1994-01-01

    It has been established that yeast membrane phospholipid content is responsive to the inositol and choline content of the growth medium. Alterations in the levels of transcription of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes contribute significantly to this response. We now describe conditions under which ethanolamine can exert significant influence on yeast membrane phospholipid composition. We demonstrate that mutations which block a defined subset of the reactions required for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) via the CDP-choline pathway cause ethanolamine-dependent effects on the steady-state levels of bulk PC in yeast membranes. Such an ethanolamine-dependent reduction in bulk membrane PC content was observed for both choline kinase (cki) and choline phosphotransferase (cpt1) mutants, but it was not observed for mutants defective in cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase, the enzyme that catalyzes the penultimate reaction of the CDP-choline pathway for PC biosynthesis. Moreover, the ethanolamine effect observed for cki and cpt1 mutants was independent of the choline content of the growth medium. Finally, we found that haploid yeast strains defective in the activity of both the choline and ethanolamine phosphotransferases experienced an ethanolamine-insensitive reduction in steady-state PC content, an effect which was not observed in strains defective in either one of these activities alone. The collective data indicate that specific enzymes of the CDP-ethanolamine pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis, while able to contribute to PC synthesis when yeast cells are grown under conditions of ethanolamine deprivation, do not do so when yeast cells are presented with this phospholipid headgroup precursor. Images PMID:7961445

  4. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  5. The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R; Leimkühler, Silke

    2015-03-01

    The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors (Moco) is an ancient, ubiquitous, and highly conserved pathway leading to the biochemical activation of molybdenum. Moco is the essential component of a group of redox enzymes, which are diverse in terms of their phylogenetic distribution and their architectures, both at the overall level and in their catalytic geometry. A wide variety of transformations are catalyzed by these enzymes at carbon, sulfur and nitrogen atoms, which include the transfer of an oxo group or two electrons to or from the substrate. More than 50 molybdoenzymes were identified to date. In all molybdoenzymes except nitrogenase, molybdenum is coordinated to a dithiolene group on the 6-alkyl side chain of a pterin called molybdopterin (MPT). The biosynthesis of Moco can be divided into three general steps, with a fourth one present only in bacteria and archaea: (1) formation of the cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate, (2) formation of MPT, (3) insertion of molybdenum into molybdopterin to form Moco, and (4) additional modification of Moco in bacteria with the attachment of a nucleotide to the phosphate group of MPT, forming the dinucleotide variant of Moco. This review will focus on the biosynthesis of Moco in bacteria, humans and plants.

  6. Lead

    MedlinePlus

    ... ATSDR Board of Scientific Counselors Lead in the environment: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Federal partner agencies: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Data, ...

  7. Effects of low-level lead exposure on pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase and other erythrocyte enzymes. Possible role of pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase in the pathogenesis of lead-induced anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Paglia, D E; Valentine, W N; Dahlgren, J G

    1975-01-01

    Similarities between lead-induced anemia and a new hereditary erythorenzymopathy involving pyrimidine-specific 5'-nucleotidase prompted studies of the effects of lead on this and other erythrocyte enzymes. In vitro incubations of normal mature erythrocytes demonstrated that significant inhibition of pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase occurred in the presence of lead at concentrations that had minimal effects on many other erythrocyte enzymes assayed simultaneously. Similarly, subjects with chronic lead intoxication secondary to industrial exposure exhibited substantial and consistent impairment of erythrocyte pyrimidine-5'-nucleotidase activity. Results suggest that lead-induced deficiency of this enzyme in maturing erythroid elements could, if sufficiently severe, result in induction of basophilic stippling and premature erythrocyte hemolysis analogous to that encountered in the genetically induced enzyme-deficiency syndrome. PMID:1184742

  8. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David S.; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S.; McAdam, Erin L.; Quittenden, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA. However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  9. Can CuO nanoparticles lead to epigenetic regulation of antioxidant enzyme system?

    PubMed

    Chibber, Sandesh; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-01-01

    Copper has been used from ancient time in various applications. Scientists have exploited its means of exposure and consequences to living organisms. The peculiar property of nanomaterials that is a high surface to volume ratio has increased the range of application in products. Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are widely used in industrial applications such as semiconductor devices, gas sensor, batteries, solar energy converter, microelectronics, heat transfer fluids and consumer products. In contrast, acute toxicity of CuO NPs has also been reported. Subsequently, human and environmental health may be at a high risk. Their frequent use can also contaminate ecosystems. Therefore, the toxicity of CuO NPs needs to be thoroughly understood. In this review, we have tried to discuss the recent facts and mechanism that have been explored for CuO NPs-induced toxicity at a cellular, in vivo and ecotoxicological level. Accordingly, the main cause for induction of toxicity by CuO NPs is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) followed by the mitochondrial destruction that leads to apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway or under the condition such as hypoxia cell on exposure to CuO NPs may commit to necrosis. Moreover, CuO NPs also result in activation of MAPK pathways, ERKs and JNK/SAPK thus play an important role in the activation of AP-1. Furthermore, CuO NPs also leads to up-regulation of p53 and caspase three genes. Therefore, careful measures are required to explore omic technology to understand the molecular mechanism of the deleterious effects caused by CuO NPs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan; Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua; Guo, Kai; Fan, Chunfen; Si, Shengli; and others

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid.

  11. Characterization of the lipopolysaccharide from Pasteurella multocida Heddleston serovar 9: identification of a proposed bi-functional dTDP-3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-α-D-glucose biosynthesis enzyme.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; St Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny; John, Marietta; Boyce, John D; Adler, Ben; Cox, Andrew D

    2012-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida strains are classified into 16 different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serovars using the Heddleston serotyping scheme. Ongoing studies in our laboratories on the LPS aim to determine the core oligosaccharide (OS) structures expressed by each of the Heddleston type strains and identify the genes and transferases required for the biosynthesis of the serovar-specific OSs. In this study, we have determined the core OS of the LPS expressed by the Heddleston serovar 9 type strain, P2095. Structural information was established by a combination of monosaccharide and methylation analyses, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry revealing the following structure: . The serovar 9 OS contains an inner core that is conserved among P. multocida strains with an elaborate outer core extension containing rhamnose (Rha), a D-glycero-D-manno isomer of heptose, and the unusual deoxyamino sugar, 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-α-D-glucose (Qui3NAc). Genetic analyses of the LPS outer core biosynthesis locus revealed that in addition to the glycosyltransferases predicted to transfer the sugars to the nascent LPS molecule, the locus also contained the complete set of genes required for the biosynthesis of the nucleotide sugar donors dTDP-Rha and dTDP-Qui3NAc. One of the genes identified as part of the dTDP-Qui3NAc biosynthesis pathway, qdtD, encodes a proposed bi-functional enzyme with N-terminal amino acid identity to dTDP-4-oxo-6-deoxy-D-glucose-3,4-oxoisomerase and C-terminal amino acid identity to dTDP-3-oxo-6-deoxy-α-D-glucose transacetylase.

  12. Catechin induced modulation in the activities of thyroid hormone synthesizing enzymes leading to hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amar K; De, Neela

    2013-02-01

    Catechins, the flavonoids found in abundance in green tea, have many beneficial health effects such as antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, and hypotensive properties. However, flavonoids have antithyroid/goitrogenic effect, although less information is available about the effect of pure catechin on thyroid physiology. The present investigation has been undertaken to explore the effect of catechin administration on thyroid physiology in rat model. For the in vivo experiment catechin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg body to male albino rats for 15 and 30 days, respectively, and thyroid activities were evaluated with respect to determination of serum levels of thyroid hormones, thyroid peroxidase, 5'-deiodinase I (5'-DI), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities that are involved in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Catechin decreased the activities of thyroid peroxidase and thyroidal 5'-deiodinase I, while Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity significantly increased in dose-dependent manner; substantial decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels coupled with significant elevation of serum TSH were also noted. Histological examinations of the thyroid gland revealed marked hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia of the thyroid follicles with depleted colloid content. In in vitro study, short-term exposure of rat thyroid tissue to catechin at the concentrations of 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 mg/ml leads to decrease in the activities of thyroid peroxidase and 5'-deiodinase I, while the activity of thyroidal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase remains unaltered even at high concentration of catechin treatment. The present study reinforces the concept that catechin, tea flavonoids possess potent antithyroid activity as evidenced from in vivo and in vitro studies.

  13. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  14. Metabolic control of respiratory levels in coenzyme Q biosynthesis-deficient Escherichia coli strains leading to fine-tune aerobic lactate fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-08-01

    A novel strategy to finely control the electron transfer chain (ETC) activity of Escherichia coli was established. In this study, the fine-tuning of the ubiquinone biosynthesis pathway was applied to further controlling ETC function in coenzyme Q8 biosynthesis-deficient E. coli strains, HW108 and HW109, which contain mutations in ubiE and ubiG, respectively. A competing pathway on the intermediate substrates of the Q8 synthesis pathway, catalyzed by diphosphate:4-hydroxybenzoate geranyltransferase (PGT-1) of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, was introduced into these mutant strains. A nearly theoretical yield of lactate production can be achieved under fully aerobic conditions via an in vivo, genetically fine-tunable means to further control the activity of the ETC of the Q8 biosynthesis-deficient E. coli strains.

  15. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GmMYB12B2, affects the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes encoding key enzymes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jing-Wen; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Su, Lian-Tai; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2013-12-10

    Isoflavones play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are potentially important for human nutrition and health. To study the regulation of isoflavonoid synthesis in soybean, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GmMYB12B2 was isolated and characterized. Yeast expression experiments demonstrated that GmMYB12B2 showed transcriptional activity. GmMYB12B2 was localized in the nucleus when it was transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GmMYB12B2 transcription was increased in roots and mature seeds compared with other organs. The gene expression level in immature embryos was consistent with the accumulation of isoflavones. CHS8 is a key enzyme in plant flavonoid biosynthesis. Transient expression experiments in soybean calli demonstrated that CHS8 was regulated by GmMYB12B2 and produced more fluorescence. The expression levels of some key enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis were examined in transgenic Arabidopsis lines. The results showed that the expression levels of PAL1, CHS and FLS in transgenic plants were significantly higher than those in wild type plants. However, the expression level of DFR was lower, and the expression levels of CHI, F3H and F3'H were the same in all lines. GmMYB12B2 expression caused a constitutive increase in the accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared with wild type plants.

  16. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of WlbA from Bordetella pertussis and Chromobacterium violaceum: Enzymes Required for the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2011-12-22

    The unusual sugar 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic acid, or ManNAc3NAcA, has been observed in the lipopolysaccharides of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. It is added to the lipopolysaccharides of these organisms by glycosyltransferases that use as substrates UDP-ManNAc3NAcA. Five enzymes are ultimately required for the biosynthesis of UDP-ManNAc3NAcA starting from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. The second enzyme in the pathway, encoded by the wlba gene and referred to as WlbA, catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidation of the C-3' hydroxyl group of the UDP-linked sugar. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of the WlbA enzymes from Bordetella pertussis and Chromobacterium violaceum. For this investigation, ternary structures were determined in the presence of NAD(H) and substrate to 2.13 and 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both of the enzymes display octameric quaternary structures with their active sites positioned far apart. The octamers can be envisioned as tetramers of dimers. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the reaction mechanisms for these enzymes are sequential and that they do not require {alpha}-ketoglutarate for activity. These results are in sharp contrast to those recently reported for the WlbA enzymes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Thermus thermophilus, which function via ping-pong mechanisms that involve {alpha}-ketoglutarate. Taken together, the results reported here demonstrate that there are two distinct families of WlbA enzymes, which differ with respect to amino acid sequences, quaternary structures, active site architectures, and kinetic mechanisms.

  17. Biochemical and structural characterization of WlbA from Bordetella pertussis and Chromobacterium violaceum: enzymes required for the biosynthesis of 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid.

    PubMed

    Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2011-03-08

    The unusual sugar 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic acid, or ManNAc3NAcA, has been observed in the lipopolysaccharides of both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. It is added to the lipopolysaccharides of these organisms by glycosyltransferases that use as substrates UDP-ManNAc3NAcA. Five enzymes are ultimately required for the biosynthesis of UDP-ManNAc3NAcA starting from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. The second enzyme in the pathway, encoded by the wlba gene and referred to as WlbA, catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidation of the C-3' hydroxyl group of the UDP-linked sugar. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of the WlbA enzymes from Bordetella pertussis and Chromobacterium violaceum. For this investigation, ternary structures were determined in the presence of NAD(H) and substrate to 2.13 and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. Both of the enzymes display octameric quaternary structures with their active sites positioned far apart. The octamers can be envisioned as tetramers of dimers. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the reaction mechanisms for these enzymes are sequential and that they do not require α-ketoglutarate for activity. These results are in sharp contrast to those recently reported for the WlbA enzymes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Thermus thermophilus, which function via ping-pong mechanisms that involve α-ketoglutarate. Taken together, the results reported here demonstrate that there are two distinct families of WlbA enzymes, which differ with respect to amino acid sequences, quaternary structures, active site architectures, and kinetic mechanisms.

  18. Comparative genomics guided discovery of two missing archaeal enzyme families involved in the biosynthesis of the pterin moiety of tetrahydromethanopterin and tetrahydrofolate.

    PubMed

    de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Phillips, Gabriela; Grochowski, Laura L; El Yacoubi, Basma; Jenney, Francis; Adams, Michael W W; Murzin, Alexey G; White, Robert H

    2012-11-16

    C-1 carriers are essential cofactors in all domains of life, and in Archaea, these can be derivatives of tetrahydromethanopterin (H(4)-MPT) or tetrahydrofolate (H(4)-folate). Their synthesis requires 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin diphosphate (6-HMDP) as the precursor, but the nature of pathways that lead to its formation were unknown until the recent discovery of the GTP cyclohydrolase IB/MptA family that catalyzes the first step, the conversion of GTP to dihydroneopterin 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate [El Yacoubi, B.; et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem., 281, 37586-37593 and Grochowski, L. L.; et al. (2007) Biochemistry46, 6658-6667]. Using a combination of comparative genomics analyses, heterologous complementation tests, and in vitro assays, we show that the archaeal protein families COG2098 and COG1634 specify two of the missing 6-HMDP synthesis enzymes. Members of the COG2098 family catalyze the formation of 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin from 7,8-dihydroneopterin, while members of the COG1634 family catalyze the formation of 6-HMDP from 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin. The discovery of these missing genes solves a long-standing mystery and provides novel examples of convergent evolutions where proteins of dissimilar architectures perform the same biochemical function.

  19. Reduced Biosynthesis of Digalactosyldiacylglycerol, a Major Chloroplast Membrane Lipid, Leads to Oxylipin Overproduction and Phloem Cap Lignification in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lih-Jen; Herrfurth, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    DIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL SYNTHASE1 (DGD1) is a chloroplast outer membrane protein responsible for the biosynthesis of the lipid digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) from monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG). The Arabidopsis thaliana dgd1 mutants have a greater than 90% reduction in DGDG content, reduced photosynthesis, and altered chloroplast morphology. However, the most pronounced visible phenotype is the extremely short inflorescence stem, but how deficient DGDG biosynthesis causes this phenotype is unclear. We found that, in dgd1 mutants, phloem cap cells were lignified and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes were highly upregulated under normal growth conditions. The coronative insensitive1 dgd1 and allene oxide synthase dgd1 double mutants no longer exhibited the short inflorescence stem and lignification phenotypes but still had the same lipid profile and reduced photosynthesis as dgd1 single mutants. Hormone and lipidomics analyses showed higher levels of JA, JA-isoleucine, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and arabidopsides in dgd1 mutants. Transcript and protein level analyses further suggest that JA biosynthesis in dgd1 is initially activated through the increased expression of genes encoding 13-lipoxygenases (LOXs) and phospholipase A-Iγ3 (At1g51440), a plastid lipase with a high substrate preference for MGDG, and is sustained by further increases in LOX and allene oxide cyclase mRNA and protein levels. Our results demonstrate a link between the biosynthesis of DGDG and JA. PMID:26721860

  20. Enzyme activity as an indicator of soil-rehabilitation processes at a zinc and lead ore mining and processing area.

    PubMed

    Ciarkowska, Krystyna; Sołek-Podwika, Katarzyna; Wieczorek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The activities of soil enzymes in relation to the changes occurring in the soil on a degraded area in southern Poland after zinc and lead mining were analyzed. An evaluation of the usefulness of urease and invertase activities for estimating the progress of the rehabilitation processes in degraded soil was performed. The data show that the soil samples differed significantly in organic carbon (0.68-104.0 g kg(-1)) and total nitrogen (0.03-8.64 g kg(-1)) content in their surface horizons. All of the soil samples (apart from one covered with forest) had very high total concentrations of zinc (4050-10,884 mg kg(-1)), lead (959-6661 mg kg(-1)) and cadmium (24.4-174.3 mg kg(-1)) in their surface horizons, and similar concentrations in their deeper horizons. Nevertheless, the amounts of the soluble forms of the above-mentioned heavy metals were quite low and they accounted for only a small percentage of the total concentrations: 1.4% for Zn, 0.01% for Pb and 2.6% for Cd. Urease activities were ranked as follows: soil from flotation settler (0.88-1.78 μg N-NH4(+) 2h(-1) g(-1))enzyme reactions occurring in slightly acidic or alkaline soil conditions. Under such conditions, heavy metals occur mainly in insoluble forms. The activities of these enzymes are strongly dependent on the content and decomposition of organic matter in the soil.

  1. Two Small RNAs Conserved in Enterobacteriaceae Provide Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics Targeting the Cell Wall Biosynthesis Enzyme Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muna A.; Göpel, Yvonne; Milewski, Slawomir; Görke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Formation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) by enzyme GlcN6P synthase (GlmS) represents the first step in bacterial cell envelope synthesis. In Escherichia coli, expression of glmS is controlled by small RNAs (sRNAs) GlmY and GlmZ. GlmZ activates the glmS mRNA by base-pairing. When not required, GlmZ is bound by adapter protein RapZ and recruited to cleavage by RNase E inactivating the sRNA. The homologous sRNA GlmY activates glmS indirectly. When present at high levels, GlmY sequesters RapZ by an RNA mimicry mechanism suppressing cleavage of GlmZ. The interplay of both sRNAs is believed to adjust GlmS synthesis to the needs of the cell, i.e., to achieve GlcN6P homeostasis. Bacilysin (tetaine) and Nva-FMDP are dipeptide antibiotics that impair cell envelope synthesis by inhibition of enzyme GlmS through covalent modification. However, although taken up efficiently, these antibiotics are less active against E. coli for reasons unknown so far. Here we show that the GlmY/GlmZ circuit provides resistance. Inhibition of GlmS causes GlcN6P deprivation leading to activation of GlmY and GlmZ, which in turn trigger glmS overexpression in a dosage-dependent manner. Mutation of glmY or glmZ disables this response and renders the bacteria highly susceptible to GlmS inhibitors. Thus, E. coli compensates inhibition of GlmS by increasing its synthesis through the GlmY/GlmZ pathway. This mechanism is also operative in Salmonella indicating that it is conserved in Enterobacteriaceae possessing these sRNAs. As GlmY apparently responds to GlcN6P, co-application of a non-metabolizable GlcN6P analog may prevent activation of the sRNAs and thereby increase the bactericidal activity of GlmS inhibitors against wild-type bacteria. Initial experiments using glucosamine-6-sulfate support this possibility. Thus, GlcN6P analogs might be considered for co-application with GlmS inhibitors in combined therapy to treat infections caused by pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27379045

  2. Biosynthesis of active pharmaceuticals: β-lactam biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Van Den Berg, Marco; Gidijala, Loknath; Kiela, Jan; Bovenberg, Roel; Vander Keli, Ida

    2010-01-01

    β-lactam antibiotics (e.g. penicillins, cephalosporins) are of major clinical importance and contribute to over 40% of the total antibiotic market. These compounds are produced as secondary metabolites by certain actinomycetes and filamentous fungi (e.g. Penicillium, Aspergillus and Acremonium species). The industrial producer of penicillin is the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzymes of the penicillin biosynthetic pathway are well characterized and most of them are encoded by genes that are organized in a cluster in the genome. Remarkably, the penicillin biosynthetic pathway is compartmentalized: the initial steps of penicillin biosynthesis are catalyzed by cytosolic enzymes, whereas the two final steps involve peroxisomal enzymes. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the enzymes of β-lactam biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum and the role of peroxisomes in this process. An overview is given on strain improvement programs via classical mutagenesis and, more recently, genetic engineering, leading to more productive strains. Also, the potential of using heterologous hosts for the development of novel ß-lactam antibiotics and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-based peptides is discussed.

  3. The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan lipid-linked intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, Ahmed; Trunkfield, Amy E; Bugg, Timothy D H; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    The biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan is a complex process involving many different steps taking place in the cytoplasm (synthesis of the nucleotide precursors) and on the inner and outer sides of the cytoplasmic membrane (assembly and polymerization of the disaccharide-peptide monomer unit, respectively). This review summarizes the current knowledge on the membrane steps leading to the formation of the lipid II intermediate, i.e. the substrate of the polymerization reactions. It makes the point on past and recent data that have significantly contributed to the understanding of the biosynthesis of undecaprenyl phosphate, the carrier lipid required for the anchoring of the peptidoglycan hydrophilic units in the membrane, and to the characterization of the MraY and MurG enzymes which catalyze the successive transfers of the N-acetylmuramoyl-peptide and N-acetylglucosamine moieties onto the carrier lipid, respectively. Enzyme inhibitors and antibacterial compounds interfering with these essential metabolic steps and interesting targets are presented.

  4. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  5. Cloning and characterization of the Streptomyces peucetius dnmZUV genes encoding three enzymes required for biosynthesis of the daunorubicin precursor thymidine diphospho-L-daunosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S L; Gallo, M A; Madduri, K; Liu, X; Hutchinson, C R

    1997-01-01

    Characterization of the dnmZ, dnmU, and dnmV genes from the daunorubicin-producer Streptomyces peucetius by DNA sequence analysis indicated that these genes encode a protein of unknown function plus a putative thymidine diphospho-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose-3(5)-epimerase and thymidine diphospho-4-ketodeoxyhexulose reductase, respectively. Inactivation of each of the three genes by gene disruption and replacement in the wild-type strain demonstrated that all of them are required for daunosamine biosynthesis. PMID:9209071

  6. Deficiencies in both starch synthase IIIa and branching enzyme IIb lead to a significant increase in amylose in SSIIa-inactive japonica rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hiroki; Abe, Natsuko; Matsushima, Ryo; Crofts, Naoko; Oitome, Naoko F; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-10-01

    Starch synthase (SS) IIIa has the second highest activity of the total soluble SS activity in developing rice endosperm. Branching enzyme (BE) IIb is the major BE isozyme, and is strongly expressed in developing rice endosperm. A mutant (ss3a/be2b) was generated from wild-type japonica rice which lacks SSIIa activity. The seed weight of ss3a/be2b was 74-94% of that of the wild type, whereas the be2b seed weight was 59-73% of that of the wild type. There were significantly fewer amylopectin short chains [degree of polymerization (DP) ≤13] in ss3a/be2b compared with the wild type. In contrast, the amount of long chains (DP ≥25) connecting clusters of amylopectin in ss3a/be2b was higher than in the wild type and lower than in be2b. The apparent amylose content of ss3a/be2b was 45%, which was >1.5 times greater than that of either ss3a or be2b. Both SSIIIa and BEIIb deficiencies led to higher activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), which partly explains the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b endosperm. The percentage apparent amylose content of ss3a and ss3a/be2b at 10 days after flowering (DAF) was higher than that of the wild type and be2b. At 20 DAF, amylopectin biosynthesis in be2b and ss3a/be2b was not observed, whereas amylose biosynthesis in these lines was accelerated at 30 DAF. These data suggest that the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b mutant results from higher amylose biosynthesis at two stages, up to 20 DAF and from 30 DAF to maturity.

  7. Benzopyrone coumarin leads to an inhibition of ochratoxin biosynthesis in representatives of Aspergillus and Penicillium spp. via a type of feedback response mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L S L; Stoll, D A; Geisen, R; Schmidt-Heydt, M

    2014-04-01

    Growth and mycotoxin biosynthesis of the ochratoxin-producing fungal strains Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus steynii, Penicillium verrucosum, and Penicillium nordium were analyzed on standard laboratory growth medium supplemented with different amounts of coumarin, an organic compound of the benzopyrone class. Neither the growth nor the phenotypic morphology of the filamentous fungi analyzed was affected by using coumarin concentrations equivalent to 2.5 to 25 μg/ml of medium. In contrast, the ochratoxin biosynthesis was strongly inhibited in both strains of the Aspergillus species and nearly completely inhibited in both Penicillium strains at coumarin concentrations above 8.75 μg/ml. Analyzing the transcriptional activity of the otapksPN polyketide synthase gene in P. nordicum using real-time PCR revealed a strong concentration-dependent decrease in gene expression. Taken together, the data show that ochratoxin biosynthesis in representative strains of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium could be effectively inhibited by coumarin in a concentration-dependent manner. It could be suggested that the molecular background behind this inhibition is some kind of feedback response mechanism, based on the structural similarity of coumarin to the benzopyrone moiety of the ochratoxin molecule.

  8. Mutation of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Core LPS Biosynthesis Enzyme RfaD Confers Hypersusceptibility to Host Intestinal Innate Immunity In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Jenn-Wei; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Teng, Ching-Hao; Hsu, Tai-I; Lu, Pei-Jung; Syu, Wan-Jr; Wang, Sin-Tian; Chou, Ting-Chen; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is an important foodborne pathogen causing severe diseases in humans worldwide. Currently, there is no specific treatment available for EHEC infection and the use of conventional antibiotics is contraindicated. Therefore, identification of potential therapeutic targets and development of effective measures to control and treat EHEC infection are needed. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are surface glycolipids found on the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, including EHEC, and LPS biosynthesis has long been considered as potential anti-bacterial target. Here, we demonstrated that the EHEC rfaD gene that functions in the biosynthesis of the LPS inner core is required for the intestinal colonization and pathogenesis of EHEC in vivo. Disruption of the EHEC rfaD confers attenuated toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans and less bacterial colonization in the intestine of C. elegans and mouse. Moreover, rfaD is also involved in the control of susceptibility of EHEC to antimicrobial peptides and host intestinal immunity. It is worth noting that rfaD mutation did not interfere with the growth kinetics when compared to the wild-type EHEC cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that mutations of the EHEC rfaD confer hypersusceptibility to host intestinal innate immunity in vivo, and suggested that targeting the RfaD or the core LPS synthesis pathway may provide alternative therapeutic regimens for EHEC infection. PMID:27570746

  9. In utero-exposed di(n-butyl) phthalate induce dose dependent, age-related changes of morphology and testosterone-biosynthesis enzymes/associated proteins of Leydig cell mitochondria in rats.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Masaya; Wempe, Michael F; Mutou, Tomoko; Okayama, Yuya; Kansaku, Norio; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Masahiro; Asari, Masao; Wakui, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Female pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were intragastrically (ig) administered di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) at four doses (0, 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg) during gestation days (GD) 12-21 (n = 5 per group). The age-related morphological changes of Leydig cell mitochondrion (LC-Mt) and testosterone biosynthesis enzymes/associated genes/proteins expression levels were investigated. As compared to the control (no DBP), the 10 mg, and 50 mg DBP dose groups, the 100 mg DBP dose group at weeks 5 and 7 showed a significant amount of small LC-Mt. Thereafter, from weeks 9 to 17, the LC-Mt size and quantity in the 100 mg DBP dose group increased and became statistically similar to the other dose groups; hence, dose and time-dependent LC-Mt changes were observed. Throughout the study, the 100 mg DBP dose group had significantly lower testosterone levels. In addition, the 100 mg DBP dose group displayed lower StAR (StAR, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and P450scc (CYP11a1, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme) levels at weeks 5 and 7, but they became statistically similar to all other dose groups at weeks 9 to 17; in contrast, the SR-B1 (Sarb1, scavenger receptor class B member 1) levels were similar for all DBP dose groups. The rats in utero 100 mg DBP /kg/day (GD 12-21) exposure results from this study indicate a dose-dependent, age-related morphological change in LC-Mt which are linked to reductions in testosterone biosynthesis genes / proteins expression, specifically StAR and P450scc.

  10. Correlation-Based Network Analysis of Metabolite and Enzyme Profiles Reveals a Role of Citrate Biosynthesis in Modulating N and C Metabolism in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, David; Xue, Wentao; Zhang, Nengyi; Kremling, Karl; Gur, Amit; Pilosof, Shai; Gibon, Yves; Stitt, Mark; Buckler, Edward S.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Fait, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their variance within the population, consistently with their related enzymes. The overall higher CV values for metabolites as compared to the tested enzymes are indicative for their greater phenotypic plasticity. H2 tests revealed galactinol (1) and asparagine (0.91) as the highest scorers among metabolites and nitrate reductase (0.73), NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase (0.52), and phosphoglucomutase (0.51) among enzymes. The overall low H2 scores for metabolites and enzymes are suggestive for a great environmental impact or gene-environment interaction. Correlation-based network generation followed by community detection analysis, partitioned the network into three main communities and one dyad, (i) reflecting the different levels of phenotypic plasticity of the two molecular classes as observed for the CV values and (ii) highlighting the concerted changes between classes of chemically related metabolites. Community 1 is composed mainly of enzymes and specialized metabolites, community 2′ is enriched in N-containing compounds and phosphorylated-intermediates. The third community contains mainly organic acids and sugars. Cross-community linkages are supported by aspartate, by the photorespiration amino acids glycine and serine, by the metabolically related GABA and putrescine, and by citrate. The latter displayed the strongest node-betweenness value (185.25) of all nodes highlighting its fundamental structural role in the connectivity of the network by linking between different communities and to the also strongly connected enzyme aldolase. PMID:27462343

  11. Evolution in biosynthetic pathways: two enzymes catalyzing consecutive steps in methionine biosynthesis originate from a common ancestor and possess a similar regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Belfaiza, J; Parsot, C; Martel, A; de la Tour, C B; Margarita, D; Cohen, G N; Saint-Girons, I

    1986-02-01

    The metC gene of Escherichia coli K-12 was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the metC gene and its flanking regions was determined. The translation initiation codon was identified by sequencing the NH2-terminal part of beta-cystathionase, the MetC gene product. The metC gene (1185 nucleotides) encodes a protein having 395 amino acid residues. The 5' noncoding region was found to contain a "Met box" homologous to sequences suggestive of operator structures upstream from other methionine genes that are controlled by the product of the pleiotropic regulatory metJ gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of beta-cystathionase showed extensive homology with that of the MetB protein (cystathionine gamma-synthase) that catalyzes the preceding step in methionine biosynthesis. The homology strongly suggests that the structural genes for the MetB and MetC proteins evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  12. The NRPS Enzyme DdaD Tethers Nβ-fumaramoyl-DAP for Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-Dependent Epoxidation by DdaC During Dapdiamide Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Marie A.; Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Matthews, Megan L.; Bollinger, J. Martin; Kelleher, Neil L.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The gene cluster from Pantoea agglomerans responsible for biosynthesis of the dapdiamide antibiotics encodes an adenylation-thiolation didomain protein, DdaD, and an Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase homolog, DdaC. Here we show that DdaD, a nonribosomal peptide synthetase module, activates and sequesters Nβ-fumaramoyl-L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid as a covalently tethered thioester for subsequent oxidative modification of the fumaramoyl group. DdaC catalyzes Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent epoxidation of the covalently bound Nβ-fumaramoyl-L-2,3-diaminopropionyl-S-DdaD species to generate Nβ-epoxysuccinamoyl-DAP in thioester linkage to DdaD. After hydrolytic release, Nβ-epoxysuccinamoyl-DAP can be ligated to L-valine by the ATP-dependent ligase DdaF to form the natural antibiotic Nβ-epoxysuccinamoyl-diaminopropionyl-valine. PMID:20945916

  13. p-Aminobenzoic acid and chloramphenicol biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae: gene sets for a key enzyme, 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Z; Sun, Y; He, J; Vining, L C

    2001-08-01

    Amplification of sequences from Streptomyces venezuelae ISP5230 genomic DNA using PCR with primers based on conserved prokaryotic pabB sequences gave two main products. One matched pabAB, a locus previously identified in S. venezuelae. The second closely resembled the conserved pabB sequence consensus and hybridized with a 3.8 kb NcoI fragment of S. venezuelae ISP5230 genomic DNA. Cloning and sequence analysis of the 3.8 kb fragment detected three ORFs, and their deduced amino acid sequences were used in BLAST searches of the GenBank database. The ORF1 product was similar to PabB in other bacteria and to the PabB domain encoded by S. venezuelae pabAB. The ORF2 product resembled PabA of other bacteria. ORF3 was incomplete; its deduced partial amino acid sequence placed it in the MocR group of GntR-type transcriptional regulators. Introducing vectors containing the 3.8 kb NcoI fragment of S. venezuelae DNA into pabA and pabB mutants of Escherichia coli, or into the Streptomyces lividans pab mutant JG10, enhanced sulfanilamide resistance in the host strains. The increased resistance was attributed to expression of the pair of discrete translationally coupled p-aminobenzoic acid biosynthesis genes (designated pabB/pabA) cloned in the 3.8 kb fragment. These represent a second set of genes encoding 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase in S. venezuelae ISP5230. In contrast to the fused pabAB set previously isolated from this species, they do not participate in chloramphenicol biosynthesis, but like pabAB they can be disrupted without affecting growth on minimal medium. The gene disruption results suggest that S. venezuelae may have a third set of genes encoding PABA synthase.

  14. Tracking the sterol biosynthesis pathway of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Michele; Matthijs, Michiel; Carbonelle, Sophie; Moses, Tessa; Pollier, Jacob; Dasseville, Renaat; Baart, Gino J E; Vyverman, Wim; Goossens, Alain

    2014-11-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic microalgae that play a major role in global primary production and aquatic biogeochemical cycling. Endosymbiotic events and recurrent gene transfers uniquely shaped the genome of diatoms, which contains features from several domains of life. The biosynthesis pathways of sterols, essential compounds in all eukaryotic cells, and many of the enzymes involved are evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes. Although well characterized in most eukaryotes, the pathway leading to sterol biosynthesis in diatoms has remained hitherto unidentified. Through the DiatomCyc database we reconstructed the mevalonate and sterol biosynthetic pathways of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in silico. We experimentally verified the predicted pathways using enzyme inhibitor, gene silencing and heterologous gene expression approaches. Our analysis revealed a peculiar, chimeric organization of the diatom sterol biosynthesis pathway, which possesses features of both plant and fungal pathways. Strikingly, it lacks a conventional squalene epoxidase and utilizes an extended oxidosqualene cyclase and a multifunctional isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase/squalene synthase enzyme. The reconstruction of the P. tricornutum sterol pathway underscores the metabolic plasticity of diatoms and offers important insights for the engineering of diatoms for sustainable production of biofuels and high-value chemicals.

  15. Mutation of Rice BC12/GDD1, Which Encodes a Kinesin-Like Protein That Binds to a GA Biosynthesis Gene Promoter, Leads to Dwarfism with Impaired Cell Elongation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Jiafu; Qian, Qian; Xu, Yunyuan; Zhang, Cui; Xiao, Jun; Du, Cheng; Luo, Wei; Zou, Guoxing; Chen, Mingluan; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yuan, Ming; Chong, Kang

    2011-01-01

    The kinesins are a family of microtubule-based motor proteins that move directionally along microtubules and are involved in many crucial cellular processes, including cell elongation in plants. Less is known about kinesins directly regulating gene transcription to affect cellular physiological processes. Here, we describe a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, gibberellin-deficient dwarf1 (gdd1), that has a phenotype of greatly reduced length of root, stems, spikes, and seeds. This reduced length is due to decreased cell elongation and can be rescued by exogenous gibberellic acid (GA3) treatment. GDD1 was cloned by a map-based approach, was expressed constitutively, and was found to encode the kinesin-like protein BRITTLE CULM12 (BC12). Microtubule cosedimentation assays revealed that BC12/GDD1 bound to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner. Whole-genome microarray analysis revealed the expression of ent-kaurene oxidase (KO2), which encodes an enzyme involved in GA biosynthesis, was downregulated in gdd1. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that GDD1 bound to the element ACCAACTTGAA in the KO2 promoter. In addition, GDD1 was shown to have transactivation activity. The level of endogenous GAs was reduced in gdd1, and the reorganization of cortical microtubules was altered. Therefore, BC12/GDD1, a kinesin-like protein with transcription regulation activity, mediates cell elongation by regulating the GA biosynthesis pathway in rice. PMID:21325138

  16. Naturally occurring amino acid substitutions at Arg1174 in the human insulin receptor result in differential effects on receptor biosynthesis and hybrid formation, leading to discordant clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rau, H; Kocova, M; O'Rahilly, S; Whitehead, J P

    2000-07-01

    Missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the human insulin receptor frequently result in a dominantly inherited form of insulin resistance. We noted a marked disparity in the clinical phenotypes of our study subjects with different missense mutations at the same residue (Arg1174) of the insulin receptor. Subjects with a tryptophan substitution (W) were only moderately hyperinsulinemic, whereas those with a glutamine substitution (Q) had severe clinical and biochemical insulin resistance. Studies were undertaken to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Both W and Q mutant receptors bound insulin normally but were kinase inactive. The W mutation resulted in more rapid degradation of newly synthesized mutant receptor, which contrasted with the near-normal biosynthesis of the Q receptor. The propensity of the W receptor to form hybrids with the cotransfected wild-type (WT) receptor was also markedly impaired compared with the Q receptor, to an extent greater than could be explained by lower steady-state expression. Thus, the more clinically benign consequences of the heterozygous W mutant receptor are likely to relate to its impaired biosynthesis and/or reduced capacity to form hybrids with WT receptors. In addition to providing an explanation for the milder phenotype of 1174W versus 1174Q carriers, these studies provide further support for the notion that the dominant-negative effect of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase mutations involves the competition between inactive mutant homodimers and WT/mutant hybrids with active WT homodimers for both ligands and intracellular substrates.

  17. Peroxidase from Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don and the biosynthesis of alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine: a specific role for a multifunctional enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sottomayor, M; Ros Barceló, A

    2003-09-01

    We have characterized a basic peroxidase with alpha-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine (AVLB) synthase activity, which was purified from Catharanthus roseus leaves. This enzyme was the single peroxidase isoenzyme detected in C. roseus leaves, and the single AVLB synthase activity detected in C. roseus extracts. It was observed that the monomeric substrates of AVLB, vindoline and catharanthine, are both suitable electron donors for the oxidizing intermediates of the basic peroxidase, compounds I and II. Results also showed that the reaction proceeds by a radical-propagated mechanism. Substrate specificity studies of the enzyme revealed that it was also able to oxidize several common peroxidase substrates, indicating a broad range of substrate specificity that is characteristic of class III plant peroxidases. Cytochemical studies showed that the enzyme is localized in C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles, in individual spots at the inner surface of the tonoplast. This particular location suggests a meaningful spatial organization that led to the proposal of a metabolic channeling model for the peroxidase-mediated synthesis of AVLB. The importance of this type of mechanism in the regulation of peroxidase isoenzyme functions in vivo is discussed. In view of the results obtained it is concluded that the basic peroxidase present in C. roseus leaves fulfills all the requirements to be considered as an AVLB synthase, and it is proposed that this specific function of this multifunctional enzyme is determined by metabolic channeling resulting from specific protein-protein interactions.

  18. Structural Studies of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase and Cinnamyl-Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Key Enzymes of Monolignol Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiyun; Zhou, Rui; Louie, Gordon V.; Mühlemann, Joëlle K.; Bomati, Erin K.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dudareva, Natalia; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the two key reduction reactions in the conversion of cinnamic acid derivatives into monolignol building blocks for lignin polymers in plant cell walls. Here, we describe detailed functional and structural analyses of CCRs from Medicago truncatula and Petunia hybrida and of an atypical CAD (CAD2) from M. truncatula. These enzymes are closely related members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Our structural studies support a reaction mechanism involving a canonical SDR catalytic triad in both CCR and CAD2 and an important role for an auxiliary cysteine unique to CCR. Site-directed mutants of CAD2 (Phe226Ala and Tyr136Phe) that enlarge the phenolic binding site result in a 4- to 10-fold increase in activity with sinapaldehyde, which in comparison to the smaller coumaraldehyde and coniferaldehyde substrates is disfavored by wild-type CAD2. This finding demonstrates the potential exploitation of rationally engineered forms of CCR and CAD2 for the targeted modification of monolignol composition in transgenic plants. Thermal denaturation measurements and structural comparisons of various liganded and unliganded forms of CCR and CAD2 highlight substantial conformational flexibility of these SDR enzymes, which plays an important role in the establishment of catalytically productive complexes of the enzymes with their NADPH and phenolic substrates. PMID:25217505

  19. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F.; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products. PMID:27630663

  20. Evolution of Arginine Biosynthesis in the Bacterial Domain: Novel Gene-Enzyme Relationships from Psychrophilic Moritella Strains (Vibrionaceae) and Evolutionary Significance of N-α-Acetyl Ornithinase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Ziyuan; Legrain, Christianne; Rüger, Hans J.; Glansdorff, Nicolas

    2000-01-01

    In the arginine biosynthetic pathway of the vast majority of prokaryotes, the formation of ornithine is catalyzed by an enzyme transferring the acetyl group of N-α-acetylornithine to glutamate (ornithine acetyltransferase [OATase]) (argJ encoded). Only two exceptions had been reported—the Enterobacteriaceae and Myxococcus xanthus (members of the γ and δ groups of the class Proteobacteria, respectively)—in which ornithine is produced from N-α-acetylornithine by a deacylase, acetylornithinase (AOase) (argE encoded). We have investigated the gene-enzyme relationship in the arginine regulons of two psychrophilic Moritella strains belonging to the Vibrionaceae, a family phylogenetically related to the Enterobacteriaceae. Most of the arg genes were found to be clustered in one continuous sequence divergently transcribed in two wings, argE and argCBFGH(A) [“H(A)” indicates that the argininosuccinase gene consists of a part homologous to known argH sequences and of a 3′ extension able to complement an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the argA gene, encoding N-α-acetylglutamate synthetase, the first enzyme committed to the pathway]. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that this new clustering pattern arose in an ancestor common to Vibrionaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, where OATase was lost and replaced by a deacylase. The AOase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase of these psychrophilic strains both display distinctly cold-adapted activity profiles, providing the first cold-active examples of such enzymes. PMID:10692366

  1. Correlation-based network analysis of metabolite and enzyme profiles reveals a role of citrate biosynthesis in modulating N and C metabolism in zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the natural variability of leaf metabolism and enzymatic activity in a maize inbred population, statistical and network analyses were employed on metabolite and enzyme profiles. The test of coefficient of variation showed that sugars and amino acids displayed opposite trends in their ...

  2. New tuberculostatic agents targeting nucleic acid biosynthesis: drug design using QSAR approaches.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Renata V; Braga, Rodolpho C; Segretti, Natanael D; Ferreira, Elizabeth I; Trossini, Gustavo H G; Andrade, Carolina H

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death among curable infectious diseases. The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB is a growing global health concern and there is an urgent need for new anti-TB drugs. Enzymes involved in DNA and ATP biosynthesis are potential targets for tuberculostatic drug design, since these enzymes are essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. This review presents the current progress and applications of structure-activity relationship analysis for the discovery of innovative tuberculostatic agents as inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, DNA gyrase, ATP synthase, and thymidylate kinase enzymes, highlighting present challenges and new opportunities in TB drug design.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase from opium poppy, a key enzyme in sanguinarine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-02-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzo[c]phenenthridine alkaloid with potent antimicrobial properties found commonly in plants of the Papaveraceae, including the roots of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Sanguinarine is formed from the central 1-benzylisoquinoline intermediate (S)-reticuline via the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine, which undergoes five enzymatic oxidations and an N-methylation. The first four oxidations from (S)-scoulerine are catalyzed by cytochromes P450, whereas the final conversion involves a flavoprotein oxidase. All but one gene in the biosynthetic pathway from (S)-reticuline to sanguinarine has been identified. In this communication, we report the isolation and characterization of (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase (MSH) from opium poppy based on the transcriptional induction in elicitor-treated cell suspension cultures and root-specific expression of the corresponding gene. Along with protopine 6-hydroxylase, which catalyzes the subsequent and penultimate step in sanguinarine biosynthesis, MSH is a member of the CYP82N subfamily of cytochromes P450. The full-length MSH cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant microsomal protein was tested for enzymatic activity using 25 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids representing a wide range of structural subgroups. The only enzymatic substrates were the N-methylated protoberberine alkaloids N-methylstylopine and N-methylcanadine, which were converted to protopine and allocryptopine, respectively.

  4. Crystal Structure and Mechanism of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase, a Heme Enzyme Involved in Tryptophan Catabolism and in Quinolinate Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Kang, S.; Mukherjee, T.; Bale, S.; Crane, B.; Begley, T.; Ealick, S.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) from Ralstonia metallidurans was determined at 2.4 {angstrom}. TDO catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of L-tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, which is the initial step in tryptophan catabolism. TDO is a heme-containing enzyme and is highly specific for its substrate L-tryptophan. The structure is a tetramer with a heme cofactor bound at each active site. The monomeric fold, as well as the heme binding site, is similar to that of the large domain of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the same reaction except with a broader substrate tolerance. Modeling of the putative (S)-tryptophan hydroperoxide intermediate into the active site, as well as substrate analogue and mutagenesis studies, are consistent with a Criegee mechanism for the reaction.

  5. DHN melanin biosynthesis in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is based on two developmentally regulated key enzyme (PKS)-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold disease in various plant species and produces grayish macroconidia and/or black sclerotia at the end of the infection cycle. It has been suggested that the pigmentation is due to the accumulation of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin. To unravel its basis and regulation, the putative melanogenic and regulatory genes were identified and functionally characterized. Unlike other DHN melanin-producing fungi, B. cinerea and other Leotiomycetes contain two key enzyme (PKS)-encoding enzymes. Bcpks12 and bcpks13 are developmentally regulated and are required for melanogenesis in sclerotia and conidia respectively. BcYGH1 converts the BcPKS13 product and contributes thereby to conidial melanogenesis. In contrast, enzymes acting downstream in conversion of the PKS products (BcBRN2, BcSCD1 and BcBRN1) are required for both, sclerotial and conidial melanogenesis, suggesting that DHN melanogenesis in B. cinerea follows a non-linear pathway that is rather unusual for secondary metabolic pathways. Regulation of the melanogenic genes involves three pathway-specific transcription factors (TFs) that are clustered with bcpks12 or bcpks13 and other developmental regulators such as light-responsive TFs. Melanogenic genes are dispensable in vegetative mycelia for proper growth and virulence. However, DHN melanin is considered to contribute to the longevity of the reproduction structures.

  6. Key enzymes for biosynthesis of neutral lipid storage compounds in prokaryotes: properties, function and occurrence of wax ester synthases/acyl-CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Wältermann, Marc; Stöveken, Tim; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters (WEs) are beside polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) important storage lipids in some groups of prokaryotes. Accumulation of these lipids occurs in cells when they are cultivated under conditions of unbalanced growth in the presence of high concentrations of a suitable carbon source, which can be used for fatty acid and storage lipid biosyntheses. The key enzymes, which mediate both WE and TAG formations from long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) as acyl donor and long-chain fatty alcohols or diacylglycerols as respective acyl acceptors in bacteria, are WE synthases/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferases (WS/DGATs). The WS/DGATs identified so far represent rather unspecific enzymes with broad spectra of possible substrates; this makes them interesting for many biotechnological applications. This review traces the molecular structure and biochemical properties including the probable regions responsible for acyltransferase properties, enzymatic activity and substrate specifities. The phylogenetic relationships based on amino acid sequence similarities of this unique class of enzymes were revealed. Furthermore, recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of WS/DGATs in their natural hosts including pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis were discussed.

  7. Crystal structure of LL-diaminopimelate aminotransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana: a recently discovered enzyme in the biosynthesis of L-lysine by plants and Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuhiko; Cherney, Maia M; van Belkum, Marco J; Marcus, Sandra L; Flegel, Mitchel D; Clay, Matthew D; Deyholos, Michael K; Vederas, John C; James, Michael N G

    2007-08-17

    The essential biosynthetic pathway to l-Lysine in bacteria and plants is an attractive target for the development of new antibiotics or herbicides because it is absent in humans, who must acquire this amino acid in their diet. Plants use a shortcut of a bacterial pathway to l-Lysine in which the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme ll-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT) transforms l-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (L-THDP) directly to LL-DAP. In addition, LL-DAP-AT was recently found in Chlamydia sp., suggesting that inhibitors of this enzyme may also be effective against such organisms. In order to understand the mechanism of this enzyme and to assist in the design of inhibitors, the three-dimensional crystal structure of LL-DAP-AT was determined at 1.95 A resolution. The cDNA sequence of LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT) was optimized for expression in bacteria and cloned in Escherichia coli without its leader sequence but with a C-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag to aid protein purification. The structure of AtDAP-AT was determined using the multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method with a seleno-methionine derivative. AtDAP-AT is active as a homodimer with each subunit having PLP in the active site. It belongs to the family of type I fold PLP-dependent enzymes. Comparison of the active site residues of AtDAP-AT and aspartate aminotransferases revealed that the PLP binding residues in AtDAP-AT are well conserved in both enzymes. However, Glu97* and Asn309* in the active site of AtDAP-AT are not found at similar positions in aspartate aminotransferases, suggesting that specific substrate recognition may require these residues from the other monomer. A malate-bound structure of AtDAP-AT allowed LL-DAP and L-glutamate to be modelled into the active site. These initial three-dimensional structures of LL-DAP-AT provide insight into its substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

  8. Crystal Structure of Ll-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From 'Arabidopsis Thaliana': a Recently-Discovered Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of L-Lysine By Plants And 'Chlamydia'

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Cherney, M.M.; van Belkum, M.J.; Marcus, S.L.; Flegel, M.D.; Clay, M.D.; Deyholos, M.K.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2007-07-13

    The essential biosynthetic pathway to l-Lysine in bacteria and plants is an attractive target for the development of new antibiotics or herbicides because it is absent in humans, who must acquire this amino acid in their diet. Plants use a shortcut of a bacterial pathway to l-Lysine in which the pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme ll-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT) transforms l-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (L-THDP) directly to LL-DAP. In addition, LL-DAP-AT was recently found in Chlamydia sp., suggesting that inhibitors of this enzyme may also be effective against such organisms. In order to understand the mechanism of this enzyme and to assist in the design of inhibitors, the three-dimensional crystal structure of LL-DAP-AT was determined at 1.95 Angstroms resolution. The cDNA sequence of LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT) was optimized for expression in bacteria and cloned in Escherichia coli without its leader sequence but with a C-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag to aid protein purification. The structure of AtDAP-AT was determined using the multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method with a seleno-methionine derivative. AtDAP-AT is active as a homodimer with each subunit having PLP in the active site. It belongs to the family of type I fold PLP-dependent enzymes. Comparison of the active site residues of AtDAP-AT and aspartate aminotransferases revealed that the PLP binding residues in AtDAP-AT are well conserved in both enzymes. However, Glu97* and Asn309* in the active site of AtDAP-AT are not found at similar positions in aspartate aminotransferases, suggesting that specific substrate recognition may require these residues from the other monomer. A malate-bound structure of AtDAP-AT allowed LL-DAP and L-glutamate to be modeled into the active site. These initial three-dimensional structures of LL-DAP-AT provide insight into its substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

  9. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  10. Genomic and functional characterization of the oas gene family encoding O-acetylserine (thiol) lyases, enzymes catalyzing the final step in cysteine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Jost, R; Berkowitz, O; Wirtz, M; Hopkins, L; Hawkesford, M J; Hell, R

    2000-08-08

    The final step of cysteine biosynthesis in plants is catalyzed by O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL), which occurs as several isoforms found in the cytosol, the plastids and the mitochondria. Genomic DNA blot hybridization and isolation of genomic clones indicate single copy genes (oasA1, oasA2, oasB and oasC) that encode the activities of OAS-TL A, B and C found in separate subcellular compartments in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Sequence analysis reveals that the newly discovered oasA2 gene represents a pseudogene that is still transcribed, but is not functionally translated. The comparison of gene structures suggests that oasA1/oasA2 and oasB/oasC are closely related and may be derived from a common ancestor by subsequent duplications. OAS-TL A, B and C were overexpressed in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking cysteine synthesis and exhibited bifunctional OAS-TL and beta-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) activities. However, all three proteins represent true OAS-TLs according to kinetic analysis and are unlikely to function in cyanide detoxification or secondary metabolism. In addition, it was demonstrated that the mitochondrial OAS-TL C exhibits in vivo protein-protein interaction capabilities with respect to cysteine synthase complex formation similar to cytosolic OAS-TL A and plastid OAS-TL B. Multiple database accessions for each of the A. thaliana OAS-TL isoforms can thus be attributed to a specified number of oas genes to which functionally defined gene products are assigned, and which are responsible for compartment-specific cysteine synthesis.

  11. Chirality and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2013-01-01

    Chirality is present at all levels of structural hierarchy of protein and plays a significant role in protein biosynthesis. The macromolecules involved in protein biosynthesis such as aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and ribosome have chiral subunits. Despite the omnipresence of chirality in the biosynthetic pathway, its origin, role in current pathway, and importance is far from understood. In this review we first present an introduction to biochirality and its relevance to protein biosynthesis. Major propositions about the prebiotic origin of biomolecules are presented with particular reference to proteins and nucleic acids. The problem of the origin of homochirality is unresolved at present. The chiral discrimination by enzymes involved in protein synthesis is essential for keeping the life process going. However, questions remained pertaining to the mechanism of chiral discrimination and concomitant retention of biochirality. We discuss the experimental evidence which shows that it is virtually impossible to incorporate D-amino acids in protein structures in present biosynthetic pathways via any of the two major steps of protein synthesis, namely aminoacylation and peptide bond formation reactions. Molecular level explanations of the stringent chiral specificity in each step are extended based on computational analysis. A detailed account of the current state of understanding of the mechanism of chiral discrimination during aminoacylation in the active site of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and peptide bond formation in ribosomal peptidyl transferase center is presented. Finally, it is pointed out that the understanding of the mechanism of retention of enantiopurity has implications in developing novel enzyme mimetic systems and biocatalysts and might be useful in chiral drug design.

  12. Strategies for strain improvement in Fusarium fujikuroi: overexpression and localization of key enzymes of the isoprenoid pathway and their impact on gibberellin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Albermann, Sabine; Linnemannstöns, Pia; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-04-01

    The rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi is known to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, such as the pigments bikaverin and fusarubins, the mycotoxins fusarins and fusaric acid, and the phytohormones gibberellic acids (GAs), which are applied as plant growth regulators in agri- and horticulture. The development of high-producing strains is a prerequisite for the efficient biotechnological production of GAs. In this work, we used different molecular approaches for strain improvement to directly affect expression of early isoprenoid genes as well as GA biosynthetic genes. Overexpression of the first GA pathway gene ggs2, encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 2, or additional integration of ggs2 and cps/ks, the latter encoding the bifunctional ent-copalyldiphosphate synthase/ent-kaurene synthase, revealed an enhanced production level of 150%. However, overexpression of hmgR and fppS, encoding the key enzymes of the mevalonate pathway, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and farnesyldiphosphate synthase, resulted in a reduced production level probably due to a negative feedback regulation of HmgR. Subsequent deletion of the transmembrane domains of HmgR and overexpression of the remaining catalytic domain led to an increased GA content (250%). Using green fluorescent protein and mCherry fusion constructs, we localized Cps/Ks in the cytosol, Ggs2 in small point-like structures, which are not the peroxisomes, and HmgR at the endoplasmatic reticulum. In summary, it was shown for the first time that amplification or truncation of key enzymes of the isoprenoid and GA pathway results in elevated production levels (2.5-fold). Fluorescence microscopy revealed localization of the key enzymes in different compartments.

  13. The hexanoyl-CoA precursor for cannabinoid biosynthesis is formed by an acyl-activating enzyme in Cannabis sativa trichomes.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jake M; Boubakir, Zakia; Ambrose, Stephen J; Purves, Randy W; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-08-01

    The psychoactive and analgesic cannabinoids (e.g. Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) in Cannabis sativa are formed from the short-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) precursor hexanoyl-CoA. Cannabinoids are synthesized in glandular trichomes present mainly on female flowers. We quantified hexanoyl-CoA using LC-MS/MS and found levels of 15.5 pmol g(-1) fresh weight in female hemp flowers with lower amounts in leaves, stems and roots. This pattern parallels the accumulation of the end-product cannabinoid, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). To search for the acyl-activating enzyme (AAE) that synthesizes hexanoyl-CoA from hexanoate, we analyzed the transcriptome of isolated glandular trichomes. We identified 11 unigenes that encoded putative AAEs including CsAAE1, which shows high transcript abundance in glandular trichomes. In vitro assays showed that recombinant CsAAE1 activates hexanoate and other short- and medium-chained fatty acids. This activity and the trichome-specific expression of CsAAE1 suggest that it is the hexanoyl-CoA synthetase that supplies the cannabinoid pathway. CsAAE3 encodes a peroxisomal enzyme that activates a variety of fatty acid substrates including hexanoate. Although phylogenetic analysis showed that CsAAE1 groups with peroxisomal AAEs, it lacked a peroxisome targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) and localized to the cytoplasm. We suggest that CsAAE1 may have been recruited to the cannabinoid pathway through the loss of its PTS1, thereby redirecting it to the cytoplasm. To probe the origin of hexanoate, we analyzed the trichome expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for enzymes of fatty acid metabolism. The high abundance of transcripts that encode desaturases and a lipoxygenase suggests that hexanoate may be formed through a pathway that involves the oxygenation and breakdown of unsaturated fatty acids.

  14. Chitinases biosynthesis by immobilized Aeromonas hydrophila SBK1 by prawn shells valorization and application of enzyme cocktail for fungal protoplast preparation.

    PubMed

    Halder, Suman Kumar; Maity, Chiranjit; Jana, Arijit; Ghosh, Kuntal; Das, Arpan; Paul, Tanmay; Das Mohapatra, Pradeep Kumar; Pati, Bikas Ranjan; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-02-01

    Production and optimization of β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase and chitinase by Ca-alginate immobilized Aeromonas hydrophila SBK1 was carried out using prawn shell as cost-effective substrate. Beads prepared with 5.0% Na-alginate (containing 2.0% colloidal chitin) and 1.0 M CaCl2 showed considerable beads integrity and supported maximum production of chitinolytic enzymes. Bead diameter, 3 mm; temperature, 35°C; pH 7.0; agitation, 90 rpm were found ideal for the maximum production of the enzymes. The fermentation and thermodynamic indices revealed the feasibility of immobilized cells over free cells for enzymes production. Reasonable amount of chitosaccharides (degree of polymerization; 1-6) accumulated in the production media which have paramount antioxidant activity. Scale up experiment was successfully carried out in 5 L fermentor. In immobilized state, the chitosaccharides yield and antioxidant activity increased about 44.76% and 22.22%, whereas specific productivity of β-N-acetyl glucosaminidase and chitinase increased by 22.86% and 33.37% over free state. The cell entrapped beads can be reused upto ten cycles without marked loss of its biocatalytic efficiency. High level of protoplast of Aspergillus niger was generated by treating mycelia with 10 U/ml of crude chitinase after 4 h at pH 7.0 and in the temperature 35-40°C, and 67% of the protoplasts were found to be regenerated.

  15. Distinct contributions of the nisin biosynthesis enzymes NisB and NisC and transporter NisT to prenisin production by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    van den Berg van Saparoea, H Bart; Bakkes, Patrick J; Moll, Gert N; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2008-09-01

    Several Lactococcus lactis strains produce the lantibiotic nisin. The dedicated enzymes NisB and NisC and the transporter NisT modify and secrete the ribosomally synthesized nisin precursor peptide. NisB can function in the absence of the cyclase NisC, yielding the dehydrated prenisin that lacks the thioether rings. A kinetic analysis of nisin production by L. lactis NZ9700 demonstrated that the prenisin was released from the cell into the medium before the processing of the leader sequence occurred. Upon the deletion of nisC, the production of prenisin was reduced by 70%, while in the absence of nisB, the production of prenisin was nearly completely abolished. In cells lacking nisT, no secretion was observed, while the expression of nisABC in these cells resulted in considerable growth rate inhibition caused by the intracellular accumulation of active nisin. Overall, these data indicate that the efficiency of prenisin transport by NisT is markedly enhanced by NisB, suggesting a channeling mechanism of prenisin transfer between the nisin modification enzymes and the transporter.

  16. Molecular modelling of the biosynthesis of the RNA-editing enzyme APOBEC-1, responsible for generating the alternative forms of apolipoprotein B.

    PubMed

    Scott, J; Navaratnam, N; Carter, C

    1999-07-01

    We discovered in 1987 that the shorter form of apolipoprotein B (B48) synthesized in the intestine is due to the action, previously unrecognized in mammalian cells, of an mRNA-editing process, and more recently we demonstrated that this was due to a specific enzyme (APOBEC-1) with cytidine deaminase activity. We show here, by sequence alignment, molecular modelling and mutagenesis, that APOBEC-1 is a cytidine deaminase, responsible for editing apoB mRNA, and that is related in crystal structure to the cytidine deaminase of Escherichia coli (ECCDA). The two enzymes are both homodimers with composite active sites formed with loops from each monomer. In the sequence of APOBEC-1, three gaps compared with ECCDA match the size and contour of the minimal RNA substrate. We propose a model in which the asymmetric binding of one active site to the substrate cytidine which is positioned by the downstream binding of the product uridine and that this helps to target the other active site for deamination.

  17. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  18. Time-resolved fluorescence observation of di-tyrosine formation in horseradish peroxidase upon ultrasound treatment leading to enzyme inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikrika, Konstantina; Lemos, M. Adília; Chu, Boon-Seang; Bremner, David H.; Hungerford, Graham

    2017-02-01

    The application of ultrasound to a solution can induce cavitional phenomena and generate high localised temperatures and pressures. These are dependent of the frequency used and have enabled ultrasound application in areas such as synthetic, green and food chemistry. High frequency (100 kHz to 1 MHz) in particular is promising in food chemistry as a means to inactivate enzymes, replacing the need to use periods of high temperature. A plant enzyme, horseradish peroxidase, was studied using time-resolved fluorescence techniques as a means to assess the effect of high frequency (378 kHz and 583 kHz) ultrasound treatment at equivalent acoustic powers. This uncovered the fluorescence emission from a newly formed species, attributed to the formation of di-tyrosine within the horseradish peroxidase structure caused by auto-oxidation, and linked to enzyme inactivation.

  19. The inherent properties of enzymes can only lead to a negative temperature response of soil C decomposition on the long-term.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Gaël; Fontaine, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    More than one century after the pioneer work of Arrhenius on the temperature dependence of chemical reactions, the response of soil C decomposition to global warming remains uncertain. The majority of lab experiments, generally conducted at short term (months to years), suggest that the decomposition of soil C accelerates with temperature. In contrast, long-term (> 5 years) ecosystem warming experiments show that stimulation of soil respiration is only transitory. Moreover, studies on ecosystem C fluxes along a latitudinal gradient even suggest that, for a given amount of C fixed by the ecosystem, the decomposition flux decreases with temperature leading to higher C storage in warmer ecosystems (Giardina and Ryan, 2000; Sanderman, 2003). To understand this discrepancy between short-term and long-term temperature responses of C decomposition, we re-analysed the thermo-dependence of decomposition in a theory distinguishing enzyme-limited and substrate-limited reactions. Indeed, it is increasingly recognized that decomposition of the largest pool of soil C (humified organic C, HOC) is limited by the amount of soil (extracellular) enzymes. The substrate-limited reaction and its dependence to temperature were classically modelled with the first order kinetics dC/dt=-kC where reaction velocity k is modelled by an Arrhenius equation. The thermo-dependence of enzyme-limited reactions was studied in models where the reaction velocity depends on the specific activity of enzymes and the dynamics of enzyme pool, each of which may display distinct temperature sensitivities. The dynamics of the enzyme pool depended on (1) the inactivation of enzymes and its dependence to time and temperature and (2) the microbial production of enzymes, which is limited by the energy available to soil microorganisms. These models were analysed mathematically and through simulations using data on thermodynamics properties of enzymes (activation energies) and ecosystem C fluxes. Our results show

  20. Preamylopectin Processing: A Mandatory Step for Starch Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Mouille, G.; Maddelein, M. L.; Libessart, N.; Talaga, P.; Decq, A.; Delrue, B.; Ball, S.

    1996-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that the [alpha]-(1->4)-linked and [alpha]-(1->6)-branched glucans of starch are generated by the coordinated action of elongation (starch synthases) and branching enzymes. We have identified a novel Chlamydomonas locus (STA7) that when defective leads to a wipeout of starch and its replacement by a small amount of glycogen-like material. Our efforts to understand the enzymological basis of this phenotype have led us to determine the selective disappearance of an 88-kD starch hydrolytic activity. We further demonstrate that this enzyme is a debranching enzyme. Cleavage of the [alpha]-(1->6) linkage in a branched precursor of amylopectin (preamylopectin) has provided us with the ground rules for understanding starch biosynthesis in plants. Therefore, we propose that amylopectin clusters are synthesized by a discontinuous mechanism involving a highly specific glucan trimming mechanism. PMID:12239416

  1. A competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunoassay for lead ion measurement using mAbs against the lead-DTPA complex.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun-jian; Zhai, Yi-fan; Tang, Yong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Guo, Chang-wei

    2010-05-01

    Immunoassays for quantitative measurement of environmental heavy metals offer several advantages over other traditional methods. To develop an immunoassay for lead, Balb/c mice were immunized with a lead-chelate-protein conjugate to allow maximum exposure of the metal to the immune system. Three stable hybridoma cell lines were obtained through spleen cells fusion with Sp2/0 cells. One cell line, 2A11D11, produced mAbs with preferential selectivity and sensitivity for Pb-DTPA than DTPA, exhibiting an affinity constant of 3.34 + or - 0.24 x 10(9) M(-1). Cross reactivity (CR) with other metals were below 1%, except for Fe(III) with a CR less than 5%. This quantitative indirect ELISA for the lead ion was used to detect environmental lead content in local water sources; importantly, the results from the immunoassay were in excellent agreement with those from ICP-MS. Development of immunoassays for metal ions may thus facilitate the detection and regulation of environmental pollution.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression in photosynthetic bacteria of a soybean cDNA coding for phytoene desaturase, an enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, G E; Viitanen, P V; Pecker, I; Chamovitz, D; Hirschberg, J; Scolnik, P A

    1991-01-01

    Carotenoids are orange, yellow, or red photo-protective pigments present in all plastids. The first carotenoid of the pathway is phytoene, a colorless compound that is converted into colored carotenoids through a series of desaturation reactions. Genes coding for carotenoid desaturases have been cloned from microbes but not from plants. We report the cloning of a cDNA for pds1, a soybean (Glycine max) gene that, based on a complementation assay using the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, codes for an enzyme that catalyzes the two desaturation reactions that convert phytoene into zeta-carotene, a yellow carotenoid. The 2281-base-pair cDNA clone analyzed contains an open reading frame with the capacity to code for a 572-residue protein of predicted Mr 63,851. Alignment of the deduced Pds1 peptide sequence with the sequences of fungal and bacterial carotenoid desaturases revealed conservation of several amino acid residues, including a dinucleotide-binding motif that could mediate binding to FAD. The Pds1 protein is synthesized in vitro as a precursor that, upon import into isolated chloroplasts, is processed to a smaller mature form. Hybridization of the pds1 cDNA to genomic blots indicated that this gene is a member of a low-copy-number gene family. One of these loci was genetically mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphisms between Glycine max and Glycine soja. We conclude that pds1 is a nuclear gene encoding a phytoene desaturase enzyme that, as its microbial counterparts, contains sequence motifs characteristic of flavoproteins. Images PMID:1862081

  3. In vivo kinetic analysis of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway using PAA stimulus response experiments.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Amit T; Verheijen, Peter J T; Maleki Seifar, Reza; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2015-11-01

    In this study we combined experimentation with mathematical modeling to unravel the in vivo kinetic properties of the enzymes and transporters of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway in a high yielding Penicillium chrysogenum strain. The experiment consisted of a step response experiment with the side chain precursor phenyl acetic acid (PAA) in a glucose-limited chemostat. The metabolite data showed that in the absence of PAA all penicillin pathway enzymes were expressed, leading to the production of a significant amount of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6APA) as end product. After the stepwise perturbation with PAA, the pathway produced PenG within seconds. From the extra- and intracellular metabolite measurements, hypotheses for the secretion mechanisms of penicillin pathway metabolites were derived. A dynamic model of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway was then constructed that included the formation and transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of pathway intermediates, PAA and the product penicillin-G (PenG). The model parameters and changes in the enzyme levels of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway under in vivo conditions were simultaneously estimated using experimental data obtained at three different timescales (seconds, minutes, hours). The model was applied to determine changes in the penicillin pathway enzymes in time, calculate fluxes and analyze the flux control of the pathway. This led to a reassessment of the in vivo behavior of the pathway enzymes and in particular Acyl-CoA:Isopenicillin N Acyltransferase (AT).

  4. A recessive mutation in the RUB1-conjugating enzyme, RCE1, reveals a requirement for RUB modification for control of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of basic chitinase and PDF1.2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Paul B; Cancel, Jesse D

    2004-05-01

    By screening etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings for mutants with aberrant ethylene-related phenotypes, we identified a mutant that displays features of the ethylene-mediated triple response even in the absence of ethylene. Further characterization showed that the phenotype observed for the dark-grown seedlings of this mutant is reversible by prevention of ethylene perception and is dependent on a modest increase in ethylene production correlated with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase (ACO) activity in the hypocotyl. Molecular characterization of leaves of the mutant revealed severely impaired induction of basic chitinase (chiB) and plant defensin (PDF)1.2 following treatment with jasmonic acid and/or ethylene. Positional cloning of the mutation resulted in identification of a 49-bp deletion in RCE1 (related to ubiquitin 1 (RUB1)-conjugating enzyme), which has been demonstrated to be responsible for covalent attachment of RUB1 to the SCF (Skpl Cdc 53 F-box) ubiquitin ligase complex to modify its activity. Our analyses with rce1-2 demonstrate a previously unknown requirement for RUB1 modification for regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and proper induction of defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

  5. PpASCL, the Physcomitrella patens Anther-Specific Chalcone Synthase-Like Enzyme Implicated in Sporopollenin Biosynthesis, Is Needed for Integrity of the Moss Spore Wall and Spore Viability

    PubMed Central

    Daku, Rhys M.; Rabbi, Fazle; Buttigieg, Josef; Coulson, Ian M.; Horne, Derrick; Martens, Garnet; Ashton, Neil W.; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. The anther-specific chalcone synthase-like (ASCL) enzyme of Physcomitrella patens, PpASCL, has previously been implicated in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the main constituent of exine and perine, the two outermost layers of the moss spore cell wall. We made targeted knockouts of the corresponding gene, PpASCL, and phenotypically characterized ascl sporophytes and spores at different developmental stages. Ascl plants developed normally until late in sporophytic development, when the spores produced were structurally aberrant and inviable. The development of the ascl spore cell wall appeared to be arrested early in microspore development, resulting in small, collapsed spores with altered surface morphology. The typical stratification of the spore cell wall was absent with only an abnormal perine recognisable above an amorphous layer possibly representing remnants of compromised intine and/or exine. Equivalent resistance of the spore walls of ascl mutants and the control strain to acetolysis suggests the presence of chemically inert, defective sporopollenin in the mutants. Anatomical abnormalities of late-stage ascl sporophytes include a persistent large columella and an air space incompletely filled with spores. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved PpASCL gene is needed for proper construction of the spore wall and for normal maturation and viability of moss spores. PMID:26752629

  6. PpASCL, the Physcomitrella patens Anther-Specific Chalcone Synthase-Like Enzyme Implicated in Sporopollenin Biosynthesis, Is Needed for Integrity of the Moss Spore Wall and Spore Viability.

    PubMed

    Daku, Rhys M; Rabbi, Fazle; Buttigieg, Josef; Coulson, Ian M; Horne, Derrick; Martens, Garnet; Ashton, Neil W; Suh, Dae-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Sporopollenin is the main constituent of the exine layer of spore and pollen walls. The anther-specific chalcone synthase-like (ASCL) enzyme of Physcomitrella patens, PpASCL, has previously been implicated in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the main constituent of exine and perine, the two outermost layers of the moss spore cell wall. We made targeted knockouts of the corresponding gene, PpASCL, and phenotypically characterized ascl sporophytes and spores at different developmental stages. Ascl plants developed normally until late in sporophytic development, when the spores produced were structurally aberrant and inviable. The development of the ascl spore cell wall appeared to be arrested early in microspore development, resulting in small, collapsed spores with altered surface morphology. The typical stratification of the spore cell wall was absent with only an abnormal perine recognisable above an amorphous layer possibly representing remnants of compromised intine and/or exine. Equivalent resistance of the spore walls of ascl mutants and the control strain to acetolysis suggests the presence of chemically inert, defective sporopollenin in the mutants. Anatomical abnormalities of late-stage ascl sporophytes include a persistent large columella and an air space incompletely filled with spores. Our results indicate that the evolutionarily conserved PpASCL gene is needed for proper construction of the spore wall and for normal maturation and viability of moss spores.

  7. Evaluating Nonpolar Surface Area and LC/MS Response: An Application for Site Occupancy Measurements for Enzyme Intermediates in Polyketide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Shan M.; Koryakina, Irina; Williams, Gavin J.; Muddiman, David C.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Site occupancy measurements using LC/MS are reported throughout the literature. However, site occupancy quantification suffers from ionization bias between modified and unmodified peptides containing the active site. In this study, we explore the MS signal as a function of nonpolar surface area (NPSA) in order to better understand this bias in electrospray response. The correlation between hydrophobicity and LC/MS response was evaluated and applied to study enzyme intermediates in polyketide synthases. METHODS Site occupancy methods were developed to study acyltransferase activity. To further evaluate these methods, several standard peptides containing one cysteine residue were modified with alkylation reagents of increasing hydrophobicity to study the MS signal as a function of nonpolar surface area. RESULTS A consistent trend in MS response was observed which is dependent on the NPSA of the analyte. An optimal NPSA zone was observed for the peptides studied. CONCLUSIONS Nonpolar surface area can be used as metric to determine relative LC/MS response for peptides and evaluate site occupancy measurements. PMID:25366398

  8. One-Pot Biosynthesis of High-Concentration α-Glucose 1-Phosphate from Starch by Sequential Addition of Three Hyperthermophilic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; You, Chun; Ma, Hongwu; Ma, Yanhe; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-03-02

    α-Glucose 1-phosphate (G1P) is synthesized from 5% (w/v) corn starch and 1 M phosphate mediated by α-glucan phosphorylase (αGP) from the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima at pH 7.2 and 70 °C. To increase G1P yield from corn starch containing branched amylopectin, a hyper-thermostable isoamylase from Sulfolobus tokodaii was added for simultaneous starch gelatinization and starch-debranching hydrolysis at 85 °C and pH 5.5 before αGP use. The pretreatment of isoamylase increased G1P titer from 120 mM to 170 mM. To increase maltose and maltotriose utilization, the third thermostable enzyme, 4-glucanotransferase (4GT) from Thermococcus litoralis, was added during the late stage of G1P biotransformation, further increasing G1P titer to 200 mM. This titer is the highest G1P level obtained on starch or its derived products (maltodextrin and soluble starch). This study suggests that in vitro multienzyme biotransformation has an advantage of great engineering flexibility in terms of space and time compared with microbial fermentation.

  9. Phosphoglycerate Mutase 1 Coordinates Glycolysis and Biosynthesis to Promote Tumor Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hitosugi, Taro; Zhou, Lu; Elf, Shannon; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Seo, Jae Ho; Shan, Changliang; Dai, Qing; Zhang, Liang; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Jin, Peng; Alečković, Masa; LeRoy, Gary; Kang, Yibin; Sudderth, Jessica A.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Chen, Georgia Z.; Muller, Susan; Shin, Dong M.; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Lonial, Sagar; Arellano, Martha L.; Khoury, Hanna J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Ye, Keqiang; Boggon, Titus J.; Kang, Sumin; He, Chuan; Chen, Jing

    2012-11-12

    It is unclear how cancer cells coordinate glycolysis and biosynthesis to support rapidly growing tumors. We found that the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), commonly upregulated in human cancers due to loss of TP53, contributes to biosynthesis regulation partially by controlling intracellular levels of its substrate, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), and product, 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PG). 3-PG binds to and inhibits 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), while 2-PG activates 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to provide feedback control of 3-PG levels. Inhibition of PGAM1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor PGMI-004A results in increased 3-PG and decreased 2-PG levels in cancer cells, leading to significantly decreased glycolysis, PPP flux and biosynthesis, as well as attenuated cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  10. Cellular localization of lead using an antibody-based detection system and enzyme activity changes in the gills and digestive gland of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Einsporn, Sonja; Bressling, Jana; Koehler, Angela

    2009-02-01

    Marine organisms are continuously exposed to heavy metals in their environment. Bivalve mollusks such as the blue mussel Mytilus edulis accumulate high levels of heavy metals effecting cellular homeostasis and functions. Lead (Pb) exposure (2.5 mg/L of lead (II) nitrate for 10 d) and depuration (10 d in clean seawater) experiments were conducted to study its intracellular fate in the gills and digestive gland of M. edulis. For this purpose, an antibody-based detection method for ultrastructural localization and a subcellular fractionation approach for chemical analysis of Pb were used. In addition, effects of Pb on enzyme activities involved in oxyradical scavenging, such as the conjugative enzyme glutathione-S-transferase and the antioxidative enzyme catalase, were determined. The ultrastructural studies showed that Pb was mainly detected in lysosomes of gill epithelial cells and digestive cells. Lead was also detected in cell nuclei and granular hemocytes. Higher metal concentrations were measured by chemical analysis in subcellular fractions of the gills compared to those of the digestive gland. Increased activities of glutathione-S-transferase were found in gills after exposure and remained elevated during the depuration period, whereas glutathione-S-transferase activity remained unaffected in the digestive gland. Catalase activities showed no changes after Pb exposure, neither in the gills nor in the digestive gland. We conclude that gill cells are major sites of uptake and accumulation for dissolved Pb and are involved in sequestration and detoxification of this metal in M. edulis.

  11. Seven Post-synthetic Covalent Reactions in Tandem Leading to Enzyme-like Complexity within Metal-Organic Framework Crystals.

    PubMed

    Fracaroli, Alejandro M; Siman, Peter; Nagib, David A; Suzuki, Mitsuharu; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Toste, F Dean; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-07-13

    The design of enzyme-like complexity within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) requires multiple reactions to be performed on a MOF crystal without losing access to its interior. Here, we show that seven post-synthetic reactions can be successfully achieved within the pores of a multivariate MOF, MTV-IRMOF-74-III, to covalently incorporate tripeptides that resemble the active sites of enzymes in their spatial arrangement and compositional heterogeneity. These reactions build up H2N-Pro-Gly-Ala-CONHL and H2N-Cys-His-Asp-CONHL (where L = organic struts) amino acid sequences by covalently attaching them to the organic struts in the MOFs, without losing porosity or crystallinity. An enabling feature of this chemistry is that the primary amine functionality (-CH2NHBoc) of the original MOF is more reactive than the commonly examined aromatic amines (-NH2), and this allowed for the multi-step reactions to be carried out in tandem within the MOF. Preliminary findings indicate that the complexity thus achieved can affect reactions that were previously accomplished only in the presence of enzymes.

  12. Final Report on Regulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monolignol Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent L. Chiang

    2006-03-09

    The focus of this research is to understand syringyl monolignol biosynthesis that leads to the formation of syringyl lignin, a type of lignin that can be easily removed during biomass conversion. We have achieved the three originally proposed goals for this project. (1) SAD and CAD genes (enzyme catalytic and kinetic properties) and their functional relevance to CAld5H/AldOMT pathway, (2) spatiotemporal expression patterns of Cald5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes, and (3) functions of CAld5H, AldOMT, and SAD genes in vivo using transgenic aspen. Furthermore, we also found that microRNA might be involved in the upstream regulatory network of lignin biosynthesis and wood formation. The achievements are as below. (1) Based on biochemical and molecular studies, we discovered a novel syringyl-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) involved in monolignol biosynthesis in angiosperm trees. Through CAld5H/OMT/SAD mediation, syringyl monolignol biosynthesis branches out from guaiacyl pathway at coniferaldehyde; (2) The function of CAld5H gene in this syringyl monolignol biosynthesis pathway also was confirmed in vivo in transgenic Populus; (3) The proposed major monolignol biosynthesis pathways were further supported by the involving biochemical functions of CCR based on a detailed kinetic study; (4) Gene promoter activity analysis also supported the cell-type specific expression of SAD and CAD genes in xylem tissue, consistent with the cell-specific locations of SAD and CAD proteins and with the proposed pathways; (5) We have developed a novel small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated stable gene-silencing system in transgenic plants; (6) Using the siRNA and P. trichocarpa transformation/regeneration systems we are currently producing transgenic P. trichocarpa to investigate the interactive functions of CAD and SAD in regulating guaiacyl and syringyl lignin biosynthesis; (7) We have cloned for the first time from a tree species, P. trichocarpa, small regulatory RNAs termed micro

  13. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  14. Gene expression analysis of enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway involved in β-cryptoxanthin accumulation in wild raspberry, Rubus palmatus.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko

    2017-03-18

    β-cryptoxanthin (β-Cry), a xanthophyll, is unlike other abundant carotenoids, such as α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. It is not found in most fruits or vegetables but is found only in specific fruits, such as hot chili pepper, persimmon, and citrus fruits. Because recent reports suggest that β-Cry intake is beneficial to human health, the xanthophyll requires further investigation. Although β-Cry accumulates in the fruit of wild raspberry, Rubus palmatus, it is not present in cultivated raspberry. In the present study, two wild raspberry species were studied-R. palmatus, which accumulates β-Cry in the fruit, and R. crataegifolius, which does not accumulate β-Cry. Four carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes derived from these two species were analyzed-phytoene synthase (PSY), lycopene β-cyclase (LCYb), β-carotene hydroxylase (HYb), and zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP). Expression levels of their genes were also assessed to elucidate mechanism underlying β-Cry accumulation. Partial gene sequences of RubPSY, RubLCYb, RubHYb, and RubZEP, isolated from immature raspberry fruits of R. palmatus, were used as probes for Northern blot analysis. RubZEP expression ceased as the fruits matured, possibly because of reduced production of zeaxanthin. β-Cry is considered to be an intermediate compound that accumulates in the mature fruits of R. palmatus. High expression of RubPSY was detectable in the mature fruits of R. crataegifolius, and the expression of RubLCYb, RubHYb, and RubZEP was detectable during all stages of fruit maturation. In contrast, β-Cry was absent in the mature fruits of R. crataegifolius.

  15. Reprogramming erythroid cells for lysosomal enzyme production leads to visceral and CNS cross-correction in mice with Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daren; Zhang, Wei; Kalfa, Theodosia A; Grabowski, Gregory; Davies, Stella; Malik, Punam; Pan, Dao

    2009-11-24

    Restricting transgene expression to maturing erythroid cells can reduce the risk for activating oncogenes in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progeny, yet take advantage of their robust protein synthesis machinery for high-level protein production. This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of reprogramming erythroid cells for production of a lysosomal enzyme, alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA). An erythroid-specific hybrid promoter provided inducible IDUA expression and release during in vitro erythroid differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells, resulting in phenotypical cross-correction in an enzyme-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line derived from patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I). Stable and higher than normal plasma IDUA levels were achieved in vivo in primary and secondary MPS I chimeras for at least 9 months after transplantation of HSCs transduced with the erythroid-specific IDUA-containing lentiviral vector (LV). Moreover, long-term metabolic correction was demonstrated by normalized urinary glycosaminoglycan accumulation in all treated MPS I mice. Complete normalization of tissue pathology was observed in heart, liver, and spleen. Notably, neurological function and brain pathology were significantly improved in MPS I mice by erythroid-derived, higher than normal peripheral IDUA protein. These data demonstrate that late-stage erythroid cells, transduced with a tissue-specific LV, can deliver a lysosomal enzyme continuously at supraphysiological levels to the bloodstream and can correct the disease phenotype in both viscera and CNS of MPS I mice. This approach provides a paradigm for the utilization of RBC precursors as a depot for efficient and potentially safer systemic delivery of nonsecreted proteins by ex vivo HSC gene transfer.

  16. Novel bioassay for the discovery of inhibitors of the 2-C-Methyl-D-Erythritol 4-Phosphate (MEP) and terpenoid pathways leading to carotenoid biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the synthesis of isopentenyl-phosphate (IPP) in plastids. It is a major branch point providing precursors for the synthesis of carotenoids, tocopherols, plastoquinone and the phytyl chain of chlorophylls, as well as the hormones abscisi...

  17. OmpA signal peptide leads to heterogenous secretion of B. subtilis chitosanase enzyme from E. coli expression system.

    PubMed

    Pechsrichuang, Phornsiri; Songsiriritthigul, Chomphunuch; Haltrich, Dietmar; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namvijtr, Peenida; Bonaparte, Napolean; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2016-01-01

    The production of secreted recombinant proteins from E. coli is pivotal to the biotechnological industry because it reduces the cost of downstream processing. Proteins destined for secretion contain an N-terminal signal peptide that is cleaved by secretion machinery in the plasma membrane. The resulting protein is released in an active mature form. In this study, Bacillus subtilis chitosanase (Csn) was used as a model protein to compare the effect of two signal peptides on the secretion of heterologous recombinant protein. The results showed that the E. coli secretion machinery could recognize both native bacillus and E. coli signal peptides. However, only the native bacillus signal peptide could generate the same N-terminal sequence as in the wild type bacteria. When the recombinant Csn constructs contained the E. coli OmpA signal peptide, the secreted enzymes were heterogeneous, comprising a mixed population of secreted enzymes with different N-terminal sequences. Nevertheless, the E. coli OmpA signal peptide was found to be more efficient for high expression and secretion of bacillus Csn. These findings may be used to help engineer other recombinant proteins for secretory production in E. coli.

  18. Rapid degradation of an active formylglycine generating enzyme variant leads to a late infantile severe form of multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Baumgartner, Matthias; Schmid, Regula; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn error of metabolism affecting posttranslational activation of sulfatases by the formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE). Due to mutations in the encoding SUMF1 gene, FGE's catalytic capacity is impaired resulting in reduced cellular sulfatase activities. Both, FGE protein stability and residual activity determine disease severity and have previously been correlated with the clinical MSD phenotype. Here, we report a patient with a late infantile severe course of disease. The patient is compound heterozygous for two so far undescribed SUMF1 mutations, c.156delC (p.C52fsX57) and c.390A>T (p.E130D). In patient fibroblasts, mRNA of the frameshift allele is undetectable. In contrast, the allele encoding FGE-E130D is expressed. FGE-E130D correctly localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and has a very high residual molecular activity in vitro (55% of wildtype FGE); however, it is rapidly degraded. Thus, despite substantial residual enzyme activity, protein instability determines disease severity, which highlights that potential MSD treatment approaches should target protein folding and stabilization mechanisms.

  19. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  20. Genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of glycinebetaine leads to alleviate salt-induced potassium efflux and enhances salt tolerance in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dandan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Cuicui; Meng, Qingwei; Li, Gang; Chen, Tony H H; Yang, Xinghong

    2017-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. 'Moneymaker') was transformed with the choline oxidase gene codA from Arthrobacter globiformis, which was modified to allow for targeting to both chloroplasts and the cytosol. Glycine betaine (GB) was accumulated in transformed plants, while no detectable GB was found in wild-type (WT) plants. Compared to WT plants, transgenic lines showed significantly higher photosynthetic rates (Pn) and antioxidant enzyme activities and lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in the leaves when exposed to salt stress. Furthermore, compared with WT plants, K(+) efflux decreased and Na(+) efflux increased in roots of transgenic plants under salt stress; resulted in lower Na(+)/K(+) ratios in transgenic lines. The exogenous application of GB also significantly reduced NaCl-induced K(+) efflux and increased Na(+) efflux in WT plants. A qRT-PCR assay indicated that GB enhanced NaCl-induced expression of genes encoding the K(+) transporter, Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, and H(+)-ATPase. These results suggest that the enhanced salt tolerance conferred by codA in transgenic tomato plants might be due to the regulation of ion channel and transporters by GB, which would allow high potassium levels and low sodium levels to be maintained in transgenic plants under salt stress condition.

  1. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis Leads to Swollen Plant Cell Walls and Severe Developmental Defects Associated with Changes in Pectic Polysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation. PMID:21949134

  2. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic acid biosynthesis leads to swollen plant cell walls and severe developmental defects associated with changes in pectic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-11-18

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation.

  3. Functional analyses of Populus euphratica brassinosteroid biosynthesis enzyme genes DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD) in the regulation of growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Si, Jianping; Sun, Yan; Wang, L U; Qin, Ying; Wang, Chongying; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-12-01

    DWF4 and CPD are key brassinosteroids (BRs) biosynthesis enzyme genes. To explore the function of Populus euphratica DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD), Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines (TLs) expressing PeDWF4, PeCPD or PeDWF4 plus PeCPD, namely PeDWF4-TL, PeCPD-TL and PeCP/DW-TL, were characterized. Compared with wild type (WT), the changes of both PeDWF4-TL and PeCPD-TL in plant heights, silique and hypocotyls lengths and seed yields were similar, but in bolting time and stem diameters, they were opposite. PeCP/DW-TL was more in plant heights and the lengths of primary root, silique, and fruit stalk, but less in silique numbers and seed yields than either PeDWF4-TL or PeCPD-TL. PeDWF4 and PeCPD specially expressed in PeDWF4-TL or PeCPDTL, and the transcription level of PeDWF4 was higher than that of PeCPD. In PeCP/DW-TL, their expressions were all relatively reduced. Additionally, the expression of PeDWF4 and PeCPD differentially made the expression levels of AtDWF4, AtCPD, AtBR6OX2, AtFLC, AtTCP1 and AtGA5 change in the TLs. The total BRs contents were PeDWF4-TL greater than PeCP/DW-TL greater than WT greater than PeCPD-TL. These results imply that PeDWF4 is functionally not exactly the same as PeCPD and there may be a synergistic and antagonistic effects in physiology between both of them in the regulation of plant growth and development.

  4. Decreased expression of two key enzymes in the sucrose biosynthesis pathway, cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sucrose phosphate synthase, has remarkably different consequences for photosynthetic carbon metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strand, A; Zrenner, R; Trevanion, S; Stitt, M; Gustafsson, P; Gardeström, P

    2000-09-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism was investigated in antisense Arabidopsis lines with decreased expression of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (cFBPase). In the light, triose phosphates are exported from the chloroplast and converted to sucrose via cFBPase and SPS. At night, starch is degraded to glucose, exported and converted to sucrose via SPS. cFBPase therefore lies upstream and SPS downstream of the point at which the pathways for sucrose synthesis in the day and night converge. Decreased cFBPase expression led to inhibition of sucrose synthesis; accumulation of phosphorylated intermediates; Pi-limitation of photosynthesis; and stimulation of starch synthesis. The starch was degraded to maintain higher levels of sugars and a higher rate of sucrose export during the night. This resembles the response in other species when expression of enzymes in the upper part of the sucrose biosynthesis pathway is reduced. Decreased expression of SPS inhibited sucrose synthesis, but phosphorylated intermediates did not accumulate and carbon partitioning was not redirected towards starch. Sugar levels and sucrose export was decreased during the night as well as during the day. Although ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration and photosynthesis were inhibited, the PGA/triose-P ratio remained low and the ATP/ADP ratio high, showing that photosynthesis was not limited by the rate at which Pi was recycled during end-product synthesis. Two novel responses counteracted the decrease in SPS expression and explain why phosphorylated intermediates did not accumulate, and why allocation was not altered in the antisense SPS lines. Firstly, a threefold decrease of PPi and a shift of the UDP-glucose/hexose phosphate ratio favoured sucrose synthesis and prevented the accumulation of phosphorylated intermediates. Secondly, there was no increase of AGPase activity relative to cFBPase activity, which would prevent a shift in carbon allocation towards

  5. Molybdenum enzymes in higher organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Russ; Nishino, Takeshi; Bittner, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the structural and catalytic properties of molybdenum-containing enzymes in eukaryotes is reviewed, along with aspects of the biosynthesis of the cofactor and its insertion into apoprotein. PMID:21516203

  6. Plant biochemistry: anthocyanin biosynthesis in roses.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Kanno, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Yoshio; Tsugawa, Hidehito; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2005-06-09

    Anthocyanin is the principal pigment in flowers, conferring intense red-to-blue cyanic colours on petals and helping to attract pollinators. Its biosynthesis involves glycosylation steps that are important for the stability of the pigment and for its aqueous solubility in vacuoles. Here we describe anthocyanin biosynthesis in roses (Rosa hybrida), which is unlike the pathway used in other flowers in that it relies on a single enzyme to achieve glycosylation at two different positions on the precursor molecule. Phylogenetic analysis also indicates that this previously unknown glucosyltransferase enzyme may be unique to roses, with glycosylation having apparently evolved into a single stabilizing step in other plants.

  7. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  8. Diurnal and light regulation of sulphur assimilation and glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huseby, Stine; Koprivova, Anna; Lee, Bok-Rye; Saha, Shikha; Mithen, Richard; Wold, Anne-Berit; Bengtsson, Gunnar B; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2013-02-01

    Glucosinolates are a major class of sulphur-containing secondary metabolites involved in plant defence against pathogens. Recently many regulatory links between glucosinolate biosynthesis and sulphate assimilation were established. Since sulphate assimilation undergoes diurnal rhythm and is light regulated, this study analysed whether the same is true for glucosinolate biosynthesis. The levels of glucosinolates and glutathione were found to be higher during the day than during the night. This agreed with variation in sulphate uptake as well as activity of the key enzyme of the sulphate assimilation pathway, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase. Correspondingly, the flux through sulphate assimilation was higher during the day than during the night, with the maximum flux through primary assimilation preceding maximal incorporation into glucosinolates. Prolonged darkness resulted in a strong reduction in glucosinolate content. Re-illumination of such dark-adapted plants induced accumulation of mRNA for many genes of glucosinolate biosynthesis, leading to increased glucosinolate biosynthesis. The light regulation of the glucosinolate synthesis genes as well as many genes of primary sulphate assimilation was controlled at least partly by the LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription regulator. Thus, glucosinolate biosynthesis is highly co-regulated with sulphate assimilation.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  10. Methylphenidate treatment leads to abnormalities on krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Freitas, Karolina V; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between energy metabolism and methylphenidate (MPH); however, there are no studies evaluating the effects of MPH in Krebs cycle. So, we investigated if MPH treatment could alter the activity of citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MD), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ID) in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced CS in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PF), with MPH at all doses in the cerebellum and hippocampus after chronic treatment in young rats. In adult rats the CS was reduced in the cerebellum after acute treatment with MPH at all doses, and after chronic treatment in the PF and cerebellum with MPH (10 mg/kg), and in the hippocampus with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg). The ID decreased in the hippocampus and striatum with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg), and in the cortex (10 mg/kg) after acute treatment in young rats. In adult rats acute treatment with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced ID in the cerebellum, and with MPH (10 mg/kg) in the cortex; chronic treatment with MPH (10 mg/kg) decreased ID in the PF; with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) in the cerebellum, and with MPH at all doses in the hippocampus. The MD did not alter. In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH can alter enzymes of Krebs cycle in brain areas involved with circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; however, such effects depend on age of animal and treatment regime.

  11. Parallels in lignin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Banks, Jo Ann

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of vascular plants is the development of a complex water-conducting system, which is physically reinforced by the heterogeneous aromatic polymer lignin. Syringyl lignin, a major building block of lignin, is often thought to be uniquely characteristic of angiosperms; however, it was demonstrated over fifty years ago that that syringyl lignin is found in another group of plants, known as the lycophytes, the ancestors of which diverged from all the other vascular plant lineages 400 million years ago.1 To determine the biochemical basis for this common biosynthetic ability, we isolated and characterized cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (P450s) from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and compared them to the enzyme that is required for syringyl lignin synthesis in angiosperms. Our results showed that one of these P450s encodes an enzyme that is functionally analogous to but phylogenetically independent from its angiosperm counterpart. Here, we discuss the evolution of lignin biosynthesis in vascular plants and the role of Selaginella moellendorffii in plant comparative biology and genomics. PMID:19704782

  12. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer. PMID:28103302

  13. Crude Extracts, Flavokawain B and Alpinetin Compounds from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica Induce Cell Death via UCK2 Enzyme Inhibition and in Turn Reduce 18S rRNA Biosynthesis in HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Malami, Ibrahim; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Abdullah, Rasedee; Kassim, Nur Kartinee Bt; Rosli, Rozita; Yeap, Swee Keong; Waziri, Peter; Etti, Imaobong Christopher; Bello, Muhammad Bashir

    2017-01-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is an enzyme that is overexpressed in abnormal cell growth and its implication is considered a hallmark of cancer. Due to the selective expression of UCK2 in cancer cells, a selective inhibition of this key enzyme necessitates the discovery of its potential inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy. The present study was carried out to demonstrate the potentials of natural phytochemicals from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica to inhibit UCK2 useful for colorectal cancer. Here, we employed the used of in vitro to investigate the effectiveness of natural UCK2 inhibitors to cause HT-29 cell death. Extracts, flavokawain B, and alpinetin compound from the rhizome of Alpinia mutica was used in the study. The study demonstrated that the expression of UCK2 mRNA were substantially reduced in treated HT-29 cells. In addition, downregulation in expression of 18S ribosomal RNA was also observed in all treated HT-29 cells. This was confirmed by fluorescence imaging to measure the level of expression of 18S ribosomal RNA in live cell images. The study suggests the possibility of MDM2 protein was downregulated and its suppression subsequently activates the expression of p53 during inhibition of UCK2 enzyme. The expression of p53 is directly linked to a blockage of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase and upregulates Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase 3 while Bcl2 was deregulated. In this respect, apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation were observed in treated HT-29 cells. Initial results from in vitro studies have shown the ability of the bioactive compounds of flavokawain B and alpinetin to target UCK2 enzyme specifically, inducing cell cycle arrest and subsequently leading to cancer cell death, possibly through interfering the MDM2-p53 signalling pathway. These phenomena have proven that the bioactive compounds could be useful for future therapeutic use in colon cancer.

  14. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  15. Transcriptional analysis of apple fruit proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Kirk, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are products of the flavonoid pathway, which also leads to the production of anthocyanins and flavonols. Many flavonoids have antioxidant properties and may have beneficial effects for human health. PAs are found in the seeds and fruits of many plants. In apple fruit (Malus × domestica Borkh.), the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is most active in the skin, with the flavan-3-ols, catechin, and epicatechin acting as the initiating units for the synthesis of PA polymers. This study examined the genes involved in the production of PAs in three apple cultivars: two heritage apple cultivars, Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden, and a commercial cultivar, Royal Gala. HPLC analysis shows that tree-ripe fruit from Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden had a higher phenolic content than Royal Gala. Epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis is under the control of the biosynthetic enzymes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR1), respectively. Counter-intuitively, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of Royal Gala LAR1 and ANR were significantly higher than those of both Devonshire Quarrenden and Hetlina. This suggests that a compensatory feedback mechanism may be active, whereby low concentrations of PAs may induce higher expression of gene transcripts. Further investigation is required into the regulation of these key enzymes in apple. Abbreviations:ANOVAanalysis of varianceANRanthocyanidin reductaseDADdiode array detectorDAFBdays after full bloomDFRdihydroflavonol reductaseLARleucoanthocyanidin reductaseLC-MSliquid chromatography/mass spectrometryPAproanthocyanidinqPCRreal-time quantitative PCR PMID:22859681

  16. Neonatal morphine administration leads to changes in hippocampal BDNF levels and antioxidant enzyme activity in the adult life of rats.

    PubMed

    Rozisky, J R; Laste, G; de Macedo, I C; Santos, V S; Krolow, R; Noschang, C; Vanzella, C; Bertoldi, K; Lovatel, G A; de Souza, I C C; Siqueira, I R; Dalmaz, C; Caumo, W; Torres, I L S

    2013-03-01

    It is know that repeated exposure to opiates impairs spatial learning and memory and that the hippocampus has important neuromodulatory effects after drug exposure and withdrawal symptoms. Thus, the aim of this investigation was to assess hippocampal levels of BDNF, oxidative stress markers associated with cell viability, and TNF-α in the short, medium and long term after repeated morphine treatment in early life. Newborn male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of morphine (morphine group) or saline (control group), 5 μg in the mid-scapular area, starting on postnatal day 8 (P8), once daily for 7 days, and neurochemical parameters were assessed in the hippocampus on postnatal days 16 (P16), 30 (P30), and 60 (P60). For the first time, we observed that morphine treatment in early life modulates BDNF levels in the medium and long term and also modulates superoxide dismutase activity in the long term. In addition, it was observed effect of treatment and age in TNF-α levels, and no effects in lactate dehydrogenase levels, or cell viability. These findings show that repeated morphine treatment in the neonatal period can lead to long-lasting neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of male rats, and indicate the importance of cellular and intracellular adaptations in the hippocampus after early-life opioid exposure to tolerance, withdrawal and addiction.

  17. Increased lead availability and enzyme activities in root-adhering soil of Lantana camara during phytoextraction in the presence of earthworms.

    PubMed

    Jusselme, My Dung; Miambi, Edouard; Mora, Philippe; Diouf, Michel; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2013-02-15

    Earthworms are known to increase availability of heavy metals in soils and also play an important role in maintaining the structure and quality of soil. The introduction of earthworms into soils contaminated with metals in the presence of a potential hyperaccumulator has been suggested as an aid for phytoremediation processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate: (i) the effects of earthworms on lead availability in artificially contaminated soil at 500 and 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb in the presence of Lantana camara, a hyperaccumulator, (ii) the effects of earthworms and lead on soil properties such as pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter (OM), total and available N, P and K and (iii) soil enzyme activities. Earthworms increased the bioavailable Pb in root-adhering soil by a factor of 2 to 3 in the contaminated soils at concentrations of 500 to 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), respectively. In lead contaminated soils, the presence of earthworms led to a significant decrease in soil pH by about 0.2 but increased CEC by 17% and OM by more than 30%. Earthworm activities also increased the activities of N-acetylglucosamidase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, xylanase, alkaline and acid phosphatase, urease and fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA). These results indicate that the ecological context for phytoremediation should be broadened by considering plant-soil-earthworm interactions as they influence both plant health and absorption of heavy metals. They also showed that the enzyme activities monitored could serve as useful proxies for phytoremediation capability and, more generally, for soil quality as a whole.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of bitter acid biosynthesis and precursor pathways in hop (Humulus lupulus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    ) clades. Conclusions Our analysis of the hop transcriptome significantly expands the genomic resources available for this agriculturally-important crop. This study provides evidence for the lupulin gland-specific biosynthesis of BCAAs and prenyl diphosphates to provide precursors for the production of bitter acids. The biosynthetic pathway leading to BCAAs in lupulin glands involves the plastidial enzyme, HlBCAT2. The mitochondrial enzyme HlBCAT1 degrades BCAAs as the first step in the catabolic pathway leading to branched chain-acyl-CoAs. PMID:23347725

  19. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid mycotoxin produced by some strains of Aspergillus flavus. Characterization of the CPA biosynthesis gene cluster confirmed that formation of CPA is via a three-enzyme pathway. This review examines the structure and organization of the CPA genes, elu...

  20. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  1. Carnosic acid biosynthesis elucidated by a synthetic biology platform

    PubMed Central

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Trikka, Fotini A.; Loupassaki, Sofia; Roussis, Vassilios; Makris, Antonios M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology approaches achieving the reconstruction of specific plant natural product biosynthetic pathways in dedicated microbial “chassis” have provided access to important industrial compounds (e.g., artemisinin, resveratrol, vanillin). However, the potential of such production systems to facilitate elucidation of plant biosynthetic pathways has been underexplored. Here we report on the application of a modular terpene production platform in the characterization of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the potent antioxidant carnosic acid and related diterpenes in Salvia pomifera and Rosmarinus officinalis. Four cytochrome P450 enzymes are identified (CYP76AH24, CYP71BE52, CYP76AK6, and CYP76AK8), the combined activities of which account for all of the oxidation events leading to the biosynthesis of the major diterpenes produced in these plants. This approach develops yeast as an efficient tool to harness the biotechnological potential of the numerous sequencing datasets that are increasingly becoming available through transcriptomic or genomic studies. PMID:26976595

  2. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  3. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J.; Interrante, Maria Filsinger; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. Here, we engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof-of-principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  4. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-04

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds.

  5. [Jasmonate biosynthesis--the latest discoveries].

    PubMed

    Wilmowicz, Emilia; Frankowski, Kamil; Sidłowska, Magdalena; Kućko, Agata; Kesy, Jacek; Gasiorowski, Adam; Glazińska, Paulina; Kopcewicz, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant hormones involved in many growth and development processes. They also participate in plant defense responses. Current progress in the study on biosynthesis and signaling of jasmonates has contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms regulating concentration of these hormones in the cell. Sustaining a proper level of jasmonates allow the plant to respond appropriately to changing conditions. It is possible due to the large number of enzymes and genes involved in biosynthesis of these hormones as well as multilevel control of their expression.

  6. Arsenic trioxide targets MTHFD1 and SUMO-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamynina, Elena; Lachenauer, Erica R; DiRisio, Aislyn C; Liebenthal, Rebecca P; Field, Martha S; Stover, Patrick J

    2017-03-06

    Arsenic exposure increases risk for cancers and is teratogenic in animal models. Here we demonstrate that small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)- and folate-dependent nuclear de novo thymidylate (dTMP) biosynthesis is a sensitive target of arsenic trioxide (As2O3), leading to uracil misincorporation into DNA and genome instability. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) generate 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate for de novo dTMP biosynthesis and translocate to the nucleus during S-phase, where they form a multienzyme complex with thymidylate synthase (TYMS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), as well as the components of the DNA replication machinery. As2O3 exposure increased MTHFD1 SUMOylation in cultured cells and in in vitro SUMOylation reactions, and increased MTHFD1 ubiquitination and MTHFD1 and SHMT1 degradation. As2O3 inhibited de novo dTMP biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner, increased uracil levels in nuclear DNA, and increased genome instability. These results demonstrate that MTHFD1 and SHMT1, which are key enzymes providing one-carbon units for dTMP biosynthesis in the form of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, are direct targets of As2O3-induced proteolytic degradation, providing a mechanism for arsenic in the etiology of cancer and developmental anomalies.

  7. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  8. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Triterpenoid Biosynthesis and Engineering in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Satoru; Saito, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Triterpenoid saponins are a diverse group of natural products in plants and are considered defensive compounds against pathogenic microbes and herbivores. Because of their various beneficial properties for humans, saponins are used in wide-ranging applications in addition to medicinally. Saponin biosynthesis involves three key enzymes: oxidosqualene cyclases, which construct the basic triterpenoid skeletons; cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, which mediate oxidations; and uridine diphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases, which catalyze glycosylations. The discovery of genes committed to saponin biosynthesis is important for the stable supply and biotechnological application of these compounds. Here, we review the identified genes involved in triterpenoid biosynthesis, summarize the recent advances in the biotechnological production of useful plant terpenoids, and discuss the bioengineering of plant triterpenoids. PMID:22639586

  10. Unconventional membrane lipid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria are surrounded by at least one bilayer membrane mainly composed of phospholipids (PLs). Biosynthesis of the most abundant PLs phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL) is well understood in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It recently emerged, however, that the diversity of bacterial membrane lipids is huge and that not yet explored biosynthesis pathways exist, even for the common PLs. A good example is the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It contains PE, PG and CL as major lipids and small amounts of the N-methylated PE derivatives monomethyl PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC = trimethylated PE). Xanthomonas campestris uses a repertoire of canonical and non-canonical enzymes for the synthesis of its membrane lipids. In this minireview, we briefly recapitulate standard pathways and integrate three recently discovered pathways into the overall picture of bacterial membrane biosynthesis.

  11. The ancient CYP716 family is a major contributor to the diversification of eudicot triterpenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Karel; Pollier, Jacob; Buyst, Dieter; Arendt, Philipp; Csuk, René; Sommerwerk, Sven; Moses, Tessa; Mertens, Jan; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pauwels, Laurens; Aharoni, Asaph; Martins, José; Nelson, David R.; Goossens, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Triterpenoids are widespread bioactive plant defence compounds with potential use as pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other high-value products. Enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 family have an essential role in creating the immense structural diversity of triterpenoids across the plant kingdom. However, for many triterpenoid oxidation reactions, the corresponding enzyme remains unknown. Here we characterize CYP716 enzymes from different medicinal plant species by heterologous expression in engineered yeasts and report ten hitherto unreported triterpenoid oxidation activities, including a cyclization reaction, leading to a triterpenoid lactone. Kingdom-wide phylogenetic analysis of over 400 CYP716s from over 200 plant species reveals details of their evolution and suggests that in eudicots the CYP716s evolved specifically towards triterpenoid biosynthesis. Our findings underscore the great potential of CYP716s as a source for generating triterpenoid structural diversity and expand the toolbox available for synthetic biology programmes for sustainable production of bioactive plant triterpenoids. PMID:28165039

  12. Modulation of GSH with exogenous agents leads to changes in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity in VL-17A cells exposed to chronic alcohol plus high glucose.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Mathan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2014-02-01

    Gluthathione (GSH) is a major cellular antioxidant. The present study utilizing VL-17A cells exposed to chronic alcohol plus high glucose investigated the changes in oxidative stress, toxicity, and glyoxalase 1 activity as a detoxification pathway due to changes in GSH level through GSH supplementation with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its depletion through buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or diethyl maleate (DEM). Glyoxalase 1 plays an important role in detoxification of methylglyoxal which is formed as a precursor of advanced glycated end products formed due to high glucose mediated oxidative stress. Significant changes in glyoxalase 1 activity utilizing methylglyoxal or glyoxal as substrates occurred with NAC or UDCA or BSO or DEM supplementation in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells. NAC or UDCA administration in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells increased viability and decreased ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation. Similarly, GSH depletion with BSO or DEM had an opposite effect on the parameters in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells. In conclusion, modulation of GSH with NAC or UDCA or BSO or DEM leads to significant changes in oxidative stress, glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and toxicity in chronic alcohol plus high glucose treated VL-17A cells.

  13. Alterations in renal heme biosynthesis during metal nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, A; Fowler, B A

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of the heme biosynthetic pathway in the kidney by various metals has been reviewed. In addition, a study on the effects of lead on renal heme biosynthesis after acute treatment of rats has been reported. Chronic low-level lead exposure in rats results in relatively small effects on renal heme biosynthetic pathway enzymes. After acute treatment of rats with lead, no effects on ALAD or UROS and mild, transitory effects on ALAS and ferrochelatase are observed. The intracellular binding of lead within intranuclear inclusion bodies in the proximal tubule cells and to high-affinity cytosolic lead-binding proteins probably protects sensitive subcellular systems, such as the heme pathway, from lead toxicity. Chronic exposure to methyl mercury results in increased urinary excretion of uro- and coproporphyrins in rats, mediated via inhibition of ferrochelatase and UROS and stimulation of ALAS. A tissue-specific inhibition of ALAD occurs in the kidney after treatment of rats with indium. Acute treatment of rats with nickel, platinum, tin, antimony, bismuth, and cobalt results in induction of heme oxygenase, followed by decreased microsomal heme content and ALAS stimulation in the kidney.

  14. Discovery of parallel pathways of kanamycin biosynthesis allows antibiotic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Je Won; Park, Sung Ryeol; Nepal, Keshav Kumar; Han, Ah Reum; Ban, Yeon Hee; Yoo, Young Ji; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Eui Min; Kim, Dooil; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-10-09

    Kanamycin is one of the most widely used antibiotics, yet its biosynthetic pathway remains unclear. Current proposals suggest that the kanamycin biosynthetic products are linearly related via single enzymatic transformations. To explore this system, we have reconstructed the entire biosynthetic pathway through the heterologous expression of combinations of putative biosynthetic genes from Streptomyces kanamyceticus in the non-aminoglycoside-producing Streptomyces venezuelae. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the biosynthetic pathway contains an early branch point, governed by the substrate promiscuity of a glycosyltransferase, that leads to the formation of two parallel pathways in which early intermediates are further modified. Glycosyltransferase exchange can alter flux through these two parallel pathways, and the addition of other biosynthetic enzymes can be used to synthesize known and new highly active antibiotics. These results complete our understanding of kanamycin biosynthesis and demonstrate the potential of pathway engineering for direct in vivo production of clinically useful antibiotics and more robust aminoglycosides.

  15. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  16. Genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Probst, Corinna; Ringel, Phillip; Boysen, Verena; Wirsing, Lisette; Alexander, Mariko Matsuda; Mendel, Ralf R; Kruse, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element that is essential for important cellular processes. To gain biological activity, Mo must be complexed in the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), a pterin derivative of low molecular weight. Moco synthesis is a multi-step pathway that involves a variable number of genes in eukaryotes, which are assigned to four steps of eukaryotic Moco biosynthesis. Moco biosynthesis mutants lack any Moco-dependent enzymatic activities, including assimilation of nitrate (plants and fungi), detoxification of sulfite (humans and plants) and utilization of hypoxanthine as sole N-source (fungi). We report the first comprehensive genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa (N. crassa) Moco biosynthesis pathway, annotating five genes which encode all pathway enzymes, and compare it with the characterized Aspergillus nidulans pathway. Biochemical characterization of the corresponding knock-out mutants confirms our annotation model, documenting the N. crassa/A. nidulans (fungal) Moco biosynthesis as unique, combining the organizational structure of both plant and human Moco biosynthesis genes.

  17. Recent advances in the elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Gao-Yi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2016-01-01

    With the successful production of artemisinic acid in yeast, the promising potential of synthetic biology for natural product biosynthesis is now being realized. The recent total biosynthesis of opioids in microbes is considered to be another landmark in this field. The importance and significance of enzymes in natural product biosynthetic pathways have been re-emphasized by these advancements. Therefore, the characterization and elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis are undoubtedly fundamental for the development of new drugs and the heterologous biosynthesis of active natural products. Here, discoveries regarding enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis over the past year are briefly reviewed. PMID:26989472

  18. Recent advances in the elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gao-Yi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2015-01-01

    With the successful production of artemisinic acid in yeast, the promising potential of synthetic biology for natural product biosynthesis is now being realized. The recent total biosynthesis of opioids in microbes is considered to be another landmark in this field. The importance and significance of enzymes in natural product biosynthetic pathways have been re-emphasized by these advancements. Therefore, the characterization and elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis are undoubtedly fundamental for the development of new drugs and the heterologous biosynthesis of active natural products. Here, discoveries regarding enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis over the past year are briefly reviewed.

  19. Yeast manno-protein biosynthesis: solubilization and selective assay of four mannosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, T; Ballou, C E

    1975-01-01

    Using appropriate yeast strains and exogenous acceptors, we have devised specific assays for four mannosyltransferase activities involved in biosynthesis of the carbohydrate outer chain of yeast mannoproteins. The assays utilize GDP-[14C]mannose as the donor and unlabeled oligosaccharides as the acceptors, the products being neutral radioactive oligosaccharides one mannose unit larger than the acceptors. The multiglycosyltransferase system from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was solubilized in Triton X-100 and urea and purified 100-fold. Free mannose is an acceptor for the alpha1 leads to 2-mannosyltransferase, the major product being alpha[14C]Man leads to 2Man. The alpha1 leads to 6-mannooligosaccharides serve as acceptors for both the alpha1 leads to 2- and alpha1 leads to 6-transferases, but the tetrasaccharide alphaMan leads to 3alphsMan leads to 2alphaMan is a specific acceptor for the latter enzyme and yields (see article). When reduced, this same tetrasaccharide serves as the acceptor for an alpha1 leads to 3-mannosyltransferase from Saccharomyces chevalieri, yielding a pentasaccharide with two terminal 1 leads to 3 linkages. Assay of the alpha1 leads to 3-transferase in S. cerevisiae utilizes reduced alpha1 leads to 2-mannotriose as the acceptor, the product being alpha[14C]Man leads to 3alphaMan leads to 2alphaMan leads to 2Mannitol. The multienzyme system works in concert to make "mannan" in a cell-free in vitro system. Images PMID:1105568

  20. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis. PMID:26510127

  1. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  2. Protein Biosynthesis in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, A. V.; Levitskii, S. A.; Vinogradova, E. N.; Atkinson, G. C.; Hauryliuk, V.; Zenkin, N.; Kamenski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis. PMID:24228873

  3. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  4. Structural evidence for an enolate intermediate in GFP fluorophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barondeau, David P; Tainer, John A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2006-03-15

    The Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) creates a fluorophore from its component amino acids Ser65, Tyr66, and Gly67 through a remarkable post-translational modification, involving spontaneous peptide backbone cyclization, dehydration, and oxidation reactions. Here we test and extend the understanding of fluorophore biosynthesis by coupling chemical reduction and anaerobic methodologies with kinetic analyses and protein structure determination. Two high-resolution structures of dithionite-treated GFP variants reveal a previously uncharacterized enolate intermediate form of the chromophore that is viable in generating a fluorophore (t1/2 = 39 min-1) upon exposure to air. Isolation of this enolate intermediate will now allow specific probing of the rate-limiting oxidation step for fluorophore biosynthesis in GFP and its red fluorescent protein homologues. Such targeted characterizations may lead to the design of faster maturing proteins with enhanced applications in biotechnology and cell biology. Moreover, our results reveal how the GFP protein environment mimics enzyme systems, by stabilizing an otherwise high energy enolate intermediate to achieve its post-translational modification.

  5. Biosynthesis of putrescine in the prostate gland of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, A. E.; Williams-Ashman, H. G.

    1968-01-01

    In the rat ventral prostate gland the biosynthesis of putrescine, a precursor of spermidine and spermine, is shown to occur by the direct decarboxylation of l-ornithine. Some properties of a soluble pyridoxal phosphate-dependent l-ornithine decarboxylase are described. The findings are discussed in relation to other enzymic reactions involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines by the prostate gland. PMID:5667265

  6. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration.

  7. The roles of latex and the vascular bundle in morphine biosynthesis in the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum.

    PubMed

    Weid, Marion; Ziegler, Jörg; Kutchan, Toni M

    2004-09-21

    The opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, is one of mankind's oldest medicinal plants. Opium poppy today is the commercial source of the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine. Along with these two morphinans, opium poppy produces approximately eighty alkaloids belonging to various tetrahydrobenzylisoquinoline-derived classes. It has been known for over a century that morphinan alkaloids accumulate in the latex of opium poppy. With identification of many of the enzymes of alkaloid biosynthesis in this plant, biochemical data suggested involvement of multiple cell types in alkaloid biosynthesis in poppy. Herein the immunolocalization of five enzymes of alkaloid formation in opium poppy is reported: (R,S)-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase central to the biosynthesis of tetrahydroisoquinoline-derived alkaloids, the berberine bridge enzyme of the sanguinarine pathway, (R,S)-reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase specific to laudanosine formation, and salutaridinol 7-O-acetyltransferase and codeinone reductase, which lead to morphine. In capsule and stem, both O-methyltransferases and the O-acetyltransferase are found predominantly in parenchyma cells within the vascular bundle, and codeinone reductase is localized to laticifers, the site of morphinan alkaloid accumulation. In developing root tip, both O-methyltransferases and the O-acetyltransferase are found in the pericycle of the stele, and the berberine bridge enzyme is localized to parenchyma cells of the root cortex. Laticifers are not found in developing root tip, and, likewise, codeinone reductase was not detected. These results provide cell-specific localization that gives a coherent picture of the spatial distribution of alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  8. Investigating Mithramycin deoxysugar biosynthesis: enzymatic total synthesis of TDP-D-olivose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guojun; Kharel, Madan K; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jürgen

    2011-11-25

    Mix'n'match: Enzymatic total synthesis of TDP-D-olivose was achieved, starting from TDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-glucose, by combining three pathway enzymes with one cofactor-regenerating enzyme. The results also revealed that MtmC is a bifunctional enzyme that can perform a 4-ketoreduction necessary for D-olivose biosynthesis besides the previously found C-methyltransfer for D-mycarose biosynthesis.

  9. Characterization of a Pipecolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway Required for Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pingtao; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ding, Yuli; Feussner, Kirstin; Busta, Lucas; Haroth, Sven; Xu, Shaohua; Li, Xin; Jetter, Reinhard; Feussner, Ivo; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an immune response induced in the distal parts of plants following defense activation in local tissue. Pipecolic acid (Pip) accumulation orchestrates SAR and local resistance responses. Here, we report the identification and characterization of SAR-DEFICIENT4 (SARD4), which encodes a critical enzyme for Pip biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Loss of function of SARD4 leads to reduced Pip levels and accumulation of a Pip precursor, Δ(1)-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid (P2C). In Escherichia coli, expression of the aminotransferase ALD1 leads to production of P2C and addition of SARD4 results in Pip production, suggesting that a Pip biosynthesis pathway can be reconstituted in bacteria by coexpression of ALD1 and SARD4. In vitro experiments showed that ALD1 can use l-lysine as a substrate to produce P2C and P2C is converted to Pip by SARD4. Analysis of sard4 mutant plants showed that SARD4 is required for SAR as well as enhanced pathogen resistance conditioned by overexpression of the SAR regulator FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1. Compared with the wild type, pathogen-induced Pip accumulation is only modestly reduced in the local tissue of sard4 mutant plants, but it is below detection in distal leaves, suggesting that Pip is synthesized in systemic tissue by SARD4-mediated reduction of P2C and biosynthesis of Pip in systemic tissue contributes to SAR establishment.

  10. Plastoquinone and Ubiquinone in Plants: Biosynthesis, Physiological Function and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miaomiao; Lu, Shanfa

    2016-01-01

    Plastoquinone (PQ) and ubiquinone (UQ) are two important prenylquinones, functioning as electron transporters in the electron transport chain of oxygenic photosynthesis and the aerobic respiratory chain, respectively, and play indispensable roles in plant growth and development through participating in the biosynthesis and metabolism of important chemical compounds, acting as antioxidants, being involved in plant response to stress, and regulating gene expression and cell signal transduction. UQ, particularly UQ10, has also been widely used in people’s life. It is effective in treating cardiovascular diseases, chronic gingivitis and periodontitis, and shows favorable impact on cancer treatment and human reproductive health. PQ and UQ are made up of an active benzoquinone ring attached to a polyisoprenoid side chain. Biosynthesis of PQ and UQ is very complicated with more than thirty five enzymes involved. Their synthetic pathways can be generally divided into two stages. The first stage leads to the biosynthesis of precursors of benzene quinone ring and prenyl side chain. The benzene quinone ring for UQ is synthesized from tyrosine or phenylalanine, whereas the ring for PQ is derived from tyrosine. The prenyl side chains of PQ and UQ are derived from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate through the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway and/or acetyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA through the mevalonate pathway. The second stage includes the condensation of ring and side chain and subsequent modification. Homogentisate solanesyltransferase, 4-hydroxybenzoate polyprenyl diphosphate transferase and a series of benzene quinone ring modification enzymes are involved in this stage. PQ exists in plants, while UQ widely presents in plants, animals and microbes. Many enzymes and their encoding genes involved in PQ and UQ biosynthesis have been intensively studied recently. Metabolic engineering of UQ10 in plants, such as rice and tobacco, has also been tested. In this

  11. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation for elucidating the type II FAS pathways in other bacteria (White et al., 2005). However, fatty acid biosynthesis is more diverse in the phylum Actinobacteria: Mycobacterium, possess both FAS systems while Streptomyces species have only the multi-enzyme FAS II system and Corynebacterium species exclusively FAS I. In this review we present an overview of the genome organization, biochemical properties and physiological relevance of the two FAS systems in the three genera of actinomycetes mentioned above. We also address in detail the biochemical and structural properties of the acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) that catalyzes the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis in actinomycetes, and discuss the molecular bases of their substrate specificity and the structure-based identification of new ACCase inhibitors with anti-mycobacterial properties. PMID:21204864

  12. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  13. Fatty acid biosynthesis pathways in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5G(B1)

    DOE PAGES

    Demidenko, Aleksandr; Akberdin, Ilya R.; Allemann, Marco; ...

    2017-01-10

    Methane utilization by methanotrophic bacteria is an attractive application for biotechnological conversion of natural or biogas into high-added-value products. Haloalcaliphilic methanotrophic bacteria belonging to the genus Methylomicrobium are among the most promising strains for methane-based biotechnology, providing easy and inexpensive cultivation, rapid growth, and the availability of established genetic tools. A number of methane bioconversions using these microbial cultures have been discussed, including the derivation of biodiesel, alkanes, and OMEGA-3 supplements. These compounds are derived from bacterial fatty acid pools. Here, we investigate fatty acid biosynthesis in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5G(B1). Most of the genes homologous to typical Type II fattymore » acid biosynthesis pathways could be annotated by bioinformatics analyses, with the exception of FA transport and regulatory elements. Different approaches for improving fatty acid accumulation were investigated. These studies indicated that both fatty acid degradation and acetyl- and malonyl-CoA levels are bottlenecks for higher level fatty acid production. The best strain generated in this study synthesizes 111 ± 2 mg/gDCW of extractable fatty acids, which is ~20% more than the original strain. A candidate gene for FA-biosynthesis regulation, farE, was identified and studied. Its deletion resulted in drastic changes to the FA profile, leading to an increased pool of C18-fatty acid methyl ester. The FarE-regulon was further investigated by RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in farE-knockout mutants and farE-overexpressing strains. These gene profiles highlighted a novel set of enzymes and regulators involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. As a result, the gene expression and fatty acid profiles of the different farE-strains support the hypothesis that metabolic fluxes upstream of fatty acid biosynthesis restrict fatty acid production in the methanotroph.« less

  14. Ethanol-induced impairment in the biosynthesis of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Welti, Michael; Hülsmeier, Andreas J

    2014-04-01

    Deficiency in N-linked protein glycosylation is a long-known characteristic of alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Previous investigations of ethanol-induced glycosylation deficiency demonstrated perturbations in the early steps of substrate synthesis and in the final steps of capping N-linked glycans in the Golgi. The significance of the biosynthesis of N-glycan precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, however, has not yet been addressed in alcoholic liver disease. Ethanol-metabolizing hepatoma cells were treated with increasing concentrations of ethanol. Transcript analysis of genes involved in the biosynthesis of N-glycans, activity assays of related enzymes, dolichol-phosphate quantification, and analysis of dolichol-linked oligosaccharides were performed. Upon treatment of cells with ethanol, we found a decrease in the final N-glycan precursor Dol-PP-GlcNAc(2) Man(9) Glc(3) and in C95- and C100-dolichol-phosphate levels. Transcript analysis of genes involved in N-glycosylation showed a 17% decrease in expression levels of DPM1, a subunit of the dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase, and an 8% increase in RPN2, a subunit of the oligosaccharyl transferase. Ethanol treatment decreases the biosynthesis of dolichol-phosphate. Consequently, the formation of N-glycan precursors is affected, resulting in an aberrant precursor assembly. Messenger RNA levels of genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis are slightly affected by ethanol treatment, indicating that the assembly of N-glycan precursors is not regulated at the transcriptional level. This study confirms that ethanol impairs N-linked glycosylation by affecting dolichol biosynthesis leading to impaired dolichol-linked oligosaccharide assembly. Together our data help to explain the underglycosylation phenotype observed in alcoholic liver disease and congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  15. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5G(B1)

    PubMed Central

    Demidenko, Aleksandr; Akberdin, Ilya R.; Allemann, Marco; Allen, Eric E.; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.

    2017-01-01

    Methane utilization by methanotrophic bacteria is an attractive application for biotechnological conversion of natural or biogas into high-added-value products. Haloalcaliphilic methanotrophic bacteria belonging to the genus Methylomicrobium are among the most promising strains for methane-based biotechnology, providing easy and inexpensive cultivation, rapid growth, and the availability of established genetic tools. A number of methane bioconversions using these microbial cultures have been discussed, including the derivation of biodiesel, alkanes, and OMEGA-3 supplements. These compounds are derived from bacterial fatty acid pools. Here, we investigate fatty acid biosynthesis in Methylomicrobium buryatense 5G(B1). Most of the genes homologous to typical Type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathways could be annotated by bioinformatics analyses, with the exception of fatty acid transport and regulatory elements. Different approaches for improving fatty acid accumulation were investigated. These studies indicated that both fatty acid degradation and acetyl- and malonyl-CoA levels are bottlenecks for higher level fatty acid production. The best strain generated in this study synthesizes 111 ± 2 mg/gDCW of extractable fatty acids, which is ~20% more than the original strain. A candidate gene for fatty acid biosynthesis regulation, farE, was identified and studied. Its deletion resulted in drastic changes to the fatty acid profile, leading to an increased pool of C18-fatty acid methyl ester. The FarE-regulon was further investigated by RNA-seq analysis of gene expression in farE-knockout mutants and farE-overexpressing strains. These gene profiles highlighted a novel set of enzymes and regulators involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. The gene expression and fatty acid profiles of the different farE-strains support the hypothesis that metabolic fluxes upstream of fatty acid biosynthesis restrict fatty acid production in the methanotroph. PMID:28119683

  16. Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1987-11-01

    The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I/sub 50/ concentration of 3.2 ..mu..M. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I/sub 50/ of 4 ..mu..M. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4-/sup 3/H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and /sup 14/C-mevalonic acid. From the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs.

  17. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  18. Conversion of anthranilate synthase into isochorismate synthase: implications for the evolution of chorismate-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Plach, Maximilian G; Löffler, Patrick; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-09-14

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes play a vital role in the biosynthesis of metabolites in plants as well as free-living and infectious microorganisms. Among these enzymes are the homologous primary metabolic anthranilate synthase (AS) and secondary metabolic isochorismate synthase (ICS). Both catalyze mechanistically related reactions by using ammonia and water as nucleophiles, respectively. We report that the nucleophile specificity of AS can be extended from ammonia to water by just two amino acid exchanges in a channel leading to the active site. The observed ICS/AS bifunctionality demonstrates that a secondary metabolic enzyme can readily evolve from a primary metabolic enzyme without requiring an initial gene duplication event. In a general sense, these findings add to our understanding how nature has used the structurally predetermined features of enzyme superfamilies to evolve new reactions.

  19. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  20. Fusion of Ferredoxin and Cytochrome P450 Enables Direct Light-Driven Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are key enzymes in the synthesis of bioactive natural products in plants. Efforts to harness these enzymes for in vitro and whole-cell production of natural products have been hampered by difficulties in expressing them heterologously in their active form, and their requirement for NADPH as a source of reducing power. We recently demonstrated targeting and insertion of plant P450s into the photosynthetic membrane and photosynthesis-driven, NADPH-independent P450 catalytic activity mediated by the electron carrier protein ferredoxin. Here, we report the fusion of ferredoxin with P450 CYP79A1 from the model plant Sorghum bicolor, which catalyzes the initial step in the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Fusion with ferredoxin allows CYP79A1 to obtain electrons for catalysis by interacting directly with photosystem I. Furthermore, electrons captured by the fused ferredoxin moiety are directed more effectively toward P450 catalytic activity, making the fusion better able to compete with endogenous electron sinks coupled to metabolic pathways. The P450-ferredoxin fusion enzyme obtains reducing power solely from its fused ferredoxin and outperforms unfused CYP79A1 in vivo. This demonstrates greatly enhanced electron transfer from photosystem I to CYP79A1 as a consequence of the fusion. The fusion strategy reported here therefore forms the basis for enhanced partitioning of photosynthetic reducing power toward P450-dependent biosynthesis of important natural products. PMID:27119279

  1. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  2. A member of the maize isopentenyl transferase gene family, Zea mays isopentenyl transferase 2 (ZmIPT2), encodes a cytokinin biosynthetic enzyme expressed during kernel development. Cytokinin biosynthesis in maize.

    PubMed

    Brugière, Norbert; Humbert, Sabrina; Rizzo, Nancy; Bohn, Jennifer; Habben, Jeffrey E

    2008-06-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) are plant hormones that regulate a large number of processes associated with plant growth and development such as induction of stomata opening, delayed senescence, suppression of auxin-induced apical dominance, signaling of nitrogen availability, differentiation of plastids and control of sink strength. In maize, CKs are thought to play an important role in establishing seed size and increasing seed set under normal and unfavorable environmental conditions therefore influencing yield. In recent years, the discovery of isopentenyl transferase (IPT) genes in plants has shed light on the CK biosynthesis pathway in plants. In an effort to increase our understanding of the role played by CKs in maize development and sink-strength, we identified several putative IPT genes using a bioinformatics approach. We focused our attention on one gene in particular, ZmIPT2, because of its strong expression in developing kernels. The expression of the gene and its product overlays the change in CK levels in developing kernels suggesting a major role in CK biosynthesis for kernel development. We demonstrate that at 8-10 days after pollination (DAP) the endosperm and especially the basal transfer cell layer (BETL) is a major site of ZmIPT2 expression, and that this expression persists in the BETL and the developing embryo into later kernel development stages. We show that ectopic expression of ZmIPT2 in calli and in planta created phenotypes consistent with CK overproduction. We also show that ZmIPT2 preferentially uses ADP and ATP over AMP as the substrates for dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) IPT activity. The expression pattern of ZmIPT2 in the BETL, endosperm and embryo during kernel development will be discussed with an emphasis on the suggested role of CKs in determining sink-strength and grain production in crop plants.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of a new enzyme, O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylase, involved in l-cysteine biosynthesis by a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, at 2.0A resolution.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yutaka; Mino, Koshiki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2005-08-12

    O-Phosphoserine sulfhydrylase is a new enzyme found in a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1. This enzyme catalyzes a novel cysteine synthetic reaction from O-phospho-l-serine and sulfide. The crystal structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0A resolution using the method of multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. A monomer consists of three domains, including an N-terminal domain with a new alpha/beta fold. The topology folds of the middle and C-terminal domains were similar to those of the O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase-A from Salmonella typhimurium and the cystathionine beta-synthase from human. The cofactor, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, is bound in a cleft between the middle and C-terminal domains through a covalent linkage to Lys127. Based on the structure determined, O-phospho-l-serine could be rationally modeled into the active site of the enzyme. An enzyme-substrate complex model and a mutation experiment revealed that Arg297, unique to hyperthermophilic archaea, is one of the most crucial residues for O-phosphoserine sulfhydrylation activity. There are more hydrophobic areas and less electric charges at the dimer interface, compared to the S.typhimurium O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase.

  4. Evaluation of N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin as a pharmacological chaperone for human GM1 gangliosidosis leads to identification of a feline model suitable for testing enzyme enhancement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rigat, Brigitte A.; Tropak, Michael B.; Buttner, Justin; Crushell, Ellen; Benedict, Daphne; Callahan, John W.; Martin, Douglas R.; Mahuran, Don J.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of lysosomal β-D-galactosidase can result in GM1 gangliosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by massive neuronal storage of GM1 ganglioside in the brain. Currently there are no available therapies that can even slow the progression of this disease. Enzyme enhancement therapy utilizes small molecules that can often cross the blood brain barrier, but are also often competitive inhibitors of their target enzyme. It is a promising new approach for treating diseases, often caused by missense mutations, associated with dramatically reduced levels of functionally folded enzyme. Despite a number of positive reports based on assays performed with patient cells, skepticism persists that an inhibitor-based treatment can increase mutant enzyme activity in vivo. To date no appropriate animal model, i.e., one that recapitulates a responsive human genotype and clinical phenotype, has been reported that could be used to validate enzyme enhancement therapy. In this report, we identify a novel enzyme enhancement-agent, N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin, that enhances the mutant β-galactosidase activity in the lysosomes of a number of patient cell lines containing a variety of missense mutations. We then demonstrate that treatment of cells from a previously described, naturally occurring feline model (that biochemically, clinically and molecularly closely mimics GM1 gangliosidosis in humans) with this molecule, results in a robust enhancement of their mutant lysosomal β-galactosidase activity. These data indicate that the feline model could be used to validate this therapeutic approach and determine the relationship between the disease stage at which this therapy is initiated and the maximum clinical benefits obtainable. PMID:22784478

  5. 24-Methylenecyclopropane steroidal inhibitors: A Trojan horse in ergosterol biosynthesis that prevents growth of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew B; Patkar, Presheet; Singha, Ujjal K; Chaudhuri, Minu; David Nes, W

    2017-03-01

    A new class of steroidal therapeutics based on phylogenetic-guided design of covalent inhibitors that target parasite-specific enzymes of ergosterol biosynthesis is shown to prevent growth of the protozoan-Trypanosoma brucei, responsible for sleeping sickness. In the presence of approximately 15±5μM 26,27-dehydrolanosterol, T. brucei procyclic or blood stream form growth is inhibited by 50%. This compound is actively converted by the parasite to an acceptable substrate of sterol C24-methyl transferase (SMT) that upon position-specific side chain methylation at C26 inactivates the enzyme. Treated cells show dose-dependent depletion of ergosterol and other 24β-methyl sterols with no accumulation of intermediates in contradistinction to profiles typical of tight binding inhibitor treatments to azoles showing loss of ergosterol accompanied by accumulation of toxic 14-methyl sterols. HEK cells accumulate 26,27-dehydrolanosterol without effect on cholesterol biosynthesis. During exposure of cloned TbSMT to 26,27-dehydrozymosterol, the enzyme is gradually inactivated (kcat/kinact=0.13min(-1)/0.08min(-1); partition ratio of 1.6) while 26,27-dehydrolanosterol binds nonproductively. GC-MS analysis of the turnover product and bound intermediate released as a C26-methylated diol (C3-OH and C24-OH) confirmed substrate recognition and covalent binding to TbSMT. This study has potential implications for design of a novel class of chemotherapeutic leads functioning as mechanism-based inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis to treat neglected tropical diseases.

  6. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  7. Dynamically Complex [6+4] and [4+2] Cycloadditions in the Biosynthesis of Spinosyn A

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashay; Chen, Zhuo; Yang, Zhongyue; Gutiérrez, Osvaldo; Liu, Hung-wen; Houk, K. N.; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    SpnF, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of spinosyn A, catalyzes a transannular Diels–Alder reaction. Quantum mechanical computations and dynamic simulations now show that this cycloaddition is not well described as either a concerted or stepwise process, and dynamical effects influence the identity and timing of bond formation. The transition state for the reaction is ambimodal and leads directly to both the observed Diels–Alder and an unobserved [6+4] cycloadduct. The potential energy surface bifurcates and the cycloadditions occur by dynamically stepwise modes featuring an “entropic intermediate”. A rapid Cope rearrangement converts the [6+4] adduct into the observed [4+2] adduct. Control of nonstatistical dynamical effects may serve as another way by which enzymes control reactions. PMID:26909570

  8. Investigating the Elusive Mechanism of Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Xylophone V.; Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Tran, Vy M.; Nguyen, Khiem V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis requires numerous biosynthetic enzymes and activated sulfate and sugar donors. Although the sequence of biosynthetic events is resolved using reconstituted systems, little is known about the emergence of cell-specific GAG chains (heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and dermatan sulfate) with distinct sulfation patterns. We have utilized a library of click-xylosides that have various aglycones to decipher the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis in a cellular system. Earlier studies have shown that both the concentration of the primers and the structure of the aglycone moieties can affect the composition of the newly synthesized GAG chains. However, it is largely unknown whether structural features of aglycone affect the extent of sulfation, sulfation pattern, disaccharide composition, and chain length of GAG chains. In this study, we show that aglycones can switch not only the type of GAG chains, but also their fine structures. Our findings provide suggestive evidence for the presence of GAGOSOMES that have different combinations of enzymes and their isoforms regulating the synthesis of cell-specific combinatorial structures. We surmise that click-xylosides are differentially recognized by the GAGOSOMES to generate distinct GAG structures as observed in this study. These novel click-xylosides offer new avenues to profile the cell-specific GAG chains, elucidate the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis, and to decipher the biological actions of GAG chains in model organisms. PMID:19628873

  9. Structures and Mechanisms of the Mycothiol Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Vetting, Matthew W.; Frantom, Patrick A.; Blanchard, John S.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, the genes encoding all four enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of mycothiol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been identified. Orthologues of each of these have been stably expressed and structurally characterized. The chemical mechanisms of all four have also been studied. Due to the unique phylogenetic distribution of mycothiol, and the enzymes responsible for its biosynthesis, these enzymes represent interesting potential targets for anti mycobacterial agents. PMID:19699138

  10. Biosynthesis of the tunicamycin antibiotics proceeds via unique exo-glycal intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszynski, Filip J.; Lee, Seung Seo; Yabe, Tomoaki; Wang, Hua; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Lee, Soo Jae; Davies, Gideon J.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2012-07-01

    The tunicamycins are archetypal nucleoside antibiotics targeting bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis and eukaryotic protein N-glycosylation. Understanding the biosynthesis of their unusual carbon framework may lead to variants with improved selectivity. Here, we demonstrate in vitro recapitulation of key sugar-manipulating enzymes from this pathway. TunA is found to exhibit unusual regioselectivity in the reduction of a key α,β-unsaturated ketone. The product of this reaction is shown to be the preferred substrate for TunF—an epimerase that converts the glucose derivative to a galactose. In Streptomyces strains in which another gene (tunB) is deleted, the biosynthesis is shown to stall at this exo-glycal product. These investigations confirm the combined TunA/F activity and delineate the ordering of events in the metabolic pathway. This is the first time these surprising exo-glycal intermediates have been seen in biology. They suggest that construction of the aminodialdose core of tunicamycin exploits their enol ether motif in a mode of C-C bond formation not previously observed in nature, to create an 11-carbon chain.

  11. Homology modeling and docking studies of FabH (β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III) enzyme involved in type II fatty acid biosynthesis of Chlorella variabilis: a potential algal feedstock for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Sukla, Lala Bihari; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-03-01

    The concept of using microalgae as an alternative renewable source of biofuel has gained much importance in recent years. However, its commercial feasibility is still an area of concern for researchers. Unraveling the fatty acid metabolic pathway and understanding structural features of various key enzymes regulating the process will provide valuable insights to target microalgae for augmented oil content. FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase; KAS III) is a condensing enzyme catalyzing the initial elongation step of type II fatty acid biosynthetic process and acyl carrier protein (ACP) facilitates the shuttling of the fatty acyl intermediates to the active site of the respective enzymes in the pathway. In the present study, a reliable three-dimensional structure of FabH from Chlorella variabilis, an oleaginous green microalga was modeled and subsequently the key residues involved in substrate binding were determined by employing protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation protocols. The FabH-ACP complex having the lowest docking energy score showed the binding of ACP to the electropositive FabH surface with strong hydrogen bond interactions. The MD simulation results indicated that the substrate-complexed FabH adopted a more stable conformation than the free enzyme. Further, the FabH structure retained its stability throughout the simulation although noticeable displacements were observed in the loop regions. Molecular simulation studies suggested the importance of crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved Arg(91) of FabH with Glu(53) and Asp(56) of ACP for exhibiting high affinity between the enzyme and substrate. The molecular modeling results are consistent with available experimental results on the flexibility of FabH and the present study provides first in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of catalytic mechanism of FabH, which could be used for further site-specific mutagenic experiments to develop

  12. Deuterium NMR used to indicate a common mechanism for the biosynthesis of ricinoleic acid by Ricinus communis and Claviceps purpurea.

    PubMed

    Billault, Isabelle; Mantle, Peter G; Robins, Richard J

    2004-03-17

    Previous studies have shown that ricinoleic acid from castor bean oil of Ricinus communis is synthesized by the direct hydroxyl substitution of oleate, while it has been proposed that ricinoleate is formed by hydration of linoleate in the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea. The mechanism of the enzymes specific to ricinoleate synthesis has not yet been established, but hydroxylation and desaturation of fatty acids in plants apparently involve closely related mechanisms. As mechanistic differences in the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of natural products can lead to different isotopic distributions in the product, we could expect ricinoleate isolated from castor or ergot oil to show distinct (2)H distribution patterns. To obtain information concerning the substrate and isotope effects that occur during the biosynthesis of ricinoleate, the site-specific natural deuterium distributions in methyl ricinoleate isolated from castor oil and in methyl ricinoleate and methyl linoleate isolated from ergot oils have been measured by quantitative (2)H NMR. First, the deuterium profiles for methyl ricinoleate from the plant and fungus are equivalent. Second, the deuterium profile for methyl linoleate from ergot is incompatible with this chemical species being the precursor of methyl ricinoleate. Hence, it is apparent that 12-hydroxylation in C. purpurea is consistent with the biosynthetic mechanisms proposed for R. communis and is compatible with the general fundamental mechanistic similarities between hydroxylation and desaturation previously proposed for plant fatty acid biosynthesis.

  13. Biological Role of Aldo–Keto Reductases in Retinoic Acid Biosynthesis and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, F. Xavier; Porté, Sergio; Parés, Xavier; Farrés, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    Several aldo–keto reductase (AKR) enzymes from subfamilies 1B and 1C show retinaldehyde reductase activity, having low Km and kcat values. Only AKR1B10 and 1B12, with all-trans-retinaldehyde, and AKR1C3, with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, display high catalytic efficiency. Major structural determinants for retinaldehyde isomer specificity are located in the external loops (A and C for AKR1B10, and B for AKR1C3), as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. Cellular models have shown that AKR1B and 1C enzymes are well suited to work in vivo as retinaldehyde reductases and to regulate retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis at hormone pre-receptor level. An additional physiological role for the retinaldehyde reductase activity of these enzymes, consistent with their tissue localization, is their participation in β-carotene absorption. Retinaldehyde metabolism may be subjected to subcellular compartmentalization, based on enzyme localization. While retinaldehyde oxidation to RA takes place in the cytosol, reduction to retinol could take place in the cytosol by AKRs or in the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum by microsomal retinaldehyde reductases. Upregulation of some AKR1 enzymes in different cancer types may be linked to their induction by oxidative stress and to their participation in different signaling pathways related to cell proliferation. AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, through their retinaldehyde reductase activity, trigger a decrease in the RA biosynthesis flow, resulting in RA deprivation and consequently lower differentiation, with an increased cancer risk in target tissues. Rational design of selective AKR inhibitors could lead to development of novel drugs for cancer treatment as well as reduction of chemotherapeutic drug resistance. PMID:22529810

  14. Biosynthesis and Toxicological Effects of Patulin

    PubMed Central

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects. PMID:22069602

  15. Circular bacteriocins: biosynthesis and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Christina; Brede, Dag A; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2014-11-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides.

  16. Circular Bacteriocins: Biosynthesis and Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Brede, Dag A.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2014-01-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides. PMID:25172850

  17. Heterocyclic Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Hotchandani, Tarun; Desgagne-Penix, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs), which are natural heterocyclic compounds, are isolated from Amaryllidaceae plants such as narcissus, snowdrop and spider lily. AAs have been extensively studied due to their multiple pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, knowledge of AA synthesis in plants is lacking and most genes encoding enzymes involved in their production remain unknown. AAs are structurally complex compounds which are challenging for total chemical synthesis that is economically viable. Therefore the understanding of AA biosynthesis could allow for the development of biotechnologies for the production of natural AAs or analogues, maintaining or improving their pharmacological properties. In this review, we describe the progress regarding the biosynthesis and pharmacological properties of AAs. The most recent developments in neurological, anti-cancer and anti-microbial bioactivities of heterocyclic AAs are covered.

  18. Deletion of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer in POMC-expressing cells leads to pituitary dysfunction, neurodegeneration and development of obesity.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Marc; Altirriba, Jordi; García, Ainhoa; Esteban, Yaiza; Castaño, Carlos; García-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Alvarez, Clara V; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of metabolism. However, their potential role in the central regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis is still unknown. In this study we show that the expression of Dicer, an essential endoribonuclease for miRNA maturation, is modulated by nutrient availability and excess in the hypothalamus. Conditional deletion of Dicer in POMC-expressing cells resulted in obesity, characterized by hyperphagia, increased adiposity, hyperleptinemia, defective glucose metabolism and alterations in the pituitary-adrenal axis. The development of the obese phenotype was paralleled by a POMC neuron degenerative process that started around 3 weeks of age. Hypothalamic transcriptomic analysis in presymptomatic POMCDicerKO mice revealed the downregulation of genes implicated in biological pathways associated with classical neurodegenerative disorders, such as MAPK signaling, ubiquitin-proteosome system, autophagy and ribosome biosynthesis. Collectively, our results highlight a key role for miRNAs in POMC neuron survival and the consequent development of neurodegenerative obesity.

  19. Peroxisomes are required for efficient penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Wiebe H; Gidijala, Loknath; Fekken, Susan; Kiel, Jan A K W; van den Berg, Marco A; Lascaris, Romeo; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van der Klei, Ida J

    2010-09-01

    In the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, penicillin (PEN) production is compartmentalized in the cytosol and in peroxisomes. Here we show that intact peroxisomes that contain the two final enzymes of PEN biosynthesis, acyl coenzyme A (CoA):6-amino penicillanic acid acyltransferase (AT) as well as the side-chain precursor activation enzyme phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL), are crucial for efficient PEN synthesis. Moreover, increasing PEN titers are associated with increasing peroxisome numbers. However, not all conditions that result in enhanced peroxisome numbers simultaneously stimulate PEN production. We find that conditions that lead to peroxisome proliferation but simultaneously interfere with the normal physiology of the cell may be detrimental to antibiotic production. We furthermore show that peroxisomes develop in germinating conidiospores from reticule-like structures. During subsequent hyphal growth, peroxisome proliferation occurs at the tip of the growing hyphae, after which the organelles are distributed over newly formed subapical cells. We observed that the organelle proliferation machinery requires the dynamin-like protein Dnm1.

  20. Substrate control in stereoselective lanthionine biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weixin; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Houk, K. N.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are typically highly stereoselective catalysts that enforce a reactive conformation on their native substrates. We report here a rare example in which the substrate controls the stereoselectivity of an enzyme-catalysed Michael-type addition during the biosynthesis of lanthipeptides. These natural products contain thioether crosslinks formed by a cysteine attack on dehydrated Ser and Thr residues. We demonstrate that several lanthionine synthetases catalyse highly selective anti-additions in which the substrate (and not the enzyme) determines whether the addition occurs from the re or si face. A single point mutation in the peptide substrate completely inverted the stereochemical outcome of the enzymatic modification. Quantum mechanical calculations reproduced the experimentally observed selectivity and suggest that conformational restraints imposed by the amino-acid sequence on the transition states determine the face selectivity of the Michael-type cyclization.

  1. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  2. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis.

  3. Transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing the two multifunctional sorghum cytochrome P450 enzymes, CYP79A1 and CYP71E1, are cyanogenic and accumulate metabolites derived from intermediates in Dhurrin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bak, S; Olsen, C E; Halkier, B A; Møller, B L

    2000-08-01

    Novel cyanogenic plants have been generated by the simultaneous expression of the two multifunctional sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) and Arabidopsis under the regulation of the constitutive 35S promoter. CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 catalyze the conversion of the parent amino acid tyrosine to p-hydroxymandelonitrile, the aglycone of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. CYP79A1 catalyzes the conversion of tyrosine to p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime and CYP71E1, the subsequent conversion to p-hydroxymandelonitrile. p-Hydroxymandelonitrile is labile and dissociates into p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, the same products released from dhurrin upon cell disruption as a result of pest or herbivore attack. In transgenic plants expressing CYP79A1 as well as CYP71E1, the activity of CYP79A1 is higher than that of CYP71E1, resulting in the accumulation of several p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime-derived products in the addition to those derived from p-hydroxymandelonitrile. Transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing only CYP79A1 accumulate the same p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime-derived products as transgenic plants expressing both sorghum cytochrome P450 enzymes. In addition, the transgenic CYP79A1 Arabidopsis plants accumulate large amounts of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate. In transgenic Arabidopsis expressing CYP71E1, this enzyme and the enzymes of the pre-existing glucosinolate pathway compete for the p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime as substrate, resulting in the formation of small amounts of p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate. Cyanogenic glucosides are phytoanticipins, and the present study demonstrates the feasibility of expressing cyanogenic compounds in new plant species by gene transfer technology to improve pest and disease resistance.

  4. Improving penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum by glyoxalase overproduction.

    PubMed

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2013-07-01

    Genetic engineering of fungal cell factories mainly focuses on manipulating enzymes of the product pathway or primary metabolism. However, despite the use of strong promoters or strains containing the genes of interest in multiple copies, the desired strongly enhanced enzyme levels are often not obtained. Here we present a novel strategy to improve penicillin biosynthesis by Penicillium chrysogenum by reducing reactive and toxic metabolic by-products, 2-oxoaldehydes. This was achieved by overexpressing the genes encoding glyoxalase I and II, which resulted in a 10% increase in penicillin titers relative to the control strain. The protein levels of two key enzymes of penicillin biosynthesis, isopenicillin N synthase and isopenicillin N acyltransferase, were increased in the glyoxalase transformants, whereas their transcript levels remained unaltered. These results suggest that directed intracellular reduction of 2-oxoaldehydes prolongs the functional lifetime of these enzymes.

  5. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kummari, Evangel; Alugubelly, Navatha; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Dong, Brittany; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2015-01-01

    Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Activity-Based Proteomic Profiling of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Salmonella-Infected Macrophages Leads to Identification of Putative Function of UCH-L5 in Inflammasome Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kummari, Evangel; Alugubelly, Navatha; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Dong, Brittany; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J.

    2015-01-01

    Although protein ubiquitination has been shown to regulate multiple processes during host response to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, specific functions of host deubiquitinating enzymes remain unknown in this bacterial infection. By using chemical proteomics approach, in which deubiquitinating enzymes were labeled by an active-site probe and analyzed by quantitative proteomics, we identified novel deubiquitinases in chicken macrophages based on their reactivity with the probe. Also, we detected down-regulation of UCH-L3, and USP4 as well as up-regulation of USP5 and UCH-L5 deubiquitinating enzymes in macrophages infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. We showed that decrease in either UCH-L5 activity, or in UCH-L5 protein amount in chicken and human macrophages infected or stimulated with LPS/nigericin, led to decreased IL-1β release. These data point towards a putative role of UCH-L5 in inflammasome regulation during Salmonella infection. Because inflammasome activation is important in innate resistance to these bacteria, one would expect that naturally occurring or therapeutically induced alteration in UCH-L5 activation would influence disease outcome and could represent a target for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26267804

  7. Regulation of insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis by succinate.

    PubMed

    Attali, Veronique; Parnes, Marcela; Ariav, Yafa; Cerasi, Erol; Kaiser, Nurit; Leibowitz, Gil

    2006-11-01

    Succinate stimulates insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis. We studied the effects of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-modulating pathways on glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis in the rat and the insulin-resistant Psammomys obesus. Disruption of the anaplerotic pyruvate/malate shuttle by phenylacetic acid inhibited glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in both species. In contrast, phenylacetic acid failed to inhibit glucose-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in P. obesus islets. Inhibition of the NADPH-consuming enzyme neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) with l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or with N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine(G) doubled succinate-stimulated insulin secretion in rat islets, suggesting that succinate- and nNOS-derived signals interact to regulate insulin secretion. In contrast, nNOS inhibition had no effect on succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis in both species. In P. obesus islets, insulin secretion was not stimulated by succinate in the absence of glucose, whereas proinsulin biosynthesis was increased 5-fold. Conversely, under stimulating glucose levels, succinate doubled insulin secretion, indicating glucose-dependence. Pyruvate ester and inhibition of nNOS partially mimicked the permissive effect of glucose on succinate-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting that anaplerosis-derived signals render the beta-cells responsive to succinate. We conclude that beta-cell anaplerosis via pyruvate carboxylase is important for glucose- and succinate-stimulated insulin secretion and for succinate-stimulated proinsulin biosynthesis. In P. obesus, pyruvate/malate shuttle dependent and independent pathways that regulate proinsulin biosynthesis coexist; the latter can maintain fuel stimulated biosynthetic activity when the succinate-dependent pathway is inhibited. nNOS signaling is a negative regulator

  8. Starch granules: structure and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Buléon, A; Colonna, P; Planchot, V; Ball, S

    1998-08-01

    The emphasis of this review is on starch structure and its biosynthesis. Improvements in understanding have been brought about during the last decade through the development of new physicochemical and biological techniques, leading to real scientific progress. All this literature needs to be kept inside the general literature about biopolymers, despite some confusing results or discrepancies arising from the biological variability of starch. However, a coherent picture of starch over all the different structural levels can be presented, in order to obtain some generalizations about its structure. In this review we will focus first on our present understanding of the structures of amylose and amylopectin and their organization within the granule, and we will then give insights on the biosynthetic mechanisms explaining the biogenesis of starch in plants.

  9. Biosynthesis of a thiamin antivitamin in Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa E; O'Leary, Seán E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2014-04-15

    Bacimethrin-derived 2'-methoxythiamin pyrophosphate inhibits microbial growth by disrupting metabolic pathways dependent on thiamin-utilizing enzymes. This study describes the discovery of the bacimethrin biosynthetic gene cluster of Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 19397 and in vitro reconstitution of bacimethrin biosynthesis from cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

  10. HypC, the anthrone oxidase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on gene disruption and enzyme activity, hypC, an open reading frame in the pksA (aflC)/nor-1 (aflD) intergenic region in the aflatoxin biosynthesis cluster, encodes a 17 kDa oxidase that catalyzes the conversion of norsolorinic acid anthrone to norsolorinic acid....

  11. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Progress report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported on the identification and fractionation of Magnesium chealatase, an enzyme involved in addition of Mg to chlorophyll during the later`s biosynthesis. Progress is documented as a series of synopsis of published and unpublished papers by the author.

  12. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that represents one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. The article includes 609 references and covers the literature from 2009 through June 2015.

  13. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Piel, Jörn

    2010-07-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that have recently been recognized as one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. 436 references are cited.

  14. [Conditions of the biosynthesis of an extracellular subtilisin-like proteinase by Bacillus pumilus KMM 62].

    PubMed

    Malikova, L A; Mardanova, A M; Sokolova, O V; Balaban, N P; Rudenskaia, G N; Sharipova, M R

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the cultivation conditions on Bacillus pumilus KMM 62 growth and effectiveness of the production of a subtilisin-like serine proteinase were investigated. Enzyme accumulation in the culture fluid reached the maximum value after 32 and 46-48 h of growth; it depends on the composition of the nutrient medium. The ratio of the concentrations of two main components of the medium, peptone and inorganic phosphate, which was optimal for enzyme biosynthesis was determined by multifactor experiments. Ammonium salts, when introduced as an additional nitrogen source, had different effects on the proteinase biosynthesis at different growth stages: they suppress enzyme production at the early stationary growth phase and stimulate the biosynthesis of the enzyme after 46-48 h of growth. Complex organic substrates (albumin, casein, hemoglobin, and gelatin) have a repressive effect on the biosynthesis of the enzyme. The effect of amino acids on culture growth and enzyme biosynthesis during the early and late stationary growth phase is different. Hydrophilic amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic acid exhibit the most pronounced repressive action on biosynthesis. The activity of different regulatory mechanisms for the synthesis of this proteinase is assumed at the early and late stationary stages of growth.

  15. Acetamido sugar biosynthesis in the Euryarchaea.

    PubMed

    Namboori, Seema C; Graham, David E

    2008-04-01

    Archaea and eukaryotes share a dolichol phosphate-dependent system for protein N-glycosylation. In both domains, the acetamido sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) forms part of the core oligosaccharide. However, the archaeal Methanococcales produce GlcNAc using the bacterial biosynthetic pathway. Key enzymes in this pathway belong to large families of proteins with diverse functions; therefore, the archaeal enzymes could not be identified solely using comparative sequence analysis. Genes encoding acetamido sugar-biosynthetic proteins were identified in Methanococcus maripaludis using phylogenetic and gene cluster analyses. Proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were purified and assayed for the predicted activities. The MMP1680 protein encodes a universally conserved glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase. The MMP1077 phosphomutase converted alpha-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to alpha-D-glucosamine-1-phosphate, although this protein is more closely related to archaeal pentose and glucose phosphomutases than to bacterial glucosamine phosphomutases. The thermostable MJ1101 protein catalyzed both the acetylation of glucosamine-1-phosphate and the uridylyltransferase reaction with UTP to produce UDP-GlcNAc. The MMP0705 protein catalyzed the C-2 epimerization of UDP-GlcNAc, and the MMP0706 protein used NAD(+) to oxidize UDP-N-acetylmannosamine, forming UDP-N-acetylmannosaminuronate (ManNAcA). These two proteins are similar to enzymes used for proteobacterial lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and gram-positive bacterial capsule production, suggesting a common evolutionary origin and a widespread distribution of ManNAcA. UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAcA biosynthesis evolved early in the euryarchaeal lineage, because most of their genomes contain orthologs of the five genes characterized here. These UDP-acetamido sugars are predicted to be precursors for flagellin and S-layer protein modifications and for the biosynthesis of methanogenic coenzyme B.

  16. The genetic basis for the biosynthesis of the pharmaceutically important class of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Michelle; Zettler, Judith; Noel, Joseph P.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.; Kaysser, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors are an established class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. Their unique α′,β′-epoxyketone pharmacophore allows binding to the catalytic β-subunits of the proteasome with extraordinary specificity. Here we report the characterization of the first gene clusters for the biosynthesis of natural peptidyl-epoxyketones. The clusters for epoxomicin, the lead compound for the anti-cancer drug Kyprolis™, and for eponemycin were identified in the actinobacterial producer strains ATCC 53904 and Streptomyces hygroscopicus ATCC 53709, respectively, using a modified protocol for Ion Torrent PGM genome sequencing. Both gene clusters code for a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase multifunctional enzyme complex and homologous redox enzymes. Epoxomicin and eponemycin were heterologously produced in Streptomyces albus J1046 via whole pathway expression. Moreover, we employed mass spectral molecular networking for a new comparative metabolomics approach in a heterologous system and discovered a number of putative epoxyketone derivatives. With this study we have definitively linked epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors and their biosynthesis genes for the first time in any organism, which will now allow for their detailed biochemical investigation. PMID:24168704

  17. Expression of Escherichia coli branching enzyme in tubers of amylose-free transgenic potato leads to an increased branching degree of the amylopectin.

    PubMed

    Kortstee, A J; Vermeesch, A M; de Vries, B J; Jacobsen, E; Visser, R G

    1996-07-01

    In order to increase the branching degree of potato tuber starch, the gene encoding branching enzyme (glgB) of Escherichia coli was expressed in the amylose-free potato mutant. The E. coli glgB was cloned in the binary vector pBIN19 under the transcriptional control of the potato Granule Bound Starch Synthase (GBSS) promoter and transitpeptide sequence. The E. coli glgB was cloned behind the two N-terminal amino acids of the GBSS mature protein, creating a chimeric protein. Transgenic plants were obtained which expressed the E. coli branching enzyme as was shown by the presence of mRNA and protein in the tubers. Correctly processed protein was found both in the soluble and starch granule bound protein fraction. Analysis of the starch showed an increase in the branching degree (DE) of up to 25% more branchpoints. The increase in the number of branchpoints was due to the presence of more short chains, with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 16 glucose-residues or less in the amylopectin. Changes in other characteristics of the starch, such as average chain length (CL) and lambda max, indicated a more branched structure for starch of transformed plants as well.

  18. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  19. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  20. Histidine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Stepansky, A; Leustek, T

    2006-03-01

    The study of histidine metabolism has never been at the forefront of interest in plant systems despite the significant role that the analysis of this pathway has played in development of the field of molecular genetics in microbes. With the advent of methods to analyze plant gene function by complementation of microbial auxotrophic mutants and the complete analysis of plant genome sequences, strides have been made in deciphering the histidine pathway in plants. The studies point to a complex evolutionary origin of genes for histidine biosynthesis. Gene regulation studies have indicated novel regulatory networks involving histidine. In addition, physiological studies have indicated novel functions for histidine in plants as chelators and transporters of metal ions. Recent investigations have revealed intriguing connections of histidine in plant reproduction. The exciting new information suggests that the study of plant histidine biosynthesis has finally begun to flower.

  1. Heme and heme biosynthesis intermediates induce heme oxygenase-1 and cytochrome P450 2A5, enzymes with putative sequential roles in heme and bilirubin metabolism: different requirement for transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid- derived 2-like 2.

    PubMed

    Lämsä, Virpi; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Sormunen, Raija; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hakkola, Jukka

    2012-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5) oxidizes bilirubin to biliverdin and represents a putative candidate for maintaining bilirubin at safe but adequate antioxidant levels. Curiously, CYP2A5 is induced by both excessive heme and chemicals that inhibit heme synthesis. We hypothesized that heme homeostasis is a key modifier of Cyp2a5 expression via transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) and characterized the coordination of CYP2A5 and heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) responses using wild-type and Nrf2(-/-) primary mouse hepatocytes. HMOX1 was rapidly elevated by exogenous hemin, thereby limiting the transactivation of Cyp2a5 until high heme (> 5µM) exposure. Nrf2 was mandatory for CYP2A5 but not for HMOX1 induction by heme. CYP2A5 was intensively and HMOX1 moderately elevated in heme synthesis blockades by succinylacetone and N-methyl protoporphyrin IX, and Nrf2 partially mediated the induction of CYP2A5. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that CYP2A5 is targeted Nrf2 dependently both to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. However, excessive heme increased CYP2A5 predominantly in the ER. Phenobarbital, dibutyryl-cAMP, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) overexpression stimulate heme biosynthesis and induce CYP2A5. Acute but not chronic CYP2A5 induction by phenobarbital required Nrf2, whereas CYP2A5 induction by dibutyryl-cAMP and PGC-1α was potentiated by Nrf2 knockout. Collectively, heme homeostasis is established as a crucial regulator of hepatic Cyp2a5 expression mediated via Nrf2 activation, whereas Nrf2 is redundant for Hmox1 induction by heme. Similar subcellular targeting and coordination of CYP2A5 and HMOX1 responses suggest favorable conditions for enhanced CYP2A5-mediated bilirubin maintenance in altered heme homeostasis that predisposes to oxidative stress.

  2. Recent advances in combinatorial biosynthesis for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huihua; Liu, Zihe; Zhao, Huimin; Ang, Ee Lui

    2015-01-01

    Because of extraordinary structural diversity and broad biological activities, natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery. These therapeutically important secondary metabolites are assembled and modified by dedicated biosynthetic pathways in their host living organisms. Traditionally, chemists have attempted to synthesize natural product analogs that are important sources of new drugs. However, the extraordinary structural complexity of natural products sometimes makes it challenging for traditional chemical synthesis, which usually involves multiple steps, harsh conditions, toxic organic solvents, and byproduct wastes. In contrast, combinatorial biosynthesis exploits substrate promiscuity and employs engineered enzymes and pathways to produce novel “unnatural” natural products, substantially expanding the structural diversity of natural products with potential pharmaceutical value. Thus, combinatorial biosynthesis provides an environmentally friendly way to produce natural product analogs. Efficient expression of the combinatorial biosynthetic pathway in genetically tractable heterologous hosts can increase the titer of the compound, eventually resulting in less expensive drugs. In this review, we will discuss three major strategies for combinatorial biosynthesis: 1) precursor-directed biosynthesis; 2) enzyme-level modification, which includes swapping of the entire domains, modules and subunits, site-specific mutagenesis, and directed evolution; 3) pathway-level recombination. Recent examples of combinatorial biosynthesis employing these strategies will also be highlighted in this review. PMID:25709407

  3. Molecular evolution and functional characterisation of haplotypes of an important rubber biosynthesis gene in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Uthup, T K; Rajamani, A; Ravindran, M; Saha, T

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A synthase (HMGS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway leading to natural rubber production in Hevea brasiliensis (rubber). Analysis of the structural variants of this gene is imperative to understand their functional significance in rubber biosynthesis so that they can be properly utilised for ongoing crop improvement programmes in Hevea. We report here allele richness and diversity of the HMGS gene in selected popular rubber clones. Haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the coding and non-coding regions with a high degree of heterozygosity were identified. Segregation and linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that recombination is the major contributor to the generation of allelic diversity, rather than point mutations. The evolutionarily conserved nature of some SNPs was identified by comparative DNA sequence analysis of HMGS orthologues from diverse taxa, demonstrating the molecular evolution of rubber biosynthesis genes in general. In silico three-dimensional structural studies highlighting the structural positioning of non-synonymous SNPs from different HMGS haplotypes revealed that the ligand-binding site on the enzyme remains impervious to the reported sequence variations. In contrast, gene expression results indicated the possibility of association between specific haplotypes and HMGS expression in Hevea clones, which may have a downstream impact up to the level of rubber production. Moreover, haplotype diversity of the HMGS gene and its putative association with gene expression can be the basis for further genetic association studies in rubber. Furthermore, the data also show the role of SNPs in the evolution of candidate genes coding for functional traits in plants.

  4. Comprehensive assessment of the genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis from Withania somnifera: chemotype-specific and elicitor-responsive expression.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aditya Vikram; Gupta, Parul; Singh, Deeksha; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Chandra, Deepak; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2017-03-11

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Family, Solanaceae), is among the most valuable medicinal plants used in Ayurveda owing to its rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. Withanolides are C28-steroidal lactones having a triterpenoidal metabolic origin synthesised via mevalonate (MVA) pathway and methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway involving metabolic intermediacy of 24-methylene (C30-terpenoid) cholesterol. Phytochemical studies suggest differences in the content and/or nature of withanolides in different tissues of different chemotypes. Though development of genomic resources has provided information about putative genes encoding enzymes for biosynthesis of intermediate steps of terpenoid backbone, not much is known about their regulation and response to elicitation. In this study, we generated detailed molecular information about genes catalysing key regulatory steps of withanolide biosynthetic pathway. The full-length sequences of genes encoding enzymes for intermediate steps of terpenoid backbone biosynthesis and their paralogs have been characterized for their functional and structural properties as well as phylogeny using bioinformatics approach. The expression analysis suggests that these genes are differentially expressed in different tissues (with maximal expression in young leaf), chemotypes and in response to salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatments. Sub-cellular localization studies suggest that both paralogs of sterol ∆-7 reductase (WsDWF5-1 and WsDWF5-2) are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thus supporting their indispensible role in withanolide biosynthesis. Comprehensive information developed, in this study, will lead to elucidation of chemotype- as well as tissue-specific withanolide biosynthesis and development of new tools for functional genomics in this important medicinal plant.

  5. BciD Is a Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) Enzyme That Completes Bacteriochlorophyllide e Biosynthesis by Oxidizing a Methyl Group into a Formyl Group at C-7.

    PubMed

    Thweatt, Jennifer L; Ferlez, Bryan H; Golbeck, John H; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-01-27

    Green bacteria are chlorophotorophs that synthesize bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c, d, or e, which assemble into supramolecular, nanotubular structures in large light-harvesting structures called chlorosomes. The biosynthetic pathways of these chlorophylls are known except for one reaction. Null mutants of bciD, which encodes a putative radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) protein, are unable to synthesize BChl e but accumulate BChl c; however, it is unknown whether BciD is sufficient to convert BChl c (or its precursor, bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) c) into BChl e (or BChlide e). To determine the function of BciD, we expressed the bciD gene of Chlorobaculum limnaeum strain DSMZ 1677(T) in Escherichia coli and purified the enzyme under anoxic conditions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of BciD indicated that it contains a single [4Fe-4S] cluster. In assays containing SAM, BChlide c or d, and sodium dithionite, BciD catalyzed the conversion of SAM into 5'-deoxyadenosine and BChlide c or d into BChlide e or f, respectively. Our analyses also identified intermediates that are proposed to be 7(1)-OH-BChlide c and d Thus, BciD is a radical SAM enzyme that converts the methyl group of BChlide c or d into the formyl group of BChlide e or f This probably occurs by a mechanism involving consecutive hydroxylation reactions of the C-7 methyl group to form a geminal diol intermediate, which spontaneously dehydrates to produce the final products, BChlide e or BChlide f The demonstration that BciD is sufficient to catalyze the conversion of BChlide c into BChlide e completes the biosynthetic pathways for all "Chlorobium chlorophylls."

  6. Controlling the delicate balance of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liang; Bauer, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are a family of compounds that contain four pyrrole rings. They are involved in many fundamental biological processes such as photoreception, electron transport, gas transport and also as cofactors for enzymatic reactions. As regulators of protein activity, tetrapyrroles mediate cellular response to light, oxygen and nutrient levels in the surrounding environment. Biosynthesis of haem tetrapyrroles shares, conserved pathways and enzymes among all three domains of life. This is contrasted by chlorophyll biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and chloroplasts, or cobalamin biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and archaea. This implicates haem as the most ancient, and chlorophyll as the most recent, of the common tetrapyrroles that are currently synthesized by existing organisms. Haem and chlorophyll are both toxic when synthesized in excess over apo-proteins that bind these tetrapyrroles. Accordingly, the synthesis of these tetrapyrroles has to be tightly regulated and coordinated with apo-protein production. The mechanism of regulating haem and chlorophyll synthesis has been studied intensively in Rhodobacter species and will be discussed. PMID:23754814

  7. Next Generation Sequencing in Predicting Gene Function in Podophyllotoxin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Kim, Kye-Won; Lee, Choonseok; Costa, Michael A.; May, Gregory D.; Crow, John A.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllum species are sources of (−)-podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan used for semi-synthesis of various powerful and extensively employed cancer-treating drugs. Its biosynthetic pathway, however, remains largely unknown, with the last unequivocally demonstrated intermediate being (−)-matairesinol. Herein, massively parallel sequencing of Podophyllum hexandrum and Podophyllum peltatum transcriptomes and subsequent bioinformatics analyses of the corresponding assemblies were carried out. Validation of the assembly process was first achieved through confirmation of assembled sequences with those of various genes previously established as involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis as well as other candidate biosynthetic pathway genes. This contribution describes characterization of two of the latter, namely the cytochrome P450s, CYP719A23 from P. hexandrum and CYP719A24 from P. peltatum. Both enzymes were capable of converting (−)-matairesinol into (−)-pluviatolide by catalyzing methylenedioxy bridge formation and did not act on other possible substrates tested. Interestingly, the enzymes described herein were highly similar to methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes from alkaloid biosynthesis, whereas candidates more similar to lignan biosynthetic enzymes were catalytically inactive with the substrates employed. This overall strategy has thus enabled facile further identification of enzymes putatively involved in (−)-podophyllotoxin biosynthesis and underscores the deductive power of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics to probe and deduce medicinal plant biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23161544

  8. Ontogenetic taurine biosynthesis ability in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) plays important roles in multiple physiological processes including osmoregulation, bile salt conjugation and membrane protection. It is known that taurine biosynthesis varies in different fish species. However, its ontogenetic regulation has not been clear. In the present study, we found that the hepatic concentrations of taurine increased marginally with rainbow trout growth. The mRNA expression, protein levels and enzyme activities of key enzymes involved in taurine biosynthesis, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), were analyzed. Our results showed that the mRNA levels and protein abundances of CSD increased dramatically with the development of rainbow trout stages while the enzyme activities showed a slight improvement. However, the expression and activities of CDO decreased with rainbow trout growth. These results provide valuable information on defining the exact supplementation of taurine in diets for different stages of rainbow trout and give new insights into elucidating the regulation of taurine metabolism in rainbow trout.

  9. Enzymatic Reductive Dehalogenation Controls the Biosynthesis of Marine Bacterial Pyrroles.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Abrahim; Agarwal, Vinayak; Rahman, Imran; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-10-12

    Enzymes capable of performing dehalogenating reactions have attracted tremendous contemporary attention due to their potential application in the bioremediation of anthropogenic polyhalogenated persistent organic pollutants. Nature, in particular the marine environment, is also a prolific source of polyhalogenated organic natural products. The study of the biosynthesis of these natural products has furnished a diverse array of halogenation biocatalysts, but thus far no examples of dehalogenating enzymes have been reported from a secondary metabolic pathway. Here we show that the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the highly brominated marine bacterial product pentabromopseudilin is catalyzed by an unusual debrominase Bmp8 that utilizes a redox thiol mechanism to remove the C-2 bromine atom of 2,3,4,5-tetrabromopyrrole to facilitate oxidative coupling to 2,4-dibromophenol. To the best of our knowledge, Bmp8 is first example of a dehalogenating enzyme from the established genetic and biochemical context of a natural product biosynthetic pathway.

  10. Aflatoxin biosynthesis is a novel source of reactive oxygen species—a potential redox signal to initiate resistance to oxidative stress?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin biosynthesis in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus parasiticus involves a minimum of 21 enzymes, encoded by genes located in a 70 kb gene cluster. For aflatoxin biosynthesis to be completed, the required enzymes must be transported to specialized early and late endosomes called aflatoxisom...

  11. In vitro stereospecific hydration activities of the 3-vinyl group of chlorophyll derivatives by BchF and BchV enzymes involved in bacteriochlorophyll c biosynthesis of green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Misato; Harada, Jiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    The photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum produces bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c pigments bearing a chiral 1-hydroxyethyl group at the 3-position, which self-aggregate to construct main light-harvesting antenna complexes, chlorosomes. The secondary alcoholic hydroxy group is requisite for chlorosomal aggregation and biosynthesized by hydrating the 3-vinyl group of their precursors. Using recombinant proteins of Cba. tepidum BchF and BchV, we examined in vitro enzymatic hydration of some 3-vinyl-chlorophyll derivatives. Both the enzymes catalyzed stereoselective hydration of zinc 3-vinyl-8-ethyl-12-methyl-bacteriopheophorbide c or d to the zinc 3(1) R-bacteriopheophorbide c or d homolog, respectively, with a slight amount of the 3(1) S-epimric species. A similar R-stereoselectivity was observed in the BchF-hydration of zinc 3-vinyl-8-ethyl- and propyl-12-ethyl-bacteriopheophorbides c, while their BchV-hydration gave a relatively larger amount of the 3(1) S-epimers. The in vitro stereoselective hydration confirmed the in vivo production of the S-epimeric species by BchV. The enzymatic hydration for the above 8-propylated substrate proceeded more slowly than that for the 8-ethylated, and the 8-isobutylated substrate was no longer hydrated. Based on these results, biosynthetic pathways of BChl c homologs and epimers are proposed.

  12. Podocyte-specific deletion of NDST1, a key enzyme in the sulfation of heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans, leads to abnormalities in podocyte organization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sugar, Terrel; Wassenhove-McCarthy, Deborah J; Esko, Jeffrey D; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Holzman, Lawrence; McCarthy, Kevin J

    2014-02-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been shown to modulate podocyte adhesion to--and pedicel organization on--the glomerular basement membrane. Recent studies showed that foot process effacement developed in a mutant mouse model whose podocytes were unable to assemble heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains. This study, a further refinement, explored the role of heparan N-sulfation on podocyte behavior. A novel mutant mouse (Ndst1(-/-)) was developed, having podocyte-specific deletion of Ndst1, the enzyme responsible for N-sulfation of heparan sulfate chains. Podocytes having this mutation had foot process effacement and abnormal adhesion to Bowman's capsule. Although glomerular hypertrophy did develop in the kidneys of mutant animals, mesangial expansion was not seen. The lack of heparan N-sulfation did not affect the expression of agrin or perlecan proteoglycan core proteins. Loss of N-sulfation did not result in significant proteinuria, but the increase in the albumin/creatinine ratio was coincident with the development of the enlarged lysosomes in the proximal tubules. Thus, although the renal phenotype of the Ndst1(-/-) mouse is mild, the data show that heparan chain N-sulfation plays a key role in podocyte organization.

  13. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  14. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  15. Identifying quantitative operation principles in metabolic pathways: a systematic method for searching feasible enzyme activity patterns leading to cellular adaptive responses

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimization methods allow designing changes in a system so that specific goals are attained. These techniques are fundamental for metabolic engineering. However, they are not directly applicable for investigating the evolution of metabolic adaptation to environmental changes. Although biological systems have evolved by natural selection and result in well-adapted systems, we can hardly expect that actual metabolic processes are at the theoretical optimum that could result from an optimization analysis. More likely, natural systems are to be found in a feasible region compatible with global physiological requirements. Results We first present a new method for globally optimizing nonlinear models of metabolic pathways that are based on the Generalized Mass Action (GMA) representation. The optimization task is posed as a nonconvex nonlinear programming (NLP) problem that is solved by an outer-approximation algorithm. This method relies on solving iteratively reduced NLP slave subproblems and mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) master problems that provide valid upper and lower bounds, respectively, on the global solution to the original NLP. The capabilities of this method are illustrated through its application to the anaerobic fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We next introduce a method to identify the feasibility parametric regions that allow a system to meet a set of physiological constraints that can be represented in mathematical terms through algebraic equations. This technique is based on applying the outer-approximation based algorithm iteratively over a reduced search space in order to identify regions that contain feasible solutions to the problem and discard others in which no feasible solution exists. As an example, we characterize the feasible enzyme activity changes that are compatible with an appropriate adaptive response of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat shock Conclusion Our results show the utility of the

  16. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Lead (Pb) Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yurong; Han, Xiaozhen; Liang, Yan; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Jie; Tang, Ming

    2015-12-23

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg-1 soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation of biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidases (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the

  17. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Lead (Pb) Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yurong; Han, Xiaozhen; Liang, Yan; ...

    2015-12-23

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg-1 soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation ofmore » biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidases (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. In conclusion, our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the phytostabilization

  18. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Lead (Pb) Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yurong; Han, Xiaozhen; Liang, Yan; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Jie; Tang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg(-1) soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation of biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidases (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. Our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the phytostabilization efficiency of Pb

  19. Increased expression of reticulon 3 in neurons leads to reduced axonal transport of β site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minzi; He, Wanxia; Tan, Ya; Han, Hailong; Hu, Xiangyou; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Yan, Riqiang

    2013-10-18

    BACE1 is the sole enzyme responsible for cleaving amyloid precursor protein at the β-secretase site, and this cleavage initiates the generation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Because amyloid precursor protein is predominantly expressed by neurons and deposition of Aβ aggregates in the human brain is highly correlated with the Aβ released at axonal terminals, we focused our investigation of BACE1 localization on the neuritic region. We show that BACE1 was not only enriched in the late Golgi, trans-Golgi network, and early endosomes but also in both axons and dendrites. BACE1 was colocalized with the presynaptic vesicle marker synaptophysin, indicating the presence of BACE1 in synapses. Because the excessive release of Aβ from synapses is attributable to an increase in amyloid deposition, we further explored whether the presence of BACE1 in synapses was regulated by reticulon 3 (RTN3), a protein identified previously as a negative regulator of BACE1. We found that RTN3 is not only localized in the endoplasmic reticulum but also in neuritic regions where no endoplasmic reticulum-shaping proteins are detected, implicating additional functions of RTN3 in neurons. Coexpression of RTN3 with BACE1 in cultured neurons was sufficient to reduce colocalization of BACE1 with synaptophysin. This reduction correlated with decreased anterograde transport of BACE1 in axons in response to overexpressed RTN3. Our results in this study suggest that altered RTN3 levels can impact the axonal transport of BACE1 and demonstrate that reducing axonal transport of BACE1 in axons is a viable strategy for decreasing BACE1 in axonal terminals and, perhaps, reducing amyloid deposition.

  20. The Combined Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Lead (Pb) Stress on Pb Accumulation, Plant Growth Parameters, Photosynthesis, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Ghosh, Amit; Chen, Jie; Tang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as a potential biotechnological tool for improving phytostabilization efficiency and plant tolerance to heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the mechanisms through which AMF help to alleviate metal toxicity in plants are still poorly understood. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of two AMF species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices) on the growth, Pb accumulation, photosynthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities of a leguminous tree (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) at Pb addition levels of 0, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg kg-1 soil. AMF symbiosis decreased Pb concentrations in the leaves and promoted the accumulation of biomass as well as photosynthetic pigment contents. Mycorrhizal plants had higher gas exchange capacity, non-photochemistry efficiency, and photochemistry efficiency compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidases (APX) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were enhanced, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were reduced in mycorrhizal plants. These findings suggested that AMF symbiosis could protect plants by alleviating cellular oxidative damage in response to Pb stress. Furthermore, mycorrhizal dependency on plants increased with increasing Pb stress levels, indicating that AMF inoculation likely played a more important role in plant Pb tolerance in heavily contaminated soils. Overall, both F. mosseae and R. intraradices were able to maintain efficient symbiosis with R. pseudoacacia in Pb polluted soils. AMF symbiosis can improve photosynthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capabilities and decrease Pb concentrations in leaves to alleviate Pb toxicity in R. pseudoacacia. Our results suggest that the application of the two AMF species associated with R. pseudoacacia could be a promising strategy for enhancing the phytostabilization efficiency of Pb contaminated

  1. Localization of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) and Methylobacterium extorquens genes of strawberry flavor biosynthesis in strawberry tissue by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nasopoulou, Constantina; Pohjanen, Johanna; Koskimäki, Janne J; Zabetakis, Ioannis; Pirttilä, Anna Maria

    2014-08-15

    Strawberry flavor is one of the most popular fruit flavors worldwide, with numerous applications in the food industry. In addition, the biosynthetic origin of the most important strawberry flavor components, such as 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-2H-furan-3-one (DMHF), is a challenging research area. DMHF's precursor, 2-hydroxy-propanal (or lactaldehyde), is biosynthesized by the endophytic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens (M. extorquens). In particular, the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes of M. extorquens are involved in the biogenesis of DMHF precursors since they have the capacity to oxidize the strawberry-derived 1,2-propanediol to lactaldehyde. In this study, the expression of the endophytic ADH and the plant DMHF biosynthesis genes was examined in the tissues of raw and ripe strawberry receptacles by in situ hybridization. The presence of endophytic bacteria was studied in the same tissues by probes targeting bacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. Hybridization signals of probes specific for endophytic ADH and plant DMHF biosynthesis genes, as well as bacteria-specific probes, were detected in the same locations. The probes were localized near the plasma membranes or intercellular spaces of cortical and vascular tissues of the receptacle, and intracellularly in the tissues of achenes. By localizing the expression of the endophytic methanol ADH and plant DMHF biosynthesis genes to the same tissues, we have reinforced our original hypothesis that an intimate symbiotic relationship between strawberry and endophytic cells exists and leads to the biosynthesis of DMHF.

  2. Identification of a novel polyfluorinated compound as a lead to inhibit the human enzymes aldose reductase and AKR1B10: structure determination of both ternary complexes and implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X; Mitschler, André; Porté, Sergio; de Lera, Ángel R; Martín, María J; Manzanaro, Sonia; de la Fuente, Jesús A; Terwesten, Felix; Betz, Michael; Klebe, Gerhard; Farrés, Jaume; Parés, Xavier; Podjarny, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are mostly monomeric enzymes which fold into a highly conserved (α/β)8 barrel, while their substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity are determined by interaction with residues located in three highly variable external loops. The closely related human enzymes aldose reductase (AR or AKR1B1) and AKR1B10 are of biomedical interest because of their involvement in secondary diabetic complications (AR) and in cancer, e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and smoking-related lung cancer (AKR1B10). After characterization of the IC50 values of both AKRs with a series of polyhalogenated compounds, 2,2',3,3',5,5',6,6'-octafluoro-4,4'-biphenyldiol (JF0064) was identified as a lead inhibitor of both enzymes with a new scaffold (a 1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol). An ultrahigh-resolution X-ray structure of the AR-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex has been determined at 0.85 Å resolution, allowing it to be observed that JF0064 interacts with the catalytic residue Tyr48 through a negatively charged hydroxyl group (i.e. the acidic phenol). The non-competitive inhibition pattern observed for JF0064 with both enzymes suggests that this acidic hydroxyl group is also present in the case of AKR1B10. Moreover, the combination of surface lysine methylation and the introduction of K125R and V301L mutations enabled the determination of the X-ray crystallographic structure of the corresponding AKR1B10-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex. Comparison of the two structures has unveiled some important hints for subsequent structure-based drug-design efforts.

  3. Mevalonate kinase deficiency leads to decreased prenylation of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Jurczyluk, Julie; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Chai, Ryan C; Ali, Naveid; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Quinn, Julian MW; Preston, Alexandra; Tangye, Stuart G; Brown, Andrew J; Argent, Elizabeth; Ziegler, John B; Mehr, Sam; Rogers, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in a key enzyme of the mevalonate–cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, leading to recurrent autoinflammatory disease characterised by enhanced release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It is currently believed that the inflammatory phenotype of MKD is triggered by temperature-sensitive loss of mevalonate kinase activity and reduced biosynthesis of isoprenoid lipids required for the prenylation of small GTPase proteins. However, previous studies have not clearly shown any change in protein prenylation in patient cells under normal conditions. With lymphoblast cell lines from two compound heterozygous MKD patients, we used a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay, together with quantitative mass spectrometry, to reveal a subtle accumulation of unprenylated Rab GTPases in cells cultured for 3 days or more at 40 °C compared with 37 °C. This included a 200% increase in unprenylated Rab7A, Rab14 and Rab1A. Inhibition of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activation by fatostatin led to more pronounced accumulation of unprenylated Rab proteins in MKD cells but not parent cells, suggesting that cultured MKD cells may partially overcome the loss of isoprenoid lipids by SREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes required for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, while inhibition of Rho/Rac/Rap prenylation promoted the release of IL-1β, specific inhibition of Rab prenylation by NE10790 had no effect in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human THP-1 monocytic cells. These studies demonstrate for the first time that mutations in mevalonate kinase can lead to a mild, temperature-induced defect in the prenylation of small GTPases, but that loss of prenylated Rab GTPases is not the cause of enhanced IL-1β release in MKD. PMID:27377765

  4. Mevalonate kinase deficiency leads to decreased prenylation of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jurczyluk, Julie; Munoz, Marcia A; Skinner, Oliver P; Chai, Ryan C; Ali, Naveid; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Quinn, Julian Mw; Preston, Alexandra; Tangye, Stuart G; Brown, Andrew J; Argent, Elizabeth; Ziegler, John B; Mehr, Sam; Rogers, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is caused by mutations in a key enzyme of the mevalonate-cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, leading to recurrent autoinflammatory disease characterised by enhanced release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). It is currently believed that the inflammatory phenotype of MKD is triggered by temperature-sensitive loss of mevalonate kinase activity and reduced biosynthesis of isoprenoid lipids required for the prenylation of small GTPase proteins. However, previous studies have not clearly shown any change in protein prenylation in patient cells under normal conditions. With lymphoblast cell lines from two compound heterozygous MKD patients, we used a highly sensitive in vitro prenylation assay, together with quantitative mass spectrometry, to reveal a subtle accumulation of unprenylated Rab GTPases in cells cultured for 3 days or more at 40 °C compared with 37 °C. This included a 200% increase in unprenylated Rab7A, Rab14 and Rab1A. Inhibition of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) activation by fatostatin led to more pronounced accumulation of unprenylated Rab proteins in MKD cells but not parent cells, suggesting that cultured MKD cells may partially overcome the loss of isoprenoid lipids by SREBP-mediated upregulation of enzymes required for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Furthermore, while inhibition of Rho/Rac/Rap prenylation promoted the release of IL-1β, specific inhibition of Rab prenylation by NE10790 had no effect in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or human THP-1 monocytic cells. These studies demonstrate for the first time that mutations in mevalonate kinase can lead to a mild, temperature-induced defect in the prenylation of small GTPases, but that loss of prenylated Rab GTPases is not the cause of enhanced IL-1β release in MKD.

  5. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  6. Sesterterpene ophiobolin biosynthesis involving multiple gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hangzhen; Yin, Ru; Liu, Yongfeng; Meng, Huiying; Zhou, Xianqiang; Zhou, Guolin; Bi, Xupeng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Tonghan; Zhu, Weiming; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are the most diverse and abundant natural products among which sesterterpenes account for less than 2%, with very few reports on their biosynthesis. Ophiobolins are tricyclic 5–8–5 ring sesterterpenes with potential pharmaceutical application. Aspergillus ustus 094102 from mangrove rizhosphere produces ophiobolin and other terpenes. We obtained five gene cluster knockout mutants, with altered ophiobolin yield using genome sequencing and in silico analysis, combined with in vivo genetic manipulation. Involvement of the five gene clusters in ophiobolin synthesis was confirmed by investigation of the five key terpene synthesis relevant enzymes in each gene cluster, either by gene deletion and complementation or in vitro verification of protein function. The results demonstrate that ophiobolin skeleton biosynthesis involves five gene clusters, which are responsible for C15, C20, C25, and C30 terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27273151

  7. New insights into bacterial type II polyketide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuan; Pan, Hai-Xue; Tang, Gong-Li

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides, exemplified by anthracyclines, angucyclines, tetracyclines, and pentangular polyphenols, are a large family of natural products with diverse structures and biological activities and are usually biosynthesized by type II polyketide synthases (PKSs). Since the starting point of biosynthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis in 1984–1985, there has been a continuous effort to investigate the biosynthetic logic of aromatic polyketides owing to the urgent need of developing promising therapeutic candidates from these compounds. Recently, significant advances in the structural and mechanistic identification of enzymes involved in aromatic polyketide biosynthesis have been made on the basis of novel genetic, biochemical, and chemical technologies. This review highlights the progress in bacterial type II PKSs in the past three years (2013–2016). Moreover, novel compounds discovered or created by genome mining and biosynthetic engineering are also included. PMID:28299197

  8. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  9. The Growth Reduction Associated with Repressed Lignin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Is Independent of Flavonoids[C

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Weng, Jing-Ke; Chapple, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Defects in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis arising from deficiency in hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) or p-coumaroyl shikimate 3′-hydroxylase (C3′H) lead to reduced lignin, hyperaccumulation of flavonoids, and growth inhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana. It was previously reported that flavonoid-mediated inhibition of auxin transport is responsible for growth reduction in HCT-RNA interference (RNAi) plants. This conclusion was based on the observation that simultaneous RNAi silencing of HCT and chalcone synthase (CHS), an enzyme essential for flavonoid biosynthesis, resulted in less severe dwarfing than silencing of HCT alone. In an attempt to extend these results using a C3′H mutant (ref8) and a CHS null mutant (tt4-2), we found that the growth phenotype of the ref8 tt4-2 double mutant, which lacks flavonoids, is indistinguishable from that of ref8. Moreover, using RNAi, we found that the relationship between HCT silencing and growth inhibition is identical in both the wild type and tt4-2. We conclude from these results that the growth inhibition observed in HCT-RNAi plants and the ref8 mutant is independent of flavonoids. Finally, we show that expression of a newly characterized gene bypassing HCT and C3′H partially restores both lignin biosynthesis and growth in HCT-RNAi plants, demonstrating that a biochemical pathway downstream of coniferaldehyde, probably lignification, is essential for normal plant growth. PMID:20511296

  10. Ecdysteroid biosynthesis in varroa mites: identification of halloween genes from the biosynthetic pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosynthesis of ecdysteroids involves sequential enzymatic hydroxylations by microsomal enzymes and mitochondrial cytochrome P450’s. Enzymes of the pathway are collectively known as Halloween genes. Complete sequences for three Halloween genes, spook (Vdspo), disembodied (Vddib) and shade (Vdshd), w...

  11. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  12. Non-statistical 13C Fractionation Distinguishes Co-incident and Divergent Steps in the Biosynthesis of the Alkaloids Nicotine and Tropine.

    PubMed

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Remaud, Gérald S; Silvestre, Virginie; Paneth, Piotr; Robins, Richard J

    2016-08-05

    During the biosynthesis of natural products, isotopic fractionation occurs due to the selectivity of enzymes for the heavier or lighter isotopomers. As only some of the positions in the molecule are implicated in a given reaction mechanism, position-specific fractionation occurs, leading to a non-statistical distribution of isotopes. This can be accessed by isotope ratio monitoring (13)C NMR spectrometry. The solanaceous alkaloids S-(-)-nicotine and hyoscyamine (atropine) are related in having a common intermediate, but downstream enzymatic steps diverge, providing a relevant test case to: (a) elucidate the isotopic affiliation between carbon atoms in the alkaloids and those in the precursors; (b) obtain information about the kinetic isotope effects of as yet undescribed enzymes, thus to make predictions as to their possible mechanism(s). We show that the position-specific (13)C/(12)C ratios in the different moieties of these compounds can satisfactorily be related to their known precursors and to the known kinetic isotope effects of enzymes involved in their biosynthesis, or to similar reaction mechanisms. Thus, the pathway to the common intermediate, N-methyl-Δ(1)-pyrrolinium, is seen to introduce similar isotope distribution patterns in the two alkaloids independent of plant species, whereas the remaining atoms of each target compound, which are of different origins, reflect their specific metabolic ancestry. We further demonstrate that the measured (13)C distribution pattern can be used to deduce aspects of the reaction mechanism of enzymes still to be identified.

  13. OSC2 and CYP716A14v2 Catalyze the Biosynthesis of Triterpenoids for the Cuticle of Aerial Organs of Artemisia annua

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Tessa; Pollier, Jacob; Shen, Qian; Soetaert, Sandra; Reed, James; Erffelinck, Marie-Laure; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip C.W.; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Osbourn, Anne; Thevelein, Johan M.; Deforce, Dieter; Tang, Kexuan

    2015-01-01

    Artemisia annua is widely studied for its ability to accumulate the antimalarial sesquiterpenoid artemisinin. In addition to producing a variety of sesquiterpenoids, A. annua also accumulates mono-, di-, and triterpenoids, the majority of which are produced in the glandular trichomes. A. annua also has filamentous trichomes on its aerial parts, but little is known of their biosynthesis potential. Here, through a comparative transcriptome analysis between glandular and filamentous trichomes, we identified two genes, OSC2 and CYP716A14v2, encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of specialized triterpenoids in A. annua. By expressing these genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Nicotiana benthamiana, we characterized the catalytic function of these proteins and could reconstitute the specialized triterpenoid spectrum of A. annua in these heterologous hosts. OSC2 is a multifunctional oxidosqualene cyclase that produces α-amyrin, β-amyrin, and δ-amyrin. CYP716A14v2 is a P450 belonging to the functionally diverse CYP716 family and catalyzes the oxidation of pentacyclic triterpenes, leading to triterpenes with a carbonyl group at position C-3, thereby providing an alternative biosynthesis pathway to 3-oxo triterpenes. Together, these enzymes produce specialized triterpenoids that are constituents of the wax layer of the cuticle covering the aerial parts of A. annua and likely function in the protection of the plant against biotic and abiotic stress. PMID:25576188

  14. Identification of unique mechanisms for triterpene biosynthesis in Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Niehaus, Tom D.; Okada, Shigeru; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Watt, David S.; Sviripa, Vitaliy; Chappell, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Botryococcene biosynthesis is thought to resemble that of squalene, a metabolite essential for sterol metabolism in all eukaryotes. Squalene arises from an initial condensation of two molecules of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to form presqualene diphosphate (PSPP), which then undergoes a reductive rearrangement to form squalene. In principle, botryococcene could arise from an alternative rearrangement of the presqualene intermediate. Because of these proposed similarities, we predicted that a botryococcene synthase would resemble squalene synthase and hence isolated squalene synthase-like genes from Botryococcus braunii race B. While B. braunii does harbor at least one typical squalene synthase, none of the other three squalene synthase-like (SSL) genes encodes for botryococcene biosynthesis directly. SSL-1 catalyzes the biosynthesis of PSPP and SSL-2 the biosynthesis of bisfarnesyl ether, while SSL-3 does not appear able to directly utilize FPP as a substrate. However, when combinations of the synthase-like enzymes were mixed together, in vivo and in vitro, robust botryococcene (SSL-1+SSL-3) or squalene biosynthesis (SSL1+SSL-2) was observed. These findings were unexpected because squalene synthase, an ancient and likely progenitor to the other Botryococcus triterpene synthases, catalyzes a two-step reaction within a single enzyme unit without intermediate release, yet in B. braunii, these activities appear to have separated and evolved interdependently for specialized triterpene oil production greater than 500 MYA. Coexpression of the SSL-1 and SSL-3 genes in different configurations, as independent genes, as gene fusions, or targeted to intracellular membranes, also demonstrate the potential for engineering even greater efficiencies of botryococcene biosynthesis. PMID:21746901

  15. Quinolizidine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Lupins and Prospects for Grain Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Karen M.; Kamphuis, Lars G.; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.; Singh, Karam B.; Foley, Rhonda C.

    2017-01-01

    Quinolizidine alkaloids (QAs) are toxic secondary metabolites found within the genus Lupinus, some species of which are commercially important grain legume crops including Lupinus angustifolius (narrow-leafed lupin, NLL), L. luteus (yellow lupin), L. albus (white lupin), and L. mutabilis (pearl lupin), with NLL grain being the most largely produced of the four species in Australia and worldwide. While QAs offer the plants protection against insect pests, the accumulation of QAs in lupin grain complicates its use for food purposes as QA levels must remain below the industry threshold (0.02%), which is often exceeded. It is not well understood what factors cause grain QA levels to exceed this threshold. Much of the early work on QA biosynthesis began in the 1970–1980s, with many QA chemical structures well-characterized and lupin cell cultures and enzyme assays employed to identify some biosynthetic enzymes and pathway intermediates. More recently, two genes associated with these enzymes have been characterized, however, the QA biosynthetic pathway remains only partially elucidated. Here, we review the research accomplished thus far concerning QAs in lupin and consider some possibilities for further elucidation and manipulation of the QA pathway in lupin crops, drawing on examples from model alkaloid species. One breeding strategy for lupin is to produce plants with high QAs in vegetative tissues while low in the grain in order to confer insect resistance to plants while keeping grain QA levels within industry regulations. With the knowledge achieved on alkaloid biosynthesis in other plant species in recent years, and the recent development of genomic and transcriptomic resources for NLL, there is considerable scope to facilitate advances in our knowledge of QAs, leading to the production of improved lupin crops. PMID:28197163

  16. An Investigation of the Storage and Biosynthesis of Phenylpropenes in Sweet Basil1

    PubMed Central

    Gang, David R.; Wang, Jihong; Dudareva, Natalia; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Simon, James E.; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Pichersky, Eran

    2001-01-01

    Plants that contain high concentrations of the defense compounds of the phenylpropene class (eugenol, chavicol, and their derivatives)