Science.gov

Sample records for bipartite energy taxis

  1. Salmonella Uses Energy Taxis to Benefit from Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Winter, Sebastian E.; Lopez, Christopher A.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Maria G.; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Russell, Joseph M.; Laughlin, Richard C.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Bevins, Charles L.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Harshey, Rasika; Adams, L. Garry; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis enhances the fitness of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) during colitis. However, the chemotaxis receptors conferring this fitness advantage and their cognate signals generated during inflammation remain unknown. Here we identify respiratory electron acceptors that are generated in the intestinal lumen as by-products of the host inflammatory response as in vivo signals for methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). Three MCPs, including Trg, Tsr and Aer, enhanced the fitness of S. Typhimurium in a mouse colitis model. Aer mediated chemotaxis towards electron acceptors (energy taxis) in vitro and required tetrathionate respiration to confer a fitness advantage in vivo. Tsr mediated energy taxis towards nitrate but not towards tetrathionate in vitro and required nitrate respiration to confer a fitness advantage in vivo. These data suggest that the energy taxis receptors Tsr and Aer respond to distinct in vivo signals to confer a fitness advantage upon S. Typhimurium during inflammation by enabling this facultative anaerobic pathogen to seek out favorable spatial niches containing host-derived electron acceptors that boost its luminal growth. PMID:23637594

  2. Understanding taxi travel patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hua; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Taxis play important roles in modern urban transportation systems, especially in mega cities. While providing necessary amenities, taxis also significantly contribute to traffic congestion, urban energy consumption, and air pollution. Understanding the travel patterns of taxis is thus important for addressing many urban sustainability challenges. Previous research has primarily focused on examining the statistical properties of passenger trips, which include only taxi trips occupied with passengers. However, unoccupied trips are also important for urban sustainability issues because they represent potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the transportation system. Therefore, we need to understand the travel patterns of taxis as an integrated system, instead of focusing only on the occupied trips. In this study we examine GPS trajectory data of 11,880 taxis in Beijing, China for a period of three weeks. Our results show that taxi travel patterns share similar traits with travel patterns of individuals but also exhibit differences. Trip displacement distribution of taxi travels is statistically greater than the exponential distribution and smaller than the truncated power-law distribution. The distribution of short trips (less than 30 miles) can be best fitted with power-law while long trips follow exponential decay. We use radius of gyration to characterize individual taxi's travel distance and find that it does not follow a truncated power-law as observed in previous studies. Spatial and temporal regularities exist in taxi travels. However, with increasing spatial coverage, taxi trips can exhibit dual high probability density centers.

  3. Hailing the bionic taxi

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, T

    1990-02-01

    This article reports on the development and marketing of the GSM, a passenger vehicle capable of running on natural gas. The vehicle is being configured in three arrangements: a commercial/taxi version, a paratransit van, and as a family car. Its body is made of plastic composites which will not rust and its fenders are made from an energy absorbing foam which resumes its original shape after being dented.

  4. Energy Taxis toward Host-Derived Nitrate Supports a Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1-Independent Mechanism of Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Lopez, Christopher A.; Zhang, Lillian F.; García-Pastor, Lucía; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Lokken, Kristen L.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can cross the epithelial barrier using either the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) or a T3SS-1-independent mechanism that remains poorly characterized. Here we show that flagellum-mediated motility supported a T3SS-1-independent pathway for entering ileal Peyer’s patches in the mouse model. Flagellum-dependent invasion of Peyer’s patches required energy taxis toward nitrate, which was mediated by the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Tsr. Generation of nitrate in the intestinal lumen required inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which was synthesized constitutively in the mucosa of the terminal ileum but not in the jejunum, duodenum, or cecum. Tsr-mediated invasion of ileal Peyer’s patches was abrogated in mice deficient for Nos2, the gene encoding iNOS. We conclude that Tsr-mediated energy taxis enables S. Typhimurium to migrate toward the intestinal epithelium by sensing host-derived nitrate, thereby contributing to invasion of Peyer’s patches. PMID:27435462

  5. Paresev on Taxi Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Test pilot Milton Thompson sitting in NASA Flight Research Center-built Paresev 1 (Paraglider Research Vehicle) on the taxi strip in front of the NASA Flight Research Center in 1962. In this photo the control stick can be seen coming from overhead and hanging in front of the pilot. The control system was a direct link with the wing membrane made of doped Irish linen. By maintaining simplicity during construction, it was possible to make control and configuration changes overnight and, in many instances, in minutes.

  6. Bipartite patella fracture.

    PubMed

    Canizares, George H; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2003-02-01

    Bipartite patella fracture is an uncommon injury that has rarely been described in the literature. It can be quite debilitating in the competitive athlete and is often overlooked by the treating physician. A bone scan can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate treatment often results in a successful outcome.

  7. Bipartite units of nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel; Wolf, Stefan

    2011-10-15

    Imagine a task in which a group of separated players aim to simulate a statistic that violates a Bell inequality. Given measurement choices the players shall announce an output based solely on the results of local operations--which they can discuss before the separation--on shared random data and shared copies of a so-called unit correlation. In the first part of this paper we show that in such a setting the simulation of any bipartite correlation, not containing the possibility of signaling, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the number of shared Popescu-Rohrlich (PR) boxes. This establishes the PR box as a simple asymptotic unit of bipartite nonlocality. In the second part we study whether this property extends to the multipartite case. More generally, we ask if it is possible for separated players to asymptotically reproduce any nonsignaling statistic by local operations on bipartite unit correlations. We find that nonadaptive strategies are limited by a constant accuracy and that arbitrary strategies on n resource correlations make a mistake with a probability greater or equal to c/n, for some constant c.

  8. Fuel Consumption and Emissions from Airport Taxi Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Developed a method to calculate fuel consumption and emissions of phases of taxi operations. Results at DFW showed that up to 18% of fuel can be saved by eliminating stop-and-go situations. Developed an energy efficient and environmentally friendly surface concept: Spot and Runway Departure Advisory (SARDA) tool. The SARDA tool has been identified as a potential candidate for a technology transfer to the FAA.

  9. Efficiently inferring community structure in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larremore, Daniel B.; Clauset, Aaron; Jacobs, Abigail Z.

    2014-07-01

    Bipartite networks are a common type of network data in which there are two types of vertices, and only vertices of different types can be connected. While bipartite networks exhibit community structure like their unipartite counterparts, existing approaches to bipartite community detection have drawbacks, including implicit parameter choices, loss of information through one-mode projections, and lack of interpretability. Here we solve the community detection problem for bipartite networks by formulating a bipartite stochastic block model, which explicitly includes vertex type information and may be trivially extended to k-partite networks. This bipartite stochastic block model yields a projection-free and statistically principled method for community detection that makes clear assumptions and parameter choices and yields interpretable results. We demonstrate this model's ability to efficiently and accurately find community structure in synthetic bipartite networks with known structure and in real-world bipartite networks with unknown structure, and we characterize its performance in practical contexts.

  10. Taxi-Aware Map: Identifying and Predicting Vacant Taxis in the City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Veloso, Marco; Bento, Carlos; Biderman, Assaf; Ratti, Carlo

    Knowing where vacant taxis are and will be at a given time and location helps the users in daily planning and scheduling, as well as the taxi service providers in dispatching. In this paper, we present a predictive model for the number of vacant taxis in a given area based on time of the day, day of the week, and weather condition. The history is used to build the prior probability distributions for our inference engine, which is based on the naïve Bayesian classifier with developed error-based learning algorithm and method for detecting adequacy of historical data using mutual information. Based on 150 taxis in Lisbon, Portugal, we are able to predict for each hour with the overall error rate of 0.8 taxis per 1x1 km2 area.

  11. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  12. 14 CFR 23.1383 - Taxi and landing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Taxi and landing lights. 23.1383 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1383 Taxi and landing lights. Each taxi and landing light must be designed and installed so that: (a)...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1383 - Taxi and landing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Taxi and landing lights. 23.1383 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1383 Taxi and landing lights. Each taxi and landing light must be designed and installed so that: (a)...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1383 - Taxi and landing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Taxi and landing lights. 23.1383 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1383 Taxi and landing lights. Each taxi and landing light must be designed and installed so that: (a)...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1383 - Taxi and landing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Taxi and landing lights. 23.1383 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1383 Taxi and landing lights. Each taxi and landing light must be designed and installed so that: (a)...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1383 - Taxi and landing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Taxi and landing lights. 23.1383 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1383 Taxi and landing lights. Each taxi and landing light must be designed and installed so that: (a)...

  17. The Effects of Taxi on Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Li, Yan; Huang, Hai-Jun

    Taxi will come to one complete halt during the boarding/alighting period and might produce stop-and-go without passengers, so it often produces traffic interruption on the single-lane system. Tang et al. pointed out that the traffic flow model [Chin. Phys. 18, 975 (2009)] can be used to directly describe various micro phenomena resulted by traffic interruption on the single-lane system, if we properly define the traffic interruption probability, so in this paper we adopt this model to study the micro phenomena resulted by taxi on the single-lane system. The numerical results show that this model can describe the effects that taxi has on the trails of each vehicle's motion and the evolutions of the flow and the density on the single-lane system, but that these effects are relevant to the initial conditions of the whole system.

  18. Cardiovascular Risk Factors of Taxi Drivers.

    PubMed

    Elshatarat, Rami Azmi; Burgel, Barbara J

    2016-06-01

    In the United States (U.S.), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major leading cause of death. Despite the high mortality rate related to CVD, little is known about CVD risk factors among urban taxi drivers in the U.S. A cross-sectional design was used to identify the predictors of high cardiovascular risk factors among taxi drivers. Convenience sampling method was used to recruit 130 taxi drivers. A structured questionnaire was used to obtain the data. The sample was male (94 %), age mean (45 ± 10.75) years, married (54 %), born outside of the USA (55 %), had some college or below (61.5 %), night drivers (50.8 %), and driving on average 9.7 years and 41 h/week. About 79 % of them were eligible for CVD prevention, and 35.4 % had high CVD risk factors (4-9 risk factors). A CVD high-risk profile had a significant relationship with the subjects who were ≥55 years old; had hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia; were drinking alcohol ≥2 times/week; and had insufficient physical activity. Subjects who worked as a taxi driver for more than 10 years (OR 4.37; 95 % CI 1.82, 10.50) and had mental exertion from cab driving >5 out of 10 (OR 2.63; 95 % CI 1.05, 6.57) were more likely to have a CVD high-risk profile. As a conclusion, system-level or worksite interventions include offering healthy food at taxi dispatching locations, creating a work culture of frequent walking breaks, and interventions focusing on smoking, physical activity, and weight management. Improving health insurance coverage for this group of workers is recommended. PMID:27151321

  19. Taxi-cabs as Subjects for a Population Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, J. A.; Bradley, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the use of capture-recapture techniques to estimate the population of taxis in Liverpool and demonstrates the points of similarity to animal population estimation. Considers advantages of studying taxis rather than organisms in introductory studies of the techniques. (AL)

  20. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll. 25.491 Section 25.491 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.491 Taxi, takeoff and landing roll. Within the range...

  1. 49 CFR 37.29 - Private entities providing taxi service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private entities providing taxi service. 37.29 Section 37.29 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.29 Private entities providing taxi service....

  2. Detecting one-mode communities in bipartite networks by bipartite clustering triangular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yaozu; Wang, Xingyuan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to detect one-mode community structures in bipartite networks, and to deduce which one-mode community structures are weighted. After analyzing the topological properties in bipartite networks, bipartite clustering triangular is introduced. First, bipartite networks are projected into two weighted one-mode networks by bipartite clustering triangular. Then all the maximal sub-graphs from two one-mode weighted networks are extracted and the maximal sub-graphs are merged together using a weighted clustering threshold. In addition, the proposed algorithm successfully finds overlapping vertices between one-mode communities. Experimental results using some real-world network data shows that the performance of the proposed algorithm is satisfactory.

  3. Measurement error analysis of taxi meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Li, Dan; Li, Hang; Zhang, Da-Jian; Hou, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Shi-pu

    2011-12-01

    The error test of the taximeter is divided into two aspects: (1) the test about time error of the taximeter (2) distance test about the usage error of the machine. The paper first gives the working principle of the meter and the principle of error verification device. Based on JJG517 - 2009 "Taximeter Verification Regulation ", the paper focuses on analyzing the machine error and test error of taxi meter. And the detect methods of time error and distance error are discussed as well. In the same conditions, standard uncertainty components (Class A) are evaluated, while in different conditions, standard uncertainty components (Class B) are also evaluated and measured repeatedly. By the comparison and analysis of the results, the meter accords with JJG517-2009, "Taximeter Verification Regulation ", thereby it improves the accuracy and efficiency largely. In actual situation, the meter not only makes up the lack of accuracy, but also makes sure the deal between drivers and passengers fair. Absolutely it enriches the value of the taxi as a way of transportation.

  4. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  5. Standardization of databases for AMDB taxi routing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pschierer, C.; Sindlinger, A.; Schiefele, J.

    2010-04-01

    Input, management, and display of taxi routes on airport moving map displays (AMM) have been covered in various studies in the past. The demonstrated applications are typically based on Aerodrome Mapping Databases (AMDB). Taxi routing functions require specific enhancements, typically in the form of a graph network with nodes and edges modeling all connectivities within an airport, which are not supported by the current AMDB standards. Therefore, the data schemas and data content have been defined specifically for the purpose and test scenarios of these studies. A standardization of the data format for taxi routing information is a prerequisite for turning taxi routing functions into production. The joint RTCA/EUROCAE special committee SC-217, responsible for updating and enhancing the AMDB standards DO-272 [1] and DO-291 [2], is currently in the process of studying different alternatives and defining reasonable formats. Requirements for taxi routing data are primarily driven by depiction concepts for assigned and cleared taxi routes, but also by database size and the economic feasibility. Studied concepts are similar to the ones described in the GDF (geographic data files) specification [3], which is used in most car navigation systems today. They include - A highly aggregated graph network of complex features - A modestly aggregated graph network of simple features - A non-explicit topology of plain AMDB taxi guidance line elements This paper introduces the different concepts and their advantages and disadvantages.

  6. Bipartite memory network architectures for parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.; Kale, L.V. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1990-01-01

    Parallel architectures are boradly classified as either shared memory or distributed memory architectures. In this paper, the authors propose a third family of architectures, called bipartite memory network architectures. In this architecture, processors and memory modules constitute a bipartite graph, where each processor is allowed to access a small subset of the memory modules, and each memory module allows access from a small set of processors. The architecture is particularly suitable for computations requiring dynamic load balancing. The authors explore the properties of this architecture by examining the Perfect Difference set based topology for the graph. Extensions of this topology are also suggested.

  7. Taxis Toward Hydrogen Gas by Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Brileya, Kristen A.; Connolly, James M.; Downey, Carey; Gerlach, Robin; Fields, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of taxis (directed swimming) in the Archaea is currently expanding through identification of novel receptors, effectors, and proteins involved in signal transduction to the flagellar motor. Although the ability for biological cells to sense and swim toward hydrogen gas has been hypothesized for many years, this capacity has yet to be observed and demonstrated. Here we show that the average swimming velocity increases in the direction of a source of hydrogen gas for the methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis using a capillary assay with anoxic gas-phase control and time-lapse microscopy. The results indicate that a methanogen couples motility to hydrogen concentration sensing and is the first direct observation of hydrogenotaxis in any domain of life. Hydrogenotaxis represents a strategy that would impart a competitive advantage to motile microorganisms that compete for hydrogen gas and would impact the C, S and N cycles. PMID:24189441

  8. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  9. Thermodynamics of bipartite systems: Application to light-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Boukobza, E.; Tannor, D. J.

    2006-12-15

    Heat and work for quantum systems governed by dissipative master equations with a time-dependent driving field were introduced in the pioneering work of Alicki [J. Phys. A 12, L103 (1979)]. Alicki's work was in the Schroedinger picture; here we extend these definitions to the Heisenberg and interaction pictures. We show that, in order to avoid consistency problems, the full time derivatives in the definitions for heat flux and power (work flux) should be replaced by partial time derivatives. We also present an alternative approach to the partitioning of the energy flux which differs from that of Alicki in that the instantaneous interaction energy with the external field is not included directly. We then proceed to generalize Alicki's definition of power by replacing the original system and its external driving field with a larger, bipartite system, governed by a time-independent Hamiltonian. Using the definition of heat flux and the generalized definition of power, we derive the first law of thermodynamics in differential form, for both the full bipartite system and the partially traced subsystems. Although the second law (Clausius formulation) is satisfied for the full bipartite system, we find that in general there is no rigorous formulation of the second law for the partially traced subsystem unless certain additional requirements are met. Once these requirements are satisfied, however, both the Carnot and the Clausius formulations of the second law are satisfied. We illustrate this thermodynamic analysis on both the simple Jaynes-Cummings model and an extended dissipative Jaynes-Cummings model, which is a model for a quantum amplifier.

  10. 77 FR 20789 - Work Group on Measuring Systems for Taxis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... time and/or distance measurements in taxi applications and to ensure that the prescribed methodologies and standards facilitate measurements that are traceable to the International System of Units (SI...: Metrology laboratory standards and test procedures, uncertainties, ] measurement traceability,...

  11. The Development of an Electronic Aircraft Taxi Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Anthony D.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display as part of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The impetus for the development of this specific display, and the TAP program as a whole, is the current bottleneck in surface operations experienced during low-visibility operations. Simply stated, while modern aircraft are equipped to fly and land in low-visibility conditions, they lack the related technology required to allow them to efficiently and safely navigation from the runway to the gate. Pilots under such conditions consequently taxi slower, sometimes get lost and have to stop, and occasionally collide with other aircraft. Based on a review of available display and navigation sensor technologies, and a one-year information requirements study conducted aboard several commercial aircraft flights, it was determined that an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display was the most viable option for improving the efficiency of low-visibility taxi operations. Based on flight deck observations and pilot interviews, previous map display research, other taxi map display efforts, and part-task taxi map research, an advanced taxi navigation display has been developed and is currently being tested. The taxi navigation display is presented as a head-down cockpit display and includes a track-up perspective airport surface view, taxiway, gate and runway labels, ownship position, traffic icons and collision annunciation, graphical route guidance, heading indicator, rotating compass, RVR wedge, stop bars, zoom control, and datalink message window. The development and support for each of the features will be discussed in detail. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Three Types of Taxis Used in the Response of Acidovorax sp. Strain JS42 to 2-Nitrotoluene

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch-Deere, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    Acidovorax sp. strain JS42 is able to utilize 2-nitrotoluene (2NT) as its sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. We report here that strain JS42 is chemotactic to 2NT and that the response is increased when cells are grown on compounds such as 2NT that are known to induce the first step of 2NT degradation. Assays with JS42 mutants unable to oxidize 2NT showed that the first step of 2NT metabolism was required for the induced response, but not for a portion of the constitutive response, indicating that 2NT itself is an attractant. The 2NT metabolite nitrite was shown to be a strong attractant for strain JS42, and sufficient nitrite was produced during the taxis assay to account for a large part of the induced response. A mutant with an inactivated ntdY gene, which is located adjacent to the 2NT degradation genes and codes for a putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, showed a defect in taxis toward 2NT that may involve a reduced response to nitrite. Responses of a mutant defective for the energy-taxis receptor, Aer, indicated that a functional aer gene is required for a substantial part of the wild-type induced response to 2NT. In summary, strain JS42 utilizes three types of taxis to sense and respond to 2NT: constitutive 2NT-specific chemotaxis to directly sense 2NT, metabolism-dependent nitrite-specific chemotaxis that may be mediated by NtdY, and energy taxis mediated by Aer. PMID:22286989

  13. Bipartite field theories from D-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Uranga, Angel

    2014-04-01

    We develop tools for determining the gauge theory resulting from a configuration of Type IIB D3-branes probing a non-compact, toric Calabi-Yau 3-fold, in the presence of additional flavor D7-branes with general embeddings. Two main ingredients of our approach are dimer models and mirror symmetry. D7-branes with general embeddings are obtained by recombination of elementary D7-brane constituents. These tools are then used to engineer a large set of Bipartite Field Theories, a class of 4d, = 1 quantum field theories defined by bipartite graphs on bordered Riemann surfaces. Several explicit examples, including infinite families of models, associated to both planar and non-planar graphs are presented.

  14. [Comparative life cycle environmental assessment between electric taxi and gasoline taxi in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Qing; Sun, Zhao-Xin; Li, Xiao-Nuo; Li, Jin-Xiang; Yang, Jian-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Tailpipe emission of internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) is one of the main sources leading to atmospheric environmental problems such as haze. Substituting electric vehicles for conventional gasoline vehicles is an important solution for reducing urban air pollution. In 2011, as a pilot city of electric vehicle, Beijing launched a promotion plan of electric vehicle. In order to compare the environmental impacts between Midi electric vehicle (Midi EV) and Hyundai gasoline taxi (ICEV), this study created an inventory with local data and well-reasoned assumptions, and contributed a life cycle assessment (LCA) model with GaBi4.4 software and comparative life cycle environmental assessment by Life cycle impact analysis models of CML2001(Problem oriented) and EI99 (Damage oriented), which included the environmental impacts of full life cycle, manufacture phase, use phase and end of life. The sensitivity analysis of lifetime mileage and power structure was also provided. The results indicated that the full life cycle environmental impact of Midi EV was smaller than Hyundai ICEV, which was mainly due to the lower fossil fuel consumption. On the contrary, Midi EV exhibited the potential of increasing the environmental impacts of ecosystem quality influence and Human health influence. By CML2001 model, the results indicated that Midi EV might decrease the impact of Abiotic Depletion Potential, Global Warming Potential, Ozone Layer Depletion Potential and so on. However, in the production phase, the impact of Abiotic Depletion Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential, Global Warming Potential, Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential, Ozone Layer Depletion Potential, Marine Aquatic Ecotoxicity Potential, Terrestric Ecotoxicity Potential, Human Toxicity Potential of Midi EV were increased relative to Hyundai ICEV because of emissions impacts from its power system especially the battery production. Besides, in the use phase, electricity production was

  15. [Comparative life cycle environmental assessment between electric taxi and gasoline taxi in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Qing; Sun, Zhao-Xin; Li, Xiao-Nuo; Li, Jin-Xiang; Yang, Jian-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Tailpipe emission of internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) is one of the main sources leading to atmospheric environmental problems such as haze. Substituting electric vehicles for conventional gasoline vehicles is an important solution for reducing urban air pollution. In 2011, as a pilot city of electric vehicle, Beijing launched a promotion plan of electric vehicle. In order to compare the environmental impacts between Midi electric vehicle (Midi EV) and Hyundai gasoline taxi (ICEV), this study created an inventory with local data and well-reasoned assumptions, and contributed a life cycle assessment (LCA) model with GaBi4.4 software and comparative life cycle environmental assessment by Life cycle impact analysis models of CML2001(Problem oriented) and EI99 (Damage oriented), which included the environmental impacts of full life cycle, manufacture phase, use phase and end of life. The sensitivity analysis of lifetime mileage and power structure was also provided. The results indicated that the full life cycle environmental impact of Midi EV was smaller than Hyundai ICEV, which was mainly due to the lower fossil fuel consumption. On the contrary, Midi EV exhibited the potential of increasing the environmental impacts of ecosystem quality influence and Human health influence. By CML2001 model, the results indicated that Midi EV might decrease the impact of Abiotic Depletion Potential, Global Warming Potential, Ozone Layer Depletion Potential and so on. However, in the production phase, the impact of Abiotic Depletion Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential, Global Warming Potential, Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential, Ozone Layer Depletion Potential, Marine Aquatic Ecotoxicity Potential, Terrestric Ecotoxicity Potential, Human Toxicity Potential of Midi EV were increased relative to Hyundai ICEV because of emissions impacts from its power system especially the battery production. Besides, in the use phase, electricity production was

  16. TAXI Direct-to-Disk Interface Demultiplexes Proprietarily Formatted Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newnan, Bruce G.; Ahlport, Steven F.

    2001-01-01

    The TAXI Direct-to-Disk interface is a special-purpose interface circuit for demultiplexing of data from a Racal Storeplex (or equivalent) multichannel recorder onto one or more hard disks that reside in, and/or are controlled by, a personal computer (PC). (The name TAXI as used here is derived from the acronym TAXI, which signifies transparent asynchronous transceiver interface.) The TAXI Direct-to-Disk interface was developed for original use in capturing data from instrumentation on a test stand in a NASA rocket-testing facility. The control, data-recording, and data-postprocessing equipment of the facility are located in a control room at a safe distance from the test stand. Heretofore, the transfer of data from the instrumentation to the postprocessing equipment has entailed post-test downloading via software, requiring many hours to days of post-test reduction before the data could be viewed in a channelized format. The installation of the TAXI Direct-to-Disk interface, in conjunction with other modifications, causes the transfer of data to take place in real time, so that the data are immediately available for review during or after the test. The instrumentation is connected to the input terminals of the signal-processing unit of multichannel recorder by standard coaxial cables. The coaxial output of the signal processing unit is converted to fiber-optic output by means of a commercial coaxial-cable/fiber-optic converter (that is, a fiber-optic transceiver) designed specifically for this application. The fiber-optic link carries the data signals to an identical fiber-optic transceiver in the control room. On the way to the TAXI Direct-to-Disk interface that is the focus of this article, the data signals are processed through a companion special purpose circuit denoted by the similar name parallel TAXI interface.

  17. An evolving model of online bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Liu, Chuang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the structure and evolution of online bipartite networks is a significant task since they play a crucial role in various e-commerce services nowadays. Recently, various attempts have been tried to propose different models, resulting in either power-law or exponential degree distributions. However, many empirical results show that the user degree distribution actually follows a shifted power-law distribution, the so-called Mandelbrot’s law, which cannot be fully described by previous models. In this paper, we propose an evolving model, considering two different user behaviors: random and preferential attachment. Extensive empirical results on two real bipartite networks, Delicious and CiteULike, show that the theoretical model can well characterize the structure of real networks for both user and object degree distributions. In addition, we introduce a structural parameter p, to demonstrate that the hybrid user behavior leads to the shifted power-law degree distribution, and the region of power-law tail will increase with the increment of p. The proposed model might shed some lights in understanding the underlying laws governing the structure of real online bipartite networks.

  18. pH-Taxis of Biohybrid Microsystems

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jiang; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increasing number of studies developing bacteria and other cell-integrated biohybrid microsystems. However, the highly stochastic motion of these microsystems severely limits their potential use. Here, we present a method that exploits the pH sensing of flagellated bacteria to realize robust drift control of multi-bacteria propelled microrobots. Under three specifically configured pH gradients, we demonstrate that the microrobots exhibit both unidirectional and bidirectional pH-tactic behaviors, which are also observed in free-swimming bacteria. From trajectory analysis, we find that the swimming direction and speed biases are two major factors that contribute to their tactic drift motion. The motion analysis of microrobots also sheds light on the propulsion dynamics of the flagellated bacteria as bioactuators. It is expected that similar driving mechanisms are shared among pH-taxis, chemotaxis, and thermotaxis. By identifying the mechanism that drives the tactic behavior of bacteria-propelled microsystems, this study opens up an avenue towards improving the control of biohybrid microsystems. Furthermore, assuming that it is possible to tune the preferred pH of bioactuators by genetic engineering, these biohybrid microsystems could potentially be applied to sense the pH gradient induced by cancerous cells in stagnant fluids inside human body and realize targeted drug delivery. PMID:26073316

  19. pH-Taxis of Biohybrid Microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jiang; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Sitti, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The last decade has seen an increasing number of studies developing bacteria and other cell-integrated biohybrid microsystems. However, the highly stochastic motion of these microsystems severely limits their potential use. Here, we present a method that exploits the pH sensing of flagellated bacteria to realize robust drift control of multi-bacteria propelled microrobots. Under three specifically configured pH gradients, we demonstrate that the microrobots exhibit both unidirectional and bidirectional pH-tactic behaviors, which are also observed in free-swimming bacteria. From trajectory analysis, we find that the swimming direction and speed biases are two major factors that contribute to their tactic drift motion. The motion analysis of microrobots also sheds light on the propulsion dynamics of the flagellated bacteria as bioactuators. It is expected that similar driving mechanisms are shared among pH-taxis, chemotaxis, and thermotaxis. By identifying the mechanism that drives the tactic behavior of bacteria-propelled microsystems, this study opens up an avenue towards improving the control of biohybrid microsystems. Furthermore, assuming that it is possible to tune the preferred pH of bioactuators by genetic engineering, these biohybrid microsystems could potentially be applied to sense the pH gradient induced by cancerous cells in stagnant fluids inside human body and realize targeted drug delivery.

  20. Computations underlying Drosophila photo-taxis, odor-taxis, and multi-sensory integration

    PubMed Central

    Gepner, Ruben; Mihovilovic Skanata, Mirna; Bernat, Natalie M; Kaplow, Margarita; Gershow, Marc

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how organisms make decisions on the basis of temporally varying multi-sensory input, we identified computations made by Drosophila larvae responding to visual and optogenetically induced fictive olfactory stimuli. We modeled the larva's navigational decision to initiate turns as the output of a Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson cascade. We used reverse-correlation to fit parameters to this model; the parameterized model predicted larvae's responses to novel stimulus patterns. For multi-modal inputs, we found that larvae linearly combine olfactory and visual signals upstream of the decision to turn. We verified this prediction by measuring larvae's responses to coordinated changes in odor and light. We studied other navigational decisions and found that larvae integrated odor and light according to the same rule in all cases. These results suggest that photo-taxis and odor-taxis are mediated by a shared computational pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06229.001 PMID:25945916

  1. Drosophila photo-taxis and odor-taxis are mediated by a shared computational pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovic Skanata, Mirna; Gepner, Ruben; Bernat, Natalie; Kaplow, Margarita; Gershow, Marc

    In natural environments, the Drosophila larva makes navigational decisions based on variable and conflicting sensory inputs. How larvae respond to multi-modal stimuli and how their neural circuits integrate and prioritize multi-sensory information remains unknown. To identify larval navigational computations we developed a high-throughput reverse-correlation assay. We provided larvae with visual and optogenetically induced fictive olfactory stimuli and measured the correlation between the presented stimulus and evoked turn decisions. We used this technique to fit parameters of a Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson model describing computations underlying turn decisions. For uni-modal inputs, the parameterized model allowed us to predict the behavior of populations of larvae responding to novel stimulus presentations. For multi-modal inputs, our assay showed that larvae linearly combine olfactory and visual signals upstream of the decision to turn. We verified this prediction using controlled combinations of stimuli. We studied other navigational decisions that determine the size and directions of turns and found that larvae integrated odor and light according to the same rule in all cases. These results suggest that photo-taxis and odor-taxis are mediated by a shared computational pathway.

  2. Mining spatiotemporal patterns of urban dwellers from taxi trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Feng; Ji, Minhe; Liu, Ting

    2016-06-01

    With the widespread adoption of locationaware technology, obtaining long-sequence, massive and high-accuracy spatiotemporal trajectory data of individuals has become increasingly popular in various geographic studies. Trajectory data of taxis, one of the most widely used inner-city travel modes, contain rich information about both road network traffic and travel behavior of passengers. Such data can be used to study the microscopic activity patterns of individuals as well as the macro system of urban spatial structures. This paper focuses on trajectories obtained from GPS-enabled taxis and their applications for mining urban commuting patterns. A novel approach is proposed to discover spatiotemporal patterns of household travel from the taxi trajectory dataset with a large number of point locations. The approach involves three critical steps: spatial clustering of taxi origin-destination (OD) based on urban traffic grids to discover potentially meaningful places, identifying threshold values from statistics of the OD clusters to extract urban jobs-housing structures, and visualization of analytic results to understand the spatial distribution and temporal trends of the revealed urban structures and implied household commuting behavior. A case study with a taxi trajectory dataset in Shanghai, China is presented to demonstrate and evaluate the proposed method.

  3. Uncovering urban human mobility from large scale taxi GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jinjun; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai; Wang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Taxi GPS trajectories data contain massive spatial and temporal information of urban human activity and mobility. Taking taxi as mobile sensors, the information derived from taxi trips benefits the city and transportation planning. The original data used in study are collected from more than 1100 taxi drivers in Harbin city. We firstly divide the city area into 400 different transportation districts and analyze the origin and destination distribution in urban area on weekday and weekend. The Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) algorithm is used to cluster pick-up and drop-off locations. Furthermore, four spatial interaction models are calibrated and compared based on trajectories in shopping center of Harbin city to study the pick-up location searching behavior. By extracting taxi trips from GPS data, travel distance, time and average speed in occupied and non-occupied status are then used to investigate human mobility. Finally, we use observed OD matrix of center area in Harbin city to model the traffic distribution patterns based on entropy-maximizing method, and the estimation performance verify its effectiveness in case study.

  4. Hybrid Taxis Give Fuel Economy a Lift, Clean Cities, Fleet Experiences, April 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    Clean Cities helped Boston, San Antonio, and Cambridge create hybrid taxi programs. The hybrid taxis are able to achieve about twice the gas mileage of a conventional taxi while helping cut gasoline use and fuel costs. Tax credits and other incentives are helping both company owners and drivers make the switch to hybrids. Program leaders have learned some important lessons other cities can benefit from including learning a city's taxi structure, relaying benefits to drivers, and understanding the needs of owners.

  5. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  6. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  7. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  8. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  9. 14 CFR 298.52 - Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air taxi operations by commuter air... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS FOR AIR TAXI AND COMMUTER AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS Commuter Air Carrier Authorizations § 298.52 Air taxi operations by commuter air carriers. (a) A...

  10. Pilot Age and Error in Air-Taxi Crashes

    PubMed Central

    Rebok, George W.; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P.; Li, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The associations of pilot error with the type of flight operations and basic weather conditions are well documented. The correlation between pilot characteristics and error is less clear. This study aims to examine whether pilot age is associated with the prevalence and patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes. Methods Investigation reports from the National Transportation Safety Board for crashes involving non-scheduled Part 135 operations (i.e., air taxis) in the United States between 1983 and 2002 were reviewed to identify pilot error and other contributing factors. Crash circumstances and the presence and type of pilot error were analyzed in relation to pilot age using Chi-square tests. Results Of the 1751 air-taxi crashes studied, 28% resulted from mechanical failure, 25% from loss of control at landing or takeoff, 7% from visual flight rule conditions into instrument meteorological conditions, 7% from fuel starvation, 5% from taxiing, and 28% from other causes. Crashes among older pilots were more likely to occur during the daytime rather than at night and off airport than on airport. The patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes were similar across age groups. Of the errors identified, 27% were flawed decisions, 26% were inattentiveness, 23% mishandled aircraft kinetics, 15% mishandled wind and/or runway conditions, and 11% were others. Conclusions Pilot age is associated with crash circumstances but not with the prevalence and patterns of pilot error in air-taxi crashes. Lack of age-related differences in pilot error may be attributable to the “safe worker effect.” PMID:19601508

  11. Quadriceps tendon rupture through a superolateral bipartite patella.

    PubMed

    Woods, G William; O'Connor, Daniel P; Elkousy, Hussein A

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture through a bipartite patella. Although quadriceps tendon ruptures and patella fractures are common, rupture through a bipartite patella fragment is rare. This case was managed similar to a quadriceps rupture with an excellent result.

  12. Expanding the definition of the classical bipartite nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Lange, Allison; McLane, Laura M; Mills, Ryan E; Devine, Scott E; Corbett, Anita H

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) are amino acid sequences that target cargo proteins into the nucleus. Rigorous characterization of NLS motifs is essential to understanding and predicting pathways for nuclear import. The best-characterized NLS is the classical NLS (cNLS), which is recognized by the cNLS receptor, importin-alpha. cNLSs are conventionally defined as having one (monopartite) or two clusters of basic amino acids separated by a 9-12 aa linker (bipartite). Motivated by the finding that Ty1 integrase, which contains an unconventional putative bipartite cNLS with a 29 aa linker, exploits the classical nuclear import machinery, we assessed the functional boundaries for linker length within a bipartite cNLS. We confirmed that the integrase cNLS is a bona fide bipartite cNLS, then carried out a systematic analysis of linker length in an obligate bipartite cNLS cargo, which revealed that some linkers longer than conventionally defined can function in nuclear import. Linker function is dependent on the sequence and likely the inherent flexibility of the linker. Subsequently, we interrogated the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome to identify cellular proteins containing putative long bipartite cNLSs. We experimentally confirmed that Rrp4 contains a bipartite cNLS with a 25 aa linker. Our studies show that the traditional definition of bipartite cNLSs is too restrictive and linker length can vary depending on amino acid composition. PMID:20028483

  13. Acute fracture bipartite patella: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ireland, M L; Chang, J L

    1995-03-01

    Disorders of the patella are the most common cause of anterior knee pain. The etiologies of anterior knee pain are reviewed. A case report of an acute displaced patella fracture in a bipartite union is presented. Bipartite patellar development, incidence, radiographic findings, and clinical symptoms follow. Treatment of excision of displaced fragment provides an excellent result.

  14. Improved community detection in weighted bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Real-world complex networks are composed of non-random quantitative interactions. Identifying communities of nodes that tend to interact more with each other than the network as a whole is a key research focus across multiple disciplines, yet many community detection algorithms only use information about the presence or absence of interactions between nodes. Weighted modularity is a potential method for evaluating the quality of community partitions in quantitative networks. In this framework, the optimal community partition of a network can be found by searching for the partition that maximizes modularity. Attempting to find the partition that maximizes modularity is a computationally hard problem requiring the use of algorithms. QuanBiMo is an algorithm that has been proposed to maximize weighted modularity in bipartite networks. This paper introduces two new algorithms, LPAwb+ and DIRTLPAwb+, for maximizing weighted modularity in bipartite networks. LPAwb+ and DIRTLPAwb+ robustly identify partitions with high modularity scores. DIRTLPAwb+ consistently matched or outperformed QuanBiMo, while the speed of LPAwb+ makes it an attractive choice for detecting the modularity of larger networks. Searching for modules using weighted data (rather than binary data) provides a different and potentially insightful method for evaluating network partitions. PMID:26909160

  15. Adaptive bipartite consensus on coopetition networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangping; Zhu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bipartite consensus tracking problem is considered for a group of autonomous agents on a coopetition network, on which the agents interact cooperatively and competitively simultaneously. The coopetition network involves positive and negative edges and is conveniently modeled by a signed graph. Additionally, the dynamics of all the agents are subjected to unknown disturbances, which are represented by linearly parameterized models. An adaptive estimation scheme is designed for each agent by virtue of the relative position measurements and the relative velocity measurements from its neighbors. Then a consensus tracking law is proposed for a new distributed system, which uses the relative measurements as the new state variables. The convergence of the consensus tracking error and the parameter estimation are analyzed even when the coopetition network is time-varying and no more global information about the bounds of the unknown disturbances is available to all the agents. Finally, some simulation results are provided to demonstrate the formation of the bipartite consensus on the coopetition network.

  16. Spectral coarse graining for random walks in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zeng, An; Di, Zengru; Fan, Ying

    2013-03-01

    Many real-world networks display a natural bipartite structure, yet analyzing and visualizing large bipartite networks is one of the open challenges in complex network research. A practical approach to this problem would be to reduce the complexity of the bipartite system while at the same time preserve its functionality. However, we find that existing coarse graining methods for monopartite networks usually fail for bipartite networks. In this paper, we use spectral analysis to design a coarse graining scheme specific for bipartite networks, which keeps their random walk properties unchanged. Numerical analysis on both artificial and real-world networks indicates that our coarse graining can better preserve most of the relevant spectral properties of the network. We validate our coarse graining method by directly comparing the mean first passage time of the walker in the original network and the reduced one.

  17. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  18. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  19. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  20. 14 CFR 25.491 - Taxi, takeoff and landing roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., takeoff and landing roll. Within the range of appropriate ground speeds and approved weights, the airplane structure and landing gear are assumed to be subjected to loads not less than those obtained when the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Taxi, takeoff and landing roll....

  1. Seatbelt use amongst taxi drivers in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Passmore, J; Ozanne-Smith, J

    2006-09-01

    Associated with explosive growth in motorization, China has the world's highest road toll with more than 100,000 deaths and 400,000 injuries annually. In response, the Chinese Government introduced the first road traffic safety law in 2003, which included mandatory use of seatbelts by drivers and front seat passengers. Noting frequent non-compliance to this seatbelt regulation by Beijing taxi drivers, the authors studied seatbelt use patterns as onboard observers in a convenience sample of 235 taxi trips. Findings indicated a low seatbelt-wearing rate among taxi drivers of 7.7%, an overt non-wearing rate of 57%, covert non-wearing of 35.3% and total non-compliance of 92.3%. As in high-income countries, adoption of proven safety strategies, including wearing safety restraints, could contribute to reducing the Chinese road toll, particularly as vehicle occupant numbers and the availability of restraints increases. Further investigation of reasons for non-compliance and pretense of wearing seatbelts is required to inform future seatbelt-wearing promotions, including attitudinal studies of taxi drivers. Seatbelt wearing rates should continue to be monitored.

  2. Protecting bipartite entanglement by quantum interferences

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-05-15

    We show that vacuum-induced coherence in three-level atomic systems can lead to preservation of bipartite entanglement when two such atoms are prepared as two initially entangled qubits, each independently interacting with their respective vacuum reservoirs. We explicitly calculate the time evolution of concurrence for two different Bell states and show that a large amount of entanglement can survive in the long time limit. The amount of entanglement left between the two qubits depends strongly on the ratio of the nonorthogonal transitions in each qubit and can be more than 50%. Moreover, we find that as a consequence of vacuum-induced coherence, sudden death of entanglement is prevented for an initial mixed entangled state of the qubits.

  3. Disentanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, F. A. S.; Coelho, A. S.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.; Faria, A. J. de; Cassemiro, K. N.; Villar, A. S.

    2011-11-15

    Entanglement in bipartite continuous-variable systems is investigated in the presence of partial losses such as those introduced by a realistic quantum communication channel, e.g., by propagation in an optical fiber. We find that entanglement can vanish completely for partial losses, in a situation reminiscent of so-called entanglement sudden death. Even states with extreme squeezing may become separable after propagation in lossy channels. Having in mind the potential applications of such entangled light beams to optical communications, we investigate the conditions under which entanglement can survive for all partial losses. Different loss scenarios are examined, and we derive criteria to test the robustness of entangled states. These criteria are necessary and sufficient for Gaussian states. Our study provides a framework to investigate the robustness of continuous-variable entanglement in more complex multipartite systems.

  4. Sexually Transmitted Diseases on Bipartite Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Luo-Sheng; Zhong, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Fan

    2009-01-01

    We study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model on bipartite graph. According to the difference of sex conception in western and oriental nations, we construct the Barabási Albert-Barabási Albert (BA-BA) model and Barabási-Albert Homogeneity (BA-HO) model for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Applying the rate equation approach, the positive equilibria of both models are given analytically. We find that the ratio between infected females and infected males is distinctly different in both models and the infected density in the BA-HO model is much less than that in the BA-BA model. These results explain that the countries with small ratio have less infected density than those with large ratio. Our numerical simulations verify these theoretical results.

  5. On some classes of bipartite unitary operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Julien; Nechita, Ion; Pellegrini, Clément

    2016-08-01

    We investigate unitary operators acting on a tensor product space, with the property that the quantum channels they generate, via the Stinespring dilation theorem, are of a particular type, independently of the state of the ancilla system in the Stinespring relation. The types of quantum channels we consider are those of interest in quantum information theory: unitary conjugations, constant channels, unital channels, mixed unitary channels, positive partial transpose channels, and entanglement breaking channels. For some of the classes of bipartite unitary operators corresponding to the above types of channels, we provide explicit characterizations, necessary and/or sufficient conditions for membership, and we compute the dimension of the corresponding algebraic variety. Inclusions between these classes are considered, and we show that for small dimensions, many of these sets are identical.

  6. Verifying the Quantumness of Bipartite Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Karlsson, Antti; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Entanglement is at the heart of most quantum information tasks, and therefore considerable effort has been made to find methods of deciding the entanglement content of a given bipartite quantum state. Here, we prove a fundamental limitation to deciding if an unknown state is entangled or not: we show that any quantum measurement which can answer this question for an arbitrary state necessarily gives enough information to identify the state completely. We also extend our treatment to other classes of correlated states by considering the problem of deciding if a state has negative partial transpose, is discordant, or is fully classically correlated. Remarkably, only the question related to quantum discord can be answered without resorting to full state tomography.

  7. Theoretical model of an organic ferrimagnetic state for a bipartite lozenge chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y. F.; Yao, K. L.

    2001-04-01

    A model for one-dimensional bipartite lozenge chain is proposed. By unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation, we find that the system should exhibit ferrimagnetic ordering for a half filled band. In the ground state, the energy levels of electrons will split off with respect to different spins and the electrons along the chain will form an antiferromagnetic spin-density wave. The ground state of the system will be more stable with increasing of the on-site Hubbard term.

  8. Arthroscopic excision of a painful bipartite patella fragment.

    PubMed

    Carney, Joseph; Thompson, Darcy; O'Daniel, Joseph; Cassidy, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Bipartite patella is an uncommon finding, with the majority of cases discovered incidentally on radiographs. Occasionally, bipartite patella can become painful through sports activities, overuse, or following an injury, and the large majority of these cases resolve with nonoperative treatment. However, for patients who do not respond to a prolonged course of nonoperative treatment, surgical options may be considered. We report a successful case of arthroscopic excision of a painful bipartite patella fragment in a 19-year-old male collegiate basketball player. A review of the literature is included.

  9. SR-71 - Taxi on Ramp with Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo shows a head-on shot of NASA's SR-71A aircraft taxiing on the ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, heat waves from its engines blurring the hangars in the background. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena

  10. The scaling of human mobility by taxis is exponential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Zheng, Xudong; Lv, Weifeng; Zhu, Tongyu; Xu, Ke

    2012-03-01

    As a significant factor in urban planning, traffic forecasting and prediction of epidemics, modeling patterns of human mobility draws intensive attention from researchers for decades. Power-law distribution and its variations are observed from quite a few real-world human mobility datasets such as the movements of banking notes, trackings of cell phone users' locations and trajectories of vehicles. In this paper, we build models for 20 million trajectories with fine granularity collected from more than 10 thousand taxis in Beijing. In contrast to most models observed in human mobility data, the taxis' traveling displacements in urban areas tend to follow an exponential distribution instead of a power-law. Similarly, the elapsed time can also be well approximated by an exponential distribution. Worth mentioning, analysis of the interevent time indicates the bursty nature of human mobility, similar to many other human activities.

  11. Asymmetric intimacy and algorithm for detecting communities in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Qin, Xiaomeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, an algorithm to choose a good partition in bipartite networks has been proposed. Bipartite networks have more theoretical significance and broader prospect of application. In view of distinctive structure of bipartite networks, in our method, two parameters are defined to show the relationships between the same type nodes and heterogeneous nodes respectively. Moreover, our algorithm employs a new method of finding and expanding the core communities in bipartite networks. Two kinds of nodes are handled separately and merged, and then the sub-communities are obtained. After that, objective communities will be found according to the merging rule. The proposed algorithm has been simulated in real-world networks and artificial networks, and the result verifies the accuracy and reliability of the parameters on intimacy for our algorithm. Eventually, comparisons with similar algorithms depict that the proposed algorithm has better performance.

  12. Talent in the taxi: a model system for exploring expertise

    PubMed Central

    Woollett, Katherine; Spiers, Hugo J.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2009-01-01

    While there is widespread interest in and admiration of individuals with exceptional talents, surprisingly little is known about the cognitive and neural mechanisms underpinning talent, and indeed how talent relates to expertise. Because many talents are first identified and nurtured in childhood, it can be difficult to determine whether talent is innate, can be acquired through extensive practice or can only be acquired in the presence of the developing brain. We sought to address some of these issues by studying healthy adults who acquired expertise in adulthood. We focused on the domain of memory and used licensed London taxi drivers as a model system. Taxi drivers have to learn the layout of 25 000 streets in London and the locations of thousands of places of interest, and pass stringent examinations in order to obtain an operating licence. Using neuropsychological assessment and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we addressed a range of key questions: in the context of a fully developed brain and an average IQ, can people acquire expertise to an exceptional level; what are the neural signatures, both structural and functional, associated with the use of expertise; does expertise change the brain compared with unskilled control participants; does it confer any cognitive advantages, and similarly, does it come at a cost to other functions? By studying retired taxi drivers, we also consider what happens to their brains and behaviour when experts stop using their skill. Finally, we discuss how the expertise of taxi drivers might relate to the issue of talent and innate abilities. We suggest that exploring talent and expertise in this manner could have implications for education, rehabilitation of patients with cognitive impairments, understanding individual differences and possibly conditions such as autism where exceptional abilities can be a feature. PMID:19528024

  13. Comparing taxi clearance input layouts for advancements in flight deck automation for surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lara W. S.

    Airport moving maps (AMMs) have been shown to decrease navigation errors, increase taxiing speed, and reduce workload when they depict airport layout, current aircraft position, and the cleared taxi route. However, current technologies are limited in their ability to depict the cleared taxi route due to the unavailability of datacomm or other means of electronically transmitting clearances from ATC to the flight deck. This study examined methods by which pilots can input ATC-issued taxi clearances to support taxi route depictions on the AMM. Sixteen general aviation (GA) pilots used a touchscreen monitor to input taxi clearances using two input layouts, softkeys and QWERTY, each with and without feedforward (graying out invalid inputs). QWERTY yielded more taxi route input errors than the softkeys layout. The presence of feedforward did not produce fewer taxi route input errors than in the non-feedforward condition. The QWERTY layout did reduce taxi clearance input times relative to the softkeys layout, but when feedforward was present this effect was observed only for the longer, 6-segment taxi clearances. It was observed that with the softkeys layout, feedforward reduced input times compared to non-feedforward but only for the 4-segment clearances. Feedforward did not support faster taxi clearance input times for the QWERTY layout. Based on the results and analyses of the present study, it is concluded that for taxi clearance inputs, (1) QWERTY remain the standard for alphanumeric inputs, and (2) feedforward be investigated further, with a focus on participant preference and performance of black-gray contrast of keys.

  14. Understanding intra-urban trip patterns from taxi trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Kang, Chaogui; Gao, Song; Xiao, Yu; Tian, Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Intra-urban human mobility is investigated by means of taxi trajectory data that are collected in Shanghai, China, where taxis play an important role in urban transportation. From the taxi trajectories, approximately 1.5 million trips of anonymous customers are extracted on seven consecutive days. The globally spatio-temporal patterns of trips exhibit a significant daily regularity. Since each trip can be viewed as a displacement in the random walk model, the distributions of the distance and direction of the extracted trips are investigated in this research. The direction distribution shows an NEE-SWW-dominant direction, and the distance distribution can be well fitted by an exponentially truncated power law, with the scaling exponent β = 1.2 ± 0.15. The observed patterns are attributed to the geographical heterogeneity of the study area, which makes the spatial distribution of trajectory stops to be non-uniform. We thus construct a model that integrates both the geographical heterogeneity and distance decay effect, to interpret the observed patterns. Our Monte Carlo simulation results closely match to the observed patterns and thus validate the proposed model. According to the proposed model, in a single-core urban area, the geographical heterogeneity and distance decay effect improve each other when influencing human mobility patterns. Geographical heterogeneity leads to a faster observed decay, and the distance decay effect makes the spatial distribution of trips more concentrated.

  15. Measuring and modeling air exchange rates inside taxi cabs in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Yu, Nu; Wang, Yueyan; Zhu, Yifang

    2015-12-01

    Air exchange rates (AERs) have a direct impact on traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) levels inside vehicles. Taxi drivers are occupationally exposed to TRAP on a daily basis, yet there is limited measurement of AERs in taxi cabs. To fill this gap, AERs were quantified in 22 representative Los Angeles taxi cabs including 10 Prius, 5 Crown Victoria, 3 Camry, 3 Caravan, and 1 Uplander under realistic driving (RD) conditions. To further study the impacts of window position and ventilation settings on taxi AERs, additional tests were conducted on 14 taxis with windows closed (WC) and on the other 8 taxis with not only windows closed but also medium fan speed (WC-MFS) under outdoor air mode. Under RD conditions, the AERs in all 22 cabs had a mean of 63 h-1 with a median of 38 h-1. Similar AERs were observed under WC condition when compared to those measured under RD condition. Under WC-MFS condition, AERs were significantly increased in all taxi cabs, when compared with those measured under RD condition. A General Estimating Equation (GEE) model was developed and the modeling results showed that vehicle model was a significant factor in determining the AERs in taxi cabs under RD condition. Driving speed and car age were positively associated with AERs but not statistically significant. Overall, AERs measured in taxi cabs were much higher than typical AERs people usually encounter in indoor environments such as homes, offices, and even regular passenger vehicles.

  16. Media Controller For Receiving Data From A TAXI(TM) Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Mcmahon, Rebecca Stempski

    1995-01-01

    TAXI(TM) media controller (TMC) is interface circuit that supports operation of test equipment in diagnosis of telemetry system in which data communicated via TAXI(TM) links. TMC designed specifically for use with TAXI(TM) test adapter for monitoring and testing telemetry data signals generated by payloads and other subsystems of Space Station Freedom. Overall, TMC characterized as providing interface between output part of a TAXI(TM) receiving chip and input port of memory system in test adapter. TMC detects some abnormalities in received data stream and resynchronizes stream to locally generated clock signal.

  17. A Mixed Integer Linear Program for Solving a Multiple Route Taxi Scheduling Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, Justin Vincent; Wood, Zachary Paul; Rathinam, Sivakumar; Malik, Waqar Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft movements on taxiways at busy airports often create bottlenecks. This paper introduces a mixed integer linear program to solve a Multiple Route Aircraft Taxi Scheduling Problem. The outputs of the model are in the form of optimal taxi schedules, which include routing decisions for taxiing aircraft. The model extends an existing single route formulation to include routing decisions. An efficient comparison framework compares the multi-route formulation and the single route formulation. The multi-route model is exercised for east side airport surface traffic at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport to determine if any arrival taxi time savings can be achieved by allowing arrivals to have two taxi routes: a route that crosses an active departure runway and a perimeter route that avoids the crossing. Results indicate that the multi-route formulation yields reduced arrival taxi times over the single route formulation only when a perimeter taxiway is used. In conditions where the departure aircraft are given an optimal and fixed takeoff sequence, accumulative arrival taxi time savings in the multi-route formulation can be as high as 3.6 hours more than the single route formulation. If the departure sequence is not optimal, the multi-route formulation results in less taxi time savings made over the single route formulation, but the average arrival taxi time is significantly decreased.

  18. Six new examples of the bipartite trapezoid bone: morphology, significant population variation, and an examination of pre-existing criteria to identify bipartition of individual carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Scott E; Stojanowski, Christopher M; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-03-01

    Carpal bone bipartition is a developmental variant resulting in the division of a normally singular carpal into two distinct segments. Cases involving the scaphoid are best known, though many other carpals can be affected, including the trapezoid. Six new examples of bipartite trapezoids, identified in African and Asian anatomical and archeological samples, are reported here and compared with the eight previously known. While the site of bipartition is consistent, the resulting segments exhibit variability in their articulations with neighboring carpals. Five of the six affected trapezoids were identified in African or African-derived samples, yielding a significantly higher frequency (0.323%) of bipartite trapezoid than seen in anatomical or archeological series of European origin. Bilateral bipartite trapezoids in archeological remains from the Mid Holocene site of Gobero (Niger) are potentially the oldest bipartite carpals yet identified in humans. Their discovery may indicate that trapezoid bipartition is a condition that has been present in African populations since prehistoric times, though more data are needed. Because bipartite carpals may be symptomatic and can occur as part of syndromes, the significant population variation in frequency identified here has potential utility in both anatomical and clinical contexts. However, a comparison of the morphological appearance of bipartite trapezoids with the suggested criteria for bipartite scaphoid diagnosis indicates that these criteria are not equally applicable to other carpals. Fortunately, due to the rarity of fracture, identification of the bipartite trapezoid and separating it from pathological conditions is considerably easier than diagnosing a bipartite scaphoid.

  19. Bipartite Community Structure of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Platig, John; DeMeo, Dawn; Quackenbush, John

    2016-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses have identified genetic associations with a wide range of human phenotypes. However, many of these variants have weak effects and understanding their combined effect remains a challenge. One hypothesis is that multiple SNPs interact in complex networks to influence functional processes that ultimately lead to complex phenotypes, including disease states. Here we present CONDOR, a method that represents both cis- and trans-acting SNPs and the genes with which they are associated as a bipartite graph and then uses the modular structure of that graph to place SNPs into a functional context. In applying CONDOR to eQTLs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we found the global network “hub” SNPs were devoid of disease associations through GWAS. However, the network was organized into 52 communities of SNPs and genes, many of which were enriched for genes in specific functional classes. We identified local hubs within each community (“core SNPs”) and these were enriched for GWAS SNPs for COPD and many other diseases. These results speak to our intuition: rather than single SNPs influencing single genes, we see groups of SNPs associated with the expression of families of functionally related genes and that disease SNPs are associated with the perturbation of those functions. These methods are not limited in their application to COPD and can be used in the analysis of a wide variety of disease processes and other phenotypic traits. PMID:27618581

  20. Bipartite Community Structure of eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Platig, John; Castaldi, Peter J; DeMeo, Dawn; Quackenbush, John

    2016-09-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses have identified genetic associations with a wide range of human phenotypes. However, many of these variants have weak effects and understanding their combined effect remains a challenge. One hypothesis is that multiple SNPs interact in complex networks to influence functional processes that ultimately lead to complex phenotypes, including disease states. Here we present CONDOR, a method that represents both cis- and trans-acting SNPs and the genes with which they are associated as a bipartite graph and then uses the modular structure of that graph to place SNPs into a functional context. In applying CONDOR to eQTLs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we found the global network "hub" SNPs were devoid of disease associations through GWAS. However, the network was organized into 52 communities of SNPs and genes, many of which were enriched for genes in specific functional classes. We identified local hubs within each community ("core SNPs") and these were enriched for GWAS SNPs for COPD and many other diseases. These results speak to our intuition: rather than single SNPs influencing single genes, we see groups of SNPs associated with the expression of families of functionally related genes and that disease SNPs are associated with the perturbation of those functions. These methods are not limited in their application to COPD and can be used in the analysis of a wide variety of disease processes and other phenotypic traits.

  1. A bipartite graph of Neuroendocrine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhong-Wei; Zou, Sheng-Rong; Peng, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Ta; Gu, Chang-Gui; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    We present an empirical investigation on the neuroendocrine system and suggest describe it by a bipartite graph. In the net the cells can be regarded as collaboration acts and the mediators can be regarded as collaboration actors. The act degree stands for the number of the cells that secrete a single mediator. Among them bFGF (the basic fibroblast growth factor) has the largest node act degree. It is the most important mitogenic cytokine, followed by TGF-beta, IL-6, IL1-beta, VEGF, IGF-1and so on. They are critical in neuroendocrine system to maintain bodily healthiness, emotional stabilization and endocrine harmony. The act degree distribution shows a shifted power law (SPL) function forms [1]. The average act degree of neuroendocrine network is h=3.01, It means that each mediator is secreted by three cells on average. The similarity, which stands for the average probability of secreting the same mediators by all neuroendocrine cells, is observed as s=0.14. Our results may be used in the research of the medical treatment of neuroendocrine diseases. [1] Assortativity and act degree distribution of some collaboration networks, Hui Chang, Bei-Bei Su, Yue-Ping Zhou, Daren He, Physica A, 383 (2007) 687-702

  2. Percolation on bipartite scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooyberghs, H.; Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Indekeu, J. O.

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies introduced biased (degree-dependent) edge percolation as a model for failures in real-life systems. In this work, such process is applied to networks consisting of two types of nodes with edges running only between nodes of unlike type. Such bipartite graphs appear in many social networks, for instance in affiliation networks and in sexual-contact networks in which both types of nodes show the scale-free characteristic for the degree distribution. During the depreciation process, an edge between nodes with degrees k and q is retained with a probability proportional to (, where α is positive so that links between hubs are more prone to failure. The removal process is studied analytically by introducing a generating functions theory. We deduce exact self-consistent equations describing the system at a macroscopic level and discuss the percolation transition. Critical exponents are obtained by exploiting the Fortuin-Kasteleyn construction which provides a link between our model and a limit of the Potts model.

  3. Hot multiboundary wormholes from bipartite entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Maxfield, Henry; Peach, Alex; Ross, Simon

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the 1+1 CFT states dual to hot (time-symmetric) 2+1 multiboundary AdS wormholes. These are black hole geometries with high local temperature, n≥slant 1 asymptotically-AdS3 regions, and arbitrary internal topology. The dual state at t = 0 is defined on n circles. We show these to be well-described by sewing together tensor networks corresponding to thermofield double states. As a result, the entanglement is spatially localized and bipartite: away from particular boundary points (‘vertices’) any small connected region A of the boundary CFT is entangled only with another small connected region B, where B may lie on a different circle or may be a different part of the same circle. We focus on the pair-of-pants case, from which more general cases may be constructed. We also discuss finite-temperature corrections, where we note that the states involve a code subspace in each circle.

  4. Competition for popularity in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguerisse Díaz, Mariano; Porter, Mason A.; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2010-12-01

    We present a dynamical model for rewiring and attachment in bipartite networks. Edges are placed between nodes that belong to catalogs that can either be fixed in size or growing in size. The model is motivated by an empirical study of data from the video rental service Netflix, which invites its users to give ratings to the videos available in its catalog. We find that the distribution of the number of ratings given by users and that of the number of ratings received by videos both follow a power law with an exponential cutoff. We also examine the activity patterns of Netflix users and find bursts of intense video-rating activity followed by long periods of inactivity. We derive ordinary differential equations to model the acquisition of edges by the nodes over time and obtain the corresponding time-dependent degree distributions. We then compare our results with the Netflix data and find good agreement. We conclude with a discussion of how catalog models can be used to study systems in which agents are forced to choose, rate, or prioritize their interactions from a large set of options.

  5. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  6. Competition for popularity in bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Mariano Beguerisse; Porter, Mason A; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2010-12-01

    We present a dynamical model for rewiring and attachment in bipartite networks. Edges are placed between nodes that belong to catalogs that can either be fixed in size or growing in size. The model is motivated by an empirical study of data from the video rental service Netflix, which invites its users to give ratings to the videos available in its catalog. We find that the distribution of the number of ratings given by users and that of the number of ratings received by videos both follow a power law with an exponential cutoff. We also examine the activity patterns of Netflix users and find bursts of intense video-rating activity followed by long periods of inactivity. We derive ordinary differential equations to model the acquisition of edges by the nodes over time and obtain the corresponding time-dependent degree distributions. We then compare our results with the Netflix data and find good agreement. We conclude with a discussion of how catalog models can be used to study systems in which agents are forced to choose, rate, or prioritize their interactions from a large set of options.

  7. Bipartite Community Structure of eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Platig, John; Castaldi, Peter J; DeMeo, Dawn; Quackenbush, John

    2016-09-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses have identified genetic associations with a wide range of human phenotypes. However, many of these variants have weak effects and understanding their combined effect remains a challenge. One hypothesis is that multiple SNPs interact in complex networks to influence functional processes that ultimately lead to complex phenotypes, including disease states. Here we present CONDOR, a method that represents both cis- and trans-acting SNPs and the genes with which they are associated as a bipartite graph and then uses the modular structure of that graph to place SNPs into a functional context. In applying CONDOR to eQTLs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we found the global network "hub" SNPs were devoid of disease associations through GWAS. However, the network was organized into 52 communities of SNPs and genes, many of which were enriched for genes in specific functional classes. We identified local hubs within each community ("core SNPs") and these were enriched for GWAS SNPs for COPD and many other diseases. These results speak to our intuition: rather than single SNPs influencing single genes, we see groups of SNPs associated with the expression of families of functionally related genes and that disease SNPs are associated with the perturbation of those functions. These methods are not limited in their application to COPD and can be used in the analysis of a wide variety of disease processes and other phenotypic traits. PMID:27618581

  8. Evolutionary method for finding communities in bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weihua; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2011-06-01

    An important step in unveiling the relation between network structure and dynamics defined on networks is to detect communities, and numerous methods have been developed separately to identify community structure in different classes of networks, such as unipartite networks, bipartite networks, and directed networks. Here, we show that the finding of communities in such networks can be unified in a general framework-detection of community structure in bipartite networks. Moreover, we propose an evolutionary method for efficiently identifying communities in bipartite networks. To this end, we show that both unipartite and directed networks can be represented as bipartite networks, and their modularity is completely consistent with that for bipartite networks, the detection of modular structure on which can be reformulated as modularity maximization. To optimize the bipartite modularity, we develop a modified adaptive genetic algorithm (MAGA), which is shown to be especially efficient for community structure detection. The high efficiency of the MAGA is based on the following three improvements we make. First, we introduce a different measure for the informativeness of a locus instead of the standard deviation, which can exactly determine which loci mutate. This measure is the bias between the distribution of a locus over the current population and the uniform distribution of the locus, i.e., the Kullback-Leibler divergence between them. Second, we develop a reassignment technique for differentiating the informative state a locus has attained from the random state in the initial phase. Third, we present a modified mutation rule which by incorporating related operations can guarantee the convergence of the MAGA to the global optimum and can speed up the convergence process. Experimental results show that the MAGA outperforms existing methods in terms of modularity for both bipartite and unipartite networks.

  9. Evolutionary method for finding communities in bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Weihua; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Guan, Jihong; Zhou, Shuigeng

    2011-06-01

    An important step in unveiling the relation between network structure and dynamics defined on networks is to detect communities, and numerous methods have been developed separately to identify community structure in different classes of networks, such as unipartite networks, bipartite networks, and directed networks. Here, we show that the finding of communities in such networks can be unified in a general framework-detection of community structure in bipartite networks. Moreover, we propose an evolutionary method for efficiently identifying communities in bipartite networks. To this end, we show that both unipartite and directed networks can be represented as bipartite networks, and their modularity is completely consistent with that for bipartite networks, the detection of modular structure on which can be reformulated as modularity maximization. To optimize the bipartite modularity, we develop a modified adaptive genetic algorithm (MAGA), which is shown to be especially efficient for community structure detection. The high efficiency of the MAGA is based on the following three improvements we make. First, we introduce a different measure for the informativeness of a locus instead of the standard deviation, which can exactly determine which loci mutate. This measure is the bias between the distribution of a locus over the current population and the uniform distribution of the locus, i.e., the Kullback-Leibler divergence between them. Second, we develop a reassignment technique for differentiating the informative state a locus has attained from the random state in the initial phase. Third, we present a modified mutation rule which by incorporating related operations can guarantee the convergence of the MAGA to the global optimum and can speed up the convergence process. Experimental results show that the MAGA outperforms existing methods in terms of modularity for both bipartite and unipartite networks. PMID:21797454

  10. Factors associated with crashes involving taxi owners and non-owners: A case of moral hazard and adverse selection?

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard; Choi, Jaisung

    2016-02-01

    Taxis experience a higher risk of a motor vehicle crash partly because of their much higher levels of exposure on the roads. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with the frequency and severity of taxi collisions, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors associated with owner taxis and non-owner taxis. This study finds that collisions involving non-owners are more likely to be associated with poor or risky driving behaviors than collisions involving taxi vehicle owners. This result is consistent with the economic principles of moral hazard and adverse selection. Hence, policy makers responsible for traffic safety, taxi regulation or taxi operations should consider measures to reduce these market inefficiencies and improve the safety of not only taxi drivers but all road users.

  11. Factors associated with crashes involving taxi owners and non-owners: A case of moral hazard and adverse selection?

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard; Choi, Jaisung

    2016-02-01

    Taxis experience a higher risk of a motor vehicle crash partly because of their much higher levels of exposure on the roads. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with the frequency and severity of taxi collisions, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors associated with owner taxis and non-owner taxis. This study finds that collisions involving non-owners are more likely to be associated with poor or risky driving behaviors than collisions involving taxi vehicle owners. This result is consistent with the economic principles of moral hazard and adverse selection. Hence, policy makers responsible for traffic safety, taxi regulation or taxi operations should consider measures to reduce these market inefficiencies and improve the safety of not only taxi drivers but all road users. PMID:26655521

  12. Hybrid Taxis Give Fuel Economy a Lift -Clean Cities Fleet Experiences -

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    The hybrid taxis are able to achieve about twice the gas mileage of a conventional taxi while helping cut gasoline use and fuel costs. Tax credits and other incentives are helping both company owners and drivers make the switch to hybrids.

  13. Degree distributions of bipartite networks and their projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasques Filho, Demival; O'Neale, Dion

    Bipartite networks play an important role in the analysis of social and economic systems as they explicitly show the conceptual links between different types of entities. As an example, it is possible to build networks to investigate interactions regarding scientific and technological innovation that are well represented by a natural bipartite structure. Since we are often most interested in only one of the node types (e.g. the authors in an author-publication network), it is common to end up working with a projected version of the underlying bipartite network. The topology of projections and the dynamics that take place on it are highly dependent on the probability distribution of nodes degrees. We use the formalism of generating functions to infer how the degree distributions of the original bipartite network affect the distribution in the projected version. Moreover, we create artificial bipartite graphs by arbitrarily choosing degree distributions for the sets of nodes and construct the projection to analyze the resulting probability distribution. Our findings show that when projecting onto a particular set of nodes, the resulting degree distribution follows the behavior of the probability distribution of such nodes, subject, however, to the tail of the opposite distribution.

  14. Entangling and assisted entangling power of bipartite unitary operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Nonlocal unitary operations can create quantum entanglement between distributed particles, and the quantification of created entanglement is a hard problem. It corresponds to the concepts of entangling and assisted entangling power when the input states are, respectively, product and arbitrary pure states. We analytically derive them for Schmidt-rank-two bipartite unitary and some complex bipartite permutation unitaries. In particular, the entangling power of permutation unitary of Schmidt rank three can take only one of two values: log29 -16 /9 or log23 ebits. The entangling power, assisted entangling power, and disentangling power of 2 ×dB permutation unitaries of Schmidt rank four are all 2 ebits. These quantities are also derived for generalized Clifford operators. We further show that any bipartite permutation unitary of Schmidt rank greater than two has entangling power greater than 1.223 ebits. We construct the generalized controlled-not (cnot) gates whose assisted entangling power reaches the maximum. We quantitatively compare the entangling power and assisted entangling power for general bipartite unitaries and their connection to the disentangling power by proposing a probabilistic protocol for implementing bipartite unitaries.

  15. Measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis.

    PubMed

    Pietrosimone, Kathryn M; Yin, Xiuyin; Knecht, David A; Lynes, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular movement in response to external stimuli is fundamental to many cellular processes including wound healing, inflammation and the response to infection. A common method to measure chemotaxis is the Boyden chamber assay, in which cells and chemoattractant are separated by a porous membrane. As cells migrate through the membrane toward the chemoattractant, they adhere to the underside of the membrane, or fall into the underlying media, and are subsequently stained and visually counted (1). In this method, cells are exposed to a steep and transient chemoattractant gradient, which is thought to be a poor representation of gradients found in tissues (2). Another assay system, the under-agarose chemotaxis assay, (3, 4) measures cell movement across a solid substrate in a thin aqueous film that forms under the agarose layer. The gradient that develops in the agarose is shallow and is thought to be an appropriate representation of naturally occurring gradients. Chemotaxis can be evaluated by microscopic imaging of the distance traveled. Both the Boyden chamber assay and the under-agarose assay are usually configured as endpoint assays. The automated ECIS/Taxis system combines the under-agarose approach with Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) (5, 6). In this assay, target electrodes are located in each of 8 chambers. A large counter-electrode runs through each of the 8 chambers (Figure 2). Each chamber is filled with agarose and two small wells are the cut in the agarose on either side of the target electrode. One well is filled with the test cell population, while the other holds the sources of diffusing chemoattractant (Figure 3). Current passed through the system can be used to determine the change in resistance that occurs as cells pass over the target electrode. Cells on the target electrode increase the resistance of the system (6). In addition, rapid fluctuations in the resistance represent changes in the interactions of cells with the electrode

  16. Observation of bipartite correlations using coherent light for optical communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim Fook

    2009-04-01

    Bipartite polarization correlations of two distant observers are observed by using coherent noise interferences. This is accomplished by mixing a vertically polarized coherent light field with a horizontally polarized coherent noise field in a 50/50 beam splitter. The superposed light fields at each output port of the beam splitter are sent to two observers and then manipulated by using a quarter-wave plate and an analyzer. The bipartite correlations between the projection angles of two distant observers are established by analyzing their data through multiplication without any postselection technique. The scheme can be used to implement entanglement-based quantum cryptography in the future. PMID:19340232

  17. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Pre-flight Taxi Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As crewmen jog and cycle alongside, a battery-powered, quarter-scale prototype of the remotely-piloted Centurion flying wing rolls across the El Mirage Dry Lake during pre-flight taxi tests. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager for solar

  18. Centurion Quarter-scale Prototype Prepared for Taxi Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    As sunlight breaks over Southern California's El Mirage Dry Lake, Crew members prepare a battery-powered quarter-scale prototype of the remotely-piloted Centurion flying wing for a taxi test. Centurion was a unique remotely piloted, solar-powered airplane developed under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor (ERAST) Program at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Dryden joined with AeroVironment, Inc., Monrovia, California, under an ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement, to design, develop, manufacture, and conduct flight development tests for the Centurion. The airplane was believed to be the first aircraft designed to achieve sustained horizontal flight at altitudes of 90,000 to 100,000 feet. Achieving this capability would meet the ERAST goal of developing an ultrahigh-altitude airplane that could meet the needs of the science community to perform upper-atmosphere environmental data missions. Much of the technology leading to the Centurion was developed during the Pathfinder and Pathfinder-Plus projects. However, in the course of its development, the Centurion became a prototype technology demonstration aircraft designed to validate the technology for the Helios, a planned future high-altitude, solar-powered aircraft that could fly for weeks or months at a time on science or telecommunications missions. Centurion had 206-foot-long wings and used batteries to supply power to the craft's 14 electric motors and electronic systems. Centurion first flew at Dryden Nov. 10, 1998, and followed up with a second test flight Nov. 19. On its third and final flight on Dec. 3, the craft was aloft for 31 minutes and reached an altitude of about 400 feet. All three flights were conducted over a section of Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to Dryden. For its third flight, the Centurion carried a simulated payload of more than 600 pounds--almost half the lightweight aircraft's empty weight. John Del Frate, Dryden's project manager for solar

  19. Ferrimagnetic Ordering and Spin Density Wave of the Polymeric Organic and Inorganic Bipartite Lozenge Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y. F.; Duan, Y. F.; Yao, K. L.; Yao, K. L.; Yao, K. L.; Chen, J. S.

    The ground state properties and spin-density wave of a class of quasi-one dimensional polymeric organic and inorganic chains are studied by the mean-field theory and the Hartree-Fock approximation. The topological structure of the bipartite lozenge chain possesses a flat-band structure of the energy band. In the ground state, the electrons along the chain will form an antiferromagnetic spin-density wave. Away from half filling, a very rich magnetic phase diagram has been found. The ferrimagnetic ground state of the system will be more stable with increasing of the on-site Hubbard term.

  20. Randomizing bipartite networks: the case of the World Trade Web

    PubMed Central

    Saracco, Fabio; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Gabrielli, Andrea; Squartini, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    Within the last fifteen years, network theory has been successfully applied both to natural sciences and to socioeconomic disciplines. In particular, bipartite networks have been recognized to provide a particularly insightful representation of many systems, ranging from mutualistic networks in ecology to trade networks in economy, whence the need of a pattern detection-oriented analysis in order to identify statistically-significant structural properties. Such an analysis rests upon the definition of suitable null models, i.e. upon the choice of the portion of network structure to be preserved while randomizing everything else. However, quite surprisingly, little work has been done so far to define null models for real bipartite networks. The aim of the present work is to fill this gap, extending a recently-proposed method to randomize monopartite networks to bipartite networks. While the proposed formalism is perfectly general, we apply our method to the binary, undirected, bipartite representation of the World Trade Web, comparing the observed values of a number of structural quantities of interest with the expected ones, calculated via our randomization procedure. Interestingly, the behavior of the World Trade Web in this new representation is strongly different from the monopartite analogue, showing highly non-trivial patterns of self-organization. PMID:26029820

  1. Controlled teleportation of a 3-dimensional bipartite quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Song, He-Shan

    2008-07-01

    A controlled teleportation scheme of an unknown 3-dimensional (3D) two-particle quantum state is proposed, where a 3D Bell state and 3D GHZ state function as the quantum channel. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional bipartite quantum state.

  2. Human Mars Mission Performance Crew Taxi Profile. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duaro, Vince A.

    1999-01-01

    This timeline was generated on the Integrated Mission Program (IMP). All burn events over 2 seconds are finite with IMP solving a two point boundary value setup for begin burn time, burn time and control angles. Perigee and apogee shown above are mean orbital values. Significant events are listed. Each finite thrust event has two lines. The first is the beginning time showing the initial conditions, thrust and ISP used. The second has the end burn conditions and the delta v and time of burn. This case is an abort from the 750 x 750 phasing abort, using the taxi's main engines. An abort using the Reaction Control System (RCS) was also investigated but required a large increase in RCS propellant and was abandoned.

  3. Pili-taxis: Clustering of Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taktikos, Johannes; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Biais, Nicolas; Stark, Holger; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    The first step of colonization of Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria, the etiological agent of gonorrhea, is the attachment to human epithelial cells. The attachment of N. gonorrhoeae bacteria to surfaces or other cells is primarily mediated by filamentous appendages, called type IV pili (Tfp). Cycles of elongation and retraction of Tfp are responsible for a common bacterial motility called twitching motility which allows the bacteria to crawl over surfaces. Experimentally, N. gonorrhoeae cells initially dispersed over a surface agglomerate into round microcolonies within hours. It is so far not known whether this clustering is driven entirely by the Tfp dynamics or if chemotactic interactions are needed. Thus, we investigate whether the agglomeration may stem solely from the pili-mediated attraction between cells. By developing a statistical model for pili-taxis, we try to explain the experimental measurements of the time evolution of the mean cluster size, number of clusters, and area fraction covered by the cells.

  4. Detecting Hotspots from Taxi Trajectory Data Using Spatial Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. X.; Qin, K.; Zhou, Q.; Liu, C. K.; Chen, Y. X.

    2015-07-01

    A method of trajectory clustering based on decision graph and data field is proposed in this paper. The method utilizes data field to describe spatial distribution of trajectory points, and uses decision graph to discover cluster centres. It can automatically determine cluster parameters and is suitable to trajectory clustering. The method is applied to trajectory clustering on taxi trajectory data, which are on the holiday (May 1st, 2014), weekday (Wednesday, May 7th, 2014) and weekend (Saturday, May 10th, 2014) respectively, in Wuhan City, China. The hotspots in four hours (8:00-9:00, 12:00-13:00, 18:00-19:00 and 23:00-24:00) for three days are discovered and visualized in heat maps. In the future, we will further research the spatiotemporal distribution and laws of these hotspots, and use more data to carry out the experiments.

  5. Suppression of radiated emission in fiscal taxi meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong; Yang, Pei-pei; Su, Xing; Zhang, Da-jian; Wang, Ke-xi; Hou, Ming-feng

    2011-12-01

    This paper is based upon National Standards for EMC. For the problem that the intensity of electromagnetic radiation in the meter with the THG at 36MHz is seriously more than National Standards, by studying the theory of radiation emission and analyzing the formation mechanism of electromagnetic radiation interference, it proposes three restrain measures: 1.the improvement of the Crystal oscillator's grounding measure; 2.adding a RC filter circuit to the Crystal oscillator circuit; 3.the improvement of the tax's communication cable, solving the problem that radiation harassment the taxi meter seriously exceeds. The experimental result demonstrates that the radiation intensity of tax meter improved with the general measures meet the requirements of the national standard, making more than 32000 taxes in Tianjin install this green meter, protecting the safety of staff and normal operation of the surrounding equipment.

  6. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    CMOS image sensors now become increasingly competitive with respect to their CCD counterparts, while adding advantages such as no blooming, simpler driving requirements and the potential of on-chip integration of sensor, analogue circuitry, and digital processing functions. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on cmos imager that can record field situation when unusual circumstance happened is described in this paper. The monitoring system is based on a CMOS imager (OV7120), which can output digital image data through parallel pixel data port. The system consists of a CMOS image sensor, a large capacity NAND FLASH ROM, a USB interface chip and a micro controller (AT90S8515). The structure of whole system and the test data is discussed and analyzed in detail.

  7. A Study on Entanglement Sudden Death in the Open Bipartite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jia Hua; Fang, Mao Fa; Huang, Guo Hui; Yang, Xiong

    2014-06-01

    Examining the relation between concurrence and energy in the open bipartite systems, we give an enlightening discussion about reason which causes the entanglement sudden death. We consider two two-level atoms A and B initially entangled to some extent and coupled individually to two cavities which are initially in their vacuum states. We analyze the dynamics of entanglement and energy for two atoms after tracing over the cavity degrees of freedom. By comparing with concurrence and energy, we obtain a conclusion, i.e., there is a critical value U C =0, when the energy U< U C =0, or, U'≤0, the concurrence must be zero and the ESD will occur for a period of time. Then, we discuss how non-Markovian effects and detunings influence the critical value. Finally, we point out the impact of initial degree of entanglement on the critical value of the energy.

  8. Increasing influenza vaccination in New York City taxi drivers: A community driven approach.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Mujawar, Imran

    2015-05-21

    The Healthy People 2020 influenza immunization goal is 80% for non-institutionalized adults 18-64. However, vaccination rates remain stubbornly low. Culturally tailored approaches to communities with poor vaccine uptake are necessary. Taxi drivers are at risk for influenza and its complications, could serve as vectors for influenza infection, and could be an effective vaccination target to enhance herd immunity of the urban population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study related to influenza vaccination among taxi drivers. The NYC Taxi Network surveyed a convenience sample of 53 taxi drivers to understand vaccination barriers. Only 17% had been vaccinated. Results informed a pilot tailored workplace intervention, which resulted in vaccinations for 44% of unvaccinated drivers. The study revealed that older drivers were more likely to be vaccinated than younger drivers, while the most common barrier to immunization was that drivers thought vaccination was 'not necessary'.

  9. Statistical Mechanics of a Simplified Bipartite Matching Problem: An Analytical Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Erba, Matías Germán

    2012-03-01

    We perform an analytical study of a simplified bipartite matching problem in which there exists a constant matching energy, and both heterosexual and homosexual pairings are allowed. We obtain the partition function in a closed analytical form and we calculate the corresponding thermodynamic functions of this model. We conclude that the model is favored at high temperatures, for which the probabilities of heterosexual and homosexual pairs tend to become equal. In the limits of low and high temperatures, the system is extensive, however this property is lost in the general case. There exists a relation between the matching energies for which the system becomes more stable under external (thermal) perturbations. As the difference of energies between the two possible matches increases the system becomes more ordered, while the maximum of entropy is achieved when these energies are equal. In this limit, there is a first order phase transition between two phases with constant entropy.

  10. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly. PMID:26236770

  11. Taxi Time Prediction at Charlotte Airport Using Fast-Time Simulation and Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate taxi time prediction is required for enabling efficient runway scheduling that can increase runway throughput and reduce taxi times and fuel consumptions on the airport surface. Currently NASA and American Airlines are jointly developing a decision-support tool called Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) that assists airport ramp controllers to make gate pushback decisions and improve the overall efficiency of airport surface traffic. In this presentation, we propose to use Linear Optimized Sequencing (LINOS), a discrete-event fast-time simulation tool, to predict taxi times and provide the estimates to the runway scheduler in real-time airport operations. To assess its prediction accuracy, we also introduce a data-driven analytical method using machine learning techniques. These two taxi time prediction methods are evaluated with actual taxi time data obtained from the SARDA human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation for Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) using various performance measurement metrics. Based on the taxi time prediction results, we also discuss how the prediction accuracy can be affected by the operational complexity at this airport and how we can improve the fast time simulation model before implementing it with an airport scheduling algorithm in a real-time environment.

  12. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly.

  13. Charging Guidance of Electric Taxis Based on Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Electric taxis are playing an important role in the application of electric vehicles. The actual operational data of electric taxis in Shenzhen, China, is analyzed, and, in allusion to the unbalanced time availability of the charging station equipment, the electric taxis charging guidance system is proposed basing on the charging station information and vehicle information. An electric taxis charging guidance model is established and guides the charging based on the positions of taxis and charging stations with adaptive mutation particle swarm optimization. The simulation is based on the actual data of Shenzhen charging stations, and the results show that electric taxis can be evenly distributed to the appropriate charging stations according to the charging pile numbers in charging stations after the charging guidance. The even distribution among the charging stations in the area will be achieved and the utilization of charging equipment will be improved, so the proposed charging guidance method is verified to be feasible. The improved utilization of charging equipment can save public charging infrastructure resources greatly. PMID:26236770

  14. Bipartite separability and nonlocal quantum operations on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Supriyo; Adhikari, Bibhas; Banerjee, Subhashish; Srikanth, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider the separability problem for bipartite quantum states arising from graphs. Earlier it was proved that the degree criterion is the graph-theoretic counterpart of the familiar positive partial transpose criterion for separability, although there are entangled states with positive partial transpose for which the degree criterion fails. Here we introduce the concept of partially symmetric graphs and degree symmetric graphs by using the well-known concept of partial transposition of a graph and degree criteria, respectively. Thus, we provide classes of bipartite separable states of dimension m ×n arising from partially symmetric graphs. We identify partially asymmetric graphs that lack the property of partial symmetry. We develop a combinatorial procedure to create a partially asymmetric graph from a given partially symmetric graph. We show that this combinatorial operation can act as an entanglement generator for mixed states arising from partially symmetric graphs.

  15. The Bipartite Network Study of the Library Book Lending System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan-Nan; Zhang, Ning

    Through collecting the library lending information of the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology during one year, we build the database between the books and readers, and then construct a bipartite network to describe the relationships. We respectively establish the corresponding un-weighted and weighted bipartite network through the borrowing relationship and the reading days, thereout obtain the statistical properties via the theory and methods of complex network. We find all the properties follow exponential distribution and there is a positive correlation between the relevant properties in un-weighted and weighted networks. The un-weighted properties can describe the cooperation situation and configuration, but the properties with node weight may describe the competition results. Besides, we discuss the practical significance for the double relationship and the statistical properties. Further more, we propose a library personal recommendation system for developing the library humanity design resumptively.

  16. Bipartite entanglement in continuous-variable tripartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.; Corney, J. F.

    2016-11-01

    In the field of continuous-variable tripartite entanglement, the systems utilised can be either asymmetric or symmetric. It is therefore of interest to examine the differences in the entanglement properties of these two types of system, using two examples that are known to produce tripartite entanglement. We examine one asymmetric and one fully symmetric Gaussian continuous-variable system in terms of their tripartite and bipartite entanglement properties. We first treat pure states and are able to find analytic solutions using the undepleted pump approximation for the Hamiltonian models. Our symmetric system exhibits perfect tripartite correlations, but only in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing. For more realistic squeezing parameters, the two systems exhibit both tripartite and bipartite entanglement. Secondly we treat the more experimentally reasonable situation where the interactions take place inside optical cavities and we are dealing with mixed states. In these cases, where the criteria for genuine tripartite entanglement are more stringent, we find that tripartite entanglement is still available, although over smaller bandwidths than three-mode inseparability. In general, the spectral results are consistent with the analytical solutions. We conclude that none of the outputs are completely analogous to either GHZ or W states, but there are parameter regions of the Hamiltonian dynamics where they produce T states as introduced by Adesso et al. [1,2]. In the intracavity cases, both bipartite entanglement and tripartite inseparability are always present, with genuine tripartite entanglement appearing as the pumping rate is increased. The qualitative differences in the output states for different interaction parameters indicate that continuous-variable tripartite quantum information systems offer a versatility not found in two-mode bipartite systems.

  17. Human sexual contact network as a bipartite graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergün, Güler

    2002-05-01

    A simple model to encapsulate the essential growth properties of the web of human sexual contacts is presented. In the model only heterosexual connection is considered and represented by a random growing bipartite graph where both male-female contact networks grow simultaneously. The time evolution of the model is analysed by a rate equation approach leading to confirm that male and female sexual contact distributions decay as power laws with exponents depending on influx and charisma of the sexes.

  18. Testing and analysis of dual-mode adaptive landing gear, taxi mode test system for YF-12A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dual mode adaptive landing gear system in reducing the dynamic response of an airplane during ground taxiing was studied. The dynamic taxi tests of the YF-12A research airplane are presented. A digital computer program which simulated the test conditions is discussed. The dual mode system as tested provides dynamic taxi response reductions of 25 percent at the cg and 30 to 45 percent at the cockpit.

  19. Implementation of bipartite or remote unitary gates with repeater nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Nemoto, Kae

    2016-08-01

    We propose some protocols to implement various classes of bipartite unitary operations on two remote parties with the help of repeater nodes in-between. We also present a protocol to implement a single-qubit unitary with parameters determined by a remote party with the help of up to three repeater nodes. It is assumed that the neighboring nodes are connected by noisy photonic channels, and the local gates can be performed quite accurately, while the decoherence of memories is significant. A unitary is often a part of a larger computation or communication task in a quantum network, and to reduce the amount of decoherence in other systems of the network, we focus on the goal of saving the total time for implementing a unitary including the time for entanglement preparation. We review some previously studied protocols that implement bipartite unitaries using local operations and classical communication and prior shared entanglement, and apply them to the situation with repeater nodes without prior entanglement. We find that the protocols using piecewise entanglement between neighboring nodes often require less total time compared to preparing entanglement between the two end nodes first and then performing the previously known protocols. For a generic bipartite unitary, as the number of repeater nodes increases, the total time could approach the time cost for direct signal transfer from one end node to the other. We also prove some lower bounds of the total time when there are a small number of repeater nodes. The application to position-based cryptography is discussed.

  20. Toward edge minability for role mining in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lijun; Wang, Yi; Liu, Ran; Pi, Benjie; Wu, Liuyi

    2016-11-01

    Bipartite network models have been extensively used in information security to automatically generate role-based access control (RBAC) from dataset. This process is called role mining. However, not all the topologies of bipartite networks are suitable for role mining; some edges may even reduce the quality of role mining. This causes unnecessary time consumption as role mining is NP-hard. Therefore, to promote the quality of role mining results, the capability that an edge composes roles with other edges, called the minability of edge, needs to be identified. We tackle the problem from an angle of edge importance in complex networks; that is an edge easily covered by roles is considered to be more important. Based on this idea, the k-shell decomposition of complex networks is extended to reveal the different minability of edges. By this way, a bipartite network can be quickly purified by excluding the low-minability edges from role mining, and thus the quality of role mining can be effectively improved. Extensive experiments via the real-world datasets are conducted to confirm the above claims.

  1. Disentangling bipartite and core-periphery structure in financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of systems are represented as networks whose architecture conveys significant information and determines many of their properties. Examples of network architecture include modular, bipartite, and core-periphery structures. However inferring the network structure is a non trivial task and can depend sometimes on the chosen null model. Here we propose a method for classifying network structures and ranking its nodes in a statistically well-grounded fashion. The method is based on the use of Belief Propagation for learning through Entropy Maximization on both the Stochastic Block Model (SBM) and the degree-corrected Stochastic Block Model (dcSBM). As a specific application we show how the combined use of the two ensembles -SBM and dcSBM- allows to disentangle the bipartite and the core-periphery structure in the case of the e-MID interbank network. Specifically we find that, taking into account the degree, this interbank network is better described by a bipartite structure, while using the SBM the core-periphery structure emerges only when data are aggregated for more than a week.

  2. Autonomous taxis could greatly reduce greenhouse-gas emissions of US light-duty vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Saxena, Samveg

    2015-09-01

    Autonomous vehicles (AVs) are conveyances to move passengers or freight without human intervention. AVs are potentially disruptive both technologically and socially, with claimed benefits including increased safety, road utilization, driver productivity and energy savings. Here we estimate 2014 and 2030 greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions and costs of autonomous taxis (ATs), a class of fully autonomous shared AVs likely to gain rapid early market share, through three synergistic effects: (1) future decreases in electricity GHG emissions intensity, (2) smaller vehicle sizes resulting from trip-specific AT deployment, and (3) higher annual vehicle-miles travelled (VMT), increasing high-efficiency (especially battery-electric) vehicle cost-effectiveness. Combined, these factors could result in decreased US per-mile GHG emissions in 2030 per AT deployed of 87-94% below current conventionally driven vehicles (CDVs), and 63-82% below projected 2030 hybrid vehicles, without including other energy-saving benefits of AVs. With these substantial GHG savings, ATs could enable GHG reductions even if total VMT, average speed and vehicle size increased substantially. Oil consumption would also be reduced by nearly 100%.

  3. Nonconstant Positive Steady States and Pattern Formation of 1D Prey-Taxis Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Song, Yang; Shao, Lingjie

    2016-08-01

    Prey-taxis is the process that predators move preferentially toward patches with highest density of prey. It is well known to have an important role in biological control and the maintenance of biodiversity. To model the coexistence and spatial distributions of predator and prey species, this paper concerns nonconstant positive steady states of a wide class of prey-taxis systems with general functional responses over 1D domain. Linearized stability of the positive equilibrium is analyzed to show that prey-taxis destabilizes prey-predator homogeneity when prey repulsion (e.g., due to volume-filling effect in predator species or group defense in prey species) is present, and prey-taxis stabilizes the homogeneity otherwise. Then, we investigate the existence and stability of nonconstant positive steady states to the system through rigorous bifurcation analysis. Moreover, we provide detailed and thorough calculations to determine properties such as pitchfork and turning direction of the local branches. Our stability results also provide a stable wave mode selection mechanism for thee reaction-advection-diffusion systems including prey-taxis models considered in this paper. Finally, we provide numerical studies of prey-taxis systems with Holling-Tanner kinetics to illustrate and support our theoretical findings. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that the 2× 2 prey-taxis system is able to model the formation and evolution of various striking patterns, such as spikes, periodic oscillations, and coarsening even when the domain is one-dimensional. These dynamics can model the coexistence and spatial distributions of interacting prey and predator species. We also give some insights on how system parameters influence pattern formation in these models.

  4. Collective Human Mobility Pattern from Taxi Trips in Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chengbin; Jin, Xiaogang; Wong, Ka-Chun; Shi, Meixia; Liò, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the passengers' traffic pattern for 1.58 million taxi trips of Shanghai, China. By employing the non-negative matrix factorization and optimization methods, we find that, people travel on workdays mainly for three purposes: commuting between home and workplace, traveling from workplace to workplace, and others such as leisure activities. Therefore, traffic flow in one area or between any pair of locations can be approximated by a linear combination of three basis flows, corresponding to the three purposes respectively. We name the coefficients in the linear combination as traffic powers, each of which indicates the strength of each basis flow. The traffic powers on different days are typically different even for the same location, due to the uncertainty of the human motion. Therefore, we provide a probability distribution function for the relative deviation of the traffic power. This distribution function is in terms of a series of functions for normalized binomial distributions. It can be well explained by statistical theories and is verified by empirical data. These findings are applicable in predicting the road traffic, tracing the traffic pattern and diagnosing the traffic related abnormal events. These results can also be used to infer land uses of urban area quite parsimoniously. PMID:22529917

  5. Study the epidemiological profile of taxi drivers in the background of occupational environment, stress and personality characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Mukesh Suresh; Srivastav, Manissha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Work hazards have been a major cause of concern in driving industry especially in taxi drivers. This study integrates the various factors that influence physical and emotional well-being of taxi drivers into the theoretical model that shows that the work environment, stress and personality characteristics directly influence taxi drivers’ health. Objective: The aim of the following study is to study the relative and combined influence of work environment, personality characteristics and stress on the health of taxi drivers. Meterials and Methods: The present study is cross-sectional (descriptive) study taxi drivers in Mumbai. They are selected using multistage random sampling method. Calculated sample size is 508. Data produced after the survey is analyzed using IBM SPSS 16.0 software. Results: Nearly 65% of taxi drivers belonged to middle-age group of 21-40 years of age. Majority (59%) of taxi drivers belonged to the lower upper socio-economic class. 70% of taxi drivers worked for more than 8 h daily. 63% gave the history of one or more addictions. 52% taxi drivers had type B1 personality, only 6% had stress prone and aggressive type A1 personality. Traffic congestion (67.1%) was reported as the leading stressor followed by narrow bottle neck roads (43%), too many speed breakers (41%), rude gestures and behavior by other drivers (42%) and bad weather (36%). Nearly 86% taxi drivers had one or more symptoms of morbidities. Gastrointestinal symptoms predominated followed by musculoskeletal symptoms and depression. Conclusion: Socio-demographic attributes, work environment, stress and personality significantly influence physical and psychological morbidities in taxi drivers. PMID:24872669

  6. Hematocrit levels as cardiovascular risk among taxi drivers in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    ISHIMARU, Tomohiro; ARPHORN, Sara; JIRAPONGSUWAN, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In Thailand, taxi drivers employed in the informal sector often experience hazardous working conditions. Previous studies revealed that elevated Hematocrit (HCT) is a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study assessed factors associated with HCT in taxi drivers to predict their occupational CVD risk factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 298 male taxi drivers who joined a health check-up campaign in Bangkok, Thailand. HCT and body mass index were retrieved from participant health check-up files. Self-administered questionnaires assessed demographics, driving mileage, working hours, and lifestyle. Statistical associations were analyzed using stepwise linear regression. Our results showed that obesity (p=0.007), daily alcohol drinking (p=0.003), and current or past smoking (p=0.016) were associated with higher HCT levels. While working hours were not directly associated with HCT levels in the current study, the effect on overworking is statistically arguable because most participants worked substantially longer hours. Our findings suggest that taxi drivers’ CVD risk may be increased by their unhealthy work styles. Initiatives to improve general working conditions for taxi drivers should take into account health promotion and CVD prevention. The policy of providing periodic health check-ups is important to make workers in the informal sector aware of their health status. PMID:27151439

  7. Multipartite-to-bipartite entanglement transformations and polynomial identity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Chitambar, Eric; Duan Runyao; Shi Yaoyun

    2010-05-15

    We consider the problem of deciding if some multiparty entangled pure state can be converted, with a nonzero success probability, into a given bipartite pure state shared between two specified parties through local quantum operations and classical communication. We show that this question is equivalent to the well-known computational problem of deciding if a multivariate polynomial is identically zero. Efficient randomized algorithms developed to study the latter can thus be applied to our question. As a result, a given transformation is possible if and only if it is generically attainable by a simple randomized protocol.

  8. Discord as a quantum resource for bi-partite communication

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Assad, Syed M.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy; Gu, Mile; Modi, Kavan; Vedral, Vlatko; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2014-12-04

    Coherent interactions that generate negligible entanglement can still exhibit unique quantum behaviour. This observation has motivated a search beyond entanglement for a complete description of all quantum correlations. Quantum discord is a promising candidate. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that under certain measurement constraints, discord between bipartite systems can be consumed to encode information that can only be accessed by coherent quantum interactions. The inability to access this information by any other means allows us to use discord to directly quantify this ‘quantum advantage’.

  9. Bipartite opinion forming: Towards consensus over coopetition networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bo; Chen, Yao; Liu, Guangbin; Sun, Fuchun; Li, Hongbo

    2015-12-01

    Within the framework of signed graph and multi-agent systems, this paper investigates the distributed bipartite opinion forming problem over coopetition networks. Several sufficient algebraic and geometric topology conditions that guarantee consensus, regardless of the magnitudes of individual coupling strengths among the agents, have been derived by exploring the interaction direction patterns. All the criteria presented do not require the global knowledge of the coupling weights of the entire network, and thus are easier to check. The effectiveness of the theoretical results are illustrated by numerical examples.

  10. Entanglement-fluctuation relation for bipartite pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaruel, Aura Mae B.; Paraan, Francis N. C.

    2016-08-01

    We identify subsystem fluctuations (variances) that measure entanglement in an arbitrary bipartite pure state. These fluctuations are of observables that generalize the notion of polarization to an arbitrary N -level subsystem. We express this polarization fluctuation in terms of subsystem purity and other entanglement measures. The derived entanglement-fluctuation relation is evaluated for the ground states of a one-dimensional free-fermion gas and the Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki spin chain. Our results provide a framework for experimentally measuring entanglement using Stern-Gerlach-type state selectors.

  11. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control 1: Automatic rollout, turnoff, and taxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1981-01-01

    A study developed for the TCV B-737, designed to apply existing navigation aids plus magnetic leader cable signals and develop breaking and reverse thrust guidance laws to provide for rapid automated rollout, turnoff, and taxi to reduce runway occupation time for a wide variety of landing conditions for conventional commercial-type aircraft, is described. Closed loop guidance laws for braking and reverse thrust are derived for rollout, turnoff, and taxi, as functions of the landing speed, the desired taxi speed and the distance to go. Brake limitations for wet runway conditions and reverse thrust limitations are taken into account to provide decision rules to avoid tire skid and to choose an alternate turnoff point, farther down the runway, to accommodate extreme landing conditions.

  12. Step On It! Workplace Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of New York City Yellow Taxi Drivers.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Bari, Sehrish; Gill, Pavan; Ramirez, Julia; Ayash, Claudia; Loeb, Rebecca; Aragones, Abraham; Leng, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Multiple factors associated with taxi driving can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in taxi drivers. This paper describes the results of Step On It!, which assessed CVD risk factors among New York City taxi drivers at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Drivers completed an intake questionnaire and free screenings for blood pressure, glucose and body mass index (BMI). 466 drivers participated. 9 % had random plasma glucose values >200 mg/dl. 77 % had elevated BMIs. Immigrants who lived in the US for >10 years had 2.5 times the odds (CI 1.1-5.9) of having high blood pressure compared to newer immigrants. Abnormalities documented in this study were significant, especially for immigrants with greater duration of residence in the US, and underscore the potential for elevated CVD risk in this vulnerable population, and the need to address this risk through frameworks that utilize multiple levels of intervention. PMID:25680879

  13. [Use of personal protective equipment for motorcycle taxi drivers: perception of risks and associated factors].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jules Ramon Brito; Santos, Ninalva de Andrade; Sales, Zenilda Nogueira; Moreira, Ramon Missias; Boery, Rita Narriman Silva de Oliveira; Boery, Eduardo Nagib; Santos, Ramon Araújo dos; Mota, Tilson Nunes

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the practices and perceptions of motorcycle taxi drivers concerning the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), based on field research and an exploratory and descriptive qualitative approach. Thirty motorcycle taxi drivers from Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil, were interviewed. Data collection used a semi-structured interview and questionnaire. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The results showed: Category 1 - risk perception, subcategory conditioning/determinant factors for the use of PPE; Category 2 - adherence, subcategory adherence to the use of personal protective equipment; Category 3 - PPE as a protective factor against traffic accidents, subcategories 1 - work-related accidents, 2 - use of PPE at the time of the accident, 3 - non-use of PPE at the time of the accident. Finally, motorcycle taxi drivers clearly have some knowledge of personal protective equipment and even acknowledge the importance of its use, despite not always using it properly. PMID:24896065

  14. X-Wing RSRA - 80 Knot Taxi Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Rotor Systems Research Aircraft/X-Wing, a vehicle that was used to demonstrate an advanced rotor/fixed wing concept called X-Wing, is shown here during high-speed taxi tests at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, on 4 November 1987. During these tests, the vehicle made three taxi tests at speeds of up to 138 knots. On the third run, the RSRA/X-Wing lifted off the runway to a 25-foot height for about 16 seconds. This liftoff maneuver was pre-planned as an aid to evaluations for first flight. At the controls were NASA pilot G. Warren Hall and Sikorsky pilot W. Faull. The unusual aircraft that resulted from the Ames Research Center/Army X-Wing Project was flown at the Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, beginning in the spring of 1984, with a follow-on program beginning in 1986. The program, was conceived to provide an efficient combination of the vertical lift characteristic of conventional helicopters and the high cruise speed of fixed-wing aircraft. It consisted of a hybrid vehicle called the NASA/Army Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA), which was equipped with advanced X-wing rotor systems. The program began in the early 1970s to investigate ways to increase the speed of rotor aircraft, as well as their performance, reliability, and safety . It also sought to reduce the noise, vibration, and maintenance costs of helicopters. Sikorsky Aircraft Division of United Technologies Laboratories built two RSRA aircraft. NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, did some initial testing and transferred the program to Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California, for an extensive flight research program conducted by Ames and the Army. The purpose of the 1984 tests was to demonstrate the fixed-wing capability of the helicopter/airplane hybrid research vehicle and explore its flight envelope and flying qualities. These

  15. Aeroassisted manned transfer vehicle (TAXI) for advanced Mars Transportation: NASA/USRA 1987 Senior Design Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design study of an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle is discussed. Nicknamed TAXI, it will ferry personnel and cargo: (1) between low Earth orbit and a spacecraft circling around the Sun in permanent orbit intersecting gravitational fields of Earth and Mars, and (2) between the cycling spacecraft and a Mars orbiting station, co-orbiting with Phobos. Crew safety and mission flexibility (in terms of ability to provide a wide range of delta-V) were given high priority. Three versions were considered, using the same overall configuration based on a low L/D aerobrake with the geometry of a raked off elliptical cone with ellipsoidal nose and a toroidal skirt. The propulsion system consists of three gimballed LOX/LH2 engines firing away from the aerobrake. The versions differ mainly in the size of the aeroshields and propellant tanks. TAXI A version resulted from an initial effort to design a single transfer vehicle able to meet all delta-V requirements during the 15-year period (2025 to 2040) of Mars mission operations. TAXI B is designed to function with the cycling spacecraft moving in a simplified, nominal trajectory. On Mars missions, TAXI B would be able to meet the requirements of all the missions with a relative approach velocity near Mars of less than 9.3 km/sec. Finally, TAXI C is a revision of TAXI A, a transfer vehicle designed for missions with a relative velocity near Mars larger than 9.3 km/sec. All versions carry a crew of 9 (11 with modifications) and a cargo of 10000 lbm. Trip duration varies from 1 day for transfer from LEO to the cycling ship to nearly 5 days for transfer from the ship to the Phobos orbit.

  16. Excision of Painful Bipartite Patella: Good Long-term Outcome in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Mickael; Pihlajamäki, Harri K.

    2008-01-01

    Excision of the accessory bipartite fragment is widely used, but its long-term outcome is not known. We evaluated the outcome after surgical excision of a symptomatic accessory bipartite or multipartite patella fragment in young adult men performing their compulsory military service and determined the incidence of painful bipartite patellae in this group of skeletally mature adults. We followed 25 of 32 patients for a minimum of 10 years (mean, 15 years; range, 10–22 years). The incidence of painful, surgically treated bipartite patella was 9.2 per 100,000 recruits. Patients’ median age at surgery was 20 years. There were 19 superolateral and six lateral bipartite fragments. Other radiographic findings were rare. At followup, the Kujala score mean was 95 points (range, 75–100 points), and osteoarthrotic changes (Kellgren-Lawrence Grade 1) were seen in two knees. No reoperations related to bipartite patella occurred during the followup. Symptomatic bipartite patella is rare and does not seem primarily associated with anatomic deviations, but when incapacitating pain persists despite nonoperative treatment, surgical excision seems to yield reasonable functional outcome and quick recovery with no apparent adverse sequelae. Our data suggest there is no reason to avoid this technically undemanding procedure for treating persistent symptoms of bipartite patella in young adults. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18607662

  17. Mutually Unbiased Maximally Entangled Bases for the Bipartite System Cd⊗ C^{dk}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Tian-Jiao; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The construction of maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ Cd is discussed firstly, and some mutually unbiased bases with maximally entangled bases are given, where 2≤ d≤5. Moreover, we study a systematic way of constructing mutually unbiased maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ C^{dk}.

  18. Multithreaded Algorithms for Maximum Matching in Bipartite Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Md Ariful; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Rajamanickam, Siva; Boman, Erik G.; Khan, Arif; Pothen, Alex

    2012-05-31

    Abstract—We design, implement, and evaluate algorithms for computing a matching of maximum cardinality in a bipartite graph on multi-core and massively multithreaded computers. As computers with larger number of slower cores dominate the commodity processor market, the design of multithreaded algorithms to solve large matching problems becomes a necessity. Recent work on serial algorithms based on searching for augmenting paths for this problem have shown that their performance is sensitive to the order in which the vertices are processed for matching. In a multithreaded environment, imposing a serial order in which vertices are considered for matching would lead to loss of concurrency and performance. But this raises the question: Would parallel matching algorithms on multithreaded machines improve performance over a serial algorithm? We answer this question in the affirmative. We report efficient multithreaded implementations of two key algorithms (Hopcroft- Karp based on breadth-first-search, and Pothen-Fan based on depth-first-search) and their variants, combined with the Karp- Sipser initialization algorithm. We report extensive results and insights using three shared-memory platforms (a 48-core AMD Opteron, a 32-core Intel Nehalem, and a 128-processor Cray XMT) on a representative set of real-world and synthetic graphs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first extensive study of augmentation-based parallel algorithms for bipartite cardinality matching.

  19. Valence bond distribution and correlation in bipartite Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, David; Alet, Fabien; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    Every singlet state of a quantum spin-1/2 system can be decomposed into a linear combination of valence bond basis states. The range of valence bonds within this linear combination as well as the correlations between them can reveal the nature of the singlet state and are key ingredients in variational calculations. In this work, we study the bipartite valence bond distributions and their correlations within the ground state of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on bipartite lattices. In terms of field theory, this problem can be mapped to correlation functions near a boundary. In dimension d ≥2, a nonlinear σ model analysis reveals that at long distances the probability distribution P (r) of valence bond lengths decays as |r|-d-1 and that valence bonds are uncorrelated. By a bosonization analysis, we also obtain P(r )∝|r|-d-1 in d =1 despite the different mechanism. On the other hand, we find that correlations between valence bonds are important even at large distances in d =1, in stark contrast to d ≥2. The analytical results are confirmed by high-precision quantum Monte Carlo simulations in d =1, 2, and 3. We develop a single-projection loop variant of the valence bond projection algorithm, which is well designed to compute valence bond probabilities and for which we provide algorithmic details.

  20. Functional analysis of bipartite begomovirus coat protein promoter sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Lacatus, Gabriela; Sunter, Garry

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate that the AL2 gene of Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) activates the CP promoter in mesophyll and acts to derepress the promoter in vascular tissue, similar to that observed for Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Binding studies indicate that sequences mediating repression and activation of the TGMV and CaLCuV CP promoter specifically bind different nuclear factors common to Nicotiana benthamiana, spinach and tomato. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TGMV AL2 can interact with both sequences independently. Binding of nuclear protein(s) from different crop species to viral sequences conserved in both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses, including TGMV, CaLCuV, Pepper golden mosaic virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus suggests that bipartite begomoviruses bind common host factors to regulate the CP promoter. This is consistent with a model in which AL2 interacts with different components of the cellular transcription machinery that bind viral sequences important for repression and activation of begomovirus CP promoters.

  1. 14 CFR 298.21 - Filing for registration by air taxi operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... specified in paragraph (d) of this section the following: (1) Air Taxi Registration (OST Form 4507... following information: 6 OST Form 4507 can be obtained from the Manager, Program Management Branch, Federal... agreement, it subscribes to the terms of Agreement 18900 (see OST Form 4523). (2) A certificate of...

  2. [Association between psychosocial aspects of work and quality of life among motorcycle taxi drivers].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jules Ramon Brito; Boery, Eduardo Nagib; Casotti, Cezar Augusto; Araújo, Tânia Maria de; Pereira, Rafael; Ribeiro, Ícaro José Santos; Rios, Marcela Andrade; Amorim, Camila Rego; Moreira, Ramon Missias; Boery, Rita Narriman Silva de Oliveira; Sales, Zenilda Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quality of life of motorcycle taxi drivers and the association with psychosocial characteristics of their work. This was a cross-sectional epidemiological study with a sample of 400 motorcycle taxi drivers in Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil. The study used a form containing demographic and socioeconomic data, WHO Quality of Life-Bref Questionnaire (WHOQOL-Bref), and the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Motorcycle taxi drivers with greater decision-making control over their work showed better self-rated quality of life in the psychological domain; those with high psychological demands presented better self-rated quality of life in the social relations and environmental domains; those with high strain and active work showed better self-rated quality of life in the social and environmental domains. The psychosocial work environment and especially decision-making autonomy were thus important determinants of self-rated quality of life in this group of motorcycle taxi drivers. PMID:25715295

  3. A comparative analysis of intra-city human mobility by taxi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjun; Pan, Lin; Yuan, Ning; Zhang, Sen; Liu, Dong

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of human movement behaviors would provide helpful insights into the mechanisms of many socioeconomic phenomena. In this paper, we investigate human mobility patterns through analyzing taxi-trace datasets collected from five metropolitan cities in two countries. We focus on three statistics for each dataset: the displacement of each occupied trip, the duration of each occupied trip, and the time interval between successive occupied trips by the same taxi (interevent time). The results indicate that the displacement distributions of human travel by taxi tend to follow exponential laws in two displacement ranges rather than power laws; the trip duration distributions can be approximated by log-normal distributions; the interevent time distributions can be well characterized by log-normal bodies followed by power law tails. For each considered measure, the rescaled distributions of all cities collapsed into a master curve. These results provide empirical evidence supporting the common regularity of intra-city human mobility. Moreover, we show that airport locations could play a role in explaining the spikes of displacement distributions of taxi trips in certain cities.

  4. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 330 - Forms for Air Taxi Operators

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Forms for Air Taxi Operators C Appendix C to Part 330 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR COMPENSATION OF AIR CARRIERS Pt. 330, App. C Appendix C...

  5. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Richard A; Soyer, Orkun S

    2008-05-23

    Bacteria are able to sense and respond to a variety of external stimuli, with responses that vary from stimuli to stimuli and from species to species. The best-understood is chemotaxis in the model organism Escherichia coli, where the dynamics and the structure of the underlying pathway are well characterised. It is not clear, however, how well this detailed knowledge applies to mechanisms mediating responses to other stimuli or to pathways in other species. Furthermore, there is increasing experimental evidence that bacteria integrate responses from different stimuli to generate a coherent taxis response. We currently lack a full understanding of the different pathway structures and dynamics and how this integration is achieved. In order to explore different pathway structures and dynamics that can underlie taxis responses in bacteria, we perform a computational simulation of the evolution of taxis. This approach starts with a population of virtual bacteria that move in a virtual environment based on the dynamics of the simple biochemical pathways they harbour. As mutations lead to changes in pathway structure and dynamics, bacteria better able to localise with favourable conditions gain a selective advantage. We find that a certain dynamics evolves consistently under different model assumptions and environments. These dynamics, which we call non-adaptive dynamics, directly couple tumbling probability of the cell to increasing stimuli. Dynamics that are adaptive under a wide range of conditions, as seen in the chemotaxis pathway of E. coli, do not evolve in these evolutionary simulations. However, we find that stimulus scarcity and fluctuations during evolution results in complex pathway dynamics that result both in adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics depending on basal stimuli levels. Further analyses of evolved pathway structures show that effective taxis dynamics can be mediated with as few as two components. The non-adaptive dynamics mediating taxis responses

  6. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  7. Locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Yang, Ying-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2016-08-01

    As we know, unextendible product basis (UPB) is an incomplete basis whose members cannot be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication. However, very little is known about those incomplete and locally indistinguishable product bases that are not UPBs. In this paper, we first construct a series of orthogonal product bases that are completable but not locally distinguishable in a general m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3) quantum system. In particular, we give so far the smallest number of locally indistinguishable states of a completable orthogonal product basis in arbitrary quantum systems. Furthermore, we construct a series of small and locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3). All the results lead to a better understanding of the structures of locally indistinguishable product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system.

  8. Negative entanglement measure for bipartite separable mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chengjie; Han Yongjian; Zhang Yongsheng; Wu Yuchun; Zhou Xiangfa; Guo Guangcan

    2010-12-15

    We define a negative entanglement measure for separable states which shows how much entanglement one should compensate the unentangled state, at the least, to change it into an entangled state. For two-qubit systems and some special classes of states in higher-dimensional systems, the explicit formula and the lower bounds for the negative entanglement measure (NEM) have been presented, and it always vanishes for bipartite separable pure states. The negative entanglement measure can be used as a useful quantity to describe the entanglement dynamics and the quantum phase transition. In the transverse Ising model, the first derivatives of negative entanglement measure diverge on approaching the critical value of the quantum phase transition, although these two-site reduced density matrices have no entanglement at all. In the one-dimensional (1D) Bose-Hubbard model, the NEM as a function of t/U changes from zero to negative on approaching the critical point of quantum phase transition.

  9. Locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Yang, Ying-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    As we know, unextendible product basis (UPB) is an incomplete basis whose members cannot be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication. However, very little is known about those incomplete and locally indistinguishable product bases that are not UPBs. In this paper, we first construct a series of orthogonal product bases that are completable but not locally distinguishable in a general m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3) quantum system. In particular, we give so far the smallest number of locally indistinguishable states of a completable orthogonal product basis in arbitrary quantum systems. Furthermore, we construct a series of small and locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3). All the results lead to a better understanding of the structures of locally indistinguishable product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system. PMID:27503634

  10. No-signaling, perfect bipartite dichotomic correlations and local randomness

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, M. P.

    2011-03-28

    The no-signaling constraint on bi-partite correlations is reviewed. It is shown that in order to obtain non-trivial Bell-type inequalities that discern no-signaling correlations from more general ones, one must go beyond considering expectation values of products of observables only. A new set of nontrivial no-signaling inequalities is derived which have a remarkably close resemblance to the CHSH inequality, yet are fundamentally different. A set of inequalities by Roy and Singh and Avis et al., which is claimed to be useful for discerning no-signaling correlations, is shown to be trivially satisfied by any correlation whatsoever. Finally, using the set of newly derived no-signaling inequalities a result with potential cryptographic consequences is proven: if different parties use identical devices, then, once they have perfect correlations at spacelike separation between dichotomic observables, they know that because of no-signaling the local marginals cannot but be completely random.

  11. Spin-1 Dirac-Weyl fermions protected by bipartite symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zeren; Liu, Zhirong

    2015-12-07

    We propose that bipartite symmetry allows spin-1 Dirac-Weyl points, a generalization of the spin-1/2 Dirac points in graphene, to appear as topologically protected at the Fermi level. In this spirit, we provide methodology to construct spin-1 Dirac-Weyl points of this kind in a given 2D space group and get the classification of the known spin-1 systems in the literature. We also apply the workflow to predict two new systems, P3m1-9 and P31m-15, to possess spin-1 at K/K′ in the Brillouin zone of hexagonal lattice. Their stability under various strains is investigated and compared with that of T{sub 3}, an extensively studied model of ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattice with spin-1 also at K/K′.

  12. Locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Yang, Ying-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    As we know, unextendible product basis (UPB) is an incomplete basis whose members cannot be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication. However, very little is known about those incomplete and locally indistinguishable product bases that are not UPBs. In this paper, we first construct a series of orthogonal product bases that are completable but not locally distinguishable in a general m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3) quantum system. In particular, we give so far the smallest number of locally indistinguishable states of a completable orthogonal product basis in arbitrary quantum systems. Furthermore, we construct a series of small and locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3). All the results lead to a better understanding of the structures of locally indistinguishable product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system. PMID:27503634

  13. On-road emission characteristics of CNG-fueled bi-fuel taxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Cao, Xinyue; Shen, Xianbao; Zhang, Yingzhi; Wang, Xintong; He, Kebin

    2014-09-01

    To alleviate air pollution and lessen the petroleum demand from the motor vehicle sector in China, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) have been rapidly developed over the last several years. However, the understanding of the real-world emissions of NGVs is very limited. In this study, the emissions from 20 compressed-natural-gas-fueled bi-fuel taxis were measured using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) under actual driving conditions in Yichang, China. The emission characteristics of the tested vehicles were analyzed, revealing that the average CO2, CO, HC and NOx emissions from the tested compressed-natural-gas (CNG) taxis under urban driving conditions were 1.6, 4.0, 2.0 and 0.98 times those under highway road conditions, respectively. The CO, HC and NOx emissions from Euro 3 CNG vehicles were approximately 40%, 55% and 44% lower than those from Euro 2 vehicles, respectively. Compared with the values for light-duty gasoline vehicles reported in the literature, the CO2 and CO emissions from the tested CNG taxis were clearly lower; however, significant increases in the HC and NOx emissions were observed. Finally, we normalized the emissions under the actual driving cycles of the entire test route to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC)-based emissions using a VSP modes method developed by North Carolina State University. The simulated NEDC-based CO emissions from the tested CNG taxis were better than the corresponding emissions standards, whereas the simulated NEDC-based HC and NOx emissions greatly exceeded the standards. Thus, more attention should be paid to the emissions from CNG vehicles. As for the CNG-fueled bi-fuel taxis currently in use, the department of environmental protection should strengthen their inspection and supervision to reduce the emissions from these vehicles. The results of this study will be helpful in understanding and controlling emissions from CNG-fueled bi-fuel vehicles in China.

  14. Teleportation and entanglement distillation in the presence of correlation among bipartite mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Mitsuru

    2003-07-01

    The teleportation channel associated with an arbitrary bipartite state denotes the map that represents the change suffered by a teleported state when the bipartite state is used instead of the ideal maximally entangled state for teleportation. This work presents and proves an explicit expression of the teleportation channel for teleportation using Weyl's projective unitary representation of (Z/dZ){sup 2n} for integers d{>=}2, n{>=}1, which has been known for n=1. This formula allows any correlation among the n bipartite mixed states, and an application shows the existence of reliable schemes for distillation of entanglement from a sequence of mixed states with correlation.

  15. Global existence of solutions and uniform persistence of a diffusive predator-prey model with prey-taxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sainan; Shi, Junping; Wu, Boying

    2016-04-01

    This paper proves the global existence and boundedness of solutions to a general reaction-diffusion predator-prey system with prey-taxis defined on a smooth bounded domain with no-flux boundary condition. The result holds for domains in arbitrary spatial dimension and small prey-taxis sensitivity coefficient. This paper also proves the existence of a global attractor and the uniform persistence of the system under some additional conditions. Applications to models from ecology and chemotaxis are discussed.

  16. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug-target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  17. Bipartite patella causing knee pain in young adults: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Chopra, Surender; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2015-04-01

    We report on 5 patients who underwent arthroscopic excision or open reduction and internal fixation for bipartite patella. All patients presented with refractory anterior knee pain. The diagnosis of bipartite patella was made using radiography, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography. All 5 patients achieved complete resolution of symptoms after surgery, and remained pain-free after a mean followup period of 13 months. PMID:25920661

  18. Constitutive expression of the xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III delays Fusarium head blight symptoms in durum wheat transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Tundo, Silvio; Janni, Michela; Sella, Luca; Gazzetti, Katia; Tauzin, Alexandra; Giardina, Thierry; Masci, Stefania; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2013-12-01

    Cereals contain xylanase inhibitor (XI) proteins which inhibit microbial xylanases and are considered part of the defense mechanisms to counteract microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, in planta evidence for this role has not been reported yet. Therefore, we produced a number of transgenic plants constitutively overexpressing TAXI-III, a member of the TAXI type XI that is induced by pathogen infection. Results showed that TAXI-III endows the transgenic wheat with new inhibition capacities. We also showed that TAXI-III is correctly secreted into the apoplast and possesses the expected inhibition parameters against microbial xylanases. The new inhibition properties of the transgenic plants correlate with a significant delay of Fusarium head blight disease symptoms caused by Fusarium graminearum but do not significantly influence leaf spot symptoms caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana. We showed that this contrasting result can be due to the different capacity of TAXI-III to inhibit the xylanase activity of these two fungal pathogens. These results provide, for the first time, clear evidence in planta that XI are involved in plant defense against fungal pathogens and show the potential to manipulate TAXI-III accumulation to improve wheat resistance against F. graminearum.

  19. Taxi Arrival of Second SR-71 to Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of two initial U.S. Air Force SR-71A reconnaissance aircraft that was retired from operational service and loaned to NASA for high-speed research programs taxis in to the ramp on its arrival at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California in March 1990. Data from the SR-71 high speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the

  20. Path-finding through flexible hierarchical road networks: An experiential approach using taxi trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingquan; Zeng, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Li, Jonathan; Wu, Zhongheng

    2011-02-01

    Optimal paths computed by conventional path-planning algorithms are usually not "optimal" since realistic traffic information and local road network characteristics are not considered. We present a new experiential approach that computes optimal paths based on the experience of taxi drivers by mining a huge number of floating car trajectories. The approach consists of three steps. First, routes are recovered from original taxi trajectories. Second, an experiential road hierarchy is constructed using travel frequency and speed information for road segments. Third, experiential optimal paths are planned based on the experiential road hierarchy. Compared with conventional path-planning methods, the proposed method provides better experiential optimal path identification. Experiments demonstrate that the travel time is less for these experiential paths than for paths planned by conventional methods. Results obtained for a case study in the city of Wuhan, China, demonstrate that experiential optimal paths can be flexibly obtained in different time intervals, particularly during peak hours.

  1. Supporting South Asian Taxi Drivers to Exercise through Pedometers (SSTEP) to decrease cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Gill, Pavan; Baser, Raymond; Leng, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    There is considerable evidence demonstrating the positive impact of pedometers and walking programs for increasing physical activity and reducing risk for cardiovascular disease among diverse populations. However, no interventions have been targeted towards South Asian taxi drivers, a population that may be at high risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Supporting South Asian Taxi Drivers to Exercise through Pedometers (SSTEP) was a 12-week pilot study among South Asian taxi drivers to increase their daily step counts. SSTEP assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and potential impact of an exercise intervention employing pedometers, a step diary, written materials, and telephone follow-up to initiate or increase physical activity in this at-risk occupational group. Seventy-four drivers were recruited to participate at sites frequented by South Asian taxi drivers. Participant inclusion criteria were: (1) age 18 or over; (2) birthplace in India, Pakistan, or Bangladesh; (3) fluent in English, Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, or Bengali; and (4) intention to remain in New York City for the 3-month study period. Comprehensive intake and exit questionnaires were administered to participants in their preferred languages. Intake and exit health screenings, including blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose were completed. Daily step counts were obtained 4 days after recruitment, and at the 4-, 8-, and 12-week mark via phone calls. To measure the impact of the intervention, step counts, blood pressure, cholesterol, and body mass index were compared at intake and exit. Participants in SSTEP were sedentary at baseline. The SSTEP intervention resulted in a small increase in step counts among participants overall, and in a significant increase (>2,000 steps) among a subset ("Bigsteppers"). Drivers with higher baseline glucose values had significantly greater improvements in their step counts. Focused lifestyle interventions for drivers at high risk for cardiovascular disease may

  2. Evolutionary matching-pennies game on bipartite regular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Varga, Levente; Borsos, István

    2014-04-01

    Evolutionary games are studied here with two types of players located on a chessboard or on a bipartite random regular graph. Each player's income comes from matching-pennies games played with the four neighbors. The players can modify their own strategies according to a myopic strategy update resembling the Glauber dynamics for the kinetic Ising model. This dynamical rule drives the system into a stationary state where the two strategies are present with the same probability without correlations between the nearest neighbors while a weak correlation is induced between the second and the third neighbors. In stationary states, the deviation from the detailed balance is quantified by the evaluation of entropy production. Finally, our analysis is extended to evolutionary games where the uniform pair interactions are composed of an anticoordination game and a weak matching-pennies game. This system preserves the Ising type order-disorder transitions at a critical noise level decreasing with the strength of the matching-pennies component for both networks.

  3. Bipartite Graphs for Visualization Analysis of Microbiome Data

    PubMed Central

    Sedlar, Karel; Videnska, Petra; Skutkova, Helena; Rychlik, Ivan; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Visualization analysis plays an important role in metagenomics research. Proper and clear visualization can help researchers get their first insights into data and by selecting different features, also revealing and highlighting hidden relationships and drawing conclusions. To prevent the resulting presentations from becoming chaotic, visualization techniques have to properly tackle the high dimensionality of microbiome data. Although a number of different methods based on dimensionality reduction, correlations, Venn diagrams, and network representations have already been published, there is still room for further improvement, especially in the techniques that allow visual comparison of several environments or developmental stages in one environment. In this article, we represent microbiome data by bipartite graphs, where one partition stands for taxa and the other stands for samples. We demonstrated that community detection is independent of taxonomical level. Moreover, focusing on higher taxonomical levels and the appropriate merging of samples greatly helps improving graph organization and makes our presentations clearer than other graph and network visualizations. Capturing labels in the vertices also brings the possibility of clearly comparing two or more microbial communities by showing their common and unique parts. PMID:27279729

  4. Conflicting attachment and the growth of bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Yin Joey; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2016-03-01

    Simple growth mechanisms have been proposed to explain the emergence of seemingly universal network structures. The widely studied model of preferential attachment assumes that new nodes are more likely to connect to highly connected nodes. Preferential attachment explains the emergence of scale-free degree distributions within complex networks. Yet it is incompatible with many network systems, particularly bipartite systems in which two distinct types of agents interact. For example, the addition of new links in a host-parasite system corresponds to the infection of hosts by parasites. Increasing connectivity is beneficial to a parasite and detrimental to a host. Therefore, the overall network connectivity is subject to conflicting pressures. Here we propose a stochastic network growth model of conflicting attachment, inspired by a particular kind of parasite-host interaction: that of viruses interacting with microbial hosts. The mechanism of network growth includes conflicting preferences to network density as well as costs involved in modifying the network connectivity according to these preferences. We find that the resulting networks exhibit realistic patterns commonly observed in empirical data, including the emergence of nestedness, modularity, and nested-modular structures that exhibit both properties. We study the role of conflicting interests in shaping network structure and assess opportunities to incorporate greater realism in linking growth process to pattern in systems governed by antagonistic and mutualistic interactions.

  5. The many cases of XFJ: suitable to drive a taxi or "killer cabbie"?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vanessa; Nankivell, Janette

    2012-09-01

    For 10 years, the refugee now known by the pseudonym XFJ attempted to gain accreditation to drive a taxi-cab. After many internal reviews and rejections by the Victorian Taxi Directorate, XFJ appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT). The difficulty for XFJ was that shortly after arriving in Australia, he had killed his estranged wife. The Supreme Court of Victoria subsequently found him not guilty of murder on the grounds of insanity. Since XFJ's mental health has been stable for many years, much of the legal argument at VCAT and the court cases that followed centred around whether he was "suitable in other respects to provide the service" of driving a taxi, as required by s 169(1)(b)(ii) of the Transport Act 1983 (Vic). This article looks at the tension between the expert medical evidence and the concept of "suitable in other respects" which XFJ's opponents claimed included the maintenance of public confidence and the meeting of community expectations.

  6. New York City Taxi Drivers' Knowledge and Perceptions of the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Flores, Cristina; Winkel, Gary; Alam, Ishtiaq; Genoff, Margaux; Leng, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess New York City taxi drivers' knowledge and perceptions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A cross-sectional street-intercept study design was used to assess drivers' knowledge about the ACA. A 146-item questionnaire was administered from September 12 to December 6, 2013 to 175 yellow taxi and for-hire vehicle drivers. 91 % of drivers were foreign-born; 50 % were uninsured. Mean knowledge about the ACA was quite low; 78 % of the sample either knew nothing or only a little bit about the ACA. 77 % wanted more information about the ACA. Greater English proficiency, more years driving a taxi, and knowledge of having or not having a pre-existing health condition (vs. not knowing) were related to higher ACA knowledge levels. Knowledge of a pre-existing condition (whether they had one or not) compared to those who lacked such knowledge was also an important predictor of the perception of whether the ACA would have a positive impact. To facilitate enrollment, efforts should focus on occupationally-focused initiatives that educate drivers at their places of work and leisure, to raise the overall knowledge levels and enrollment of the community.

  7. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sanzo, D.; Kimura, C.Y.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1996-06-03

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  8. Teleportation of Three-Level Multi-partite Entangled State by a Partial Three-Level Bipartite Entangled State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Ming; Li, Cheng-Zu

    2008-04-01

    We present a scheme for probabilistically teleporting an unknown three-level bipartite entangled state by using a partial entangled three-level bipartite state as quantum channel. This scheme can be directly generalized to probabilistically teleport an unknown three-level k-particle entangled state by a partial three-level bipartite entangled state. All kinds of unitary transformations are given in detail. We calculate the successful total probability and the total classical communication cost required for this scheme.

  9. Framework for distinguishability of orthogonal bipartite states by one-way local operations and classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Tanmay

    2016-03-01

    In the topic of perfect local distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite quantum states, most results obtained so far pertain to bipartite systems whose subsystems are of specific dimensions. In contrast very few results for bipartite systems whose subsystems are of arbitrary dimensions, are known. This is because a rich variety of (algebraic or geometric) structure is exhibited by different sets of orthogonal states owing to which it is difficult to associate some common property underlying them all, i.e., a common property that would play a crucial role in the local distinguishability of these states. In this Rapid Communication, I propose a framework for the distinguishability by one-way local operations and classical communication (1-LOCC) of sets of orthogonal bipartite states in a dA⊗dB bipartite system, where dA,dB are the dimensions of both subsytems, labeled as A and B . I show that if the i th party (where i =A ,B ) can initiate a 1-LOCC protocol to perfectly distinguish among a set of orthogonal bipartite states, then the information of the existence of such a 1-LOCC protocol lies in a subspace of di×di Hermitian matrices, denoted by T⊥(i ), and that the method to extract this information (of the existence of this 1-LOCC protocol) from T⊥(i ) depends on the value of dim T⊥(i ) . In this way one can give sweeping results for the 1-LOCC (in)distinguishability of all sets of orthogonal bipartite states corresponding to certain values of dim T⊥(i ) . Thus I propose that the value of dim T⊥(i ) gives the common underlying property based on which sweeping results for the 1-LOCC (in)distinguishability of orthogonal bipartite quantum states can be made.

  10. Isolation and initial characterization of the bipartite contractile vacuole complex from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Nolta, K V; Steck, T L

    1994-01-21

    The contractile vacuole complex serves to excrete excess cytosolic water from protists. In the amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, the organelle had a bipartite morphology: a large main vacuole (bladder) marked by lumenal alkaline phosphatase was surrounded by numerous satellite vacuoles (spongiomes). Bladders and spongiomes have now been purified for the first time. The spongiome membranes had a high density of surface projections identified as catalytically-active vacuolar proton pumps (V-H(+)-ATPase). Spongiomes were resolved from the pump-poor bladders by immunogold buoyant density shift with antibodies to the V-H(+)-ATPase; they contained little protein other than this pump. It appears that, following homogenization, most of the spongiome dissociated from bladders and populated the proton pump-rich membrane fraction called acidosomes. Isolated bladders were enriched > 40-fold in alkaline phosphatase and phosphodiesterase, the activities of which were > 85% latent. Bladders depleted of spongiomes bore several distinctive polypeptides; they also had an excess of the basepieces of the proton pump over the catalytic heads. Bladder membranes were also lipid-rich and had a distinctive lipid composition. We conclude that the contractile vacuole system in Dictyostelium is a complex of discrete, separable bladder and spongiome membranes. The V-H(+)-ATPase in the spongiome may catalyze the primary energy transduction step for pumping water out of the cytoplasm.

  11. Babesia bovis: a bipartite signal directs the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase to the apicoplast.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Monica J; Luu, Tracy N K; Lau, Audrey O T

    2012-06-01

    Babesia bovis contains a prokaryotic derived organelle known as the apicoplast. Many participants of the metabolic pathways within the apicoplast are encoded in the nuclear genome and post-translationally imported with the help of a bipartite signal. Recently, an all encompassing algorithm was derived to predict apicoplast targeted proteins for many non-Plasmodium apicomplexans in which it reported the presence of 260 apicoplast targeted proteins in Babesia. One of these proteins is glutamyl tRNA synthetase (GltX). This study investigates if the putative bipartite signal of GltX alone is sufficient to direct proteins into the apicoplast. Using a transient transfection system consisting of a green fluorescent protein as the reporter, we tested the signal and transit portions of the bipartite signal in apicoplastic transport. We first identified the transcript of gltX to be expressed during the asexual blood stages and subsequently confirmed that the complete bipartite signal is responsible for directing the reporter protein into a compartment distinct from the nucleus and the mitochondrion. As GltX bipartite signal successfully guided the reporter protein into the apicoplast, our finding implies that it also directs native GltX into the same organelle.

  12. Emission characteristics of nonmethane hydrocarbons from private cars and taxis at different driving speeds in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Zou, S. C.; Tsai, W. Y.; Chan, L. Y.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-05-01

    Vehicular emissions are the major sources of a number of air pollutants including nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in urban area. The emission composition and emission factors of NMHCs from vehicles are currently lacking in Hong Kong. In this study, speciation and emission factors of NMHCs emitted from gasoline-fuelled private cars and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-fuelled taxis at different driving speeds were constructed using a chassis dynamometer. Large variations in the contributions of individual NMHC species to total emission were observed for different private cars at different driving speeds. The variations of individual NMHC emissions were relatively smaller for taxis due to their relatively homogeneous year of manufacture and mileages. Incomplete combustion products like ethane, ethene and propene were the major component of both types of vehicles, while unburned fuel component was also abundant in the exhausts of private cars and taxis (i.e. i-pentane and toluene for private car, and propane and butanes for taxi). Emission factors of major NMHCs emitted from private cars and taxis were estimated. High emission factors of ethane, n-butane, i/ n-pentanes, methylpentanes, trimethylpentanes, ethene, propene, i-butene, benzene, toluene and xylenes were found for private cars, whereas propane and i/ n-butanes had the highest values for taxis. By evaluating the effect of vehicular emissions on the ozone formation potential (OFP), it was found that the contributions of olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons to OFP were higher than that from paraffinic hydrocarbons for private car, whereas the contributions of propane and i/ n-butanes were the highest for taxis. The total OFP value was higher at lower speeds (≤50 km h -1) for private cars while a minimum value at driving speed of 100 km h -1 was found for taxis. At the steady driving speeds, the total contribution of NMHCs emitted from LPG-fuelled taxis to the OFP was much lower than that from gasoline

  13. Optically promoted bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid metallic carbon nanotube systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, M. F.; Bondarev, I. V.; Meliksetyan, A. V.

    2014-02-14

    We study theoretically a pair of spatially separated extrinsic atomic type species (extrinsic atoms, ions, molecules, or semiconductor quantum dots) near a metallic carbon nanotube, that are coupled both directly via the inter-atomic dipole-dipole interactions and indirectly by means of the virtual exchange by resonance plasmon excitations on the nanotube surface. We analyze how the optical preparation of the system by using strong laser pulses affects the formation and evolution of the bipartite atomic entanglement. Despite a large number of possible excitation regimes and evolution pathways, we find a few generic scenarios for the bipartite entanglement evolution and formulate practical recommendations on how to optimize and control the robust bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid carbon nanotube systems.

  14. Geometric phase and quantum correlations for a bipartite two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Villar, Paula I.

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the geometric phase of a bipartite two-level system coupled to an external environment. We compute the correction to the unitary geometric phase through a kinematic approach. To this end, we analyse the reduced density matrix of the bipartite system after tracing over the environmental degrees of freedom, for arbitrary initial states of the composite system. In all cases considered, the correction to the unitary phase has a similar structure as a function of the degree of the entanglement of the initial state. In the case of a maximally entangled state (MES), the survival phase is only the topological phase, and there is no correction induced by the environments. Further, we compute the quantum discord and concurrence of the bipartite state and analyse possible relations among these quantities and the geometric phase acquired during the non-unitary system's evolution.

  15. Complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus infecting fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) plants in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Leke, Walter N; Khatabi, Behnam; Fondong, Vincent N; Brown, Judith K

    2016-08-01

    The complete genome sequence was determined and characterized for a previously unreported bipartite begomovirus from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis, family Cucurbitaceae) plants displaying mosaic symptoms in Cameroon. The DNA-A and DNA-B components were ~2.7 kb and ~2.6 kb in size, and the arrangement of viral coding regions on the genomic components was like those characteristic of other known bipartite begomoviruses originating in the Old World. While the DNA-A component was more closely related to that of chayote yellow mosaic virus (ChaYMV), at 78 %, the DNA-B component was more closely related to that of soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV), at 64 %. This newly discovered bipartite Old World virus is herein named telfairia mosaic virus (TelMV). PMID:27262944

  16. BIPARTITE PATELLA IN 35-YEAR-OLD FITNESS INSTRUCTOR: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Zabierek, Jakub; Kwapisz, Adam; Domzalski, Marcin E

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The patella plays an important role in knee biomechanics and provides anterior coverage of the knee joint. One to two percent of the population has an anatomical variant of patella called a bipartite patella that usually does not case pain. However, occasionally after injury or overuse during sport it can be a source of anterior knee pain. The purpose of this case report was to present a rare variant of bipartite patella and highlight conservative treatment of this condition. Study Design Case Report Case Description A 35-year-old female patient presented with persistent bilateral non-traumatic anterior knee pain of a six-year duration that was enhanced by strenuous kinds of sport activity. Standard radiographs and MRI revealed the presence of bipartite patella with medial pole cartilage edema bilaterally. Conservative care including physical therapy, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), and viscosupplementation was utilized. Outcome After treatment VAS decreased to 0/10 from 5/10 in the left knee and 1/10 from 5/10 in the right knee. The Kujala Scores improved after treatment to 100 and 95 for the left and right knees respectively. The subject returned to full sport activity and work as a fitness instructor without pain and limitations. Discussion This case describes a rare finding of bilateral medial bipartite patella and the successful use of physical therapy with viscosupplementation in patellar pain caused by bipartite patella. It also supports the use of Extra Corporeal Shock Wave Therapy in bipartite patella pain as a supplement for therapy. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:27757290

  17. Entanglement degree measure and a criterion for sudden death as a phase transition in bipartite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ponte, M.A. de; Mizrahi, S.S.; Moussa, M.H.Y.

    2009-11-15

    We propose a method to compute the entanglement degree E of bipartite systems having dimension 2 x 2 and demonstrate that the partial transposition of density matrix, the Peres criterion, arise as a consequence of our method. Differently from other existing measures of entanglement, the one presented here makes possible the derivation of a criterion to verify if an arbitrary bipartite entanglement will suffers sudden death (SD) based only on the initial-state parameters. Our method also makes possible to characterize the SD as a dynamical quantum phase transition, with order parameter E, having a universal critical exponent -1/2.

  18. Identification of a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the silkworm Masc protein.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yudai; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Ueda, Masamichi; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Shimada, Toru; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    The silkworm Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH-tandem zinc finger protein that controls both masculinization and dosage compensation. Masc protein is a nuclear protein, but the mechanism underlying the transport of this protein into the nucleus has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identified a functional bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located between residues 274 and 290 of the Masc protein. Sequence comparison revealed that this bipartite NLS is evolutionarily conserved in Masc proteins from other lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, we showed that the degree of nuclear localization is not associated with the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. PMID:27277067

  19. Efficient implementation of bipartite nonlocal unitary gates using prior entanglement and classical communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Li; Griffiths, Robert B.; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-06-15

    Any bipartite nonlocal unitary operation can be carried out by teleporting a quantum state from one party to the other, performing the unitary gate locally, and teleporting a state back again. This paper investigates unitaries which can be carried out using less prior entanglement and classical communication than are needed for teleportation. Large families of such unitaries are constructed using (projective) representations of finite groups. Among the tools employed are: a diagrammatic approach for representing entangled states, a theorem on the necessary absence of information at certain times and locations, and a representation of bipartite unitaries based on a group Fourier transform.

  20. Bipartite quantum channels using multipartite cluster-type entangled coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Munhoz, P. P.; Semiao, F. L.; Roversi, J. A.; Vidiella-Barranco, A.

    2010-04-15

    We propose a particular encoding for bipartite entangled states derived from multipartite cluster-type entangled coherent states (CTECSs). We investigate the effects of amplitude damping on the entanglement content of this bipartite state, as well as its usefulness as a quantum channel for teleportation. We find interesting relationships among the amplitude of the coherent states constituting the CTECSs, the number of subsystems forming the logical qubits (redundancy), and the extent to which amplitude damping affects the entanglement of the channel. For instance, in the sense of sudden death of entanglement, given a fixed value of the initial coherent state amplitude, the entanglement life span is shortened if redundancy is increased.

  1. Coupling-induced bipartite pointer states in arrays of electron billiards: quantum Darwinism in action?

    PubMed

    Brunner, R; Akis, R; Ferry, D K; Kuchar, F; Meisels, R

    2008-07-11

    We discuss a quantum system coupled to the environment, composed of an open array of billiards (dots) in series. Beside pointer states occurring in individual dots, we observe sets of robust states which arise only in the array. We define these new states as bipartite pointer states, since they cannot be described in terms of simple linear combinations of robust single-dot states. The classical existence of bipartite pointer states is confirmed by comparing the quantum-mechanical and classical results. The ability of the robust states to create "offspring" indicates that quantum Darwinism is in action.

  2. Coupling-Induced Bipartite Pointer States in Arrays of Electron Billiards: Quantum Darwinism in Action?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, R.; Akis, R.; Ferry, D. K.; Kuchar, F.; Meisels, R.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss a quantum system coupled to the environment, composed of an open array of billiards (dots) in series. Beside pointer states occurring in individual dots, we observe sets of robust states which arise only in the array. We define these new states as bipartite pointer states, since they cannot be described in terms of simple linear combinations of robust single-dot states. The classical existence of bipartite pointer states is confirmed by comparing the quantum-mechanical and classical results. The ability of the robust states to create “offspring” indicates that quantum Darwinism is in action.

  3. Personal exposures to airborne metals in London taxi drivers and office workers in 1995 and 1996.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, G D; Harrison, R M; Lynam, D R

    1999-09-01

    In 1995, a petroleum marketer introduced a diesel fuel additive in the UK containing Mn as MMT (methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl). A small study of personal exposures to airborne Mn in London was conducted before and after introduction of the additive to identify any major impact of the additive on exposures. In 1995, personal exposures to Mn were measured in two groups, taxi drivers and office workers (10 subjects per group) for two consecutive 7-day periods. A similar study was carried out in 1996 to determine if exposures had changed. Samples were also analyzed for Ca, Al, Mg and Pb. In 1996, exposures to aerosol mass as total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM2.5 were measured in addition to the metals. Manganese exposures in this cohort did not increase as a result of introduction of the additive. However, a significant source of Mn exposure was discovered during the conduct of these tests. The mean exposure to Mn was higher among the office workers in both years than that of the taxi drivers. This was due to the fact that approximately half of the office workers commuted via the underground railway system where airborne dust and metal concentrations are significantly elevated over those in the general environment. Similar results have been noted in other cities having underground rail systems. Exposure to Mn, Pb, Ca, and Mg were not significantly different between the 2 years. Taxi drivers had higher exposures than office workers to Mg and Pb in both years. Commuting via the underground also had a significant impact on exposures to TSP, PM2.5, Al, and Ca, but had little effect on exposures to Mg. The aerosol in the underground was particularly enriched in Mn, approximately 10-fold, when compared to the aerosol in the general environment. There are several possible sources for this Mn, including mechanical wear of the steel wheels on the steel rais, vaporization of metal from sparking of the third rail, or brake wear. PMID:10535124

  4. Study of cross-correlation in a self-affine time series of taxi accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebende, G. F.; da Silva, P. A.; Machado Filho, A.

    2011-05-01

    We study in this paper the cross-correlation between self-affine time series of real variables recorded simultaneously in cases of taxi accidents. For this purpose, we apply the DCCA method and show that the cross-correlation can be divided into three distinct groups, if we look for the detrended covariance function, i.e., long-range cross-correlations, short-range cross-correlations and no cross-correlations. Finally, it will be seen that the detrended covariance function is robust, if compared with other methods, in identifying these types of cross-correlations.

  5. Factors related to pilot survival in helicopter commuter and air taxi crashes.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M B; Li, G; Baker, S P

    1995-02-01

    We examined factors related to pilot survival in 167 consecutive helicopter commuter and air taxi crashes that occurred during 1983-88. Case fatality rates and adjusted odds ratios from multivariate logistic regression models were determined using data from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). During this 6-year period, 29 pilots-in-command died in 167 helicopter commuter and air taxi crashes, a case fatality rate of 17.4%. Factors significantly associated with increased risk of pilot fatality were aircraft fire [odds ratio (OR) 20.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.6-86.8], not using shoulder harnesses (OR 9.2, 95% CI 2.2-37.3), and aircraft with two engines (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-17.4). In addition, we present data regarding success and failure of emergency flotation devices. The results suggest that the likelihood of pilot survival in helicopter crashes could be greatly improved by preventing crash associated fires and promoting the usage of shoulder restraints.

  6. The Effects of Very Light Jet Air Taxi Operations on Commercial Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the potential effects of Very Light Jet (VLJ) air taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The affordable cost relative to existing business jets and ability to use many of the existing small, minimally equipped, but conveniently located airports is projected to stimulate a large demand for the aircraft. The resulting increase in air traffic operations will mainly be at smaller airports, but this study indicates that VLJs have the potential to increase further the pressure of demand at some medium and large airports, some of which are already operating at or near capacity at peak times. The additional delays to commercial passenger air transportation due to VLJ air taxi operations are obtained from simulation results using the Airspace Concepts Evaluation System (ACES) simulator. The direct increase in operating cost due to additional delays is estimated. VLJs will also cause an increase in traffic density, and this study shows increased potential for conflicts due to VLJ operations.

  7. Injuries and absenteeism among motorcycle taxi drivers who are victims of traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Kevan G N; Lucas-Neto, Alfredo; Gama, Bruno D; Lima-Neto, Jose C; Lucas, Rilva Suely C C; d'Ávila, Sérgio

    2014-08-01

    Facial injuries frequently occur in traffic accidents involving motorcycles. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of facial injuries among motorcycle drivers who perform motorcycle taxi service. The study design was cross-sectional. A total of 210 participants who served as motorcycle taxi drivers in a city in northeastern Brazil completed a survey concerning their experience of accidents involving facial injuries and consequent hospitalization and absenteeism from work. The motorcycle drivers included in the study were randomly selected from a list provided by the city. Out of the respondents, 165 (78.6%) who were involved in traffic accidents in the last 12 months, 15 (9.1%) reported facial injuries. The types of facial injury most frequently reported involved soft tissues (n = 8; 53.3%), followed by simple fracture (n = 4; 26.7%) and dentoalveolar fracture (n = 3; 20%). We found an association between facial injuries and absenteeism, as well as an association between the presence of facial injury and the need for hospitalization for a period of 2 days or more. Respondents reported that they had accidents, but due to the use of full face motorcycle helmet the number of facial injuries was low. For most of them, absenteeism was observed for a period of one month or more. PMID:25066167

  8. Enhancing pilot situation awareness by using an onboard taxi guidance system: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Biella, Markus; Jakobi, Joern

    2004-08-01

    This study supplements prior and concurrent field trials testing the operational benefit of an Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). A-SMGCS comprises a range of new technologies for both the flight deck and the air traffic control tower enabling more efficient and safe airport surface movement. These technologies are expected to significantly increase the throughput at presently highly congested major airports without compromising safety. A flight deck A-SMGCS module is the onboard guidance system TARMAC-AS. This module consists of a controller pilot data link (DL) communication and an electronic moving map (EMM), which also displays airport surface traffic information to the pilot crew. TARMAC-AS is evaluated in an investigation involving twenty commercial pilots who performed a series of approach, landing and taxiing simulation trials that were completed in a fixed-base cockpit simulator. Evaluation was based on subjective questionnaires, effectiveness of taxi operation, and visual scanning strategies derived from eye-point-of-gaze measurements. Results support the notion that EMM + DL improve awareness of the global airport surface situation, particularly under conditions of low visibility, enabling more efficient and timely surface movements and avoidance of conflicting traffic. A potential negative impact of increased head-down times was not substantiated.

  9. Analyses on influencing factors of airborne VOCS pollution in taxi cabins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaokai; Feng, Lili; Luo, Huilong; Cheng, Heming

    2014-11-01

    Due to the long time in vehicular cabins, people have high exposure to the airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCS), which will lead to negative effects on human health. In order to analyze the influencing factors of in-car VOCS pollution concentrations, 38 taxis were investigated on the static and closed conditions. The interior air of taxis was collected through activated Tenax adsorption tubes, and the air samples were analyzed with thermally desorbed gas chromatograph. The average concentrations of in-car benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, butyl acetate, undecane, and total VOCS (TVOC) were 82.7, 212.3, 74.7, 182.3, 24.7, 33.5, 61.3, and 1,441.7 μg/m(3), respectively. Furthermore, the VOCS and TVOC concentrations increase with the rise of in-car temperature and relative humidity, and decrease with the increase of car age and total mileage. In addition, the VOCS and TVOC concentrations are higher in vehicles with small cabins than in ones with big cabins, and change with different sampling sites and various vehicular grades. Finally, according to the multiple linear regression analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis, car age is the most important factor influencing airborne VOCS and TVOC pollution concentrations in vehicular cabins, followed by interior temperature and total mileage.

  10. Effects of prolonged autovehicle driving on male reproduction function: a study among taxi drivers.

    PubMed

    Figà-Talamanca, I; Cini, C; Varricchio, G C; Dondero, F; Gandini, L; Lenzi, A; Lombardo, F; Angelucci, L; Di Grezia, R; Patacchioli, F R

    1996-12-01

    This study had the purpose of exploring the possible association between the work exposures of professional drivers and their reproductive health, by studying a group of 201 taxi drivers in the city of Rome. Data on work and reproductive history were collected by interviews. Biological markers examined in 72 subjects included salivary testosterone levels, sperm quality (i.e., sperm concentration, sperm morphology, and motility), and fertility experience, including time to pregnancy. Their spermatologic profile was compared with that of a control group of 50 healthy subjects of similar age and smoking habits. The results showed that taxi drivers, compared to the controls, had a significantly lower prevalence of normal sperm forms (45.8% vs. 64.0%); this was particularly true for those with a longer time on this job. This result was confirmed by a multivariate analysis in which confounders such as age, smoking, and alcohol consumption were controlled. The other sperm parameters did not differ in the study and the control groups. Among the life-style factors, we found smoking to be associated with poorer sperm morphology. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a better seminologic profile, while the pattern in respect to coffee intake was inconclusive. Subjects with poor semen quality also more frequently exhibited longer time to pregnancy of their partner. The results suggest that prolonged urban automobile driving might be a risk factors for sperm quality, and particularly for sperm morphology, but the finding needs further confirmation.

  11. Construction of three-qubit genuine entanglement with bipartite positive partial transposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Kil-Chan; Kye, Seung-Hyeok

    2016-03-01

    We construct triqubit genuinely entangled states which have positive partial transposes (PPTs) with respect to the bipartition of systems. These examples disprove a conjecture [Novo, Moroder, and Gühne, Phys. Rev A 88, 012305 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.012305] which claims that PPT mixtures are necessary and sufficient for the biseparability of three qubits.

  12. An area law for the bipartite entanglement of disordered oscillator systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nachtergaele, Bruno; Sims, Robert; Stolz, Guenter

    2013-04-15

    We prove an upper bound proportional to the surface area for the bipartite entanglement of the ground state and thermal states of harmonic oscillator systems with disorder, as measured by the logarithmic negativity. Our assumptions are satisfied for some standard models that are almost surely gapless in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. N-qubit W states are determined by their bipartite marginals

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Preeti; Rana, Swapan

    2009-07-15

    We prove that the most general W class of N-qubit states are uniquely determined among arbitrary states (pure or mixed) by just their bipartite reduced density matrices. Moreover, if we consider only pure states, then (N-1) of them are shown to be sufficient.

  14. New bipartite coherent-entangled state in two-mode Fock space and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Ji-Suo; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2011-04-01

    A new bipartite coherent-entangled state (CES) is found which exhibits both coherent state and entangled state properties. The set of CESs constitute a complete and partly nonorthogonal representation. Using an asymmetric beamsplitter a experimental scheme to produce the CES is proposed. Applications of CESs in quantum optics are also presented.

  15. Decomposition of bipartite and multipartite unitary gates into the product of controlled unitary gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yu, Li

    2015-03-01

    We show that any unitary operator on the dA×dB system (dA≥2 ) can be decomposed into the product of at most 4 dA-5 controlled unitary operators. The number can be reduced to 2 dA-1 when dA is a power of two. We also prove that three controlled unitaries can implement a bipartite complex permutation operator, and discuss the connection to an analogous result on classical reversible circuits. We further show that any n -partite unitary on the space Cd1⊗⋯⊗Cdn is the product of at most [2 ∏j=1n -1(2 dj-2 ) -1 ] controlled unitary gates, each of which is controlled from n -1 systems. We also decompose any bipartite unitary into the product of a simple type of bipartite gate and some local unitaries. We derive dimension-independent upper bounds for the controlled-not gate cost or entanglement cost of bipartite permutation unitaries (with the help of ancillas of fixed size) as functions of the Schmidt rank of the unitary. It is shown that such costs under a simple protocol are related to the log-rank conjecture in communication complexity theory via the link of nonnegative rank.

  16. A simple model of bipartite cooperation for ecological and organizational networks.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2009-01-22

    In theoretical ecology, simple stochastic models that satisfy two basic conditions about the distribution of niche values and feeding ranges have proved successful in reproducing the overall structural properties of real food webs, using species richness and connectance as the only input parameters. Recently, more detailed models have incorporated higher levels of constraint in order to reproduce the actual links observed in real food webs. Here, building on previous stochastic models of consumer-resource interactions between species, we propose a highly parsimonious model that can reproduce the overall bipartite structure of cooperative partner-partner interactions, as exemplified by plant-animal mutualistic networks. Our stochastic model of bipartite cooperation uses simple specialization and interaction rules, and only requires three empirical input parameters. We test the bipartite cooperation model on ten large pollination data sets that have been compiled in the literature, and find that it successfully replicates the degree distribution, nestedness and modularity of the empirical networks. These properties are regarded as key to understanding cooperation in mutualistic networks. We also apply our model to an extensive data set of two classes of company engaged in joint production in the garment industry. Using the same metrics, we find that the network of manufacturer-contractor interactions exhibits similar structural patterns to plant-animal pollination networks. This surprising correspondence between ecological and organizational networks suggests that the simple rules of cooperation that generate bipartite networks may be generic, and could prove relevant in many different domains, ranging from biological systems to human society.

  17. Modeling one-mode projection of bipartite networks by tagging vertex information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jian; Meng, Ying-Ying; Chen, Hsinchun; Huang, Hong-Qiao; Li, Guo-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Traditional one-mode projection models are less informative than their original bipartite networks. Hence, using such models cannot control the projection's structure freely. We proposed a new method for modeling the one-mode projection of bipartite networks, which thoroughly breaks through the limitations of the available one-mode projecting methods by tagging the vertex information of bipartite networks in their one-mode projections. We designed a one-mode collaboration network model by using the method presented in this paper. The simulation results show that our model matches three real networks very well and outperforms the available collaboration network models significantly, which reflects the idea that our method is ideal for modeling one-mode projection models of bipartite graphs and that our one-mode collaboration network model captures the crucial mechanisms of the three real systems. Our study reveals that size growth, individual aging, random collaboration, preferential collaboration, transitivity collaboration and multi-round collaboration are the crucial mechanisms of collaboration networks, and the lack of some of the crucial mechanisms is the main reason that the other available models do not perform as well as ours.

  18. Patella fracture in a boy with bilateral inferior pole bipartite patellae.

    PubMed

    Peek, A C; Barry, M

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a 12 year old boy who had bilateral inferior pole fragment (Saupe type 1) bipartite patellae, and who sustained a traumatic separation through the right patella while playing basket ball, the left remaining asymptomatic. We have reviewed and discussed the previously published literature and case reports.

  19. Human Mars Mission: SEP Architecture, Crew Taxi Propulsion Stage Study and Design and Technology for Reaction and Control System. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Archie

    1999-01-01

    The Mars exploration is a candidate pathway to expand human presence and useful activities in the solar system. There are several propulsion system options being considered to place the Mars payload on its interplanetary transfer trajectory. One propulsion option is the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to spiral out with the Mars payload from an initial Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to an elliptical High Earth Orbit (HEO). This report, presented in annotated facing page format, describes the work completed on the design of a crew taxi propulsion stage used in conjunction with the SEP. Transportation system/mission analysis topics covered in this report include sub-system analysis, trajectory profile description, mass performance and crew taxi stage sizing, stage configuration, stage cost, and Trans-Mars Injection (TMI) launch window. The high efficiency of SEP is used to provide the major part of the TMI propulsion maneuver. Orbital energy is continuously added over a period of approximately twelve months. The SEP and Mars payload follow a spiral trajectory from an initial LEO to a final elliptical HEO. A small chemical stage is then used to provide the final part of the TMI. The now unloaded SEP returns to LEO to repeat another spiral trajectory with payload to HEO. The spiral phase of the SEP's trajectory takes several months to reach HEO, thus significantly increasing the exposure time of the crew to zero-gravity. In order to minimize the long zero-gravity effects, a high thrust chemical stage delivers the crew to the SEP's HEO. The crew rendezvous with the Mars payload in HEO. After a checkout period the Mars payload with the crew is injected onto a Trans-Mars Trajectory by a small chemical stage.

  20. Human Mars Mission: SEP Architecture Crew Taxi Propulsion Stage Study and Design and Technology for Reaction and Control System. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Archie

    1999-01-01

    The Mars exploration is a candidate pathway to expand human presence and useful activities in the solar system. There are several propulsion system options being considered to place the Mars payload on its inter-planetary transfer trajectory. One propulsion option is the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to spiral out with the Mars payload from an initial Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to an elliptical High Earth Orbit (HEO). This report, presented in annotated facing page format, describes the work completed on the design of a crew taxi propulsion stage used in conjunction with the SEP. Transportation system/mission analysis topics covered in this report include sub-system analysis, trajectory profile description, mass performance and crew taxi stage sizing, stage configuration, stage cost, and Trans-Mars Injection (TMI) launch window. The high efficiency of SEP is used to provide the major part of the TMI propulsion maneuver. Orbital energy is continuously added over a period of approximately twelve months. The SEP and Mars payload follow a spiral trajectory from an initial LEO to a final elliptical HEO. A small chemical stage is then used to provide the final part of the TMI. The now unloaded SEP returns to LEO to repeat another spiral trajectory with payload to HEO. The spiral phase of the SEP's trajectory takes several months to reach HEO, thus significantly increasing the exposure time of the crew to zero-gravity. In order to minimize the long zero-gravity effects, a high thrust chemical stage delivers the crew to the SEP's HEO. The crew rendezvous with the Mars payload in HEO. After a checkout period the Mars payload with the crew is injected onto a Trans-Mars Trajectory by a small chemical stage.

  1. The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III counteracts the necrotic activity of a Fusarium graminearum xylanase in vitro and in durum wheat transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Faoro, Franco; Moro, Stefano; Sabbadin, Davide; Sella, Luca; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-08-01

    The xylanase inhibitor TAXI-III has been proven to delay Fusarium head blight (FHB) symptoms caused by Fusarium graminearum in transgenic durum wheat plants. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the capacity of the TAXI-III transgenic plants to limit FHB symptoms, we treated wheat tissues with the xylanase FGSG_03624, hitherto shown to induce cell death and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Experiments performed on lemmas of flowering wheat spikes and wheat cell suspension cultures demonstrated that pre-incubation of xylanase FGSG_03624 with TAXI-III significantly decreased cell death. Most interestingly, a reduced cell death relative to control non-transgenic plants was also obtained by treating, with the same xylanase, lemmas of TAXI-III transgenic plants. Molecular modelling studies predicted an interaction between the TAXI-III residue H395 and residues E122 and E214 belonging to the active site of xylanase FGSG_03624. These results provide, for the first time, clear indications in vitro and in planta that a xylanase inhibitor can prevent the necrotic activity of a xylanase, and suggest that the reduced FHB symptoms on transgenic TAXI-III plants may be a result not only of the direct inhibition of xylanase activity secreted by the pathogen, but also of the capacity of TAXI-III to avoid host cell death.

  2. 41 CFR 301-10.420 - When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of official travel are reimbursable for the usual fare plus tip for use of a taxi, shuttle service or.... (i) From your residence or other authorized point of departure, e.g., residence to airport; (ii) To your residence or other authorized point of return, e.g., airport to residence; (iii) From...

  3. 41 CFR 301-10.420 - When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of official travel are reimbursable for the usual fare plus tip for use of a taxi, shuttle service or.... (i) From your residence or other authorized point of departure, e.g., residence to airport; (ii) To your residence or other authorized point of return, e.g., airport to residence; (iii) From...

  4. 41 CFR 301-10.420 - When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When may I use a taxi, shuttle service or other courtesy transportation? 301-10.420 Section 301-10.420 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES 10-TRANSPORTATION...

  5. First evidence of a bipartite medial cuneiform in the hominin fossil record: a case report from the Early Pleistocene site of Dmanisi

    PubMed Central

    Jashashvili, Tea; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Lordkipanidze, David; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2010-01-01

    A medial cuneiform exhibiting complete bipartition was discovered at the Early Pleistocene site of Dmanisi, Georgia. The specimen is the oldest known instance of this anatomical variant in the hominin fossil record. Here we compare developmental variation of the medial cuneiform in fossil hominins, extant humans and great apes, and discuss potential implications of bipartition for hominin foot phylogeny and function. Complete bipartition is rare among modern humans (< 1%); incomplete bipartition was found in 2 of 200 examined great ape specimens and also appears in the form of a divided distal articular surface in the Stw573c Australopithecus africanus specimen. Although various developmental pathways lead to medial cuneiform bipartition, it appears that the bipartite bone does not deviate significantly from normal overall morphology. Together, these data indicate that bipartition represents a phyletically old developmental variant of the medial cuneiform, which does not, however, affect the species-specific morphology and function of this bone. PMID:20579174

  6. Visual exploration of big spatio-temporal urban data: a study of New York City taxi trips.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nivan; Poco, Jorge; Vo, Huy T; Freire, Juliana; Silva, Cláudio T

    2013-12-01

    As increasing volumes of urban data are captured and become available, new opportunities arise for data-driven analysis that can lead to improvements in the lives of citizens through evidence-based decision making and policies. In this paper, we focus on a particularly important urban data set: taxi trips. Taxis are valuable sensors and information associated with taxi trips can provide unprecedented insight into many different aspects of city life, from economic activity and human behavior to mobility patterns. But analyzing these data presents many challenges. The data are complex, containing geographical and temporal components in addition to multiple variables associated with each trip. Consequently, it is hard to specify exploratory queries and to perform comparative analyses (e.g., compare different regions over time). This problem is compounded due to the size of the data-there are on average 500,000 taxi trips each day in NYC. We propose a new model that allows users to visually query taxi trips. Besides standard analytics queries, the model supports origin-destination queries that enable the study of mobility across the city. We show that this model is able to express a wide range of spatio-temporal queries, and it is also flexible in that not only can queries be composed but also different aggregations and visual representations can be applied, allowing users to explore and compare results. We have built a scalable system that implements this model which supports interactive response times; makes use of an adaptive level-of-detail rendering strategy to generate clutter-free visualization for large results; and shows hidden details to the users in a summary through the use of overlay heat maps. We present a series of case studies motivated by traffic engineers and economists that show how our model and system enable domain experts to perform tasks that were previously unattainable for them.

  7. Positive taxis and sustained responsiveness to water motions in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, Antonia H.; Herget, Ulrich; Ryu, Soojin; De Marco, Rodrigo J.

    2015-01-01

    Larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become favored subjects for studying the neural bases of behavior. Here, we report a highly stereotyped response of zebrafish larvae to hydrodynamic stimuli. It involves positive taxis, motion damping and sustained responsiveness to flows derived from local, non-stressful water motions. The response depends on the lateral line and has a high sensitivity to stimulus frequency and strength, sensory background and rearing conditions—also encompassing increased threshold levels of response to parallel input. The results show that zebrafish larvae can use near-field detection to locate sources of minute water motions, and offer a unique handle for analyses of hydrodynamic sensing, sensory responsiveness and arousal with accurate control of stimulus properties. PMID:25798089

  8. Taxiing, Take-Off, and Landing Simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaves, Mercedes C.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1999-01-01

    The aircraft industry jointly with NASA is studying enabling technologies for higher speed, longer range aircraft configurations. Higher speeds, higher temperatures, and aerodynamics are driving these newer aircraft configurations towards long, slender, flexible fuselages. Aircraft response during ground operations, although often overlooked, is a concern due to the increased fuselage flexibility. This paper discusses modeling and simulation of the High Speed Civil Transport aircraft during taxiing, take-off, and landing. Finite element models of the airframe for various configurations are used and combined with nonlinear landing gear models to provide a simulation tool to study responses to different ground input conditions. A commercial computer simulation program is used to numerically integrate the equations of motion and to compute estimates of the responses using an existing runway profile. Results show aircraft responses exceeding safe acceptable human response levels.

  9. Algerian pearl millet ( Pennisetum glaucum L.) contains XIP but not TAXI and TLXI type xylanase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mokrane, Hind; Gebruers, Kurt; Beaugrand, Johnny; Proost, Paul; Nadjemi, Boubekeur; Belhanèche-Bensemra, Naima; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2009-06-24

    An XIP (xylanase inhibiting protein) type xylanase inhibitor was purified from Algerian pearl millet ( Pennisetum glaucum L.) grains and characterized for the first time. Cation exchange and affinity chromatography with immobilized Trichoderma longibrachiatum glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 11 xylanase resulted in electrophoretically pure protein with a molecular mass of 27-29 kDa and a pI value of 6.7. The experimentally determined N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified XIP protein is 87.5%, identical to that of sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L.) XIP and 79.2% identical to that of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) XIP-I. The biochemical properties of pearl millet XIP are comparable to those described earlier for sorghum XIP, except for the higher specific activity toward a T. longibrachiatum GH family 11 xylanase. On the basis of immunoblot neither TAXI nor TLXI type xylanase inhibitors were detected in pearl millet grains.

  10. Sociodemographic factors associated with aggressive driving behaviors of 3-wheeler taxi drivers in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Akalanka, Ediriweera Chintana; Fujiwara, Takeo; Desapriya, Ediriweera; Peiris, Dinithi C; Scime, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the nature and scope of aggressive driving in developing countries. The objective of this study is to specifically examine the sociodemographic factors associated with aggressive driving behavior among 3-wheeler taxi drivers in Sri Lanka. Convenience samples of 3-wheeler taxi drivers from Rathnapura, Ahaliyagoda, Sri Lanka were surveyed from June to August 2006. Analyses included bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Drivers with less than high school education were 3.5 times more likely to drive aggressively (odds ratio [OR] = 3.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 11.1). Single drivers were 9 times more likely to run red lights (OR = 8.74; 95% CI = 2.18, 35.0), and being single was a major risk factor for drunk driving (OR = 4.80; 95% CI = 1.23, 18.7). Furthermore, high school completers were 4 times more likely to bribe a policeman (OR = 4.27; 95% CI = 1.23, 14.9) when caught violating the road rules. Aggressive driving and risk-taking behavior are amenable to policy initiatives, and preventive programs targeted at key groups could be used to improve road safety in Sri Lanka. This study demonstrates that aggressive driving behavior is associated with sociodemographic factors, including the level of education, marital status, and other socioeconomic factors. Hence, economic factors should be addressed to find solutions to traffic-related issues. It will be the government's and policy makers' responsibility to try and understand the economic factors behind risky road behavior and bribe-taking behavior prior to legislating or enforcing new laws.

  11. Soyuz missions and taxi flights. New opportunities for technology development. An example: The ENEIDE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortezza, R.; Pontetti, G.; Martinelli, E.; Lo Castro, F.; Di Natale, C.; D'Amico, A.

    2006-07-01

    The Soyuz vehicle represents today a key Spacecraft: it provides astronaut transfer from the ground to the ISS and it ensures, at the same time, the possibility to escape from it. A Soyuz capsule therefore has to remain always attached to the ISS to be potentially used as Crew Escape Vehicle in case of need. To maintain the full operability the Soyuz needs to be replaced every six months by a new one. The mission aimed to launch a new spacecraft and to retrieve the "used" one is called Taxi Flight. The Russians, since few years, offer commercial seat available during this mission on the bases of commercial contracts. Several Space Tourists already made use of this opportunity like Dennis Tito or Mark Shuttleworth. But a Taxi Flight is not only a good opportunity for Space Flight; it could represent also a unique chance for scientist and engineers to find new flight opportunities to carry out experiments. It is possible to fly a piece of equipment onboard ISS for up 10 days, with the possibility to have also other resources available, like crew time, telemetry, commanding, etc. Of course to exploit such an opportunity and to develop space hardware, a company willing to carry out its own experiment need to have in-house resource to support the mission. Often the resources are not enough or the specific know-how for a space mission is missing. But today to help the users, very often represented by a SME, there is in ESA a dedicated team, supported by national user support centers, able to transform an idea into a consolidated flying experiment. The paper is aimed at presenting the reference scenario, the approach and methodologies used and offer a guide for future users. The example of three experiments flown in the Soyuz 10S mission is presented together with the strategy used to pass from the idea to the results in less than nine months.

  12. Sociodemographic factors associated with aggressive driving behaviors of 3-wheeler taxi drivers in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Akalanka, Ediriweera Chintana; Fujiwara, Takeo; Desapriya, Ediriweera; Peiris, Dinithi C; Scime, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the nature and scope of aggressive driving in developing countries. The objective of this study is to specifically examine the sociodemographic factors associated with aggressive driving behavior among 3-wheeler taxi drivers in Sri Lanka. Convenience samples of 3-wheeler taxi drivers from Rathnapura, Ahaliyagoda, Sri Lanka were surveyed from June to August 2006. Analyses included bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Drivers with less than high school education were 3.5 times more likely to drive aggressively (odds ratio [OR] = 3.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 11.1). Single drivers were 9 times more likely to run red lights (OR = 8.74; 95% CI = 2.18, 35.0), and being single was a major risk factor for drunk driving (OR = 4.80; 95% CI = 1.23, 18.7). Furthermore, high school completers were 4 times more likely to bribe a policeman (OR = 4.27; 95% CI = 1.23, 14.9) when caught violating the road rules. Aggressive driving and risk-taking behavior are amenable to policy initiatives, and preventive programs targeted at key groups could be used to improve road safety in Sri Lanka. This study demonstrates that aggressive driving behavior is associated with sociodemographic factors, including the level of education, marital status, and other socioeconomic factors. Hence, economic factors should be addressed to find solutions to traffic-related issues. It will be the government's and policy makers' responsibility to try and understand the economic factors behind risky road behavior and bribe-taking behavior prior to legislating or enforcing new laws. PMID:20685667

  13. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  14. Bipartite nuclear localization signal of matrin 3 is essential for vertebrate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisada-Ishii, Shoji; Ebihara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Nao; Kitagawa, Yasuo . E-mail: yasuok@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Matrin 3, a nuclear matrix protein has potential (1) to withhold promiscuously edited RNAs within the nucleus in cooperation with p54{sup nrb} and PSF (2) to mediate NMDA-induced neuronal death, and (3) to modulate promoter activity of genes proximal to matrix/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR). We identified a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of chicken matrin 3 (cmatr3) at residues 583-602. By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the NLS mutant in chicken DT40 cells, we showed an essential role of the NLS for cell proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that both clusters of basic amino acids and a linker of the bipartite NLS were essential and sufficient for the nuclear import of GFP. Exogenous cmatr3 rescued the HeLa cells where human matrin 3 was suppressed by RNA interference, but cmatr3 containing deletions at either of the basic amino acid clusters or the linker could not.

  15. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Shoji, Yutaka; Conrads, Kelly A; Stroop, Kevin D; Hamilton, Chad A; Darcy, Kathleen M; Maxwell, George L; Risinger, John I; Conrads, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors.

  16. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  17. Center-of-mass interpretation for bipartite purity analysis of N -party entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Miguel A.; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Eberly, J. H.

    2016-09-01

    We provide a graphical description of the entanglement of pure-state multiparty systems based on an analogy between a bipartite purity analysis and the centroid of a collection of point masses. This description applies to quantum systems with N parties, each with an arbitrary number of (discrete) states. The case of N qubits is highlighted for simplicity. This geometric description illustrates some of the restrictions in the form of inequalities that apply to entanglement in multiparty systems.

  18. A New Kind of Bipartite Coherent-Entangled State and Its Applications in Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Ji-Suo; Liang, Bao-Long

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of bipartite coherent-entangled state (CES) is introduced in the two-mode Fock space which exhibits the properties of both coherent state and entangled state. The set of CESs make up a complete and partly nonorthogonal representation. A simple experimental scheme to produce the CES is proposed by using a beam splitter. Some applications of the CES are also presented in quantum optics.

  19. Biology, Methodology or Chance? The Degree Distributions of Bipartite Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of the number of links per species, or degree distribution, is widely used as a summary of the topology of complex networks. Degree distributions have been studied in a range of ecological networks, including both mutualistic bipartite networks of plants and pollinators or seed dispersers and antagonistic bipartite networks of plants and their consumers. The shape of a degree distribution, for example whether it follows an exponential or power-law form, is typically taken to be indicative of the processes structuring the network. The skewed degree distributions of bipartite mutualistic and antagonistic networks are usually assumed to show that ecological or co-evolutionary processes constrain the relative numbers of specialists and generalists in the network. I show that a simple null model based on the principle of maximum entropy cannot be rejected as a model for the degree distributions in most of the 115 bipartite ecological networks tested here. The model requires knowledge of the number of nodes and links in the network, but needs no other ecological information. The model cannot be rejected for 159 (69%) of the 230 degree distributions of the 115 networks tested. It performed equally well on the plant and animal degree distributions, and cannot be rejected for 81 (70%) of the 115 plant distributions and 78 (68%) of the animal distributions. There are consistent differences between the degree distributions of mutualistic and antagonistic networks, suggesting that different processes are constraining these two classes of networks. Fit to the MaxEnt null model is consistently poor among the largest mutualistic networks. Potential ecological and methodological explanations for deviations from the model suggest that spatial and temporal heterogeneity are important drivers of the structure of these large networks. PMID:21390231

  20. Congenital anomaly of combined atlas-odontoid process fusion and bipartite atlas.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jea Ryoung; Kim, Wan Tae; Seo, Min Jeong

    2015-12-01

    Congenital fusion of the atlas with the odontoid process of the axis is a very rare condition caused by a segmental defect of the first cervical somite. Only 9 such cases have been reported in the literature to date. The bipartite atlas, another well-documented rare anomaly, has been observed in only 0.1% of the general population. We describe the first case of a 70-year-old male with both of these complex congenital anomalies.

  1. Compliance and enforcement of a partial smoking ban in Lisbon taxis: an exploratory cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research evaluating enforcement and compliance with smoking partial bans is rather scarce, especially in countries with relative weak tobacco control policies, such as Portugal. There is also scarce evidence on specific high risk groups such as vehicle workers. In January 2008, Portugal implemented a partial ban, followed by poor enforcement. The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a partial smoking ban in a pro-smoking environment, specifically transportation by taxi in the city of Lisbon. Ban effectiveness was generally defined by ban awareness and support, compliance and enforcement. Methods Exploratory cross-sectional study; purposive sampling in selected Lisbon streets. Structured interviews were conducted by trained researchers while using taxi services (January 2009-December 2010). Participants: 250 taxi drivers (98.8% participation rate). Chi-square, McNemar, Man Whitney tests and multiple logistic regression were performed. Results Of the participants, 249 were male; median age was 53.0 years; 43.6% were current smokers. Most participants (82.8%) approved comprehensive bans; 84.8% reported that clients still asked to smoke in their taxis; 16.8% allowed clients to smoke. Prior to the ban this value was 76.9% (p < 0.001). The major reason for not allowing smoking was the legal ban and associated fines (71.2%). Of the smokers, 66.1% admitted smoking in their taxi. Stale smoke smells were detected in 37.6% of the cars. None of the taxi drivers did ever receive a fine for non-compliance. Heavy smoking, night-shift and allowing smoking prior the ban predicted non-compliance. Conclusions Despite the strong ban support observed, high smoking prevalence and poor enforcement contribute to low compliance. The findings also suggest low compliance among night-shift and vehicle workers. This study clearly demonstrates that a partial and poorly-enforced ban is vulnerable to breaches, and highlights the need for clear and strong

  2. Decomposition of bipartite states with applications to quantum no-broadcasting theorems

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Shunlong; Sun Wei

    2010-07-15

    Correlations in bipartite quantum states are fundamental objects in quantum information theory. A canonical framework for studying correlations is the entangled versus separable dichotomy in which the decompositions of separable states as convex combinations of product states play an instrumental role. In this paper, motivated by both the representation of separable states and quantum no-broadcasting considerations, we establish a constructive decomposition representation for any bipartite state. As applications, we prove the conjectures proposed by Luo [Lett. Math. Phys. 92, 143 (2010)] concerning no-unilocal broadcasting for quantum correlations and further provide a unified picture for the celebrated quantum no-broadcasting theorem for noncommuting states by Barnum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2818 (1996)], and the elegant no-local-broadcasting theorem for quantum correlations by Piani et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 090502 (2008)]. The results reveal some intrinsic relation between quantumness of correlations and noncommutativity of states, and in particular, provide a characterization for zero quantum discord introduced by Ollivier and Zurek [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 017901 (2001)] from the broadcasting perspective. Furthermore, it is indicated that the distinction between the decomposition for general bipartite states and that for separable states might be useful in studying entanglement versus separability.

  3. Modelling the evolution of a bi-partite network Peer referral in interlocking directorates*

    PubMed Central

    Edling, Christofer

    2010-01-01

    A central part of relational ties between social actors are constituted by shared affiliations and events. The action of joint participation reinforces personal ties between social actors as well as mutually shared values and norms that in turn perpetuate the patterns of social action that define groups. Therefore the study of bipartite networks is central to social science. Furthermore, the dynamics of these processes suggests that bipartite networks should not be considered static structures but rather be studied over time. In order to model the evolution of bipartite networks empirically we introduce a class of models and a Bayesian inference scheme that extends previous stochastic actor-oriented models for unimodal graphs. Contemporary research on interlocking directorates provides an area of research in which it seems reasonable to apply the model. Specifically, we address the question of how tie formation, i.e. director recruitment, contributes to the structural properties of the interlocking directorate network. For boards of directors on the Stockholm stock exchange we propose that a prolific mechanism in tie formation is that of peer referral. The results indicate that such a mechanism is present, generating multiple interlocks between boards. PMID:24944435

  4. Information Filtering via Clustering Coefficients of User-Object Bipartite Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Leng, Rui; Shi, Kerui; Liu, Jian-Guo

    The clustering coefficient of user-object bipartite networks is presented to evaluate the overlap percentage of neighbors rating lists, which could be used to measure interest correlations among neighbor sets. The collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering algorithm evaluates a given user's interests in terms of his/her friends' opinions, which has become one of the most successful technologies for recommender systems. In this paper, different from the object clustering coefficient, users' clustering coefficients of user-object bipartite networks are introduced to improve the user similarity measurement. Numerical results for MovieLens and Netflix data sets show that users' clustering effects could enhance the algorithm performance. For MovieLens data set, the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, can be improved by 12.0% and the diversity could be improved by 18.2% and reach 0.649 when the recommendation list equals to 50. For Netflix data set, the accuracy could be improved by 14.5% at the optimal case and the popularity could be reduced by 13.4% comparing with the standard CF algorithm. Finally, we investigate the sparsity effect on the performance. This work indicates the user clustering coefficients is an effective factor to measure the user similarity, meanwhile statistical properties of user-object bipartite networks should be investigated to estimate users' tastes.

  5. Modelling the evolution of a bi-partite network Peer referral in interlocking directorates.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Johan; Edling, Christofer

    2012-07-01

    A central part of relational ties between social actors are constituted by shared affiliations and events. The action of joint participation reinforces personal ties between social actors as well as mutually shared values and norms that in turn perpetuate the patterns of social action that define groups. Therefore the study of bipartite networks is central to social science. Furthermore, the dynamics of these processes suggests that bipartite networks should not be considered static structures but rather be studied over time. In order to model the evolution of bipartite networks empirically we introduce a class of models and a Bayesian inference scheme that extends previous stochastic actor-oriented models for unimodal graphs. Contemporary research on interlocking directorates provides an area of research in which it seems reasonable to apply the model. Specifically, we address the question of how tie formation, i.e. director recruitment, contributes to the structural properties of the interlocking directorate network. For boards of directors on the Stockholm stock exchange we propose that a prolific mechanism in tie formation is that of peer referral. The results indicate that such a mechanism is present, generating multiple interlocks between boards. PMID:24944435

  6. Searching for preventive measures of cardiovascular events in aged Japanese taxi drivers--the daily rhythm of cardiovascular risk factors during a night duty day.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Azami, Y

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that Japanese taxi drivers are exposed to more risk factors and have a higher mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease than other occupational groups. We investigated the effect of night taxi driving with a view to preventing acute events of cardiovascular disease among aged taxi drivers. Twenty-nine taxi drivers (41-67 years old) were examined for urine normetanephrine/creatinine, von Willebrand factor, anti-thrombin III, t-plasminogen activator-plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-complex, hematocrit, blood glucose and blood pressure in the morning and at midnight during a duty day and in the following morning. At the same time, the blood pressure and blood glucose of 46 taxi drivers (43-67 years old) in the morning after a night duty with little sleep and in the morning after daytime work and subsequent night sleep were compared. The results obtained indicate that the aggravation of sympathetic nervous system functions with disturbed circadian rhythms, increased blood coagulation and blood concentration, endothelial injury and the elevation of blood glucose at midnight or the next morning were induced by their night work. These conditions are supposed to favour acute vascular events in aged taxi drivers. Preventive measures considered include social support for anticoagulant food and water intake, short exercise and walking as well as taking a rest and a nap during night work.

  7. "Dammed Taxi Cab"--How Silent Communication in Questionnaires Can Be Understood and Used to Give Voice to Children's Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alerby, E.; Kostenius, C.

    2011-01-01

    "Dammed taxi cab"--a 12-year-old boy wrote these words in the margins of a questionnaire, and within this paper they will serve as a point of departure for the discussion of the use of questionnaires as a way to voice children's experiences. The overall aim of this paper is to enable understanding of and discuss the use of questionnaires as a way…

  8. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Drew L; Bergen, Jamie M; Johnson, Russell N; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M; Horner, Philip J; Pun, Suzie H

    2016-03-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics.

  9. Targeted axonal import (TAxI) peptide delivers functional proteins into spinal cord motor neurons after peripheral administration

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Drew L.; Bergen, Jamie M.; Johnson, Russell N.; Back, Heidi; Ravits, John M.; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2016-01-01

    A significant unmet need in treating neurodegenerative disease is effective methods for delivery of biologic drugs, such as peptides, proteins, or nucleic acids into the central nervous system (CNS). To date, there are no operative technologies for the delivery of macromolecular drugs to the CNS via peripheral administration routes. Using an in vivo phage-display screen, we identify a peptide, targeted axonal import (TAxI), that enriched recombinant bacteriophage accumulation and delivered protein cargo into spinal cord motor neurons after intramuscular injection. In animals with transected peripheral nerve roots, TAxI delivery into motor neurons after peripheral administration was inhibited, suggesting a retrograde axonal transport mechanism for delivery into the CNS. Notably, TAxI-Cre recombinase fusion proteins induced selective recombination and tdTomato-reporter expression in motor neurons after intramuscular injections. Furthermore, TAxI peptide was shown to label motor neurons in the human tissue. The demonstration of a nonviral-mediated delivery of functional proteins into the spinal cord establishes the clinical potential of this technology for minimally invasive administration of CNS-targeted therapeutics. PMID:26888285

  10. Taxi drivers' views on risky driving behavior in Tehran: a qualitative study using a social marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Shams, Mohsen; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Majdzadeh, Reza; Rashidian, Arash; Montazeri, Ali

    2011-05-01

    The use of the social marketing approach for public health issues is increasing. This approach uses marketing concepts borrowed from the principles of commercial marketing to promote beneficial health behaviors. In this qualitative study, four focus groups involving 42 participants were used in consumer research to explore taxi drivers' views on the driving situation and the determinants of risky driving behaviors in Tehran, as well as to gather their ideas for developing a social marketing program to reduce risky driving behaviors among taxi drivers in Tehran, Iran. Participants were asked to respond to questions that would guide the development of a marketing mix, or four Ps (product, price, place and promotion). The discussions determined that the program product should involve avoiding risky driving behaviors through increased attention to driving. They pointed out that developing and communicating with a well-designed persuasive message meant to draw their attention to driving could affect their driving behaviors. In addition, participants identified price, place and promotion strategies. They offered suggestions for marketing nonrisky driving to the target audience. The focus group discussions generated important insights into the values and the motivations that affect consumers' decisions to adopt the product. The focus group guided the development of a social marketing program to reduce risky driving behaviors in taxi drivers in Tehran, Iran.

  11. Taxi drivers' views on risky driving behavior in Tehran: a qualitative study using a social marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Shams, Mohsen; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Majdzadeh, Reza; Rashidian, Arash; Montazeri, Ali

    2011-05-01

    The use of the social marketing approach for public health issues is increasing. This approach uses marketing concepts borrowed from the principles of commercial marketing to promote beneficial health behaviors. In this qualitative study, four focus groups involving 42 participants were used in consumer research to explore taxi drivers' views on the driving situation and the determinants of risky driving behaviors in Tehran, as well as to gather their ideas for developing a social marketing program to reduce risky driving behaviors among taxi drivers in Tehran, Iran. Participants were asked to respond to questions that would guide the development of a marketing mix, or four Ps (product, price, place and promotion). The discussions determined that the program product should involve avoiding risky driving behaviors through increased attention to driving. They pointed out that developing and communicating with a well-designed persuasive message meant to draw their attention to driving could affect their driving behaviors. In addition, participants identified price, place and promotion strategies. They offered suggestions for marketing nonrisky driving to the target audience. The focus group discussions generated important insights into the values and the motivations that affect consumers' decisions to adopt the product. The focus group guided the development of a social marketing program to reduce risky driving behaviors in taxi drivers in Tehran, Iran. PMID:21376850

  12. TrajGraph: A Graph-Based Visual Analytics Approach to Studying Urban Network Centralities Using Taxi Trajectory Data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoke; Zhao, Ye; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Chong; Ma, Chao; Ye, Xinyue

    2016-01-01

    We propose TrajGraph, a new visual analytics method, for studying urban mobility patterns by integrating graph modeling and visual analysis with taxi trajectory data. A special graph is created to store and manifest real traffic information recorded by taxi trajectories over city streets. It conveys urban transportation dynamics which can be discovered by applying graph analysis algorithms. To support interactive, multiscale visual analytics, a graph partitioning algorithm is applied to create region-level graphs which have smaller size than the original street-level graph. Graph centralities, including Pagerank and betweenness, are computed to characterize the time-varying importance of different urban regions. The centralities are visualized by three coordinated views including a node-link graph view, a map view and a temporal information view. Users can interactively examine the importance of streets to discover and assess city traffic patterns. We have implemented a fully working prototype of this approach and evaluated it using massive taxi trajectories of Shenzhen, China. TrajGraph's capability in revealing the importance of city streets was evaluated by comparing the calculated centralities with the subjective evaluations from a group of drivers in Shenzhen. Feedback from a domain expert was collected. The effectiveness of the visual interface was evaluated through a formal user study. We also present several examples and a case study to demonstrate the usefulness of TrajGraph in urban transportation analysis.

  13. Orbital Transfer Vehicle (space taxi) with aerobraking at Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report shall cover all major aspects of the design of an Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (or TAXI) for use as part of advanced manned Mars missions based on a cycling ship concept. Along with the heliocentric orbiting Cycling Spacecraft, such a TAXI would be a primary component of a long-term transportation system for Mars exploration. The Aeroassisted Manned Transfer Vehicle (AMTV) design developed shall operate along transfer trajectories between Earth and a Cycling Spacecraft (designed by the University of Michigan) and Mars. All operations of the AMTV shall be done primarily within the sphere of influence of the two planets. Maximum delta-V's for the vehicle have been established near 9 km/sec, with transfer durations of about 3 days. Acceleration deltaV's will be accomplished using 3 SSME-based hydrogen-oxygen chemical rockets (l(sub sp) = 485 sec & Thrust greater than = 300,00 Ib(sub f)/engine) with a thrust vector directly opposite the aerobraking deceleration vector. The aerobraking deceleration portion of an AMTV mission would be accomplished in this design by a moderate L/D aeroshield of an ellipsoidally-blunt, raked-off, elliptic cone (EBROEC) shape. The reusable thermal protection material comprising the shield will consist of a flexible, multi-layer, ceramic fabric stretched over a lightweight, rigid, shape - defining truss structure. Behind this truss, other components, including the engine supports, would be attached and protected from heating during aerobraking passes. Among these other components would be 2 LOX tanks and 4 LH2 tanks (and their support frames) holding over 670,000 lbm of propellant necessary to impart the required delta-V to the 98,000 lbm burnout mass vehicle. A 20,000 lbm crew module with docking port (oriented parallel to the accel./decel. axis) will provide accommodations for 9 crew members (11 under extreme conditions) for durations up to seven days, thus allowing extra time for emergency situations. This AMTV will be

  14. The Detection of Transport Land-Use Data Using Crowdsourcing Taxi Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, T.; Yang, W.

    2016-06-01

    This study tries to explore the question of transport land-use change detection by large volume of vehicle trajectory data, presenting a method based on Deluanay triangulation. The whole method includes three steps. The first one is to pre-process the vehicle trajectory data including the point anomaly removing and the conversion of trajectory point to track line. Secondly, construct Deluanay triangulation within the vehicle trajectory line to detect neighborhood relation. Considering the case that some of the trajectory segments are too long, we use a interpolation measure to add more points for the improved triangulation. Thirdly, extract the transport road by cutting short triangle edge and organizing the polygon topology. We have conducted the experiment of transport land-use change discovery using the data of taxi track in Beijing City. We extract not only the transport land-use area but also the semantic information such as the transformation speed, the traffic jam distribution, the main vehicle movement direction and others. Compared with the existed transport network data, such as OpenStreet Map, our method is proved to be quick and accurate.

  15. Effect of steady and unsteady flow on chemoattractant plume formation and sperm taxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Allison F.; Crimaldi, John P.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of chemoattractant plumes around benthic invertebrate eggs in steady and unsteady shear flows is investigated for a range of shear rates, and the ability of sperm to navigate within these plumes is assessed using several chemotactic strategies. Although many of the details of sperm taxis remain uncertain, we investigate the role of basic processes using a toy model in two dimensions. Search strategies in 2D are intrinsically less complex than 3D, but many of the basic components are similar, and the simplified geometry permits an understanding and identification of the key factors of navigation tactics. Numerical simulations are used to model the advection and diffusion of the chemoattractant within the different flows, using three different sperm swimming behaviors. A Monte-Carlo approach is then used to determine the probability of a sperm reaching an egg for a range of flow conditions, initial conditions, and swimming behaviors. The spatial structure of chemoattractant plumes at the scale of the gametes is also investigated. Success rates for locating an egg decrease monotonically with increasing shear rates, and a definitive hierarchical ordering of the tested swimming strategies is identified. A conceptual framework to study and identify important aspects of this fundamental process to support further studies is provided.

  16. Shared-ride taxi feeder service in Memphis, TN. Final report, May 1983-October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-03-01

    From May 1983 through October 1984, the Memphis Area Transit Authority (MATA) conducted the Taxi Feeder Demonstration Project. It entailed the operation of fixed-route feeder services through three low-density neighborhoods and one industrial park, connecting them to the public bus system. These feeder services, called the Neighborhood Shuttle, were operated by private suppliers, who were selected by competitive bid on a route-by-route basis, under contract to the transit authority. The private contractors operated a total of five to ten passenger vehicles along the system of shuttle routes. A grant received from the U.S. Department of Transportation under its Service and Methods Demonstration Program funded the project. Neighborhood Shuttle service was implemented as a low-cost way to provide minimal transit service to low-demand, low-density areas. Based on available information, it would appear that privately contracted shuttle service is less costly to operate than conventional MATA fixed-route bus on a total cost basis, but more expensive on a cost per passenger basis.

  17. Regional Webgis User Access Patterns Based on a Weighted Bipartite Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Shen, Y.; Huang, W.; Wu, H.

    2015-07-01

    With the rapid development of geographic information services, Web Geographic Information Systems (WebGIS) have become an indispensable part of everyday life; correspondingly, map search engines have become extremely popular with users and WebGIS sites receive a massive volume of requests for access. These WebGIS users and the content accessed have regional characteristics; to understand regional patterns, we mined regional WebGIS user access patterns based on a weighted bipartite network. We first established a weighted bipartite network model for regional user access to a WebGIS. Then, based on the massive user WebGIS access logs, we clustered geographic information accessed and thereby identified hot access areas. Finally we quantitatively analyzed the access interests of regional users and the visitation volume characteristics of regional user access to these hot access areas in terms of user access permeability, user usage rate, and user access viscosity. Our research results show that regional user access to WebGIS is spatially aggregated, and the hot access areas that regional users accessed are associated with specific periods of time. Most regional user contact with hot accessed areas is variable and intermittent but for some users, their access to certain areas is continuous as it is associated with ongoing or recurrent objectives. The weighted bipartite network model for regional user WebGIS access provides a valid analysis method for studying user behaviour in WebGIS and the proposed access pattern exhibits access interest of regional user is spatiotemporal aggregated and presents a heavy-tailed distribution. Understanding user access patterns is good for WebGIS providers and supports better operational decision-making, and helpful for developers when optimizing WebGIS system architecture and deployment, so as to improve the user experience and to expand the popularity of WebGIS.

  18. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  19. Increased pathogenicity in a pseudorecombinant bipartite geminivirus correlates with intermolecular recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Y M; Gilbertson, R L

    1996-01-01

    Most whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses possess bipartite DNA genomes, and this feature may facilitate viral evolution through pseudorecombination and/or recombination. To test this hypothesis, the DNA-A and DNA-B components of the geminiviruses bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV) and tomato mottle virus (ToMoV) were exchanged, and the resultant pseudorecombinants were serially passaged through plants. Both pseudorecombinants were infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana but induced attenuated symptoms and had reduced DNA-B levels. Serial passage experiments revealed that the BDMV DNA-A plus ToMoV DNA-B pseudorecombinant could not be maintained beyond three passages. In contrast, the ToMoV DNA-A plus BDMV DNA-B pseudorecombinant was maintained during serial passage through N. benthamiana and Phaseolus vulgaris and, after three to five passages, became highly pathogenic. Furthermore, the increased pathogenicity of this pseudorecombinant was consistently associated with an increased level of DNA-B, which eventuated in equivalent levels of both components. Sequence analysis of the DNA-B component of the more pathogenic pseudorecombinant revealed that intermolecular recombination had taken place in which most of the BDMV DNA-B common region was replaced with the ToMoV DNA-A common region. This recombinant DNA-B component, which contained the ToMoV origin of replication, was the predominant DNA-B component associated with the more pathogenic pseudorecombinant. These results provide the first demonstration of recombination between distinct bipartite geminiviruses and establish that the bipartite genome can facilitate viral evolution through pseudorecombination and intermolecular recombination. PMID:8764054

  20. Comparison of quantum discord and relative entropy in some bipartite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Arjmandi, M. B.

    2016-04-01

    The study of quantum correlations in high-dimensional bipartite systems is crucial for the development of quantum computing. We propose relative entropy as a distance measure of correlations may be measured by means of the distance from the quantum state to the closest classical-classical state. In particular, we establish relations between relative entropy and quantum discord quantifiers obtained by means of orthogonal projection measurements. We show that for symmetrical X-states density matrices the quantum discord is equal to relative entropy. At the end of paper, various examples of X-states such as two-qubit and qubit-qutrit have been demonstrated.

  1. Strong monogamy of bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: the Gaussian case.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-10-12

    We demonstrate the existence of general constraints on distributed quantum correlations, which impose a trade-off on bipartite and multipartite entanglement at once. For all N-mode Gaussian states under permutation invariance, we establish exactly a monogamy inequality, stronger than the traditional one, that by recursion defines a proper measure of genuine N-partite entanglement. Strong monogamy holds as well for subsystems of arbitrary size, and the emerging multipartite entanglement measure is found to be scale invariant. We unveil its operational connection with the optimal fidelity of continuous variable teleportation networks.

  2. Bipartite Entanglement Entropy in Massive Two-Dimensional Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2009-01-23

    Recently, Cardy, Castro Alvaredo, and the author obtained the first exponential correction to saturation of the bipartite entanglement entropy at large region lengths in massive two-dimensional integrable quantum field theory. It depends only on the particle content of the model, and not on the way particles scatter. Based on general analyticity arguments for form factors, we propose that this result is universal, and holds for any massive two-dimensional model (also out of integrability). We suggest a link of this result with counting pair creations far in the past.

  3. Entanglement detection for bipartite systems with continuous variables in non-Markovian baths

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Hongguang; Liang Xianting

    2011-03-15

    By using the dynamics described with the quantum Langevin equation and the inseparability criterion for continuous-variable systems [L.-M. Duan, G. Giedke, J. I. Cirac, and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2722 (2000).], we discuss a method to judge whether entanglement exists in the evolutions of bipartite systems with continuous variables in their baths. By using this method we investigate a nontrivial example, namely, we judge when the entanglement exists in the evolution of the two coupled anharmonic oscillators in their environments.

  4. Bipartite entanglement entropy in massive two-dimensional quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2009-01-23

    Recently, Cardy, Castro Alvaredo, and the author obtained the first exponential correction to saturation of the bipartite entanglement entropy at large region lengths in massive two-dimensional integrable quantum field theory. It depends only on the particle content of the model, and not on the way particles scatter. Based on general analyticity arguments for form factors, we propose that this result is universal, and holds for any massive two-dimensional model (also out of integrability). We suggest a link of this result with counting pair creations far in the past.

  5. Optimizing local protocols for implementing bipartite nonlocal unitary gates using prior entanglement and classical communication

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-06-15

    We present a method of optimizing recently designed protocols for implementing an arbitrary nonlocal unitary gate acting on a bipartite system. These protocols use only local operations and classical communication with the assistance of entanglement, and they are deterministic while also being 'one-shot', in that they use only one copy of an entangled resource state. The optimization minimizes the amount of entanglement needed, and also the amount of classical communication, and it is often the case that less of each of these resources is needed than with an alternative protocol using two-way teleportation.

  6. Strong monogamy of bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: the Gaussian case.

    PubMed

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-10-12

    We demonstrate the existence of general constraints on distributed quantum correlations, which impose a trade-off on bipartite and multipartite entanglement at once. For all N-mode Gaussian states under permutation invariance, we establish exactly a monogamy inequality, stronger than the traditional one, that by recursion defines a proper measure of genuine N-partite entanglement. Strong monogamy holds as well for subsystems of arbitrary size, and the emerging multipartite entanglement measure is found to be scale invariant. We unveil its operational connection with the optimal fidelity of continuous variable teleportation networks. PMID:17995148

  7. Classification of 4-qubit Entangled Graph States According to Bipartite Entanglement, Multipartite Entanglement and Non-local Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Leila; Jafarpour, Mojtaba

    2016-07-01

    We use concurrence to study bipartite entanglement, Meyer-Wallach measure and its generalizations to study multi-partite entanglement and MABK and SASA inequalities to study the non-local properties of the 4-qubit entangled graph states, quantitatively. Then, we present 3 classifications, each one in accordance with one of the aforementioned properties. We also observe that the classification according to multipartite entanglement does exactly coincide with that according to nonlocal properties, but does not match with that according to bipartite entanglement. This observation signifies the fact that non-locality and multipartite entanglement enjoy the same basic underlying principles, while bipartite entanglement may not reveal the non-locality issue in its entirety.

  8. On Parallel Push-Relabel based Algorithms for Bipartite Maximum Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Langguth, Johannes; Azad, Md Ariful; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Manne, Fredrik

    2014-07-01

    We study multithreaded push-relabel based algorithms for computing maximum cardinality matching in bipartite graphs. Matching is a fundamental combinatorial (graph) problem with applications in a wide variety of problems in science and engineering. We are motivated by its use in the context of sparse linear solvers for computing maximum transversal of a matrix. We implement and test our algorithms on several multi-socket multicore systems and compare their performance to state-of-the-art augmenting path-based serial and parallel algorithms using a testset comprised of a wide range of real-world instances. Building on several heuristics for enhancing performance, we demonstrate good scaling for the parallel push-relabel algorithm. We show that it is comparable to the best augmenting path-based algorithms for bipartite matching. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first extensive study of multithreaded push-relabel based algorithms. In addition to a direct impact on the applications using matching, the proposed algorithmic techniques can be extended to preflow-push based algorithms for computing maximum flow in graphs.

  9. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft taxies at airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    View of QF-106 airplane for the Eclipse project taxiing on the runway at Mojave Airport, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  10. Factors associated with HIV testing among male motorbike taxi drivers in urban Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen Van; Khuyen, Le Thi; Ha, Pham Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Using the Attitude-Skills-Knowledge (ASK) model, this study examined the prevalence of, and factors associated with, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among male motorbike taxi drivers (MMTDs). In a cross-sectional design, using quantitative approaches, 291 MMTDs were recruited from 135 sites across 13 districts in Hanoi, Vietnam, for a face-to-face interview. Applying the ASK model modified as a central theory, logistic regression was used to identify determinants of HIV testing. Although many MMTDs engaged in multiple risk behaviours for HIV, only 20.6% had been tested for HIV during the past 12 months. The tested model included one factor of the ASK model, HIV prevention knowledge (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.76; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.12-10.7) and five additional factors: being married (AOR = 3.13; 95% CI = 1.25-4.78), preferring sex with men or with both men and women (AOR = 8.72; 95% CI = 1.48-51.5), having lower number of lifetime sex partners (AOR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.49-0.88), higher number of past year sex partners (AOR = 2.97: 95% CI = 1.21-7.31) and discussing condom use when having sex with partners (AOR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.01-7.31). This modified ASK model provided better fit than the ASK model, as it explained more variance in HIV testing (47 vs. 29.8%). Recognising factors associated with HIV testing among MMTDs enables us to create suitable public health intervention strategies.

  11. Magnetostratigraphy of the Northern Tian Shan foreland, Taxi He section, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanxin; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Guo, Zhaojie

    2010-05-01

    The Tian Shan range formed in the late Cenozoic in response to the northward propagation of deformation related to the India-Eurasia continental collision. Precise timing of the Tian Shan uplift is required to understand possible mechanisms of continental lithosphere deformation and interactions between climate, tectonism and erosion. Here, we provide magnetostratigraphic age control on the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland successions. A thorough rock magnetic analysis identifies hematite and magnetite bearing alluvial deposits in the upper portion of the sampled stratigraphy as more reliable paleomagnetic recorders than magnetite bearing fluvial and lacustrine deposits that are often maghemitized in the lower part of the record. As a result, a robust correlation to the geomagnetic polarity time scale is obtained from 6 Ma to 2 Ma while a tentative correlation is proposed from 6 to 16 Ma. Sediment accumulation rates increase from 155 to 260 m/Myr at 3.9+/-0.4 Ma. This change coincides with a gradual lithologic transition from fluvial (sandstone dominated) to alluvial (conglomerate dominated). Theis change is so drastic that it more likely corresponds to an approaching erosional source associated to tectonically increased subsidence rather than differential compaction alone. Clear evidences for growth strata starting at an estimated age of ca. 2 Ma provide a minimum age for the folding. These results are compared to previous magneotstratigraphic studies from the same and other section of the northern Tian Shan foreland deposits. This enables critical assessment of the reliability of magnetostratigraphic dating and the significance of sediment accumulation rate variations with respect to facies variations and growth strata. Our results in the Taxi He section provide a sequence of events that is consistent with enhanced tectonic forcing starting at ~4 Ma although a climatic contribution must be considered given the close relationship of these ages with the Pliocene

  12. Factors associated with HIV testing among male motorbike taxi drivers in urban Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen Van; Khuyen, Le Thi; Ha, Pham Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Using the Attitude-Skills-Knowledge (ASK) model, this study examined the prevalence of, and factors associated with, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing among male motorbike taxi drivers (MMTDs). In a cross-sectional design, using quantitative approaches, 291 MMTDs were recruited from 135 sites across 13 districts in Hanoi, Vietnam, for a face-to-face interview. Applying the ASK model modified as a central theory, logistic regression was used to identify determinants of HIV testing. Although many MMTDs engaged in multiple risk behaviours for HIV, only 20.6% had been tested for HIV during the past 12 months. The tested model included one factor of the ASK model, HIV prevention knowledge (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.76; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.12-10.7) and five additional factors: being married (AOR = 3.13; 95% CI = 1.25-4.78), preferring sex with men or with both men and women (AOR = 8.72; 95% CI = 1.48-51.5), having lower number of lifetime sex partners (AOR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.49-0.88), higher number of past year sex partners (AOR = 2.97: 95% CI = 1.21-7.31) and discussing condom use when having sex with partners (AOR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.01-7.31). This modified ASK model provided better fit than the ASK model, as it explained more variance in HIV testing (47 vs. 29.8%). Recognising factors associated with HIV testing among MMTDs enables us to create suitable public health intervention strategies. PMID:25415855

  13. "Every disease…man can get can start in this cab": focus groups to identify south Asian taxi drivers' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about cardiovascular disease and its risks.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca M; Gill, Pavan P; Ahmed, Ayaz; Acharya, Sudha; Leng, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    South Asian (SA) taxi drivers potentially possess a double epidemiologic risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due to their ethnicity and occupation. This study investigates SA taxi drivers' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs about general health, CVD and approaches to reduce CVD risk. Five focus groups were conducted with 31 SA taxi drivers in the participants' primary language (Bengali, Hindi, Urdu or Punjabi). Audio-recordings of the sessions were transcribed, translated and entered into ATLAS.ti 6.2 for coding and analysis. SA drivers in an urban setting perceive themselves to be at high risk for CVD because of high work-related stress, physical inactivity, poor diet and poor health care access. Participants attributed their occupation to increasing risk for heart disease; none believed that being SA increased their risk. Interventions to lower CVD risk among SA taxi drivers should be multi-level and involve the individual drivers and the taxi industry.

  14. Systematic analysis of signal-to-noise ratio in bipartite ghost imaging with classical and quantum light

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, G.; Fornaro, G. A.; Genovese, M.; Berchera, I. Ruo; Chekhova, M. V.; Lopaeva, E. D.

    2011-06-15

    We present a complete and exhaustive theory of signal-to-noiseratio in bipartite ghost imaging with classical (thermal) and quantum (twin beams) light. The theory is compared with experiment for both twin beams and thermal light in a certain regime of interest.

  15. Foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform: A case of co-occurrence in a Celtic skeleton from Verona (Italy).

    PubMed

    Laffranchi, Z; Martín Flórez, J S; Jiménez Brobeil, S A; Castellani, V

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform in a male individual buried in a Celtic/Roman necropolis (3rd to 1st century BCE) in the city of Verona (Italy). During the construction of an underground garage in the main courtyard of the Bishop's Seminary at Verona between 2005 and 2010, archaeologists uncovered the remains of 174 individuals (108 non-adults and 66 adults). It is thought that these graves could belong to some of the first inhabitants of the urban area of Verona. The individual presented here (US 2807) is a middle-aged male (40-50 years) in a good state of preservation. His estimated stature is 1756 mm (± 32.1 mm). This male presents congenital anomalies in the feet and dental agenesis. We believe this to be the only known archaeological case of bilateral postaxial polydactyly with forked (Y) shape, in which both fifth metatarsals are associated with complete bipartition of the left medial cuneiform and partial bipartition of the right one. Polydactyly is fairly common in modern clinical cases but bipartite medial cuneiform is relatively rare; neither of these congenital conditions is well documented archaeologically.

  16. The STAR RNA binding proteins GLD-1, QKI, SAM68 and SLM-2 bind bipartite RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Galarneau, André; Richard, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Background SAM68, SAM68-like mammalian protein 1 (SLM-1) and 2 (SLM-2) are members of the K homology (KH) and STAR (signal transduction activator of RNA metabolism) protein family. The function of these RNA binding proteins has been difficult to elucidate mainly because of lack of genetic data providing insights about their physiological RNA targets. In comparison, genetic studies in mice and C. elegans have provided evidence as to the physiological mRNA targets of QUAKING and GLD-1 proteins, two other members of the STAR protein family. The GLD-1 binding site is defined as a hexanucleotide sequence (NACUCA) that is found in many, but not all, physiological GLD-1 mRNA targets. Previously by using Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX), we defined the QUAKING binding site as a hexanucleotide sequence with an additional half-site (UAAY). This sequence was identified in QKI mRNA targets including the mRNAs for myelin basic proteins. Results Herein we report using SELEX the identification of the SLM-2 RNA binding site as direct U(U/A)AA repeats. The bipartite nature of the consensus sequence was essential for SLM-2 high affinity RNA binding. The identification of a bipartite mRNA binding site for QKI and now SLM-2 prompted us to determine whether SAM68 and GLD-1 also bind bipartite direct repeats. Indeed SAM68 bound the SLM-2 consensus and required both U(U/A)AA motifs. We also confirmed that GLD-1 also binds a bipartite RNA sequence in vitro with a short RNA sequence from its tra-2 physiological mRNA target. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the STAR proteins QKI, GLD-1, SAM68 and SLM-2 recognize RNA with direct repeats as bipartite motifs. This information should help identify binding sites within physiological RNA targets. PMID:19457263

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus from Brazil infecting Abutilon.

    PubMed

    Paprotka, T; Metzler, V; Jeske, H

    2010-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Abutilon mosaic Brazil virus (AbMBV), a new bipartite begomovirus from Bahia, Brazil, is described and analyzed phylogenetically. Its DNA A is most closely related to those of Sida-infecting begomoviruses from Brazil and forms a phylogenetic cluster with pepper- and Euphorbia-infecting begomoviruses from Central America. The DNA B component forms a cluster with different Sida- and okra-infecting begomoviruses from Brazil. Both components are distinct from those of the classical Abutilon mosaic virus originating from the West Indies. AbMBV is transmissible to Nicotiana benthamiana and Malva parviflora by biolistics of rolling-circle amplification products and induces characteristic mosaic and vein-clearing symptoms in M. parviflora.

  18. Bipartite networks of oscillators with distributed delays: Synchronization branches and multistability.

    PubMed

    Punetha, Nirmal; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna; Atay, Fatihcan M

    2015-04-01

    We study synchronization in bipartite networks of phase oscillators with general nonlinear coupling and distributed time delays. Phase-locked solutions are shown to arise, where the oscillators in each partition are perfectly synchronized among themselves but can have a phase difference with the other partition, with the phase difference necessarily being either zero or π radians. Analytical conditions for the stability of both types of solutions are obtained and solution branches are explicitly calculated, revealing that the network can have several coexisting stable solutions. With increasing value of the mean delay, the system exhibits hysteresis, phase flips, final state sensitivity, and an extreme form of multistability where the numbers of stable in-phase and antiphase synchronous solutions with distinct frequencies grow without bound. The theory is applied to networks of Landau-Stuart and Rössler oscillators and shown to accurately predict both in-phase and antiphase synchronous behavior in appropriate parameter ranges.

  19. Bipartite networks of oscillators with distributed delays: Synchronization branches and multistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punetha, Nirmal; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna; Atay, Fatihcan M.

    2015-04-01

    We study synchronization in bipartite networks of phase oscillators with general nonlinear coupling and distributed time delays. Phase-locked solutions are shown to arise, where the oscillators in each partition are perfectly synchronized among themselves but can have a phase difference with the other partition, with the phase difference necessarily being either zero or π radians. Analytical conditions for the stability of both types of solutions are obtained and solution branches are explicitly calculated, revealing that the network can have several coexisting stable solutions. With increasing value of the mean delay, the system exhibits hysteresis, phase flips, final state sensitivity, and an extreme form of multistability where the numbers of stable in-phase and antiphase synchronous solutions with distinct frequencies grow without bound. The theory is applied to networks of Landau-Stuart and Rössler oscillators and shown to accurately predict both in-phase and antiphase synchronous behavior in appropriate parameter ranges.

  20. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, Marco Fedele

    2015-03-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  1. Controlling coherence via tuning of the population imbalance in a bipartite optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Liberto, M.; Comparin, T.; Kock, T.; Ölschläger, M.; Hemmerich, A.; Smith, C. Morais

    2014-12-01

    The control of transport properties is a key tool at the basis of many technologically relevant effects in condensed matter. The clean and precisely controlled environment of ultracold atoms in optical lattices allows one to prepare simplified but instructive models, which can help to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms. Here we show that by tuning a structural deformation of the unit cell in a bipartite optical lattice, one can induce a phase transition from a superfluid into various Mott insulating phases forming a shell structure in the superimposed harmonic trap. The Mott shells are identified via characteristic features in the visibility of Bragg maxima in momentum spectra. The experimental findings are explained by Gutzwiller mean-field and quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Our system bears similarities with the loss of coherence in cuprate superconductors, known to be associated with the doping-induced buckling of the oxygen octahedra surrounding the copper sites.

  2. The algebra of bipartite graphs and Hurwitz numbers of seamed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseevskii, A. V.; Natanzon, S. M.

    2008-08-01

    We extend the definition of Hurwitz numbers to the case of seamed surfaces, which arise in new models of mathematical physics, and prove that they form a system of correlators for a Klein topological field theory in the sense defined in [1]. We find the corresponding Cardy-Frobenius algebras, which yield a method for calculating the Hurwitz numbers. As a by-product, we prove that the vector space generated by the bipartite graphs with n edges possesses a natural binary operation that makes this space into a non-commutative Frobenius algebra isomorphic to the algebra of intertwining operators for a representation of the symmetric group S_n on the space generated by the set of all partitions of a set of n elements.

  3. Modeling discrete combinatorial systems as alphabetic bipartite networks: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Monojit; Ganguly, Niloy; Maiti, Abyayananda; Mukherjee, Animesh; Brusch, Lutz; Deutsch, Andreas; Peruani, Fernando

    2010-03-01

    Genes and human languages are discrete combinatorial systems (DCSs), in which the basic building blocks are finite sets of elementary units: nucleotides or codons in a DNA sequence, and letters or words in a language. Different combinations of these finite units give rise to potentially infinite numbers of genes or sentences. This type of DCSs can be represented as an alphabetic bipartite network (ABN) where there are two kinds of nodes, one type represents the elementary units while the other type represents their combinations. Here, we extend and generalize recent analytical findings for ABNs derived in [Peruani , Europhys. Lett. 79, 28001 (2007)] and empirically investigate two real world systems in terms of ABNs, the codon gene and the phoneme-language network. The one-mode projections onto the elementary basic units are also studied theoretically as well as in real world ABNs. We propose the use of ABNs as a means for inferring the mechanisms underlying the growth of real world DCSs.

  4. Cascading Failures in Bi-partite Graphs: Model for Systemic Risk Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008–2011. PMID:23386974

  5. Interlocking directorates in Irish companies using a latent space model for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nial; Rastelli, Riccardo; Wyse, Jason; Raftery, Adrian E

    2016-06-14

    We analyze the temporal bipartite network of the leading Irish companies and their directors from 2003 to 2013, encompassing the end of the Celtic Tiger boom and the ensuing financial crisis in 2008. We focus on the evolution of company interlocks, whereby a company director simultaneously sits on two or more boards. We develop a statistical model for this dataset by embedding the positions of companies and directors in a latent space. The temporal evolution of the network is modeled through three levels of Markovian dependence: one on the model parameters, one on the companies' latent positions, and one on the edges themselves. The model is estimated using Bayesian inference. Our analysis reveals that the level of interlocking, as measured by a contraction of the latent space, increased before and during the crisis, reaching a peak in 2009, and has generally stabilized since then. PMID:27247395

  6. Strategies for molecular classification of asthma using bipartite network analysis of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Regina R; Divekar, Rohit; Brasier, Allan; Bhavnani, Suresh; Calhoun, William J

    2012-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that leads to various degrees of recurrent respiratory symptoms affecting patients globally. Specific subgroups of asthma patients have severe disease leading to increased healthcare costs and socioeconomic burden. Despite the overwhelming prevalence of the asthma, there are limitations in predicting response to therapy and identifying patients who are at increased risk of morbidity. This syndrome presents with common clinical signs and symptoms; however, awareness of subgroups of asthma patients with distinct characteristics has surfaced in recent years. Investigators attempt to describe the phenotypes of asthma to ultimately assist with diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Approaches to asthma phenotyping are multifold; however, it can be partitioned into 2 essential groups, clinical phenotyping and molecular phenotyping. Innovative techniques such as bipartite network analysis and visual analytics introduce a new dimension of data analysis to identify underlying mechanistic pathways.

  7. Controlling spin-dependent localization and directed transport in a bipartite lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yunrong; Lu, Gengbiao; Kong, Chao; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-04-01

    We study coherent control of spin-dependent dynamical localization (DL) and directed transport (DT) of a spin-orbit-coupled single atom held in a driven optical bipartite lattice. Under the high-frequency limit and nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation, we find a new decoupling mechanism between states with the same (different) spins, which leads to two sets of analytical solutions describing DL and DT with (without) spin flipping. The analytical results are numerically confirmed, and perfect agreements are found. Extending the research to a system of spin-orbit-coupled single atoms, the spin current and quantum information transport with controllable propagation speed and distance are investigated. The results can be experimentally tested in the current setups and may be useful in quantum information processing.

  8. Interlocking directorates in Irish companies using a latent space model for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nial; Rastelli, Riccardo; Wyse, Jason; Raftery, Adrian E

    2016-06-14

    We analyze the temporal bipartite network of the leading Irish companies and their directors from 2003 to 2013, encompassing the end of the Celtic Tiger boom and the ensuing financial crisis in 2008. We focus on the evolution of company interlocks, whereby a company director simultaneously sits on two or more boards. We develop a statistical model for this dataset by embedding the positions of companies and directors in a latent space. The temporal evolution of the network is modeled through three levels of Markovian dependence: one on the model parameters, one on the companies' latent positions, and one on the edges themselves. The model is estimated using Bayesian inference. Our analysis reveals that the level of interlocking, as measured by a contraction of the latent space, increased before and during the crisis, reaching a peak in 2009, and has generally stabilized since then.

  9. Interlocking directorates in Irish companies using a latent space model for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Friel, Nial; Rastelli, Riccardo; Wyse, Jason; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the temporal bipartite network of the leading Irish companies and their directors from 2003 to 2013, encompassing the end of the Celtic Tiger boom and the ensuing financial crisis in 2008. We focus on the evolution of company interlocks, whereby a company director simultaneously sits on two or more boards. We develop a statistical model for this dataset by embedding the positions of companies and directors in a latent space. The temporal evolution of the network is modeled through three levels of Markovian dependence: one on the model parameters, one on the companies’ latent positions, and one on the edges themselves. The model is estimated using Bayesian inference. Our analysis reveals that the level of interlocking, as measured by a contraction of the latent space, increased before and during the crisis, reaching a peak in 2009, and has generally stabilized since then. PMID:27247395

  10. Spin Configurations of π Electrons and Dimerization in Quasi-One-Dimensional Organic Bipartite Lozenge Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y. F.; Yao, K. L.; Yi, L.

    Based on a theoretical model proposed for an organic bipartite lozenge ferrimagnetic chain, the spin configuration of π electrons and the dimerization are investigated. With the Hartree-Fock approximation, the strong electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interaction in the one-dimensional system are taken into account self-consistently. It is shown that around the middle of the chain appears a π electron spin polarization cloud with alternation of sign and amplitude of the spin density extending over a certain distance, which extends all over the chain with no decay when the e-e interaction is larger than a critical value. In the stable ferrimagnetic state, the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between electrons at site A and site B along the chain will become very strong, and almost zero dimerization happens for the chain.

  11. Time-reversal formalism applied to maximal bipartite entanglement: Theoretical and experimental exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Laforest, M.; Baugh, J.; Laflamme, R.

    2006-03-15

    Within the context of quantum teleportation, a proposed interpretation of bipartite entanglement describes teleportation as consisting of a qubit of information evolving along and against the flow of time of an external observer. We investigate the physicality of such a model by applying time reversal to the Schroedinger equation in the teleportation context. To do so, we first present the theory of time reversal applied to the circuit model. We then show that the outcome of a teleportationlike circuit is consistent with the usual tensor product treatment and is therefore independent of the physical quantum system used to encode the information. Finally, we illustrate these concepts with a proof-of-principle experiment on a liquid-state NMR quantum-information processor. The experimental results are consistent with the interpretation that information can be seen as flowing backward in time through entanglement.

  12. Quantum Discord and Entanglement of Quasi-Werner States Based on Bipartite Entangled Coherent States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Manoj K.; Maurya, Ajay K.; Prakash, Hari

    2016-06-01

    Present work is an attempt to compare quantum discord and quantum entanglement of quasi-Werner states formed with the four bipartite entangled coherent states (ECS) used recently for quantum teleportation of a qubit encoded in superposed coherent state. Out of these, the quasi-Werner states based on maximally ECS due to its invariant nature under local operation is independent of measurement basis and mean photon numbers, while for quasi-Werner states based on non-maximally ECS, it depends upon measurement basis as well as on mean photon number. However, for large mean photon numbers since non-maximally ECS becomes almost maximally entangled therefore dependence of quantum discord for non-maximally ECS based quasi-Werner states on the measurement basis disappears.

  13. Using the bipartite human phenotype network to reveal pleiotropy and epistasis beyond the gene.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Harmon, Samantha H; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the quality and quantity of data generated by modern high-throughput sequencing techniques, there has been a need for innovative methods able to convert this tremendous amount of data into more accessible forms. Networks have been a corner stone of this movement, as they are an intuitive way of representing interaction data, yet they offer a full set of sophisticated statistical tools to analyze the phenomena they model. We propose a novel approach to reveal and analyze pleiotropic and epistatic effects at the genome-wide scale using a bipartite network composed of human diseases, phenotypic traits, and several types of predictive elements (i.e. SNPs, genes, or pathways). We take advantage of publicly available GWAS data, gene and pathway databases, and more to construct networks different levels of granularity, from common genetic variants to entire biological pathways. We use the connections between the layers of the network to approximate the pleiotropy and epistasis effects taking place between the traits and the predictive elements. The global graph-theory based quantitative methods reveal that the levels of pleiotropy and epistasis are comparable for all types of predictive element. The results of the magnified "glaucoma" region of the network demonstrate the existence of well documented interactions, supported by overlapping genes and biological pathway, and more obscure associations. As the amount and complexity of genetic data increases, bipartite, and more generally multipartite networks that combine human diseases and other physical attributes with layers of genetic information, have the potential to become ubiquitous tools in the study of complex genetic and phenotypic interactions.

  14. Fusarium graminearum produces different xylanases causing host cell death that is prevented by the xylanase inhibitors XIP-I and TAXI-III in wheat.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Silvio; Moscetti, Ilaria; Faoro, Franco; Lafond, Mickaël; Giardina, Thierry; Favaron, Francesco; Sella, Luca; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-11-01

    To shed light on the role of Xylanase Inhibitors (XIs) during Fusarium graminearum infection, we first demonstrated that three out of four F. graminearum xylanases, in addition to their xylan degrading activity, have also the capacity to cause host cell death both in cell suspensions and wheat spike tissue. Subsequently, we demonstrated that TAXI-III and XIP-I prevented both the enzyme and host cell death activities of F. graminearum xylanases. In particular, we showed that the enzymatic inhibition by TAXI-III and XIP-I was competitive and only FGSG_11487 escaped inhibition. The finding that TAXI-III and XIP-I prevented cell death activity of heat inactivated xylanases and that XIP-I precluded the cell death activity of FGSG_11487 - even if XIP-I does not inhibit its enzyme activity - suggests that the catalytic and the cell death activities are separated features of these xylanases. Finally, the efficacy of TAXI-III or XIP-I to prevent host cell death caused by xylanases was confirmed in transgenic plants expressing separately these inhibitors, suggesting that the XIs could limit F. graminearum infection via direct inhibition of xylanase activity and/or by preventing host cell death.

  15. PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY OF THE PSA PEUGEOT CITROEN'S DPF SYSTEM ON A TAXI FLEET IN THE PARIS AREA

    SciTech Connect

    COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

    2003-08-24

    The use of Diesel engines has strongly increased during the last years and now represents 40% of the sales in Europe and up to 50% of the number of cars in circulation for some countries. This success is linked not only to the economical aspect of the use of such vehicles, but also to the recent technological improvements of these engines. The new technical solutions (high pressure direct injection, turbocharger) have indeed allowed the increase of these engine performances while decreasing their fuel consumption, pollutant emissions and noise level. From an environment point of view, Diesel engines are nevertheless penalized by their particulates and NOx emissions. The study and the treatment of the particulate, highly criticized for their potential impact on health, are the subject of numerous works of characterizations and developments. PSA Peugeot Citroen has recently (2000) launched its particulate filter technology on several types of vehicles (500,000 vehicles with DPF have been sold today). In order to evaluate the durability of this technology over a long period of time, a study program has been set-up by ADEME (French Environmental Agency), IFP Powertrain, PSA Peugeot Citroen and Taxis G7 (a Parisian taxis Company). The objective is to study the evolution of five taxis and their after-treatment system performances over 80,000km mileage--which corresponds to the recommended mileage before the first DPF maintenance--in hard urban driving conditions, as well over 120,000km, after the DPF maintenance and remanufacturing. More specifically, the following evaluations are being performed at regular intervals (around 20,000km): regulated gaseous pollutant emissions on NEDC cycle, particulate emissions and unregulated pollutant emissions. The results obtained until now have not shown any degradation of the particulate filter efficiency (more than 90%). This paper presents the methodology set-up, and the explanation of the first results obtained. Indeed, a more

  16. Shuttle Endeavour Mated to 747 SCA Taxi to Runway for Delivery to Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft No. 911, with the space shuttle orbiter Endeavour securely mounted atop its fuselage, taxies to the runway to begin the ferry flight from Rockwell's Plant 42 at Palmdale, California, where the orbiter was built, to the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. At Kennedy, the space vehicle was processed and launched on orbital mission STS-49, which landed at NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later redesignated Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, 16 May 1992. NASA 911, the second modified 747 that went into service in November 1990, has special support struts atop the fuselage and internal strengthening to accommodate the added weight of the orbiters. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into space, the laboratories remain inside the payload bay

  17. Dynamics of bloggers’ communities: Bipartite networks from empirical data and agent-based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, Marija; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis of the empirical data and the agent-based modeling of the emotional behavior of users on the Web portals where the user interaction is mediated by posted comments, like Blogs and Diggs. We consider the dataset of discussion-driven popular Diggs, in which all comments are screened by machine-learning emotion detection in the text, to determine positive and negative valence (attractiveness and aversiveness) of each comment. By mapping the data onto a suitable bipartite network, we perform an analysis of the network topology and the related time-series of the emotional comments. The agent-based model is then introduced to simulate the dynamics and to capture the emergence of the emotional behaviors and communities. The agents are linked to posts on a bipartite network, whose structure evolves through their actions on the posts. The emotional states (arousal and valence) of each agent fluctuate in time, subject to the current contents of the posts to which the agent is exposed. By an agent’s action on a post its current emotions are transferred to the post. The model rules and the key parameters are inferred from the considered empirical data to ensure their realistic values and mutual consistency. The model assumes that the emotional arousal over posts drives the agent’s action. The simulations are preformed for the case of constant flux of agents and the results are analyzed in full analogy with the empirical data. The main conclusions are that the emotion-driven dynamics leads to long-range temporal correlations and emergent networks with community structure, that are comparable with the ones in the empirical system of popular posts. In view of pure emotion-driven agents actions, this type of comparisons provide a quantitative measure for the role of emotions in the dynamics on real blogs. Furthermore, the model reveals the underlying mechanisms which relate the post popularity with the emotion dynamics and the prevalence of negative

  18. FALCON: a software package for analysis of nestedness in bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Stephen J; Boulton, Chris A; Williams, Hywel T P

    2014-01-01

    Nestedness is a statistical measure used to interpret bipartite interaction data in several ecological and evolutionary contexts, e.g. biogeography (species-site relationships) and species interactions (plant-pollinator and host-parasite networks). Multiple methods have been used to evaluate nestedness, which differ in how the metrics for nestedness are determined. Furthermore, several different null models have been used to calculate statistical significance of nestedness scores. The profusion of measures and null models, many of which give conflicting results, is problematic for comparison of nestedness across different studies. We developed the FALCON software package to allow easy and efficient comparison of nestedness scores and statistical significances for a given input network, using a selection of the more popular measures and null models from the current literature. FALCON currently includes six measures and five null models for nestedness in binary networks, and two measures and four null models for nestedness in weighted networks. The FALCON software is designed to be efficient and easy to use. FALCON code is offered in three languages (R, MATLAB, Octave) and is designed to be modular and extensible, enabling users to easily expand its functionality by adding further measures and null models. FALCON provides a robust methodology for comparing the strength and significance of nestedness in a given bipartite network using multiple measures and null models. It includes an "adaptive ensemble" method to reduce undersampling of the null distribution when calculating statistical significance. It can work with binary or weighted input networks. FALCON is a response to the proliferation of different nestedness measures and associated null models in the literature. It allows easy and efficient calculation of nestedness scores and statistical significances using different methods, enabling comparison of results from different studies and

  19. The construction, properties and applications of a new bipartite coherent-entangled state in the two-mode Fock space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Ji-Suo; Liang, Bao-Long

    2011-02-01

    Using the technique of integration within an ordered product (IWOP) of operators, we find a new kind of bipartite coherent-entangled state (CES) that exhibits both coherent state and entangled state properties. The set of CESs makes up a complete and partly nonorthogonal representation. Using an asymmetric beamsplitter we propose a simple experimental scheme for producing the CES. Finally, we present some new quantum states related to the CES and some applications of the CES to quantum optics.

  20. On finding bicliques in bipartite graphs: a novel algorithm and its application to the integration of diverse biological data types

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating and analyzing heterogeneous genome-scale data is a huge algorithmic challenge for modern systems biology. Bipartite graphs can be useful for representing relationships across pairs of disparate data types, with the interpretation of these relationships accomplished through an enumeration of maximal bicliques. Most previously-known techniques are generally ill-suited to this foundational task, because they are relatively inefficient and without effective scaling. In this paper, a powerful new algorithm is described that produces all maximal bicliques in a bipartite graph. Unlike most previous approaches, the new method neither places undue restrictions on its input nor inflates the problem size. Efficiency is achieved through an innovative exploitation of bipartite graph structure, and through computational reductions that rapidly eliminate non-maximal candidates from the search space. An iterative selection of vertices for consideration based on non-decreasing common neighborhood sizes boosts efficiency and leads to more balanced recursion trees. Results The new technique is implemented and compared to previously published approaches from graph theory and data mining. Formal time and space bounds are derived. Experiments are performed on both random graphs and graphs constructed from functional genomics data. It is shown that the new method substantially outperforms the best previous alternatives. Conclusions The new method is streamlined, efficient, and particularly well-suited to the study of huge and diverse biological data. A robust implementation has been incorporated into GeneWeaver, an online tool for integrating and analyzing functional genomics experiments, available at http://geneweaver.org. The enormous increase in scalability it provides empowers users to study complex and previously unassailable gene-set associations between genes and their biological functions in a hierarchical fashion and on a genome-wide scale. This practical

  1. GENERAL: Teleportation of a Bipartite Entangled Coherent State via a Four-Partite Cluster-Type Entangled State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui-Na; Liu, Jin-Ming

    2009-10-01

    We present an optical scheme to almost completely teleport a bipartite entangled coherent state using a four-partite cluster-type entangled coherent state as quantum channel. The scheme is based on optical elements such as beam splitters, phase shifters, and photon detectors. We also obtain the average fidelity of the teleportation process. It is shown that the average fidelity is quite close to unity if the mean photon number of the coherent state is not too small.

  2. A bipartite operator interacts with a heat shock element to mediate early meiotic induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP82

    SciTech Connect

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report seeks to characterize the activation of meiotic gene in terms of cis-acting DNA elements and their associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that vegetative repression and meiotic induction depend on interactions of the promoter-proximal heat shock element with a nearby bipartite repression element. The experiments described explore how two different regulatory pathways induce transcription by stimulating a single classical activation element, a nonspecific heat shock element. 81 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nuclear Localization of the DNA Repair Scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the Functional Role of a Bipartite NLS

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior provides a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system. PMID:26304019

  4. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  5. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGES

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  6. Nuclear Localization of the DNA Repair Scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the Functional Role of a Bipartite NLS.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Thomas W; Gassman, Natalie R; Smith, Cassandra E; Pedersen, Lars C; Gabel, Scott A; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H; London, Robert E

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior provides a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  7. Reaction Factoring and Bipartite Update Graphs Accelerate the Gillespie Algorithm for Large-Scale Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Indurkhya, Sagar; Beal, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    ODE simulations of chemical systems perform poorly when some of the species have extremely low concentrations. Stochastic simulation methods, which can handle this case, have been impractical for large systems due to computational complexity. We observe, however, that when modeling complex biological systems: (1) a small number of reactions tend to occur a disproportionately large percentage of the time, and (2) a small number of species tend to participate in a disproportionately large percentage of reactions. We exploit these properties in LOLCAT Method, a new implementation of the Gillespie Algorithm. First, factoring reaction propensities allows many propensities dependent on a single species to be updated in a single operation. Second, representing dependencies between reactions with a bipartite graph of reactions and species requires only storage for reactions, rather than the required for a graph that includes only reactions. Together, these improvements allow our implementation of LOLCAT Method to execute orders of magnitude faster than currently existing Gillespie Algorithm variants when simulating several yeast MAPK cascade models. PMID:20066048

  8. Bank-Firm Credit Network in Japan: An Analysis of a Bipartite Network

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Luca; Miccichè, Salvatore; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Gallegati, Mauro; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our investigation is performed with tools of network science. In our investigation we perform community detection with an algorithm which is identifying communities composed of both banks and firms. We show that the communities obtained by directly working on the bipartite network carry information about the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our analysis is performed for each calendar year during the time period from 1980 to 2011. To investigate the time evolution of the networked structure of the credit market we introduce a new statistical method to track the time evolution of detected communities. We then characterize the time evolution of communities by detecting for each time evolving set of communities the over-expression of attributes of firms and banks. Specifically, we consider as attributes the economic sector and the geographical location of firms and the type of banks. In our 32-year-long analysis we detect a persistence of the over-expression of attributes of communities of banks and firms together with a slow dynamic of changes from some specific attributes to new ones. Our empirical observations show that the credit market in Japan is a networked market where the type of banks, geographical location of firms and banks, and economic sector of the firm play a role in shaping the credit relationships between banks and firms. PMID:25933413

  9. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Smallest state spaces for which bipartite entangled quantum states are separable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Hussain; Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Oliver; Virmani, Shashank

    2015-09-01

    According to usual definitions, entangled states cannot be given a separable decomposition in terms of products of local density operators. If we relax the requirement that the local operators be positive, then an entangled quantum state may admit a separable decomposition in terms of more general sets of single-system operators. This form of separability can be used to construct classical models and simulation methods when only a restricted set of measurements is available. With these motivations in mind, we ask what are the smallest sets of local operators such that a pure bipartite entangled quantum state becomes separable? We find that in the case of maximally entangled states there are many inequivalent solutions, including for example the sets of phase point operators that arise in the study of discrete Wigner functions. We therefore provide a new way of interpreting these operators, and more generally, provide an alternative method for constructing local hidden variable models for entangled quantum states under subsets of quantum measurements.

  11. Bank-firm credit network in Japan: an analysis of a bipartite network.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Luca; Miccichè, Salvatore; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Gallegati, Mauro; Mantegna, Rosario N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our investigation is performed with tools of network science. In our investigation we perform community detection with an algorithm which is identifying communities composed of both banks and firms. We show that the communities obtained by directly working on the bipartite network carry information about the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our analysis is performed for each calendar year during the time period from 1980 to 2011. To investigate the time evolution of the networked structure of the credit market we introduce a new statistical method to track the time evolution of detected communities. We then characterize the time evolution of communities by detecting for each time evolving set of communities the over-expression of attributes of firms and banks. Specifically, we consider as attributes the economic sector and the geographical location of firms and the type of banks. In our 32-year-long analysis we detect a persistence of the over-expression of attributes of communities of banks and firms together with a slow dynamic of changes from some specific attributes to new ones. Our empirical observations show that the credit market in Japan is a networked market where the type of banks, geographical location of firms and banks, and economic sector of the firm play a role in shaping the credit relationships between banks and firms.

  12. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [

    F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)
    ], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  13. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. II. Bipartite systems, physical processes, and heterodyne squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    Extending the scheme developed for a single mode of the electromagnetic field in the preceding paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, Phys. Rev. A 69, 033812 (2004)], we introduce two-mode nonlinear canonical transformations depending on two heterodyne mixing angles. They are defined in terms of Hermitian nonlinear functions that realize heterodyne superpositions of conjugate quadratures of bipartite systems. The canonical transformations diagonalize a class of Hamiltonians describing nondegenerate and degenerate multiphoton processes. We determine the coherent states associated with the canonical transformations, which generalize the nondegenerate two-photon squeezed states. Such heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states are defined as the simultaneous eigenstates of the transformed, coupled annihilation operators. They are generated by nonlinear unitary evolutions acting on two-mode squeezed states. They are non-Gaussian, highly nonclassical, entangled states. For a quadratic nonlinearity the heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states define two-mode cubic phase states. The statistical properties of these states can be widely adjusted by tuning the heterodyne mixing angles, the phases of the nonlinear couplings, as well as the strength of the nonlinearity. For quadratic nonlinearity, we study the higher-order contributions to the susceptibility in nonlinear media and we suggest possible experimental realizations of multiphoton conversion processes generating the cubic-phase heterodyne squeezed states.

  14. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA. PMID:25144371

  15. Activation of wingless targets requires bipartite recognition of DNA by TCF.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mikyung V; Chang, Jinhee L; Gangopadhyay, Anu; Shearer, Andrew; Cadigan, Ken M

    2008-12-01

    Specific recognition of DNA by transcription factors is essential for precise gene regulation. In Wingless (Wg) signaling in Drosophila, target gene regulation is controlled by T cell factor (TCF), which binds to specific DNA sequences through a high mobility group (HMG) domain. However, there is considerable variability in TCF binding sites, raising the possibility that they are not sufficient for target location. Some isoforms of human TCF contain a domain, termed the C-clamp, that mediates binding to an extended sequence in vitro. However, the significance of this extended sequence for the function of Wnt response elements (WREs) is unclear. In this report, we identify a cis-regulatory element that, to our knowledge, was previously unpublished. The element, named the TCF Helper site (Helper site), is essential for the activation of several WREs. This motif greatly augments the ability of TCF binding sites to respond to Wg signaling. Drosophila TCF contains a C-clamp that enhances in vitro binding to TCF-Helper site pairs and is required for transcriptional activation of WREs containing Helper sites. A genome-wide search for clusters of TCF and Helper sites identified two new WREs. Our data suggest that DNA recognition by fly TCF occurs through a bipartite mechanism, involving both the HMG domain and the C-clamp, which enables TCF to locate and activate WREs in the nucleus. PMID:19062282

  16. Bank-firm credit network in Japan: an analysis of a bipartite network.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Luca; Miccichè, Salvatore; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Gallegati, Mauro; Mantegna, Rosario N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our investigation is performed with tools of network science. In our investigation we perform community detection with an algorithm which is identifying communities composed of both banks and firms. We show that the communities obtained by directly working on the bipartite network carry information about the networked nature of the Japanese credit market. Our analysis is performed for each calendar year during the time period from 1980 to 2011. To investigate the time evolution of the networked structure of the credit market we introduce a new statistical method to track the time evolution of detected communities. We then characterize the time evolution of communities by detecting for each time evolving set of communities the over-expression of attributes of firms and banks. Specifically, we consider as attributes the economic sector and the geographical location of firms and the type of banks. In our 32-year-long analysis we detect a persistence of the over-expression of attributes of communities of banks and firms together with a slow dynamic of changes from some specific attributes to new ones. Our empirical observations show that the credit market in Japan is a networked market where the type of banks, geographical location of firms and banks, and economic sector of the firm play a role in shaping the credit relationships between banks and firms. PMID:25933413

  17. Cluster Analysis of Weighted Bipartite Networks: A New Copula-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chessa, Alessandro; Crimaldi, Irene; Riccaboni, Massimo; Trapin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    In this work we are interested in identifying clusters of “positional equivalent” actors, i.e. actors who play a similar role in a system. In particular, we analyze weighted bipartite networks that describes the relationships between actors on one side and features or traits on the other, together with the intensity level to which actors show their features. We develop a methodological approach that takes into account the underlying multivariate dependence among groups of actors. The idea is that positions in a network could be defined on the basis of the similar intensity levels that the actors exhibit in expressing some features, instead of just considering relationships that actors hold with each others. Moreover, we propose a new clustering procedure that exploits the potentiality of copula functions, a mathematical instrument for the modelization of the stochastic dependence structure. Our clustering algorithm can be applied both to binary and real-valued matrices. We validate it with simulations and applications to real-world data. PMID:25303095

  18. Integration of Phenotypic Metadata and Protein Similarity in Archaea Using a Spectral Bipartitioning Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Sean D.; Anderson, Iain J; Pati, Amrita; Dalevi, Daniel; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2009-01-01

    In order to simplify and meaningfully categorize large sets of protein sequence data, it is commonplace to cluster proteins based on the similarity of those sequences. However, it quickly becomes clear that the sequence flexibility allowed a given protein varies significantly among different protein families. The degree to which sequences are conserved not only differs for each protein family, but also is affected by the phylogenetic divergence of the source organisms. Clustering techniques that use similarity thresholds for protein families do not always allow for these variations and thus cannot be confidently used for applications such as automated annotation and phylogenetic profiling. In this work, we applied a spectral bipartitioning technique to all proteins from 53 archaeal genomes. Comparisons between different taxonomic levels allowed us to study the effects of phylogenetic distances on cluster structure. Likewise, by associating functional annotations and phenotypic metadata with each protein, we could compare our protein similarity clusters with both protein function and associated phenotype. Our clusters can be analyzed graphically and interactively online.

  19. Molecular characterization of distinct bipartite begomovirus infecting bhendi (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) in India.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, Salil; Krishna Reddy, M

    2012-06-01

    Yellow vein mosaic disease of okra is a whitefly transmitted begomovirus causing heavy economic loss in different parts of India. The okra isolate (OY131) of this virus from a bhendi plant [(Abelmoschus esculentus L.) Moench] showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting, reduced leaves, and a bushy appearance in the Palem region, New Delhi, India, was characterized in the present study. The complete DNA-A and DNA-B sequences have been determined and are comprised of 2,746 and 2,703 nucleotides, respectively. The betasatellite (DNA-β) component was absent in the sample. The genome organization was typically of biparite begomoviruses, which were characterized earlier. Comparison of DNA-A component with other known begomoviruses suggest that this virus, being only distantly related (<85.9% similarity with its nearest relative, BYVMV) to other known begomoviruses, is a new species. We have tentatively assigned the genome to a novel geminivirus species Bhendi yellow vein mosaic Delhi virus [BYVDV-IN (India: Delhi: okra)]. DNA-B showed highest sequence identity (87.8% identical) to that of a ToLCNDV (AY158080). The phylogenetic analysis of the present isolate is distinct from all other viruses; however clusters with ToLCNDV group infect different crops. The recombination analysis revealed that this isolate has sequences originated from ToLCNDV. This is the first known bhendi yellow vein mosaic disease associated bipartite begomovirus from India.

  20. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L; Yario, Therese A; Steitz, Thomas A; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3'-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3' nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a 'helical reset' that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature.

  1. Orchid fleck virus is a rhabdovirus with an unusual bipartite genome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Maeda, Takanori; Shirako, Yukio; Tamada, Tetsuo

    2006-08-01

    Orchid fleck virus (OFV) has an unusual bipartite negative-sense RNA genome with clear sequence similarities to those of nucleorhabdoviruses. The OFV genome consists of two single-stranded RNA molecules, RNA1 and RNA2 that are 6413 and 6001 nt long, respectively, with open reading frame (ORF) information in the complementary sense. RNA1 encodes 49 (ORF1), 26 (ORF2), 38 (ORF3), 20 (ORF4) and 61 kDa (ORF5) proteins, and RNA2 encodes a single protein of 212 kDa (ORF6). ORF1, ORF5 and ORF6 proteins had significant similarities (21-38 % identity) to the nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein (G) and polymerase (L) gene products, respectively, of other rhabdoviruses, especially nucleorhabdoviruses, whereas ORF2, ORF3 and ORF4 proteins had no significant similarities to other proteins in the international databases. Similarities between OFV and rhabdoviruses were also found in the sequence complementarity at both termini of each RNA segment (the common terminal sequences are 3'-UGUGUC---GACACA-5'), the conserved intergenic sequences and in being negative sense. It was proposed that a new genus Dichorhabdovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae of the order Mononegavirales should be established with OFV as its prototype member and type species.

  2. A bipartite interaction between Hsp70 and CHIP regulates ubiquitination of chaperoned client proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huaqun; Amick, Joseph; Chakravarti, Ritu; Santarriaga, Stephanie; Schlanger, Simon; McGlone, Cameron; Dare, Michelle; Nix, Jay C.; Scaglione, K. Matthew; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Misra, Saurav; Page, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin ligase CHIP plays an important role in cytosolic protein quality control by ubiquitinating proteins chaperoned by Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90, thereby targeting such substrate proteins for degradation. We present a 2.91 Å resolution structure of the TPR domain of CHIP in complex with the α-helical “lid” subdomain and unstructured “tail” of Hsc70. Surprisingly, the CHIP-TPR interacts with determinants within both the Hsc70-lid subdomain and the C-terminal PTIEEVD motif of the tail, exhibiting a novel mode of interaction between chaperones and TPR domains. We demonstrate that the interaction between CHIP and the Hsc70-lid subdomain is required for proper ubiquitination of Hsp70/Hsc70 or Hsp70/Hsc70-bound substrate proteins. Post-translational modifications of the Hsc70 lid and tail disrupt key contacts with the CHIP-TPR and may regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination. Our study shows how CHIP docks onto Hsp70/Hsc70 and defines a new bipartite mode of interaction between TPR domains and their binding partners. PMID:25684577

  3. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  4. Wnt-Mediated Repression via Bipartite DNA Recognition by TCF in the Drosophila Hematopoietic System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen U.; Blauwkamp, Timothy A.; Burby, Peter E.; Cadigan, Ken M.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA. PMID:25144371

  5. Effective temperature from fluctuation-dissipation theorem in systems with bipartite eigenmode entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, T. S.; Iucci, A.

    2015-01-01

    In thermal equilibrium, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the linear response and correlation functions in a model and observable independent fashion. Out of equilibrium, these relations still hold if the equilibrium temperature is replaced by an observable and frequency-dependent parameter (effective temperature). When the system achieves a long-time thermal state all of these effective temperatures should be equal and constant. Following this approach we examine the long-times regime after a quantum quench in a system with bipartite entanglement in which the asymptotic values of the observable are compatible with the ones obtained in a Gibbs ensemble. We observe that when the initial entanglement is large, and for a large range of (intermediate) frequencies, the effective temperatures corresponding to the analyzed local and nonlocal operators approach an approximate constant value equal to the temperature that governs the decay of correlations. Still, the residual frequency dependence in the effective temperature, and the differences observed among observables, discards strict thermalization.

  6. Matched Bipartite Digraph Representation of Generalized Dynamical System Formed by One-way Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, John; Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin; Tom Solomon Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We studied a dynamical system with stable and unstable manifolds that behave as one-way barriers, instead of separatrices in traditional dynamical system that are two-way barriers. This asymmetry gives rise to a richer dynamical behavior such as the overlapping of basins of attraction. The recently developed Burning Invariant Manifold (BIM) theory took a dynamical system approach to understand front propagation in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion systems, which have BIMs as the one-way barriers. Through numerical simulations under BIM theory, we found that although both unstable and stable BIMs are one-way barriers, unstable BIMs are the ones that we can experimentally observe the fronts converging onto, and the stable BIMs act as the basin boundaries. We further hypothesized a duality relation between the stable and unstable BIMs. Under the duality hypothesis, we developed a mechanism of the behavior of the system by reducing it back to a traditional system based on topology, and we found a simplification of the system by to summarize the topological information into a Matched Bipartite directed graph (MB digraph). This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0748828 and NSF Fellowship DGE-0937362.

  7. Davies theory for reservoir-induced entanglement in a bipartite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendi, K.; van Wonderen, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Two mutually noninteracting qubits with identical modest coupling to one and the same reservoir are considered. For a given Hamiltonian and uncorrelated initial state, the mathematically rigorous Davies theory of the weak-coupling and van Hove limit provides a unique Markovian quantum master equation where absolutely none of the usually made additional assumptions and further approximations are introduced. Due to completely positive time evolution also no artificial correlations can arise. Numerical solution of the Markovian master equation shows that the qubits become entangled. In a first short time-interval containing one single maximum of entanglement for reservoir temperature T = 0, different choices of uncorrelated initial states give rise to a remarkable emergence of entanglement of different degree. The quantitative evaluation is analysed in terms of a measure derived from Wootters concurrence. Selected results show that there are even states that acquire the possible maximum. Particularly those states will show a periodic type of 'collapse and revival' behaviour with exponentially decaying envelope at longer times. This has never been reported so far for noninteracting qubits as mediated by simultaneous coupling to an uncontrollable reservoir. Moreover, even selected uncorrelated mixed states of modest degree of mixture may show a similar behaviour, although less pronounced. For T > 0 states with high degree of entanglement at T = 0 in the first time-interval still show a gradually reduced value up to a few tenth of Kelvin but for T >= 33 K no effects can be observed. Finally, initially entangled states will slowly lose their oscillatory degree, again with exponential envelope, as the bipartite system approaches its stationary final state.

  8. A quantum logic network for implementing optimal symmetric universal and phase-covariant telecloning of a bipartite entangled state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanyu; Zhu, Aidong

    2008-10-01

    A quantum logic network to implement quantum telecloning is presented in this paper. The network includes two parts: the first part is used to create the telecloning channel and the second part to teleport the state. It can be used not only to implement universal telecloning for a bipartite entangled state which is completely unknown, but also to implement the phase-covariant telecloning for one that is partially known. Furthermore, the network can also be used to construct a tele-triplicator. It can easily be implemented in experiment because only single- and two-qubit operations are used in the network.

  9. NO and NO2 emission ratios measured from in-use commercial aircraft during taxi and takeoff.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Shorter, Joanne H; Zahniser, Mark S; Nelson, David D; Jayne, John; Brown, Robert C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Waitz, Ian; Silva, Phillip; Lanni, Thomas; Demerjian, Ken; Kolb, Charles E

    2004-11-15

    In August 2001, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory simultaneously measured NO, NO2, and CO2 within 350 m of a taxiway and 550 m of a runway at John F. Kennedy Airport. The meteorological conditions were such that taxi and takeoff plumes from individual aircraft were clearly resolved against background levels. NO and NO2 concentrations were measured with 1 s time resolution using a dual tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy instrument, utilizing an astigmatic multipass Herriott cell. The CO2 measurements were also obtained at 1 s time resolution using a commercial non-dispersive infrared absorption instrument. Plumes were measured from over 30 individual planes, ranging from turbo props to jumbo jets. NOx emission indices were determined by examining the correlation between NOx (NO + NO2) and CO2 during the plume measurements. Several aircraft tail numbers were unambiguously identified, allowing those specific airframe/engine combinations to be determined. The resulting NOx emission indices from positively identified in-service operating airplanes are compared with the published International Civil Aviation Organization engine certification test database collected on new engines in certification test cells.

  10. Jobs, food, taxis and journals: complexities of implementing Stepping Stones and Creating Futures in urban informal settlements in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Andrew; Jewkes, Rachel; Mbatha, Nompumelelo; Washington, Laura; Willan, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to refocus debates on structural interventions away from 'assessing' their effectiveness towards understanding processes around how such interventions are implemented. Implementation Science is focused on understanding potential challenges of translating interventions from highly controlled conditions into 'real life' settings. Using the case study of Stepping Stones and Creating Futures a structural and behavioural intervention to reduce intimate partner violence and HIV risk behaviours amongst young women and men in urban informal settlements, we explore the challenges of implementing such an approach. We move beyond simply describing challenges of implementing, to understand how these challenges had an impact on the safe social space the intervention seeks to create as its underlying theory of change. We identify four major challenges of implementation: taxi fares, food provided during the intervention, young people's ongoing need to work and journals provided during the intervention. We suggest that, in different ways, these factors all impinged on the emergence of a safe social space. Understanding the challenges of implementing the intervention is critical for reflecting on scaling up interventions. Central to this is the need to work with participants to help them negotiate the challenges of participating in interventions.

  11. Step On It! Impact of a Workplace New York City Taxi Driver Health Intervention to Increase Necessary Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gany, Francesca; Bari, Sehrish; Gill, Pavan; Loeb, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We describe the impact of the Step On It! intervention to link taxi drivers, particularly South Asians, to health insurance enrollment and navigate them into care when necessary. Methods. Step On It! was a worksite initiative held for 5 consecutive days from September 28 to October 2, 2011, at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. Data collected included sociodemographics, employment, health care access and use, height, weight, blood pressure, and random plasma glucose. Participants were given their results, counseled by a medical professional, and invited to participate in free workshops provided by partner organizations. Results. Of the 466 drivers participated, 52% were uninsured, and 49% did not have a primary care provider. Of 384 drivers who had blood pressure, glucose, or both measured, 242 (63%) required urgent or regular follow-up. Of the 77 (32%) requiring urgent follow-up, 50 (65%) sought medical care at least once, of whom 13 (26%) received a new diagnosis. Of the 165 (68%) requiring regular follow-up, 68 (41%) sought medical care at least once, of whom 5 (7%) received a new diagnosis. Conclusions. This study provides encouraging results about the potential impact of an easy-to-deliver, easily scalable workplace intervention with a large, vulnerable population. PMID:25211738

  12. Jobs, food, taxis and journals: complexities of implementing Stepping Stones and Creating Futures in urban informal settlements in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Andrew; Jewkes, Rachel; Mbatha, Nompumelelo; Washington, Laura; Willan, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to refocus debates on structural interventions away from 'assessing' their effectiveness towards understanding processes around how such interventions are implemented. Implementation Science is focused on understanding potential challenges of translating interventions from highly controlled conditions into 'real life' settings. Using the case study of Stepping Stones and Creating Futures a structural and behavioural intervention to reduce intimate partner violence and HIV risk behaviours amongst young women and men in urban informal settlements, we explore the challenges of implementing such an approach. We move beyond simply describing challenges of implementing, to understand how these challenges had an impact on the safe social space the intervention seeks to create as its underlying theory of change. We identify four major challenges of implementation: taxi fares, food provided during the intervention, young people's ongoing need to work and journals provided during the intervention. We suggest that, in different ways, these factors all impinged on the emergence of a safe social space. Understanding the challenges of implementing the intervention is critical for reflecting on scaling up interventions. Central to this is the need to work with participants to help them negotiate the challenges of participating in interventions. PMID:25174633

  13. Driving performance changes of middle-aged experienced taxi drivers due to distraction tasks during unexpected situations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Seung; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Sang-Pyo; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Tack, Gye-Rae; Kim, Boseong; Min, Ung-Chan; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of distraction taskssuch as sending a text message with a cellphone and searching navigation with car navigation system-on the driving performance of 29 highly experienced taxi drivers in their 50s. All participants were instructed to drive using a driving simulator for 2 min. while maintaining a constant distance from the vehicle in front and a constant speed. Participants drove without any distractions for the first minute. For an additional minute, they performed Driving Only or performed a task while driving (Driving + Sending Text Message or Driving + Searching Navigation). An unexpected situation, in which the participant had to stop abruptly due to a sudden stop of the preceding vehicle, occurred during this period. Driving performance during the unexpected situation was evaluated by car control variables, medial-lateral coefficient of variation and brake time, and by motion variables such as the jerk-cost function. Compared to Driving Only, jerk-cost function, medial-lateral coefficient of variation, and brake time increased during Driving + Sending Text Message or Driving + Searching Navigation. PMID:24611246

  14. A novel bipartite UNC-101/AP-1 μ1 binding signal mediates KVS-4/Kv2.1 somatodendritic distribution in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Zeng, Jia; Ouyang, Chenxi; Luo, Qianyun; Yu, Miao; Yang, Zhenrong; Wang, Hui; Shen, Kang; Shi, Anbing

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels such as Kv2.1 are targeted to specific subcellular compartments to fulfill various functions. However, the mechanisms for their localization are poorly understood. Here, we show that KVS-4/Kv2.1 somatodendritic localization in Caenorhabditis elegansDA9 neuron requires UNC-101(AP-1 μ subunit). We define a bipartite sorting signal within KVS-4 consisting of a C-terminal EQMIL and N-terminal WNIIE motifs. The bipartite signal is sufficient to target nonpolarized transmembrane protein MIG-13 into DA9 somatodendritic compartments. Furthermore, we found that AP-1 interacts with the bipartite signal through UNC-101/AP-1 μ N-terminal predicted Longin-like domain. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms of Kv2.1 post-Golgi sorting and targeting.

  15. Determination of W states equivalent under stochastic local operations and classical communication by their bipartite reduced density matrices with tree form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Tian, Guo-Jing; Huang, Wei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2014-07-01

    It has been known that, among pure states, N-qubit W states cannot be uniquely determined by their arbitrary (N-1) bipartite reduced density matrices. Parashar and Rana proved that among arbitrary states, (N-1) bipartite reduced density matrices that the pairs of qubits constitute a star graph or a line graph can uniquely determine stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) equivalent W states, and we generalize this conclusion into tree graph. In this paper, we show that all SLOCC equivalent W states can be uniquely determined (among pure, mixed states) by their (N-1) bipartite reduced density matrices, if the (N-1) pairs of qubits constitute a tree graph on N vertices, where each pair of qubits represents an edge.

  16. Template recognition mechanisms by replicase proteins differ between bipartite positive-strand genomic RNAs of a plant virus.

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Hiro-Oki; Mine, Akira; Hyodo, Kiwamu; An, Mengnan; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of RNA templates by viral replicase proteins is one of the key steps in the replication process of all RNA viruses. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, including primary RNA elements that are recognized by the viral replicase proteins, are not well understood. Here, we used aptamer pulldown assays with membrane fractionation and protein-RNA coimmunoprecipitation in a cell-free viral translation/replication system to investigate how viral replicase proteins recognize the bipartite genomic RNAs of the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). RCNMV replicase proteins bound specifically to a Y-shaped RNA element (YRE) located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of RNA2, which also interacted with the 480-kDa replicase complexes that contain viral and host proteins. The replicase-YRE interaction recruited RNA2 to the membrane fraction. Conversely, RNA1 fragments failed to interact with the replicase proteins supplied in trans. The results of protein-RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays suggest that RNA1 interacts with the replicase proteins coupled with their translation. Thus, the initial template recognition mechanisms employed by the replicase differ between RCNMV bipartite genomic RNAs and RNA elements are primary determinants of the differential replication mechanism.

  17. Molecular characterization of a distinct bipartite Begomovirus species infecting ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, K; Satya, V K; Mohankumar, S; Karthikeyan, G

    2016-02-01

    A distinct bipartite begomovirus was found to be associated with the mosaic disease on ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India. The complete DNA A and DNA B components were cloned by rolling circle amplification. Genome organization of this virus is found to be typical of Old World bipartite begomovirus. The association of betasatellite component with this virus is absent. The closest nucleotide identity of 73.4 % was seen with the Loofa yellow mosaic virus (LYMV-[VN]-AF509739) suggesting that it is a new virus species Coccinia mosaic virus (CoMoV-Ivy gourd [TN TDV Coc1]) and distantly related to the other known begomoviruses. The DNA B component shared a maximum identity of 55 % with that of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). In the phylogenetic analysis, CoMoV-Ivy gourd form cluster separate from other begomoviruses. Recombination analysis showed that there was no recombination event in the genome. This is the distinct begomovirus infecting ivy gourd. PMID:26739457

  18. Unique conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses-cancer terminator viruses (CTV): efficacious reagents for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Fisher, Paul B

    2006-07-01

    The frequent resistance of aggressive cancers to currently available therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, mandates development of targeted, nontoxic and more efficacious treatment protocols. Conditionally replication competent adenoviruses (CRCAs) that induce oncolysis by cancer-specific replication are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, a single modality approach may not be sufficient to completely eradicate cancer in a patient, because most cancers arise from abnormalities in multiple genetic and signal transduction pathways. The promoter region of rodent progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), cloned and characterized in our laboratory, embodies the unique property of increased activity in a broad range of tumor cells, both rodent and human, when compared to normal counterparts. Bipartite adenoviruses were engineered to express the E1A gene, necessary for viral replication, under control of the PEG-3 promoter (PEG-Prom) and simultaneously express a second transgene in the E3 region that encodes an apoptosis-inducing and immunomodulatory cytokine, either immune interferon (IFN-gamma) or melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24). These conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses, referred to as cancer terminator viruses (CTVs), facilitated cancer-selective adenovirus replication, robust transgene expression and apoptosis induction with complete eradication of both primary and distant (metastatic) human cancers xenotransplanted in athymic nude mice. These findings suggest that CTVs might prove efficacious for the therapy of primary and advanced neoplastic diseases. PMID:16861924

  19. Maximal violation of a bipartite three-setting, two-outcome Bell inequality using infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Karoly F.; Vertesi, Tamas

    2010-08-15

    The I{sub 3322} inequality is the simplest bipartite two-outcome Bell inequality beyond the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, consisting of three two-outcome measurements per party. In the case of the CHSH inequality the maximal quantum violation can already be attained with local two-dimensional quantum systems; however, there is no such evidence for the I{sub 3322} inequality. In this paper a family of measurement operators and states is given which enables us to attain the maximum quantum value in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Further, it is conjectured that our construction is optimal in the sense that measuring finite-dimensional quantum systems is not enough to achieve the true quantum maximum. We also describe an efficient iterative algorithm for computing quantum maximum of an arbitrary two-outcome Bell inequality in any given Hilbert space dimension. This algorithm played a key role in obtaining our results for the I{sub 3322} inequality, and we also applied it to improve on our previous results concerning the maximum quantum violation of several bipartite two-outcome Bell inequalities with up to five settings per party.

  20. The N Terminus of the Retinoblastoma Protein Inhibits DNA Replication via a Bipartite Mechanism Disrupted in Partially Penetrant Retinoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Borysov, Sergiy I.; Nepon-Sixt, Brook S.

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (RbN) harbors in-frame exon deletions in partially penetrant hereditary retinoblastomas and is known to impair cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, how such RbN deletions contribute to Rb tumor- and growth-suppressive functions is unknown. Here we establish that RbN directly inhibits DNA replication initiation and elongation using a bipartite mechanism involving N-terminal exons lost in cancer. Specifically, Rb exon 7 is necessary and sufficient to target and inhibit the replicative CMG helicase, resulting in the accumulation of inactive CMGs on chromatin. An independent N-terminal loop domain, which forms a projection, specifically blocks DNA polymerase α (Pol-α) and Ctf4 recruitment without affecting DNA polymerases ε and δ or the CMG helicase. Individual disruption of exon 7 or the projection in RbN or Rb, as occurs in inherited cancers, partially impairs the ability of Rb/RbN to inhibit DNA replication and block G1-to-S cell cycle transit. However, their combined loss abolishes these functions of Rb. Thus, Rb growth-suppressive functions include its ability to block replicative complexes via bipartite, independent, and additive N-terminal domains. The partial loss of replication, CMG, or Pol-α control provides a potential molecular explanation for how N-terminal Rb loss-of-function deletions contribute to the etiology of partially penetrant retinoblastomas. PMID:26711265

  1. Health risk equations and risk assessment of airborne benzene homologues exposure to drivers and passengers in taxi cabins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaokai; Feng, Lili; Luo, Huilong; Cheng, Heming

    2016-03-01

    Interior air environment and health problems of vehicles have attracted increasing attention, and benzene homologues (BHs) including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and styrene are primary hazardous gases in vehicular cabins. The BHs impact on the health of passengers and drivers in 38 taxis is assessed, and health risk equations of in-car BHs to different drivers and passengers are induced. The health risk of in-car BHs for male drivers is the highest among all different receptors and is 1.04, 6.67, and 6.94 times more than ones for female drivers, male passengers, and female passengers, respectively. In-car BHs could not lead to the non-cancer health risk to all passengers and drivers as for the maximal value of non-cancer indices is 0.41 and is less than the unacceptable value (1.00) of non-cancer health risk from USEPA. However, in-car BHs lead to cancer health risk to drivers as for the average value of cancer indices is 1.21E-04 which is 1.21 times more than the unacceptable value (1.00E-04) of cancer health risk from USEPA. Finally, for in-car airborne benzene concentration (X, μg/m(3)) to male drivers, female drivers, male passengers, and female passengers, the cancer health risk equations are Y = 1.48E-06X, Y = 1.42E-06X, Y = 2.22E-07X, and Y = 2.13E-07X, respectively, and the non-cancer health risk equations are Y = 1.70E-03X, Y = 1.63E-03X, Y = 2.55E-04X, and Y = 2.45E-04X, respectively.

  2. Quantum discord with weak measurement operators of quasi-Werner states based on bipartite entangled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, E.; Gómez, R.; Ladera, C. L.; Zambrano, A.

    2013-11-01

    Among many applications quantum weak measurements have been shown to be important in exploring fundamental physics issues, such as the experimental violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation and the Hardy paradox, and have also technological implications in quantum optics, quantum metrology and quantum communications, where the precision of the measurement is as important as the precision of quantum state preparation. The theory of weak measurement can be formulated using the pre-and post-selected quantum systems, as well as using the weak measurement operator formalism. In this work, we study the quantum discord (QD) of quasi-Werner mixed states based on bipartite entangled coherent states using the weak measurements operator, instead of the projective measurement operators. We then compare the quantum discord for both kinds of measurement operators, in terms of the entanglement quality, the latter being measured using the concept of concurrence. It's found greater quantum correlations using the weak measurement operators.

  3. Characterization of a Novel Bipartite Double-Stranded RNA Mycovirus Conferring Hypovirulence in the Phytopathogenic Fungus Botrytis porri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingde; Jin, Fengyin; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Long; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-01-01

    The ascomycete Botrytis porri causes clove rot and leaf blight of garlic worldwide. We report here the biological and molecular features of a novel bipartite double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus named Botrytis porri RNA virus 1 (BpRV1) from the hypovirulent strain GarlicBc-72 of B. porri. The BpRV1 genome comprises two dsRNAs, dsRNA-1 (6,215 bp) and dsRNA-2 (5,879 bp), which share sequence identities of 62 and 95% at the 3′- and 5′-terminal regions, respectively. Two open reading frames (ORFs), ORF I (dsRNA-1) and ORF II (dsRNA-2), were detected. The protein encoded by the 3′-proximal coding region of ORF I shows sequence identities of 19 to 23% with RNA-dependent RNA polymerases encoded by viruses in the families Totiviridae, Chrysoviridae, and Megabirnaviridae. However, the proteins encoded by the 5′-proximal coding region of ORF I and by the entire ORF II lack sequence similarities to any reported virus proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BpRV1 belongs to a separate clade distinct from those of other known RNA mycoviruses. Purified virions of ∼35 nm in diameter encompass dsRNA-1 and dsRNA-2, and three structural proteins (SPs) of 70, 80, and 85 kDa, respectively. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis revealed that the 80- and 85-kDa SPs are encoded by ORF I, while the 70-kDa SP is encoded by ORF II. Introducing BpRV1 purified virions into the virulent strain GarlicBc-38 of B. porri caused derivative 38T reduced mycelial growth and hypovirulence. These combined results suggest that BpRV1 is a novel bipartite dsRNA virus that possibly belongs to a new virus family. PMID:22496220

  4. Ultracold fermions in a one-dimensional bipartite optical lattice: Metal-insulator transitions driven by shaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Liberto, M.; Malpetti, D.; Japaridze, G. I.; Morais Smith, C.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the behavior of a system of fermionic atoms loaded in a bipartite one-dimensional optical lattice that is under the action of an external time-periodic driving force. By using Floquet theory, an effective model is derived. The bare hopping coefficients are renormalized by zeroth-order Bessel functions of the first kind with different arguments for the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hopping. The insulating behavior characterizing the system at half filling in the absence of driving is dynamically suppressed, and for particular values of the driving parameter the system becomes either a standard metal or an unconventional metal with four Fermi points. The existence of the four-Fermi-point metal relies on the fact that, as a consequence of the shaking procedure, the next-nearest-neighbor hopping coefficients become significant compared to the nearest-neighbor ones. We use the bosonization technique to investigate the effect of on-site Hubbard interactions on the four-Fermi-point metal-insulator phase transition. Attractive interactions are expected to enlarge the regime of parameters where the unconventional metallic phase arises, whereas repulsive interactions reduce it. This metallic phase is known to be a Luther-Emery liquid (spin-gapped metal) for both repulsive and attractive interactions, contrary to the usual Hubbard model, which exhibits a Mott-insulator phase for repulsive interactions. Ultracold fermions in driven one-dimensional bipartite optical lattices provide an interesting platform for the realization of this long-studied four-Fermi-point unconventional metal.

  5. Indications of a pan-hemispheric bi-partition of the Younger Dryas Stadial from Lake Suigetsu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlolaut, Gordon; Brauer, Achim; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Lamb, Henry; Marshall, Michael; Kato-Saito, Megumi; Staff, Richard; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Bryant, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas Stadial marks the final succession of climatic fluctuations of the last Glacial. Whilst well studied in records from Europe and Greenland, few high resolution records are available from East Asia. Here we present a high resolution, multi-proxy study of the Lake Suigetsu (Japan) sediments using the 'SG06' composite profile. Utilising microfacies, μXRF, pollen and diatom analysis we characterise changes occurring in the timeframe corresponding to the Younger Dryas Stadial. Firstly, our results show that the climatic equivalent of the Younger Dryas at Lake Suigetsu shows no major lead or lag in comparison to records from the North Atlantic region, which was postulated by an earlier project on the Suigetsu sediments ('SG93'). Reason for this disagreement between the SG06 and SG93 core is that the SG93 core/chronology was compromised by gaps between individual cores and varve count uncertainties. Furthermore, some of the analysed proxies from the SG06 core show a sub-division of the Younger Dryas Stadial. The timing of this sub-division is similar to the bi-partition of the Younger Dryas Stadial observed in a number of European records (e.g. Lane et al., 2013). This bi-partition was related to a northward shift of the westerly wind jet in the North Atlantic region. Our findings imply that the underlying climatic mechanism operated on a hemispheric rather than just on a regional scale. References: Lane et al. 2013, Volcanic ash reveals time-transgressive abrupt climate change during the Younger Dryas, Geology 41, 1251-1254

  6. Pyramiding PvPGIP2 and TAXI-III But Not PvPGIP2 and PMEI Enhances Resistance Against Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Silvio; Kalunke, Raviraj; Janni, Michela; Volpi, Chiara; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2016-08-01

    Plant protein inhibitors counteract the activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs) secreted by pathogens to breach the plant cell-wall barrier. Transgenic plants expressing a single protein inhibitor restrict pathogen infections. However, since pathogens secrete a number of CWDEs at the onset of infection, we combined more inhibitors in a single wheat genotype to reinforce further the cell-wall barrier. We combined polygalacturonase (PG) inhibiting protein (PGIP) and pectin methyl esterase inhibitor (PMEI), both controlling the activity of PG, one of the first CWDEs secreted during infection. We also pyramided PGIP and TAXI-III, a xylanase inhibitor that controls the activity of xylanases, key factors for the degradation of xylan, a main component of cereal cell wall. We demonstrated that the pyramiding of PGIP and PMEI did not contribute to any further improvement of disease resistance. However, the presence of both pectinase inhibitors ensured a broader spectrum of disease resistance. Conversely, the PGIP and TAXI-III combination contributed to further improvement of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance, probably because these inhibitors target the activity of different types of CWDEs, i.e., PGs and xylanases. Worth mentioning, the reduction of FHB symptoms is accompanied by a reduction of deoxynivalenol accumulation with a foreseen great benefit to human and animal health.

  7. Pyramiding PvPGIP2 and TAXI-III But Not PvPGIP2 and PMEI Enhances Resistance Against Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Silvio; Kalunke, Raviraj; Janni, Michela; Volpi, Chiara; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Favaron, Francesco; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2016-08-01

    Plant protein inhibitors counteract the activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs) secreted by pathogens to breach the plant cell-wall barrier. Transgenic plants expressing a single protein inhibitor restrict pathogen infections. However, since pathogens secrete a number of CWDEs at the onset of infection, we combined more inhibitors in a single wheat genotype to reinforce further the cell-wall barrier. We combined polygalacturonase (PG) inhibiting protein (PGIP) and pectin methyl esterase inhibitor (PMEI), both controlling the activity of PG, one of the first CWDEs secreted during infection. We also pyramided PGIP and TAXI-III, a xylanase inhibitor that controls the activity of xylanases, key factors for the degradation of xylan, a main component of cereal cell wall. We demonstrated that the pyramiding of PGIP and PMEI did not contribute to any further improvement of disease resistance. However, the presence of both pectinase inhibitors ensured a broader spectrum of disease resistance. Conversely, the PGIP and TAXI-III combination contributed to further improvement of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance, probably because these inhibitors target the activity of different types of CWDEs, i.e., PGs and xylanases. Worth mentioning, the reduction of FHB symptoms is accompanied by a reduction of deoxynivalenol accumulation with a foreseen great benefit to human and animal health. PMID:27366923

  8. Bipartite output consensus in networked multi-agent systems of high-order power integrators with signed digraph and input noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwen; Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding; Luo, Biao

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we concentrate on investigating bipartite output consensus in networked multi-agent systems of high-order power integrators. Systems with power integrator are ubiquitous among weakly coupled, unstable and underactuated mechanical systems. In the presence of input noises, an adaptive disturbance compensator and a technique of adding power integrator are introduced to the complex nonlinear multi-agent systems to reduce the deterioration of system performance. Additionally, due to the existence of negative communication weights among agents, whether bipartite output consensus of high-order power integrators can be achieved remains unknown. Therefore, it is of great importance to study this issue. The underlying idea of designing the distributed controller is to combine the output information of each agent itself and its neighbours, the state feedback within its internal system and input adaptive noise compensator all together. When the signed digraph is structurally balanced, bipartite output consensus can be reached. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to verify the validity of the developed criteria.

  9. Tomato chlorotic leaf distortion virus, a new bipartite begomovirus infecting Solanum lycopersicum and Capsicum chinense in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Karla; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Chirinos, Doris; Romay, Gustavo; Marys, Edgloris

    2011-12-01

    Virus isolate T217L was obtained from a diseased tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plant showing leaf deformation and chlorotic mottle symptoms near Maracaibo in the state of Zulia, Venezuela. Full-length DNA-A and DNA-B molecules of T217L were cloned and sequenced. The genome organization of T217L was identical to the bipartite genomes of other begomoviruses described from the Americas. Characteristic disease symptoms were reproduced in S. lycopersicum and Capsicum annum plants inoculated using the cloned viral DNA-A and DNA-B components, confirming disease aetiology. A sequence analysis of DNA-A showed that the T217L isolate has the highest sequence identity (84%) with sida yellow mosaic Yucatan virus (SiYMYuV), sida golden mosaic Honduras virus (SiGMHV) and bean dwarf mosaic virus (BDMV) isolates. This is less than the 89% identity in the DNA-A component that has been defined as the threshold value for the demarcation of species in the genus Begomovirus. The molecular data show that isolate T217L belongs to a novel tentative begomovirus species, for which the name tomato chlorotic leaf distortion virus is proposed. TCLDV was also detected in symptomatic C. chinense plants growing near the T217L-infected plant.

  10. Ground states, magnetization plateaus and bipartite entanglement of frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alécio, Raphael C.; Lyra, Marcelo L.; Strečka, Jozef

    2016-11-01

    The ground-state phase diagram, magnetization process and bipartite entanglement of the frustrated spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg and Heisenberg triangular tube (three-leg ladder) are investigated in a non-zero external magnetic field. The exact ground-state phase diagram of the spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra-rung and Ising inter-rung couplings consists of six distinct gapped phases, which manifest themselves in a magnetization curve as intermediate plateaus at zero, one-third and two-thirds of the saturation magnetization. Four out of six available ground states exhibit quantum entanglement between two spins from the same triangular unit evidenced by a non-zero concurrence. Density-matrix renormalization group calculations are used in order to construct the ground-state phase diagram of the analogous but purely quantum spin-1/2 Heisenberg tube with Heisenberg intra- and inter-rung couplings, which consists of four gapped and three gapless phases. The Heisenberg tube shows a continuous change of the magnetization instead of a plateau at zero magnetization, while the intermediate one-third and two-thirds plateaus may be present or not in the zero-temperature magnetization curve.

  11. Complete nucleotide sequences of a new bipartite begomovirus from Malvastrum sp. plants with bright yellow mosaic symptoms in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Villegas, Cecilia; Gregg, Lori; Murray, K Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Two isolates of a novel bipartite begomovirus, tentatively named malvastrum bright yellow mosaic virus (MaBYMV), were molecularly characterized from naturally infected plants of the genus Malvastrum showing bright yellow mosaic disease symptoms in South Texas. Six complete DNA-A and five DNA-B genome sequences of MaBYMV obtained from the isolates ranged in length from 2,608 to 2,609 nucleotides (nt) and 2,578 to 2,605 nt, respectively. Both genome segments shared a 178- to 180-nt common region. In pairwise comparisons, the complete DNA-A and DNA-B sequences of MaBYMV were most similar (87-88 % and 79-81 % identity, respectively) and phylogenetically related to the corresponding sequences of sida mosaic Sinaloa virus-[MX-Gua-06]. Further analysis revealed that MaBYMV is a putative recombinant virus, thus supporting the notion that malvaceous hosts may be influencing the evolution of several begomoviruses. The design of new diagnostic primers enabled the detection of MaBYMV in cohorts of Bemisia tabaci collected from symptomatic Malvastrum sp. plants, thus implicating whiteflies as potential vectors of the virus. PMID:27016928

  12. Interaction of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E with 4E-BP2 at a dynamic bipartite interface.

    PubMed

    Lukhele, Sabelo; Bah, Alaji; Lin, Hong; Sonenberg, Nahum; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2013-12-01

    Cap-dependent translation initiation is regulated by the interaction of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) with eIF4E binding proteins (4E-BPs). Whereas the binding of 4E-BP peptides containing the eIF4E-binding ⁵⁴YXXXXLΦ⁶⁰ motif has been studied, atomic-level characterization of the interaction of eIF4E with full-length 4E-BPs has been lacking. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize the dynamic, structural and binding properties of 4E-BP2. Although disordered, 4E-BP2 contains significant fluctuating secondary structure and binds eIF4E at an extensive bipartite interface including the canonical ⁵⁴YXXXXLΦ⁶⁰ and ⁷⁸IPGVT⁸² sites. Each of the two binding elements individually has submicromolar affinity and exchange on and off of the eIF4E surface within the context of the overall nanomolar complex. This dynamic interaction facilitates exposure of regulatory phosphorylation sites within the complex. The 4E-BP2 interface on eIF4E overlaps yet is more extensive than the eIF4G:eIF4E interface, suggesting that these key interactions may be differentially targeted for therapeutics.

  13. Bipartite recognition and conformational sampling mechanisms for hydride transfer from nicotinamide coenzyme to FMN in pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Pudney, Christopher R; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2009-09-01

    Elucidating the origin of substrate and coenzyme specificity has been the focus of much work relating to enzyme engineering. Many enzymes exhibit tight specificity for particular substrates despite a close structural relationship to other nonreactive compounds. This tight specificity is especially remarkable and important biologically for the coenzymes NADH and NADPH. In the present study, we examined the preference of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, an 'old yellow enzyme' family member, for the coenzymes NADPH over NADH. Using structural and mutagenesis studies, we have previously established that the coenzyme nicotinamide group is the key binding determinant in old yellow enzymes [Khan H et al. (2005) FEBS J 272, 4660-4671]. We have now performed detailed transient-state studies using NAD(P)H and the nonreactive analogues 1,4,5,6-tetrahydroNAD(P)H [NAD(P)H4], leading us to uncover an additional binding step in the reductive half-reaction of pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase. We suggest that this initial binding step may primarily reflect binding of the adenine ribophosphate portion of the coenzyme, and that the second step reflects a rearrangement of the nicotinamide. Bipartite recognition, in which the adenine ribophosphate moiety localizes the coenzyme in the active site region, enables subsequent and localized searches of configurational space by the nicotinamide moiety to form the catalytically relevant charge-transfer complex. We suggest that this localized search contributes to catalytic efficiency via the principle of 'reduction in dimensionality'.

  14. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands. PMID:27170470

  15. Burning Invariant Manifold Theory and the Bipartite Digraph Representation of Generalized Dynamical System Formed by One-way Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, John; Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin; Solomon, Tom

    2013-11-01

    The recently developed Burning Invariant Manifold (BIM) theory took a dynamical system approach to understand front propagation in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion systems and successfully predicted both the short-term and asymptotic front behavior by finding the unstable BIMs which act as barriers to front propagation. Unlike separatrices in traditional dynamical system being two-way barriers, the BIMs are one-way barriers. This asymmetry gives rise to a much richer dynamical behavior than traditional dynamical systems. Through numerical simulations, we found that the stable BIMs are the basin boundaries. Based on the properties of BIM theory, we further derived a theory to investigate a dynamical system consists of one-way barriers and the cooperative behavior of these barriers. This theory reveals the global structure of both stable and unstable BIMs by first using a systematic algorithm to convert the flow to a bipartite digraph and then extracting information of the steady states of fronts and corresponding basins of attraction from the digraph. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0748828 and NSF Fellowship DGE-0937362.

  16. Beyond ectomycorrhizal bipartite networks: projected networks demonstrate contrasted patterns between early- and late-successional plants in Corsica

    PubMed Central

    Taudiere, Adrien; Munoz, François; Lesne, Annick; Monnet, Anne-Christine; Bellanger, Jean-Michel; Selosse, Marc-André; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Richard, Franck

    2015-01-01

    The ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbiosis connects mutualistic plants and fungal species into bipartite networks. While links between one focal ECM plant and its fungal symbionts have been widely documented, systemic views of ECM networks are lacking, in particular, concerning the ability of fungal species to mediate indirect ecological interactions between ECM plant species (projected-ECM networks). We assembled a large dataset of plant–fungi associations at the species level and at the scale of Corsica using molecular data and unambiguously host-assigned records to: (i) examine the correlation between the number of fungal symbionts of a plant species and the average specialization of these fungal species, (ii) explore the structure of the plant–plant projected network and (iii) compare plant association patterns in regard to their position along the ecological succession. Our analysis reveals no trade-off between specialization of plants and specialization of their partners and a saturation of the plant projected network. Moreover, there is a significantly lower-than-expected sharing of partners between early- and late-successional plant species, with fewer fungal partners for early-successional ones and similar average specialization of symbionts of early- and late-successional plants. Our work paves the way for ecological readings of Mediterranean landscapes that include the astonishing diversity of below-ground interactions. PMID:26539201

  17. The Effects of Projected Future Demand Including Very Light Jet Air-Taxi Operations on U.S. National Airspace System Delays as a Function of Next Generation Air Transportation System Airspace Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerry; Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a study which investigates the potential effects of the growth in air traffic demand including projected Very Light Jet (VLJ) air-taxi operations adding to delays experienced by commercial passenger air transportation in the year 2025. The geographic region studied is the contiguous United States (U.S.) of America, although international air traffic to and from the U.S. is included. The main focus of this paper is to determine how much air traffic growth, including VLJ air-taxi operations will add to enroute airspace congestion and determine what additional airspace capacity will be needed to accommodate the expected demand. Terminal airspace is not modeled and increased airport capacity is assumed.

  18. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  19. THE PROFITS AND PERILS OF PUBLICITY: ALLGEMEINE LITERATUR- ZEITUNG, THE THURN UND TAXIS POST, AND THE PERIODICAL TRADE AT THE END OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

    PubMed

    Broman, Thomas

    2015-09-20

    Recent historiography on the growth of periodical publishing has emphasized newspapers and journals as constituents of an emergent communications system in early modern Europe. This system comprised the newspapers, journals and other publications that contributed its content, and also the postal systems that were the principal method of distributing that content. This article describes how the growth of this system in central Europe was supported in large measure by financial incentives that it offered to both constituents. First, in contrast with postal systems in France and the UK, the Thurn und Taxis Reichspost inserted itself as a middleman in the sale of periodicals, which gave the Reichspost an incentive to promote the trade. Second, the financial conditions for periodical publication made their costs depend more heavily on costs that were scalable to circulation than is true today, which resulted in the viability of publications with a lower circulation. The same cost structure also made it possible for certain prominent periodicals of the era to earn considerable profits for their publishers, as illustrated in this article by Allgemeine Literatur-Zeitung, which was published in Jena from 1785.

  20. THE PROFITS AND PERILS OF PUBLICITY: ALLGEMEINE LITERATUR- ZEITUNG, THE THURN UND TAXIS POST, AND THE PERIODICAL TRADE AT THE END OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

    PubMed

    Broman, Thomas

    2015-09-20

    Recent historiography on the growth of periodical publishing has emphasized newspapers and journals as constituents of an emergent communications system in early modern Europe. This system comprised the newspapers, journals and other publications that contributed its content, and also the postal systems that were the principal method of distributing that content. This article describes how the growth of this system in central Europe was supported in large measure by financial incentives that it offered to both constituents. First, in contrast with postal systems in France and the UK, the Thurn und Taxis Reichspost inserted itself as a middleman in the sale of periodicals, which gave the Reichspost an incentive to promote the trade. Second, the financial conditions for periodical publication made their costs depend more heavily on costs that were scalable to circulation than is true today, which resulted in the viability of publications with a lower circulation. The same cost structure also made it possible for certain prominent periodicals of the era to earn considerable profits for their publishers, as illustrated in this article by Allgemeine Literatur-Zeitung, which was published in Jena from 1785. PMID:26495577

  1. The profits and perils of publicity: Allgemeine Literatur-Zeitung, the Thurn und Taxis Post, and the periodical trade at the end of the eighteenth century

    PubMed Central

    Broman, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent historiography on the growth of periodical publishing has emphasized newspapers and journals as constituents of an emergent communications system in early modern Europe. This system comprised the newspapers, journals and other publications that contributed its content, and also the postal systems that were the principal method of distributing that content. This article describes how the growth of this system in central Europe was supported in large measure by financial incentives that it offered to both constituents. First, in contrast with postal systems in France and the UK, the Thurn und Taxis Reichspost inserted itself as a middleman in the sale of periodicals, which gave the Reichspost an incentive to promote the trade. Second, the financial conditions for periodical publication made their costs depend more heavily on costs that were scalable to circulation than is true today, which resulted in the viability of publications with a lower circulation. The same cost structure also made it possible for certain prominent periodicals of the era to earn considerable profits for their publishers, as illustrated in this article by Allgemeine Literatur-Zeitung, which was published in Jena from 1785. PMID:26495577

  2. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    PubMed

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds.

  3. Family of Crouzon Syndrome Represents the Evolution of the Frontofacial Monobloc Advancement Technique: From Immediate Movement to Monobloc Distraction to Monobloc Bipartition Distraction.

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Denadai, Rafael; Ghizoni, Enrico; Buzzo, Celso Luiz; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by premature fusion of cranial sutures, midface and supraorbital ridge retrusion, exorbitism, and in some clinical scenarios strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, short upper lip and hypertelorbitism. Treatment of CS is overlapped with the beginning of craniofacial surgery and is grounded on morphologic and functional objectives. The authors reported on the outcomes and complications of family members (mother and 2 siblings) with CS, who were operated on by different techniques of frontofacial advancement and have attained skeletal maturity. Operations were performed in different moments throughout the last 3 decades of craniofacial surgery history. A 10-year-old Crouzon progenitor underwent a monobloc osteotomy with acute advancement, using rigid fixation and bone grafting in the osteotomy sites. An 8-year-old Crouzon daughter underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment, using an external, institutionally made distracter device. In addition, a 10-year-old Crouzon son underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment associated to facial bipartition, using an internal distracter device. After 30 years, the mother presented a mild relapse on the orbit level, but her children had satisfactory stable outcomes. The family members with CS have undergone different modifications of the monobloc approach based on different chronological momentum, from acute monobloc advancement, to monobloc distraction, to monobloc facial bipartition distraction. PMID:26267562

  4. Painful bipartite patella in young athletes. The diagnostic value of skyline views taken in squatting position and the results of surgical excision.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Sakurai, A; Hirata, S; Ohno, O; Kita, K; Sato, T; Kashiwagi, D

    1994-08-01

    Nine patients with painful bipartite patella associated with young athletes were evaluated clinically and radiologically at an average of 60 months (range, 21 to 145 months) after excision of accessory nucleus of the patella. All patients were male and between 14 and 21 years of age when they were operated on. The indications for excision of separated fragments of the patella included: failure of nonoperative treatment for more than 3 months; radiographic evidence of significant irregularities of the articular surface of the separated fragment of the patella; and symptoms severe and prolonged enough to warrant surgery. Skyline views taken with the patient in a squatting position with weight bearing showed a wider separation of the accessory fragment from the main patella than did the nonweight bearing skyline views. This appears to be an important and useful diagnostic feature in a painful bipartite patellae; the authors propose that this radiographic examination should be called a "squatting position test". Histologically, the interface between the accessory and main patella was fibrocartilaginous, and the adjacent bone tissue was clearly demarcated by a dense lamina, indicating that the initial lesion was probably a traction lesion. All patients returned to full sports activity at their previous highest level within 4 to 7 weeks. The excision of accessory bone appears to be a simple and reliable procedure for avoiding prolonged postoperative treatment, reducing the length of incapacitation, and minimizing the danger of permanent stiffness of the joint.

  5. ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC): an integrated quantitative high-throughput screening platform for electrical field-directed cell migration†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Siwei; Zhu, Kan; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Zijie; Xu, Zhengping

    2015-01-01

    Both endogenous and externally applied electrical stimulation can affect a wide range of cellular functions, including growth, migration, differentiation and division. Among those effects, the electrical field (EF)-directed cell migration, also known as electrotaxis, has received broad attention because it holds great potential in facilitating clinical wound healing. Electrotaxis experiment is conventionally conducted in centimetre-sized flow chambers built in Petri dishes. Despite the recent efforts to adapt microfluidics for electrotaxis studies, the current electrotaxis experimental setup is still cumbersome due to the needs of an external power supply and EF controlling/monitoring systems. There is also a lack of parallel experimental systems for high-throughput electrotaxis studies. In this paper, we present a first independently operable microfluidic platform for high-throughput electrotaxis studies, integrating all functional components for cell migration under EF stimulation (except microscopy) on a compact footprint (the same as a credit card), referred to as ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC). Inspired by the R–2R resistor ladder topology in digital signal processing, we develop a systematic approach to design an infinitely expandable microfluidic generator of EF gradients for high-throughput and quantitative studies of EF-directed cell migration. Furthermore, a vacuum-assisted assembly method is utilized to allow direct and reversible attachment of our device to existing cell culture media on biological surfaces, which separates the cell culture and device preparation/fabrication steps. We have demonstrated that our ETC platform is capable of screening human cornea epithelial cell migration under the stimulation of an EF gradient spanning over three orders of magnitude. The screening results lead to the identification of the EF-sensitive range of that cell type, which can provide valuable guidance to the clinical application of EF-facilitated wound healing

  6. Bipartite life cycle of coral reef fishes promotes increasing shape disparity of the head skeleton during ontogeny: an example from damselfishes (Pomacentridae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative studies of the variation of disparity during ontogeny exhibited by the radiation of coral reef fishes are lacking. Such studies dealing with the variation of disparity, i.e. the diversity of organic form, over ontogeny could be a first step in detecting evolutionary mechanisms in these fishes. The damselfishes (Pomacentridae) have a bipartite life-cycle, as do the majority of demersal coral reef fishes. During their pelagic dispersion phase, all larvae feed on planktonic prey. On the other hand, juveniles and adults associated with the coral reef environment show a higher diversity of diets. Using geometric morphometrics, we study the ontogenetic dynamic of shape disparity of different head skeletal units (neurocranium, suspensorium and opercle, mandible and premaxilla) in this fish family. We expected that larvae of different species might be relatively similar in shapes. Alternatively, specialization may become notable even in the juvenile and adult phase. Results The disparity levels increase significantly throughout ontogeny for each skeletal unit. At settlement, all larval shapes are already species-specific. Damselfishes show high levels of ontogenetic allometry during their post-settlement growth. The divergence of allometric patterns largely explains the changes in patterns and levels of shape disparity over ontogeny. The rate of shape change and the length of ontogenetic trajectories seem to be less variable among species. We also show that the high levels of shape disparity at the adult stage are correlated to a higher level of ecological and functional diversity in this stage. Conclusion Diversification throughout ontogeny of damselfishes results from the interaction among several developmental novelties enhancing disparity. The bipartite life-cycle of damselfishes exemplifies a case where the variation of environmental factors, i.e. the transition from the more homogeneous oceanic environment to the coral reef offering a wide

  7. A monopartite begomovirus-associated DNA beta satellite substitutes for the DNA B of a bipartite begomovirus to permit systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Zafar, Yusuf; Randles, John W; Rezaian, M Ali

    2007-10-01

    DNA beta is a circular single-stranded satellite DNA which co-infects with certain monopartite helper begomoviruses to cause economically important diseases, such as cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD). DNA beta encodes a single protein, betaC1. Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) is a bipartite begomovirus in which both DNA A and DNA B are required for systemic infection. Inoculation of tomato plants with ToLCNDV DNA A alone induced local but not systemic infection, whereas co-inoculation with DNA A and the DNA beta associated with CLCuD resulted in systemic infection. DNA beta containing a disrupted betaC1 open reading frame (ORF) did not mobilize DNA A systemically. Co-inoculation of plants with DNA A and a construct of the betaC1 ORF, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, resulted in the systemic movement of DNA A. In inoculated tobacco and onion epidermal cells, betaC1 fused to GFP was localized at the cell periphery in association with punctate bodies, around and within the cell nucleus and with the endoplasmic reticulum. It is concluded that heterologous betaC1 protein can replace the movement function of the DNA B of a bipartite begomovirus. Evidence is also provided that tomato leaf curl virus-encoded C4 protein confers the same movement function to ToLCNDV DNA A. The intracellular distribution of betaC1 is consistent with the hypothesis that it has a role in transporting the DNA A from the nuclear site of replication to the plasmodesmatal exit sites of the infected cell. PMID:17872543

  8. Taxis through Computer Simulation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, David

    1983-01-01

    Describes a sequence of five computer programs (listings for Apple II available from author) on tactic responses (oriented movement of a cell, cell group, or whole organism in reponse to stimuli). The simulation programs are useful in helping students examine mechanisms at work in real organisms. (JN)

  9. Strains of a new bipartite begomovirus, pepper yellow leaf curl Indonesia virus, in leaf-curl-diseased tomato and yellow-vein-diseased ageratum in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Jyun-Ji; Shibuya, Yutaka; Sharma, Pradeep; Ikegami, Masato

    2008-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of begomoviruses from pepper with leaf curl and yellowing symptoms, tomato with leaf curl symptoms, and ageratum with yellow vein in Indonesia were determined. On the basis of genome organization and sequence homology, they were proposed to belong to a new species, Pepper yellow leaf curl Indonesia virus (PepYLCIV), which includes the new strains PepYLCIV-Tomato and PepYLCIV-Ageratum. These viruses had bipartite genomes. Pepper virus DNAs from Indonesia (PepYLCIV, PepYLCIV-Tomato and PepYLCIV-Ageratum DNA-As) were noticeably distinct, forming a separate branch from the viruses infecting pepper. Considerable divergence was observed in the common region (CR) of the genomic components of PepYLCIV (77%), PepYLCIV-Tomato (82%) and PeYLCIV-Ageratum (75%). A stem-loop-forming region and a Rep-binding motif were identical in the CR of the three viruses. The CRs of PepYLCIV-Ageratum DNA-A was approximately 10 nucleotides longer than that of PepYLCIV DNA-A and PepYLCIV-Tomato DNA-A. A similar insertion was also found in the CR of PepYLCIV-Ageratum DNA-B. PepYLCIV DNA-A alone was infectious in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and association with DNA-B increased symptom severity.

  10. Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is necessary and sufficient to promote different stepwise assembly of morphologically distinct bipartite cilia in Drosophila antenna

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Swadhin C.; Girotra, Mukul; Ray, Krishanu

    2011-01-01

    Structurally diverse sensory cilia have evolved from primary cilia, a microtubule-based cellular extension engaged in chemical and mechanical sensing and signal integration. The diversity is often associated with functional specialization. The olfactory receptor neurons in Drosophila, for example, express three distinct bipartite cilia displaying different sets of olfactory receptors on them. Molecular description underlying their assembly and diversification is still incomplete. Here, we show that the branched and the slender olfactory cilia develop in two distinct step-wise patterns through the pupal stages before the expression of olfactory receptor genes in olfactory neurons. The process initiates with a thin procilium growth from the dendrite apex, followed by volume increment in successive stages. Mutations in the kinesin-II subunit genes either eliminate or restrict the cilia growth as well as tubulin entry into the developing cilia. Together with previous results, our results here suggest that heterotrimeric kinesin-II is the primary motor engaged in all type-I sensory cilia assembly in Drosophila and that the cilia structure diversity is achieved through additional transports supported by the motor during development. PMID:21233284

  11. Involvement of a Putative Bipartite Transit Peptide in Targeting Rice Pheophorbide a Oxygenase into Chloroplasts for Chlorophyll Degradation during Leaf Senescence.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingjun; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Huakun; Dong, Guojun; Qian, Qian; Zuo, Jianru

    2016-03-20

    Leaf senescence is one of the major factors contributing to the productivity and the grain quality in crops. The regulatory mechanism of leaf senescence remains largely unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a rice early senescence 1 (eas1) mutant, which displayed an early leaf senescence phenotype, accompanying by dwarfism and reduced tiller number, eventually leading to the reduction of grain yield. Map-based cloning revealed that the nuclear gene EAS1 encodes a pheophorbide a oxygenase (PaO), a key enzyme for chlorophyll breakdown. A highly conserved Thr residue of PaO was mutated into Ile in the eas1 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that PaO is an evolutionarily conserved protein, and EAS1 is 68% identical to the Arabidopsis ACCERLERATED CELL DEATH (ACD1) protein. Unlike ACD1 that contains a single transit peptide, EAS1 contains two putative transit peptides at its N-terminus, which are essential for its functionality, suggesting that targeting of EAS1 to the chloroplast is likely mediated by a putative bipartite transit peptide. Consistently, only a short version of EAS1 lacking the first putative transit peptide, but not the full-length EAS1, was capable of rescuing the Arabidopsis acd1 mutant phenotype. These results suggest that rice EAS1 represents a functional PaO, which is involved in chlorophyll degradation and may utilize a unique mechanism for its import into the chloroplast. PMID:27020034

  12. Expression of sex-specific molecular markers in clones of bipartite allophenic nemertines produced by somatic embryogenesis from Lineus sanguineus male/female chimera fragments.

    PubMed

    Tarpin, M; Bierne, J

    1995-04-01

    SDS-PAGE electrophoresis showed major sex-specific proteins in sexually maturing and mature Lineus sanguineus. These "egg-specific" (145, 78 and 40 kDa) and "sperm-specific" (55,52 and 28 kDa) proteins are useful for studying sex differentiation in bilaterally allophenic worms produced by asexual reproduction of bipartite male/female chimeric worms. This study was carried out on 2 symmetrical clones of bilaterally allophenic worms, derived by somatic embryogenesis from fragments transected from chimeras obtained by exchange-grafting lateral body halves of male and female specimens, and from their asexually-derived progeny. The electrophoretic patterns of proteins extracted from sexually immature, maturing and mature allophenic animals from the 5th to the 19th year of cloning, showed the presence of all female-specific markers and the absence of male-specific markers. There was also complete biochemical feminization of the male halves. The synthesis of the only egg-specific molecules in initially male lateral body halves means that the long-term cloning results in the total repression of genes encoding sperm-specific proteins, since genetically male determinant-bearing cells can randomly re-express the testis characteristic as fertile but rudimentary male gonads.

  13. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Fig cryptic virus, a novel bipartite dsRNA virus infecting fig, widely distributed in the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Kubaa, Raied Abou; Digiaro, Michele; Minafra, Angelantonio; Martelli, Giovanni P

    2011-06-01

    Two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) segments of a virus with a bipartite genome identified in fig (Ficus carica L.) and denoted Fig cryptic virus (FCV) were cloned and sequenced. Viral dsRNAs are 1696 bp (RNA-1) and 1415 bp (RNA-2) in size. RNA-1 contains a single ORF (1419 nt) potentially encoding a 54 kDa protein and comprising the conserved amino acid motifs of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of species of the genus Alphacryptovirus. Its full-length amino acid sequence has the highest identity with Raphanus sativus cryptic virus 2 (RsCV-2) (36%), Beet cryptic virus 3 (BCV-3) (36%) and Fragaria chiloensis cryptic virus (FCCV) (34%). RNA-2 has also a single ORF (1014 nt) coding for a polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 38 kDa, identified as the viral coat protein (CP). In a phylogenetic tree constructed with the amino acid sequences of the RdRp domain, FCV clusters in a clade comprising BCV-3 and a number of tentative species of the genus Alphacryptovirus. FCV is not mechanically transmissible. It was detected in fig orchards of six Mediterranean countries (Albania, Algeria, Italy, Lebanon, Syria and Tunisia) where it does not seem to induce a visible disease.

  14. Heterotrimeric kinesin-II is necessary and sufficient to promote different stepwise assembly of morphologically distinct bipartite cilia in Drosophila antenna.

    PubMed

    Jana, Swadhin C; Girotra, Mukul; Ray, Krishanu

    2011-03-15

    Structurally diverse sensory cilia have evolved from primary cilia, a microtubule-based cellular extension engaged in chemical and mechanical sensing and signal integration. The diversity is often associated with functional specialization. The olfactory receptor neurons in Drosophila, for example, express three distinct bipartite cilia displaying different sets of olfactory receptors on them. Molecular description underlying their assembly and diversification is still incomplete. Here, we show that the branched and the slender olfactory cilia develop in two distinct step-wise patterns through the pupal stages before the expression of olfactory receptor genes in olfactory neurons. The process initiates with a thin procilium growth from the dendrite apex, followed by volume increment in successive stages. Mutations in the kinesin-II subunit genes either eliminate or restrict the cilia growth as well as tubulin entry into the developing cilia. Together with previous results, our results here suggest that heterotrimeric kinesin-II is the primary motor engaged in all type-I sensory cilia assembly in Drosophila and that the cilia structure diversity is achieved through additional transports supported by the motor during development.

  15. Bipartite electronic superstructures in the vortex core of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    PubMed Central

    Machida, T.; Kohsaka, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Iwaya, K.; Hanaguri, T.; Tamegai, T.

    2016-01-01

    The central issue in the physics of cuprate superconductivity is the mutual relationship among superconductivity, pseudogap and broken-spatial-symmetry states. A magnetic field B suppresses superconductivity, providing an opportunity to investigate the competition among these states. Although various B-induced electronic superstructures have been reported, their energy, spatial and momentum-space structures are unclear. Here, we show using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunnelling microscopy on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ that there are two distinct B-induced electronic superstructures, both being localized in the vortex core but appearing at different energies. In the low-energy range where the nodal Bogoliubov quasiparticles are well-defined, we observe the so-called vortex checkerboard that we identify as the B-enhanced quasiparticle interference pattern. By contrast, in the high-energy region where the pseudogap develops, the broken-spatial-symmetry patterns that pre-exist at B=0 T is locally enhanced in the vortex core. This evidences the competition between superconductivity and the broken-spatial-symmetry state that is associated with the pseudogap. PMID:27230420

  16. Bipartite bosonic modes and magnetic memory effects in superconducting Sr4V2O6Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jhinhwan; Choi, Seokhwan; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jang, Won-Jun; Ok, Jong Mok; Choi, Hyun Woo; Jung, Jin Oh; Son, Dong Hyun; Suh, Hwan Soo; Semertzidis, Yannis; Kim, Jun Sung

    Using a homemade variable temperature high field spin-polarized STM, we have performed spectroscopic-imaging STM measurement on the parent-state superconductor Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 with each unit cell composed of superconducting FeAs layer sandwiched by two nearly Mott-insulating Sr2VO3 layers. The hybridization between the localized V electrons and the itinerant Fe electrons causes electron transfer to the FeAs bands and generates a Gamma-centered electron pocket, as well as a Fano resonance at -18 meV with signature of Fano lattice. In the QPI measurement, we observed two distinct bosonic modes, i.e. the kinks and the partial replicas of the QPI dispersion with characteristic mode energies around 14 meV and 20 meV respectively, which agree with the self-energies due to two distinct electron-boson mode coupling functions in Migdal approximation. In spin-polarized STM mode, we observed atomic scale magnetic memory effect of the V atoms controlled with low energy (around 50 meV) spin-polarized tunneling current and used it to reveal underlying magnetic domains in the FeAs layer. Variable temperature spin-polarized STM measurements on some known antiferromagnetic materials will also be presented and discussed.

  17. Human ERCC5 cDNA-cosmid complementation for excision repair and bipartite amino acid domains conserved with RAD proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    MacInnes, M.A.; Dickson, J.A.; Hernandez, R.R.; Lin, G.Y.; Park, M.S.; Schauer, S.; Reynolds, R.J.; Strniste, G.F. ); Learmonth, D. ); Mudgett, J.S. ); Yu, J.Y. )

    1993-10-01

    Several human genes related to DNA excision repair (ER) have been isolated via ER cross-species complementation (ERCC) of UV-sensitive CHO cells. The authors have now isolated and characterized cDNAs for the human ERCC5 gene that complement CHO UV135 cells. The ERCC5 mRNA size is about 4.6 kb. Their available cDNA clones are partial length, and no single clone was active for UV135 complementation. When cDNAs were mixed pairwise with a cosmid clone containing an overlapping 5[prime]-end segment of the ERCC5 gene, DNA transfer produced UV-resistant colonies with 60 to 95% correction of UV resistance relative to either a genomic ERCC5 DNA transformant or the CHO AA8 progenitor cells. cDNA-cosmid transformants regained intermediate levels (20 to 45%) of ER-dependent reactivation of a UV-damaged pSVCATgpt reporter plasmid. Their evidence strongly implicates an in situ recombination mechanism in cDNA-cosmid complementation for ER. The complete deduced amino acid sequence of ERCC5 was reconstructed for several cDNA clones encoding a predicted protein of 1,186 amino acids. The ERCC5 protein has extensive sequence similarities, in bipartite domains A and B, to products of RAD repair genes of two yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad13. Sequence, structural, and functional data taken together indicate that ERCC5 and its relatives are probable functional homologs. A second locus represented by S. cerevisiae YKL510 and S. pombe rad2 genes is structurally distinct from the ERCC5 locus but retains vestigial A and B domain similarities. Their analyses suggest that ERCC5 is a nuclear-localized protein with one or more highly conserved helix-loop-helix segments within domains A and B. 69 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a trimeric, pore-forming rare outer membrane protein of Treponema pallidum, has a bipartite domain structure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178-5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprC(Fl)) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprC(Fl) increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprC(N)), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprC(C)). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprC(C), while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host.

  19. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and natural…

  20. Localisation and protein-protein interactions of the Helicobacter pylori taxis sensor TlpD and their connection to metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Wiebke; Schweinitzer, Tobias; McMurry, Jonathan L; Loewen, Peter C; Buettner, Falk F R; Menz, Sarah; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori energy sensor TlpD determines tactic behaviour under low energy conditions and is important in vivo. We explored protein-protein interactions of TlpD and their impact on TlpD localisation and function. Pull-down of tagged TlpD identified protein interaction partners of TlpD, which included the chemotaxis histidine kinase CheAY2, the central metabolic enzyme aconitase (AcnB) and the detoxifying enzyme catalase (KatA). We confirmed that KatA and AcnB physically interact with TlpD. While the TlpD-dependent behavioural response appeared not influenced in the interactor mutants katA and acnB in steady-state behavioural assays, acetone carboxylase subunit (acxC) mutant behaviour was altered. TlpD was localised in a bipolar subcellular pattern in media of high energy. We observed a significant change in TlpD localisation towards the cell body in cheAY2-, catalase- or aconitase-deficient bacteria or in bacteria incubated under low energy conditions, including oxidative stress or respiratory inhibition. Inactivation of tlpD resulted in an increased sensitivity to iron limitation and oxidative stress and influenced the H. pylori transcriptome. Oxidative stress, iron limitation and overexpressing the iron-sulfur repair system nifSU altered TlpD-dependent behaviour. We propose that TlpD localisation is instructed by metabolic activity and protein interactions, and its sensory activity is linked to iron-sulfur cluster integrity. PMID:27045738

  1. Localisation and protein-protein interactions of the Helicobacter pylori taxis sensor TlpD and their connection to metabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Wiebke; Schweinitzer, Tobias; McMurry, Jonathan L.; Loewen, Peter C.; Buettner, Falk F.R.; Menz, Sarah; Josenhans, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori energy sensor TlpD determines tactic behaviour under low energy conditions and is important in vivo. We explored protein-protein interactions of TlpD and their impact on TlpD localisation and function. Pull-down of tagged TlpD identified protein interaction partners of TlpD, which included the chemotaxis histidine kinase CheAY2, the central metabolic enzyme aconitase (AcnB) and the detoxifying enzyme catalase (KatA). We confirmed that KatA and AcnB physically interact with TlpD. While the TlpD-dependent behavioural response appeared not influenced in the interactor mutants katA and acnB in steady-state behavioural assays, acetone carboxylase subunit (acxC) mutant behaviour was altered. TlpD was localised in a bipolar subcellular pattern in media of high energy. We observed a significant change in TlpD localisation towards the cell body in cheAY2-, catalase- or aconitase-deficient bacteria or in bacteria incubated under low energy conditions, including oxidative stress or respiratory inhibition. Inactivation of tlpD resulted in an increased sensitivity to iron limitation and oxidative stress and influenced the H. pylori transcriptome. Oxidative stress, iron limitation and overexpressing the iron-sulfur repair system nifSU altered TlpD-dependent behaviour. We propose that TlpD localisation is instructed by metabolic activity and protein interactions, and its sensory activity is linked to iron-sulfur cluster integrity. PMID:27045738

  2. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanebrook, J. Richard

    This document describes a course designed to acquaint students with the many societal and technological problems facing the United States and the world due to the increasing demand for energy. The course begins with a writing assignment that involves readings on the environmental philosophy of Native Americans and the Chernobyl catastrophe.…

  3. The testis-specific VAD1.3/AEP1 interacts with {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1 and directs peri-nuclear/Golgi expression with bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yan; Gao, Jing; Yeung, William S.B.; Lee, Kai-Fai

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} VAD1.3 interacts {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1. {yields} VAD1.3 colocalizes {beta}-actin in spermatids. {yields} The bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) signal is important for peri-nuclear/Golgi expression in transfected cells. {yields} The C-terminal region of VAD1.3 direct nuclei localization. -- Abstract: VAD1.3 (AEP1), a novel testis-specific gene, was first isolated from the testis of a retinol-treated vitamin-A-deficient (VAD) rat model. It is expressed at the acrosomal region of spermatids from postnatal day 25. VAD1.3 immunoreactivity is present in rat, human, monkey and porcine spermatids and spermatozoa, suggesting that VAD1.3 may play a role in acrosome formation. However, direct evidence on the detailed sub-cellular localization of the VAD1.3 protein in the acrosome and how VAD1.3 is involved in acrosome formation remains largely unknown. Here, we isolated and identified VAD1.3 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry, and determined the functional motifs of VAD1.3 that were important for its specific sub-cellular location in vitro. We found that VAD1.3 bound to syntaxin 1 and {beta}-actin proteins in vitro. Immunogold electron microscopic study localized VAD1.3 immunoreactivity to the acrosome membranes and matrix, and colocalized it with the {beta}-actin protein. The full-length GFP-VAD (1-3601) and GFP-VAD (1-730) fusion proteins that contain the bipartite nucleus localization (BNL) signal were located in the peri-nucleus/Golgi of the transfected cells. In addition, the GFP signal colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the syntaxin 1 protein in the transfected HeLa and GC-2spd cells. The C-terminal GFP-VAD (1770-3601) was expressed in the nucleus. Taken together, VAD1.3 interacts with {beta}-actin and syntaxin 1 in vitro. The BNL signal may mediate the peri-nuclei localization of the protein that may interact with syntaxin 1 and {beta}-actin for acrosome formation in

  4. How to Restore Plant's Taxis in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    All plants respond to gravity, yet in micro-gravity not all plants will grow the way as they do on the Earth. Successful space experiments with plants grown from seed to seed, were performed (to the best of my knowledge) with non electrotropic plants. Such plants use phototropism instead of the gravitropism. The electrotropic plants have been successfully grown in phytotron and in a greenhouse. We used the electric field to direct their growth where we want them to grow. Normally the ground or soil is negatively charged, and plants grow upwards towards positive charges in the air or the anode (positive electrode) in plant growth chambers. In reversed field polarization with "ground positive" the lettuce grows down-wards. In horizontal electric fields it grows horizontally again towards positively charged field generating conducting plate. This is at the first glance a very surprising effect even to the physicist. But one has to remember the most important fact that the electromagnetic forces are a factor of 1038 times stronger than the gravitational force. On the Earth the gravity acts on the entire plant, but the electrical field acts only on ions which are distributed on the surface of leaves, sprouts or stem tips. The ions are directed so very much strongly (1038 times) by the electrical field, than by gravity. The electric field lines guide the concentrations of ions to follow the field lines rendering the plants electrotropic and shaping their growth pattern. There is also a clear positive dependence of the rate of plant growth on field strength and crop yield. This is why it is so important to know which plants are electrotropic not only for use in space but also in greenhouse plant cultures. It is very much cheaper to select the electrotropic plant here, and not in space experiments for best cost efficiency. Special light weight plant growth chambers have been designed and very successfully used in terrestrial experiments. We can make the plant growth chambers very much lighter for space applications. We do not need to send them assembled into space, but rather make them foldable. Then we do not strain the plant growth chambers by vibrations and about 10 times stronger accelerations than gravity during launch, besides they are also not gravitationally loaded in space. We deploy them by stretching or inflating, them and suspend them using springs to get them into the needed shape and position. Some considerations have been given to some designs of space borne plant growth chambers. We pay special attention to secure the very important advantages of light weight and low cost so vital in space applications.

  5. Human Mars Mission Performance Crew Taxi Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duaro, Vince A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the results from Integrated Mission Program (IMP), a simulation language and code used to model present and future Earth Moon, or Mars missions, this report presents six different case studies of a manned Mars mission. The mission profiles, timelines, propellant requirements, feasibility and perturbation analysis is presented for two aborted, two delayed rendezvous, and two normal rendezvous cases for a future Mars mission.

  6. F-18 SRA taxi at dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    One of NASA's F/A-18 Hornets is seen here sitting on the ramp at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, at dawn August 6, 1993. F-18 aircraft, on loan to NASA by the U.S. Navy, are currently being flown at Dryden as support aircraft and as research testbeds. As support aircraft, they are used primarily for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. As research aircraft, they are involved in thrust vectoring and high angle of attack research, as well as numerous smaller scale experiments.

  7. Quantum control on entangled bipartite qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Francisco

    2010-04-15

    Ising interactions between qubits can produce distortion on entangled pairs generated for engineering purposes (e.g., for quantum computation or quantum cryptography). The presence of parasite magnetic fields destroys or alters the expected behavior for which it was intended. In addition, these pairs are generated with some dispersion in their original configuration, so their discrimination is necessary for applications. Nevertheless, discrimination should be made after Ising distortion. Quantum control helps in both problems; making some projective measurements upon the pair to decide the original state to replace it, or just trying to reconstruct it using some procedures which do not alter their quantum nature. Results about the performance of these procedures are reported. First, we will work with pure systems studying restrictions and advantages. Then, we will extend these operations for mixed states generated with uncertainty in the time of distortion, correcting them by assuming the control prescriptions for the most probable one.

  8. Décision d'amputation dans la prise en charge initiale d'une luxation ouverte grave de la cheville à propos d'un cas observé à l'Hôpital Laquintinie de Douala suite à un accident par moto-taxi

    PubMed Central

    Tsatedem, Faustin Atemkeng; Tsiagadigui, Jean Gustave; Ndando, Richard Polle; Arabo, Mohamadou Saidou; Bayiha, Alphonse; Kenfack, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    La décision d'amputation pour traumatisme grave de membre n'est pas toujours facile à prendre. Les auteurs rapportent le cas d'un traumatisme ouvert de la cheville gauche avec luxation tibiotalienne complète, référé pour amputation. Il s'agit d'une passagère d'une moto-taxi percutée par une voiture. A l'admission, le pouls tibial postérieur était présent et le score dit MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) côté à 5, ce qui a permis et d'éviter l'amputation. Après débridement et réduction, une broche transplantaire a permis d'immobiliser la cheville et de faire les pansements. L'amputation a été évitée. La cicatrisation dirigée de la peau a été suivie par la kinésithérapie. La mobilité de la cheville autorise une marche avec cannes au quatrième mois post-opératoire. Les auteurs recommandent l'utilisation du MESS dans la décision d'amputation après traumatisme grave de membre. PMID:23396997

  9. Theoretical Analysis of Pseudodegenerate Zero-Energy Modes in Vacancy-Centered Hexagonal Armchair Nanographene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Naoki; Ketut Sunnardianto, Gagus; Miyao, Satoaki; Kusakabe, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    Deriving mathematical expressions for two zero modes for a π-band tight-binding model, we identify a class of bipartite graphs having the same number of subgraph sites, where each graph represents one of the vacancy-centered hexagonal armchair nanographene (VANG) molecules. Indeed, in the VANG molecule C60H24, which shows stability in a density functional theory simulation, two pseudodegenerate zero modes, a vacancy-centered quasilocalized zero mode and an extended zero mode with a √{3} × √{3} structure, appear at the highest occupied level. Since there is a finite energy gap between these two zero-energy modes and the other modes, low-lying states composed of pseudodegenerate zero modes appear as magnetic multiplets. Thus, the unique magnetic characteristics derived using our theory are expected to hold for synthesized VANG molecules in reality.

  10. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  11. Slow Thinking and Deep Learning: Tversky and Kahneman's Taxi Cabs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedwell, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on classroom application of a problem story constructed by Amos Tversky in the 1970s. His intention was to evaluate human beings' intuitions about statistical inference. The problem was revisited by his colleague, the Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman. The aim of this article is to show how popular science textbooks can…

  12. Biohydrogen production from microalgal biomass: energy requirement, CO2 emissions and scale-up scenarios.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana F; Ortigueira, Joana; Alves, Luís; Gouveia, Luísa; Moura, Patrícia; Silva, Carla

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a life cycle inventory of biohydrogen production by Clostridium butyricum through the fermentation of the whole Scenedesmus obliquus biomass. The main purpose of this work was to determine the energy consumption and CO2 emissions during the production of hydrogen. This was accomplished through the fermentation of the microalgal biomass cultivated in an outdoor raceway pond and the preparation of the inoculum and culture media. The scale-up scenarios are discussed aiming for a potential application to a fuel cell hybrid taxi fleet. The H2 yield obtained was 7.3 g H2/kg of S. obliquus dried biomass. The results show that the production of biohydrogen required 71-100 MJ/MJ(H2) and emitted about 5-6 kg CO2/MJ(H2). Other studies and production technologies were taken into account to discuss an eventual process scale-up. Increased production rates of microalgal biomass and biohydrogen are necessary for bioH2 to become competitive with conventional production pathways.

  13. Enhancement of high-speed flywheel energy storage via carbon-fiber composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conteh, Michael Abu

    This study on the enhancement of high-speed flywheel energy storage is to investigate composite materials that are suitable for high-speed, high-energy density for energy storage and/or energy recovery. The main motivation of the study is to explore the application of the flywheel in the aviation industry for recovering some of the energy that is currently being lost at the wheel brakes of an aircraft due to the high temperature developed in the brake stack as a result of landing, frequent brake applications during taxiing in or out of heavy traffic airports and rejected take-off. Lamina and laminate mechanical properties of materials suitable for flywheel high-speed energy storage were investigated. Design and optimum stress analysis were used to determine the shape factor, maximum stress and energy density for a flywheel with a constant stress disk and a constant thickness rim. Analytical studies along with the use of the CADEC-online software were used to evaluate the lamina and laminate properties. This study found that the use of hybrid composite material with higher strength (based on first ply failure strength) and lower density and lower elastic moduli for the disk than the rim material will yield high-speed and high-energy density. The materials designed based on the results from this study show outperformance compared to previous published results of standard flywheel material combinations. The safe rotational velocity and energy density were found to be 166,000 RPM and 2.73 MJ/kg respectively. Therefore, results from this study will contribute to aiding further development of the flywheel that has recently re-emerged as a promising application for energy storage due to significant improvements in composite materials and technology. Further study on flywheel energy recovery from aircraft brakes revealed that more than half of the energy dissipated at the wheel brake as heat could be recovered and converted to some useful form. In this way, the operating

  14. Random pure states: Quantifying bipartite entanglement beyond the linear statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivo, Pierpaolo; Pato, Mauricio P.; Oshanin, Gleb

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of entangled random pure states of a quantum system partitioned into two smaller subsystems of dimensions N and M . Framing the problem in terms of random matrices with a fixed-trace constraint, we establish, for arbitrary N ≤M , a general relation between the n -point densities and the cross moments of the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix, i.e., the so-called Schmidt eigenvalues, and the analogous functionals of the eigenvalues of the Wishart-Laguerre ensemble of the random matrix theory. This allows us to derive explicit expressions for two-level densities, and also an exact expression for the variance of von Neumann entropy at finite N ,M . Then, we focus on the moments E {Ka} of the Schmidt number K , the reciprocal of the purity. This is a random variable supported on [1 ,N ] , which quantifies the number of degrees of freedom effectively contributing to the entanglement. We derive a wealth of analytical results for E {Ka} for N =2 and 3 and arbitrary M , and also for square N =M systems by spotting for the latter a connection with the probability P (xminGUE≥√{2 N }ξ ) that the smallest eigenvalue xminGUE of an N ×N matrix belonging to the Gaussian unitary ensemble is larger than √{2 N }ξ . As a by-product, we present an exact asymptotic expansion for P (xminGUE≥√{2 N }ξ ) for finite N as ξ →∞ . Our results are corroborated by numerical simulations whenever possible, with excellent agreement.

  15. Remote preparation of W states from imperfect bipartite sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M. G. M.; Cunha, Márcio M.; Parisio, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Several proposals to produce tripartite W-type entanglement are probabilistic even if no imperfections are considered in the processes. We provide a deterministic way to remotely create W states out of an EPR source. The proposal is made viable through measurements (which can be demolitive) in an appropriate three-qubit basis. The protocol becomes probabilistic only when source flaws are considered. It turns out that, even in this situation, it is robust against imperfections in two senses: (i) It is possible, after postselection, to create a pure ensemble of W states out of an EPR source containing a systematic error; (ii) If no postselection is done, the resulting mixed state has a fidelity, with respect to a pure |Wrangle , which is higher than that of the imperfect source in comparison with an ideal EPR source. This simultaneously amounts to entanglement concentration and lifting.

  16. Random pure states: Quantifying bipartite entanglement beyond the linear statistics.

    PubMed

    Vivo, Pierpaolo; Pato, Mauricio P; Oshanin, Gleb

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of entangled random pure states of a quantum system partitioned into two smaller subsystems of dimensions N and M. Framing the problem in terms of random matrices with a fixed-trace constraint, we establish, for arbitrary N≤M, a general relation between the n-point densities and the cross moments of the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix, i.e., the so-called Schmidt eigenvalues, and the analogous functionals of the eigenvalues of the Wishart-Laguerre ensemble of the random matrix theory. This allows us to derive explicit expressions for two-level densities, and also an exact expression for the variance of von Neumann entropy at finite N,M. Then, we focus on the moments E{K^{a}} of the Schmidt number K, the reciprocal of the purity. This is a random variable supported on [1,N], which quantifies the number of degrees of freedom effectively contributing to the entanglement. We derive a wealth of analytical results for E{K^{a}} for N=2 and 3 and arbitrary M, and also for square N=M systems by spotting for the latter a connection with the probability P(x_{min}^{GUE}≥sqrt[2N]ξ) that the smallest eigenvalue x_{min}^{GUE} of an N×N matrix belonging to the Gaussian unitary ensemble is larger than sqrt[2N]ξ. As a by-product, we present an exact asymptotic expansion for P(x_{min}^{GUE}≥sqrt[2N]ξ) for finite N as ξ→∞. Our results are corroborated by numerical simulations whenever possible, with excellent agreement. PMID:27300829

  17. Generation of pulsed bipartite entanglement using four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorieux, Quentin; Clark, Jeremy B.; Corzo, Neil V.; Lett, Paul D.

    2012-12-01

    Using four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor, we generate a pair of entangled twin beams in the microsecond pulsed regime near the D1 line of 85Rb, making it compatible with commonly used quantum memory techniques. The beams are generated in the bright and vacuum-squeezed regimes, requiring two separate methods of analysis, without and with local oscillators, respectively. We report a noise reduction of up to 3.8 ± 0.2 dB below the standard quantum limit in the pulsed regime and a level of entanglement that violates an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen inequality.

  18. Information Filtering via Heterogeneous Diffusion in Online Bipartite Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-Guo; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Internet brings us overwhelming online information, which is impossible for an individual to go through all of it. Therefore, recommender systems were created to help people dig through this abundance of information. In networks composed by users and objects, recommender algorithms based on diffusion have been proven to be one of the best performing methods. Previous works considered the diffusion process from user to object, and from object to user to be equivalent. We show in this work that it is not the case and we improve the quality of the recommendation by taking into account the asymmetrical nature of this process. We apply this idea to modify the state-of-the-art recommendation methods. The simulation results show that the new methods can outperform these existing methods in both recommendation accuracy and diversity. Finally, this modification is checked to be able to improve the recommendation in a realistic case. PMID:26125631

  19. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-27

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  20. Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth's surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth's heat can be converted into electricity.

  1. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  2. Energy: Conservation, Energy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive energy conservation program at College of the Holy Cross has saved nearly one-third of the fuel oil and one-fifth of the electricity used at the college; briefs on boilers, lights, design. (Author/MLF)

  3. Energy Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  4. Energy policy: energy prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, G.H.

    1983-08-18

    The Reagan administration, after reversing the trend of the 1970s toward government participation in energy programs, will continue its non-intervention philosophy in the National Energy Policy Plan (NEP III) update now under development. The plan eliminates oil and gas price controls, reduces or eliminates commercialization and tax-incentive programs for solar energy and synthetic fuels, and reduces research and development programs for near-term technologies. Large-scale, high-risk energy research will receive federal support if there is a potential commercial future. A level of regulation will remain, at least until alternative power systems sufficiently alter the non-competitive nature of utilities. Issues being raised are whether or not industry can provide needed service under deregulation, whether states will be able to set their own standards, whether the federal government should support new or necessary industries, whether private industry can compete against foreign government-backed firms, and the long-term consequences for energy development of widely fluctuating federal policies. (DCK)

  5. Renewable energy.

    PubMed

    Destouni, Georgia; Frank, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Committee of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has in a series of projects gathered information and knowledge on renewable energy from various sources, both within and outside the academic world. In this article, we synthesize and summarize some of the main points on renewable energy from the various Energy Committee projects and the Committee's Energy 2050 symposium, regarding energy from water and wind, bioenergy, and solar energy. We further summarize the Energy Committee's scenario estimates of future renewable energy contributions to the global energy system, and other presentations given at the Energy 2050 symposium. In general, international coordination and investment in energy research and development is crucial to enable future reliance on renewable energy sources with minimal fossil fuel use.

  6. Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  7. Gravitational energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    Observers at rest in a stationary spacetime flat at infinity can measure small amounts of rest-mass + internal energies + kinetic energies + pressure energy in a small volume of fluid attached to a local inertial frame. The sum of these small amounts is the total 'matter energy', EM, for those observers. If Mc2 is the total mass energy, the difference Mc2 - EM is the binding gravitational energy. Misner, Thorne and Wheeler (MTW) evaluated the gravitational energy of a spherically symmetric static spacetime. Here we show how to calculate gravitational energy in any static and stationary spacetimes with isolated sources with a set of observers at rest. The result of MTW is recovered and we find that electromagnetic and gravitational 3-covariant energy densities in conformastatic spacetimes are of opposite signs. Various examples suggest that gravitational energy is negative in spacetimes with special symmetries or when the energy momentum tensor satisfies usual energy conditions.

  8. Energy overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slone, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The experience, capabilities, and facilities being utilized at NASA Lewis in support of energy programs conducted by the Department of Energy and other agencies are discussed. Background information is given regarding NASA's involvement in solving energy problems.

  9. Energy Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy models characterize the energy system, its evolution, and its interactions with the broader economy. The energy system consists of primary resources, including both fossil fuels and renewables; power plants, refineries, and other technologies to process and convert these r...

  10. Energy resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the availability of fossil fuels for energy and non-energy production is presented. The cumulative requirements for petroleum, natural gas, and coal are discussed. Alternate forms of energy are described and the advantages and limitations are analyzed. Emphasis is placed on solar energy availability and methods for conversion. The Federal energy research and development funding for energy sources is tabulated.

  11. Energy Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-05-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical scenario, and participants move from one region to another to demonstrate the flow of energy among objects. (See Figs. 1, 3, and 4.) The goal of Energy Theater is for students to track energy transfers and transformations in real-world energy scenarios while employing the principle of energy conservation and disambiguating matter and energy. Unlike most representations of energy, which are static before-and-after accounting schemes for energy changes, Energy Theater is a dynamic representation that provides a natural stepping stone toward the more advanced ideas of energy density, energy current, and a continuity equation relating them. The fact that conservation of energy is embedded in the representation encourages students to "find the energy" in situations where it may be imperceptible. The rules of Energy Theater are listed in Fig. 2.

  12. Energy Theater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical…

  13. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemzer, Marilyn; Page, Deborah

    This curriculum unit describes geothermal energy in the context of the world's energy needs. It addresses renewable and nonrenewable energy sources with an in-depth study of geothermal energy--its geology, its history, and its many uses. Included are integrated activities involving science, as well as math, social studies, and language arts.…

  14. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    An introduction to geothermal energy is provided in this discussion of: (1) how a geothermal reservoir works; (2) how to find geothermal energy; (3) where it is located; (4) electric power generation using geothermal energy; (5) use of geothermal energy as a direct source of heat; (6) geopressured reservoirs; (7) environmental effects; (8)…

  15. Energy Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program in which students present their displays in the normal science-fair style but without the competitive element and more as a "science-share". Describes an "energy day" celebration which included an energy exhibition and engaged students in an "energy decathlon" that challenged them with tasks encompassing many aspects of energy.…

  16. Save Energy $.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Thomas E., III; Shapiro, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    Large institutional energy users can reduce energy costs by constructing and operating steam and electricity cogeneration facilities and purchasing their own gas at lower prices rather than relying on local distributors. (MSE)

  17. Energy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    1981-01-01

    The Aquatic Center at Corvallis (Oregon) is analyzed for energy use. Energy conservation in the building would be accomplished best through heavy insulation of exterior surfaces and the maximization of passive solar gain. (Author/MLF)

  18. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J.

    1996-02-01

    Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

  19. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Marshall J.

    1979-01-01

    During 1978, exploration for geothermal energy continued at the same moderately low level of the past few years in most countries. The U.S. is the only country where the development of geothermal energy depends on private industry. (BB)

  20. Hydrogen energy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P P; Kuznetsov, V L; David, W I F

    2007-04-15

    The problem of anthropogenically driven climate change and its inextricable link to our global society's present and future energy needs are arguably the greatest challenge facing our planet. Hydrogen is now widely regarded as one key element of a potential energy solution for the twenty-first century, capable of assisting in issues of environmental emissions, sustainability and energy security. Hydrogen has the potential to provide for energy in transportation, distributed heat and power generation and energy storage systems with little or no impact on the environment, both locally and globally. However, any transition from a carbon-based (fossil fuel) energy system to a hydrogen-based economy involves significant scientific, technological and socio-economic barriers. This brief report aims to outline the basis of the growing worldwide interest in hydrogen energy and examines some of the important issues relating to the future development of hydrogen as an energy vector.

  1. Energy Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaddy, Carol T., Ed.; Wells, Kathy, Ed.

    This collection of reprints offers practical solutions, not readily available elsewhere, to everyday energy problems, such as high utility bills, insulating windows, getting more gas mileage, or buying a more efficient washer or refrigerator. The Arkansas Energy Office provides a weekly column of energy news and conservation tips to newspapers,…

  2. Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

  3. Energy Builders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Due to increasing energy demands and decreasing supplies, it is important for teachers to provide students with a solid foundation for energy decision making. Activities are presented which offer hands-on experiences with four sources of energy: wind, water, sun, and fossil fuels. (JN)

  4. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are the origin and nature of geothermal energy. Included is the history of its development as an energy source, technological considerations affecting its development as an energy source, its environmental effects, economic considerations, and future prospects of development in this field. Basic system diagrams of the operation of a…

  5. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  6. ENERGY-10

    1996-06-30

    ENERGY-10 is a software tool that helps architects, builders, and engineers quickly identify the most cost-effective, energy-saving measures to take in designing a low-energy building. The simulation software is suitable for examining small commercial and residential buildings that are characterized by one, or two thermal zones (generally less than 10,000 ft2.)

  7. Biomass energy

    SciTech Connect

    Smil, V.

    1983-01-01

    This book offers a broad, interdisciplinary approach to assessing the factors that are key determinants to the use of biomass energies, stressing their limitations, complexities, uncertainties, links, and consequences. Considers photosynthesis, energy costs of nutrients, problems with monoculture, and the energy analysis of intensive tree plantations. Subjects are examined in terms of environmental and economic impact. Emphasizes the use and abuse of biomass energies in China, India, and Brazil. Topics include forests, trees for energy, crop residues, fuel crops, aquatic plants, and animal and human wastes. Recommended for environmental engineers and planners, and those involved in ecology, systematics, and forestry.

  8. Marine energy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David

    2007-04-15

    Marine energy is renewable and carbon free and has the potential to make a significant contribution to energy supplies in the future. In the UK, tidal power barrages and wave energy could make the largest contribution, and tidal stream energy could make a smaller but still a useful contribution. This paper provides an overview of the current status and prospects for electrical generation from marine energy. It concludes that a realistic potential contribution to UK electricity supplies is approximately 80 TWh per year but that many years of development and investment will be required if this potential is to be realized. PMID:17272244

  9. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  10. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  11. Energy Audits. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This course in energy audits is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in company-sponsored training…

  12. Energy Drinks

    PubMed Central

    Ugochukwu, Chio; Bagot, Kara; Khalili, David; Zaky, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The market and degree of consumption of energy drinks have exponentially expanded while studies that assess their psychological effects and impact on quality of life remain in the early stages, albeit on the rise. This review aims to examine the literature for evidence of the psychological effects of energy drinks and their impact on the sense of well-being and quality of life. Methods: Studies were identified through Pubmed, Medline, and PsycINFO searches from the dates of 1990 to 2011, published in English, using the keywords energy or tonic drinks, psychological effects, caffeine and cognitive functions, mood, sleep, quality of life, well-being, and mental illness. Three authors agreed independently on including 41 studies that met specific selection criteria. Results: The literature reveals that people most commonly consume energy drinks to promote wakefulness, to increase energy, and to enhance the experience of alcohol intoxication. A number of studies reveal that individuals who consume energy drinks with alcohol were more inclined to be involved in risk-taking behaviors. There was also excessive daytime sleepiness the day following energy drink consumption. Contrary to expectations, the impact of energy drinks on quality of life and well-being was equivocal. Conclusions: Energy drinks have mixed psychological and well-being effects. There is a need to investigate the different contexts in which energy drinks are consumed and the impact on mental health, especially in the psychiatrically ill. PMID:22347688

  13. Transporation Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2012-06-30

    This Transportation Energy Project is comprised of four unique tasks which work within the railroad industry to provide solutions in various areas of energy conservation. These tasks addressed: energy reducing yard related decision issues; alternate fuels; energy education, and energy storage for railroad applications. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team examined these areas and provided current solutions which can be used to both provide important reduction in energy usage and system efficiency in the given industry. This project also sought a mode in which rural and long-distance education could be provided. The information developed in each of the project tasks can be applied to all of the rail companies to assist in developing efficiencies.

  14. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented.

  15. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  16. Wind energy.

    PubMed

    Leithead, W E

    2007-04-15

    From its rebirth in the early 1980s, the rate of development of wind energy has been dramatic. Today, other than hydropower, it is the most important of the renewable sources of power. The UK Government and the EU Commission have adopted targets for renewable energy generation of 10 and 12% of consumption, respectively. Much of this, by necessity, must be met by wind energy. The US Department of Energy has set a goal of 6% of electricity supply from wind energy by 2020. For this potential to be fully realized, several aspects, related to public acceptance, and technical issues, related to the expected increase in penetration on the electricity network and the current drive towards larger wind turbines, need to be resolved. Nevertheless, these challenges will be met and wind energy will, very likely, become increasingly important over the next two decades. An overview of the technology is presented. PMID:17272245

  17. Solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  18. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  19. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened. PMID:20873683

  20. Solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, D.

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  1. Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Amy A.

    This selection of class activities involves a sequence of 10 class sessions. The goal of the collection is to aid students in learning the concepts of energy conservation and to put this knowledge into practice. Attention is also given to the development of alternate energy sources. Each lesson includes an activity title, motivational hints,…

  2. Energy Underground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Catherina L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a unit to study the cycling of matter and energy through speleology using cooperative learning groups. Integrates the topic with zoology, biogeochemistry, paleontology, and meteorology. Includes a sample rubric for a salt block cave presentation, unit outline, and processes for studying matter and energy processes in caves. (Author/KHR)

  3. Magma energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal energy contained in magmatic systems represents a huge potential resource. In the US, useful energy contained in molten and partially-molten magma within the upper 10 km of the crust has been estimated at 5 to 50 x 10/sup 22/ J (50,000 to 500,000 Quads). The objective of the Magma Energy Extraction Program is to determine the engineering feasibility of locating, accessing, and utilizing magma as a viable energy resource. This program follows the DOE/OBES-funded Magma Energy Research Project that concluded scientific feasibility of the magma energy concept. A primary long-range goal of this program is to conduct an energy extraction experiment directly in a molten, crustal magma body. Critical to determining engineering feasibility are several key technology tasks: (1) Geophysics - to obtain detailed definition of potential magma targets, (2) Geochemistry/Materials - to characterize the magma environment and select compatible engineering materials, (3) Drilling - to develop drilling and completion techniques for entry into a magma body, and (4) Energy Extraction - to develop heat extraction technology.

  4. Energy Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobieski, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Education facilities managers are faced with a daunting set of challenges: They must find new ways to reduce energy consumption and carry out greener energy policies. HVAC typically accounts for more than 30% of a building's electricity costs, so there is a clear incentive to eliminate unnecessary heating and cooling of unoccupied rooms. With more…

  5. Geothermal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bufe, Charles Glenn

    1983-01-01

    Major activities, programs, and conferences in geothermal energy during 1982 are highlighted. These include first comprehensive national assessment of U.S. low-temperature geothermal resources (conducted by U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Energy), map production by U.S. Geological Survey, geothermal plant production, and others. (JN)

  6. Energy - 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Board of Regents, Topeka.

    A checklist of energy consumption reduction measures for universities is provided with the intent of achieving rapid and significant energy savings at minimal cost. Measures described should be within the scope of accomplishment by regular university operating and maintenance personnel. The measures involve non-technical actions such as adjusting…

  7. Energy Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Ron

    2010-01-01

    When construction slows and campus operating expenses are under the microscope, it is more important than ever to save energy dollars with the equipment and staff on hand. For the facilities manager who thinks out of the box, significant savings can be found on most school and college campuses. This article provides energy-conservation tips that…

  8. Energy Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed as an interdisciplinary, supplemental teaching guide, this document provides fundamental information about energy supply, use, and conservation and related learning activities for secondary students. Eight units address the following topics: energy history, petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, alternative sources, energy…

  9. Renewable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Godfrey

    2004-05-01

    Stimulated by recent technological developments and increasing concern over the sustainability and environmental impact of conventional fuel usage, the prospect of producing clean, sustainable power in substantial quantities from renewable energy sources arouses interest around the world. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the principal types of renewable energy--including solar, thermal, photovoltaics, bioenergy, hydro, tidal, wind, wave, and geothermal. In addition, it explains the underlying physical and technological principles of renewable energy and examines the environmental impact and prospects of different energy sources. With more than 350 detailed illustrations, more than 50 tables of data, and a wide range of case studies, Renewable Energy, 2/e is an ideal choice for undergraduate courses in energy, sustainable development, and environmental science. New to the Second Edition ·Full-color design ·Updated to reflect developments in technology, policy, attitides ·Complemented by Energy Systems and Sustainability edited by Godfrey Boyle, Bob Everett and Janet Ramage, all of the Open University, U.K.

  10. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  11. Energy Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen

    Rules are provided for this bingo game focusing on terms related to solar, coal, nuclear, hydro, and wind energy. Playing cards and calling cards (to be cut out by the teacher) are also provided. (JN)

  12. Salinity Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are the costs of deriving energy from the earth's natural reserves of salt. Argues that, as fossil fuel supplies become more depleted in the future, the environmental advantages of salinity power may prove to warrant its exploitation. (TW)

  13. Tidal Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impact of Science on Society, 1987

    1987-01-01

    States that tidal power projects are feasible in a relatively limited number of locations around the world. Claims that together they could theoretically produce the energy equivalent to more than one million barrels of oil per year. (TW)

  14. Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Design and Construction, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes 21 completed projects now using solar energy for heating, cooling, or electricity. Included are elementary schools in Atlanta and San Diego, a technical school in Detroit, and Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. (MLF)

  15. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  16. Thermionic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion is the production of energy from a nuclear source. It is a technology advanced by SNSO, a joint research and development organization formed by NASA and the AEC. SNSO contracted with Thermo Electron Corporation to develop high temperature applications, i.e., metals with high melting points. Thermo Electron Corporation's expertise resulted in contracts for products made from exotic metals such as bone implants, artificial hips, and heart pacemakers.

  17. Energy 101: Clean Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-09

    Most of us have a basic understanding of manufacturing. It's how we convert raw materials, components, and parts into finished goods that meet our essential needs and make our lives easier. But what about clean energy manufacturing? Clean energy and advanced manufacturing have the potential to rejuvenate the U.S. manufacturing industry and open pathways to increased American competitiveness. Watch this video to learn more about this exciting movement and to see some of these innovations in action.

  18. Geothermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, A.

    2015-08-01

    Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Geothermal energy is stored in rocks and in fluids circulating in the underground. Electricity generation usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100°C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology), spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Geothermal technology, which has focused so far on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth's crust.

  19. Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.

    1995-06-01

    There are two fundamental reasons or motivations for energy conservation: (1) economics; and (2) consideration of energy - its sources and availability. Economics speaks for itself and needs little explanation: a project is undertaken, the cost is recovered in a given period of time (we hope) and our company realizes cost savings thereafter. We study and propose a project; we estimate the payback. If approved, we implement the project. Then, we eagerly watch for its effectiveness - for the proposed payback. The second consideration in regard to energy conservation might - in the foreseeable future - become by far the most important - that of availability. Very knowledgeable persons have stated that this - in reality - is the most serious problem facing our nation today. Readily available, reasonably priced energy has given to the US the high form of living experienced today. An interruption in this flow could catapult our nation in an awesome catastrophe. The energy shortage of the late 70`s might be a forerunner of such an experience.

  20. Energy Deskbook

    SciTech Connect

    Glasstone, S

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of the Energy Deskbook is to serve as a convenient reference to definitions of energy-related terms and descriptions of current and potential energy sources and their utilization. The material is presented at a low technical level with emphasis on general principles, which are not difficult to understand, rather than technology. The entries vary in length from a few lines to several pages, according to circumstances. As a general rule, each topic is defined and outlined in the first paragraph; this may be followed by a more detailed treatment, as required. An important feature of the Deskbook is the use of boldface (heavy) type for cross references. Words in the text set in boldface are the titles of articles where the particular subjects are described.

  1. The Energy Crisis and Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1974-01-01

    Examines the status of the energy crisis in Australia. Outlines energy alternatives for the 1990's and describes the present status of solar energy research and the economics of solar energy systems. (GS)

  2. 76 FR 33639 - Safety Zone; New York Water Taxi 10th Anniversary Fireworks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Red Hook, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary Final rule. SUMMARY... fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of vessels and spectators from hazards associated with fireworks displays. Persons and vessels are prohibited from entering...

  3. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taxiing on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A frontal view of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California in July 1999. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  4. Evaluation of Head-Worn Display Concepts for Commercial Aircraft Taxi Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a Head-Up Display (HUD) can be used to enable more capacity and safer aircraft surface operations. This previous research also noted that the HUD exhibited two major limitations which hindered the full potential of the display concept: 1) the monochrome HUD format; and, 2) a limited, fixed field of regard. Full-color Head Worn Displays (HWDs) with very small sizes and weights are emerging to the extent that this technology may be practical for commercial and business aircraft operations. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, full-color, out-the-window display concepts with an unlimited field-of-regard may be realized to improve efficiency and safety in surface operations. A ground simulation experiment was conducted at NASA Langley to evaluate the efficacy of head-worn display applications which may directly address the limitations of the HUD while retaining all of its advantages in surface operations. The simulation experiment used airline crews to evaluate various displays (HUD, HWD) and display concepts in an operationally realistic environment by using a Chicago, O Hare airport database. The results pertaining to the implications of HWDs for commercial business and transport aviation applications are presented herein. Overall HWD system latency was measured and found to be acceptable, but not necessarily optimal. A few occurrences of simulator sickness were noted while wearing the HWD, but overall there appears to be commercial pilot acceptability and usability to the concept. Many issues were identified which need to be addressed in future research including continued reduction in user encumbrance due to the HWD, and improvement in image alignment, accuracy, and boresighting.

  5. Evaluation of head-worn display concepts for commercial aircraft taxi operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, J. J., III; Prinzel, Lance, III; Kramer, Lynda J.

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a Head-Up Display (HUD) can be used to enable more capacity and safer aircraft surface operations. This previous research also noted that the HUD exhibited two major limitations which hindered the full potential of the display concept: 1) the monochrome HUD format; and, 2) a limited, fixed field of regard. Full-color Head Worn Displays (HWDs) with very small sizes and weights are emerging to the extent that this technology may be practical for commercial and business aircraft operations. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, full-color, out-the-window display concepts with an unlimited field-of-regard may be realized to improve efficiency and safety in surface operations. A ground simulation experiment was conducted at NASA Langley to evaluate the efficacy of head-worn display applications which may directly address the limitations of the HUD while retaining all of its advantages in surface operations. The simulation experiment used airline crews to evaluate various displays (HUD, HWD) and display concepts in an operationally realistic environment by using a Chicago, O'Hare airport database. The results pertaining to the implications of HWDs for commercial business and transport aviation applications are presented herein. Overall HWD system latency was measured and found to be acceptable, but not necessarily optimal. A few occurrences of simulator sickness were noted while wearing the HWD, but overall there appears to be commercial pilot acceptability and usability to the concept. Many issues were identified which need to be addressed in future research including continued reduction in user encumbrance due to the HWD, and improvement in image alignment, accuracy, and boresighting.

  6. Teaching Political Science to First-Year University Students: Challenging "Taxi-Rank Analysis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the situated nature of the epistemological values of a social science discipline as it finds expression in a particular department. Although it explores Becher and Trowler's anthropological conception of disciplinary "territories" and tribes ([1989]/2001) it finds deeper resonances in Trowler's more recent notion of "teaching…

  7. 14 CFR 294.3 - General requirements for Canadian charter air taxi operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of part 203 of this chapter; (e) Has effective authority from the Government of Canada to conduct... substantially owned and effectively controlled by Canadian citizens, or the Government of Canada, or a... conduct charter air service between the United States and Canada only if it: (a) Has been registered...

  8. Death and taxis: what non-mammalian models tell us about sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Oskouian, Babak; Saba, Julie D

    2004-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a signaling molecule that regulates critical events including mammalian cell proliferation, survival, migration and cell-cell interactions. Most of these signals are triggered by engagement of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors of the Edg family. However, accumulating evidence derived from investigation of non-mammalian models that lack Edg receptors suggests that sphingosine-1-phosphate-like molecules can act through alternative mechanisms and thereby contribute to morphogenesis, development, reproduction and survival. This review provides an overview of sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism, the isolation of genes in this pathway employing yeast genetics, the evidence for its influence on non-mammalian development, and the pertinence of these findings to human disease.

  9. Moving Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Rameau, Jon; Crabtree, George; Greene, Laura; Kwok, Wai; Johnson, Peter; Tsvelik, Alexei

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CES is to discover new high-temperature superconductors and improve the performance of known superconductors by understanding the fundamental physics of superconductivity.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensors that detect Ran conformational changes and a Ran x GDP-importin-beta -RanBP1 complex in vitro and in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Plafker, Kendra; Macara, Ian G

    2002-08-16

    The Ran GTPase plays a central role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Association of Ran x GTP with transport carriers (karyopherins) triggers the loading/unloading of export or import cargo, respectively. The C-terminal tail of Ran x GTP is deployed in an extended conformation when associated with a Ran binding domain or importins. To monitor tail orientation, a Ran-GFP fusion was labeled with the fluorophore Alexa546. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs efficiently between the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Alexa546 for Ran x GDP and Ran x GTP, suggesting that the tail is tethered in both states. However, Ran x GTP complexes with importin-beta, RanBP1, and Crm1 all show reduced FRET consistent with tail extension. Displacement of the C-terminal tail of Ran by karyopherins may be a general mechanism to facilitate RanBP1 binding. A Ran x GDP-RanBP1-importin-beta complex also displayed a low FRET signal. To detect this complex in vivo, a bipartite biosensor consisting of Ran-Alexa546 plus GST-GFP-RanBP1, was co-injected into the cytoplasm of cells. The Ran redistributed predominantly to the nucleus, and RanBP1 remained cytoplasmic. Nonetheless, a robust cytoplasmic FRET signal was detectable, which suggests that a significant fraction of cytoplasmic Ran.GDP may exist in a ternary complex with RanBP1 and importins.

  11. Creating Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David A.

    The author of this booklet is an engineer who conducts experiments in solar energy. Here he has described basic principles of the field. He also details methods of constructing a variety of solar implements, including solar panels, solar cells, a concentrating collector and a solar furnace. The book is intended for the layman and contains…

  12. Energy politics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Augustin

    2012-07-01

    In his review of Tyler Hamilton's book Mad Like Tesla (May pp44-45), Roger Bridgman writes that "in energy supply, obviously, companies cannot simply junk huge infrastructure investments in favour of something new, however good it might be". But that is exactly what Angela Merkel's administration has done in Germany with its anti-nuclear policy.

  13. Energy Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrahy, Dennis J.

    One of a series of social studies units designed to develop the reading and writing skills of low achievers, this student activity book focuses on the theme of energy. The unit can be used for high school classes, individual study in alternative and continuing high schools, and adult education classes. Separate sections cover early sources of…

  14. Energy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Group of Eight (Go8) is a coalition of leading Australian universities, intensive in research and comprehensive in general and professional education. The Go8 member universities recognise that the issue of energy usage and transformation is one of vital importance not only to Australia but to the world as a whole. The universities aim to make…

  15. Energy Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    These resource materials, developed for use by teachers in the elementary and secondary schools, are designed to provide the teacher with a bibliography, questions and answeres, and suggested classroom activities all relating to the energy problem. The materials are designed to develop a conservation ethic and greater understanding of our energy…

  16. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  17. Energy Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-01-01

    The United States and other countries face the problem of waste disposal in an economical, environmentally safe manner. A widely applied solution adopted by Americans is "waste to energy," incinerating the refuse and using the steam produced by trash burning to drive an electricity producing generator. NASA's computer program PRESTO II, (Performance of Regenerative Superheated Steam Turbine Cycles), provides power engineering companies, including Blount Energy Resources Corporation of Alabama, with the ability to model such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiency, exhaust loss, leakage, mechanical losses and generator losses are used to calculate the cycle heat rate. The generator output program is sufficiently precise that it can be used to verify performance quoted in turbine generator supplier's proposals.

  18. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  19. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  20. Monthly Energy Review

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's primary report of recent energy statistics. Included are total energy production, consumption, and trade; energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions.

  1. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, J.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Purchasing System Review (CPSR) Program, which oversees the extensive subcontracting activities of the Department's management and operating (M and O) contractors. This review is part of a special GAO audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that adequate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is DOE contractor oversight. This report describes the subcontracting deficiencies occurring at DOE, identifies shortcomings in DOE's CPSR Program, and discusses the corrective actions that DOE has committed to take in its CPSR Program in response to these findings.

  2. Energy awareness luncheon and energy seminar

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-23

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the following: the luncheon address, energy-growth-freedom by Kenneth A. Randall; the keynote commentary, by F.S. Patton, program chairman; and four current-awareness papers on the future of oil and gas, coal, nuclear energy, and solar energy. In addition, in a section, Speaking of Energy, very brief statements by eight professional engineers on the energy challenge are included. Also, the NSPE position paper on energy policy is included.

  3. Energy barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Energy conservation and home insulation may have been off the front pages in recent years, but rising fuel prices and the current crisis in the Mideast remind us once again that it's time to make sure our houses are adequately insulated. Doing so saves money and, to borrow a phrase from that Quaker Oats commercial, It's the right thing to do. Heat always wants to sneak from a warm space to a cold one. In the winter, it's like a convict trying to bust out of the big joint - it looks for any gap, crack or chink that it can slip through. Int he summer, it's more like a burglar trying to break in to your house. Insulation, properly installed, keeps the heat and the cold where you want it. You probably already know that insulation is rated by R-value, which indicates the material's ability to (R)esist the flow of heat. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power. But how much is enough The three model national building codes that form the basis for most state and municipal building codes now support a single, recently revised Model Energy Code. This article deals with deciding how much insulation is right for the application and how to install it correctly.

  4. Energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy that is specifically charged with encouraging the more efficient use of energy resources, and the use of renewable energy resources - such as solar power, wind power, biomass energy and geothermal energy. In the past several years, EE has increased its emphasis on technology deployment through partnerships with states, local governments and private companies. Partnerships move new discoveries more quickly into the marketplace, where they can create jobs, prevent pollution, save resources, and produce many other benefits. The author then emphasizes the importance of this effort in a number of different sections of the paper: energy consumption pervades everything we do; U.S. energy imports are rising to record levels; transportation energy demand is increasing; U.S. energy use is increasing; population growth increases world energy demand; total costs of energy consumption aren`t always counted; world energy markets offer incredible potential; cost of renewables is decreasing; clean energy is essential to sustainable development; sustainable energy policy; sustainable energy initiatives: utilities, buildings, and transportation.

  5. Energy management

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990 GAO began implementing a special audit effort to help ensure that areas vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement are identified and that appropriate corrective actions are taken. This effort focuses on 16 areas, one of which is the Department of Energy's (DOE) contracting practices. As part of this effort, the authors determined if contract audits for monitoring and overseeing DOE's contracting process were being performed and that we identify the impact or potential impact to the government when contract audits were not performed. Specifically, this paper discusses audit coverage of DOE's management and operating (M and O) contractors and DOE contracts, the problems that may occur when contract audit activity is not performed, and factors that have impeded contract audit coverage.

  6. Energy and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Bent

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the feasibility of utilizing continuous sources of of energy, particularly solar and wind energy. Outlines an energy plan for Denmark, which would supply all of Denmark's energy needs by the year 2050. (MLH)

  7. Cutting Energy Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes school-district energy-conservation efforts including teaching students to save energy, retrofitting schools, hiring energy consulting companies, and activating the sleep function on computer monitors. Also describes the federal Energy Star program (www.energystar.gov). (PKP)

  8. Annual energy review 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report presents historical energy statistics on all major energy activities. The statistics cover consumption, production, trade, stock, and prices, for all major energy commodities including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources.

  9. Wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion on wind energy systems involved with the DOE wind energy program is presented. Some of the problems associated with wind energy systems are discussed. The cost, efficiency, and structural design of wind energy systems are analyzed.

  10. Theme: Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkland, Joe R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series of articles focuses on energy education as a part of secondary vocational agriculture. Among the topics addressed are alternative energy sources for agriculture, wood power technology, energy efficiency, and energy in the Future Farmers of America program. (LRA)

  11. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  12. Collecting Solar Energy. Solar Energy Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Alexander

    This solar energy learning module for use with junior high school students offers a list of activities, a pre-post test, job titles, basic solar energy vocabulary, and diagrams of solar energy collectors and installations. The purpose is to familiarize students with applications of solar energy and titles of jobs where this knowledge could be…

  13. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

  14. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-14

    Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

  15. Energy Informatics Panel (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2012-06-01

    Designed to be the world's most comprehensive, open, and collaborative energy information network, Open Energy Information (OpenEI - openei.org) supplies essential energy data to decision makers and supports a global energy transformation. The platform, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is intended for global contribution and collaboration.

  16. Energy: The Surprising Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, John M.

    1983-01-01

    Stresses the importance of energy education and discusses various aspects of and trends related to energy in the United States. These include energy costs, recession and energy conservation, the nuclear debate, environmental concerns (including acid rain), solar energy, technological developments, energy policy/politics, and projection of energy…

  17. The ABC's of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H., Ed.; Bitner, Betty L., Ed.

    This resource guide consists of activities related to 26 separate energy topics (one for each letter of the alphabet). Topic areas are: approaches to problems related to energy shortages; biomass; conserving energy; demand for energy in the year 2000; economics and energy; fossil fuels; geothermal energy; hydroelectric power; insulation; energy…

  18. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  19. Renewable energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoferson, L.A.; Bokalders, V.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a valuable overview of the prospects for new and renewable energy technologies and their possible role in energy planning in developing countries. Contents include: biomass energy; production; conversion; utilisation; biomass engines and biomass fuels; solar energy systems; wind energy systems; and hydro energy systems.

  20. Arctic Energy Resources: Energy Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryc, George

    1984-04-01

    Arctic Energy Resources is a volume of 26 papers recording the proceedings of the Comite' Arctique International Conference, held at the Veritas Centre, Oslo, Norway, September 22-24, 1982. This was the fourth of a series of meetings on the Arctic organized by the Comite', an organization established in the Principality of Monaco with the active support of H.S.H. Prince Rainer III. The fourth Conference was opened by H.R.H. Crown Prins Harald of Norway, a noble beginning for a noble objective.The North Polar Region has drawn world attention recently because of several large hydrocarbon and other mineral discoveries and because of major political and environmental actions in the North American Arctic. Since 1923 when Naval Petroleum Reserve number 4 (NPR-4) was established, northern Alaska has been considered a major petroleum province. It was first explored systematically with modern techniques from 1943 to 1953. In 1958, Alaska became a state, and both federal and state lands in northern Alaska were available for private exploration. Building on the knowledge base provided by the Pet-4 program and its spinoff research laboratory at Barrow, industry explored the area east of NPR-4 and discovered the largest hydrocarbon accumulation (9.6 bbl crude oil and 26 Tcf (trillion cubic feet) gas) in North America at Prudhoe Bay. Concerns for environmental impacts, including oil spills, led to the passing of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1969. In 1970, over 9 million acres were set aside, now known as the Arctic National Wildlife Range, and in 1971 the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act was passed by the U.S. Congress. The Arab oil embargo of 1973 heightened the energy crisis and changed the economic basis for further exploration in the Arctic. The convergence of these events dramatically changed the balance of power and the pace of activity in the North American Arctic.

  1. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  2. Photovoltaic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. photovoltaic industry enjoyed a growth rate of 30 percent in sales for the second year in a row. This sends a message that the way we think about electricity is changing. Instead of big energy projects that perpetuate environmental and economic damage, there is a growing trend toward small renewable technologies that are well matched to end-user needs and operating conditions. As demand grows and markets expand, investment capital will be drawn to the industry and new growth trends will emerge. The photovoltaic industry around the world achieved record shipments also. Worldwide shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules for 1989 totaled more than 40 megawatts (MW), nearly a 20 percent increase over last year's shipments. The previous two years showed increases in worldwide shipments of 23 and 25 percent, respectively. If this growth rate continues through the 1990s, as industry back orders would indicate, 300 to 1000 MW of PV-supplied power could be on line by 2000. Photovoltaic systems have low environmental impact and they are inexpensive to operate and maintain. Using solid-state technology, PV systems directly convert sunlight to electricity without high-temperature fluids or moving parts that could cause mechanical failure. This makes the technology very reliable.

  3. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  4. Real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions of light-duty diesel vehicles and their correlation with road conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingnan; Wu, Ye; Wang, Zhishi; Li, Zhenhua; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Haitao; Bao, Xiaofeng; Hao, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    The real-world fuel efficiency and exhaust emission profiles of CO, HC and NOx for light-duty diesel vehicles were investigated. Using a portable emissions measurement system, 16 diesel taxies were tested on different roads in Macao and the data were normalized with the vehicle specific power bin method. The 11 Toyota Corolla diesel taxies have very good fuel economy of (5.9 +/- 0.6) L/100 km, while other five diesel taxies showed relatively high values at (8.5 +/- 1.7) L/100 km due to the variation in transmission systems and emission control strategies. Compared to similar Corolla gasoline models, the diesel cars confirmed an advantage of ca. 20% higher fuel efficiency. HC and CO emissions of all the 16 taxies are quite low, with the average at (0.05 +/- 0.02) g/km and (0.38 +/- 0.15) g/km, respectively. The average NOx emission factor of the 11 Corolla taxies is (0.56 +/- 0.17) g/km, about three times higher than their gasoline counterparts. Two of the three Hyundai Sonata taxies, configured with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) + diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) emission control strategies, indicated significantly higher NO2 emissions and NO2/NOx ratios than other diesel taxies and consequently trigger a concern of possibly adverse impacts on ozone pollution in urban areas with this technology combination. A clear and similar pattern for fuel consumption and for each of the three gaseous pollutant emissions with various road conditions was identified. To save energy and mitigate CO2 emissions as well as other gaseous pollutant emissions in urban area, traffic planning also needs improvement. PMID:22893964

  5. Co-Clustering by Bipartite Spectral Graph Partitioning for Out-of-Tutor Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivedi, Shubhendu; Pardos, Zachary A.; Sarkozy, Gabor N.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    Learning a more distributed representation of the input feature space is a powerful method to boost the performance of a given predictor. Often this is accomplished by partitioning the data into homogeneous groups by clustering so that separate models could be trained on each cluster. Intuitively each such predictor is a better representative of…

  6. Contact processes with competitive dynamics in bipartite lattices: effects of distinct interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianegonda, Salete; Fiore, Carlos E.

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional contact process (CP) with a competitive dynamics proposed by Martins et al (2011 Phys. Rev. E 84 011125) leads to the appearance of an unusual active-asymmetric phase, in which the system sublattices are unequally populated. It differs from the usual CP only by the fact that particles also interact with their next-nearest neighbor sites via a distinct strength creation rate, and for the inclusion of an inhibition effect, proportional to the local density. Aimed at investigating the robustness of such an asymmetric phase, in this paper we study the influence of distinct interactions for two bidimensional CPs. In the first model, the interaction between first neighbors requires a minimal neighborhood of adjacent particles for creating new offspring, whereas second neighbors interact as usual (e.g. at least one neighboring particle is required). The second model takes the opposite situation, in which the restrictive dynamics is in the interaction between next-nearest neighbor sites. Both models are investigated under mean field theory (MFT) and Monte Carlo simulations. In similarity with results by Martins et al, the inclusion of distinct sublattice interactions maintains the occurrence of an asymmetric active phase and re-entrant transition lines. In contrast, remarkable differences are presented, such as discontinuous phase transitions (even between the active phases), the appearance of tricritical points and the stabilization of active phases under larger values of control parameters. Finally, we have shown that the critical behaviors are not altered due to the change of interactions, in which the absorbing transitions belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, whereas second-order active phase transitions belong to the Ising universality class.

  7. Quantum interference in timed Dicke basis and its effect on bipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Sete, Eyob A.; Das, Sumanta

    2011-04-15

    We analyze the effect of the position-dependent excitation phase on the properties of entanglement between two qubits formed in atomic systems. We show that the excitation phase induces a vacuum-mediated quantum interference in the system that affects the dynamical behavior of entanglement between the qubits. It is also found that the quantum interference leads to a coherent population transfer between the symmetric and antisymmetric states that can considerably modify the dynamics of two-qubit entanglement and can even prevent finite-time disentanglement (sudden death) under certain conditions.

  8. Relation between catalyst-assisted transformation and multiple-copy transformation for bipartite pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yuan; Duan Runyao; Ying Mingsheng

    2006-10-15

    We show that in some cases, catalyst-assisted entanglement transformation cannot be implemented by multiple-copy transformation for pure states. This fact, together with the result we obtained in R. Y. Duan, Y. Feng, X. Li, and M. S. Ying, Phys. Rev. A 71, 042319 (2005), namely that the latter can be completely implemented by the former, indicates that catalyst-assisted transformation is strictly more powerful than multiple-copy transformation. For the purely probabilistic setting we find, however, these two kinds of transformations are geometrically equivalent in the sense that the sets of pure states that can be converted into a given pure state with maximal probabilities not less than a given value have the same closure, regardless of whether catalyst-assisted transformation or multiple-copy transformation is used.

  9. Strong monogamies of no-signaling violations for bipartite correlation bell inequalities.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Horodecki, Paweł

    2014-11-21

    The phenomenon of monogamy of Bell inequality violations is interesting both from the fundamental perspective as well as in cryptographic applications such as the extraction of randomness and secret bits. In this article, we derive new and stronger monogamy relations for violations of Bell inequalities in general no-signaling theories. These relations are applicable to the class of binary output correlation inequalities known as XOR games, and to free unique games. In many instances of interest, we show that the derived relation provides a significant strengthening over previously known results. Our result connects, for the first time, the property of monogamy with that crucial part of the Bell expression that is necessary for revealing a contradiction with local realistic predictions, thus shifting the paradigm in the field of monogamy of correlations.

  10. Skn-1: Evidence for a bipartite recognition helix in DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Santona; Lo, Mei-Chu; Schmidt, Darby; Pelczer, István; Thurber, Stacy; Walker, Suzanne

    1997-01-01

    Skn-1 is a maternally expressed transcription factor that specifies the fate of certain blastomeres early in the development of Caenorhabditis elegans. This transcription factor contains a basic region, but it binds to DNA as a monomer. Because other transcription factors containing basic regions bind as dimers, this finding implied that Skn represents a new DNA recognition motif. It has been proposed that the basic region helix of Skn is stabilized for binding by tertiary contacts to other parts of the protein. We have tested this proposal by carrying out circular dichroism (CD) and NMR experiments on the Skn domain and five truncated proteins. Our results have shown that the basic region of Skn is unstructured in solution and does not contact other parts of the protein; like other basic region peptides, it folds into a helix only upon binding specifically to DNA. However, there is a stably folded helical module in the Skn domain, and one of the helices in this module terminates immediately before the start of the basic region. This pre-organized helix contains a surface rich in basic amino acids, and we propose that this helix contacts the DNA distal to the basic region proper, providing an extra long helical recognition surface which helps to stabilize monomeric binding. Homology between the Skn domain and several basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) domains raises the possibility that the affinity and perhaps the specificity of DNA binding by bZIP proteins can be modulated by incorporating a stably folded helical segment that contacts the DNA just below the basic region proper. PMID:9159111

  11. Invariance of bipartite separability and PPT-probabilities over Casimir invariants of reduced states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    Milz and Strunz (J Phys A 48:035306, 2015) recently studied the probabilities that two-qubit and qubit-qutrit states, randomly generated with respect to Hilbert-Schmidt (Euclidean/flat) measure, are separable. They concluded that in both cases, the separability probabilities (apparently exactly 8/33 in the two-qubit scenario) hold constant over the Bloch radii ( r) of the single-qubit subsystems, jumping to 1 at the pure state boundaries (r=1). Here, firstly, we present evidence that in the qubit-qutrit case, the separability probability is uniformly distributed, as well, over the generalized Bloch radius ( R) of the qutrit subsystem. While the qubit (standard) Bloch vector is positioned in three-dimensional space, the qutrit generalized Bloch vector lives in eight-dimensional space. The radii variables r and R themselves are the lengths/norms (being square roots of quadratic Casimir invariants) of these ("coherence") vectors. Additionally, we find that not only are the qubit-qutrit separability probabilities invariant over the quadratic Casimir invariant of the qutrit subsystem, but apparently also over the cubic one—and similarly the case, more generally, with the use of random induced measure. We also investigate two-qutrit (3 × 3) and qubit- qudit (2 × 4) systems—with seemingly analogous positive partial transpose-probability invariances holding over what has been termed by Altafini the partial Casimir invariants of these systems.

  12. Relation Between Stereographic Projection and Concurrence Measure in Bipartite Pure States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarbashi, G.; Seifi, B.

    2016-10-01

    One-qubit pure states, living on the surface of Bloch sphere, can be mapped onto the usual complex plane by using stereographic projection. In this paper, after reviewing the entanglement of two-qubit pure state, it is shown that the quaternionic stereographic projection is related to concurrence measure. This is due to the fact that every two-qubit state, in ordinary complex field, corresponds to the one-qubit state in quaternionic skew field, called quaterbit. Like the one-qubit states in complex field, the stereographic projection maps every quaterbit onto a quaternion number whose complex and quaternionic parts are related to Schmidt and concurrence terms respectively. Rather, the same relation is established for three-qubit state under octonionic stereographic projection which means that if the state is bi-separable then, quaternionic and octonionic terms vanish. Finally, we generalize recent consequences to 2⊗ N and 4⊗ N dimensional Hilbert spaces ( N ≥ 2) and show that, after stereographic projection, the quaternionic and octonionic terms are entanglement sensitive. These trends are easily confirmed by direct computation for general multi-particle W- and GHZ-states.

  13. Zhang-Rice singlet hopping on bipartite tetragonal CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreschini, L.; Moser, S.; Yang, H.-Y.; Innocenti, D.; Fuchs, F.; Hansen, N. H.; Chang, Y. J.; Kim, K. S.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Mila, F.; Grioni, M.

    2014-03-01

    In the superconducting cuprates, corner sharing CuO4 plaquettes host the formation and propagation of the Zhang-Rice singlet. Adding a further Cu atom to the center of such plaquettes results in a rare edge sharing geometry. The cupric oxide CuO indeed crystallizes in a lower-symmetry monoclinic form. At beamline 7.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source, we have grown tetragonal CuO thin films by pulsed laser deposition. By in situ angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), we show that the first ionization state is a singlet propagating on two nearly independent corner sharing sublattices, and we resolve an inter-plaquette coupling of the order of 100 meV.

  14. Protecting remote bipartite entanglement against amplitude damping by local unitary operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Du, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ming; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2014-12-01

    Remote entanglement will inevitably decrease due to the interactions between quantum systems and their environments. Therefore protecting remote entanglement against decoherence is of great importance in realizing quantum communication and quantum comp utation. In this paper, we demonstrate that decoherence caused by weak-measurement-induced damping can be effectively suppressed by adding local unitary operation series on each qubit. The results show that the entanglement of the output state can approach that of the state before amplitude damping. The most distinct advantage of this entanglement protection scheme is that any unitary operation (except the identity operation) has this entanglement reversal effect on the amplitude-damped states. Furthermore, in each local unitary operation series, all the operations can be different from one other, and all the time intervals between any two adjacent operations can be different too. In addition, there is no need for the two remote users to synchronize their operations. Unlike most of the previous schemes, we do not assume the instantaneous local unitary operation, and each operation has a duration. All these advantages suggest that this remote entanglement protection scheme is much simpler and feasible than the previous ones, and we hope it can be implemented in the near future. Recently, Y. S. Kim et al. [Nat. Phys. 8, 117 (2012), 10.1038/nphys2178] pointed out that "pre-weak measurement + amplitude damping + bit-flipping operation + post-weak measurement" can actively combat specific decoherence. By combing our proposal with Kim et al.'s scheme, the protection performance can be greatly improved by replacing the bit-flipping operation with an arbitrary rotational operation around the x axis, the number of the operations as well as the interval between any two adjacent operations all can be different, and the application range of the scheme can be greatly broadened.

  15. Phase transitions and metastability in the distribution of the bipartite entanglement of a large quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Parisi, G.; Pascazio, S.; Scardicchio, A.

    2010-05-15

    We study the distribution of the Schmidt coefficients of the reduced density matrix of a quantum system in a pure state. By applying general methods of statistical mechanics, we introduce a fictitious temperature and a partition function and translate the problem in terms of the distribution of the eigenvalues of random matrices. We investigate the appearance of two phase transitions, one at a positive temperature, associated with very entangled states, and one at a negative temperature, signaling the appearance of a significant factorization in the many-body wave function. We also focus on the presence of metastable states (related to two-dimensional quantum gravity) and study the finite size corrections to the saddle point solution.

  16. Relation Between Stereographic Projection and Concurrence Measure in Bipartite Pure States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarbashi, G.; Seifi, B.

    2016-06-01

    One-qubit pure states, living on the surface of Bloch sphere, can be mapped onto the usual complex plane by using stereographic projection. In this paper, after reviewing the entanglement of two-qubit pure state, it is shown that the quaternionic stereographic projection is related to concurrence measure. This is due to the fact that every two-qubit state, in ordinary complex field, corresponds to the one-qubit state in quaternionic skew field, called quaterbit. Like the one-qubit states in complex field, the stereographic projection maps every quaterbit onto a quaternion number whose complex and quaternionic parts are related to Schmidt and concurrence terms respectively. Rather, the same relation is established for three-qubit state under octonionic stereographic projection which means that if the state is bi-separable then, quaternionic and octonionic terms vanish. Finally, we generalize recent consequences to 2⊗N and 4⊗N dimensional Hilbert spaces (N ≥ 2) and show that, after stereographic projection, the quaternionic and octonionic terms are entanglement sensitive. These trends are easily confirmed by direct computation for general multi-particle W- and GHZ-states.

  17. Plasticity in Repressor-DNA Interactions Neutralizes Loss of Symmetry in Bipartite Operators.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Narayanan, Naveen; Nair, Deepak T

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to gene regulation. Many transcription factors regulate multiple target genes and can bind sequences that do not conform strictly to the consensus. To understand the structural mechanism utilized by the transcription regulators to bind diverse target sequences, we have employed the repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis as a model system. AraR is known to bind to eight different operator sites in the bacterial genome. Although there are differences in the sequences of four of these operators, ORE1, ORX1, ORA1, and ORR3, the AraR-DNA binding domain (AraR-DBD) as well as full-length AraR unexpectedly binds to each of these sequences with similar affinities as measured by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We have determined crystal structures of AraR-DBD in complex with two different natural operators ORE1 and ORX1 up to 2.07 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. These structures were compared with the previously reported structures of AraR-DBD bound to two other natural operators (ORA1 and ORR3). Interactions of two molecules of AraR-DBD with the symmetric operator, ORE1, are identical, but their interaction with the non-symmetric operator ORX1 results in breakdown of the symmetry in protein-DNA interactions. The novel interactions observed are accompanied by local conformational change in the DNA. ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data on other transcription factors has shown that they can bind to diverse targets, and hence the plasticity exhibited by AraR may be a general phenomenon. The ability of transcription factors to form alternate interactions may be important for employment in new functions and evolution of novel regulatory circuits.

  18. Effects of high-order correlations on personalized recommendations for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Che, Hong-An; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified collaborative filtering (MCF) algorithm, which has remarkably higher accuracy than the standard collaborative filtering. In the MCF, instead of the cosine similarity index, the user-user correlations are obtained by a diffusion process. Furthermore, by considering the second-order correlations, we design an effective algorithm that depresses the influence of mainstream preferences. Simulation results show that the algorithmic accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, is further improved by 20.45% and 33.25% in the optimal cases of MovieLens and Netflix data. More importantly, the optimal value λ depends approximately monotonously on the sparsity of the training set. Given a real system, we could estimate the optimal parameter according to the data sparsity, which makes this algorithm easy to be applied. In addition, two significant criteria of algorithmic performance, diversity and popularity, are also taken into account. Numerical results show that as the sparsity increases, the algorithm considering the second-order correlation can outperform the MCF simultaneously in all three criteria.

  19. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  20. Global view of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kursunoglu, B.N.; Millunzi, A.C.; Perlmutter, A.

    1982-01-01

    This book contains selected papers presented at the fourth interdisciplinary international forum on the Geopolitics of Energy. Topics included: energy demand; energy modeling; urgency of world energy problems; nuclear fission; progress in nuclear fusion; financing energy investments; conservation of energy in developed countries; public safety - risks and benefits; and atmospheric carbon dioxide. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 25 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base; all will appear in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis and five in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). (RJC)