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Sample records for bipolar patients treated

  1. Metallomics studies of human blood serum from treated bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Sussulini, Alessandra; Kratzin, Hartmut; Jahn, Olaf; Banzato, Claudio E Muller; Arruda, Marco A Zezzi; Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2010-07-01

    In the present work, metallomics studies using biomolecular (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF MS/MS) and elemental mass spectrometry (laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, LA-ICPMS) of human blood serum samples from bipolar disorder (BD) patients compared to controls were performed. The serum samples from three different groups: control (n = 25), BD patients treated with Li (n = 15), and BD patients not treated with Li (n = 10), were pooled according to their groups and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). Then, in order to determine the metals bound to the protein spots and search for differences among the studied groups, the 2-D gels were analyzed by LA-ICPMS in three distinct modes: bioimaging of metals in gel sections, line scan through the protein spots, and microlocal analysis of selected protein spots. MALDI-TOF MS/MS characterized 32 serum proteins, and they were associated with the metals previously detected. When comparing control and treated BD patient groups, a differentiation in terms of metals bound to proteins was possible to observe. The main metals bound to proteins found in all groups were Na, Mg, Zn, Ca, and Fe. Mn was only detected in the control group; Co was only observed in the control and BD patients treated with Li group. K and Ti were only found in the BD patient groups, and P was only observed in control and BD patients not treated with Li drugs. This exploratory work shows that the association of LA-ICPMS with MALDI-TOF MS/MS is a powerful strategy in metallomics studies applied to determine differences in metal-containing proteins, being able to play an important role on the discovery of potential markers for BD and its treatment with Li in serum samples.

  2. Ziprasidone as Adjunctive Therapy in Severe Bipolar Patients Treated with Clozapine

    PubMed Central

    Bartolommei, Natalia; Pensabene, Laura; Luchini, Federica; Benvenuti, Antonella; Di Paolo, Antonello; Cosentino, Luca; Mauri, Mauro; Lattanzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To confirm the efficacy and tolerability of ziprasidone as adjunctive therapy in bipolar patients partially responding to clozapine or with persisting negative symptoms, overweight, or with metabolic syndrome. Methods. Eight patients with psychotic bipolar disorder were tested with the BPRS, the HAM-D, and the CGI at T0 and retested after 2 weeks (T1). Plasma clozapine and norclozapine levels and BMI were tested at T0 and T1. Results. Ziprasidone was well tolerated by all the patients. BPRS and HAM-D scores were reduced in all patients. BMI was reduced in patients with a BMI at T0 higher than 25. Plasma levels of clozapine and norclozapine showed an irregular course. PMID:25006524

  3. Metabolic syndrome and serum homocysteine in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia treated with second generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Vuksan-Ćusa, Bjanka; Jakovljević, Miro; Sagud, Marina; Mihaljević Peleš, Alma; Marčinko, Darko; Topić, Radmila; Mihaljević, Sanea; Sertić, Jadranka

    2011-08-30

    There is accumulating evidence for an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in bipolar patients, which is comparable to the prevalence of MetS in patients with schizophrenia. Hyperhomocysteinaemia has emerged as an independent and graded risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is, at the same time, the primary clinical outcome of MetS. The aim of this study was to ascertain if the presence of MetS was associated with hyperhomocysteinaemia in patients with bipolar disorder (N=36) and schizophrenia (N=46) treated with second-generation antipsychotics (SGA). MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP-III) criteria and the cut-off point for hyperhomocysteinaemia was set up at 15 μmoll(-1). Results of the study indicated that the presence of the MetS is statistically significantly associated with the elevated serum homocysteine in all participants. As hyperhomocysteinaemia has emerged as an independent risk factor for psychiatric disorder and CVD, it could be useful to include fasting homocysteine serum determination in the diagnostic panels of psychiatric patients to obtain a better assessment of their metabolic risk profile. PMID:21216014

  4. Augmentation of light therapy in difficult-to-treat depressed patients: an open-label trial in both unipolar and bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Camardese, Giovanni; Leone, Beniamino; Serrani, Riccardo; Walstra, Coco; Di Nicola, Marco; Della Marca, Giacomo; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the clinical benefits of bright light therapy (BLT) as an adjunct treatment to ongoing psychopharmacotherapy, both in unipolar and bipolar difficult-to-treat depressed (DTD) outpatients. Methods In an open-label study, 31 depressed outpatients (16 unipolar and 15 bipolar) were included to undergo 3 weeks of BLT. Twenty-five completed the treatment and 5-week follow-up. Main outcome measures Clinical outcomes were evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The Snaith–Hamilton Pleasure Scale and the Depression Retardation Rating Scale were used to assess changes in anhedonia and psychomotor retardation, respectively. Results The adjunctive BLT seemed to influence the course of the depressive episode, and a statistically significant reduction in HDRS scores was reported since the first week of therapy. The treatment was well-tolerated, and no patients presented clinical signs of (hypo)manic switch during the overall treatment period. At the end of the study (after 5 weeks from BLT discontinuation), nine patients (36%, eight unipolar and one bipolar) still showed a treatment response. BLT augmentation also led to a significant improvement of psychomotor retardation. Conclusion BLT combined with the ongoing pharmacological treatment offers a simple approach, and it might be effective in rapidly ameliorating depressive core symptoms of vulnerable DTD outpatients. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trial on larger samples. PMID:26396517

  5. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Erroneously Diagnosed and Treated as Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atmaca, Murad; Ozler, Sinan; Topuz, Mehtap; Goldstein, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a dearth of literature on patients erroneously diagnosed and treated for bipolar disorder. Method: The authors report a case of an adult with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder erroneously diagnosed and treated for bipolar disorder for 6 years. At that point, methylphenidate was initiated. The patient was judged to be a…

  6. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Lithium Attitudes Questionnaire (LAQ) in bipolar patients treated with lithium: cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to lithium is very common in bipolar patients and it is a frequent cause of recurrence during prophylactic treatment. Several reports suggest that attitudes of bipolar patients interfere with adherence to lithium. The Lithium Attitudes Questionnaire (LAQ) is a brief questionnaire developed as a means of identifying and grouping the problems patients commonly have with taking lithium regularly. The original version is validated in patients, but a validated version in Portuguese is not yet available. Methods One-hundred six patients with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV criteria) criteria under lithium treatment for at least one month were assessed using LAQ. LAQ is a brief questionnaire administered under interview conditions, which includes 19 items rating attitudes towards prophylactic lithium treatment. We analysed the internal consistency, concurrent validity, sensitivity and specificity of the Portuguese version of LAQ. Results The internal consistency, evaluated by Cronbach's alpha was 0.78. The mean total LAQ score was 4.1. Concurrent validity was confirmed by a negative correlation between plasma lithium concentration and total LAQ score (r = -0,198; p = 0.048). We analysed the scale's discriminative capacity revealing a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 71% in the identification of negative attitudes of bipolar patients. Conclusion The psychometric assessment of the Portuguese version of LAQ showed good internal consistency, sensitivity and specificity. The results were similar to the original version in relation to attitudes of bipolar patients towards lithium therapy. PMID:17121674

  7. Adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the Lithium Knowledge Test (LKT) of bipolar patients treated with lithium: cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective Adherence problems are a common feature among bipolar patients. A recent study showed that lithium knowledge was the main difference between adherent and non adherents bipolar patients. The Lithium Knowledge Test (LKT), a brief questionnaire, was developed as a means of identifying aspects of patients' practical and pharmacological knowledge which are important if therapy is to be safe and effective. The original English version is validated in psychiatric population, but a validated Portuguese one is not yet available. Methods One hundred six patients selected were diagnosed with bipolar disorder (I or II) according to DSM-IV criteria and had to be on lithium treatment for at least one month. The LKT was administered on only one occasion. We analysed the internal consis tency, concurrent validity, sensitivity and specificity of the LKT for the detection of the knowledge about lithium treatment of bipolar patients. Results The internal consistency, evaluated by Cronbach's alpha was 0.596. The mean of total score LKT by bipolar patients was 9.0 (SD: 0.75) for men and 8.74 (SD: 0.44) for women. Concurrent validity based on plasma lithium concentration showed a significant correlation between the total LKT score and plasma lithium (r = 0,232; p = 0.020). The sensitivity was 84% and specificity was 81%. Conclusion LKT is a rapid, reliable instrument which appears to be as effective as a lengthier standard interview with a lithium clinic doctor, and which has a high level of acceptability to lithium patients. We found that the psychometric assessment of the Portuguese version of LKT showed good internal consistency, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:17147815

  8. [Bipolar patients, structured psychotherapeutic treatment and approaches].

    PubMed

    Bonvalot, Thierry; Mazouni, Rabbah; Rivallan, Armel; Lassignardie, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    The current development of structured psychotherapy has brought gradual improvements to the treatment provided to bipolar patients. This psychotherapy may be either carried out individually or in a group. In this context, psychotherapeutic meditation seems beneficial.

  9. Adult presentation of congenital muscular torticollis: a series of 12 patients treated with a bipolar release of sternocleidomastoid and Z-lengthening.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, S; Shyam, A K; Sancheti, P; Arora, P; Nagda, T; Naik, P

    2011-06-01

    Adult presentation of neglected congenital muscular torticollis is rare. We report 12 patients with this condition who underwent a modified Ferkel's release comprising a bipolar release of sternocleidomastoid with Z-lengthening. They had a mean age of 24 years (17 to 31) and were followed up for a minimum of two years. Post-operatively a cervical collar was applied for three weeks with intermittent supervised active assisted exercises for six weeks. Outcome was assessed using a modified Lee score and a Cheng and Tang score. The mean pre-operative rotational deficit was 8.25° (0° to 15°) and mean lateral flexion deficit was 20.42° (15° to 30°), which improved after treatment to a mean of 1.67° (0° to 5°) and 7.0° (4° to 14°) after treatment, respectively. According to the modified Lee scoring system, six patients had excellent results, two had good results and four had fair results, and using the Cheng and Tang score, eight patients had excellent results and four had good results. Surgical management of adult patients with neglected congenital muscular torticollis using a modified Ferkel's bipolar release gives excellent results. The range of neck movement and head tilt improved in all 12 patients and cosmesis improved in 11, despite the long-standing nature of the deformity.

  10. An archetype of the collaborative efforts of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in successfully treating dissociative identity disorder with comorbid bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Meier, Stacey L Colton; Meier, Robert S; Lakshmanan, Ramaswamy

    2010-07-01

    We present a case where dissociative identity disorder was effectively treated with memory retrieval psychotherapy. However, the patient's comorbid bipolar disorder contributed to the patient's instability and fortified the amnesiac barriers that exist between alter personality states in dissociative identity disorder, which made memory retrieval difficult to achieve. Implications from this case indicate that a close collaboration between psychologist and psychiatrist focused on carefully diagnosing and treating existing comorbid conditions may be the most important aspect in treating dissociative identity disorder. We present our experience of successfully treating a patient with dissociative identity disorder and bipolar disorder using this collaborative method.

  11. Unmet needs of bipolar disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Hajda, Miroslav; Prasko, Jan; Latalova, Klara; Hruby, Radovan; Ociskova, Marie; Holubova, Michaela; Kamaradova, Dana; Mainerova, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a serious mental illness with adverse impact on the lives of the patients and their caregivers. BD is associated with many limitations in personal and interpersonal functioning and restricts the patients’ ability to use their potential capabilities fully. Bipolar patients long to live meaningful lives, but this goal is hard to achieve for those with poor insight. With progress and humanization of society, the issue of patients’ needs became an important topic. The objective of the paper is to provide the up-to-date data on the unmet needs of BD patients and their caregivers. Methods A systematic computerized examination of MEDLINE publications from 1970 to 2015, via the keywords “bipolar disorder”, “mania”, “bipolar depression”, and “unmet needs”, was performed. Results Patients’ needs may differ in various stages of the disorder and may have different origin and goals. Thus, we divided them into five groups relating to their nature: those connected with symptoms, treatment, quality of life, family, and pharmacotherapy. We suggested several implications of these needs for pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Conclusion Trying to follow patients’ needs may be a crucial point in the treatment of BD patients. However, many needs remain unmet due to both medical and social factors. PMID:27445475

  12. Comparison of clinical and sociodemographic features of bipolar disorder patients with those of social anxiety disorder patients comorbid with bipolar disorder in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Berkol, Tonguç D.; Kırlı, Ebru; Islam, Serkan; Pınarbaşı, Rasim; Özyıldırım, İlker

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of social anxiety disorder (SAD) comorbidity on the clinical features, illness severity, and response to mood stabilizers in bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Methods: This retrospective study included bipolar patients that were treated at the Department of Psychiatry, Haseki Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey in 2015, and who provided their informed consents for participation in this study. The study was conducted by assessing patient files retrospectively. Two hundred bipolar patients were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition axis-I (SCID-I) in order to detect all possible comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. The sample was split according to the presence of SAD comorbidity and the groups were compared. Results: The SAD comorbidity was detected in 17.5% (35/200) of the BD patients. The SAD comorbid bipolar patients were more educated, had earlier onset of BD, lower number of manic episodes, and more severe episodes. There was no difference between groups in terms of total number of episodes, hospitalization, suicidality, being psychotic, treatment response to lithium and anticonvulsants. Conclusion: Social anxiety disorder comorbidity may be associated with more severe episodes and early onset of BD. However, SAD comorbidity may not be related to treatment response in bipolar patients. PMID:26905355

  13. Neuroprotective and neurogenesis agent for treating bipolar II disorder: add-on memantine to mood stabilizer works.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ru-Band; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsieh; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Huang, San-Yuan; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2012-08-01

    Bipolar disorder, characterized by a dysregulation of mood, impulsivity, risky behavior and interpersonal problems, is a recurrent and often becomes chronic psychiatric illness. However, bipolar subtypes are not often recognized in psychiatric settings, especially bipolar II subtype, until Akiskal and Angst made clear definition to bipolar I (BP-I) and bipolar II (BP-II) disorder in 1999. More and more studies, not only on family inheritance, diagnosis, but also on disease process have been reported that BP-I and BP-II are two different disorders with distinct pathological mechanisms. In general, patients with BP-II express less symptoms and have shorter hypomania stages than BP-I. According to a longitudinal research, patients with BP-II have poor recovery than do BP-I patients. Memantine used to be recognized as a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist. However, it was found to have neuroprotective and neurogenesis effect in several neurodegenerative diseases in the past years. We found that memantine could inhibit brain inflammatory response through its action on neuroglial cells and provide neurotrophic effect. The above evidences of benefit on auto-immune system with memantine would support that memantine as add-on therapy to valproate might be more effective than valproate alone on improvement of the neuron degeneration in bipolar disorders. Review articles indicate that not only the mood stabilizers provide with good neuroprotection, but the memantine also have conspicuous anti-autoimmune and neurogenesis effect. Therefore, we propose that drugs with neuroprotective effect and neurotrophic effect may treat neurodegenerative diseases including BP-II. The combination treatment of mood stabilizers memantine may not only augment and improve the remedy for bipolar disorders, but also repair the damaged neurons and neurogenesis through activation of astroglial cell and release of neurotrophic factors.

  14. An exploration of testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wooderson, Sarah C.; Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Background Testosterone influences well-being, mood and cognition and may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Aim To examine testosterone levels in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. Method We examined baseline total testosterone levels and current depression scores in male and female patients with bipolar disorder and mild to moderate depression and healthy controls. Results A significant interaction between diagnosis and gender was observed (F(2,97)=9.791, P=0.002). Testosterone levels were significantly lower for male patients with bipolar disorder compared with male controls (P=0.001). Women with bipolar disorder had significantly higher testosterone levels than female controls (P=0.03). Conclusions Disturbances in testosterone levels may represent an important neurobiological abnormality in bipolar disorder and may differ by gender. If these findings are confirmed, the use of gender appropriate treatment strategies for the normalisation of testosterone levels in bipolar disorder depression should be further explored. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703738

  15. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  16. Behavioral family treatment for patients with bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, D J; Goldstein, M J

    1990-10-01

    Techniques of behavioral family management (BFM), which have been found to be highly effective in delaying relapse for schizophrenic patients when used as adjuncts to medication maintenance, are also applicable in the outpatient treatment of recently hospitalized bipolar, manic patients. The authors describe their adaptation of the educational, communication skills training, and problem-solving skills training modules of BFM to families containing a bipolar member. The observations that families of bipolar patients are often high functioning, and that these families seem to enjoy interchanges that are highly affective and spontaneous, led to certain modifications in the original BFM approach. The authors found it necessary to be (a) more flexible and less didactic, (b) more oriented toward dealing with affect and resistance to change, and (c) more focused on the patient's and family members' feelings about labeling, stigmatization, and medication usage. Research issues relevant to testing the efficacy of this approach are also discussed. PMID:2252468

  17. Reduced Neurite Density in Neuronal Cell Cultures Exposed to Serum of Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wollenhaupt-Aguiar, Bianca; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Chagas, Vinicius de Saraiva; Castro, Mauro A A; Passos, Ives Cavalcante; Kauer-Sant’Anna, Márcia; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased inflammatory markers and oxidative stress have been reported in serum among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of this study is to assess whether biochemical changes in the serum of patients induces neurotoxicity in neuronal cell cultures. Methods: We challenged the retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the serum of BD patients at early and late stages of illness and assessed neurite density and cell viability as neurotoxic endpoints. Results: Decreased neurite density was found in neurons treated with the serum of patients, mostly patients at late stages of illness. Also, neurons challenged with the serum of late-stage patients showed a significant decrease in cell viability. Conclusions: Our findings showed that the serum of patients with bipolar disorder induced a decrease in neurite density and cell viability in neuronal cultures. PMID:27207915

  18. Bipolar depression: Managing patients with second generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay M; Drayton, Shannon J

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a debilitating illness that manifests as cyclical episodes of mood elevation and depression, but the treatment of the depressive episodes (i.e., bipolar depression) differs considerably from the treatment of major depressive disorder. In bipolar affective disorder, it is well known that patients spend a significantly greater amount of time in depressive episodes than manic or hypomanic episodes, yet there are currently just three Food and Drug Administration-approved agents for the treatment of bipolar depression: (1) olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (2) quetiapine, both immediate- and extended-release, and (3) lurasidone. The literature review presented here focuses on the clinical trials that led to the Food and Drug Administration-approval of these second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar depression. The discussion highlights key considerations regarding overall treatment strategies to aid clinicians in the selection of pharmacologic agents. Recommended monitoring parameters, potential adverse effects, and pertinent counseling points for second generation antipsychotics used in bipolar depression are included. PMID:27079776

  19. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  20. [Dislocation-disassembly of bipolar hip arthroplasty--case report].

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Blacha, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation is rare. A case of bipolar hip arthroplasty dislocation in patient treated because of femoral neck fracture was described. Patient had neurological problems. The arthroplasty was made with posterolateral approach. Disassembly of bipolar prosthesis occurred during closed reduction. Open reduction with bipolar head exchange was necessary. To avoid this complication reduction should be made in anesthesia with muscles relaxation.

  1. The influence of lithium on hippocampal volume in elderly bipolar patients: a study using voxel-based morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Zung, S; Souza-Duran, F L; Soeiro-de-Souza, M G; Uchida, R; Bottino, C M; Busatto, G F; Vallada, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that lithium (Li) exerts neuronal protective and regenerative effects both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of long-term Li treatment in the brain areas associated with memory impairment of elderly bipolar patients are still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the hippocampal volumes of elderly bipolar patients using Li, elderly bipolar patients not using Li and healthy controls. Sociodemographic, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 elderly euthymic bipolar patients who had been using Li for an average of >61 months; 27 elderly euthymic bipolar patients not taking Li for an average of 45 months; and 22 elderly healthy controls were analyzed. Volumetric differences in the hippocampus between groups were investigated with voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based on the Statistical Parametric Mapping technique. No statistical differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and course of bipolar disorder between the two bipolar groups were observed. Using small volume correction in the VBM analysis (analysis of variance (ANOVA)), one voxel cluster of statistical significance was detected in the left hippocampus (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons, extent threshold >10 voxels). Post hoc unpaired t-tests revealed increased left hippocampal volume in the Li-treated group compared with the non-Li-treated group, and decreased left hippocampal volume in the non-Li group relative to controls. Additional exploratory two-group comparisons indicated trends toward reduced right-hippocampal volumes in the non-Li-treated group relative to both the Li-treated group and controls. The findings suggested that the use of Li may influence the volume of the hippocampus, possibly due to its neuroprotective effects. PMID:27351600

  2. Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic mental health disorder that is frequently encountered in primary care. Many patients with depression may actually have bipolar disorder. The management of bipolar disorder requires proper diagnosis and awareness or referral for appropriate pharmacologic therapy. Patients with bipolar disorder require primary care management for comorbidities such as cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. PMID:27262007

  3. Electrical mapping in bipolar disorder patients during the oddball paradigm.

    PubMed

    Di Giorgio Silva, Luiza Wanick; Cartier, Consuelo; Cheniaux, Elie; Novis, Fernanda; Silveira, Luciana Angélica; Cavaco, Paola Anaquim; de Assis da Silva, Rafael; Batista, Washington Adolfo; Tanaka, Guaraci Ken; Gongora, Mariana; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis Fernando; Budde, Henning; Cagy, Mauricio; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is characterized by an alternated occurrence between acute mania episodes and depression or remission moments. The objective of this study is to analyze the information processing changes in BP (Bipolar Patients) (euthymia, depression and mania) during the oddball paradigm, focusing on the P300 component, an electric potential of the cerebral cortex generated in response to external sensorial stimuli, which involves more complex neurophysiological processes related to stimulus interpretation. Twenty-eight bipolar disorder patients (BP) (17 women and 11 men with average age of 32.5, SD: 9.5) and eleven healthy controls (HC) (7 women and 4 men with average age of 29.78, SD: 6.89) were enrolled in this study. The bipolar patients were divided into 3 major groups (i.e., euthymic, depressive and maniac) according to the score on the Clinical Global Impression--Bipolar Version (CGI-BP). The subjects performed the oddball paradigm simultaneously to the EEG record. EEG data were also recorded before and after the execution of the task. A one-way ANOVA was applied to compare the P300 component among the groups. After observing P300 and the subcomponents P3a and P3b, a similarity of amplitude and latency between euthymic and depressive patients was observed, as well as small amplitude in the pre-frontal cortex and reduced P3a response. This can be evidence of impaired information processing, cognitive flexibility, working memory, executive functions and ability to shift the attention and processing to the target and away from distracting stimuli in BD. Such neuropsychological impairments are related to different BD symptoms, which should be known and considered, in order to develop effective clinical treatment strategies. PMID:26551764

  4. Treating Insomnia Improves Mood State, Sleep, and Functioning in Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Kaplan, Kate A.; Hein, Kerrie; Lee, Jason; Kanady, Jennifer; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Neylan, Thomas C.; Li, Descartes; Ketter, Terence A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if a treatment for interepisode bipolar disorder I patients with insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning. Method Alongside psychiatric care, interepisode bipolar disorder I participants with insomnia were randomly allocated to a bipolar disorder–specific modification of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTI-BP; n = 30) or psychoeducation (PE; n = 28) as a comparison condition. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of 8 sessions of treatment, and 6 months later. This pilot was conducted to determine initial feasibility and generate effect size estimates. Results During the 6-month follow-up, the CBTI-BP group had fewer days in a bipolar episode relative to the PE group (3.3 days vs. 25.5 days). The CBTI-BP group also experienced a significantly lower hypomania/mania relapse rate (4.6% vs. 31.6%) and a marginally lower overall mood episode relapse rate (13.6% vs. 42.1%) compared with the PE group. Relative to PE, CBTI-BP reduced insomnia severity and led to higher rates of insomnia remission at posttreatment and marginally higher rates at 6 months. Both CBTI-BP and PE showed statistically significant improvement on selected sleep and functional impairment measures. The effects of treatment were well sustained through follow-up for most outcomes, although some decline on secondary sleep benefits was observed. Conclusions CBTI-BP was associated with reduced risk of mood episode relapse and improved sleep and functioning on certain outcomes in bipolar disorder. Hence, sleep disturbance appears to be an important pathway contributing to bipolar disorder. The need to develop bipolar disorder–specific sleep diary scoring standards is highlighted. Public Health Significance This study suggests that an intervention to improve sleep and circadian functioning reduces risk of relapse and improves sleep and overall functioning among individuals who meet diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder. PMID:25622197

  5. Efficacy of bipolar release in neglected congenital muscular torticollis patients.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nevra; Jasharllari, Lorenc; Keskin, Mustafa; Savacı, Nedim

    2012-06-01

    Surgical correction of the congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is recommended for patients with unsuccessful conservative treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of surgical release of congenital muscular torticollis in neglected cases. We retrospectively evaluated the data of our patients in terms of age, sex, clinical presentation, localization of the lesion, diagnostic tests, and additional abnormalities. The age at operation ranged from 6 to 23 years. Complete muscular release as determined by pre-operative and postoperative range of motion measurements was achieved in all of the patients by bipolar release. In this study, neck motion and head tilt showed marked improvement with surgical treatment in cases with CMT who were admitted to the hospital lately. Congenital muscular torticollis patients can benefit from surgical intervention above the age of 5. Bipolar release is an adequate and complication-free method.

  6. ESPECTRA: Searching the Bipolar Spectrum in Eating Disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a chronic, recurrent and highly prevalent illness. Despite the need for correct diagnosis to allow proper treatment, studies have shown that reaching a diagnosis can take up to ten years due to the lack of recognition of the broader presentations of BD. Frequent comorbidities with other psychiatric disorders are a major cause of misdiagnosis and warrant thorough evaluation. Methods/Design ESPECTRA (Occurrence of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Eating Disorder Patients) is a single-site cross-sectional study involving a comparison group, designed to evaluate the prevalence of bipolar spectrum in an eating disorder sample. Women aged 18-45 years will be evaluated using the SCID-P and Zurich criteria for diagnosis and the HAM-D, YOUNG, SCI-MOODS, HCL-32, BIS-11, BSQ, WHOQoL and EAS instruments for rating symptoms and measuring clinical correlates. Discussion The classificatory systems in psychiatry are based on categorical models that have been criticized for simplifying the diagnosis and leading to an increase in comorbidities. Some dimensional approaches have been proposed aimed at improving the validity and reliability of psychiatric disorder assessments, especially in conditions with high rates of comorbidity such as BD and Eating Disorder (ED). The Bipolar Spectrum (BS) remains under-recognized in clinical practice and its definition is not well established in current diagnostic guidelines. Broader evaluation of psychiatric disorders combining categorical and dimensional views could contribute to a more realistic understanding of comorbidities and help toward establishing a prognosis. PMID:21489298

  7. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  8. Bipolar Disorder after Stroke in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Raquel Calvão; Lopes, Rui; Alves, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The onset of bipolar disorder (BD) secondary to a stroke event is a rare clinical entity. Although it may be related to specific regions of the brain, several other factors have been linked to its expression such as subcortical atrophy or chronic vascular burden. While precise locations and cerebral circuits involved in the bipolarity expression after stroke still need to be determined, their investigation represents an opportunity to study brain function and BD etiopathogenesis. We present a BD secondary to multiple subcortical biparietal lacunar infarctions, a lacunar infarction in left putamen and an ischemic lesion at the cerebral trunk evolving the right median portion, in a 65-year-old male patient who experienced manic, hypomanic, and depressive episodes, after 6, 10, and 16 months, respectively, of the cerebrovascular events. PMID:24991445

  9. Cross-cultural comparisons on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ming; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Fleck, David E; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2011-10-30

    We compared executive dysfunction with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) among distinct national and ethnic patients with bipolar disorder in euthymia. Bipolar patients, aged 16-45years, from the United States (n=25) and Taiwan (n=30) did not differ significantly on any measure. The WCST score for number Failure to Maintain Set was significantly positively correlated with residual affective symptoms in Taiwanese and US patients. Selective executive dysfunction in euthymia is inherent to bipolar disorder. Euthymic bipolar patients of various ethnic groups may exhibit similar executive dysfunction.

  10. Risk Factors Associated with Dislocation after Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Kim, Joon-Kuk; Joo, Il-Han; Hwang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the incidence and time of dislocation and other factors associated with dislocation of bipolar hemiarthroplasty related to the treatment of femoral neck fracture in old age patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2002 and April 2014, 498 femoral neck fractures (467 patients) were treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty and included in this study. All surgeries were performed using the postero-lateral approach. The incidence of dislocation was investigated. A comparative analysis between a control group and dislocation group was performed with respect to patient factors including age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, the ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) score, mental status and center-edge angle, and surgical factors including type of femoral stem, leg length discrepancy, femoral offset and method of short external rotator (SER) reconstruction. Results The incidence of dislocation was 3.8%, and the dislocation occurred on average 2.2 months (range, 0.6-6.5 months) after operation. No difference in patient-related factors was observed between the two groups. However, a smaller center edge (CE) angle was observed in the dislocation group (42.1°±3.2° vs. 46.9°±5.4°, P<0.001), and significantly lower incidence of dislocation was observed in tendon to bone repair group (0.7% vs 7.8%, P<0.001). Conclusion SERs should be repaired using the tendon-to-bone repair method to reduce dislocation rate in elderly patients who undergo bipolar hemiarthroplasty using the postero-lateral approach due to femoral neck fracture. In addition, patients with smaller CE angle should be carefully monitored due to high incidence of dislocation. PMID:27536652

  11. Platelet parameters (PLT, MPV, P-LCR) in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Wysokiński, Adam; Szczepocka, Ewa

    2016-03-30

    There are no studies comparing platelet parameters platelet parameters (platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR)) between patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine and compare differences in PLT, MPV and P-LCR in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, naturalistic study of 2377 patients (schizophrenia n=1243; unipolar depression n=791; bipolar disorder n=343, including bipolar depression n=259 and mania n=84). There were significant differences for PLT, MPV and P-LCR values between study groups. A significant percentage of patients with bipolar disorder had abnormal (too low or too high) number of platelets. Negative correlation between PLT and age was found in all study groups and positive correlation between age and MPV and P-LCR was found in patients with schizophrenia.

  12. Predominant mania course in Indian patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Rangappa, Sushma Bilichodu; Munivenkatappa, Shashidhara; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Jain, Sanjeev; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2016-08-01

    Many long-term follow-up studies suggest that bipolar disorder (BD) is highly recurrent and that depressive episodes are commoner than hypomania/manic episodes. However, some studies from tropical countries including India suggest that the patients experience a greater proportion of manic episodes than depressive episodes. The aim of the present study was to examine the course of BD type 1 (BD I) in a sample of hospitalized Indian subjects. We examined the clinical course of 285 BD I subjects with at least 5 years of illness using standard life charting method. These subjects were hospitalized between October 2010 and October 2012. The predominant polarity (having at least two-thirds of their lifetime episodes at one polarity) was mania (79%). Unipolar mania (≥ 3 mania episodes and no episodes of depression) was observed in 48% of the subjects. The frequency of rapid cycling course was noted in 2.5% of the subjects. Predominant manic polarity group had the illness onset mostly with a manic episode (88.9%) and the predominant depressive polarity group with a depressive episode (73.8%). Mania was the predominant polarity with a high rate of unipolar mania and a majority of the subjects had greater number of manic episodes than depressive/mixed episodes. The onset polarity determined the predominant polarity during the course of illness. Predominantly, mania course could have significant implications in the treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:27520890

  13. Does Borderline Personality Disorder Manifest Itself Differently in Patients With Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Walsh, Emily

    2015-12-01

    Perugi and colleagues (2013) recently reported that some features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) significantly predicted a diagnosis of bipolar disorder among depressed patients. They interpreted these findings as indicating that some BPD criteria are nonspecific and are indicators of bipolar disorder rather than BPD, whereas other criteria are more specific to BPD. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, the authors tested the hypothesis that BPD presents itself differently in psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. The authors found that the patients with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely to report impulsive behavior and transient dissociation. No criterion was significantly more common in the BPD patients with MDD. The authors therefore do not consider the BPD criteria to be nonspecific with regard to the distinction between BPD and bipolar disorder.

  14. Lamotrigine Dosing for Pregnant Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Crystal T.; Klein, Autumn M.; Perel, James M.; Helsel, Joseph; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little information is available on the need for dosage changes for lamotrigine in pregnant women with bipolar disorder. The authors present new data on serial serum levels of lamotrigine in pregnant patients on lamotrigine monotherapy. They also review the epilepsy literature on use of lamotrigine during pregnancy. Method Lamotrigine serum samples were obtained from eight mother-infant pairs at different time points during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Results All of the women were taking lamotrigine throughout pregnancy. Serum-level-to-dose ratios were lower during pregnancy than the postpartum period. Lamotrigine was taken once daily in doses ranging from 100 mg to 300 mg. Three patients had an increase of 50 mg to their daily dose across pregnancy. The change in serum lamotrigine levels in the postpartum period ranged from a 30% decrease to a 640% increase compared with the first level obtained during pregnancy. Level-to-dose ratios obtained within 4 weeks after delivery reflected a mean level 402% greater than the baseline level during gestation. Compared with the third trimester, lamotrigine serum concentration increased an average of 154% within 5 weeks after delivery. The most dramatic increase in lamotrigine serum level early after delivery occurred at 1.5 weeks. The mean infant cord level was 66% of the maternal serum level at delivery. The mean breast-fed infant serum level was 32.5% of the maternal serum levels. Conclusions The pattern of lamotrigine changes during pregnancy in these women with bipolar disorder was consistent with that described in the epilepsy literature. PMID:24185239

  15. Season of birth is associated with adult body mass index in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Soreca, Isabella; Cheng, Yu; Frank, Ellen; Fagiolini, Andrea; Kupfer, David J

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors, such as abdominal obesity and obesity in general, are very prevalent among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Although long-term use of psychotropic medications is an important determinant of these risk factors, other evidence suggests that early development may interact with the mood disorder diathesis to exponentially increase the risk of obesity. The goal of our study was to test whether season of birth is associated with adult body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity in individuals with bipolar disorder. We compared season of birth effects on BMI in 375 adult patients with bipolar disorder and 196 adult patients with unipolar major depression. We found a significant season of birth effect on BMI in patients with bipolar disorder, but not unipolar. In patients with bipolar disorder, season of birth was also associated with waist circumference, with a stronger effect in males. Season of birth affects adult BMI and waist circumference in patients with bipolar disorder, but not in patients with unipolar depression. Our results suggest that early environmental factors, yet to be identified, interact with specific neurobiological features of bipolar disorder to determine stable traits and disease risk factors in adult life. PMID:23445513

  16. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important.

  17. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important. PMID:27391371

  18. Elevated levels of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Munkholm, Klaus; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-09-01

    Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case-control designs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF and NT-3 levels differ between patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder and healthy control subjects and whether BDNF and NT-3 levels alter with affective states in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients. Plasma levels of BDNF and NT-3 were measured in 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients and in 40 age- and gender matched healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a longitudinal design, repeated measurements of BDNF and NT-3 were evaluated in various affective states in bipolar disorder patients during a 6-12 months period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Careful attention was given to standardization of all procedures and adjustment for potential confounders of BDNF and NT-3. In linear mixed models, adjusting for demographical and lifestyle factors, levels of BDNF were significantly elevated in bipolar disorder patients in euthymic- (p<0.05), depressed- (p<0.005) and manic/hypomanic (p<0.005) states compared with healthy control subjects. Within bipolar disorder patients, adjusting for medication, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels between affective states, with equally elevated levels present in euthymic-, depressive- and manic/hypomanic patients. Levels of BDNF were higher in patients with longer duration of illness compared with patients with shorter duration of illness. We found no difference in NT-3 levels between bipolar disorder patients in any affective state compared with healthy control subjects and no difference in NT-3 levels between affective states in bipolar disorder patients. The results suggest that

  19. Glucose metabolism alterations in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Gianluca; Cattaneo, Annamaria; Zanardini, Roberta; Gennarelli, Massimo; Maina, Giuseppe; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella

    2015-09-15

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) are more frequently affected by metabolic syndrome (MetS) than the general population, but the neurobiological correlates underlying such association are still not clarified and few studies in BD have evaluated the role of regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism. The present study was aimed to investigate putative alterations in markers linked to metabolic dysfunctions as C-peptide, Ghrelin, GIP, GLP-1, Glucagon, Insulin, Leptin, PAI-1 (total), Resistin and Visfatin in a sample of BD patients compared to controls. Furthermore, associations between changes of metabolic markers and relevant clinical features, such as severity of symptomatology, number and type of past mood episodes, drug treatments and presence/absence of metabolic alterations (MetS, diabetes and cardiovascular disease) were analyzed. A total of 57 patients with BD and 49 healthy controls were recruited. The main results showed lower serum levels of Glucagon, GLP-1, Ghrelin, and higher levels of GIP in BD patients as compared to controls (p = 0.018 for Ghrelin; p < 0.0001 for Glucagon; p < 0.0001 for GLP-1; p < 0.0001 for GIP). Further, Glucagon and GLP-1 levels were significantly associated with the number of past mood episodes. These findings support the hypothesis that alterations in Glucagon, GLP-1, GIP and Ghrelin might be involved in BD pathogenesis and might represent useful biomarkers for the development of preventive and personalized therapies in this disorder. PMID:26120808

  20. Renal Failure in Lithium-Treated Bipolar Disorder: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Close, Helen; Reilly, Joe; Mason, James M.; Kripalani, Mukesh; Wilson, Douglas; Main, John; Hungin, A. Pali S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lithium users are offered routine renal monitoring but few studies have quantified the risk to renal health. The aim of this study was to assess the association between use of lithium carbonate and incidence of renal failure in patients with bipolar disorder. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD) and a nested validation study of lithium exposure and renal failure. A cohort of 6360 participants aged over 18 years had a first recorded diagnosis of bipolar disorder between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 2007. Data were examined from electronic primary care records from 418 general practices across the UK. The primary outcome was the hazard ratio for renal failure in participants exposed to lithium carbonate as compared with non-users of lithium, adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and poly-pharmacy. Results Ever use of lithium was associated with a hazard ratio for renal failure of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 4.0) adjusted for known renal risk factors. Absolute risk was age dependent, with patients of 50 years or older at particular risk of renal failure: Number Needed to Harm (NNH) was 44 (21 to 150). Conclusions Lithium is associated with an increased risk of renal failure, particularly among the older age group. The absolute risk of renal failure associated with lithium use remains small. PMID:24670976

  1. Bipolar hemiarthroplasty in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R; Arya, R; Bhan, S

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-two elderly patients with a femoral neck fracture treated by bipolar hemiarthroplasty and 36 patients (matched for age) with an Austin-Moore hemiarthroplasty were followed-up and compared. Bipolar replacement resulted in a higher percentage of satisfactory results, less postoperative pain, greater range of movement, more rapid return to unassisted activity, fewer unsatisfactory results and no acetabular erosion. The device functioned as bipolar in all the cases studied for inner-bearing motion.

  2. Differential responses to lithium in hyperexcitable neurons from patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Jerome; Wang, Qiu-Wen; Kim, Yongsung; Yu, Diana X; Pham, Son; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Yi; Diffenderfer, Kenneth E; Zhang, Jian; Soltani, Sheila; Eames, Tameji; Schafer, Simon T; Boyer, Leah; Marchetto, Maria C; Nurnberger, John I; Calabrese, Joseph R; Ødegaard, Ketil J; McCarthy, Michael J; Zandi, Peter P; Alda, Martin; Alba, Martin; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Mi, Shuangli; Brennand, Kristen J; Kelsoe, John R; Gage, Fred H; Yao, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder that is characterized by intermittent episodes of mania and depression; without treatment, 15% of patients commit suicide. Hence, it has been ranked by the World Health Organization as a top disorder of morbidity and lost productivity. Previous neuropathological studies have revealed a series of alterations in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder or animal models, such as reduced glial cell number in the prefrontal cortex of patients, upregulated activities of the protein kinase A and C pathways and changes in neurotransmission. However, the roles and causation of these changes in bipolar disorder have been too complex to exactly determine the pathology of the disease. Furthermore, although some patients show remarkable improvement with lithium treatment for yet unknown reasons, others are refractory to lithium treatment. Therefore, developing an accurate and powerful biological model for bipolar disorder has been a challenge. The introduction of induced pluripotent stem-cell (iPSC) technology has provided a new approach. Here we have developed an iPSC model for human bipolar disorder and investigated the cellular phenotypes of hippocampal dentate gyrus-like neurons derived from iPSCs of patients with bipolar disorder. Guided by RNA sequencing expression profiling, we have detected mitochondrial abnormalities in young neurons from patients with bipolar disorder by using mitochondrial assays; in addition, using both patch-clamp recording and somatic Ca(2+) imaging, we have observed hyperactive action-potential firing. This hyperexcitability phenotype of young neurons in bipolar disorder was selectively reversed by lithium treatment only in neurons derived from patients who also responded to lithium treatment. Therefore, hyperexcitability is one early endophenotype of bipolar disorder, and our model of iPSCs in this disease might be useful in developing new therapies and drugs aimed at its clinical

  3. Differences in Trauma Experience Between Patients With Bipolar I Disorder, Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Song, Wonyoung; Park, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in traumatic experiences between patients with bipolar I disorder, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The traumatic experiences (as measured by the Trauma Experience Questionnaire) of 40 participants with bipolar I disorder were compared with those of 38 participants with MDD and 92 controls. Participants with bipolar I disorder exhibited a significantly higher frequency of traumatic experiences and higher impact ratings when traumas did occur than did patients with MDD and controls. In addition, the present impact of past trauma for patients in the bipolar I disorder and MDD groups was significantly higher than for controls. The bipolar I disorder group reported more severe traumatic experiences than did both the MDD and control groups, and the MDD group in turn reported more severe traumatic experiences than did the control group.

  4. Dopaminergic Influences on Emotional Decision Making in Euthymic Bipolar Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Katherine E; Braga, Raphael J; Gopin, Chaya B; Malhotra, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole may have pro-cognitive effects in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder (BPD); however, the emergence of impulse-control disorders has been documented in Parkinson's disease (PD) after pramipexole treatment. Performance on reward-based tasks is altered in healthy subjects after a single dose of pramipexole, but its potential to induce abnormalities in BPD patients is unknown. We assessed reward-dependent decision making in euthymic BPD patients pre- and post 8 weeks of treatment with pramipexole or placebo by using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The IGT requires subjects to choose among four card decks (two risky and two conservative) and is designed to promote learning to make advantageous (conservative) choices over time. Thirty-four BPD patients completed both assessments (18 placebo and 16 pramipexole). Baseline performance did not differ by treatment group (F=0.63; p=0.64); however, at week 8, BPD patients on pramipexole demonstrated a significantly greater tendency to make increasingly high-risk, high-reward choices across the five blocks, whereas the placebo group's pattern was similar to that reported in healthy individuals (treatment × time × block interaction, p<0.05). Analyses of choice strategy using the expectancy valence model revealed that after 8 weeks on pramipexole, BPD patients attended more readily to feedback related to gains than to losses, which could explain the impaired learning. There were no significant changes in mood symptoms over the 8 weeks, and no increased propensity toward manic-like behaviors were reported. Our results suggest that the enhancement of dopaminergic activity influences risk-associated decision-making performance in euthymic BPD. The clinical implications remain unknown. PMID:23884342

  5. Deficits in docosahexaenoic acid and associated elevations in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids in the postmortem orbitofrontal cortex of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Stanford, Kevin E.; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Richtand, Neil M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous antemortem and postmortem tissue fatty acid composition studies have observed significant deficits in the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cell (RBC) and postmortem cortical membranes of patients with unipolar depression. In the present we determined the fatty acid composition of postmortem orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, Brodmann area 10) of patients with bipolar disorder (n=18) and age-matched normal controls (n=19) by gas chromatography. After correction for multiple comparisons, DHA (-24%), arachidonic acid (-14%), and stearic acid (C18:0)(-4.5%) compositions were significantly lower, and cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7)(+12.5%) composition significantly higher, in the OFC of bipolar patients relative to normal controls. Based on metabolite:precursor ratios, significant elevations in arachidonic acid, stearic acid, and palmitic acid conversion/metabolism were observed in the OFC of bipolar patients, and were inversely correlated with DHA composition. Deficits in OFC DHA and arachidonic acid composition, and elevations in arachidonic acid metabolism, were numerically (but not significantly) greater in drug-free bipolar patients relative to patients treated with mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications. OFC DHA and arachidonic acid deficits were greater in patients plus normal controls with high versus low alcohol abuse severity. These results add to a growing body of evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acid deficiency as well as the OFC in the pathoaetiology of bipolar disorder. PMID:18715653

  6. Influence of valproate on the required dose of propofol for anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy of bipolar affective disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı Sayar, Gökben; Eryılmaz, Gül; Şemieoğlu, Siban; Özten, Eylem; Göğcegöz Gül, Işıl

    2014-01-01

    Background Propofol is often used as an anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In recent studies, propofol was shown to possess significant seizure-shortening properties during ECT. “Valproate” is a mood stabilizer used mainly in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. It is reported that valproate, being an anticonvulsant, raises the seizure threshold, thus decreases the efficacy of ECT treatment. Aim The purpose of our study was to compare the dose of propofol in valproate-using patients and valproate-free patients. Methods In an open design, 17 patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes who were to be treated with valproate and ECT in combination, were compared with 16 manic-episode patients who were to be treated with ECT but not valproate. The two groups were compared on the basis of electroencephalography-registered seizure duration and the propofol dosage required to induce anesthesia. Results Valproate, compared with no valproate treatment, results in a decrease in the propofol dose required to induce anesthesia. In the valproate group of study participants, seizure duration was significantly shorter than in the valproate-free group. Conclusion The results suggest that valproate reduces the dose of propofol required for anesthesia during ECT treatment in patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes. Although propofol is a safe and efficacious anesthetic for ECT treatment, lower doses of propofol should be used to induce anesthesia for patients under valproate treatment. When the clinician needs to prolong seizure duration in patients treated with valproate, interruption of the valproate treatment or an anesthetic agent other than propofol should be considered. PMID:24623978

  7. Manic patients exhibit more utilitarian moral judgments in comparison with euthymic bipolar and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwa; Kim, Tae Young; Ryu, Vin; Ha, Ra Yeon; Lee, Su Jin; Ha, Kyooseob; Cho, Hyun-Sang

    2015-04-01

    Both emotional and cognitive processes are involved in moral judgments. Ventromedial prefrontal lesions are related to impaired prosocial emotions and emotional dysregulation, and patients with these lesions exhibit increased utilitarian judgments of emotionally salient personal moral dilemmas. Bipolar patients experiencing manic episode also have impaired emotional regulation and behavioral control. We investigated the characteristics of moral judgment in manic and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder using the 50 hypothetical moral dilemma task (17 non-moral, 20 personal, and 13 impersonal). Our study included 27 manic bipolar patients, 26 euthymic bipolar patients, and 42 healthy controls. Subjects were instructed to determine whether or not each dilemma was morally acceptable, and their reaction times were recorded. Manic patients showed significantly greater utilitarian judgment than euthymic patients and normal controls for personal moral dilemmas. However, there were no significant between-group differences for the non-moral and impersonal moral dilemmas. Our results suggest that increased utilitarian judgments of personal moral dilemmas may be a state-related finding observed only in manic patients. This difference in moral judgment assessments may reflect the decision-making characteristics and underlying neurobiological mechanisms of bipolar disorder, especially during the manic state.

  8. Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenic Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    García, Saínza; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; López-Zurbano, Saioa; Zorrilla, Iñaki; López, Purificación; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotics are the drugs prescribed to treat psychotic disorders; however, patients often fail to adhere to their treatment, and this has a severe negative effect on prognosis in these kinds of illnesses. Among the wide range of risk factors for treatment nonadherence, this systematic review covers those that are most important from the point of view of clinicians and patients and proposes guidelines for addressing them. Analyzing 38 studies conducted in a total of 51,796 patients, including patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder, we found that younger age, substance abuse, poor insight, cognitive impairments, low level of education, minority ethnicity, poor therapeutic alliance, experience of barriers to care, high intensity of delusional symptoms and suspiciousness, and low socioeconomic status are the main risk factors for medication nonadherence in both types of disorder. In the future, prospective studies should be conducted on the use of personalized patient-tailored treatments, taking into account risk factors that may affect each individual, to assess the ability of such approaches to improve adherence and hence prognosis in these patients. PMID:27307187

  9. Medication Adherence in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jennifer B; Krivenko, Anna; Howland, Molly; Schlachet, Rebecca; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-09-01

    Poor medication adherence is a pervasive problem that causes disability and suffering as well as extensive financial costs among individuals with bipolar disorder (BD). Barriers to adherence are numerous and cross multiple levels, including factors related to bipolar pathology and those unique to an individual's circumstances. External factors, including treatment setting, healthcare system, and broader health policies, can also affect medication adherence in people with BD. Fortunately, advances in research have suggested avenues for improving adherence. A comprehensive review of adherence-enhancement interventions for the years 2005-2015 is included. Specific bipolar adherence-enhancement approaches that target knowledge gaps, cognitive patterns, specific barriers, and motivation may be helpful, as may approaches that capitalize on technology or novel drug-delivery systems. However, much work remains to optimally facilitate long-term medication adherence in people with BD. For adherence-enhancement approaches to be widely adapted, they need to be easily accessible, affordable, and practical. PMID:27435356

  10. Bipolar Disorder and Cognitive Therapy: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riskind, John H.

    2005-01-01

    This article comments on the three articles (Leahy, 2005; Newman, 2005; and Reilly-Harrington & Knauz, 2005) that deal with the applications of cognitive therapy to treatment of bipolar disorder. They focus on the uses of cognitive therapy in treating three important facets of the special problems of bipolar patients: rapid cycling, severe…

  11. A Case of Clozapine-Induced Myocarditis in a Young Patient with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ronny; Lysenko, Alla; Mallet, Thierry; Mirrer, Brooks; Gale, Michael; Loarte, Pablo; McCue, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of drug-induced myocarditis manifesting as acute heart failure in a young patient with bipolar disorder being treated for depression. The case describes a 20-year-old man being treated in the psychiatry ward for worsening depression when he started complaining of chest pain and shortness of breath. His list of medications included clozapine, lithium, lorazepam, and haloperidol. The main findings on physical examination were tachycardia, low-grade fever, crackles in both lung bases on auscultation, and the absence of any notable edema. Abnormal labs included a troponin of 0.9, with a CK of 245 and CK-MB of 3.1. An ECG revealed sinus tachycardia and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). An echocardiogram revealed global hypokinesis, severe left ventricular dysfunction with an ejection fraction estimated at 20%. The patient had an admitting diagnosis of acute left ventricular systolic dysfunction likely secondary to drug-induced myocarditis (suspect clozapine) versus acute coronary syndrome. He was managed conservatively and transferred to another facility for endomyocardial biopsy confirming myocarditis. This case is an example of one of the most typical presentations of suspected drug-induced acute myocarditis and will hopefully prompt the reader to think of this underdiagnosed entity in the right clinical setting. PMID:26413355

  12. Subjective Symptoms in Euthymic Bipolar Disorder and Remitted Schizophrenia Patients: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Mondal, Anwesha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subjective experience means subtle, not yet psychotic abnormalities of experience that might be present during remitted phase and also in prodromal phase of schizophrenia and might be accurately efficient in identifying individuals at risk of eminent psychosis (Parnas et al., 2003). Apart from schizophrenic patients, bipolar patients also experience certain subjective symptoms in their euthymic state. They often experience subtle cognitive impairment and functional disturbances during their euthymic states. These subjective experiences may be related to distorted cognitive functions in these patients. These experiences include a great variety of cognitive dysfunction complaints about attention, perception, memory, thinking, language, movement, and emotion. Objective: To measure the experience of subjective symptoms and compare them between euthymic bipolar and remitted schizophrenia patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty euthymic bipolar patients and 30 remitted schizophrenia patients as per International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision were selected for the purpose of the study. At first, sociodemographic data were collected. And then, the patients were assessed using the scales; positive and negative syndrome scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, and Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire-24. Results: Both the groups showed significant differences in terms of subjective symptoms. However, no significant correlation has been found between the objective psychopathology and subjective experience in the two groups. Conclusion: It can be suggested that the patients with schizophrenia show significantly higher subjective experience when compared with the patients of bipolar disorder. PMID:27114621

  13. Structural and Functional Brain Correlates of Cognitive Impairment in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goikolea, José M.; Bonnin, Caterina M.; Sarró, Salvador; Segura, Barbara; Amann, Benedikt L.; Monté, Gemma C.; Moro, Noemi; Fernandez-Corcuera, Paloma; Maristany, Teresa; Salvador, Raymond; Vieta, Eduard; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment in the euthymic phase is a well-established finding in bipolar disorder. However, its brain structural and/or functional correlates are uncertain. Methods Thirty-three euthymic bipolar patients with preserved memory and executive function and 28 euthymic bipolar patients with significant memory and/or executive impairment, as defined using two test batteries, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), plus 28 healthy controls underwent structural MRI using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-seven of the cognitively preserved patients, 23 of the cognitively impaired patients and 28 controls also underwent fMRI during performance of the n-back working memory task. Results No clusters of grey or white matter volume difference were found between the two patient groups. During n-back performance, the cognitively impaired patients showed hypoactivation compared to the cognitively preserved patients in a circumscribed region in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Both patient groups showed failure of de-activation in the medial frontal cortex compared to the healthy controls. Conclusions Cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar patients appears from this study to be unrelated to structural brain abnormality, but there was some evidence for an association with altered prefrontal function. PMID:27448153

  14. Effects, experiences, and impact of stigma on patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mileva, Viktoria R; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Milev, Roumen

    2013-01-01

    Background Many people with mental illness experience stigma that has impacted their lives. In this study, we validated the Inventory of Stigmatizing Experiences (ISE) as a tool to help quantify the stigma experienced by patients with bipolar disorder and its impact on their lives. The ISE has two components, ie, the Stigma Experiences Scale (SES) and the Stigma Impact Scale (SIS), which were administered to a population of Argentinean patients with bipolar disorder. We characterized the differences between these two populations using the SES and SIS. Finally, we compared SES and SIS scores with those in a population of Canadian patients with bipolar disorder. Methods: The SES and SIS scales were administered to tertiary care patients with bipolar I and II disorder in Argentina (n = 178) and Canada (n = 214). Results: In this study, we validated both SES (Kuder-Richardson coefficient of reliability, 0.78) and SIS (Cronbach’s alpha, 0.91) scales in a population of Argentinean patients with bipolar disorder. There were no significant differences in stigma between patients with bipolar I or II disorder on SES or SIS. However, over 50% of all respondents believed that the average person is afraid of those with mental illnesses, that stigma associated with mental illness has affected their quality of life, and that their self-esteem has suffered due to stigma. In comparison with the Canadian population, Argentinean participants scored lower on both the SES and SIS, which may be due to cultural differences or to differences in population characteristics. Conclusion: Stigma associated with mental illness is serious and pervasive. If we are to find successful strategies to mitigate stigma, it is first important to understand how patients perceive such stigma. The ISE is a valuable tool which allows us to do this with high reliability among cultures. PMID:23355778

  15. Light therapy in the treatment of patients with bipolar depression: A meta-analytic study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Tu, Kun-Yu; Chung, Weilun; Wang, Hung-Yu; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-06-01

    Light therapy (LT) has been widely used in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder. Recently some evidence indicated that LT may play a role in bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or in combination with total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, the studies examining the treatment effect of LT in bipolar depression resulted in inconsistent findings. To clarify the role of LT in the disorder, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of LT in the treatment of bipolar depression. The results of individual studies were synthesized by a random effects model. Nine studies including 489 patients with bipolar depression were included in this current meta-analysis. We found that disease severity was significantly decreased after LT, in both with and without TSD, and with concomitant medication (p<0.001). Augmentation treatment with LT significantly decreased disease severity compared to treatment without LT (p=0.024). Our results highlight the significant efficacy of LT, either as monotherapy or in combination with TSD, in the treatment of bipolar depression. However, the detailed mechanism of LT still remains elusive. Further well-designed controlled trials are required to investigate the optimal intensity and frequency of LT in the treatment of bipolar depression. PMID:26993616

  16. Light therapy in the treatment of patients with bipolar depression: A meta-analytic study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Tu, Kun-Yu; Chung, Weilun; Wang, Hung-Yu; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-06-01

    Light therapy (LT) has been widely used in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder. Recently some evidence indicated that LT may play a role in bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or in combination with total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, the studies examining the treatment effect of LT in bipolar depression resulted in inconsistent findings. To clarify the role of LT in the disorder, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of LT in the treatment of bipolar depression. The results of individual studies were synthesized by a random effects model. Nine studies including 489 patients with bipolar depression were included in this current meta-analysis. We found that disease severity was significantly decreased after LT, in both with and without TSD, and with concomitant medication (p<0.001). Augmentation treatment with LT significantly decreased disease severity compared to treatment without LT (p=0.024). Our results highlight the significant efficacy of LT, either as monotherapy or in combination with TSD, in the treatment of bipolar depression. However, the detailed mechanism of LT still remains elusive. Further well-designed controlled trials are required to investigate the optimal intensity and frequency of LT in the treatment of bipolar depression.

  17. Treatment of Bipolar Depression: Evolving Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Post, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Bipolar depression is the most common and difficult-to-treat phase of bipolar disorder. Antidepressants for unipolar depression are among the most widely used drugs, but recent data and meta-analyses indicate a lack of efficacy. Many of the drugs discussed here are graded provisionally for the strength of the findings in the literature, safety and tolerability, and likely utility of use in patients with bipolar disorder. Successful long-term treatment of bipolar depression is critical to preventing illness-related morbidity, disability, cognitive decline, suicide, and premature loss of years of life expectancy largely from the excess medical mortality associated with cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Reducing the Risk of Suicide in Patients with Bipolar Disorder: Interventions and Safeguards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Cory F.

    2005-01-01

    Bipolar disorder exacts a terrible toll on its sufferers owing to the repeated, severe disruptions in the patients' lives, the discomfort and uncertainties of being on rigorous, ongoing pharmacotherapy regimens, the emotional difficulties inherent in experiencing depression and mania, and the fear of a deteriorating course. Patients with bipolar…

  19. Cognitive Dysfunction Is Worse among Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I than Type II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; West, Amy E.; Jacobs, Rachel; Sweeney, John A.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Impaired profiles of neurocognitive function have been consistently demonstrated among pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and may aid in the identification of endophenotypes across subtypes of the disorder. This study aims to determine phenotypic cognitive profiles of patients with BD Type I and II. Methods: Subjects (N =…

  20. Neuropsychological performance and affective temperaments in Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder type II.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ester; Holtzman, Jessica N; Tannenhaus, Lucila; Monchablon, Romina; Rago, Carlo Mario; Lolich, Maria; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2016-04-30

    Affective temperament has been suggested as a potential mediator of the effect between genetic predisposition and neurocognitive functioning. As such, this report seeks to assess the extent of the correlation between affective temperament and cognitive function in a group of bipolar II subjects. 46 bipolar II outpatients [mean age 41.4 years (SD 18.2); female 58.9%] and 46 healthy controls [mean age 35.1 years (SD 18); female 56.5%] were evaluated with regard to their demographic and clinical characteristics, affective temperament, and neurocognitive performance. Crude bivariate correlation analyses and multiple linear regression models were constructed between five affective temperament subscales and eight neurocognitive domains. Significant correlations were identified in bipolar patients between hyperthymic temperament and verbal memory and premorbid IQ; cyclothymic temperament and attention; and irritable temperament, attention, and verbal fluency. In adjusting for potential confounders of the relationship between temperament and cognitive function, the strongest mediating factors among the euthymic bipolar patients were found to be residual manic and depressive symptoms. It is therefore concluded that affective temperaments may partially influence the neurocognitive performance of both healthy controls and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder type II in several specific domains.

  1. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shao-hua; Lai, Jian-bo; Xu, Dong-rong; Qi, Hong-li; Peterson, Bradley S.; Bao, Ai-min; Hu, Chan-chan; Huang, Man-li; Chen, Jing-kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-bo; Li, Shu-lan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Xu, Wei-juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  2. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shao-Hua; Lai, Jian-Bo; Xu, Dong-Rong; Qi, Hong-Li; Peterson, Bradley S; Bao, Ai-Min; Hu, Chan-Chan; Huang, Man-Li; Chen, Jing-Kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-Bo; Li, Shu-Lan; Zhou, Wei-Hua; Xu, Wei-Juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  3. [Nursing care of a patient with bipolar disorder and lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    García de la Orden, Lucía; García Carretero, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is one of the most common, severe and persistent mental disorders. The evaluation of all data and variables related to bipolar disorder is a difficult task, because there is no clear agreement on what should be included in this category. One of the traditional treatments for this disease is the lithium metal that is administered in the form of lithium salt. Lithium has a narrow therapeutic window and there is a significant risk of complications arising from its use, mainly neurological and renal. In the case presented, the preparation of a care plan is described for a patient diagnosed with bipolar disorder who suffered a complication with lithium treatment. To do this, it was decided to use a standardized care plan and later completed it with diagnostic, objectives and interventions to the specific needs of the patient, aimed at achieving optimal levels of independence.

  4. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of aberrant behaviors in bipolar disorder from patients to models

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Geyer, Mark A.; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Henry, Brook L.; Young, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder suffer from states of depression and mania, during which a variety of symptoms are present. Current treatments are limited and neurocognitive deficits in particular often remain untreated. Targeted therapies based on the biological mechanisms of bipolar disorder could fill this gap and benefit patients and their families. Developing targeted therapies would benefit from appropriate animal models which are challenging to establish, but remain a vital tool. In this review, we summarize approaches to create a valid model relevant to bipolar disorder. We focus on studies that use translational tests of multivariate exploratory behavior, sensorimotor gating, decision-making under risk, and attentional functioning to discover profiles that are consistent between patients and rodent models. Using this battery of translational tests, similar behavior profiles in bipolar mania patients and mice with reduced dopamine transporter activity have been identified. Future investigations should combine other animal models that are biologically relevant to the neuropsychiatric disorder with translational behavioral assessment as outlined here. This methodology can be utilized to develop novel targeted therapies that relieve symptoms for more patients without common side effects caused by current treatments. PMID:26297513

  5. [Neuroprogression and cognition in Bipolar Disorders: A systematic review of cognitive performance in euthymic patients].

    PubMed

    Lolich, María; Holtzman, Jessica N; Rago, Carlo M; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have begun to consider the possibility of explaining the physiopathology of bipolar disorder from a neuroprogressive perspective. The evidence that supports the feasibility of such an approach is varied, and arises from neuroimaging studies, batteries of neurocognitive evaluations, and tests to identify the specific biomarkers of the disorder. The present article seeks to perform a review of the research that investigates the cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. A bibliographic revision was performed of articles published between 1990 and 2015. Levels of cognitive performance were explored in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The compiled studies signal the presence of altered cognitive function, even during periods of euthymia. However, there are contradictory results as to whether bipolar disorder presents a degenerative course. New lines of investigation suggest that only a percentage of individuals with bipolar disorder are affected in a progressive manner. It is of paramount importance to perform new longitudinal studies in high-risk populations, so as to validate or refute a neuroprogressive model of cognitive deficits in patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:26672503

  6. [Neuroprogression and cognition in Bipolar Disorders: A systematic review of cognitive performance in euthymic patients].

    PubMed

    Lolich, María; Holtzman, Jessica N; Rago, Carlo M; Vázquez, Gustavo H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have begun to consider the possibility of explaining the physiopathology of bipolar disorder from a neuroprogressive perspective. The evidence that supports the feasibility of such an approach is varied, and arises from neuroimaging studies, batteries of neurocognitive evaluations, and tests to identify the specific biomarkers of the disorder. The present article seeks to perform a review of the research that investigates the cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. A bibliographic revision was performed of articles published between 1990 and 2015. Levels of cognitive performance were explored in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. The compiled studies signal the presence of altered cognitive function, even during periods of euthymia. However, there are contradictory results as to whether bipolar disorder presents a degenerative course. New lines of investigation suggest that only a percentage of individuals with bipolar disorder are affected in a progressive manner. It is of paramount importance to perform new longitudinal studies in high-risk populations, so as to validate or refute a neuroprogressive model of cognitive deficits in patients with bipolar disorder.

  7. Relationship between personality traits and perceived internalized stigma in bipolar patients and their treatment partners.

    PubMed

    Bassirnia, Anahita; Briggs, Jessica; Kopeykina, Irina; Mednick, Amy; Yaseen, Zimri; Galynker, Igor

    2015-12-15

    Internalized stigma of mental disorders has significant negative outcomes for patients with bipolar disorder and their families. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between personality traits and internalized stigma of mental disorders in bipolar patients and their treatment partners. Five different questionnaires were utilized in this study: (1) Demographic data questionnaire, (2) Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) for personality traits, (3) Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) for stigma, (4) Self Report Manic Inventory (SRMI) for mania and (5) Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) for depression. The scores of personality traits were combined to create externalizing and internalizing personality trait scores. Results showed that patients with bipolar disorder and their treatment partners both experienced internalized stigma of mental health disorders. There was a significant positive correlation between internalized stigma and internalizing personality traits, but not externalizing traits. In a multi-variate regression analysis, internalizing personality trait score was found to be a significant predictor of internalized stigma. In conclusion, patients with bipolar disorder and their treatment partners perceive higher level of internalized stigma of mental disorders if they have internalizing personality traits.

  8. An Acceptance-Based Psychoeducation Intervention to Reduce Expressed Emotion in Relatives of Bipolar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Lori R.; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2008-01-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) is a robust predictor of outcome in bipolar disorder. Despite decades of research, interventions to reduce EE levels have had only modest effects. This study used an expanded model of EE to develop an intervention. Research has demonstrated a strong link between attributions and EE in families of patients with psychiatric…

  9. Prophylactic lithium treatment and cognitive performance in patients with a long history of bipolar illness: no simple answers in complex disease-treatment interplay.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Andrea; Alda, Martin; Young, Trevor; MacQueen, Glenda; Rybakowski, Janusz; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Simhandl, Christian; König, Barbara; Hajek, Tomas; O'Donovan, Claire; Wittekind, Dirk; von Quillfeldt, Susanne; Ploch, Jana; Sauer, Cathrin; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) is not restricted to symptomatic phases. It is also present in euthymia. There is evidence of differences in the brain's structure between bipolar patients and healthy individuals, as well as changes over time in patients. Lithium constitutes the gold standard in long-term prophylactic treatment. Appropriate therapy that prevents new episodes improves the disease's course and reduces the frequency of harmful outcomes. Interestingly, preclinical data suggest that lithium has a (additional) neuroprotective effect. There is limited data on its related effects in humans and even less on its long-term application. In this multi-center cross-sectional study from the International Group for the Study of Lithium-treated Patients (IGSLi), we compared three groups: bipolar patients without long-term lithium treatment (non-Li group; <3 months cumulative lithium exposure, ≥24 months ago), bipolar patients with long-term lithium treatment (Li group, ongoing treatment ≥24 months), and healthy subjects (controls). Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined; the inclusion criteria for patients were diagnosis of BD types I or II, duration of illness ≥10 years, ≥5 episodes in patient's history and a euthymic mood state. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), and a visual backward masking (VBM) task. A total of 142 subjects were included, 31 in the non-Li and 58 in the Li group, as well as 53 healthy controls. Treated patients with long-standing BD and controls did not differ significantly in overall cognitive functioning and verbal learning, recall, and recognition; regardless of whether lithium had been part of the treatment. Patients, however, demonstrated poorer early visual information processing than healthy controls, with the lithium-treated patients performing worse than those without. Our

  10. Prophylactic lithium treatment and cognitive performance in patients with a long history of bipolar illness: no simple answers in complex disease-treatment interplay.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Andrea; Alda, Martin; Young, Trevor; MacQueen, Glenda; Rybakowski, Janusz; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Simhandl, Christian; König, Barbara; Hajek, Tomas; O'Donovan, Claire; Wittekind, Dirk; von Quillfeldt, Susanne; Ploch, Jana; Sauer, Cathrin; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) is not restricted to symptomatic phases. It is also present in euthymia. There is evidence of differences in the brain's structure between bipolar patients and healthy individuals, as well as changes over time in patients. Lithium constitutes the gold standard in long-term prophylactic treatment. Appropriate therapy that prevents new episodes improves the disease's course and reduces the frequency of harmful outcomes. Interestingly, preclinical data suggest that lithium has a (additional) neuroprotective effect. There is limited data on its related effects in humans and even less on its long-term application. In this multi-center cross-sectional study from the International Group for the Study of Lithium-treated Patients (IGSLi), we compared three groups: bipolar patients without long-term lithium treatment (non-Li group; <3 months cumulative lithium exposure, ≥24 months ago), bipolar patients with long-term lithium treatment (Li group, ongoing treatment ≥24 months), and healthy subjects (controls). Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined; the inclusion criteria for patients were diagnosis of BD types I or II, duration of illness ≥10 years, ≥5 episodes in patient's history and a euthymic mood state. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), and a visual backward masking (VBM) task. A total of 142 subjects were included, 31 in the non-Li and 58 in the Li group, as well as 53 healthy controls. Treated patients with long-standing BD and controls did not differ significantly in overall cognitive functioning and verbal learning, recall, and recognition; regardless of whether lithium had been part of the treatment. Patients, however, demonstrated poorer early visual information processing than healthy controls, with the lithium-treated patients performing worse than those without. Our

  11. Differences between patients with borderline personality disorder who do and do not have a family history of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2014-10-01

    Diagnostic confusion sometimes exists between bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD). To improve the recognition of bipolar disorder researchers have identified nondiagnostic factors that point toward bipolar disorder. One such factor is the presence of a family history of bipolar disorder. In the current report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we compared the demographic, clinical, and psychosocial characteristics of patients with BPD who did and did not have a family history of bipolar disorder. A large sample of psychiatric outpatients were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. Three hundred seventeen patients without bipolar disorder were diagnosed with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder. Slightly less than 10% of the 317 patients with BPD (9.5%, n=30) reported a family history of bipolar disorder in their first-degree relatives. There were no differences between groups in any specific Axis I or Axis II disorder. The patients with a positive family history were significantly less likely to report excessive or inappropriate anger, but there was no difference in the frequency of other criteria for BPD such as affective instability, impulsivity, or suicidal behavior. The patients with a positive family history reported a significantly higher rate of increased appetite and fatigue. There was no difference in overall severity of depression, scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning, history of psychiatric hospitalizations, suicide attempts, time unemployed due to psychiatric reasons during the 5 years before the evaluation, and ratings of current and adolescent social functioning. There was no difference on any of the 5 subscales of the childhood trauma questionnaire. Overall, we found few differences between BPD patients with and without a family history of bipolar disorder thereby suggesting that a positive family history of bipolar disorder was not a useful marker for

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with bipolar disorder: A review for advanced practice nurses

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Bethany; McNew, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This review article provides an overview of the frequency, burden of illness, diagnosis, and treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) from the perspective of the advanced practice nurses (APNs). Data sources PubMed searches were conducted using the following keywords: “bipolar disorder and primary care,” restricted to dates 2000 to present; “bipolar disorder and nurse practitioner”; and “bipolar disorder and clinical nurse specialist.” Selected articles were relevant to adult outpatient care in the United States, with a prioritization of articles written by APNs or published in nursing journals. Conclusions BD has a substantial lifetime prevalence in the population at 4%. Because the manic or depressive symptoms of BD tend to be severe and recurrent over a patient's lifetime, the condition is associated with significant burden to the individual, caregivers, and society. Clinician awareness that BD may be present increases the likelihood of successful recognition and appropriate treatment. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments are available for acute and maintenance treatments, with the prospect of achieving reduced symptom burden and increased functioning for many patients. Implications for practice Awareness of the disease burden, diagnostic issues, and management choices in BD has the potential to enhance outcome in substantial proportions of patients. PMID:26172568

  13. Disrupted action monitoring in recent-onset psychosis patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Minzenberg, Michael J.; Gomes, Glenn C.; Yoon, Jong H.; Swaab, Tamara Y.; Carter, Cameron S.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients experience cognitive control disturbances, manifest in altered neural signatures during action monitoring. It remains unclear whether error- and conflict-monitoring disturbances co-occur, and whether they are observed in recent-onset psychosis patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. We tested electrophysiological measures of action monitoring in these patients. 73 schizophrenia patients (SZ), 26 bipolar disorder type I patients (BP), each within one year of psychosis onset, and 54 healthy control subjects (HC) underwent EEG during Stroop task performance. In the trial-averaged EEG at three midline scalp electrodes, the error-related negativity (ERN), error positivity (Pe) and conflict-related N450 were measured. Compared to HC, 1) SZ exhibited an attenuated ERN and N450, and Pe unchanged, and 2) BP exhibited an attenuated ERN but normal Pe and N450. Between patient groups, SZ showed an attenuated N450; ERN and Pe were not significantly different. A small (n=10) SZ subgroup that was not receiving antipsychotic medication showed normal ERPs. Altered error- and conflict-monitoring occur together in first-episode schizophrenia patients, and these measures are comparable in patients with first-episode bipolar disorder. Antipsychotic medication may be associated with altered measures of error-monitoring in schizophrenia. PMID:24314907

  14. How Patients Contribute to an Online Psychoeducation Forum for Bipolar Disorder: A Virtual Participant Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Simpson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Background In a recent exploratory randomized controlled trial, an online psychoeducation intervention for bipolar disorder has been found to be feasible and acceptable to patients and may positively impact on their self-management behaviors and quality of life. Objective The objective of the study was to investigate how these patients contribute to an online forum for bipolar disorder and the issues relevant for them. Methods Participants in the intervention arm of the Bipolar Interactive PsychoEDucation (“BIPED”) trial were invited to contribute to the Beating Bipolar forum alongside receiving interactive online psychoeducation modules. Within this virtual participant observation study, forum posts were analyzed using thematic analysis, incorporating aspects of discourse analysis. Results The key themes which arose from the forum posts included: medication, employment, stigma, social support, coping strategies, insight and acceptance, the life chart, and negative experiences of health care. Participants frequently provided personal narratives relating to their history of bipolar disorder, life experiences, and backgrounds, which often contained emotive language and humor. They regularly sought and offered advice, and expressed encouragement and empathy. The forum would have benefitted from more users to offer a greater support network with more diverse views and experiences. Conclusions Online forums are inexpensive to provide and may offer peer support and the opportunity for patients to share their experiences and explore issues related to their illness anonymously. Future research should focus on how to enhance patient engagement with online health care forums. Trial Registration ISRCTN81375447; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN81375447 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6YzWtHUqu). PMID:26543925

  15. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: revised third edition Recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, G.M.; Haddad, P. M.; Ferrier, I.N.; Aronson, J.K.; Barnes, T.R.H.; Cipriani, A.; Coghill, D.R.; Fazel, S.; Geddes, J.R.; Grunze, H.; Holmes, E.A.; Howes, O.; Hudson, S.; Hunt, N.; Jones, I.; Macmillan, I.C.; McAllister-Williams, H.; Miklowitz, D.M.; Morriss, R.; Munafò, M.; Paton, C.; Saharkian, B.J.; Saunders, K.E.A.; Sinclair, J.M.A.; Taylor, D.; Vieta, E.; Young, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines: in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change. PMID:26979387

  16. Evidence-based guidelines for treating bipolar disorder: Revised third edition recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, G M; Haddad, P M; Ferrier, I N; Aronson, J K; Barnes, Trh; Cipriani, A; Coghill, D R; Fazel, S; Geddes, J R; Grunze, H; Holmes, E A; Howes, O; Hudson, S; Hunt, N; Jones, I; Macmillan, I C; McAllister-Williams, H; Miklowitz, D R; Morriss, R; Munafò, M; Paton, C; Saharkian, B J; Saunders, Kea; Sinclair, Jma; Taylor, D; Vieta, E; Young, A H

    2016-06-01

    The British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines specify the scope and targets of treatment for bipolar disorder. The third version is based explicitly on the available evidence and presented, like previous Clinical Practice Guidelines, as recommendations to aid clinical decision making for practitioners: it may also serve as a source of information for patients and carers, and assist audit. The recommendations are presented together with a more detailed review of the corresponding evidence. A consensus meeting, involving experts in bipolar disorder and its treatment, reviewed key areas and considered the strength of evidence and clinical implications. The guidelines were drawn up after extensive feedback from these participants. The best evidence from randomized controlled trials and, where available, observational studies employing quasi-experimental designs was used to evaluate treatment options. The strength of recommendations has been described using the GRADE approach. The guidelines cover the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, clinical management, and strategies for the use of medicines in short-term treatment of episodes, relapse prevention and stopping treatment. The use of medication is integrated with a coherent approach to psychoeducation and behaviour change.

  17. What is the real significance and management of major thyroid disorders in bipolar patients?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Pilar; Cámara, Rosa; Tobella, Helena; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disfunction affects negatively emotional stability and worsens the clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. The main stabilizer used in this illness, lithium carbonate has numerous effects on the physiology of the thyroid, with the most significant being the inhibition of thyroid hormone release that may occur at therapeutic levels. These dysfunctions have also been reported most frequently in bipolar patients not undergoing treatment with lithium, and was not completely explained by the effects of this drug. Apart from the numerous medical complications and mood disturbances, the cognitive or perceptual system may also be affected. In fact, the presence of thyroid disease increases the rates of obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, panic disorder, major depressive disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder. In severe cases of hypothyroidism, the clinical symptoms and signs can be similar to a melancholic depression or dementia. It is therefore important to know well all these possible complications in daily clinical practice. This review will cover the main thyroid dysfunctions present in bipolar patients, whether ot not produced by treatment with lithium carbonate, and will provide a series of recommendations for clinical management. PMID:24462913

  18. Divergent Relationship of Depression Severity to Social Reward Responses Among Patients with Bipolar Versus Unipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Vandekar, Lillie; Katchmar, Natalie; Daldal, Aylin; Ruparel, Kosha; A.Elliott, Mark; Baldassano, Claudia; Thase, Michael E.; Gur, Raquel E.; Kable, Joseph W.; Wolf, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of mood disorders demonstrate abnormalities in brain regions implicated in reward processing. However, there is a paucity of research investigating how social rewards affect reward circuit activity in these disorders. Here, we evaluated the relationship of both diagnostic category and dimensional depression severity to reward system function in bipolar and unipolar depression. In total, 86 adults were included, including 24 patients with bipolar depression, 24 patients with unipolar depression, and 38 healthy comparison subjects. Participants completed a social reward task during 3T BOLD fMRI. On average, diagnostic groups did not differ in activation to social reward. However, greater depression severity significantly correlated with reduced bilateral ventral striatum activation to social reward in the bipolar depressed group, but not the unipolar depressed group. In addition, decreased left orbitofrontal cortical activation correlated with more severe symptoms in bipolar depression, but not unipolar depression. These differential dimensional effects resulted in a significant voxelwise group by depression severity interaction. Taken together, these results provide initial evidence that deficits in social reward processing are differentially related to depression severity in the two disorders. PMID:27295401

  19. What is the real significance and management of major thyroid disorders in bipolar patients?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Pilar; Cámara, Rosa; Tobella, Helena; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid disfunction affects negatively emotional stability and worsens the clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. The main stabilizer used in this illness, lithium carbonate has numerous effects on the physiology of the thyroid, with the most significant being the inhibition of thyroid hormone release that may occur at therapeutic levels. These dysfunctions have also been reported most frequently in bipolar patients not undergoing treatment with lithium, and was not completely explained by the effects of this drug. Apart from the numerous medical complications and mood disturbances, the cognitive or perceptual system may also be affected. In fact, the presence of thyroid disease increases the rates of obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, panic disorder, major depressive disorder, cyclothymia, or bipolar disorder. In severe cases of hypothyroidism, the clinical symptoms and signs can be similar to a melancholic depression or dementia. It is therefore important to know well all these possible complications in daily clinical practice. This review will cover the main thyroid dysfunctions present in bipolar patients, whether ot not produced by treatment with lithium carbonate, and will provide a series of recommendations for clinical management.

  20. Greater Trochanter Reconstruction in Unstabl Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated With Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, G V; Guravareddy, A V; Reddy, Anil Kumar K R; Chiranjeevi, T

    2012-01-01

    Cemented Bipolar arthroplasty is an established method for treatment of comminuted Intertrochanteric fractures. Reconstruction of greater trochanter is an essential technical step to avoid complications like abductor lurch gait. We here describe a technique of reconstruction and fixation of greater trochanter using cancellous screws with wide washers made of reconstruction plate and tension band wiring. This gives a stable fixation of greater trochanter and avoids cut out, slippage of implants. PMID:27298870

  1. A Comparison of Internal Fixation and Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for the Treatment of Reverse Oblique Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong-Ju; Min, Woong-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological results between internal fixation using the proximal femoral nail system and bipolar hemiarthroplasty (BHA) in reverse oblique intertrochanteric hip fractures in elderly patients. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to July 2012, we reviewed the medical records of 53 patients who had been treated surgically for reverse oblique intertrochanteric fracture and had been followed-up on for a minimum of two years. All patients were ≥70 years of age, and divided into two groups for retrospective evaluation. One group was treated with internal fixation using the proximal femoral nail system (31 cases), and the other group was treated with BHA (22 cases). Results Early ambulation postoperatively and less pain at postoperative three month were significantly superior in the BHA group. However, by 24 months postoperatively, the internal fixation group exhibited higher Harris scores and correspondingly less pain than the BHA group. There were no significant differences in union rate, duration of hospitalization or lateral wall fracture healing between the two groups. Four patients in the internal fixation group underwent reoperation. Conclusion In the treatment of intertrochanteric fracture of the reverse oblique type, open reduction and internal fixation should be considered to be the better choice for patients with good health and bone quality. However, in cases of severe comminition of fracture and poor bone quality, BHA is an alternative offering advantages including early ambulation, less pain at early stages, and a lower risk of reoperation. PMID:27536619

  2. Impact of living with bipolar patients: Making sense of caregivers' burden.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Harnic, Désirée; Gonda, Xenia; Forte, Alberto; Dominici, Giovanni; Innamorati, Marco; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Serafini, Gianluca; Sher, Leo; Janiri, Luigi; Rihmer, Zoltan; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2014-03-22

    The aim of the present review was to examine objective and subjective burdens in primary caregivers (usually family members) of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and to list which symptoms of the patients are considered more burdensome by the caregivers. In order to provide a critical review about caregiver's burden in patients with bipolar disorder, we performed a detailed PubMed, BioMedCentral, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Elsevier Science Direct and Cochrane Library search to identify all papers and book chapters in English published during the period between 1963 and November 2011. The highest levels of distress were caused by the patient's behavior and the patient's role dysfunction (work, education and social relationships). Furthermore, the caregiving role compromises other social roles occupied by the caregiver, becoming part of the heavy social cost of bipolar affective disorder. There is a need to better understand caregivers' views and personal perceptions of the stresses and demands arising from caring for someone with BD in order to develop practical appropriate interventions and to improve the training of caregivers.

  3. Ten-year outcomes in first episode psychotic major depression patients compared with schizophrenia and bipolar patients.

    PubMed

    Heslin, M; Lappin, J M; Donoghue, K; Lomas, B; Reininghaus, U; Onyejiaka, A; Croudace, T; Jones, P B; Murray, R M; Fearon, P; Doody, G A; Dazzan, P; Craig, T J; Morgan, C

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to investigate long-term outcomes in psychotic major depression patients compared to schizophrenia and bipolar/manic psychosis patients, in an incidence sample, while accounting for diagnostic change. Based on Aetiology and Ethnicity in Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses (ÆSOP and ÆSOP-10), a first episode psychosis cohort was followed-up 10years after first presentation. The Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, WHO Life Chart and Global Assessment of Functioning were used to assess clinical, social and service use outcomes. Seventy-two PMD patients, 218 schizophrenia patients and 70 psychotic bipolar disorder/mania patients were identified at baseline. Differences in outcome between PMD and bipolar patients based on baseline and lifetime diagnosis were minimal. Differences in clinical, social and service use outcomes between PMD and schizophrenia were more substantial with PMD patients showing better outcomes on most variables. However, there was some weak evidence (albeit not quite statistically significant at p<0.05) based on lifetime diagnoses that PMD patients were more likely to attempt suicide (OR 2.31, CI 0.98-5.42, p0.055) and self-harm (OR 2.34, CI 0.97-5.68, p0.060). PMD patients have better social and service use outcomes compared to people with schizophrenia, but may be more likely to attempt suicide or self-harm. This unique profile is important for clinicians to consider in any risk assessment.

  4. Designing a patient monitoring system for bipolar disorder using Semantic Web technologies.

    PubMed

    Thermolia, Chryssa; Bei, Ekaterini S; Petrakis, Euripides G M; Kritsotakis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    The new movement to personalize treatment plans and improve prediction capabilities is greatly facilitated by intelligent remote patient monitoring and risk prevention. This paper focuses on patients suffering from bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by severe mood swings. We exploit the advantages of Semantic Web and Electronic Health Record Technologies to develop a patient monitoring platform to support clinicians. Relying on intelligently filtering of clinical evidence-based information and individual-specific knowledge, we aim to provide recommendations for treatment and monitoring at appropriate time or concluding into alerts for serious shifts in mood and patients' non response to treatment.

  5. Designing a patient monitoring system for bipolar disorder using Semantic Web technologies.

    PubMed

    Thermolia, Chryssa; Bei, Ekaterini S; Petrakis, Euripides G M; Kritsotakis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Sakkalis, Vangelis

    2015-01-01

    The new movement to personalize treatment plans and improve prediction capabilities is greatly facilitated by intelligent remote patient monitoring and risk prevention. This paper focuses on patients suffering from bipolar disorder, a mental illness characterized by severe mood swings. We exploit the advantages of Semantic Web and Electronic Health Record Technologies to develop a patient monitoring platform to support clinicians. Relying on intelligently filtering of clinical evidence-based information and individual-specific knowledge, we aim to provide recommendations for treatment and monitoring at appropriate time or concluding into alerts for serious shifts in mood and patients' non response to treatment. PMID:26737852

  6. Association between gastrointestinal symptoms and affectivity in patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Karling, Pontus; Maripuu, Martin; Wikgren, Mikael; Adolfsson, Rolf; Norrback, Karl-Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study if anxiety, depression and experience of stress are associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder. METHODS A total of 136 patients with bipolar disorder (mean age 49.9 years; 61% women) and 136 controls from the general population (mean age 51.0 years; 60% women) were included in the study. GI symptoms were assessed with The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale-irritable bowel syndrome (GSRS-IBS), level of anxiety and depression with The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and stress-proneness with Perceived Stress Questionnaire. Over a ten year period, all visits in primary care were retrospectively recorded in order to identify functional GI disorders. RESULTS In subjects with low total HADS-score, there were no significant differences in GI-symptoms between patients and controls (GSRS-IBS 7.0 vs 6.5, P = 0.513). In the patients with bipolar disorder there were significant correlations between all GSRS and HADS subscores for all symptom clusters except for “constipation” and “reflux”. Factors associated to GI symptoms in the patient group were female sex (adjusted OR = 2.37, 95%CI: 1.07-5.24) and high HADS-Depression score (adjusted OR = 3.64, 95%CI: 1.07-12.4). These patients had also significantly more visits for IBS than patients with low HADS-Depression scores (29% vs 8%, P = 0.008). However, there was no significant differences in consulting behaviour for functional GI disorders between patients and controls (25% vs 17%, P = 0.108). CONCLUSION Female patients and patients with high HADS depression score reported significantly more GI symptoms, whereas patients with low HADS scores did not differ from control subjects. PMID:27784966

  7. Can risk-taking be an endophenotype for bipolar disorder? A study on patients with bipolar disorder type I and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Hıdıroğlu, Ceren; Demirci Esen, Özlem; Tunca, Zeliha; Neslihan Gűrz Yalçìn, Sehnaz; Lombardo, Lauren; Glahn, David C; Özerdem, Ayşegül

    2013-04-01

    Risk-taking behavior and impulsivity are core features of bipolar disorder. Whether they are part of the inherited aspect of the illness is not clear. We aimed to evaluate risk-taking behavior as a potential endophenotype for bipolar disorders, and its relationship with impulsivity and illness features. The Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) were used to assess risk-taking behavior and impulsivity respectively in 30 euthymic bipolar I patients (BD), their 25 asymptomatic first-degree relatives (BD-R), and 30 healthy controls (HC). The primary BART outcome measure was the behavioral adjustment score (number of pumps after trials where the balloon did not pop minus the number of pumps after trials where the balloon popped). BD (p < .001) and BD-R (p = .001) had similar and significantly lower adjustment scores than HC. Only BD scored significantly higher on BIS-11 total (p = .01) and motor (p = .04) subscales than HC. Neither the BART, nor impulsivity scores associated with illness features. A limitation of this study is medicated patients and a heterogeneous BD-R were included. Riskiness may be a candidate endophenotype for bipolar disorder as it appears independently from illness features, presents similarly in BD and BD-R groups and differs from impulsivity. PMID:23410848

  8. Treating drug-dependent patients in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane; Keays, David; Gardner, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    Are hospital staff legally permitted to test drug-dependent patients for drugs or infectious disease without the patient's consent in order to treat the patient or to protect themselves or other patients? What should staff do with "suspicious" items in the patient's possession (drugs, credit cards in different names, firearms)? Can drug-dependent patients lawfully use illicit drugs in hospital? Who should supply and administer them? PMID:12242876

  9. A bipolar disorder patient becoming asymptomatic after adjunctive anti-filiarasis treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that neurotropic infectious agents might be involved in bipolar disorder. So far, few have been written for the association between parasitic infection and bipolar disorder. Filariasis is a parasitic disease acting ruthlessly via mosquitos and affecting more than 120 million people worldwide. We present here, to our knowledge, the first description of a filariasis infected manic bipolar disorder patient fully improved in terms of psychiatric symptoms by anti-heminthic treatment. Case presentation The patient is a 31 years-old man native of Congo. At inclusion, he presented a severe manic episode with dangerous behaviour unresolved by classic treatments. A diagnosis of filariasis bancrofti infection was made after the discovery of a systemic hypereosinophilia. Therefore, a bi-therapy of anthelmintics was conducted allowing a successful improvement with clear reduction of agitation and aggressive behaviours that could not be attributed to a modification of psychotropic treatments or filarial encephalopathy or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Conclusion The ineffectiveness of psychotropic treatment of a manic episode requires the evaluation of co-morbid medical conditions such as infections which can interfere with adequate mood stabilizing medication. Filariasis by inducing chronic inflammation and immunopathologic reactions seems to play a major role in infected affective disorders patients by changing levels of cytokines of the Th1 system or indirectly damaging the brain tissue. The beneficial combination of antihelmintics and mood stabilizers, in this case, could be explained by the potential of such association to downregulate neuroinflammation and excitotoxicity processes. Altogether, these data pinpoint the requirement to explore the parasitic infectious status in case of bipolar disorder patients resistant to classic treatments and originating or living in endemic geographical areas. PMID:23497411

  10. Clinical, psychological and environmental predictors of prospective suicide events in patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Antypa, Niki; Antonioli, Marco; Serretti, Alessandro

    2013-11-01

    Patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) have high rates of suicide compared to the general population. The present study investigates the predictive power of baseline clinical, psychological and environmental characteristics as risk factors of prospective suicide events (attempts and completions). Data was collected from the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) study. 3083 bipolar patients were included in this report, among these 140 (4.6%) had a suicide event (8 died by suicide and 132 attempted suicide). Evaluation and assessment forms were used to collect clinical, psychological and socio-demographic information. Chi-square and independent t-tests were used to evaluate baseline characteristics. Potential prospective predictors were selected on the basis of prior literature and using a screening analysis of all risk factors that were associated with a history of suicide attempt at baseline and were tested using a Cox regression analysis. The strongest predictor of a suicide event was a history of suicide attempt (hazard ratio = 2.60, p-value < 0.001) in line with prior literature. Additional predictors were: younger age, a high total score on the personality disorder questionnaire and a high percentage of days spent depressed in the year prior to study entry. In conclusion, the present findings may help clinicians to identify patients at high risk for suicidal behavior upon presentation for treatment.

  11. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy in subsyndromal bipolar patients with a history of traumatic events: a randomized, controlled pilot-study.

    PubMed

    Novo, Patricia; Landin-Romero, Ramon; Radua, Joaquim; Vicens, Victor; Fernandez, Isabel; Garcia, Francisca; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J; Shapiro, Francine; Amann, Benedikt L

    2014-09-30

    Traumatic events are frequent in bipolar patients and can worsen the course of the disease. Psychotherapeutic interventions for these events have not been studied so far. Twenty DSM-IV bipolar I and II patients with subsyndromal mood symptoms and a history of traumatic events were randomly assigned to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy (n=10) or treatment as usual (n=10). The treatment group received between 14 and 18 Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing sessions during 12 weeks. Evaluations of affective symptoms, symptoms of trauma and trauma impact were carried out by a blind rater at baseline, 2 weeks, 5 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks and at 24 weeks follow-up. Patients in the treatment group showed a statistically significant improvement in depressive and hypomanic symptoms, symptoms of trauma and trauma impact compared to the treatment as usual group after intervention. This effect was only partly maintained in trauma impact at the 24 weeks follow-up visit. One patient dropped from Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing group whereas four from the treatment as usual group. This pilot study suggests that Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy may be an effective and safe intervention to treat subsyndromal mood and trauma symptoms in traumatized bipolar patients.

  12. Can body mass index help predict outcome in patients with bipolar disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Cynthia; van de Velde, Caroline; Růžičková, Martina; Slaney, Claire; Garnham, Julie; Hajek, Tomas; O’Donovan, Claire; Alda, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported higher prevalence of obesity in patients suffering from bipolar disorder (BD). To study the relation of elevated body mass index (BMI) in patients with BD more closely, we investigated differences in sociodemographic, clinical, and medical characteristics with respect to BMI, with the hypothesis that BMI is related to prognosis and outcome. Methods We measured the BMI of 276 subjects of a tertiary care sample from the Maritime Bipolar Registry. Subjects were 16 to 83 years old, with psychiatric diagnoses of bipolar I disorder (n = 186), bipolar II disorder (n = 85), and BD not otherwise specified (n = 5). The registry included basic demographic data and details of the clinical presentation. We first examined the variables showing a significant association with BMI; subsequently, we modeled the relationship between BMI and psychiatric outcome using structural equation analysis. Results The prevalence of obesity in our sample was 39.1%. We found higher BMI in subjects with a chronic course (p < 0.001) and longer duration of illness (p = 0.02), lower scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (p = 0.02), and on disability (p = 0.002). Overweight patients had more frequent comorbid subthreshold social (p = 0.02) and generalized anxiety disorders (p = 0.05), diabetes mellitus type II (p < 0.001), and hypertension (p = 0.001). Subjects who achieved complete remission of symptoms on lithium showed significantly lower BMI (p = 0.01). Conclusions Our findings suggest that BMI is associated with the prognosis and outcome of BD. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined. PMID:19689507

  13. Interaction between Personality and Mood in Unipolar and Bipolar Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Gene E.; And Others

    Much of the literature on affective disorders has been devoted to categorizing, assessing, and treating the mood and behavioral symptoms typically associated with depressive illness, and much research has studied how personality traits interact with these state symptoms. The personality scales of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) are…

  14. [Bipolar affective disorders and role of intraneuronal calcium. Therapeutic effects of the treatment with lithium salts and/or calcium antagonist in patients with rapid polar inversion].

    PubMed

    Manna, V

    1991-11-01

    Treatment with lithium salts produces improvements in bipolar affective disorders. Up to date, the relationship between neurochemical and behavioural effects of lithium and its actions on intraneuronal free calcium ions is not well known. Some calcium antagonist drugs resulted active in the treatment of bipolar affective syndromes, with therapeutic effects similar to lithium salts. Some studies suggest that also lithium salts act as calcium antagonist at intraneuronal level. In this preliminary open study the activity of nimodipine, a selective neuronal calcium antagonist drug, was evaluated alone and in association with lithium salts in the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar manic-depressive illness. During three periods of 6 months 12 rapid cycling patients were treated with lithium salts, lithium salts plus nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day, nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day. The association of lithium with nimodipine resulted more effective than lithium alone or nimodipine alone in the reduction of episodes of affective disorder. These results suggest a probable sinergic activity of both treatments. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the mechanism of action, perhaps calcium antagonism, at the basis of therapeutic effects of both treatments. The results seem to confirm the hypothesis that a calcium-ionic disorders play a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar affective disorders.

  15. [Self-esteem and partner relationships of patients with bipolar affective disorder: a study of the interval personality with the Giessen-test].

    PubMed

    Himmighoffen, Holger; Budischewski, Kai; Härtling, Fabian; Hell, Daniel; Böker, Heinz

    2003-01-01

    The self-concept and the partner relationships of patients with bipolar affective disorder in remission were investigated with the Giessen-Test (GT, Beckmann et al. ) comparing the bipolar patients with unipolar depressive patients, a control group of orthopedic patients and the standard sample of the Giessen-Test. The new dimensions "self-esteem" and "near-to-object" were developed by means of the Giessen-Test items. Self-esteem was significantly lower in bipolar patients in remission than in the controls. The bipolar patients also described themselves as "more distant to others" than the controls. Bipolar and unipolar-depressive patients had a similar self-concept and view of their partner relationships. The results underline the importance of the regulation of self-esteem and the interpersonal dimension in the long-term course of bipolar affective disorder. Therapeutic implications are discussed.

  16. Anatomical abnormalities of the anterior cingulate and paracingulate cortex in patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Malhi, Gin S; Lagopoulos, Jim; Ivanovski, Belinda; Wood, Stephen J; Saling, Michael M; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2008-02-28

    Abnormalities of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, but structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies have reported variable findings. Reasons for this include a failure to consider variability in regional cortical folding patterns and a reliance on relatively coarse measures (e.g., volume) to index anatomical change. We sought to overcome these limitations by combining a novel protocol for parcellating the ACC and adjacent paracingulate cortex (PaC) that accounts for inter-individual variations in sulcal and gyral morphology with a cortical surface-based approach that allowed calculation of regional grey matter volume, surface area and cortical thickness in 24 patients with bipolar I disorder and 24 matched controls. No changes in grey matter volume or surface area were identified in any region, but patients did show significant reductions in cortical thickness in the left rostral PaC and right dorsal PaC that were not attributable to group differences in cortical folding patterns. These findings suggest that bipolar disorder is associated with more pronounced changes in the PaC, and that reliance on volumetric measures alone may obscure more subtle differences. PMID:18207705

  17. Identification of high risk DISC1 protein structural variants in patients with bipolar spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Li, Wenyan; Noltner, Katie; Yan, Jin; Green, Elaine; Grozeva, Detelina; Jones, Ian R; Craddock, Nick; Longmate, Jeff; Feng, Jinong; Sommer, Steve S

    2010-12-17

    In a large Scottish pedigree, a balanced translocation t (1;11)(q42.1;q14.3) disrupting the DISC1 and DISC2 genes segregates with major mental illness, including schizophrenia and depression. A frame-shift carboxyl-terminal deletion was reported in DISC1 in an American family with schizophrenia, but subsequently found in two controls. Herein, we test one hypothesis utilizing a large scale case-control mutation analysis: uncommon DISC1 variants are associated with high risk for bipolar spectrum disorder. We have analyzed the regions of likely functional significance in the DISC1 gene in 504 patients with bipolar spectrum disorder and 576 ethnically similar controls. Five patients were heterozygous for ultra-rare protein structural variants not found in the 576 controls (p=0.02, one-sided Fisher's exact test) and shown to be ultra-rare by their absence in a pool of 10,000 control alleles. In our sample, ultra-rare (private) protein structural variants in DISC1 are associated with an estimated attributable risk of about 0.5% in bipolar spectrum disorder. These data are consistent with: (i) the high frequency of depression in the large Scottish family with a translocation disrupting DISC1; (ii) linkage disequilibrium analysis demonstrating haplotypes associated with relatively small increases in risk for bipolar disorder (<3-fold odds ratio). The data illustrate how low/moderate risk haplotypes that might be found by the HapMap project can be followed up by resequencing to identify protein structural variants with high risk, low frequency and of potential clinical utility. PMID:20850505

  18. Smartphone-based recognition of states and state changes in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Grünerbl, Agnes; Muaremi, Amir; Osmani, Venet; Bahle, Gernot; Ohler, Stefan; Tröster, Gerhard; Mayora, Oscar; Haring, Christian; Lukowicz, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Today's health care is difficult to imagine without the possibility to objectively measure various physiological parameters related to patients' symptoms (from temperature through blood pressure to complex tomographic procedures). Psychiatric care remains a notable exception that heavily relies on patient interviews and self-assessment. This is due to the fact that mental illnesses manifest themselves mainly in the way patients behave throughout their daily life and, until recently there were no "behavior measurement devices." This is now changing with the progress in wearable activity recognition and sensor enabled smartphones. In this paper, we introduce a system, which, based on smartphone-sensing is able to recognize depressive and manic states and detect state changes of patients suffering from bipolar disorder. Drawing upon a real-life dataset of ten patients, recorded over a time period of 12 weeks (in total over 800 days of data tracing 17 state changes) by four different sensing modalities, we could extract features corresponding to all disease-relevant aspects in behavior. Using these features, we gain recognition accuracies of 76% by fusing all sensor modalities and state change detection precision and recall of over 97%. This paper furthermore outlines the applicability of this system in the physician-patient relations in order to facilitate the life and treatment of bipolar patients.

  19. Nutrition and Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Beyer, John L; Payne, Martha E

    2016-03-01

    As with physical conditions, bipolar disorder is likely to be impacted by diet and nutrition. Patients with bipolar disorder have been noted to have relatively unhealthy diets, which may in part be the reason they also have an elevated risk of metabolic syndrome and obesity. An improvement in the quality of the diet should improve a bipolar patient's overall health risk profile, but it may also improve their psychiatric outcomes. New insights into biological dysfunctions that may be present in bipolar disorder have presented new theoretic frameworks for understanding the relationship between diet and bipolar disorder.

  20. Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle at acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joint is an uncommon traumatic injury. The conservative treatments adopted in the past is associated with redislocation dysfunction and deformity. A 41 years old lady with bipolar dislocation of right shoulder is treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation by oblique T-plate at sternoclavicular joint and Kirschner wire stabilization at acromioclavicular joint. The patient showed satisfactory recovery with full range of motion of the right shoulder and normal muscular strength. The case reported in view of rarity and at 2 years followup. PMID:23325981

  1. The Relationship Between Educational Years and Phonemic Verbal Fluency (PVF) and Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) Tasks in Spanish Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    García-Laredo, Eduardo; Maestú, Fernando; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel; Molina, Juan D; Peréz-Moreno, Elisa

    2015-09-01

    Semantic and verbal fluency tasks are widely used as a measure of frontal capacities. It has been well described in literature that patients affected by schizophrenic and bipolar disorders present a worse execution in these tasks. Some authors have also noted the importance of educational years. Our objective is to analyze whether the effect of cognitive malfunction caused by apathology is superior to the expected effect of years of education in phonemic verbal fluency (PVF) and semantic verbal fluency (SVF) task execution. A total of 62 individuals took part in this study, out of which 23 were patients with schizophrenic paranoid disorder, 11 suffered from bipolar disorder with psychotic symptomatology, 13 suffered from bipolar disorder without psychotic symptomatology, and 15 participants were nonpathological individuals. All participants were evaluated with the PVF and SVF tests (animals and tools). The performance/execution results were analyzed with a mixed-model ANCOVA, with educational years as a covariable. The effect of education seems to be more determined by PVF FAS tests than by SVF. With PVF FAS tasks, the expected effect of pathology disappears when the covariable EDUCATION is introduced. With SVF tasks, the effect continues to be significant, even though the EDUACTION covariable dims such effect. These results suggest that SVF tests (animals category) are better evaluation tools as they are less dependent on the patients' education than PVF FAS tests.

  2. [Bipolar disorder in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Monczor, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a frequent disorder in the elderly, with a prevalence of 0.1 a 0.4%; a 10% of bipolar patients have mania onset after 50 years old. It has in ageing a more heterogeneous clinical presentation. The manic episodes are less severe, mixed depression is common, as well as confusion and cognitive impairment. A first manic episode in ageing can be secondary to medical illness. Treatment for bipolar disorder in ageing is similar to treatment for young patients. The differences are due to pharmacocinetic changes because of the age, with the comorbidity and with the etiology, if it is a secondary mania. Lithium can be the first choice for treating mania in patients with antecedent of good response and have tolerance to adverse effects, but because of its toxicity and secondary effects other possibilities may be considered: divalproate, cabamazepine, antipsychotics. There are some little studies that show lamotrigine efficacy in bipolar depression in elderly. We need more specific studies about bipolar disorder treatment in aging.

  3. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  4. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  5. Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in a Clinical Sample of Patients with Internet Addiction: Hidden Comorbidity or Differential Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E.; Dreier, Michael; Müller, Kai W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Behavioral addictions and bipolar disorders have a certain probability of co-occurrence. While the presence of a manic episode has been defined as an exclusion criterion for gambling disorder, no such exclusion has been formulated for Internet addiction. Methods A clinical sample of 368 treatment seekers presenting with excessive to addictive Internet use was screened for bipolar spectrum disorders using the Mood Disorder Questionnaire. Psychopathology was assessed by the Symptom Checklist 90R and a clinical interview was administered to screen for comorbid disorders. Results Comorbid bipolar disorders were more frequent in patients meeting criteria for Internet addiction (30.9%) than among the excessive users (5.6%). This subgroup showed heightened psychopathological symptoms, including substance use disorders, affective disorders and personality disorders. Further differences were found regarding frequency of Internet use regarding social networking sites and online-pornography. Discussion Patients with Internet addiction have a heightened probability for meeting criteria of bipolar disorders. It is not possible to draw conclusions regarding the direction of this association but it is recommended to implement screening for bipolar disorders in patients presenting with Internet addiction. Conclusion Similar to gambling disorder, it might prove necessary to subsume bipolar disorders as an exclusion criterion for the future criteria of Internet addiction. PMID:26132914

  6. Genome-wide association study of personality traits in bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Alliey-Rodriguez, Ney; Zhang, Dandan; Badner, Judith A.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Zhang, Xiaotong; Dinwiddie, Stephen; Romanos, Benjamin; Plenys, Natalie; Liu, Chunyu; Gershon, Elliot S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association study was carried out on personality traits among bipolar patients as possible endophenotypes for gene discovery in bipolar disorder. Methods The subscales of Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and the Zuckerman–Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ) were used as quantitative phenotypes. The genotyping platform was the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP array. The sample consisted of 944 individuals for TCI and 1007 for ZKPQ, all of European ancestry, diagnosed with bipolar disorder by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Results Genome-wide significant association was found for two subscales of the TCI, rs10479334 with the ‘Social Acceptance versus Social Intolerance’ subscale (Bonferroni P = 0.014) in an intergenic region, and rs9419788 with the ‘Spiritual Acceptance versus Rational Materialism’ subscale (Bonferroni P = 0.036) in PLCE1 gene. Although genome-wide significance was not reached for ZKPQ scales, lowest P values pinpointed to genes, RXRG for Sensation Seeking, GRM7 and ITK for Neuroticism Anxiety, and SPTLC3 gene for Aggression Hostility. Conclusion After correction for the 25 subscales in TCI and four scales plus two subscales in ZKPQ, phenotype-wide significance was not reached. PMID:21368711

  7. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Bipolar Disorder KidsHealth > For Teens > Bipolar Disorder Print A A ... Bipolar Disorder en español Trastorno bipolar What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorders are one of several medical conditions ...

  8. The Relationship Between Educational Years and Phonemic Verbal Fluency (PVF) and Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) Tasks in Spanish Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    García-Laredo, Eduardo; Maestú, Fernando; Castellanos, Miguel Ángel; Molina, Juan D.; Peréz-Moreno, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Semantic and verbal fluency tasks are widely used as a measure of frontal capacities. It has been well described in literature that patients affected by schizophrenic and bipolar disorders present a worse execution in these tasks. Some authors have also noted the importance of educational years. Our objective is to analyze whether the effect of cognitive malfunction caused by apathology is superior to the expected effect of years of education in phonemic verbal fluency (PVF) and semantic verbal fluency (SVF) task execution. A total of 62 individuals took part in this study, out of which 23 were patients with schizophrenic paranoid disorder, 11 suffered from bipolar disorder with psychotic symptomatology, 13 suffered from bipolar disorder without psychotic symptomatology, and 15 participants were nonpathological individuals. All participants were evaluated with the PVF and SVF tests (animals and tools). The performance/execution results were analyzed with a mixed-model ANCOVA, with educational years as a covariable. The effect of education seems to be more determined by PVF FAS tests than by SVF. With PVF FAS tasks, the expected effect of pathology disappears when the covariable EDUCATION is introduced. With SVF tasks, the effect continues to be significant, even though the EDUACTION covariable dims such effect. These results suggest that SVF tests (animals category) are better evaluation tools as they are less dependent on the patients’ education than PVF FAS tests. PMID:26426640

  9. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Bipolar Disorder Patients With and Without Suicide Attempts.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kristine Kahr

    2016-03-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) are at an increased risk of attempted and completed suicide. To elucidate the beliefs and assumptions associated with suicidality in BD, the present study compared BD patients with and without a history of suicide attempt in terms of early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). The sample consisted of 49 remitted BD patients who completed the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Version. Information on suicide attempts was obtained through interviews combined with medical records. Compared with BD patients without suicide attempts, the BD patients with suicide attempts scored significantly higher on 3 EMSs: social isolation, practical incompetence, and entitlement. The findings suggest that specific EMSs may be implicated in suicidal behaviors in BD. These results have implications for the assessment and treatment of suicidality in BD. PMID:26919302

  10. Group Psychoeducation for Relatives of Persons With Bipolar Disorder: Perceived Benefits for Participants and Patients.

    PubMed

    Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Cuénoud, Sandrine; Stauffer-Corminboeuf, Marie-Joëlle; Aillon, Nancy; Perroud, Nader; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Psychoeducation is a key element in the management of patients with bipolar disorders. The present study explored the perception of patients and family members with respect to group psychoeducation for relatives. Patients (n = 20) and relatives (n = 26) were assessed with questionnaires about perceived benefits and quality of life (median 4 years after participation). A large majority (>80%) of relatives acknowledged benefits with respect to easier detection of the early warning signs of relapse, improved quality of life, feeling more involved, and engaging in higher quality caregiving activities. Patients were less positive in general, but agreed that the program had helped them deal with crises, increased their feeling of being understood by relatives, and promoted positive changes in the family (>60%). Perceived positive changes in the family were associated with higher quality of life for relatives and patients. The present study highlights the importance of communication enhancement in group psychoeducation for relatives. PMID:26313039

  11. Neuropsychology, social cognition and global functioning among bipolar, schizophrenic patients and healthy controls: preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Caletti, Elisabetta; Paoli, Riccardo A.; Fiorentini, Alessio; Cigliobianco, Michela; Zugno, Elisa; Serati, Marta; Orsenigo, Giulia; Grillo, Paolo; Zago, Stefano; Caldiroli, Alice; Prunas, Cecilia; Giusti, Francesca; Consonni, Dario; Altamura, A. Carlo

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the extent of impairment in social and non-social cognitive domains in an ecological context comparing bipolar (BD), schizophrenic (SKZ) patients and healthy controls (HC). The sample was enrolled at the Department of Psychiatry of Policlinico Hospital, University of Milan; it includes stabilized SKZ patients (n = 30), euthymic bipolar patients (n = 18) and HC (n = 18). Patients and controls completed psychiatric assessment rating scales, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) and the Executive and Social Cognition Battery (ESCB) that contains both ecological tests of executive function and social cognition, in order to better detect cognitive deficits in patients with normal results in standard executive batteries. The three groups differed significantly for gender and substance abuse, however, the differences did not influence the results. BD patients showed less impairment on cognitive performance compared to SKZ patients, even in “ecological” tests that mimic real life scenarios. In particular, BD performed better than SKZ in verbal memory (p < 0.0038) and BACS symbol coding (p < 0.0043). Regarding the ESCB tests, in the Hotel task SKZ patients completed significantly less tasks (p < 0.001), showed a greater number of errors in Multiple Errands Test (MET-HV) (p < 0.0248) and a worse performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tests (p < 0.001 for the Eyes test and Faux pas test). Both patients' groups performed significantly worse than HC. Finally, significant differences were found between the two groups in GAF scores, being greater among BD subjects (p < 0.001). GAF was correlated with BACS and ESCB scores showing the crucial role of cognitive and ecological performances in patients' global functioning. PMID:24146642

  12. Reevaluation of patients with bipolar disorder on manic episode: improving the diagnosing of mixed episode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Ran; Cho, Hyun-Sang; Kim, Se Joo; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Eun; Jon, Duk-In

    2013-08-01

    Mixed manic/depressive episodes in patients with bipolar disorder are underdiagnosed because of restrictive diagnostic criteria. Using the broader definition of a mixed episode represented by the Cincinnati criteria, we reevaluated the medical records of patients with bipolar disorder hospitalized for a manic episode. We also examined the predictive power of previously unrecognized depressive symptoms. Of 520 inpatients with mania, we retrospectively diagnosed 59 (11.3%) as having a probable mixed episode. Compared with the patients with pure mania, the patients with mixed episodes were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric illness, comorbid personality disorder, and a history of suicide attempts. Binary logistic regression revealed that loss of interest, loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness, and feelings of helplessness had good positive predictive value (>0.7) for mixed episodes. Accurate diagnosis of mixed episodes may require a broadening of diagnostic criteria and emphasis on symptoms such as loss of interest, loss of energy, and feelings of worthlessness and helplessness.

  13. Fractal analysis of MRI data for the characterization of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squarcina, Letizia; De Luca, Alberto; Bellani, Marcella; Brambilla, Paolo; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Fractal geometry can be used to analyze shape and patterns in brain images. With this study we use fractals to analyze T1 data of patients affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, with the aim of distinguishing between healthy and pathological brains using the complexity of brain structure, in particular of grey matter, as a marker of disease. 39 healthy volunteers, 25 subjects affected by schizophrenia and 11 patients affected by bipolar disorder underwent an MRI session. We evaluated fractal dimension of the brain cortex and its substructures, calculated with an algorithm based on the box-count algorithm. We modified this algorithm, with the aim of avoiding the segmentation processing step and using all the information stored in the image grey levels. Moreover, to increase sensitivity to local structural changes, we computed a value of fractal dimension for each slice of the brain or of the particular structure. To have reference values in comparing healthy subjects with patients, we built a template by averaging fractal dimension values of the healthy volunteers data. Standard deviation was evaluated and used to create a confidence interval. We also performed a slice by slice t-test to assess the difference at slice level between the three groups. Consistent average fractal dimension values were found across all the structures in healthy controls, while in the pathological groups we found consistent differences, indicating a change in brain and structures complexity induced by these disorders.

  14. The borderline of bipolar: opinions of patients and lessons for clinicians on the diagnostic conflict

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Emma; Tracy, Derek K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method It has been observed that some individuals self-diagnose with a bipolar affective disorder and many are later diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder. There is a background context of clinical and neurobiological overlap between these conditions, and fundamental debates on the validity of current diagnostic systems. This qualitative study is the first work to explore the views of patients caught at this diagnostic interface. We predicted that media exposure, stigma and attribution of responsibility would be key factors affecting patient understanding and opinion. Results Six core illness-differentiating themes emerged: public information, diagnosis delivery, illness causes, illness management, stigma, and relationship with others. Individuals did not ‘want’ to be diagnosed with a bipolar disorder, but wished for informed care. Clinical implications Understanding patient perspectives will allow clinical staff to better appreciate the difficulties faced by those we seek to help, identify gaps in care provision, and should stimulate thought on our attitudes to care and how we facilitate provision of information, including information about diagnosis. PMID:26191447

  15. Fractal analysis of MRI data for the characterization of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Squarcina, Letizia; De Luca, Alberto; Bellani, Marcella; Brambilla, Paolo; Turkheimer, Federico E; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-02-21

    Fractal geometry can be used to analyze shape and patterns in brain images. With this study we use fractals to analyze T1 data of patients affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, with the aim of distinguishing between healthy and pathological brains using the complexity of brain structure, in particular of grey matter, as a marker of disease. 39 healthy volunteers, 25 subjects affected by schizophrenia and 11 patients affected by bipolar disorder underwent an MRI session. We evaluated fractal dimension of the brain cortex and its substructures, calculated with an algorithm based on the box-count algorithm. We modified this algorithm, with the aim of avoiding the segmentation processing step and using all the information stored in the image grey levels. Moreover, to increase sensitivity to local structural changes, we computed a value of fractal dimension for each slice of the brain or of the particular structure. To have reference values in comparing healthy subjects with patients, we built a template by averaging fractal dimension values of the healthy volunteers data. Standard deviation was evaluated and used to create a confidence interval. We also performed a slice by slice t-test to assess the difference at slice level between the three groups. Consistent average fractal dimension values were found across all the structures in healthy controls, while in the pathological groups we found consistent differences, indicating a change in brain and structures complexity induced by these disorders.

  16. The borderline of bipolar: opinions of patients and lessons for clinicians on the diagnostic conflict.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Emma; Tracy, Derek K

    2015-06-01

    Aims and method It has been observed that some individuals self-diagnose with a bipolar affective disorder and many are later diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder. There is a background context of clinical and neurobiological overlap between these conditions, and fundamental debates on the validity of current diagnostic systems. This qualitative study is the first work to explore the views of patients caught at this diagnostic interface. We predicted that media exposure, stigma and attribution of responsibility would be key factors affecting patient understanding and opinion. Results Six core illness-differentiating themes emerged: public information, diagnosis delivery, illness causes, illness management, stigma, and relationship with others. Individuals did not 'want' to be diagnosed with a bipolar disorder, but wished for informed care. Clinical implications Understanding patient perspectives will allow clinical staff to better appreciate the difficulties faced by those we seek to help, identify gaps in care provision, and should stimulate thought on our attitudes to care and how we facilitate provision of information, including information about diagnosis. PMID:26191447

  17. Emotion Regulation Strategies Can Predict Task-Switching Abilities in Euthymic Bipolar Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Amara; Khan, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    This study examined task-switching abilities and emotion regulation strategies in euthymic bipolar patients (EBP). Forty EBP and 40 healthy individuals performed face categorization tasks where they switched between emotion and non-emotion (i.e., gender) features among faces and completed emotion regulation questionnaire (Gross and John, 2003). Subject groups showed substantial differences in task-switching abilities and emotion regulation strategies: (1) there was a dissociation between emotion and gender classification in EBP. The switch cost was larger [i.e., higher reaction times (RTs) on switch as compared to no-switch trials] for gender categorization as compared to the emotion categorization task. In contrast, such asymmetries were absent among healthy participants. The differential pattern of task switching reflected functional disturbances in frontotemporal neural system and an attentional bias to emotion features of the faces in EBP. This suggests that when a euthymic bipolar patient is preoccupied with emotion recognition, an instruction to perform gender categorization results in greater cost on RTs. (2) In contrast to healthy individuals, EBP reported more frequent use of emotion suppression and lesser use of cognitive reappraisal as emotion regulation strategy. (3) Emotion regulation was found to be a significant predictor of task-switching abilities. It is argued that task switching deficits rely on maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in EBP specifically when tasks of emotional significance are involved. PMID:25386129

  18. Facial affect recognition in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yalcin-Siedentopf, Nursen; Hoertnagl, Christine M; Biedermann, Falko; Baumgartner, Susanne; Deisenhammer, Eberhard A; Hausmann, Armand; Kaufmann, Alexandra; Kemmler, Georg; Mühlbacher, Moritz; Rauch, Anna-Sophia; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Hofer, Alex

    2014-02-01

    Both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) have consistently been associated with deficits in facial affect recognition (FAR). These impairments have been related to various aspects of social competence and functioning and are relatively stable over time. However, individuals in remission may outperform patients experiencing an acute phase of the disorders. The present study directly contrasted FAR in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia or BD and healthy volunteers and investigated its relationship with patients' outcomes. Compared to healthy control subjects, schizophrenia patients were impaired in the recognition of angry, disgusted, sad and happy facial expressions, while BD patients showed deficits only in the recognition of disgusted and happy facial expressions. When directly comparing the two patient groups individuals suffering from BD outperformed those with schizophrenia in the recognition of expressions depicting anger. There was no significant association between affect recognition abilities and symptomatic or psychosocial outcomes in schizophrenia patients. Among BD patients, relatively higher depression scores were associated with impairments in both the identification of happy faces and psychosocial functioning. Overall, our findings indicate that during periods of symptomatic remission the recognition of facial affect may be less impaired in patients with BD than in those suffering from schizophrenia. However, in the psychosocial context BD patients seem to be more sensitive to residual symptomatology.

  19. Cortical thickness, volume and surface area in patients with bipolar disorder types I and II

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Christoph; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Sellgren, Carl; Petrovic, Predrag; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common chronic psychiatric disorder mainly characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression. The disorder is associated with cognitive impairments and structural brain abnormalities, such as lower cortical volumes in primarily frontal brain regions than healthy controls. Although bipolar disorder types I (BDI) and II (BDII) exhibit different symptoms and severity, previous studies have focused on BDI. Furthermore, the most frequently investigated measure in this population is cortical volume. The aim of our study was to investigate abnormalities in patients with BDI and BDII by simultaneously analyzing cortical volume, thickness and surface area, which yields more information about disease- and symptom-related neurobiology. Methods We used MRI to measure cortical volume, thickness and area in patients with BDI and BDII as well as in healthy controls. The large study cohort enabled us to adjust for important confounding factors. Results We included 81 patients with BDI, 59 with BDII and 85 controls in our analyses. Cortical volume, thickness and surface area abnormalities were present in frontal, temporal and medial occipital regions in patients with BD. Lithium and antiepileptic drug use had an effect on the observed differences in medial occipital regions. Patients with the subtypes BDI and BDII displayed common cortical abnormalities, such as lower volume, thickness and surface area than healthy controls in frontal brain regions but differed in temporal and medial prefrontal regions, where only those with BDI had abnormally low cortical volume and thickness. Limitations The group differences can be explained by progressive changes, but also by premorbid conditions. They could also have been influenced by unknown factors, such as social, environmental or genetic factors. Conclusion Our findings suggest diagnosis-related neurobiological differences between the BD subtypes, which could explain distinct symptoms and

  20. Asymptomatic bacteriuria. Which patients should be treated?

    PubMed

    Zhanel, G G; Harding, G K; Guay, D R

    1990-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in both the community nursing home and hospital settings. Few data, however, are available about the potential complications arising from asymptomatic bacteriuria (eg, the development of symptomatic infection and renal damage) for various patient populations and for various medical conditions. On the basis of data in the literature, we believe that neonates and preschool children with asymptomatic bacteriuria should be treated. Pregnant women and "nonelderly" (less than 60 years old) men should be treated. We do not think that school-age children, nonpregnant, nonelderly women, or elderly men and women need antimicrobial treatment if their urinary tracks are normal. In addition, antimicrobial treatment is recommended for patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and abnormal urinary tracts and those undergoing clean intermittent catheterization, genitourinary manipulation, or instrumentation. Patients with long-term indwelling catheters should not be treated. The treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with short-term indwelling catheters and those with ileal conduits is controversial. These treatment recommendations should not necessarily be accepted as the standards of practice, since treatment is often controversial due to the lack of published data describing the natural course of asymptomatic bacteriuria in various patient populations. PMID:2196024

  1. Brain cortical thickness and surface area correlates of neurocognitive performance in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hartberg, C B; Sundet, K; Rimol, L M; Haukvik, U K; Lange, E H; Nesvåg, R; Dale, A M; Melle, I; Andreassen, O A; Agartz, I

    2011-11-01

    Relationships between cortical brain structure and neurocognitive functioning have been reported in schizophrenia, but findings are inconclusive, and only a few studies in bipolar disorder have addressed this issue. This is the first study to directly compare relationships between cortical thickness and surface area with neurocognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia (n = 117) and bipolar disorder (n = 121) and healthy controls (n = 192). MRI scans were obtained, and regional cortical thickness and surface area measurements were analyzed for relationships with test scores from 6 neurocognitive domains. In the combined sample, cortical thickness in the right rostral anterior cingulate was inversely related to working memory, and cortical surface area in four frontal and temporal regions were positively related to neurocognitive functioning. A positive relationship between left transverse temporal thickness and processing speed was specific to schizophrenia. A negative relationship between right temporal pole thickness and working memory was specific to bipolar disorder. In conclusion, significant cortical structure/function relationships were found in a large sample of healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The differences that were found between schizophrenia and bipolar may indicate differential relationship patterns in the two disorders, which may be of relevance for understanding the underlying pathophysiology.

  2. Severe strongyloidiasis in corticosteroid-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Fardet, L; Généreau, T; Cabane, J; Kettaneh, A

    2006-10-01

    Severe strongyloidiasis, caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, is a preventable life-threatening disease that can occur in any corticosteroid-treated patient who has travelled to a country with infested soil, even if the contact occurred up to 30 years previously. This diagnosis should be considered in corticosteroid-treated patients who experience either unusual gastrointestinal or pulmonary symptoms, or who suffer from unexplained sepsis caused by Gram-negative bacilli. Peripheral eosinophilia is not observed systematically and, even if present, is moderate in most cases. Ivermectine is the best prophylactic and therapeutic option, and thiabendazole should no longer be used. However, guidelines for the prevention and management of S. stercoralis infection in such patients have not yet been established. PMID:16961629

  3. Significant Treatment Effect of Bupropion in Patients With Bipolar Disorder but Similar Phase-Shifting Rate as Other Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bupropion is widely used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), and especially those with depressive mood, based on its good treatment effect, safety profile, and lower risk of phase shifting. However, increasing evidence indicates that the safety of bupropion in BD patients may not be as good as previously thought. The aim of this study was to summarize data on the treatment effect and safety profile of bupropion in the treatment of BD via a meta-analysis. Electronic search through PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. The inclusion criteria were: (i) studies comparing changes in disease severity before and after bupropion treatment or articles comparing the treatment effect of bupropion in BD patients with those receiving other standard treatments; (ii) articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were (i) case reports/series, and (ii) nonclinical trials. All effect sizes from 10 clinical trials were pooled using a random effects model. We examined the possible confounding variables using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Bupropion significantly improved the severity of disease in BD patients (P < 0.001), and the treatment effect was similar to other antidepressants/standard treatments (P = 0.220). There were no significant differences in the dropout rate (P = 0.285) and rate of phase shifting (P = 0.952) between BD patients who received bupropion and those who received other antidepressants. We could not perform a detailed meta-analysis of every category of antidepressant, nor could we rule out the possible confounding effect of concurrent psychotropics or include all drug side effects. Furthermore, the number of studies recruited in the meta-analysis was relatively small. Our findings reconfirm the benefits of bupropion for the treatment of bipolar depression, which are similar to those of other antidepressants. However, the rate of phase shifting with bupropion usage was not as low compared to other

  4. Increased Subsequent Risk of Peptic Ulcer Diseases in Patients With Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with bipolar disorders (BDs) exhibit increased physical comorbidity and psychological distress. Studies have shown that schizophrenia and anxiety increase the risk of peptic ulcer diseases (PUDs). Therefore, we conducted this study to determine the association between these 2 diseases and examine the possible risk factors. We used patients diagnosed with BDs from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort comprising patients without BDs was frequency matched by age, sex, and comorbidities, and the occurrence of PUDs was evaluated in both the cohorts. The BD and non-BD cohort consisted of 21,060 patients with BDs and 84,240 frequency-matched patients without BDs, respectively. The incidence of PUDs (hazard ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.43–1.59; P < 0.001) was higher among the patients with BDs than the control patients. Cox models showed that irrespective of comorbidities, BDs were an independent risk factor for PUDs. Patients with BDs exhibit a substantially higher risk for developing PUDs. According to our data, we suggest that, following a diagnosis of BD, practitioners could notice the occurrence of PUD and associated prevention. Further prospective clinical studies investigating the relationship between BDs and PUDs are warranted. PMID:26200637

  5. Investigating Aggressive Styles and Defense Mechanisms in Bipolar Patients and in their Parents.

    PubMed

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Pezzoni, Franca; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a very common mental health disorder, whose etiology concerning aggressive styles and defense mechanisms is still poorly known despite the efforts dedicated to develop psychological and biological theories. After obtaining written signed informed consent, this study will recruit inpatients with a clinical diagnosis of BD, based on Structured Clinical Interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, and their parents. The Bus-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Defense Style Questionnaire 40, the Symptom check list SCL-90-R, developed by DeRogatis will be administered to the participants, together with a semi-structured questionnaire concerning demographic data (age, gender, employment, education) and only for the patients clinical information (onset year of the disorder, presence of co-morbidities, alcohol and drug use, suicide tendencies, kind of treatment). All the questionnaires are in the Italian validated version. The successful completion of this study will shed light on the relationship between aggressive styles and defensive mechanisms in bipolar inpatients and in their parents, helping the clinicians to develop ad hoc psychological interventions.

  6. Investigating Aggressive Styles and Defense Mechanisms in Bipolar Patients and in their Parents

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Pezzoni, Franca; Del Puente, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a very common mental health disorder, whose etiology concerning aggressive styles and defense mechanisms is still poorly known despite the efforts dedicated to develop psychological and biological theories. After obtaining written signed informed consent, this study will recruit inpatients with a clinical diagnosis of BD, based on Structured Clinical Interview and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria, and their parents. The Bus-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Defense Style Questionnaire 40, the Symptom check list SCL-90-R, developed by DeRogatis will be administered to the participants, together with a semi-structured questionnaire concerning demographic data (age, gender, employment, education) and only for the patients clinical information (onset year of the disorder, presence of co-morbidities, alcohol and drug use, suicide tendencies, kind of treatment). All the questionnaires are in the Italian validated version. The successful completion of this study will shed light on the relationship between aggressive styles and defensive mechanisms in bipolar inpatients and in their parents, helping the clinicians to develop ad hoc psychological interventions. PMID:26973942

  7. Non-Compliance and Related Factors in Patients With Bipolar I Disorder: A Six Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Azadforouz, Sanaz; Shabani, Amir; Nohesara, Shabnam; Ahmadzad-Asl, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication treatment compliance among bipolar patients is quite widespread. Objectives Treatment compliance depends on multiple factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predicting factors of noncompliance in patients with bipolar I disorder admitted to an Iranian hospital during a six-month follow up period. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included 47 bipolar I disorder subjects who were admitted to the Iran psychiatric hospital and that were chosen using a non-randomized convenient sampling model. The patients were assessed at baseline, and at two and six months after admission. For evaluating the patients, we used the medication possession ratio (MPR), the drug attitude inventory (DIA-10), the young mania rating scale (Y-MRS) and the scale for the assessment of positive symptoms (SAPS). The data were analyzed using a general linear model by SPSS 16 software. Results The repeated measures analysis revealed that medication compliance increased successively (P = 0.045), and age, gender and symptom severity did not alter the pattern. Conclusions There is an increasing pattern in treatment compliance in bipolar I disorder patients, regardless of the known predicting factors for nonadherence. PMID:27803718

  8. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of aberrant behaviors in bipolar disorder from patients to models: Rodent and human studies.

    PubMed

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Geyer, Mark A; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Henry, Brook L; Young, Jared W

    2015-11-01

    Psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder suffer from states of depression and mania, during which a variety of symptoms are present. Current treatments are limited and neurocognitive deficits in particular often remain untreated. Targeted therapies based on the biological mechanisms of bipolar disorder could fill this gap and benefit patients and their families. Developing targeted therapies would benefit from appropriate animal models which are challenging to establish, but remain a vital tool. In this review, we summarize approaches to create a valid model relevant to bipolar disorder. We focus on studies that use translational tests of multivariate exploratory behavior, sensorimotor gating, decision-making under risk, and attentional functioning to discover profiles that are consistent between patients and rodent models. Using this battery of translational tests, similar behavior profiles in bipolar mania patients and mice with reduced dopamine transporter activity have been identified. Future investigations should combine other animal models that are biologically relevant to the neuropsychiatric disorder with translational behavioral assessment as outlined here. This methodology can be utilized to develop novel targeted therapies that relieve symptoms for more patients without common side effects caused by current treatments.

  9. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). Method This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Results Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05). Conclusion This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize

  10. Estimation of lithium clearance from routine clinical data in Egyptian bipolar patients. A population pharmacokinetic approach.

    PubMed

    ElDesoky, E S; Kumar, V; Alorainy, M S; Hamdi, M M; Derendorf, H

    2008-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetics (PK) of lithium as a mood stabilizer was investigated in Egyptian patients with bipolar affective disorders (n = 50) of whom 31 were suffering from lithium toxicity. The mean (+/- SD) age and body weight of patients were 33 +/- 10 years and 67 +/- 3.6 kg, respectively. Patients selected were maintained on lithium carbonate controlled release tablets at doses of 400 mg/12 hours (n = 43) or 200 mg/12 hours (n = 7) respectively. In 19 patients who continued lithium therapy, 1 blood sample/patient was withdrawn for lithium level determination before the morning dose of the drug was given while for 31 patients who suffered from lithium-related toxicity and cessation of drug intake was therapeutically decided, a single blood was drawn at variable time (36, 48 or 72 h) following the last administered dose of the drug. The data was subjected to population PK analysis using NONMEM and a two-compartment model was used. Due to single point sparse data, not all parameters and their between subject variability (BSV) could be determined. Therefore, lithium clearance (CL) and BSV were estimated while other PK parameters were fixed using available literature information. First order (FO) estimation method was used in the analysis. Covariates were evaluated by univariate analysis using likelihood ratio test. The most significant covariate on lithium CL was found to be creatinine clearance (CrCL). The population CL of lithium in the final model was expressed as CLpop = 0.51 x (CrCL/105.3)0.44. The final population PK parameters estimates of lithium were: CL = 0.51 l/h with 12.7% BSV, V1 (Fixed) = 15.2 l, Q (Fixed) = 7.44 l/h, and V2 (Fixed) = 6.7 l. The mean value of lithium concentration at 12 hours as predicted by the final model in the patients with drug toxicity was 1.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/l versus 0.8 +/- 0.14 mmol/l in patients without toxic signs. External validation of the final model on another group of adult bipolar patients (n = 12) maintained on

  11. Recognizing and treating patients with envenomations.

    PubMed

    Hurt, John B; Maday, Kristopher R

    2016-07-01

    Venomous spiders and snakes are found throughout the United States, and clinicians often encounter patients with suspected spider or snakebites. Due to the significant morbidity and mortality that can be related to a particular envenomation, clinicians must be able to recognize the species of spiders and snakes that are capable of delivering a venomous bite. Through proper species identification, recognition of the specific signs and symptoms that specific venom produces, and understanding the treatment guidelines for the envenomation, clinicians can properly diagnosis, treat, and manage patients with venomous bites. PMID:27351646

  12. Review of Evidence for Use of Antidepressants in Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Shane J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Depressive episodes predominate over the course of bipolar disorder and cause considerable functional impairment. Antidepressants are frequently prescribed in the treatment of bipolar depression, despite concerns about efficacy and risk of switching to mania. This review provides a critical examination of the evidence for and against the use of antidepressants in bipolar depression. Data Sources: English-language peer-reviewed literature and evidence-based guidelines published between January 1, 1980, and March 2014, were identified using PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO/PsycLIT, and EMBASE. All searches contained the terms antidepressants, bipolar depression, depressive episodes in bipolar disorder, and treatment guidelines for bipolar depression. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines were included. Bibliographies from these publications were used to identify additional articles of interest. Data Extraction: Studies involving treatment of bipolar depression with antidepressant monotherapy, adjunctive use of antidepressant with a mood stabilizer, and meta-analysis of such studies combined were reviewed. Conclusions: The body of evidence on the use of antidepressant monotherapy to treat patients with bipolar depression is contentious, but the recommendations from evidence-based guidelines do not support antidepressant monotherapy for bipolar depression. Only when mood stabilizer or atypical antipsychotic monotherapy has failed should adjunctive treatment with an antidepressant be considered. PMID:25667812

  13. Altered self-report of empathic responding in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Cusi, Andrée; Macqueen, Glenda M; McKinnon, Margaret C

    2010-07-30

    Despite evidence of impairments in social cognition in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), systematic investigations of empathic responding in this population have not been conducted. The objectives of the current study were to investigate empathic responding in patients with BD in varying states of illness and to determine whether course of illness variables and symptom severity predicted responding. Twenty well-characterized patients with BD and 20 matched healthy control subjects completed the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and the Social Adjustment Scale Self-Report (SAS-SR), self-report measures of cognitive and emotional empathy and of psychosocial functioning, respectively. Patients with BD reported significantly reduced levels of cognitive empathy ('Perspective Taking') and higher levels of personal distress in response to others' negative experiences than did controls. Altered affective empathic abilities correlated significantly with reduced psychosocial functioning in family, social and occupational domains and with increased symptom severity. This study provides preliminary evidence of alterations in empathic responding in patients with BD. Alterations in the ability to adopt the perspective of others may contribute to the difficulties in social communication inherent in this patient population. Additional studies, involving larger samples, are required to determine the contribution of social cognitive performance to impaired social functioning in BD. PMID:20483472

  14. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  15. Modeling bipolar disorder in mice by increasing acetylcholine or dopamine: Chronic lithium treats most, but not all features

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Geyer, Mark A.; Young, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Bipolar disorder (BD) is a disabling and life-threatening disease characterized by states of depression and mania. New and efficacious treatments have not been forthcoming partly due to a lack of well-validated models representing both facets of BD. Objectives We hypothesized that cholinergic- and dopaminergic-pharmacological manipulations would model depression and mania respectively, each attenuated by lithium treatment. Methods C57BL/6J mice received the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine or saline before testing for ‘behavioral despair’ (immobility) in the tail-suspension test (TST) and forced-swim test (FST). Physostigmine effects on exploration and sensorimotor gating were assessed using the cross-species behavioral pattern monitor (BPM) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) paradigms. Other C57BL/6J mice received chronic lithium drinking water (300, 600, or 1200 mg/l) before assessing their effects alone in the BPM or with physostigmine on FST performance. Another group was tested with acute GBR12909 (dopamine transporter inhibitor) and chronic lithium (1000 mg/l) in the BPM. Results Physostigmine (0.03 mg/kg) increased immobility in the TST and FST without affecting activity, exploration, or PPI. Lithium (600 mg/l) resulted in low therapeutic serum concentrations and normalized the physostigmine-increased immobility in the FST. GBR12909 induced mania-like behavior in the BPM of which hyper-exploration was attenuated, though not reversed, after chronic lithium (1000 mg/ml). Conclusions Increased cholinergic levels induced depression-like behavior and hyperdopaminergia induced mania-like behavior in mice, while chronic lithium treated some, but not all, facets of these effects. These data support a cholinergic-monoaminergic mechanism for modeling BD aspects and provide a way to assess novel therapeutics. PMID:26141192

  16. How I treat glioblastoma in older patients.

    PubMed

    Mohile, Nimish A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma, a WHO grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. It is characterized by molecular heterogeneity and aggressive behavior. Glioblastoma is almost always incurable and most older patients survive less than 6 months. Supportive care with steroids and anti-epileptic drugs is critical to improving and maintain quality of life. Young age, good performance status and methylation of the methyl guanyl methyl transferase promoter are important positive prognostic factors. Several recent clinical trials suggest that there is a subset of the elderly with prolonged survival that is comparable to younger patients. Treatment of glioblastoma in older patients includes maximal safe resection followed by either radiation, chemotherapy or combined modality therapy. Recent advances suggest that some patients can avoid radiation entirely and be treated with chemotherapy alone. Decisions about therapy are individual and based on a patient's performance status, family support and molecular features. Future work needs to better determine the role for comprehensive geriatric assessments in this patient population to better identify patients who may most benefit from aggressive therapies. PMID:26725536

  17. Carbamazepine in Bipolar Disorder With Pain: Reviewing Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Austin; O’Connell, Christopher R.; Nallapula, Kishan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if any monotherapy drug treatment has robust efficacy to treat comorbid bipolar disorder and chronic pain. Data Sources: The American Psychiatric Association (APA) treatment guidelines for bipolar mood disorder and the 2012 Cochrane database for pain disorders. Study Selection: We relied on the treatment guides to determine if the drugs that are APA guideline–supported to treat bipolar disorder have supporting data from the Cochrane database for chronic pain. Data Synthesis: No single drug was mentioned by either guideline to treat this comorbidity. However, carbamazepine was the only drug that has guideline-supported robust efficacy in the management of each condition separately. Conclusions: Carbamazepine was found to have strong preclinical data for the treatment of comorbid bipolar mood disorder and chronic pain disorders. While requiring more studies in this population, we propose that this treatment modality may benefit patients. PMID:25667814

  18. The characteristics of sleep in patients with manifest bipolar disorder, subjects at high risk of developing the disease and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Philipp S; Marx, Carolin; Lewtschenko, Natalia; Pfeiffer, Steffi; Leopold, Karolina; Bauer, Michael; Pfennig, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Sleep is highly altered during affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. There is accumulating evidence that sleep is also altered in euthymic states. A deficit in sleep regulation may be a vulnerability factor with aetiological relevance in the development of the disease. This study aims to explore the objective, subjective and lifetime sleep characteristics of patients with manifest bipolar disorder and persons with an elevated risk of developing the disease. Twenty-two patients with bipolar I and II disorder, nine persons with an elevated risk of developing the disorder and 28 healthy controls were evaluated with a structured interview to characterize subjective and lifetime sleeping habits. In addition, participants wore an actimeter for six nights. Patients with bipolar disorder had longer sleep latency and duration compared with healthy controls as determined by actigraphy. The subjective and lifetime sleep characteristics of bipolar patients differed significantly from healthy controls. The results of participants with an elevated risk of developing the disorder had subjective and lifetime characteristics that were largely analogous to those of patients with manifest bipolar disorder. In particular, both groups described recurring insomnia and hypersomnia, sensitivity to shifts in circadian rhythm, difficulties awakening and prolonged sleep latency. This study provides further evidence that sleep and circadian timing are profoundly altered in patients with bipolar disorder. It may also tentatively suggest that sleep may be altered prior to the first manic episode in subjects at high risk.

  19. HBV: Do I treat my immunotolerant patients?

    PubMed

    Vlachogiannakos, Jiannis; Papatheodoridis, George V

    2016-01-01

    Immunotolerant patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are characterized by positive HBeAg, high viral replication, persistently normal ALT and no or minimal liver damage. Since the risk of the progression of liver disease and the chance of a sustained response with existing anti-HBV agents are low, current guidelines do not recommend treatment but close monitoring with serial alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and HBV DNA measurements instead. However, not treating all these patients is a concern because advanced histological lesions have been reported in certain cases who are usually older (>30-40 years old), and continued high HBV replication could increase the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, the optimal management of immunotolerant patients is often individualised according to age, which is associated with histological severity and patient outcome. In particular, immunotolerant patients <30 years old can be monitored for ALT and HBV DNA, while treatment is often recommended in the few patients over 40. A liver biopsy and/or non-invasive assessment of fibrosis may be helpful to determine the therapeutic strategy in patients between 30 and 40 years old. Moreover, there are three specific subgroups of immunotolerant patients who often require treatment with oral anti-HBV agents: patients who will receive immunosuppressive treatment or chemotherapy, women with serum HBV DNA >10(6-7) IU/ml during the last trimester of pregnancy and certain healthcare professionals with high viraemia levels. More studies are needed to further clarify the natural history for the optimal timing of treatment in this setting.

  20. Changes in absolute theta power in bipolar patients during a saccadic attention task.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Consuelo; Diniz, Claudia; Di Girogio, Luiza; Bittencourt, Juliana; Gongora, Mariana; Ken Tanaka, Guaraci; Teixeira, Silmar; Basile, Luis F; Novis, Fernanda; Angélica Silveira, Luciana; da Silva, Rafael de Assis; Cagy, Mauricio; Cheniaux, Elie; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna

    2015-08-30

    The present study analyzed absolute theta power (ATP) in brain areas involved with attention in the three phase of BD while the patients performing a saccadic attention task. We hypothesized that patients in depression and mania states show a higher ATP compared to euthymic patients, since a higher ATP is indicative of attention deficit. We analyzed the frontal (F7, F3, Fz, F4 and F8) and central (C3, Cz and C4) areas. Thirty bipolar patients were enrolled in this study. The subjects performed a saccadic attention task while their brain activity pattern was recorded using quantitative electroencephalography (20 channels). Our results showed a main effect for group over C3, C4, Cz, F7, F4, F8 electrodes, and a main effect for moment over Cz, F7, F8 electrodes. These results indicate that both task and groups produce changes in theta activity in distinct cortical areas that participate in the organization of attention. Our results therefore demonstrate that, although it is well established in the literature that theta has a relevant role in the attention process, it is necessary to deepen the investigations to better understand the specifics of theta during visual processing tasks that have a demand for attention.

  1. Binding of lithium and boron to human plasma proteins II: results for a bipolar patient not on lithium therapy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, W Brian; Guscott, Richard; Lindstrom, Richard M

    2004-02-01

    We report further measurements of lithium and boron bound to human plasma proteins using the techniques of gel chromatography, thermal-neutron activation, and high-sensitivity helium isotope mass spectrometry. The plasma sample was donated by a bipolar patient who had never been on lithium therapy. The plasma lithium-binding pattern for the bipolar patient is distinctly different from that previously observed in this laboratory for plasma donated by a normal individual. In the bipolar case, virtually all of the lithium is bound to low-molecular-weight proteins (approx 1000 amu), whereas in the normal case, most of the lithium eluted from the gel column was bound to five high-molecular-weight proteins (approx 50,000 amu to approx 1,000,000 amu). The gel elution profiles for boron were roughly similar for the normal and bipolar cases. The lithium results are in agreement with our previous speculation that lithium-binding plasma proteins are missing or exist in very low concentrations in some individuals suffering from affective disorders.

  2. Abnormal high-energy phosphate molecule metabolism during regional brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, C; Du, F; Ravichandran, C; Goldbach, J R; Thida, T; Lin, P; Dora, B; Gelda, J; O'Connor, L; Sehovic, S; Gruber, S; Ongur, D; Cohen, B M

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests bioenergetic abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). In the brain, phosphocreatine (PCr) acts a reservoir of high-energy phosphate (HEP) bonds, and creatine kinases (CK) catalyze the transfer of HEP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to PCr and from PCr back to ATP, at times of increased need. This study examined the activity of this mechanism in BD by measuring the levels of HEP molecules during a stimulus paradigm that increased local energy demand. Twenty-three patients diagnosed with BD-I and 22 healthy controls (HC) were included. Levels of phosphorus metabolites were measured at baseline and during visual stimulation in the occipital lobe using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4T. Changes in metabolite levels showed different patterns between the groups. During stimulation, HC had significant reductions in PCr but not in ATP, as expected. In contrast, BD patients had significant reductions in ATP but not in PCr. In addition, PCr/ATP ratio was lower at baseline in patients, and there was a higher change in this measure during stimulation. This pattern suggests a disease-related failure to replenish ATP from PCr through CK enzyme catalysis during tissue activation. Further studies measuring the CK flux in BD are required to confirm and extend this finding.

  3. Heredity in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    AMERIO, Andrea; TONNA, Matteo; ODONE, Anna; STUBBS, Brendon; GHAEMI, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Summary Partly due to the overlap of symptom groupings in DSM, psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the key nosological question about this condition – whether they are two distinct disorders or a subtype of one of the disorders – remains unresolved. In order to help address this unanswered question, we updated our recent systematic review, searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to specifically investigate the heredity in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 8 relevant papers, the majority of which found that, compared to non-BD-OCD patients, BD-OCD patients were more likely to have a family history for mood disorders and less likely to have a family history for OCD. These results support the view that the majority of cases of comorbid BD-OCD are, in fact, BD cases. If confirmed in larger, more focused studies, this conclusion would have important nosological and clinical implications. PMID:26977128

  4. Heredity in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, Andrea; Tonna, Matteo; Odone, Anna; Stubbs, Brendon; Ghaemi, S Nassir

    2015-10-01

    Partly due to the overlap of symptom groupings in DSM, psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). However, the key nosological question about this condition - whether they are two distinct disorders or a subtype of one of the disorders - remains unresolved. In order to help address this unanswered question, we updated our recent systematic review, searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to specifically investigate the heredity in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 8 relevant papers, the majority of which found that, compared to non-BD-OCD patients, BD-OCD patients were more likely to have a family history for mood disorders and less likely to have a family history for OCD. These results support the view that the majority of cases of comorbid BD-OCD are, in fact, BD cases. If confirmed in larger, more focused studies, this conclusion would have important nosological and clinical implications.

  5. Systematic screening for mutations in the human serotonin 1F receptor gene in patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Harms, H.; Erdmann, J.; Propping, P.; Noethen, M.M.

    1996-04-09

    Using single strand conformational analysis we screened the complete coding sequence of the serotonin 1F (5-HT{sub 1F}) receptor gene for the presence of DNA sequence variation in a sample of 137 unrelated individuals including 45 schizophrenic patients, 46 bipolar patients, as well as 46 healthy controls. We detected only three rare sequence variants which are characterized by single base pair substitutions, namely a silent T{r_arrow}A transversion in the third position of codon 261 (encoding isoleucine), a silent C{r_arrow}T transition in the third position of codon 176 (encoding histidine), and a C{r_arrow}T transition in position -78 upstream from the start codon. The lack of significant mutations in patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder indicates that the 5-HT{sub 1F} receptor is not commonly involved in the etiology of these diseases. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Burden, coping and needs for support of caregivers for patients with a bipolar disorder: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, T Y G; Goossens, P J J; van der Bijl, J J

    2007-10-01

    This study was aimed to highlight the factors which influence experienced burden, coping and needs for support of caregivers for patients with a bipolar disorder. Research articles meeting content and methodological quality criteria from January 1995 through October 2005 were reviewed. High objective and subjective burden is experienced by these caregivers. Subjective burden is extremely influenced by illness beliefs. High burden is associated more with severity of symptoms (than diagnosis), difficulties in the relationship with patient, lack of support and stigma. Coping is influenced by appraisal and burden. Different phases in the process of caregiving require different coping mechanisms. Little research is available on effectiveness of coping mechanisms and needs for support. Suggestions are nevertheless found in the literature for professional support. Caregivers of patients with a bipolar disorder experience high burden and try to cope in different ways. Little research is available on coping styles and needs for support. However, recommendations can be made to increase support for these caregivers.

  7. The Influence of the Val158Met Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphism on the Personality Traits of Bipolar Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dávila, Wendy; Basterreche, Nieves; Arrue, Aurora; Zamalloa, María I.; Gordo, Estíbaliz; Dávila, Ricardo; González-Torres, Miguel A.; Zumárraga, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Certain personality traits and genetic polymorphisms are contributing factors to bipolar disorder and its symptomatology, and in turn, this syndrome influences personality. The aim of the present study is to compare the personality traits of euthymic bipolar patients with healthy controls and to investigate the effect of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met genotype on those traits. We recruited thirty seven bipolar I patients in euthymic state following a manic episode and thirty healthy controls and evaluated their personality by means of the Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory (version TCI-R-140). We assessed the influence of the polymorphism Val158Met in the COMT gene on the personality of these patients. The patients scored higher than controls in harm avoidance (61.3±12.5 vs. 55.3±8.1) and self-transcendence (45.3±12.8 vs. 32.7±8.2) and scored lower than controls in self-directedness (68.8±13.3 vs. 79.3±8.1), cooperativeness (77.1±9.1 vs. 83.9±6.5) and persistence (60.4±15.1 vs. 67.1±8.9). The novelty seeking dimension associates with the Val158Met COMT genotype; patients with the low catabolic activity genotype, Met/Met, show a higher score than those with the high catabolic activity genotype, Val/Val. Conclusions Suffering from bipolar disorder could have an impact on personality. A greater value in harm avoidance may be a genetic marker for a vulnerability to the development of a psychiatric disorder, but not bipolar disorder particularly, while a low value in persistence may characterize affective disorders or a subgroup of bipolar patients. The association between novelty seeking scores and COMT genotype may be linked with the role dopamine plays in the brain’s reward circuits. PMID:23646156

  8. Efficacy and safety of olanzapine for treatment of patients with bipolar depression: Chinese subpopulation analysis of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Jia Ning; Wu, Sheng Hu; Xue, Hai Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression in bipolar I disorder responds to the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. This subpopulation analysis assessed whether olanzapine is superior to placebo specifically in the treatment of Chinese patients with bipolar I depression. Methods This was a subpopulation analysis of a 6-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel, randomized, placebo-controlled trial among 12 Chinese study centers. Eligible inpatients and outpatients were randomized to olanzapine (5 to 20 mg/day) or placebo. Patients were primarily assessed by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score. Secondary assessments used a range of other efficacy and safety measures. This subpopulation analysis was underpowered to show statistically significant differences between treatment groups. Results In total, 210 patients (mean age 32.9 years at baseline, 54.3% females) were random-ized. Similar proportions of patients treated with olanzapine (75.0%) and placebo (72.9%) completed the double-blind phase. Baseline-to-endpoint least-squares mean ± standard error decrease in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score in the olanzapine group (−13.55±0.80) was similar to that noted in the parent trial (−13.82±0.65). However, the difference between olanzapine and placebo groups was not statistically significant (P=0.44); this finding was also true for the secondary efficacy measures. A post hoc analysis showed a greater emergence of mania in the placebo group, which likely reduced the treatment difference between olanzapine and placebo in the primary efficacy measure. Safety data were consistent with the known safety profile of olanzapine, including a higher incidence of weight gain (≥7%) in the olanzapine group (24.1% vs 1.4%, P<0.001). Conclusion Olanzapine provides similar improvement in depression among Chinese and non-Chinese bipolar I patients. The lack of a statistically significant difference between the olanzapine and placebo groups in this

  9. Efficacy and safety of olanzapine for treatment of patients with bipolar depression: Chinese subpopulation analysis of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cheng, Yan; Wang, Jia Ning; Wu, Sheng Hu; Xue, Hai Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression in bipolar I disorder responds to the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. This subpopulation analysis assessed whether olanzapine is superior to placebo specifically in the treatment of Chinese patients with bipolar I depression. Methods This was a subpopulation analysis of a 6-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel, randomized, placebo-controlled trial among 12 Chinese study centers. Eligible inpatients and outpatients were randomized to olanzapine (5 to 20 mg/day) or placebo. Patients were primarily assessed by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score. Secondary assessments used a range of other efficacy and safety measures. This subpopulation analysis was underpowered to show statistically significant differences between treatment groups. Results In total, 210 patients (mean age 32.9 years at baseline, 54.3% females) were random-ized. Similar proportions of patients treated with olanzapine (75.0%) and placebo (72.9%) completed the double-blind phase. Baseline-to-endpoint least-squares mean ± standard error decrease in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score in the olanzapine group (−13.55±0.80) was similar to that noted in the parent trial (−13.82±0.65). However, the difference between olanzapine and placebo groups was not statistically significant (P=0.44); this finding was also true for the secondary efficacy measures. A post hoc analysis showed a greater emergence of mania in the placebo group, which likely reduced the treatment difference between olanzapine and placebo in the primary efficacy measure. Safety data were consistent with the known safety profile of olanzapine, including a higher incidence of weight gain (≥7%) in the olanzapine group (24.1% vs 1.4%, P<0.001). Conclusion Olanzapine provides similar improvement in depression among Chinese and non-Chinese bipolar I patients. The lack of a statistically significant difference between the olanzapine and placebo groups in this

  10. [Pediatric bipolar disorder - case report of a bipolar patient with disease onset in childhood and adolescence: implications for diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Lackner, N; Birner, A; Bengesser, S A; Reininghaus, B; Kapfhammer, H P; Reininghaus, E

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, intense controversies have evolved about the existence and exact diagnostic criteria of pediatric bipolar affective disorder. The present study aims to discuss pediatric bipolar affective disorder based on the current literature focussing on the diagnostic prospects. Based on a case study, a process of bipolar disorder developed in childhood is depicted exemplarily. Because of the high comorbidity and overlapping symptoms of paediatric bipolar affective disorder and other psychiatric disorders, the major impact of the differential diagnosis has to be stressed. An early diagnosis and the treatment possibilities are discussed.

  11. Neurocognitive dysfunction and psychosocial outcome in patients with bipolar I disorder at 15-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, K. E.; Goldberg, J. F.; Harrow, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing interest in cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder, little is known about its impact on functional outcome relative to affective symptoms. Method A total of 33 bipolar I subjects were evaluated at index hospitalization and prospectively followed up 15 years later. Affective symptoms, cognition, global functioning, work, and social adjustment were assessed at follow-up and analyzed by linear regression. Results Global functional impairment was significantly associated with poor performance on a cognitive measure of processing speed (WAIS Digit Symbol). Digit symbol performance also was the sole significant predictor of social functioning. Neither symptom severity nor course of illness features significantly contributed to global and social functioning. In contrast, verbal learning deficits, recent depression, and lifetime hospitalizations all were independently associated with work disability. Conclusion Processing speed is robustly associated with social and global functioning in bipolar disorder. Poor work functioning is significantly related to subsyndromal depression, course of illness, and verbal learning deficits. Cognitive and mood symptoms warrant consideration as independent determinants of functioning in patients with bipolar disorder many years after an index manic episode. PMID:20637012

  12. A limit cycle oscillator model for cycling mood variations of bipolar disorder patients derived from cellular biochemical reaction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.

    2013-08-01

    We derive a nonlinear limit cycle model for oscillatory mood variations as observed in patients with cycling bipolar disorder. To this end, we consider two signaling pathways leading to the activation of two enzymes that play a key role for cellular and neural processes. We model pathway cross-talk in terms of an inhibitory impact of the first pathway on the second and an excitatory impact of the second on the first. The model also involves a negative feedback loop (inhibitory self-regulation) for the first pathway and a positive feedback loop (excitatory self-regulation) for the second pathway. We demonstrate that due to the cross-talk the biochemical dynamics is described by an oscillator equation. Under disease-free conditions the oscillatory system exhibits a stable fixed point. The breakdown of the self-inhibition of the first pathway at higher concentration levels is studied by means of a scalar control parameter ξ, where ξ equal to zero refers to intact self-inhibition at all concentration levels. Under certain conditions, stable limit cycle solutions emerge at critical parameter values of ξ larger than zero. These oscillations mimic pathological cycling mood variations that emerge due to a disease-induced bifurcation. Consequently, our modeling analysis supports the notion of bipolar disorder as a dynamical disease. In addition, our study establishes a connection between mechanistic biochemical modeling of bipolar disorder and phenomenological nonlinear oscillator approaches to bipolar disorder suggested in the literature.

  13. Differential expression of exosomal microRNAs in prefrontal cortices of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Banigan, Meredith G; Kao, Patricia F; Kozubek, James A; Winslow, Ashley R; Medina, Juan; Costa, Joan; Schmitt, Andrea; Schneider, Anja; Cabral, Howard; Cagsal-Getkin, Ozge; Vanderburg, Charles R; Delalle, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are cellular secretory vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs). Once secreted, exosomes are able to attach to recipient cells and release miRNAs potentially modulating the function of the recipient cell. We hypothesized that exosomal miRNA expression in brains of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) might differ from controls, reflecting either disease-specific or common aberrations in SZ and BD patients. The sources of the analyzed samples included McLean 66 Cohort Collection (Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center), BrainNet Europe II (BNE, a consortium of 18 brain banks across Europe) and Boston Medical Center (BMC). Exosomal miRNAs from frozen postmortem prefrontal cortices with well-preserved RNA were isolated and submitted to profiling by Luminex FLEXMAP 3D microfluidic device. Multiple statistical analyses of microarray data suggested that certain exosomal miRNAs were differentially expressed in SZ and BD subjects in comparison to controls. RT-PCR validation confirmed that two miRNAs, miR-497 in SZ samples and miR-29c in BD samples, have significantly increased expression when compared to control samples. These results warrant future studies to evaluate the potential of exosome-derived miRNAs to serve as biomarkers of SZ and BD.

  14. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol; Levin, Jennifer B; Cassidy, Kristin A; Perzynski, Adam T; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. Objective The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes. Results Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1) problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing) and 2) emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support). Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD. Conclusion This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual’s coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of this chronic mental illness. PMID:27524888

  15. Decision tree for smart feature extraction from sleep HR in bipolar patients.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Matteo; Mariani, Sara; Bianchi, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is the creation of a completely automatic method for the extraction of informative parameters from peripheral signals recorded through a sensorized T-shirt. The acquired data belong to patients affected from bipolar disorder, and consist of RR series, body movements and activity type. The extracted features, i.e. linear and non-linear HRV parameters in the time domain, HRV parameters in the frequency domain, and parameters indicative of the sleep quality, profile and fragmentation, are of interest for the automatic classification of the clinical mood state. The analysis of this dataset, which is to be performed online and automatically, must address the problems related to the clinical protocol, which also includes a segment of recording in which the patient is awake, and to the nature of the device, which can be sensitive to movements and misplacement. Thus, the decision tree implemented in this study performs the detection and isolation of the sleep period, the elimination of corrupted recording segments and the checking of the minimum requirements of the signals for every parameter to be calculated. PMID:24110866

  16. Fatty acid composition of the postmortem prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Maekawa, Motoko; Toyota, Tomoko; Dean, Brian; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-06-30

    Postmortem brain studies have shown abnormal levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid, in the frontal cortex (particularly the orbitofrontal cortex) of patients with depression, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. However, the results from regions in the frontal cortex other than the orbitofrontal cortex are inconsistent. In this study we investigated whether patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder have abnormalities in PUFA levels in the prefrontal cortex [Brodmann area (BA) 8]. In postmortem studies, fatty acids in the phospholipids of the prefrontal cortex (BA8) were evaluated by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. Specimens were evaluated for patients with schizophrenia (n=15), bipolar disorder (n=15), or major depressive disorder (n=15) and compared with unaffected controls (n=15). In contrast to previous studies, we found no significant differences in the levels of PUFAs or other fatty acids in the prefrontal cortex (BA8) between patients and controls. Subanalysis by sex also showed no significant differences. No significant differences were found in any individual fatty acids between suicide and non-suicide cases. These psychiatric disorders might be characterized by very specific fatty acid compositions in certain areas of the brain, and BA8 might not be involved in abnormalities of PUFA metabolism.

  17. AMYGDALA VOLUME IN DEPRESSED PATIENTS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER ASSESSED USING HIGH RESOLUTION 3T MRI: THE IMPACT OF MEDICATION

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan; Nugent, Allison C.; Bogers, Wendy; Liu, Alice; Sills, Rebecca; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Bain, Earle E.; Price, Joseph L.; Zarate, Carlos; Manji, Husseini K.; Cannon, Dara; Marrett, Sean; Charney, Dennis S.; Drevets, Wayne C.

    2009-01-01

    MRI-based reports of both abnormally increased and decreased amygdala volume in bipolar disorder (BD) have surfaced in the literature. Two major methodological weaknesses characterizing extant studies are treatment with medication and inaccurate segmentation of the amygdala due to limitations in spatial and tissue contrast resolution. Here, we acquired high-resolution images (voxel size=0.55×0.55×0.60mm) using a GE 3T MRI scanner, and a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. The amygdala was manually segmented by one rater blind to diagnosis, using coronal images. Eighteen unmedicated (mean medication-free period 11±10 months) BD subjects were age and gender matched with 18 healthy controls, and 17 medicated (lithium or divalproex) subjects were matched to 17 different controls. The unmedicated BD patients displayed smaller left and right amygdala volumes than their matched control group (p<0.01). Conversely, the BD subjects undergoing medication treatment showed a trend towards greater amygdala volumes than their matched HC sample (p=0.051). Right and left amygdala volumes were larger (p<0.05) or trended larger, respectively, in the medicated BD sample compared with the unmedicated BD sample. The two control groups did not differ from each other in either left or right amygdala volume. BD patients treated with lithium have displayed increased gray matter volume of the cortex and hippocampus relative to untreated BD subjects in previous studies. Here we extend these results to the amygdala. We raise the possibility that neuroplastic changes in the amygdala associated with BD are moderated by some mood stabilizing medications. PMID:19931399

  18. Amygdala volume in depressed patients with bipolar disorder assessed using high resolution 3T MRI: the impact of medication.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan; Nugent, Allison C; Bogers, Wendy; Liu, Alice; Sills, Rebecca; Luckenbaugh, David A; Bain, Earle E; Price, Joseph L; Zarate, Carlos; Manji, Husseini K; Cannon, Dara M; Marrett, Sean; Charney, Dennis S; Drevets, Wayne C

    2010-02-15

    MRI-based reports of both abnormally increased and decreased amygdala volume in bipolar disorder (BD) have surfaced in the literature. Two major methodological weaknesses characterizing extant studies are treatment with medication and inaccurate segmentation of the amygdala due to limitations in spatial and tissue contrast resolution. Here, we acquired high-resolution images (voxel size=0.55 x 0.55 x 0.60 mm) using a GE 3T MRI scanner, and a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. The amygdala was manually segmented by one rater blind to diagnosis, using coronal images. Eighteen unmedicated (mean medication-free period 11+/-10 months) BD subjects were age and gender matched with 18 healthy controls, and 17 medicated (lithium or divalproex) subjects were matched to 17 different controls. The unmedicated BD patients displayed smaller left and right amygdala volumes than their matched control group (p<0.01). Conversely, the BD subjects undergoing medication treatment showed a trend towards greater amygdala volumes than their matched HC sample (p=0.051). Right and left amygdala volumes were larger (p<0.05) or trended larger, respectively, in the medicated BD sample compared with the unmedicated BD sample. The two control groups did not differ from each other in either left or right amygdala volume. BD patients treated with lithium have displayed increased gray matter volume of the cortex and hippocampus relative to untreated BD subjects in previous studies. Here we extend these results to the amygdala. We raise the possibility that neuroplastic changes in the amygdala associated with BD are moderated by some mood stabilizing medications. PMID:19931399

  19. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls.

    PubMed

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; de la Serna, Elena; Romero, Soledad; Calvo, Anna; Sánchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Padrós-Fornieles, Marta; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bargalló, Núria; Frangou, Sophia; Sugranyes, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7-19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27), offspring of patients with BD (N = 39) and offspring of community control parents (N = 40). We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26885824

  20. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; de la Serna, Elena; Romero, Soledad; Calvo, Anna; Sánchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Padrós-Fornieles, Marta; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bargalló, Núria; Frangou, Sophia; Sugranyes, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7–19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27), offspring of patients with BD (N = 39) and offspring of community control parents (N = 40). We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26885824

  1. A Naturalistic, Single-blind Comparison of Rapid Dose Administration of Divalproex ER Versus Quetiapine in Patients with Acute Bipolar Mania

    PubMed Central

    Galangue, Barbara; MacDonald, Kai; Cobb, Patrice; Dinca, Ana; Becker, Olga; Cooper, J.; Hadley, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Objective: When treating acute bipolar mania, the speed of onset of anti-manic effects is crucial. Quetiapine and divalproex ER are widely used agents to treat acute mania. Rapid dose administration regimens for divalproex ER and for quetiapine have been described. We conducted a naturalistic, head-to-head, pilot study comparing the efficacy and safety of rapidly titrated divalproex ER and quetiapine in acutely manic inpatients, with the primary outcome being improvement within the first seven days. Method: Thirty consenting bipolar patients with acute mania (Young Mania Rating Scale >17 ) needing hospitalization due to acute mania were randomized to receive rapidly loaded divalproex ER (30mg/kg/day) or rapidly titrated quetiapine (200mg Day 1, raised by 200mg/day up to 800mg as tolerated). Assessments were made on Day 1 (baseline), Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, and Day 21 and included Young Mania Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impressions-Severity, Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Raters but not patients or treating physicians were blinded (single-blinded study). Results: Subjects in both treatment groups exhibited significant and rapid improvement in their mania starting at Day 3 with few significant adverse effects; however, there were no significant differences in the degree or rate of improvement between the two treatment groups in any of the efficacy or adverse effects scales. Conclusion: Results of this small study indicate that rapid-dose administration of both quetiapine and divalproex ER produce rapid improvement in acute mania within the first seven days and both seem to be well tolerated. PMID:21311705

  2. Genes involved in pruning and inflammation are enriched in a large mega-sample of patients affected by Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder and controls.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Marco; Marco, Calabrò; Drago, Antonio; Antonio, Drago; Sidoti, Antonina; Antonina, Sidoti; Serretti, Alessandro; Alessandro, Serretti; Crisafulli, Concetta; Concetta, Crisafulli

    2015-08-30

    A molecular pathway analysis has been performed in order to complement previous genetic investigations on Schizophrenia. 4486 Schizophrenic patients and 4477 controls served as the investigation sample. 3521 Bipolar patients and 3195 controls served as replication sample. A molecular pathway associated with the neuronal pruning activity was found to be enriched in subjects with Schizophrenia compared to controls. HLA-C and HLA-DRA had more SNPs associated with both Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder than expected by chance.

  3. Bipolar and borderline patients display differential patterns of functional connectivity among resting state networks.

    PubMed

    Das, Pritha; Calhoun, Vince; Malhi, Gin S

    2014-09-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and borderline personality (BPD) disorder share clinical features such as emotional lability and poor interpersonal functioning but the course of illness and treatment differs in these groups, which suggests that the underlying neurobiology of BD and BPD is likely to be different. Understanding the neural mechanisms behind the pathophysiology of BD and BPD will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform the administration of targeted treatment. Since deficits in social cognition or emotion regulation or in the self-referential processing system can give rise to these clinical features, and impairment in these domains have been observed in both patient groups, functional connectivity within and between networks subserving these processes during resting was investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Data were acquired from 16 patients with BD, 14 patients with BPD, and 13 healthy controls (HC) and functional connectivity strength was correlated with scores using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Functional network connectivity (FNC) patterns differentiated BD and BPD patients from HC. In BD, FNC was increased while in BPD it was decreased. In BD impaired FNC was evident primarily among networks involved in self-referential processing while in BPD it also involved the emotion regulatory network. Impaired FNC displayed an association with impulsivity in BPD and emotional clarity and emotional awareness in BD. This study shows that BD and BPD can perhaps be differentiated using resting state FNC approach and that the neural mechanisms underpinning overlapping symptoms discernibly differ between the groups. These findings provide a potential platform for elucidating the targeted effects of psychological interventions in both disorders.

  4. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  5. Bipolar deep brain stimulation permits routine EKG, EEG, and polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Frysinger, Robert C; Quigg, Mark; Elias, W Jeffrey

    2006-01-24

    As the population of patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) grows and the patients age, more will require routine or emergent electrophysiologic tests. DBS artifact may render these uninterpretable, whereas stopping DBS may release symptoms that confound evaluation. The authors find that monopolar, but not bipolar, stimulation produces significant artifact during EKG, EEG, and polysomnography.

  6. Increased DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, A S; Vinberg, M; Poulsen, H E; Kessing, L V; Munkholm, K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder (BD) and the associated medical burden are unclear. Damage generated by oxidation of nucleosides may be implicated in BD pathophysiology; however, evidence from in vivo studies is limited and the extent of state-related alterations is unclear. This prospective study investigated for we believe the first time the damage generated by oxidation of DNA and RNA strictly in patients with type I BD in a manic or mixed state and subsequent episodes and remission compared with healthy control subjects. Urinary excretion of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxoGuo), valid markers of whole-body DNA and RNA damage by oxidation, respectively, was measured in 54 patients with BD I and in 35 healthy control subjects using a modified ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry assay. Repeated measurements were evaluated in various affective phases during a 6- to 12-month period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Independent of lifestyle and demographic variables, a 34% (P<0.0001) increase in RNA damage by oxidation across all affective states, including euthymia, was found in patients with BD I compared with healthy control subjects. Increases in DNA and RNA oxidation of 18% (P<0.0001) and 8% (P=0.02), respectively, were found in manic/hypomanic states compared with euthymia, and levels of 8-oxodG decreased 15% (P<0.0001) from a manic or mixed episode to remission. The results indicate a role for DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in BD pathophysiology and a potential for urinary 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo to function as biological markers of diagnosis, state and treatment response in BD. PMID:27505230

  7. Increased DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in patients with bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, A S; Vinberg, M; Poulsen, H E; Kessing, L V; Munkholm, K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder (BD) and the associated medical burden are unclear. Damage generated by oxidation of nucleosides may be implicated in BD pathophysiology; however, evidence from in vivo studies is limited and the extent of state-related alterations is unclear. This prospective study investigated for we believe the first time the damage generated by oxidation of DNA and RNA strictly in patients with type I BD in a manic or mixed state and subsequent episodes and remission compared with healthy control subjects. Urinary excretion of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-guanosine (8-oxoGuo), valid markers of whole-body DNA and RNA damage by oxidation, respectively, was measured in 54 patients with BD I and in 35 healthy control subjects using a modified ultraperformance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry assay. Repeated measurements were evaluated in various affective phases during a 6- to 12-month period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Independent of lifestyle and demographic variables, a 34% (P<0.0001) increase in RNA damage by oxidation across all affective states, including euthymia, was found in patients with BD I compared with healthy control subjects. Increases in DNA and RNA oxidation of 18% (P<0.0001) and 8% (P=0.02), respectively, were found in manic/hypomanic states compared with euthymia, and levels of 8-oxodG decreased 15% (P<0.0001) from a manic or mixed episode to remission. The results indicate a role for DNA and RNA damage by oxidation in BD pathophysiology and a potential for urinary 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo to function as biological markers of diagnosis, state and treatment response in BD. PMID:27505230

  8. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality. PMID:26172635

  9. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality.

  10. Effects of Omega-3 Supplement in the Treatment of Patients with Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shakeri, Jalal; Khanegi, Maryam; Golshani, Sanobar; Farnia, Vahid; Tatari, Faeze; Alikhani, Mostafa; Nooripour, Roghih; Ghezelbash, Mohammad Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fatty acids play various physiological roles in the organism; they are crucial for the structure of cell membranes, metabolic processes, transmission of nerve impulses and brain functions. In recent years, particular attention has been paid to the rich sources of omega-3 for the treatment of many diseases, especially mental illnesses. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of omega-3 supplement in the treatment of patients with bipolar I disorder (BID). Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial, 100 patients suffering from BIDs were randomly divided into two, i.e. control (n = 50) and experimental (n = 50) groups. In addition to the other standard treatments, 1000 mg of omega-3 supplement was given to the experimental group on daily basis for 3 months and placebo was given to the control group. The Young Mania Rating Scale was completed for both groups before and after the intervention. Afterward, data were analyzed using paired t-test, independent t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: Before intervention, mean severity of mania in the experimental group (23.50 ± 7.02) and control group (23.70 ± 8.09) was not significant (P ≤ 0.89). The difference after the intervention in the experimental group (10.64 ± 3.3) and control group (20.12 ± 6.78) was significant (P < 0.01). The mean intensity of mania before (23.50 ± 7.02) and after (10.64 ± 3.3) intervention reported to be significant at P < 0.05. Conclusions: Since omega-3 supplement was effective for the treatment of BID, it is suggested to use omega-3 supplements as an adjuvant therapy along with the other pharmacotherapies. PMID:27280013

  11. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  12. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonemia in a Long Time Treated Patient.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Seide, Margaret; Stern, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient who had been on long time valproic acid for treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While being an inpatient, serology ammonia level testing revealed a very high ammonia level despite being asymptomatic. Dual therapy of carnitine and lactulose was provided to the patient for treatment of the hyperammonemia. It should also be noted that, during this treatment, valproic acid was not stopped. Consequently, this case illustrates that patients can present asymptomatically despite very high ammonia levels and hyperammonemia can occur in chronic valproic acid despite not increasing the dose of the medication and psychiatrists do not need to discontinue valproic acid in the presence of elevated levels of ammonia if the patient shows no signs of encephalopathy or delirium. PMID:27516916

  13. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD) monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ), which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points). They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores) were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. PMID:27274258

  14. Correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Chunling; Cheng, Lijun; Reilly, James L; Bishop, Jeffrey R; Sweeney, John A; Chen, Hua-yun; Gershon, Elliot S; Liu, Chunyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aberrant DNA methylation and gene expression have been reported in postmortem brain tissues of psychotic patients, but until now there has been no systematic evaluation of synergistic changes in methylation and expression on a genome-wide scale from brain tissue. Methods In this study, genome-wide methylation and expression analysis were performed on cerebellum samples from 39 patients with schizophrenia, 36 patients with bipolar disorder, and 43 unaffected controls, to screen for the correlation in gene expression and CpG methylation. Results Out of 71,753 CpG Gene Pairs (CGPs) tested across the genome, 204 were found to significantly correlate with gene expression after correction for multiple testing [p < 0.05, false discovery rate (FDR) q < 0.05]. The correlated CGPs were tested for disease-associated expression and methylation by comparing psychotic patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to healthy controls. Four of the identified CGPs were found to significantly correlate with the differential expression and methylation of the PIK3R1, BTN3A3, NHLH1, and SLC16A7 in psychotic patients (p < 0.05, FDR q < 0.2). Additional expression and methylation datasets were used to validate the relationship between DNA methylation, gene expression, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Conclusions These results suggest that the identified differentially expressed genes with an aberrant methylation pattern can represent novel candidate factors in the etiology and pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25243493

  15. Nicotine dependence and psychosis in Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Elena; Hartz, Sarah; Tran, Jeffrey; Hilty, Donald; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with Bipolar disorder smoke more than the general population. Smoking negatively impacts mortality and clinical course in Bipolar disorder patients. Prior studies have shown contradictory results regarding the impact of psychosis on smoking behavior in Bipolar disorder. We analyzed a large sample of Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients and predicted those with a history of psychosis would be more likely to be nicotine dependent. Methods Data from subjects and controls were collected from the Genomic Psychiatry Cohort (GPC). Subjects were diagnosed with Bipolar disorder without psychosis (N=610), Bipolar disorder with psychosis (N=1591), and Schizoaffective Disorder, Bipolar Type (N=1544). Participants were classified with or without nicotine dependence. Diagnostic groups were compared to controls (N=10065) using logistic regression. Results Among smokers (N=6157), those with Bipolar disorder had an increased risk of nicotine dependence (OR=2.5; p<0.0001). Patients with Bipolar disorder with psychosis were more likely to be dependent than Bipolar disorder patients without psychosis (OR=1.3; p=0.03). Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients had more risk of nicotine dependence when compared to Bipolar disorder patients with or without psychosis (OR=1.2; p=0.02). Conclusions Bipolar disorder patients experiencing more severity of psychosis have more risk of nicotine dependence. PMID:26467098

  16. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia

  18. Stigma and its correlates among patients with bipolar disorder: A study from a tertiary care hospital of North India.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Hazari, Nandita; Aneja, Jitender; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2016-10-30

    This study aimed to assess stigma and its sociodemographic and clinical correlates among patients with bipolar disorder while in remission. 185 patients currently in remission were assessed on Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMIS) for internalized stigma, Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue Stigma Scale for perceived stigma and Participation scale for restriction of activities. About 28% patients reported moderate to high level of self stigma as assessed by ISMIS total score. Discrimination experience (38.9%) was reported to be the most commonly experienced self stigma followed by alienation (28.6%) and social withdrawal (28.6%). On the participation scale, about two-fifth (42%) of the participants had severe restriction of activities. Internalized stigma was higher among those with lower age and lesser income. Higher level of stigma was associated with shorter mean duration of remission, income, mean duration of depressive episodes, higher severity of residual depressive symptoms and current level of functioning. Higher internalized stigma was associated with greater restriction in participation of activities. To conclude, present study suggests that self stigma is highly prevalent among patients with bipolar disorder in India and is associated with clinical variables like duration of depressive episodes and level of functioning. PMID:27479100

  19. Facial Emotion Processing in Acutely Ill and Euthymic Patients with Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; Pavuluri, Mani N.; Herbener, Ellen S.; Harral, Erin M.; Sweeney, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Past investigations indicate facial emotion-processing abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) subjects. However, the extent to which these deficits represent state- and trait-related factors is unclear. We investigated facial affect processing in acutely ill and clinically stabilized children with PBD and matched healthy…

  20. [Psychoeducation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    In treating bipolar disorder, specific psychotherapies in adjunct to pharmacotherapy have been shown to be effective in preventing new episodes and treating depressive episodes. Among those, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) developed by Frank, amalgamation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with behavioral therapy focused on social rhythm has been shown to be an efficacious adjunct to mediation in preventing new episodes in bipolar I patients and in treating depression in bipolar I arid II disorder. IPSRT has also been shown to enhance total functioning, relationship functioning and life satisfaction among patients with bipolar disorder, even after pretreatment functioning and concurrent depression were covaried. IPSRT was designed to directly address the major pathways to recurrence in bipolar disorder, namely medication nonadherence, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. IPT, originated by Klerman et al., is a strategic time-limited psychotherapy focused on one or two of four current interpersonal problem areas (ie, grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal dificits). In IPSRT, the fifth problem area "grief for the lost healthy self" has been added in order to promote acceptance of the diagnosis and the need for life-long treatment. Social rhythm therapy is a behavioral approach aiming at increasing regularity of social rhythms using the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), a chart to record daily social activities including how stimulating they were, developed from observation that disruptions in social rhythms often trigger affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. IPSRT also appears to be a promising intervention for a subset of individuals with bipolar II depression as monotherapy for the acute treatment.

  1. Bipolar disorder in general practice: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Piterman, Leon; Jones, Kay M; Castle, David J

    2010-08-16

    General practitioners are involved in the continuing care and shared care of patients with chronic mental illness, including bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists are particularly reliant on GPs to monitor and treat comorbidities as well as the psychiatric condition itself. Management of chronic mental illness is compromised by a number of factors, including problems with diagnosis, physical comorbidity, erratic attendance and poor compliance with treatment. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder is often delayed, and differential diagnoses to be considered include unipolar depression, anxiety disorder, drug and alcohol dependence, personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and general medical and central nervous system diseases. New Medicare items have been introduced under the Better Access to Mental Health Care initiative. However, uptake for patients with chronic psychiatric illness, including bipolar disorder, is low. Patients with bipolar disorder may be prone to a range of comorbid psychological, social and physical problems, and GPs need to be vigilant to detect and manage comorbidity and social problems as part of the overall plan. This includes assistance with certification for sickness and unemployment benefits. GPs may become involved during crises affecting patients and this may pose significant problems for GPs who need to provide ongoing care following patient discharge from hospital. Despite these difficulties, opportunities exist for GPs to play a vital and ongoing role in the management of patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:20712554

  2. Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in the University Student Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federman, Russ

    2011-01-01

    University counseling centers are faced with the challenge of effectively treating bipolar students while also utilizing brief treatment frameworks and managing high patient volumes. Potential destabilization, particularly within the elevated mood phase, poses significant behavioral management issues for university clinicians and administrators,…

  3. Reassessing Medical Students' Willingness to Treat HIV-Infected Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Darren; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Surveyed 297 matriculating medical students at 3 Chicago medical schools concerning their willingness to treat HIV-infected patients. Found that 92% of the students agreed that patients with HIV would be welcome in their medical practices. Fear of infection and homophobia were associated with decreased willingness to treat. (MDM)

  4. Treating the elderly diabetic patient: special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kezerle, Louise; Shalev, Leah; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the >65 year-old group. The challenge of defining the goals of therapy arises from the heterogeneity of the aging process and the sparse clinical data in this patient population. In light of these challenges, the clinician should be aware of the pitfalls of caring for the older diabetic patient and prioritize an individualized treatment plan to ensure an optimal glycemic control, without placing the patient at unnecessary risk. We present a review of the current guidelines and literature that deal specifically with the treatment of the older diabetic patient in order to establish the principles of treatment in this age group and help the clinician make decisions regarding the care of these patients. PMID:25210468

  5. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... or digestive problems Problems sleeping, or wanting to sleep all of the time Feeling tired all of the time Thoughts about death and suicide Causes & Risk Factors What causes bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder may be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. It sometimes runs in ...

  6. Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearing, Melissa

    Bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, affects approximately one percent of the population. It commonly occurs in late adolescence and is often unrecognized. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made on the basis of symptoms, course of illness, and when possible, family history. Thoughts of suicide are…

  7. Treating a physician patient with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jacob L; Crow, Fredrick F; Gutheil, Thomas G; Sanchez, Luis T; Suzuki, Joji

    2012-06-01

    The authors present a case of a psychotic female patient who is a former graduate of a locally prestigious medical school and has subsequently been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The patient entered treatment in an outpatient clinic following discharge from her 11th hospitalization. This hospitalization was initiated after the patient's physician friend had called the police and notified them that the patient was significantly disorganized to warrant further evaluation. Treatment was characterized by significant transference and counter-transference reactions amongst her clinicians - both treatment-promoting and treatment-interfering - based on her status as a physician. The problem of insight was a significant hurdle in the treatment of the patient as her medical knowledge of mental illness was substantially greater than her insight into her own mental illness. Throughout treatment, a number of medical-legal and ethical issues arose. Initially, the question was raised as to the legality of the actions by the patient's friend-having made a clinical assessment without having a clinical role in the patient's care. As the patient's clinical status improved and she sought to re-enter the medical field as a resident, new medical legal issues surfaced. What were the roles of the patient's treaters in maintaining confidentiality and simultaneously ensuring the safety of patients that the psychotic physician might care for? This case highlights the universality of psychiatric vulnerability. Insight in psychosis as well as the transference and counter-transference issues involved in caring for a psychotic physician are discussed. Additionally, a thorough medical-legal discussion addresses the various complexities of caring for a psychotic physician. PMID:22813669

  8. Characterization of depressive States in bipolar patients using wearable textile technology and instantaneous heart rate variability assessment.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Gentili, Claudio; Lanata, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of cognitive and autonomic responses to emotionally relevant stimuli could provide a viable solution for the automatic recognition of different mood states, both in normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we present a methodological application describing a novel system based on wearable textile technology and instantaneous nonlinear heart rate variability assessment, able to characterize the autonomic status of bipolar patients by considering only electrocardiogram recordings. As a proof of this concept, our study presents results obtained from eight bipolar patients during their normal daily activities and being elicited according to a specific emotional protocol through the presentation of emotionally relevant pictures. Linear and nonlinear features were computed using a novel point-process-based nonlinear autoregressive integrative model and compared with traditional algorithmic methods. The estimated indices were used as the input of a multilayer perceptron to discriminate the depressive from the euthymic status. Results show that our system achieves much higher accuracy than the traditional techniques. Moreover, the inclusion of instantaneous higher order spectra features significantly improves the accuracy in successfully recognizing depression from euthymia.

  9. The role of mood stabilisers in the treatment of the depressive facet of bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Prica, Corina

    2007-01-01

    It was previously shown that available mood stabilisers are used to treat bipolar depression. As part of the natural course of illness, patients with bipolar disorder often suffer from episodes of depression more frequently and for longer durations than mania. A major challenge in the treatment of bipolar depression is the tendency for antidepressant medications, particularly tricyclic antidepressants, to precipitate episodes of mania, or to increase cycle frequency or symptom intensity. Thus, exploring the utility of mood stabilisers as monotherapy for bipolar depression is important. The aim of this review it to collate data involving the effects of some mood stabilisers like lithium, carbamazepine, valproate and lamotrigine in depressive aspects of bipolar disorder, but as well using an animal model of depression, to understand their mechanism of action.

  10. Homophobia: How Physicians Treat Homosexual Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Christiane

    1982-01-01

    Doctors tend to be uncomfortable with homosexual patients, who make up a large part of an average practice. Homosexuality lies along the continuum of sexual expression and should not be considered a perversion. To a greater or lesser extent, it is present in all people, and is acted upon in a variety of ways. Physicians should be aware of the homosexual patient's lifestyle in order to give the best medical care. The epidemiology of disease differs in the homosexual and heterosexual population. PMID:21286083

  11. Treating venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piatek, Caroline; O’Connell, Casey L; Liebman, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer. Although much is known about the factors that contribute to VTE risk, pre-emptive therapy in high-risk populations is clearly indicated in only a few clinical situations. Low-molecular-weight heparin is still the recommended class of anticoagulants for cancer-associated VTE. Management of VTE in patients with renal failure, hemorrhagic brain metastases, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy remains challenging with few safe and effective alternatives. Novel oral agents are currently being investigated and may play a role in the future in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE. PMID:22475288

  12. The difficult to treat insomniac patient.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J A

    1993-01-01

    When a complaint of significant insomnia does not respond to standard interventions, the clinician must reassess the diagnosis with particular emphasis on psychiatric or psychological factors. This article describes the management of patients with 'sleeping pill insomnia,' insomnia associated with affective illness, sleep state misperception, 'sick role' behavior and treatment non-compliance. PMID:8445586

  13. The difficult to treat insomniac patient.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J A

    1993-01-01

    When a complaint of significant insomnia does not respond to standard interventions, the clinician must reassess the diagnosis with particular emphasis on psychiatric or psychological factors. This article describes the management of patients with 'sleeping pill insomnia,' insomnia associated with affective illness, sleep state misperception, 'sick role' behavior and treatment non-compliance.

  14. Bipolar cemented hip hemiarthroplasty in patients with femoral neck fracture who are on hemodialysis is associated with risk of stem migration

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, Robert; Karwanski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral neck fractures are considerably more common in patients on hemodialysis than in the general population. We determined the outcome of bipolar hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture in patients with long-term hemodialysis and compared it with that of a matched-paired group of patients with intact renal function. Methods We analyzed 26 bipolar hemiarthroplasties in 23 hemodialysed patients with a mean age of 56 (41–78) years who were followed for mean 3.6 (1–8) years. These cases were matched for age, sex, and BMI with 26 patients with femoral neck fractures and normal renal function. The mean follow-up time in the control group was 7 (5–10) years. As primary surgery for their femoral neck fracture, all patients had a bipolar hemiarthroplasty with a 28-mm metal-polyethylene internal articulation and a cemented stem. Results The mortality rate was 21% in the hemodialysed group and 4% in the control group (p = 0.005). The bipolar head migrated in 1 patient in the hemodialysed group but in none of the patients in the case-matched group. In the hemodialysed group, 8 stems migrated and 3 of these were revised, whereas in the control group 3 stems migrated and 2 were revised. The stem migration in the hemodialysed group was not preceded by the development of osteolysis or radiolucent lines at the bone-cement interface. The cumulative survival for prosthesis migration as endpoint was 44% at 5 years in the hemodialysed group and 96% in the control group (p = 0.03). Interpretation The main mode of failure of cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasties in hemodialysed patients is stem migration, due to failure of the bone-cement interface. PMID:19404798

  15. A single nucleotide polymorphism in glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta promoter gene influences onset of illness in patients affected by bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Bernasconi, Alessandro; Lorenzi, Cristina; Pontiggia, Adriana; Serretti, Alessandro; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2004-01-23

    Genetic studies in medicine exploited age of onset as a criterion to delineate subgroups of illness. Bipolar patients stratified with this criterion were shown to share clinical characteristics and patterns of inheritance of illness. The molecular mechanisms driving the biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus may play a role in mood disorders. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (-50 T/C) falling into the effective promoter region (nt -171 to +29) of the gene coding for glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3-beta) has been identified. GSK3-beta codes for an enzyme which is a target for the action of lithium and which is also known to regulate circadian rhythms in Drosophila. We studied the effect of this polymorphism on the age at onset of bipolar disorder type I. A homogeneous sample of 185 Italian patients affected by bipolar disorder was genotyped. Age at onset was retrospectively ascertained with best estimation procedures. No association was detected between GSK3-beta -50 T/C SNP and the presence of bipolar illness. Homozygotes for the wild variant (T/T) showed an earlier age at onset than carriers of the mutant allele (F=5.53, d.f.=2,182, P=0.0047). Results warrant interest for the variants of genes pertaining to the molecular clock as possible endophenotypes of bipolar disorder, but caution ought to be taken in interpreting these preliminary results and future replication studies must be awaited.

  16. Significant Treatment Effect of Bupropion in Patients With Bipolar Disorder but Similar Phase-Shifting Rate as Other Antidepressants: A Meta-Analysis Following the PRISMA Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-03-01

    Bupropion is widely used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), and especially those with depressive mood, based on its good treatment effect, safety profile, and lower risk of phase shifting. However, increasing evidence indicates that the safety of bupropion in BD patients may not be as good as previously thought. The aim of this study was to summarize data on the treatment effect and safety profile of bupropion in the treatment of BD via a meta-analysis. Electronic search through PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. The inclusion criteria were: (i) studies comparing changes in disease severity before and after bupropion treatment or articles comparing the treatment effect of bupropion in BD patients with those receiving other standard treatments; (ii) articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were (i) case reports/series, and (ii) nonclinical trials. All effect sizes from 10 clinical trials were pooled using a random effects model. We examined the possible confounding variables using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Bupropion significantly improved the severity of disease in BD patients (P < 0.001), and the treatment effect was similar to other antidepressants/standard treatments (P = 0.220). There were no significant differences in the dropout rate (P = 0.285) and rate of phase shifting (P = 0.952) between BD patients who received bupropion and those who received other antidepressants. We could not perform a detailed meta-analysis of every category of antidepressant, nor could we rule out the possible confounding effect of concurrent psychotropics or include all drug side effects. Furthermore, the number of studies recruited in the meta-analysis was relatively small. Our findings reconfirm the benefits of bupropion for the treatment of bipolar depression, which are similar to those of other antidepressants. However, the rate of phase shifting with bupropion usage was not as low compared to other antidepressants as

  17. Significant Treatment Effect of Bupropion in Patients With Bipolar Disorder but Similar Phase-Shifting Rate as Other Antidepressants: A Meta-Analysis Following the PRISMA Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-03-01

    Bupropion is widely used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), and especially those with depressive mood, based on its good treatment effect, safety profile, and lower risk of phase shifting. However, increasing evidence indicates that the safety of bupropion in BD patients may not be as good as previously thought. The aim of this study was to summarize data on the treatment effect and safety profile of bupropion in the treatment of BD via a meta-analysis. Electronic search through PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. The inclusion criteria were: (i) studies comparing changes in disease severity before and after bupropion treatment or articles comparing the treatment effect of bupropion in BD patients with those receiving other standard treatments; (ii) articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were (i) case reports/series, and (ii) nonclinical trials. All effect sizes from 10 clinical trials were pooled using a random effects model. We examined the possible confounding variables using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Bupropion significantly improved the severity of disease in BD patients (P < 0.001), and the treatment effect was similar to other antidepressants/standard treatments (P = 0.220). There were no significant differences in the dropout rate (P = 0.285) and rate of phase shifting (P = 0.952) between BD patients who received bupropion and those who received other antidepressants. We could not perform a detailed meta-analysis of every category of antidepressant, nor could we rule out the possible confounding effect of concurrent psychotropics or include all drug side effects. Furthermore, the number of studies recruited in the meta-analysis was relatively small. Our findings reconfirm the benefits of bupropion for the treatment of bipolar depression, which are similar to those of other antidepressants. However, the rate of phase shifting with bupropion usage was not as low compared to other antidepressants as

  18. [Neuropsychology of bipolar disorders].

    PubMed

    Rathgeber, Katrin; Gauggel, Siegfried

    2006-03-01

    In this article the contribution of neuropsychological research for a better understanding of the psychopathology of mood disorders is reviewed. First, the broad spectrum of bipolar disorders is described. Second, a selective review of important results of neuropsychological studies with patients with mood disorders is presented. Although several methodological problems limit the interpretation of the findings, there is evidence that patients with a bipolar disorder show a consistent impairment in attention, memory/learning and executive functions. The cognitive deficits are still visible during clinical recovery (euthymia) and closely associated with psychosocial limitation in daily life. Finally, the impact of neuropsychological findings is considered in relation to assessment, treatment and prognosis.

  19. Pseudoproteinuria in tolmetin-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, G E; Wortham, G F

    1975-04-01

    In a clinical study of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug tolmetin, the urines of 5 patients reacted positively when tested for protein by the standard sulfosalicylic acid method. Pseudoproteinuria, due to the precipitation by acid of the major metabolite of tolmetin, was suspected. The urines were subsequently tested for protein by the following alternate methods: solubility of acid precipitate test, heat coagulation test, Upjohn modification of the sulfosalicylic acid test, biuret test, Albustix, and electrophoresis. All were negative for protein. These results confirmed that the reactions with the sulfosalicylic acid test did not indicate true proteinuria but pseudoproteinuria. It is suggested that patients who receive tolmetin be tested for proteinuria by methods other than those involving acid precipitation.

  20. Long-term efficacy of a psychological intervention program for patients with refractory bipolar disorder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    González-Isasi, Ana; Echeburúa, Enrique; Mosquera, Fernando; Ibáñez, Berta; Aizpuru, Felipe; González-Pinto, Ana

    2010-04-30

    The aim of this research was to test the long-term efficacy of combined standard treatment (pharmacotherapy and adjunctive psychosocial treatment based on a cognitive-behavioral model) compared with standard drug treatment for patients with recurrent bipolar disorder. Twenty patients selected according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were randomized to 1) combined treatment or 2) control treatment. A multigroup experimental design with repeated assessment measures (pre-treatment, post-treatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up) was used. Results of the repeated measurement analysis showed a significant increment in scores of Global Activity Functioning within the combined treatment group during the follow-up, which was not observed in the control treatment group. Therefore, the effectiveness of psychotherapy tends to increase with time, and this improvement is not significant until 12 months of follow-up.

  1. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto; Wade, Charles E; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Holcomb, John B

    2014-11-13

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids, and red blood cells (RBCs) in the early phase and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid-1990s, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by proactive resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced, and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.

  2. The microtubule-associated molecular pathways may be genetically disrupted in patients with Bipolar Disorder. Insights from the molecular cascades.

    PubMed

    Drago, Antonio; Crisafulli, Concetta; Sidoti, Antonina; Calabrò, Marco; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-15

    Bipolar Disorder is a severe disease characterized by pathological mood swings from major depressive episodes to manic ones and vice versa. The biological underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder have yet to be defined. As a consequence, pharmacological treatments are suboptimal. In the present paper we test the hypothesis that the molecular pathways involved with the direct targets of lithium, hold significantly more genetic variations associated with BD. A molecular pathway approach finds its rationale in the polygenic nature of the disease. The pathways were tested in a sample of ∼ 7,000 patients and controls. Data are available from the public NIMH database. The definition of the pathways was conducted according to the National Cancer Institute (http://pid.nci.nih.gov/). As a result, 3 out of the 18 tested pathways related to lithium action resisted the permutation analysis and were found to be associated with BD. These pathways were related to Reelin, Integrins and Aurora. A pool of genes selected from the ones linked with the above pathways was further investigated in order to identify the fine molecular mechanics shared by our significant pathways and also their link with lithium mechanism of action. The data obtained point out to a possible involvement of microtubule-related mechanics. PMID:26551401

  3. Bipolar Disorder: A Daughter's Experience.

    PubMed

    Khare, Satya Rashi

    2016-09-01

    My father suffered from bipolar disorder. His illness placed an enormous strain on our relationship which, for the most part, was filled with turbulence. Although our family physician played an integral role in supporting my parents throughout the disease, I did not receive the same support and suffered as a consequence. In this essay, I describe my father's manic and major depressive episodes, as well as my emotions that resulted from the experience. Treating mental illness goes beyond just treating the patient but rather encompasses the family as a whole. My relationship with my father may have been different had I learned effective coping strategies through the support of my family physician. PMID:27621165

  4. Bipolar disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of self-esteem Thoughts of death or suicide Trouble getting to sleep or sleeping too much ... with bipolar disorder are at high risk of suicide . They may use alcohol or other substances . This ...

  5. Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... health professional before making a commitment. Learn More Free Booklets and Brochures Bipolar Disorder: A brochure on ... in the public domain and available for use free of charge. Citation of the NIMH is appreciated. ...

  6. Light flashes in cancer patients treated with heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Dieter; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Krämer, Michael; Durante, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Light flashes (phosphenes) are reported by most of the astronauts during spaceflight and patients treated with radiotherapy for brain tumors. They are induced by cosmic ray traversals, but the target area is unknown. With a correlation analysis of the visual sensation and the position of the beam in patients treated with energetic carbon ions for skull base tumors, we demonstrate here that light flashes are elicited only when the energetic particles hit the retina. PMID:22939278

  7. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  8. Bipolar battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    A bipolar battery having a plurality of cells. The bipolar battery includes: a negative electrode; a positive electrode and a separator element disposed between the negative electrode and the positive electrode, the separator element electrically insulating the electrodes from one another; an electrolyte disposed within at least one of the negative electrode, the positive electrode and the separator element; and an electrode containment structure including a cup-like electrode holder.

  9. Pregnancy in acromegaly patients treated with pegvisomant.

    PubMed

    van der Lely, A J; Gomez, Roy; Heissler, Joseph F; Åkerblad, Ann-Charlotte; Jönsson, Peter; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria

    2015-08-01

    To summarize all available data on pregnancy outcome of acromegaly patients exposed to the growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant (PEGV) during pregnancy as present in the Pfizer's Global Safety Database. Pfizer's Global Safety Database contains adverse event data obtained from the following sources: spontaneous reports, health authorities, Pfizer-sponsored post-marketing surveillance program (ACROSTUDY), customer engagement programs, and clinical studies, reported regardless of outcome. The safety database was searched up to 10th March 2014. From the 35 pregnancy cases, 27 involved maternal [mean age (range) 33.3 years (23-41) and 8 paternal (33.7 years (32-38)] PEGV exposure. Two female patients were reported with two pregnancy cases each. Fetal outcome was normal in 14 (4 paternal) of the 18 reported as live birth, while 4 cases (1 paternal) did not specify the birth outcome. At conception, PEGV mean dose (range) was 15.3 mg/d (4.3-30). In 3 cases of maternal exposure of the 18 cases reporting live birth, PEGV was continued throughout the pregnancy in a dose of 12.1 mg/d (10-15). In 5 cases (all maternal) an elective termination of the pregnancy was performed with no reported fetal abnormalities, 2 cases (maternal) reported a non-PEGV-related spontaneous abortion and in 1 maternal case an ectopic pregnancy occurred. In 9 cases (3 paternal), the fetal outcome was not reported. Three women reported gestational diabetes; one woman continued PEGV treatment during pregnancy. Although the number of reported pregnancies with exposure to PEGV is very small, the presented data reflect the largest series of data available to date and do not suggest adverse consequences of PEGV on pregnancy outcome. Nevertheless, it should be stressed that PEGV should not be used during pregnancy unless absolutely necessary. PMID:25542184

  10. Pregnancy in acromegaly patients treated with pegvisomant.

    PubMed

    van der Lely, A J; Gomez, Roy; Heissler, Joseph F; Åkerblad, Ann-Charlotte; Jönsson, Peter; Camacho-Hübner, Cecilia; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria

    2015-08-01

    To summarize all available data on pregnancy outcome of acromegaly patients exposed to the growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant (PEGV) during pregnancy as present in the Pfizer's Global Safety Database. Pfizer's Global Safety Database contains adverse event data obtained from the following sources: spontaneous reports, health authorities, Pfizer-sponsored post-marketing surveillance program (ACROSTUDY), customer engagement programs, and clinical studies, reported regardless of outcome. The safety database was searched up to 10th March 2014. From the 35 pregnancy cases, 27 involved maternal [mean age (range) 33.3 years (23-41) and 8 paternal (33.7 years (32-38)] PEGV exposure. Two female patients were reported with two pregnancy cases each. Fetal outcome was normal in 14 (4 paternal) of the 18 reported as live birth, while 4 cases (1 paternal) did not specify the birth outcome. At conception, PEGV mean dose (range) was 15.3 mg/d (4.3-30). In 3 cases of maternal exposure of the 18 cases reporting live birth, PEGV was continued throughout the pregnancy in a dose of 12.1 mg/d (10-15). In 5 cases (all maternal) an elective termination of the pregnancy was performed with no reported fetal abnormalities, 2 cases (maternal) reported a non-PEGV-related spontaneous abortion and in 1 maternal case an ectopic pregnancy occurred. In 9 cases (3 paternal), the fetal outcome was not reported. Three women reported gestational diabetes; one woman continued PEGV treatment during pregnancy. Although the number of reported pregnancies with exposure to PEGV is very small, the presented data reflect the largest series of data available to date and do not suggest adverse consequences of PEGV on pregnancy outcome. Nevertheless, it should be stressed that PEGV should not be used during pregnancy unless absolutely necessary.

  11. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Combination Pharmacotherapy, Adverse Effects, and Treatment of High-Risk Youth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kiki D

    2016-01-01

    Treating bipolar disorder in pediatric patients is challenging because data from rigorous trials of pharmacotherapy in this population are still not plentiful enough. Furthermore, the treatment of children and adolescents is complicated by the frequent need to combine pharmacotherapies to address all bipolar symptoms as well as this population's elevated risk for experiencing side effects. Additionally, young patients with depressive episodes who are at high risk for developing bipolar disorder need careful treatment to prevent or delay the emergence of mania. Despite these challenges, clinicians should evaluate the existing pediatric literature, extrapolate evidence obtained from adult patients, and draw from clinical experience to guide treatment decisions for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. PMID:27570929

  12. Evidence-Based Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Findling, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is an important component of treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. The body of evidence supporting safe and effective treatments in this population is growing. Available data provide information on the risks and benefits of pharmacologic agents used for acute manic, mixed, and depressive episodes as well as for maintenance treatment. Lithium, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics comprise the armamentarium for treating pediatric bipolar disorder. When selecting treatment, clinicians must consider the efficacy and side effect profile of potential pharmacotherapies, as well as the patient's history, including the presence of comorbidities, in order to develop a treatment plan that will ensure optimal outcomes. PMID:27570928

  13. The DRD3 Ser9Gly Polymorphism Predicted Metabolic Change in Drug-Naive Patients With Bipolar II Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po-See; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I-Hui; Chen, Kao-Ching; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band; Lee, Sheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with bipolar II disorder (BDII) have a higher prevalence rate of metabolic disturbance. Whether BDII itself, in addition to its current standard treatment, is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome warrants additional study. The dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) gene, one of the candidate genes for BDII, is also involved in the dopaminergic system. We investigated whether it is related to changes in the metabolic indices of patients with BDII given 12 weeks of standard treatment. Patients with a first diagnosis of BDII (n = 117) were recruited. Metabolic profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting serum glucose, body mass index) were measured at baseline and at 2, 8, and 12 weeks. The genotype of the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism (rs6280) was determined. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used. Seventy-six (65.0%) patients completed the 12-week intervention. Significant differences in triglyceride change were associated with the DRD3 Ser9Gly genotype (P = 0.03). Patients with the Ser/Ser genotype had significantly smaller triglyceride increases and a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome than did those with the Ser/Gly+Gly/Gly genotype. However, the associations between the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism with changes in triglyceride level become nonsignificant after correcting for multiple comparisons. We conclude that the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism is nominally associated with changes in triglycerides and metabolic syndrome after 12 weeks of standard BDII treatment. PMID:27310943

  14. Evaluation of Patients Treated with Natalizumab for Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yousry, Tarek A.; Ryschkewitsch, Caroline; Fahle, Gary; Fischer, Steven; Hou, Jean; Curfman, Blanche; Miszkiel, Katherine; Mueller-Lenke, Nicole; Sanchez, Esther; Barkhof, Frederik; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Jäger, Hans R.; Clifford, David B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was reported to have developed in three patients treated with natalizumab. We conducted an evaluation to determine whether PML had developed in any other treated patients. Methods We invited patients who had participated in clinical trials in which they received recent or long-term treatment with natalizumab for multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease, or rheumatoid arthritis to participate. The clinical history, physical examination, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and testing of cerebrospinal fluid for JC virus DNA were used by an expert panel to evaluate patients for PML. We estimated the risk of PML in patients who completed at least a clinical examination for PML or had an MRI. Results Of 3417 patients who had recently received natalizumab while participating in clinical trials, 3116 (91 percent) who were exposed to a mean of 17.9 monthly doses underwent evaluation for PML. Of these, 44 patients were referred to the expert panel because of clinical findings of possible PML, abnormalities on MRI, or a high plasma viral load of JC virus. No patient had detectable JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. PML was ruled out in 43 of the 44 patients, but it could not be ruled out in one patient who had multiple sclerosis and progression of neurologic disease because data on cerebrospinal fluid testing and follow-up MRI were not available. Only the three previously reported cases of PML were confirmed (1.0 per 1000 treated patients; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.2 to 2.8 per 1000). Conclusions A detailed review of possible cases of PML in patients exposed to natalizumab found no new cases and suggested a risk of PML of roughly 1 in 1000 patients treated with natalizumab for a mean of 17.9 months. The risk associated with longer treatment is not known. PMID:16510746

  15. Outcomes of patients with melioidosis treated with meropenem.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Fisher, Dale A; Anstey, Nicholas M; Stephens, Dianne P; Jacups, Susan P; Currie, Bart J

    2004-05-01

    Melioidosis, an infection due to Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in southeast Asia and northern Australia. We reviewed our experience with meropenem in the treatment of severe melioidosis in 63 patients over a 6-year period. Outcomes were similar to those of ceftazidime-treated patients (n = 153) despite a deliberate selection bias to more-unwell patients receiving meropenem. The mortality among meropenem-treated patients was 19%. One patient had a possible drug fever associated with the use of meropenem. We conclude that meropenem (1 g or 25 mg/kg every 8 h intravenously for >/=14 days) is an alternative to ceftazidime and imipenem in the treatment of melioidosis. The use of meropenem may be associated with improved outcomes in patients with severe sepsis associated with melioidosis.

  16. Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic markers); (ii) diagnosis (new focus on the subjective aspects of bipolar disorder to offset the current trend of underdiagnosis due to overreliance on standardized interviews and rating scales); (iii) outcome (increase in treatment-resistant forms signaling a change in the natural history of bipolar disorder); (iv) pathophysiology (research into circadian biological rhythms and the kindling hypothesis to explain recurrence); (v) treatment (emergence of the anticonvulsants, suggested role of chronic antidepressant treatment in the development of treatment resistance); (vi) neurobiology (evaluation of regulatory function in relation to affective disturbances, role of postsynaptic second-messenger mechanisms, advances in functional neuroimaging); and (vii) psychosocial research (shedding overly dualistic theories of the past to understand the mind and brain as an entity, thus emphasizing the importance of balancing the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches). Future progress in the understanding and treatment of bipolar disorder will rely on successful integration of the biological and psychosocial lines of investigation. PMID:22033232

  17. Prevalence of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders and Associated Factors in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yuichi; Murakoshi, Akiko; Komada, Yoko; Otsuka, Ayano; Futenma, Kunihiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there are certain pathophysiological relationships between bipolar disorder (BD) and circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, apparently no studies have clarified the prevalence of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWD) in patients with BD. This study was set out to investigate the prevalence of CRSWD and associated factors in patients with BD. One hundred four euthymic BD outpatients participated in this study. The subjects were asked to answer questionnaires including demographic variables, clinical course of BD, and family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide. Severity of BD was assessed by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. CRSWD was diagnosed by clinical interview, together with sleep logs, according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, third edition (ICSD-3). Thirty-five subjects (32.4%) met the criteria for CRSWD. The age at the time of investigation and that at the onset of BD were both lower in the CRSWD group than in the non-CRSWD group. The rates of family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide in the CRSWD group were higher than those in the non-CRSWD group. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of CRSWD was significantly associated with younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide. The prevalence of CRSWD could be quite high in BD patients. Younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide were associated with presence of CRSWD in BD patients. PMID:27442503

  18. Prevalence of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders and Associated Factors in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yuichi; Murakoshi, Akiko; Komada, Yoko; Otsuka, Ayano; Futenma, Kunihiro; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that there are certain pathophysiological relationships between bipolar disorder (BD) and circadian rhythm dysfunction. However, apparently no studies have clarified the prevalence of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWD) in patients with BD. This study was set out to investigate the prevalence of CRSWD and associated factors in patients with BD. One hundred four euthymic BD outpatients participated in this study. The subjects were asked to answer questionnaires including demographic variables, clinical course of BD, and family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide. Severity of BD was assessed by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. CRSWD was diagnosed by clinical interview, together with sleep logs, according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, third edition (ICSD-3). Thirty-five subjects (32.4%) met the criteria for CRSWD. The age at the time of investigation and that at the onset of BD were both lower in the CRSWD group than in the non-CRSWD group. The rates of family history of psychiatric disorders and suicide in the CRSWD group were higher than those in the non-CRSWD group. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of CRSWD was significantly associated with younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide. The prevalence of CRSWD could be quite high in BD patients. Younger onset age of BD and family history of suicide were associated with presence of CRSWD in BD patients. PMID:27442503

  19. Intrahepatic Flow Redistribution in Patients Treated with Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Carlo Morosi, Carlo; Maccauro, Marco; Romito, Raffaele; Lanocita, Rodolfo Civelli, Enrico M.; Sposito, Carlo Bhoori, Sherrie; Chiesa, Carlo; Frigerio, Laura F.; Lorenzoni, Alice; Cascella, Tommaso Marchianò, Alfonso; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-04-15

    IntroductionIn planning Yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-radioembolizations, strategy problems arise in tumours with multiple arterial supplies. We aim to demonstrate that tumours can be treated via one main feeding artery achieving flow redistribution by embolizing accessory vessels.MethodsOne hundred {sup 90}Y-radioembolizations were performed on 90 patients using glass microspheres. In 19 lesions/17 patients, accessory branches were found feeding a minor tumour portion and embolized. In all 17 patients, the assessment of the complete perfusion was obtained by angiography and single photon emission computerized tomography–computerized tomography (SPECT–CT). Dosimetry, toxicity, and tumor response rate of the patients treated after flow redistribution were compared with the 83 standard-treated patients. Seventeen lesions in 15 patients with flow redistribution were chosen as target lesions and evaluated according to mRECIST criteria.ResultsIn all patients, the complete tumor perfusion was assessed immediately before radioembolization by angiography in all patients and after the {sup 90}Y-infusion by SPECT–CT in 15 of 17 patients. In the 15 assessable patients, the response rate in their 17 lesions was 3 CR, 8 PR, and 6 SD. Dosimetric and toxicity data, as well tumour response rate, were comparable with the 83 patients with regular vasculature.ConclusionsAll embolization procedures were performed successfully with no complications, and the flow redistribution was obtained in all cases. Results in term of toxicity, median dose administered, and radiological response were comparable with standard radioembolizations. Our findings confirmed the intratumoral flow redistribution after embolizing the accessory arteries, which makes it possible to treat the tumour through its single main feeding artery.

  20. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  1. Making see and treat work for patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Parker, Louise

    2004-02-01

    Every department is at a different stage in the development of see and treat. Teams have been established in various ways and are experiencing different dilemmas in making see and treat work best. It is not enough to pick up an established see and treat model, place it in an emergency department and sit back and watch the results. There is no 'magic wand'; no single determining factor to make see and treat work well. Influencing factors need to be understood, applied locally and reviewed regularly to assess success. The NHS Modernisation Agency publishes its survey report, See and Treat: Making it work for patients and staff, on February 4. For Further details, access www.modern.nhs.uk/emergency

  2. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (p<0.0001). Seven ACC patients (47%) had hair cortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients.

  3. [METABOLIC SYNDROME AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, BIPOLAR DISORDER AND SCHIZOAFFECTIVE DISORDER].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Calero Franco, Paloma; Sánchez Sánchez, Blanca; Rodríguez Criado, Natalia; Pinilla Santos, Berta; Bravo Herrero, Sandra; Cruz Fourcade, José Fernando; Martín Aragón, Rubén

    2015-12-01

    Introducción: los pacientes con patologías mentales graves como la esquizofrenia, el trastorno esquizoafectivo y el trastorno bipolar fallecen de media 20 años antes que la población general. La muerte por problemas cardiovasculares es la primera causa de fallecimiento, a pesar de la introducción de estrategias para el control de dichos factores de riesgo. Objetivos: analizar el porcentaje de pacientes con índice de masa corporal elevado, síndrome metabólico y riesgo cardiovascular diagnosticados según los criterios diagnósticos DSM-IV de esquizofrenia, trastorno bipolar y trastorno esquizoafectivo ingresados en la Unidad de Hospitalización Breve del Hospital Universitario de Móstoles de noviembre de 2014 a junio de 2015 por descompensación de su patología. Metodología: en 53 pacientes, 34 con diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, 16 con diagnóstico de trastorno bipolar y 3 con diagnóstico de trastorno esquizoafectivo se tomaron mediciones de peso, talla, perímetro abdominal y tensión arterial. Se realizó también analítica de ingreso, se incluyó determinación de glucosa en ayunas, triglicéridos, colesterol total y colesterol HDL. Se utilizó también la historia clínica para conocer los hábitos tóxicos de los pacientes y su estilo de vida, y se calculó el índice de masa corporal de los pacientes. Posteriormente fueron utilizados los criterios ATP III para síndrome metabólico y los de Framingham para calcular el riesgo cardiovascular a los diez años de los pacientes. Resultados: la muestra está compuesta por un 51% de varones y un 49% de mujeres, con una mediana de edad de 40 años. El 38% de los pacientes presentaron sobrepeso, el 22 % obesidad y el 4% obesidad mórbida. En cuanto a la presencia de síndrome metabólico, el 26% de los pacientes lo presentan según los criterios APT III; la mayoría de estos presentaban años de evolución de enfermedad y de tratamiento con psicofármacos. El 11% de los pacientes presenta un riesgo

  4. Perturbational Profiling of Metabolites in Patient Fibroblasts Implicates α-Aminoadipate as a Potential Biomarker for Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Joanne H; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Iaconelli, Jonathan; Watmuff, Bradley; Park, Hyoungjun; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; McPhie, Donna; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M; Clish, Clary B; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    Many studies suggest the presence of aberrations in cellular metabolism in bipolar disorder. We studied the metabolome in bipolar disorder to gain insight into cellular pathways that may be dysregulated in bipolar disorder and to discover evidence of novel biomarkers. We measured polar and nonpolar metabolites in fibroblasts from subjects with bipolar I disorder and matched healthy control subjects, under normal conditions and with two physiologic perturbations: low-glucose media and exposure to the stress-mediating hormone dexamethasone. Metabolites that were significantly different between bipolar and control subjects showed distinct separation by principal components analysis methods. The most statistically significant findings were observed in the perturbation experiments. The metabolite with the lowest p value in both the low-glucose and dexamethasone experiments was α-aminoadipate, whose intracellular level was consistently lower in bipolar subjects. Our study implicates α-aminoadipate as a possible biomarker in bipolar disorder that manifests under cellular stress. This is an intriguing finding given the known role of α-aminoadipate in the modulation of kynurenic acid in the brain, especially as abnormal kynurenic acid levels have been implicated in bipolar disorder.

  5. Perturbational Profiling of Metabolites in Patient Fibroblasts Implicates α-Aminoadipate as a Potential Biomarker for Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Joanne H; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Iaconelli, Jonathan; Watmuff, Bradley; Park, Hyoungjun; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; McPhie, Donna; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M; Clish, Clary B; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    Many studies suggest the presence of aberrations in cellular metabolism in bipolar disorder. We studied the metabolome in bipolar disorder to gain insight into cellular pathways that may be dysregulated in bipolar disorder and to discover evidence of novel biomarkers. We measured polar and nonpolar metabolites in fibroblasts from subjects with bipolar I disorder and matched healthy control subjects, under normal conditions and with two physiologic perturbations: low-glucose media and exposure to the stress-mediating hormone dexamethasone. Metabolites that were significantly different between bipolar and control subjects showed distinct separation by principal components analysis methods. The most statistically significant findings were observed in the perturbation experiments. The metabolite with the lowest p value in both the low-glucose and dexamethasone experiments was α-aminoadipate, whose intracellular level was consistently lower in bipolar subjects. Our study implicates α-aminoadipate as a possible biomarker in bipolar disorder that manifests under cellular stress. This is an intriguing finding given the known role of α-aminoadipate in the modulation of kynurenic acid in the brain, especially as abnormal kynurenic acid levels have been implicated in bipolar disorder. PMID:27606323

  6. The Characteristics of Treated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Patients in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Haris M.; Camacho, Ximena; Granton, John T.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Yao, Zhan; Singh, Samantha; Juurlink, David N.; Gomes, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are no Canadian prevalence studies on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) to date. We described the characteristics of treated PAH patients and the healthcare utilization and costs associated with PAH in a population of public drug plan beneficiaries in Ontario, Canada. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was conducted between April 2010 and March 2011 to identify treated PAH patients using population-based health administrative databases. We investigated demographic and clinical characteristics of treated PAH patients and conducted a cohort study to determine treatment patterns, healthcare utilization, and associated costs, over a one-year follow-up period (March 2012). Results. We identified 326 treated PAH cases in Ontario's publicly funded drug plan. Overall mean age was 59.4 years (±20.3 years) and over 77% of cases were women (n = 251). Combination therapy was used to treat 22.9% (n = 69) of cases, costing an average of $4,569 (SD $1,544) per month. Median monthly healthcare costs were $264 (IQR $96–$747) for those who survived and $2,021 (IQR $993–$6,399) for those who died over a one-year period, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusions. PAH care in Ontario is complex and has high healthcare costs. This data may help guide towards improved patient management. PMID:27445555

  7. The Characteristics of Treated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Patients in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Haris M; Camacho, Ximena; Granton, John T; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Yao, Zhan; Singh, Samantha; Juurlink, David N; Gomes, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are no Canadian prevalence studies on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) to date. We described the characteristics of treated PAH patients and the healthcare utilization and costs associated with PAH in a population of public drug plan beneficiaries in Ontario, Canada. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was conducted between April 2010 and March 2011 to identify treated PAH patients using population-based health administrative databases. We investigated demographic and clinical characteristics of treated PAH patients and conducted a cohort study to determine treatment patterns, healthcare utilization, and associated costs, over a one-year follow-up period (March 2012). Results. We identified 326 treated PAH cases in Ontario's publicly funded drug plan. Overall mean age was 59.4 years (±20.3 years) and over 77% of cases were women (n = 251). Combination therapy was used to treat 22.9% (n = 69) of cases, costing an average of $4,569 (SD $1,544) per month. Median monthly healthcare costs were $264 (IQR $96-$747) for those who survived and $2,021 (IQR $993-$6,399) for those who died over a one-year period, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusions. PAH care in Ontario is complex and has high healthcare costs. This data may help guide towards improved patient management. PMID:27445555

  8. LURASIDONE IN THE LONG‐TERM TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER: A 24‐WEEK OPEN‐LABEL EXTENSION STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Kaushik; Silva, Robert; Kroger, Hans; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Loebel, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of 6 months of open‐label, uncontrolled extension treatment with lurasidone in patients with a diagnosis of bipolar depression who completed 6 weeks of acute treatment. Methods Patients completing 6 weeks of double‐blind placebo‐controlled treatment with either lurasidone monotherapy (one study) or adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate (two studies), were treated for 6 months with flexible doses of lurasidone, 20–120 mg/day, in an open‐label, uncontrolled extension study (N = 813; monotherapy, 38.9%; adjunctive therapy, 61.1%). Changes in safety parameters were calculated from double‐blind, acute‐phase baseline to month 6 of the extension phase, using a last observation carried forward (LOCF endpoint) analysis. Results Five hundred fifty‐nine of 817 (68.4%) patients completed the extension study. In the monotherapy and adjunctive therapy groups, 6.9 and 9.0%, respectively, discontinued due to an adverse event. For the monotherapy and adjunctive therapy groups, respectively, changes from double‐blind baseline to month 6 were +0.8 and +0.9 kg for weight (mean), 0.0 and +2.0 mg/dL for total cholesterol (median), +5.0 and +5.0 mg/dL for triglycerides (median), −1.0 and 0.0 mg/dL for glucose (median); −22.6 and −21.7 for Montgomery‐Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS; mean); whereas change from open‐label baseline to month 6 were +0.85 and +0.88 kg for weight (mean), and −6.9 and −6.5 for MADRS (mean). Conclusions Six months of treatment with open‐label lurasidone was safe and well tolerated with minimal effect on weight and metabolic parameters; continued improvement in depressive symptoms was observed. PMID:26918425

  9. Gas emission during laparoscopic colorectal surgery using a bipolar vessel sealing device: A pilot study on four patients

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Martin; Sigrist, Markus W; Demartines, Nicolas; Gianella, Michele; Clavien, Pierre A; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Background Dissection during laparoscopic surgery produces smoke containing potentially toxic substances. The aim of the present study was to analyze smoke samples produced during laparoscopic colon surgery using a bipolar vessel sealing device (LigaSure™). Methods Four consecutive patients undergoing left-sided colectomy were enrolled in this pilot study. Smoke was produced by the use of LigaSure™. Samples (5,5l) were evacuated from the pneumoperitoneum in a closed system into a reservoir. Analysis was performed with CO2-laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy and confirmed by a Fourier-transform infrared spectrum. The detected spectra were compared to the available spectra of known toxins. Results Samples from four laparoscopic sigmoid resections were analyzed. No relevant differences were noted regarding patient and operation characteristics. The gas samples were stable over time proven by congruent control measurements as late as 24 h after sampling. The absorption spectra differed considerably between the patients. One broad absorption line at 100 ppm indicating H2O and several unknown molecules were detected. With a sensitivity of alpha min ca 10-5 cm-1 no known toxic substances like phenol or indole were identified. Conclusion The use of a vessel sealing device during laparoscopic surgery does not produce known toxic substances in relevant quantity. Further studies are needed to identify unknown molecules and to analyze gas emission under various conditions. PMID:18803818

  10. Is Hyperuricemia Overlooked when Treating Pediatric Tuberculosis Patients with Pyrazinamide?

    PubMed

    Şişmanlar, Tuğba; Aslan, Ayşe T; Budakoğlu, Irem

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of tuberculosis (TB) requires long-term multiple drug use. Hyperuricemia is frequently reported in adults, but there are few data for the pediatric population. This study aimed to review drug-related side effects in pediatric patients that received treatment for TB. Patients with active TB undergoing treatment were followed for drug-related side effects. During the 7 year period, 23 patients with a mean age of 7.9 ± 4.66 years were treated. Drug-related side effects were observed in 14 patients. Hyperuricemia occurred in 12 of the 14 patients, vs. hepatotoxicity in 2. In all, eight of the patients with hyperuricemia had ≥2 episodes during pyrazinamide (PZA) therapy. Based on these findings, we devised an algorithm that could be used for the management of hyperuricemia in patients receiving PZA because of TB, and recommend that hyperuricemia be closely monitored during PZA therapy.

  11. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or “orphan” treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice. PMID:23393416

  12. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics for bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Chronotherapeutics refers to treatments based on the principles of circadian rhythm organization and sleep physiology, which control the exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms, in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. It includes manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle such as sleep deprivation and sleep phase advance, and controlled exposure to light and dark. The antidepressant effects of chronotherapeutics are evident in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression, which has been associated with extremely low success rates of antidepressant drugs in naturalistic settings and with stable antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics in more than half of the patients. Recent advances in the study of the effects of chronotherapeutics on neurotransmitter systems, and on the biological clock machinery, allow us to pinpoint its mechanism of action and to transform it from a neglected or "orphan" treatment to a powerful clinical instrument in everyday psychiatric practice.

  13. [Obesity and dyslipidemia in Tunisian bipolar subjects].

    PubMed

    Ezzaher, Asma; Haj Mouhamed, Dhouha; Mechri, Anwar; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Gaha, Lotfi; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of obesity and overweight and their association with lipid parameters in bipolar patients. Our study included 130 patients with bipolar disorder and 130 control subjects aged respectively 37.9 +/- 12.1 and 37.2 +/- 13.1 years. Obesity was evaluated by body mass index (BMI). Concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, cLDL and cHDL were determined by enzymatic methods and ApoA1, ApoB and Lp(a) by techniques immunoturbidimetric. The prevalence of obesity in patients is 30.1% vs 12.3% in controls. A significant increase in BMI was noted in patients compared with controls regardless of sex and tobacco status and in patients aged less than 35 years and those consumers of alcohol. The majority of obese and overweight patients are treated with valproic acid. We found increase in cholesterol (4.41 +/- 1.02 vs 3.90 +/- 0.98 mmol/L), in cLDL (2.13 +/- 1.09 vs 1.29 +/- 0.56 mmol/L) and in Lp(a) (236 +/- 207 vs 163 +/- 150 mg/L) and decrease in HDLc (0.98 +/- 0.28 vs 1.09 +/- 0.36 mmol/L), more frequent at the obese patients and those presenting an overweight. In conclusion, in bipolar patients, obesity and overweight are frequent and associated with perturbations in lipid profile particularly an increase in total cholesterol, cLDL and Lp(a) and decrease in cHDL that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20478770

  14. Treatment of bipolar disorders during pregnancy: maternal and fetal safety and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Richard A; Moore, Katherine M; Bobo, William V

    2015-01-01

    Treating pregnant women with bipolar disorder is among the most challenging clinical endeavors. Patients and clinicians are faced with difficult choices at every turn, and no approach is without risk. Stopping effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy exposes the patient and her baby to potential harms related to bipolar relapses and residual mood symptom-related dysfunction. Continuing effective pharmacotherapy during pregnancy may prevent these occurrences for many; however, some of the most effective pharmacotherapies (such as valproate) have been associated with the occurrence of congenital malformations or other adverse neonatal effects in offspring. Very little is known about the reproductive safety profile and clinical effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drugs when used to treat bipolar disorder during pregnancy. In this paper, we provide a clinically focused review of the available information on potential maternal and fetal risks of untreated or undertreated maternal bipolar disorder during pregnancy, the effectiveness of interventions for bipolar disorder management during pregnancy, and potential obstetric, fetal, and neonatal risks associated with core foundational pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorder. PMID:25565896

  15. Psychiatrists' Perceptions and Practices in Treating Patients' Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichwala-Zyla, Christine; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Jordan, Timothy; Price, Joy Ann

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study identified psychiatrists' perceptions and practices regarding advising and treating obese patients. Methods: Questionnaires were mailed to a national random sample of 500 members of APA. A three-wave mailing was used to maximize the return rate. The questionnaire contained items on weight control based on the Stages of Change…

  16. Ofuji's disease in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated with dapsone

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Manne, Sindhura; Panicker, Vinitha Varghese; Eapen, Malini

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis or Ofuji's disease is a non-infectious eosinophilic infiltration of hair follicles, which usually presents with itchy papules and pustules in a circinate configuration. We report this case of an immunocompetent patient with erythematous papules and plaques without macropustules diagnosed as eosinophilic pustular folliculitis—a rarely reported entity outside Japan. He was successfully treated with oral dapsone. PMID:27730038

  17. Maintenance Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Sessions are Associated with Reduced Depressive Relapses in Patients with Unipolar or Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; Imperatori, Claudio; Del Casale, Antonio; Di Pietro, Simone; Ferri, Vittoria R.; Serata, Daniele; Raccah, Ruggero N.; Zangen, Abraham; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) is a new form of TMS allowing safe stimulation of deep brain regions. The objective of this preliminary study was to assess the role of dTMS maintenance sessions in protecting patients with bipolar disorder (BD) or recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) from developing depressive or manic relapses in a 12-month follow-up period. Methods: Twenty-four drug-resistant patients with a current depressive episode and a diagnosis of MDD or BD have been enrolled in the study. All the participants underwent daily dTMS sessions for 4 weeks. One group (maintenance – M group) received additional maintenance dTMS sessions weekly or twice a week. Results: After the first dTMS cycle, a significant reduction of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores was observed in all participants. Subsequently, the HDRS mean scores did not significantly change over time in the M group, while it significantly increased in the non-M-group after 6 and 12 months. Discussion: This study confirms previous evidence of a positive therapeutic effect of dTMS on depressive symptoms and suggests that, after recovery from acute episodes, maintenance dTMS sessions may be helpful in maintaining euthymia in a 12-month follow-up period. PMID:25709596

  18. Maintenance Treatment With Varenicline for Smoking Cessation in Patients With Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Evins, A. Eden; Cather, Corinne; Pratt, Sarah A.; Pachas, Gladys N.; Hoeppner, Susanne S.; Goff, Donald C.; Achtyes, Eric D.; Ayer, David; Schoenfeld, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance It is estimated that more than half of those with serious mental illness smoke tobacco regularly. Standard courses of pharmacotherapeutic cessation aids improve short-term abstinence, but most who attain abstinence relapse rapidly after discontinuation of pharmacotherapy. Objective To determine whether smokers diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disease have higher rates of prolonged tobacco abstinence with maintenance pharmacotherapy than with standard treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, relapse-prevention clinical trial conducted in 10 community mental-health centers. Of 247 smokers with schizophrenia or bipolar disease recruited from March 2008-April 2012, 203 received 12-weeks' open-label varenicline and cognitive behavioral therapy and 87 met abstinence criteria to enter the relapse prevention intervention. Interventions Participants who had 2 weeks or more of continuous abstinence at week 12 of open treatment were randomly assigned to receive cognitive behavioral therapy and double-blind varenicline (1 mg, 2 per day) or placebo from weeks 12 to 52. Participants then discontinued study treatment and were followed up to week 76. Main Outcomes and Measures Seven-day rate of continuous abstinence at study week 52, the end of the relapse-prevention phase, confirmed by exhaled carbon monoxide. Secondary outcomes were continuous abstinence rates for weeks 12 through 64 based on biochemically verified abstinence and weeks 12 through 76, based on self-reported smoking behavior. Results Sixty-one participants completed the relapse-prevention phase; 26 discontinued participation (7 varenicline, 19 placebo) and were considered to have relapsed for the analyses; 18 of these had relapsed prior to dropout. At week 52, point-prevalence abstinence rates were 60% in the varenicline group (24 of 40) vs 19% (9 of 47) in the placebo group (odds ratio [OR], 6.2; 95% CI, 2.2-19.2; P < .001). From

  19. Amisulpride plus valproate vs haloperidol plus valproate in the treatment of acute mania of bipolar I patients: a multicenter, open-label, randomized, comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Pierre; Vieta, Eduard

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of combination treatment of valproate and amisulpride with that of valproate and haloperidol in bipolar I disorder. Adult inpatients with a current manic episode fulfilling DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for bipolar type I disorder were included. Patients were randomized to amisulpride (400–800 mg/day) or haloperidol (5–15 mg/day) for 3 months and all received valproate. The primary effectiveness criterion was the percentage of responders (defined by a decrease of ≥50% of the Y-MRS) in patients completing the study. Safety was evaluated by adverse event reporting, determination of extrapyramidal function and clinical examination. Sixty-two patients were randomized to receive valproate-amisulpride, and 61 to receive valproate-haloperidol. At study end, responder rates were 72.6% in the amisulpride group and 65.5% in the haloperidol group. Remission rates were 83.9% and 89.7%, respectively. At study end, neither response rates nor remission rates differed significantly between groups. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred significantly (p = 0.009) more frequently in the haloperidol group (86.4%) than in the amisulpride group (66.1%). In conclusion, the valproate–amisulpride combination was as effective as the valproate – haloperidol combination in bipolar I patients, with a better safety profile. PMID:18830442

  20. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  1. Multiple Meningioma in a Patient of Bipolar Disorder: The Dilemma of Detecting Structural Brain Lesions in the Backdrop of a Long Standing Psychiatric Illness.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sood, Mamta; Khandelwal, Sudhir Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Multiple meningioma often can be clinically silent and may present with only psychiatric symptoms. We report a case of 43-year-old, right handed woman with a 23 year history of long standing bipolar affective disorder, who presented with a mixed episode with psychotic symptoms which did not respond to usual treatment and was further complicated with a different set of symptomatology. MRI brain revealed multiple dural based mass lesions identified to be multiple meningiomas. Patient's symptoms improved after gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for the multiple meningioma. Our finding illustrates the need to assess for brain lesions in presence of atypical symptoms, along with unresponsiveness to traditional management with psychotropic medications in patients with bipolar affective disorders. PMID:27656537

  2. [A patient with paclitaxel hypersensitivity treated with nab-paclitaxel].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Akira; Ouchi, Akira; Asano, Masahiko; Aono, Keiya; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Kato, Takehiro

    2014-07-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple liver metastases from gastric cancer was treated with S-1 plus cisplatin; however, the number of multiple liver metastases increased. The patient received paclitaxel(PTX)treatment, but a hypersensitivity reaction occurred after administering the second dose; therefore, he received docetaxel treatment. A hypersensitivity reaction occurred after administering the first dose of docetaxel; therefore, he received irinotecan treatment. However, irinotecan administration was stopped because of severe diarrhea and weight reduction. Subsequently, at the patient's request, nab-PTX treatment was initiated by administering a premedication regimen of dexamethasone(8mg)and chlorpheniramine(10mg); no hypersensitivity reactions were reported thereafter. Nab-PTX is a contraindication; however, it might be possible to use nab-PTX for treating patients with PTX hypersensitivity.

  3. Hearing Loss in Patients with Shunt-Treated Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Panova, Margarita V; Geneva, Ina E; Madjarova, Kalina I; Bosheva, Miroslava N

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common manifestation of the long-term complications in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus along with motor development disturbance, cognitive and visual impairment, epilepsy and endocrine disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations of hearing in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus of non-tumor etiology and at least one year after implantation of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, as well as their impact on the quality of life of patients. The study included 70 patients (age range 1.25 years - 21.25 years) with shunted non-tumor hydrocephalus and at least one year after placement of the shunt system. Hearing alterations were proved by measuring the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) for children up to 5 years of age and children with mental retardation; audiograms was used for children older than 5 years with normal neuro-psychological development (NPD). Of the 70 studied patients 17 (24%) had hearing loss (10 bilateral and 7-unilateral) and all of them had sensorineural hearing loss, which is associated with low weight at birth, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and brainstem symptoms at the time of diagnosis of hydrocephalus. Hearing pathology was found more often in shunt-treated patients with NPD retardation, poor functional status and low quality of life. Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus have hearing loss of sensorineural type. Children with brain stem symptomatology at diagnosing hydrocephalus and children with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus show higher risk of hearing loss. Children with shunted hydrocephalus and hearing loss show lower NPD, lower quality of life and lower functional status.

  4. Hearing Loss in Patients with Shunt-Treated Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Panova, Margarita V; Geneva, Ina E; Madjarova, Kalina I; Bosheva, Miroslava N

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common manifestation of the long-term complications in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus along with motor development disturbance, cognitive and visual impairment, epilepsy and endocrine disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alterations of hearing in patients with shunt treated hydrocephalus of non-tumor etiology and at least one year after implantation of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, as well as their impact on the quality of life of patients. The study included 70 patients (age range 1.25 years - 21.25 years) with shunted non-tumor hydrocephalus and at least one year after placement of the shunt system. Hearing alterations were proved by measuring the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) for children up to 5 years of age and children with mental retardation; audiograms was used for children older than 5 years with normal neuro-psychological development (NPD). Of the 70 studied patients 17 (24%) had hearing loss (10 bilateral and 7-unilateral) and all of them had sensorineural hearing loss, which is associated with low weight at birth, posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and brainstem symptoms at the time of diagnosis of hydrocephalus. Hearing pathology was found more often in shunt-treated patients with NPD retardation, poor functional status and low quality of life. Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus have hearing loss of sensorineural type. Children with brain stem symptomatology at diagnosing hydrocephalus and children with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus show higher risk of hearing loss. Children with shunted hydrocephalus and hearing loss show lower NPD, lower quality of life and lower functional status. PMID:27180348

  5. Examination of IMPA1 and IMPA2 genes in manic-depressive patients: association between IMPA2 promoter polymorphisms and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Sjøholt, G; Ebstein, R P; Lie, R T; Berle, J Ø; Mallet, J; Deleuze, J F; Levinson, D F; Laurent, C; Mujahed, M; Bannoura, I; Murad, I; Molven, A; Steen, V M

    2004-06-01

    Manic-depressive (bipolar) illness is a serious psychiatric disorder with a strong genetic predisposition. The disorder is likely to be multifactorial and etiologically complex, and the causes of genetic susceptibility have been difficult to unveil. Lithium therapy is a widely used pharmacological treatment of manic-depressive illness, which both stabilizes the ongoing episodes and prevents relapses. A putative target of lithium treatment has been the inhibition of the myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) enzyme, which dephosphorylates myo-inositol monophosphate in the phosphatidylinositol signaling system. Two genes encoding human IMPases have so far been isolated, namely myo-inositol monophosphatase 1 (IMPA1) on chromosome 8q21.13-21.3 and myo-inositol monophosphatase 2 (IMPA2) on chromosome 18p11.2. In the present study, we have scanned for DNA variants in the human IMPA1 and IMPA2 genes in a pilot sample of Norwegian manic-depressive patients, followed by examination of selected polymorphisms and haplotypes in a family-based bipolar sample of Palestinian Arab proband-parent trios. Intriguingly, two frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (-461C>T and -207T>C) in the IMPA2 promoter sequence and their corresponding haplotypes showed transmission disequilibrium in the Palestinian Arab trios. No association was found between the IMPA1 polymorphisms and bipolar disorder, neither with respect to disease susceptibility nor with variation in lithium treatment response. The association between manic-depressive illness and IMPA2 variants supports several reports on the linkage of bipolar disorder to chromosome 18p11.2, and sustains the possible role of IMPA2 as a susceptibility gene in bipolar disorder.

  6. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Crow, T.J.

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Bipolar electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fosdick, Stephen E; Knust, Kyle N; Scida, Karen; Crooks, Richard M

    2013-09-27

    A bipolar electrode (BPE) is an electrically conductive material that promotes electrochemical reactions at its extremities (poles) even in the absence of a direct ohmic contact. More specifically, when sufficient voltage is applied to an electrolyte solution in which a BPE is immersed, the potential difference between the BPE and the solution drives oxidation and reduction reactions. Because no direct electrical connection is required to activate redox reactions, large arrays of electrodes can be controlled with just a single DC power supply or even a battery. The wireless aspect of BPEs also makes it possible to electrosynthesize and screen novel materials for a wide variety of applications. Finally, bipolar electrochemistry enables mobile electrodes, dubbed microswimmers, that are able to move freely in solution.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Patients with Bipolar Disorder from an Old Order Amish Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Hye; Liu, Jiangang; Sells Galvin, Rachelle J.; Dage, Jeffrey L.; Egeland, Janice A.; Smith, Rosamund C.; Merchant, Kalpana M.; Paul, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with Type I bipolar disorder (BPD) and their unaffected siblings were obtained from an Old Order Amish pedigree with a high incidence of BPD and reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Established iPSCs were subsequently differentiated into neuroprogenitors (NPs) and then to neurons. Transcriptomic microarray analysis was conducted on RNA samples from iPSCs, NPs and neurons matured in culture for either 2 weeks (termed early neurons, E) or 4 weeks (termed late neurons, L). Global RNA profiling indicated that BPD and control iPSCs differentiated into NPs and neurons at a similar rate, enabling studies of differentially expressed genes in neurons from controls and BPD cases. Significant disease-associated differences in gene expression were observed only in L neurons. Specifically, 328 genes were differentially expressed between BPD and control L neurons including GAD1, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (2.5 fold) and SCN4B, the voltage gated type IV sodium channel beta subunit (-14.6 fold). Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the up-regulation of GAD1 in BPD compared to control L neurons. Gene Ontology, GeneGo and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of differentially regulated genes in L neurons suggest that alterations in RNA biosynthesis and metabolism, protein trafficking as well as receptor signaling pathways may play an important role in the pathophysiology of BPD. PMID:26554713

  9. Genetic and clinical factors predict lithium's effects on PER2 gene expression rhythms in cells from bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M J; Wei, H; Marnoy, Z; Darvish, R M; McPhie, D L; Cohen, B M; Welsh, D K

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with abnormal circadian rhythms. In treatment responsive BD patients, lithium (Li) stabilizes mood and reduces suicide risk. Li also affects circadian rhythms and expression of 'clock genes' that control them. However, the extent to which BD, Li and the circadian clock share common biological mechanisms is unknown, and there have been few direct measurements of clock gene function in samples from BD patients. Hence, the role of clock genes in BD and Li treatment remains unclear. Skin fibroblasts from BD patients (N=19) or healthy controls (N=19) were transduced with Per2::luc, a rhythmically expressed, bioluminescent circadian clock reporter gene, and rhythms were measured for 5 consecutive days. Rhythm amplitude and period were compared between BD cases and controls with and without Li. Baseline period was longer in BD cases than in controls. Li 1 mM increased amplitude in controls by 36%, but failed to do so in BD cases. Li 10 mM lengthened period in both BD cases and controls. Analysis of clock gene variants revealed that PER3 and RORA genotype predicted period lengthening by Li, whereas GSK3β genotype predicted rhythm effects of Li, specifically among BD cases. Analysis of BD cases by clinical history revealed that cells from past suicide attempters were more likely to show period lengthening with Li 1 mM. Finally, Li enhanced the resynchronization of damped rhythms, suggesting a mechanism by which Li could act therapeutically in BD. Our work suggests that the circadian clock's response to Li may be relevant to molecular pathology of BD.

  10. A feasibility study of expert patient and community mental health team led bipolar psychoeducation groups: implementing an evidence based practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Group psychoeducation is a cost effective intervention which reduces relapse and improves functioning in bipolar disorder but is rarely implemented. The aim of this study was to identify the acceptability and feasibility of a group psychoeducation programme delivered by community mental health teams (CMHTs) and peer specialist (PS) facilitators. Organisational learning was used to identify and address systematically barriers and enablers, at organisational, health professional and patient levels, to its implementation into a routine service. Methods A systematic examination of barriers and enablers to a three day training process informed the delivery of a first treatment group and a similar process informed the delivery of the second treatment group. Triangulation of research methods improved its internal validity: direct observation of training, self-rated surveys of participant experiences, group discussion, and thematically analysed individual participant and facilitator interviews were employed. Results Barriers and enablers were identified at organisational, educational, treatment content, facilitator and patient levels. All barriers under the control of the research team were addressed with subsequent improvements in patient knowledge about the condition and about local service. In addition, self-management, agency and altruism were enhanced. Barriers that could not be addressed required senior clinical and education leadership outside the research team’s control. PS and professional facilitators were successfully trained and worked together to deliver groups which were generally reported as being beneficial. Conclusion Psychoeducation groups involving CMHT and PS facilitators is acceptable and feasible but their sustainment requires senior leadership within and outside the organisation that control finance and education services. PMID:24215655

  11. Types of Bipolar Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Studies Peer Support Research WeSearchTogether Types of Bipolar Disorder There are several kinds of bipolar disorder. Each ... like an illness. What is the difference between bipolar disorder and ordinary mood swings? The three main things ...

  12. Bipolar-Battery Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E.; Edwards, Dean B.

    1988-01-01

    Bipolar batteries fabricated in continuous quasi-automated process. Components of battery configured so processing steps run sequentially. Key components of battery, bipolar plate and bipolar separator, fabricated separately and later joined together.

  13. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, N.; Jones, I.

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (also known as manic depressive illness) is a complex genetic disorder in which the core feature is pathological disturbance in mood (affect) ranging from extreme elation, or mania, to severe depression usually accompanied by disturbances in thinking and behaviour. The lifetime prevalence of 1% is similar in males and females and family, twin, and adoption studies provide robust evidence for a major genetic contribution to risk. There are methodological impediments to precise quantification, but the approximate lifetime risk of bipolar disorder in relatives of a bipolar proband are: monozygotic co-twin 40-70%; first degree relative 5-10%; unrelated person 0.5-1.5%. Occasional families may exist in which a single gene plays the major role in determining susceptibility, but the majority of bipolar disorder involves the interaction of multiple genes (epistasis) or more complex genetic mechanisms (such as dynamic mutation or imprinting). Molecular genetic positional and candidate gene approaches are being used for the genetic dissection of bipolar disorder. No gene has yet been identified but promising findings are emerging. Regions of interest identified in linkage studies include 4p16, 12q23-q24, 16p13, 21q22, and Xq24-q26. Chromosome 18 is also of interest but the findings are confusing with up to three possible regions implicated. To date most candidate gene studies have focused on neurotransmitter systems influenced by medication used in clinical management of the disorder but no robust positive findings have yet emerged. It is, however, almost certain that over the next few years bipolar susceptibility genes will be identified. This will have a major impact on our understanding of disease pathophysiology and will provide important opportunities to investigate the interaction between genetic and environmental factors involved in pathogenesis. This is likely to lead to major improvements in treatment and patient care but will also raise important

  14. Factors associated with lithium efficacy in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-01-01

    About one-third of lithium-treated, bipolar patients are excellent lithium responders; that is, lithium monotherapy totally prevents further episodes of bipolar disorder for ten years and more. These patients are clinically characterized by an episodic clinical course with complete remission, a bipolar family history, low psychiatric comorbidity, mania-depression episode sequences, a moderate number of episodes, and a low number of hospitalizations in the pre-lithium period. Recently, it has been found that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. Lithium exerts a neuroprotective effect, in which increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) play an important role. The response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of the BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels. A better response to lithium is connected with the Met allele of the BDNF Val/Met polymorphism, as is a hyperthymic temperament. Excellent lithium responders have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. The preservation of cognitive functions in long-term lithium-treated patients may be connected with the stimulation of the BDNF system, with the resulting prevention of affective episodes exerting deleterious cognitive effects, and possibly also with lithium's antiviral effects. A number of candidate genes that are related to neurotransmitters, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection, circadian rhythms, and other pathogenic mechanisms of bipolar disorder were found to be associated with the lithium prophylactic response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has recently performed the first genome-wide association study on the lithium response in bipolar disorder.

  15. Who Treats Patients with Diabetes and Compensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Barritt IV, A. Sidney; Weinberger, Morris; Paul, John E.; Fried, Bruce; Trogdon, Justin G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasingly, patients with multiple chronic conditions are being managed in patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) that coordinate primary and specialty care. However, little is known about the types of providers treating complex patients with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Objective We examined the mix of physician specialties who see patients dually-diagnosed with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study using 2000–2013 MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters and Medicare Supplemental Databases. Patients We identified 22,516 adults (≥ 18 years) dually-diagnosed with diabetes and compensated cirrhosis. Patients with decompensated cirrhosis, HIV/AIDS, or liver transplantation prior to dual diagnosis were excluded. Main Measures Physician mix categories: patients were assigned to one of four physician mix categories: primary care physicians (PCP) with no gastroenterologists (GI) or endocrinologists (ENDO); GI/ENDO with no PCP; PCP and GI/ENDO; and neither PCP nor GI/ENDO. Health care utilization: annual physician visits and health care expenditures were assessed by four physician mix categories. Key Results Throughout the 14 years of study, 92% of patients visited PCPs (54% with GI/ENDO and 39% with no GI/ENDO). The percentage who visited PCPs without GI/ENDO decreased 22% (from 63% to 49%), while patients who also visited GI/ENDO increased 71% (from 25% to 42%). Conclusions This is the first large nationally representative study to document the types of physicians seen by patients dually-diagnosed with diabetes and cirrhosis. A large proportion of these complex patients only visited PCPs, but there was a trend toward greater specialty care. The trend toward co-management by both PCPs and GI/ENDOs suggests that PCMH initiatives will be important for these complex patients. Documenting patterns of primary and specialty care is the first step toward improved care coordination. PMID:27783702

  16. [Is scuba diving allowed in diabetic patients treated with insulin?].

    PubMed

    Dufaitre, L; Vialettes, B

    2000-11-01

    Scuba diving is usually prohibited in diabetic patients at risk of hypoglycemic attacks (i.e. IDDM and NIDDM treated with sulfonylureas) due to the particular severity of these episodes in a hostile environment. In fact, diabetic subjects can perform this popular leisure activity without extra-risk, provided strict requisites in aptitude, practice and environment are enforced. These limitations lead to the establishment of practical guidelines, as proposed in this paper.

  17. Prognostic factors in recurrent glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Christina; Tichy, Julia; Schäfer, Niklas; Franz, Kea; Mack, Frederic; Mittelbronn, Michel; Kebir, Sied; Thiepold, Anna-Luisa; Waha, Andreas; Filmann, Natalie; Banat, Mohammed; Fimmers, Rolf; Steinbach, Joachim P; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Rieger, Johannes; Glas, Martin; Bähr, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    The value of bevacizumab (BEV) in recurrent glioblastoma is unclear. Imaging parameters and progression-free survival (PFS) are problematic endpoints. Few data exist on clinical factors influencing overall survival (OS) in unselected patients with recurrent glioblastoma exposed to BEV. We retrospectively analyzed 174 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with BEV at two German brain tumor centers. We evaluated general patient characteristics, MGMT status, pretreatment, concomitant oncologic treatment and overall survival. Karnofsky performance score, number of prior chemotherapies, number of prior recurrences and combined treatment with irinotecan (IRI) were significantly associated with OS in univariate analysis. We did not find differences in OS related to sex, age, histology, MGMT status, prior surgical treatment or number of prior radiotherapies. Combined treatment with IRI and higher KPS both remained significantly associated with prolonged survival in multivariate analysis, but patients receiving IRI co-treatment had less advanced disease. Grouping into clinically relevant categories revealed an OS of 16.9 months from start of BEV in patients with first recurrence and KPS ≥ 80 % (n = 25). In contrast, in patients with second recurrence and KPS < 80 %, OS was 3.6 months (n = 27). Our observational data support an early use of BEV in patients with good performance status. The benefit of co-treatment with IRI in our cohort seems to be the result of biased patient recruitment. PMID:27193554

  18. Time to rehospitalization in patients with major depression vs. those with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder in a public psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chou, Li-Shiu; Lin, Chieh-Hsin; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2010-12-30

    Compared rehospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder to patients with major depressive disorder remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the time to rehospitalization of the three groups. Other clinical variables were also examined. Rehospitalization status was monitored for all admitted inpatients with schizophrenia (n=637), bipolar I disorder (n=197), or major depressive disorder (n=191), from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006. Time to rehospitalization within 1 year after discharge was measured using the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors associated with rehospitalization were examined using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. The three groups were comparable for comorbid alcohol abuse/dependence, family history of severe psychiatric illness, years of education, and number of previous hospitalizations. No significant differences were noted among the three groups for the time to rehospitalization or the time to discontinuation. Age onset and number of previous admission were associated with risks of rehospitalization. This study suggests that the major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar I disorder have comparable influences on time to rehospitalization and discontinuation from treatment and that earlier onset of illness and more previous hospitalizations are associated with higher risks of rehospitalization. Further prospective research is warranted. PMID:20494450

  19. Multiple Meningioma in a Patient of Bipolar Disorder: The Dilemma of Detecting Structural Brain Lesions in the Backdrop of a Long Standing Psychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Mamta; Khandelwal, Sudhir Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Multiple meningioma often can be clinically silent and may present with only psychiatric symptoms. We report a case of 43-year-old, right handed woman with a 23 year history of long standing bipolar affective disorder, who presented with a mixed episode with psychotic symptoms which did not respond to usual treatment and was further complicated with a different set of symptomatology. MRI brain revealed multiple dural based mass lesions identified to be multiple meningiomas. Patient’s symptoms improved after gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery for the multiple meningioma. Our finding illustrates the need to assess for brain lesions in presence of atypical symptoms, along with unresponsiveness to traditional management with psychotropic medications in patients with bipolar affective disorders. PMID:27656537

  20. Fluoroscopy-guided Bipolar Radiofrequency Thermocoagulation Treatment for Discogenic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Ding, Xin-Li; Zhao, Xu-Li; Wang, Jun-Nan; Li, Yan-Ping; Tian, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermocoagulation (PIRFT) for the treatment of discogenic low back pain (LBP) remains controversial. However, all the PIRFT studies utilized monopolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC). The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of bipolar RFTC for the treatment of discogenic LBP. Methods: A total of 23 patients with discogenic LBP were treated with single-level bipolar RFTC. The patients were assessed before the procedure and at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the procedure. The primary outcome included the visual analog scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score. The secondary outcome included pain relief, reduction of analgesic dose, and patient satisfaction. Results: The VAS and ODI scores were significantly decreased after bipolar RFTC treatment at all time points of follow-up (P < 0.05). Bipolar RFTC treatment also resulted in a significant change in all secondary measures, such as pain relief, reduction of analgesic dose, and patient satisfaction. No serious complications or neurological sequelae were observed in any of the patients. Conclusions: Bipolar RFTC treatment can significantly attenuate pain and improve the function of patients with discogenic LBP. PMID:27647190

  1. A rare mutation of CACNA1C in a patient with bipolar disorder, and decreased gene expression associated with a bipolar-associated common SNP of CACNA1C in brain.

    PubMed

    Gershon, E S; Grennan, K; Busnello, J; Badner, J A; Ovsiew, F; Memon, S; Alliey-Rodriguez, N; Cooper, J; Romanos, B; Liu, C

    2014-08-01

    Timothy Syndrome (TS) is caused by very rare exonic mutations of the CACNA1C gene that produce delayed inactivation of Cav1.2 voltage-gated calcium channels during cellular action potentials, with greatly increased influx of calcium into the activated cells. The major clinical feature of this syndrome is a long QT interval that results in cardiac arrhythmias. However, TS also includes cognitive impairment, autism and major developmental delays in many of the patients. We observed the appearance of bipolar disorder (BD) in a patient with a previously reported case of TS, who is one of the very few patients to survive childhood. This is most interesting because the common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) most highly associated with BD is rs1006737, which we show here is a cis-expression quantitative trait locus for CACNA1C in human cerebellum, and the risk allele (A) is associated with decreased expression. To combine the CACNA1C perturbations in the presence of BD in this patient and in patients with the common CACNA1C SNP risk allele, we would propose that either increase or decrease in calcium influx in excitable cells can be associated with BD. In treatment of BD with calcium channel blocking drugs, we would predict better response in patients without the risk allele, because they have increased CACNA1C expression.

  2. Treating Pain in Addicted Patients: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, Martin; Wunsch, Martha; Skoufalos, Alexis; Reddy, Yeshwant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Clinicians may face pragmatic, ethical, and legal issues when treating addicted patients. Equal pressures exist for clinicians to always address the health care needs of these patients in addition to their addiction. Although controversial, mainly because of the lack of evidence regarding their long-term efficacy, the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain management is widespread. Their use for pain management in the addicted population can present even more challenges, especially when evaluating the likelihood of drug-seeking behavior. As the misuse and abuse of opioids continues to burgeon, clinicians must be particularly vigilant when prescribing chronic opioid therapy. The purpose of this article is to summarize recommendations from a recent meeting of experts convened to recommend how primary care physicians should approach treatment of chronic pain for addicted patients when an addiction specialist is not available for a referral. As there is a significant gap in guidelines and recommendations in this specific area of care, this article serves to create a foundation for expanding chronic pain guidelines in the area of treating the addicted population. This summary is designed to be a practical how-to guide for primary care physicians, discussing risk assessment, patient stratification, and recommended therapeutic approaches. (Population Health Management 2014;17:79–89) PMID:24138341

  3. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Polymedicated Patient Treated With Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Calderón, Remedios; Corrales-Vargas, Silvia; Jiménez-Ferrera, Gloria; Rodríguez-Nevado, Isabel; Díaz-Delgado, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide is an oral alkylating agent indicated for the treatment of patients with glioblastoma multiforme concomitantly with radiotherapy and subsequently as monotherapy treatment. We report the case of a patient who developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) while she was being treated with chemoradiotherapy and several drugs. Cutaneous tests were performed with the drugs involved with negative result. Although the occurrence of TEN contraindicates suspected drug readministration, we based the decision to perform the controlled administration of temozolomide on the following reasons: (1) the poor prognosis of the underlying disease, (2) the lack of therapeutic alternatives, (3) the suspicion that other drugs taken by the patient simultaneously may be responsible (as anticonvulsants and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole [TMP-SMX]), and (4) temozolomide was the first choice for treating the patient's disease. The administration of a cumulative dose of 60 mg of temozolomide caused a slight skin reaction. Given this result, we conducted controlled administration of other drugs involved. Dexamethasone, codeine, omeprazole and levetiracetam were well tolerated. However, TMP-SMX produced a similar reaction to that caused by temozolomide. In conclusion, we present the first case of TEN induced by temozolomide and TMP-SMX associated with cranial radiotherapy confirmed by controlled administration. Radiotherapy in combination with these drugs could have favored TEN, as some authors have postulated, but we cannot prove this. PMID:25729629

  4. Bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty in a patient with an above knee amputation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Leonid; Hernandez, Miguel; Safran, Ori; Schwartz, Isabella; Liebergall, Meir; Mattan, Yoav

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of an above knee amputee who has sustained a fracture of femoral neck is a challenge for both the orthopaedic surgeon and the rehabilitation team. We present a case of such a patient and discuss different difficulties in his treatment. PMID:19646230

  5. [Oxidative stress in bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, E Z; Zelzer, S; Reininghaus, B; Lackner, N; Birner, A; Bengesser, S A; Fellendorf, F T; Kapfhammer, H-P; Mangge, H

    2014-09-01

    The results of mortality studies have indicated that medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes are the most important causes of mortality among patients with bipolar disorder. The reasons for the increased incidence and mortality are not fully understood. Oxidative stress and an inadequate antioxidative system might be one missing link and could also help to further elucidate the pathophysiological basis of bipolar disorder. This article provides a comprehensive review of oxidative stress in general and about the existing data for bipolar disorder. In addition information is given about possible therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress and the use in bipolar disorder. PMID:24441847

  6. Psychogenic or neurogenic origin of agrammatism and foreign accent syndrome in a bipolar patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Stéphane; Macoir, Joël; Paquet, Nancy; Fossard, Marion; Gagnon, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Background Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a rare speech disorder characterized by the appearance of a new accent, different from the speaker's native language and perceived as foreign by the speaker and the listener. In most of the reported cases, FAS follows stroke but has also been found following traumatic brain injury, cerebral haemorrhage and multiple sclerosis. In very few cases, FAS was reported in patients presenting with psychiatric disorders but the link between this condition and FAS was confirmed in only one case. Case presentation In this report, we present the case of FG, a bipolar patient presenting with language disorders characterized by a foreign accent and agrammatism, initially categorized as being of psychogenic origin. The patient had an extensive neuropsychological and language evaluation as well as brain imaging exams. In addition to FAS and agrammatism, FG also showed a working memory deficit and executive dysfunction. Moreover, these clinical signs were related to altered cerebral activity on an FDG-PET scan that showed diffuse hypometabolism in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes bilaterally as well as a focal deficit in the area of the anterior left temporal lobe. When compared to the MRI, these deficits were related to asymmetric atrophy, which was retrospectively seen in the left temporal and frontal opercular/insular region without a focal lesion. Discussion To our knowledge, FG is the first case of FAS imaged with an 18F-FDG-PET scan. The nature and type of neuropsychological and linguistic deficits, supported by neuroimaging data, exclude a neurotoxic or neurodegenerative origin for this patient's clinical manifestations. For similar reasons, a psychogenic etiology is also highly improbable. Conclusion To account for the FAS and agrammatism in FG, various explanations have been ruled out. Because of the focal deficit seen on the brain imaging, involving the left insular and anterior temporal cortex, two brain regions

  7. The relationship between bipolar disorder and type 2 diabetes: more than just co-morbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Cynthia V; Gardner, David M; Ransom, Thomas; Alda, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rates are three times higher in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. This is a major contributing factor to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality, the leading cause of death in bipolar patients. There may be shared pathophysiology linking the two disorders, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and mitochondrial dysfunction, common genetic links, and epigenetic interactions. Life-style, phenomenology of bipolar symptoms, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be contributing factors. Patients with BD and T2DM have a more severe course of illness and are more refractory to treatment. Control of their diabetes is poorer when compared to diabetics without BD, and an existing disparity in medical care may be partly responsible. Glucose abnormalities in bipolar patients need to be screened for and treated. Metformin appears to have the best benefit/risk ratio, and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and analogues also appear promising, although these agents have not been specifically studied in populations with mood disorders. Physicians need to be aware of the increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease in bipolar patients, and appropriate prevention, screening, case finding, and treatment is recommended. PMID:22621171

  8. The relationship between bipolar disorder and type 2 diabetes: more than just co-morbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Cynthia V; Gardner, David M; Ransom, Thomas; Alda, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rates are three times higher in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), compared to the general population. This is a major contributing factor to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality, the leading cause of death in bipolar patients. There may be shared pathophysiology linking the two disorders, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and mitochondrial dysfunction, common genetic links, and epigenetic interactions. Life-style, phenomenology of bipolar symptoms, and adverse effects of pharmacotherapy may be contributing factors. Patients with BD and T2DM have a more severe course of illness and are more refractory to treatment. Control of their diabetes is poorer when compared to diabetics without BD, and an existing disparity in medical care may be partly responsible. Glucose abnormalities in bipolar patients need to be screened for and treated. Metformin appears to have the best benefit/risk ratio, and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and analogues also appear promising, although these agents have not been specifically studied in populations with mood disorders. Physicians need to be aware of the increased risk for T2DM and cardiovascular disease in bipolar patients, and appropriate prevention, screening, case finding, and treatment is recommended.

  9. A case of lithium intoxication induced by an antihypertensive angiotensin 1 subtype-specific angiotensin II receptor blocker in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Nishida, Shohei; Takekoshi, Akira; Murakami, Muneharu; Yamada, Megumi; Kimura, Akio; Suzuki, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium carbonate is considered to be a first-line treatment for bipolar disorder; however, this drug has a narrow therapeutic window, and lithium intoxication is commonly induced by various drugs interaction and situations. We herein report a case of lithium intoxication induced by the administration of an antihypertensive agent targeting the angiotensin 1 (AT1) subtype of the angiotensin II receptor in a 65-year-old woman with a 40-year history of bipolar disorder type 1, and 1-year history of essential hypertension. Her bipolar disorder had been well-controlled with 600 mg/day of lithium carbonate for more than 10 years. She was later diagnosed with hypertension and the AT1 receptor blocker, azilsartan was thereafter administrated on a daily basis. After 3 weeks of azilsartan administration, she presented with progressive action tremor and showed a gradual deterioration of her physical state. Four months after the start of azilsartan administration, she presented with alternating episodes of diarrhea and constipation. Two weeks before admission to our hospital, she presented with mild consciousness disturbances, myoclonus, truncal ataxia, and appetite loss. She was diagnosed to have lithium intoxication based on an elevated serum lithium concentration of 3.28 mEq/l.It is therefore important to evaluate the serum lithium concentration after the administration of antihypertensive agents, and consider lithium-antihypertensive agent interactions when selecting antihypertensive agents in elderly patients receiving long-term lithium carbonate treatment. PMID:27535187

  10. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  11. Clinical assessment of periodontal conditions in patients treated with nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C; Willershausen-Zönnchen, B; Klug, C; Darius, H

    1996-03-19

    Calcium antagonists are widely used in treating acute and chronic coronary insufficiency disorders. A major side effect of long-term treatment is gingival hyperplasia. In the present study, 70 patients taking nifedipine for at least six months and 70 controls similar in age, gender, approximal hygiene and systemic disease with at least 6 anterior teeth in upper and lower arches were examined. Their periodontal conditions were determined by modified Sulcus-Bleeding-Index (mSBI), modified Approximal-Plaque-Index (mAPI), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN), a hyperplasia index quantifying the extent of gingival overgrowth, probing depths, clinical attachment loss and the modified Phenytoin-Gingival-Inflammation-Index (mPGI). A mild to moderate gingival hyperplasia was diagnosed in 21 of 70 patients resulting in a prevalence of 30% compared to 8.5% in controls. The hyperplastic changes were situated mainly in the anterior region of the dentition. Significant differences between both groups could be found comparing the severity of the gingival hyperplasia, the CPITN, mSBI, probing depths and the part of mPGI evaluating colour and turgor of the gingiva (p < 0.05). The severity of gingival overgrowth was strongly correlated with the inflammatory gingival changes, probing depths, the periodontal treatment need and the approximal hygiene of the patients. No statistically significant correlation could be found between the severity of gingival hyperplasia and the age and gender of the patient, or the dose or duration of nifedipine therapy. Gingival changes seemed to be more pronounced in patients with cardiovascular disorders than in patients under hemodialysis. The high incidence of gingival hyperplasia in patients receiving nifedipine on a long-term basis emphasises the role of the dentist and general practitioner in the early detection and prophylaxis of gingival changes and requires a thorough information to the patient concerning periodontal side

  12. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E; Chan, Philip K; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J; Calabrese, Joseph R; Gao, Keming

    2011-02-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥ 300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD.

  13. Opportunistic infections in patients treated with immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Kyi, Chrisann; Hellmann, Matthew D; Wolchok, Jedd D; Chapman, Paul B; Postow, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory antibodies that enhance the immune system to fight cancer are revolutionizing the treatment of patients with an expanding variety of malignancies. There is a unique spectrum of side effects associated with immunomodulatory antibodies, termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which include colitis and hepatitis among others. The treatment of refractory or severe irAEs can occasionally require significant immunosuppression, involving steroids or tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists, placing these patients at risk for infections. We present the first reported case to our knowledge of an opportunistic infection in a patient treated with an immunomodulatory antibody. As the use of immunomodulatory antibodies expands and more patients develop irAEs that require treatment with immunosuppression, recognition of the potential for opportunistic infections in this emerging patient population will be critical. Prospective trials are needed to define the optimal immunosuppressive management of irAEs and determine whether prophylactic antiviral, antibacterial, or antifungal therapies are beneficial in this unique population. PMID:24991413

  14. Psychological characteristics of patients treated by chronic maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Pop-Jordanova, Nada D; Polenakovic, Momir H

    2013-02-01

    Studies related to psychological aspects of dialysis patients show that depression and anxiety are the most common characteristics. The aim of our study was to analyze the personality profile in patients on chronic maintenance dialysis and to evaluate more specifically the level of depression. The total number of patients was 68 (30 females and 38 males), with mean age 62.3 and 56.5 for females and males respectively. Mean duration of dialysis was 6.73 years for females and 6.68 years for men (the period varied from 0.5 to 18 years). For the evaluation of psychological characteristics, we used two psychometric instruments: Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI- 201) and Beck Depression Inventory. The obtained results confirmed the presence of depression in patients treated with hemodialysis. The level of depression is variable (minimal is present in 21.43%; mild in 35.71%; moderate in 17.85% and severe in 14.28% of patients). The depression is significantly positively correlated with age (p<0.05) as well as with educational level, and negatively with the duration of dialysis. Specific characteristics of personality obtained with MMPI are hypersensitivity, depressive mood, and withdrawal from friends and relatives. More specific emotional traits are the accentuated anxiety, low level of hostility, but very high passive aggression which destroys their social communications. Some response measures for depression such as relaxation training, psychological support, music therapy, or peripheral biofeedback are recommended. PMID:23335381

  15. Enhanced cholesterol reduction by simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Rowland Yeo, K; Yeo, W W; Wallis, E J; Ramsay, L E

    1999-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether an interaction between diltiazem and the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor simvastatin may enhance the cholesterol-lowering response to simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients. Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients attending the Sheffield hypertension clinic who started consecutively on simvastatin for primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) during the 2 years June, 1996—May 1998 were surveyed. From the clinic records we extracted and recorded absolute and percentage cholesterol responses to the starting dose of simvastatin and coprescription of diltiazem. Results The cholesterol reduction for the 19 patients on diltiazem was 33.3% compared with 24.7% in the remaining 116 patients (median difference 8.6%, 95% CI 1.1–12.2%, P < 0.02). The interindividual variability of cholesterol response to simvastatin was greater for patients not taking diltiazem than for those patients taking diltiazem. The ratio of the variances in response for the nondiltiazem group relative to the diltiazem group was 1.34 at 10 mg simvastatin daily (not significant, 95% CI 0.16–4.11), and 3.42 at 20 mg daily (P < 0.01, 95% CI 1.26–7.18). Concurrent diltiazem therapy (P < 0.04), age (P = 0.001) and starting dose of simvastatin (P = 0.002) were found to be significant independent predictors of percentage cholesterol response. Conclusions Patients who take both simvastatin and diltiazem may need lower doses of simvastatin to achieve the recommended reduction in cholesterol. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of this interaction need further study to confirm an enhanced effect on cholesterol reduction, and exclude an increased risk of adverse events. PMID:10583033

  16. [Peritonitis in patients treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Georgiev, M; Krivoshiev, S; Kraev, Z

    1989-01-01

    With the present study the authors set themselves the task to compare the number of peritonitis episodes in patients treated with two types of systems: "Sorin-Biomedica" and "Travenol-(UV-XD)", in which disinfection of the connecting devices is achieved accordingly with chemical agents and with ultraviolet irradiation. Eleven patients have been observed from August 1984 through February 1989. The total duration of treatment was 156 months. Twenty one peritonitis episodes were observed--15 with "Sorin-Biomedica" system and 6 with "Travenol-(UV-XD)" system--an average of one episode in 4 1/2 months with the former system and one episode in 14.7 months with the latter. It is pointed out in conclusion that the "Travenol-(UV-XD)" system with ultraviolet disinfection has significantly reduced the incidence of peritonitis at the dialysis center where the authors work.

  17. A Meta-Analysis of Neuropsychological Functioning in Patients with Early Onset Schizophrenia and Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Rebeca Garcia; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Despite the nosological distinction between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, there is increasing evidence that these conditions share phenomenological characteristics. To examine the similarities in their patterns of cognitive impairment, we conducted a meta-analysis from 12 studies of Early Onset Schizophrenia (EOS) and 12 studies of Pediatric…

  18. Early Prognostication Markers in Cardiac Arrest Patients Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Karapetkova, Maria; Koenig, Matthew A.; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Established prognostication markers, such as clinical findings, electroencephalography (EEG), and biochemical markers, used by clinicians to predict neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest (CA) are altered under therapeutic hypothermia (TH) conditions and their validity remains uncertain. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for evidence on the current standards for neurologic outcome prediction for out-of-hospital CA patients treated with TH and the validity of a wide range of prognostication markers. Relevant studies that suggested one or several established biomarkers, and multimodal approaches for prognostication were included and reviewed. Results While the prognostic accuracy of various tests has been questioned after TH, pupillary light reflexes and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) are still strongly associated with negative outcome for early prognostication. Increasingly, EEG background activity has also been identified as a valid predictor for outcome after 72 hours after CA and a preferred prognostic method in clinical settings. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and CT, can identify functional and structural brain injury, but are not readily available at the patient’s bedside because of limited availability and high costs. Conclusions A multimodal algorithm composed of neurological examination, EEG-based quantitative testing, and SSEP, in conjunction with newer MRI sequences, if available, holds promise for accurate prognostication in CA patients treated with TH. In order to avoid premature withdrawal of care, prognostication should be performed later than 72 hours after CA. PMID:26228521

  19. Malignancy rates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tocilizumab

    PubMed Central

    Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Sebba, Anthony; Brockwell, Laura; Kelman, Ariella; Porter-Brown, Benjamin; Pulley, Jennifer; Napalkov, Pavel; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse malignancy rates in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with tocilizumab. Methods Patients who received tocilizumab or placebo+methotrexate/disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the double-blind phases of 5-phase three trials or who received at least 1 dose of tocilizumab in the long-term extension studies were analysed up to the 2 May 2012 cut-off date. Malignancies were monitored throughout the studies, analysed and adjudicated as malignant by medical review. Risk was compared with that in the general population using standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) based on data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results SEER (US general population) and GLOBOCAN (non-US general population) databases. Results In total, 4009 patients in the tocilizumab all-exposure population were included. Mean treatment duration was 4.0 years (mean 5.1 (range 0.0–6.8); total observation time was 16 120.1 patient-years (PY). The adjudicated malignancy rate (95% CI) was 1.26/100 PY (1.09 to 1.44) and remained constant over time. The SIR (95% CI) for all malignancies combined, excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, was 1.36 (1.01 to 1.80) for US and 1.81 (1.44 to 2.23) for non-US populations, driven primarily by higher rates in lung and bronchus (US/non-US) malignancies and prostate cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (non-US), in contrast to those for the general populations; these higher rates are in line with those expected in patients with RA or in the geographic regions studied. Conclusions Malignancy rates remained stable with long-term tocilizumab treatment, and malignancy types and rates were consistent with those expected in patients with RA. PMID:27252893

  20. Hyperuricemia and uncontrolled hypertension in treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaelim; Kim, Changsoo; Kang, Dae Ryong; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that uric acid is an independent risk factor for incident hypertension, whereas few studies have evaluated the effect of hyperuricemia on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. We investigated whether hyperuricemia predicts uncontrolled hypertension through a large-scale prospective cohort study with hypertensive patients treated with fimasartan in the Republic of Korea (the Kanarb–Metabolic Syndrome study). Of the 10,601 hypertensive patients who were recruited from 582 private clinics and 11 university hospitals at baseline, 7725 completed the follow-up after 3 months of fimasartan medication, and 6506 were included in the analysis after excluding those with missing values. We estimated the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months (≥130/80 mm Hg in those with diabetes or chronic renal failure and ≥140/90 mm Hg in the remaining patients) related with baseline hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥7 mg/dL in males ≥6 mg/dL in females) using multiple logistic regression models. Hyperuricemia increased the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months of fimasartan medication (odds ratio, 1.247; 95% confidence interval, 1.063–1.462). Males in the highest quartile of uric acid level were at a 1.322 (95% confidence interval, 1.053–1.660) times higher risk of uncontrolled hypertension in reference to the lowest quartile; the same analyses in females were not significant. Patients without metabolic syndrome had significantly higher odds of uncontrolled hypertension with hyperuricemia (odds ratio, 1.328; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–1.751). Hyperuricemia predicted uncontrolled hypertension even after 3 months of fimasartan treatment in hypertensive patients. PMID:27428212

  1. The changing characteristics of atrial fibrillation patients treated with warfarin

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaokui; Haymart, Brian; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Almany, Steve; Kozlowski, Jay; Krol, Gregory D.; Kaatz, Scott; Froehlich, James B.; Barnes, Geoffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that direct oral anticoagulants are being preferentially used in low risk atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Understanding the changing risk profile of new AF patients treated with warfarin is important for interpreting the quality of warfarin delivery through an anticoagulation clinic. Six anticoagulation clinics participating in the Michigan Anticoagulation Quality Improvement Initiative enrolled 1293 AF patients between 2010 and 2014 as an inception cohort. Abstracted data included demographics, comorbidities, medication use and all INR values. Risk scores including CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, HAS-BLED, SAMe-TT2R2, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) were calculated for each patient at the time of warfarin initiation. The quality of anticoagulation was assessed using the Rosendaal time in the therapeutic range (TTR) during the first 6 months of treatment. Between 2010 and 2014, patients initiating warfarin therapy for AF had an increasing mean CHADS2 (2.0 ± 1.1 to 2.2 ± 1.4, p = 0.02) and CCI (4.7 ± 1.8 to 5.1 ± 2.0, p = 0.03), and a trend towards increasing mean CHA2DS2-VASc, HAS-BLED, and SAMe-TT2R2 scores. The actual TTR remained unchanged over the study period (62.6 ± 18.2 to 62.7 ± 17.0, p = 0.98), and the number of INR checks did not change (18.9 ± 5.2 to 18.5 ± 5.1, p = 0.06). Between 2010 and 2014, AF patients newly starting warfarin had mild increases in risk for stroke and death with sustained quality of warfarin therapy. PMID:26130229

  2. Targeting astrocytes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Li, Baoman; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are homeostatic cells of the central nervous system, which are critical for development and maintenance of synaptic transmission and hence of synaptically connected neuronal ensembles. Astrocytic densities are reduced in bipolar disorder, and therefore deficient astroglial function may contribute to overall disbalance in neurotransmission and to pathological evolution. Classical anti-bipolar drugs (lithium salts, valproic acid and carbamazepine) affect expression of astroglial genes and modify astroglial signalling and homeostatic cascades. Many effects of both antidepressant and anti-bipolar drugs are exerted through regulation of glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic transmission, through K(+) buffering, through regulation of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (that controls metabolism of arachidonic acid) or through Ca(2+) homeostatic and signalling pathways. Sometimes anti-depressant and anti-bipolar drugs exert opposite effects, and some effects on gene expression in drug treated animals are opposite in neurones vs. astrocytes. Changes in the intracellular pH induced by anti-bipolar drugs affect uptake of myo-inositol and thereby signalling via inositoltrisphosphate (InsP3), this being in accord with one of the main theories of mechanism of action for these drugs. PMID:27015045

  3. Modern approach to treating mental patients in colonial chosun.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bang Hyun

    2013-08-01

    them or who posed a threat to others, or else commissioned them to the government hospital. Thus, the final responsibility for mental patients was imposed on the modern Western medical team, because the district commissioners sent them to the police and the police sent them to the government mental hospital. Most educated people and government personnel in the colonial era thought modern Western psychiatry circles were responsible for mental patient management, and the Japanese empire enacted mental-healthrelated laws and made efforts to secure funds for the establishment of mental hospitals. As the literature at that time also show the position of the modern Western medical circle, their ambivalent attitude to mental patients must also be clarified to interpret the modern approach to treating mental patients in colonial Chosun. In this context, a research on historical figures in Japanese psychiatry, a study on the specific treatment methods used by the modern Western psychiatric team in the colonial era and their effects, and the extension of the subject period for such researches are suggested. PMID:24005649

  4. How bipolar disorders are managed in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Krishna; Sharma, Verinder; Dozois, David; Bhayana, Bhooma

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing bipolar disorder, how they rate their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and what they think they need to learn in the future. DESIGN Survey questionnaire. SETTING Family practices in London, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Random sample of 297 family physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physicians’ experience in diagnosing and managing patients with bipolar disorder, rating of their undergraduate and postgraduate training in this area, and thoughts about what they need to learn in the future. RESULTS Of 297 surveys sent out, 147 (49.5%) were returned. Male respondents accounted for 62%, and female respondents 37%, of completed surveys. Average year of graduation from medical school was 1979. The most common response for level of experience in diagnosing and treating bipolar disorders was “somewhat comfortable.” Physicians frequently reported screening for symptoms of mood disorders (42%), and most of them were sharing care with other professionals (88%). Undergraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (46%), and postgraduate training was rated as poor (42%) or satisfactory (44%). Physicians thought they needed more education in issues of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. CONCLUSION Family physicians were only somewhat comfortable with diagnosing and managing bipolar disorders, and most thought their undergraduate and graduate training in this area had been, at best, satisfactory. They expressed a need for more education in the areas of diagnosis and pharmacotherapy. PMID:16926928

  5. Bipolar disorder--underdiagnosis and HoNOS-PbR.

    PubMed

    Bongards, Eva Nora; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2013-09-01

    The effect of reassessing patients with depression and resistant depression in a CMHT caseload using the DSM IV criteria for bipolar I and bipolar II conditions inevitably leads to the diagnosis of more patients with bipolar disorder. This has an effect on the number of patients within the population of the CMHT who fall within the psychotic clusters of HONOS-PBR. This should effect the resources which will be allocated to deal with the patients in the team.

  6. Deformity incidence in leprosy patients treated with multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Subramanian, M; Subramanian, G

    1994-01-01

    The records of 2,285 (2,007 paucibacillary (PB) and 278 multibacillary (MB)) cases of leprosy which were declared as released from treatment (RFT) after multidrug therapy (MDT) and under surveillance as per the National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP) guidelines in the rural field practice area of Central Leprosy Teaching & Research Institute (CLTRI), Chengalpattu, between September 1986 and September 1993 were analyzed for collecting data on the incidence of deformity. Of the 2,285 cases 2,053 (1,947 PB and 106 MB) did not have deformity at the commencement of treatment. Three MB cases and one PB case out of the 2,053 developed deformity (all grade II) during the course of treatment. No patient developed deformity during surveillance. Thus the deformity incidence in the population of patients was 0.681 per 1000 person-years of observation. Age, sex, type of disease, prior dapsone monotherapy and nerve involvement at the commencement of treatment appear to influence the deformity incidence. The risk of development of deformity in patients treated with MDT appear to be very low and analysis of larger data sets is suggested to corroborate the above findings as the information would be useful for planning prevention and management of deformity services. PMID:7714354

  7. The microRNA network is altered in anterior cingulate cortex of patients with unipolar and bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Joshua A; Carter, Bradley S; Meng, Fan; Turner, David L; Dai, Manhong; Schatzberg, Alan F; Barchas, Jack D; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E; Myers, Richard M; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Thompson, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs acting as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Though implicated in multiple CNS disorders, miRNAs have not been examined in any psychiatric disease state in anterior cingulate cortex (AnCg), a brain region centrally involved in regulating mood. We performed qPCR analyses of 29 miRNAs previously implicated in psychiatric illness (major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and/or schizophrenia (SZ)) in AnCg of patients with MDD and BP versus controls. miR-132, miR-133a and miR-212 were initially identified as differentially expressed in BP, miR-184 in MDD and miR-34a in both MDD and BP (although none survived multiple correction testing and must be considered preliminary). In silico target prediction algorithms identified putative targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Nuclear Co-Activator 1 (NCOA1), Nuclear Co-Repressor 2 (NCOR2) and Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) were selected based upon predicted targeting by miR-34a (with NCOR2 and PDE4B both targeted by miR-184) and published relevance to psychiatric illness. Luciferase assays identified PDE4B as a target of miR-34a and miR-184, while NCOA1 and NCOR2 were targeted by miR-34a and 184, respectively. qPCR analyses were performed to determine whether changes in miRNA levels correlated with mRNA levels of validated targets. NCOA1 showed an inverse correlation with miR-34a in BP, while NCOR2 demonstrated a positive correlation. In sum, this is the first study to demonstrate miRNA changes in AnCg in psychiatric illness and validate miR-34a as differentially expressed in CNS in MDD. These findings support a mechanistic role for miRNAs in the regulation of stress-responsive genes disrupted in psychiatric illness. PMID:27468165

  8. How Childhood Maltreatment Is Related to Suicidality, Bipolarity and Central Serotonergic Activity in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to determine whether childhood maltreatment contributes to the occurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) with bipolarity, and whether there is a relationship between central serotonergic activity, as assessed using loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), and childhood maltreatment. Methods Thirty-five MDD patients were stratified according to the presence or absence of childhood trauma into two subgroups, childhood trauma (CT) and no childhood trauma (NCT), using the Korean version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (K-CTQ). The CT group was subjected to further analysis. Several psychometric ratings were also applied. In addition, auditory processing for the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP), which was used as a marker of serotonergic activity, was measured before beginning medication. Results There was a significant difference in total Korean Bipolar Spectrum Disorder Scale score between the CT and NCT groups (t=-2.14, p=0.04). The total K-CTQ score was positively correlated with the total Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS) score (r=0.36, p=0.036). In particular, emotional abuse was positively correlated with the total Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (r=0.38, p=0.026), BSS (r=0.38, p=0.025), and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) (r=0.36, p=0.035) scores. There was also a positive correlation between LDAEP and total Hypomania Personality Scale (r=0.49, p=0.02) and HAMD (r=0.58, p=0.004) scores within CT group. Conclusion The findings of this study support that there is a relationship between childhood maltreatment and bipolarity in patients with MDD. PMID:27081379

  9. Screening for bipolar disorder during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Lindsay; Mittal, Leena; Nicoloro, Jennifer; Caiozzo, Christina; Maciejewski, Paul K; Miller, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar disorder is a high-risk condition during pregnancy. In women receiving prenatal care, this study addresses the proportion screening positive for bipolar disorder with or without also screening positive for depression. This is a pilot study using chart abstraction of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) scores from patients' initial prenatal visits. Among 342 participants, 289 (87.1 %) completed the EPDS, 277 (81.0 %) completed the MDQ, and 274 (80.1 %) completed both. Among EPDS screens, 49 (16.4 %) were positive. Among MDQ screens, 14 (5.1 %) were positive. Nine (21.4 %) of the 42 participants with a positive EPDS also had a positive MDQ. Of the 14 patients with a positive MDQ, five (35.7 %) had a negative EPDS. The prevalence of positive screens for bipolar disorder in an obstetric population is similar to gestational diabetes and hypertension, which are screened for routinely. Without screening for bipolar disorder, there is a high risk of misclassifying bipolar depression as unipolar depression. If only women with current depressive symptoms are screened for bipolar disorder, approximately one third of bipolar disorder cases would be missed. If replicated, these findings support simultaneous screening for both depression and bipolar disorder during pregnancy.

  10. Do family physicians treat older patients with mental disorders differently from younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, C. S.; Gekoski, W. L.; Knox, V. J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there are differences between family physicians' beliefs and treatment intentions regarding older patients with mental disorders and younger patients with similar disorders. Such differences might contribute to older adults' lower rates of mental health service use. DESIGN: Mailed survey. SETTING: Primary care practices in and around Kingston, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Questionnaires were mailed to 294 general practitioners listed in the 42nd Annual Canadian Medical Directory. Of the 285 eligible physicians, 115 (40%) completed and returned questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians' ratings of preparedness to identify and treat, likelihood of treating, likelihood of using each of five different treatment methods, likelihood of referral, preferences for six referral options, and treatment effectiveness with respect to hypothetical older and younger patients with panic disorder or dysthymia. RESULTS: Physicians reported being less prepared to identify and treat older patients than younger patients. In addition, physicians reported being significantly less likely to treat and to refer older patients than younger patients. Finally, physicians reported that both psychotherapy alone, and in combination with pharmacotherapy, were less effective for older patients than for younger patients. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to other possible reasons for older adults' low rates of mental health service use, this study suggests that family physicians' beliefs and treatment intentions could be contributing factors. Changes in medical education aimed at replacing inaccurate beliefs with accurate information regarding older patients might be one way to increase rates of use in this underserved age group, because family physicians play a key role in the mental health care of older adults. PMID:10349066

  11. Neuropsychiatric sequelae in an efavirenz treated patient with hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Emma; Patel, Anish S

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old man of African origin, positive for both HIV and hepatitis B virus, who developed symptoms of mania and psychosis while being treated with efavirenz (a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in HIV therapy) that required inpatient psychiatric admission and treatment with antipsychotic medication. Our case illustrates multiple predisposing and precipitating factors occurring simultaneously that have been previously implicated individually in the development of neuropsychiatric complications with efavirenz (and other HIV treatments in general). We suggest that patient’s commenced on antiretroviral medication should have a screening process for pre-existing mental and medical health problems as well as psychosocial risk factors that might put a patient at risk. In addition with advances in pharmacogenomics we advocate future cytochrome P450 gene variant testing coupled with routine efavirenz plasma concentration monitoring to help ensure maximum treatment benefit and minimal risk of side effects. PMID:22121393

  12. Scurvy in an alcoholic patient treated with intravenous vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ong, John; Randhawa, Rabinder

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries but there is an increased prevalence in chronic alcohol abusers. In the UK, it is common practice to treat patients with chronic alcoholism who are admitted to hospital with intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 2-3 days, followed by oral thiamine and vitamin B-compound tablets. This is a case of a 57-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism and chronic obstructive lung disease who was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia requiring ventilatory support. He was given high doses of intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 3 days then oral thiamine and vitamin B compound tablets but developed scurvy 4 days later. He was restarted on oral vitamin C supplementation and showed signs of improvement within 3 days of treatment. PMID:24728889

  13. Scurvy in an alcoholic patient treated with intravenous vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ong, John; Randhawa, Rabinder

    2014-04-11

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries but there is an increased prevalence in chronic alcohol abusers. In the UK, it is common practice to treat patients with chronic alcoholism who are admitted to hospital with intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 2-3 days, followed by oral thiamine and vitamin B-compound tablets. This is a case of a 57-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism and chronic obstructive lung disease who was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia requiring ventilatory support. He was given high doses of intravenous vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6 and C for 3 days then oral thiamine and vitamin B compound tablets but developed scurvy 4 days later. He was restarted on oral vitamin C supplementation and showed signs of improvement within 3 days of treatment.

  14. New bipolar tissue ligator combines constant tissue compression and temperature guidance: histologic study and implications for treatment of hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Piskun, Gregory; Tucker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background Several minimally invasive technologies are available to treat common soft tissue lesions including symptomatic hemorrhoids. The use of energy to deliver heat and coagulate target lesions is commonly practiced. This study compares the histologic effects produced on intestinal tissues by two energy-based systems which employ different approaches of heat delivery. Methods Two heat delivery systems were evaluated in vivo in a single porcine subject: infrared coagulator and bipolar tissue ligator utilizing constant tissue compression and temperature guidance. Eighteen treatment sites divided into three groups of six were assessed. Treatment site temperature was measured and the effects of thermal treatment in the mucosa, submucosa, submucosal vessels, and muscularis layer were scored. Lateral thermal spread beyond the energy application site was also assessed. Results Treatment site temperatures were much lower in the bipolar ligator group than in the infrared coagulator group. The mucosal and submucosal tissue changes observed in tissues treated with infrared energy and bipolar energy at 55°C were similar. Both the mucosal and submucosal tissue changes with bipolar energy at 50°C were significantly less. Conclusion Both devices achieved similar histologic results. However, the unique design of the bipolar ligator, which allows consistent capture, constant compression, and temperature monitoring of target tissue, accomplished the desired histologic changes with less muscular damage at much lower temperatures than the infrared coagulator. The use of bipolar ligation could offer clinical advantages such as reduced patient pain and a minimized chance of heat-related collateral tissue damage. PMID:23152714

  15. Mathematical models of bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, Darryl; Roque-Urrea, Tairi; Urrea-Roque, John; Troyer, Jessica; Wirkus, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.

    2009-07-01

    We use limit cycle oscillators to model bipolar II disorder, which is characterized by alternating hypomanic and depressive episodes and afflicts about 1% of the United States adult population. We consider two non-linear oscillator models of a single bipolar patient. In both frameworks, we begin with an untreated individual and examine the mathematical effects and resulting biological consequences of treatment. We also briefly consider the dynamics of interacting bipolar II individuals using weakly-coupled, weakly-damped harmonic oscillators. We discuss how the proposed models can be used as a framework for refined models that incorporate additional biological data. We conclude with a discussion of possible generalizations of our work, as there are several biologically-motivated extensions that can be readily incorporated into the series of models presented here.

  16. Grey matter volume abnormalities in patients with bipolar I depressive disorder and unipolar depressive disorder: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Li; Liao, Mei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lifeng; Peng, Hongjun; He, Zhong; Li, Zexuan; Li, Weihui; Lu, Shaojia; Ding, Yuqiang; Li, Lingjiang

    2015-02-01

    Bipolar disorder and unipolar depressive disorder (UD) may be different in brain structure. In the present study, we performed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to quantify the grey matter volumes in 23 patients with bipolar I depressive disorder (BP1) and 23 patients with UD, and 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) using magnetic resonance imaging. We found that compared with the HC and UD groups, the BP1 group showed reduced grey matter volumes in the right inferior frontal gyrus and middle cingulate gyrus, while the UD group showed reduced volume in the right inferior frontal gyrus compared to HCs. In addition, correlation analyses revealed that the grey matter volumes of these regions were negatively correlated with the Hamilton depression rating scores. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that decreased grey matter volume of the right inferior frontal gyrus is a common abnormality in BP1 and UD, and decreased grey matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus may be specific to BP1.

  17. Facial expression in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in response to emotional stimuli: a partially shared cognitive and social deficit of the two disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Giuseppe; Polli, Elisa; Valeriani, Giuseppe; Zullo, Daiana; Melcore, Claudia; Capra, Enrico; Quartini, Adele; Marino, Pietropaolo; Minichino, Amedeo; Bernabei, Laura; Robiony, Maddalena; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Liberati, Damien

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It has recently been highlighted that patients affected by schizophrenia (SCZ) and those affected by bipolar disorder (BD) undergo gradual chronic worsening of cognitive and social functioning. The objective of the current study was to evaluate and compare (using the Facial Action Coding System [FACS]) the way by which patients with the two disorders experience and display emotions in relation to specific emotional stimuli. Materials and methods Forty-five individuals participated in the study: 15 SCZ patients, 15 BD patients, and 15 healthy controls. All participants watched emotion-eliciting video clips while their facial activity was videotaped. The congruent/incongruent feeling of emotions and the facial expression in reaction to emotions were evaluated. Results SCZ and BD patients presented similar incongruent emotive feelings and facial expressions (significantly worse than healthy participants); SCZ patients expressed the emotion of disgust significantly less appropriately than BD patients. Discussion BD and SCZ patients seem to present a similar relevant impairment in both experiencing and displaying emotions; this impairment may be seen as a behavioral indicator of the deficit of social cognition present in both the disorders. As the disgust emotion is mainly elaborated in the insular cortex, the incongruent expression of disgust of SCZ patients can be interpreted as a further evidence of a functional deficit of the insular cortex in this disease. Specific remediation training could be used to improve emotion and social cognition in SCZ and BD patients. PMID:23966784

  18. A Rare Case of Bipolar Clavicle Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Segmental or bipolar fractures of the clavicle generally refer to a concomitant ipsilateral distal clavicle and midshaft clavicle fracture. These injuries are exceedingly rare and are generally secondary to higher energy injuries. We report a case of a 38-year-old male who sustained a left bipolar clavicle fracture after falling from a push bike while riding recreationally which unusually involved the medial and lateral ends of the clavicle and not the midshaft as previously reported in other patients. The patient's exact fracture configuration was not immediately apparent highlighting the need for careful examination of the whole clavicle in order to not miss a bipolar fracture. PMID:27051546

  19. Chronotypes of bipolar patients in remission: validation of the French version of the circadian type inventory in the FACE-BD sample.

    PubMed

    Boudebesse, C; Lajnef, M; Geoffroy, P A; Bellivier, F; Nieto, I; Gard, S; Olié, E; Azorin, J M; Kahn, J P; Bougerol, T; Passerieux, C; Aubin, V; Milhiet, V; Folkard, S; Leboyer, M; Henry, C; Etain, B

    2013-10-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances have been associated with bipolar disorder (BD) during both the mood episodes and the periods of remission. Circadian phase preferences for the evening have been reported for remitted patients, whereas the amplitude and stability of their rhythms have never been assessed using questionnaires. The primary aim of our study was the validation of a French version of the Circadian Type Inventory (CTI), whereas its secondary aim was the comparison between remitted patients with BD and healthy controls for rhythm stability and amplitude and for phase preference. For this purpose, we used the CTI and the Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM) that assesses phase preference ("morning" or "evening" type). First, we report here on the validation of the French version of the 11-item Circadian Type Inventory in a sample of 140 remitted patients with BD and 156 healthy controls. Principal components analysis revealed a two-factor structure (FR: flexibility/rigidity scale corresponding to rhythm stability; LV: languid/vigorous scale corresponding to rhythm amplitude) explaining 52% of the variance in the control group and 47% in the bipolar group. Cronbach's alpha was 0.75 for FR and 0.73 for LV. The test-retest reliability was 0.74 for FR and 0.86 for LV (3 wks) and 0.62 for FR and 0.72 for LV (6 mos). LV and FR scores correlated with the Composite Scale of Morningness score (p < 0.00001 and p = 0.0002, respectively). Second, as compared with controls, patients with BD were more languid (p < 0.00001) and showed an evening preference (p = 0.0003), but they did not differ from the controls with regard to flexibility/rigidity. The French version of the CTI appeared to have satisfactory psychometrics characteristics. Bipolar patients exhibited not only abnormalities in phase preference but also in amplitude as measured by languidity. Since circadian rhythm dysfunction has been shown to predict poor functioning and mood relapses in interepisodic patients

  20. The relationship between borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A

    2013-06-01

    It is clinically important to recognize both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in patients seeking treatment for depression, and it is important to distinguish between the two. Research considering whether BPD should be considered part of a bipolar spectrum reaches differing conclusions. We reviewed the most studied question on the relationship between BPD and bipolar disorder: their diagnostic concordance. Across studies, approximately 10% of patients with BPD had bipolar I disorder and another 10% had bipolar II disorder. Likewise, approximately 20% of bipolar II patients were diagnosed with BPD, though only 10% of bipolar I patients were diagnosed with BPD. While the comorbidity rates are substantial, each disorder is nontheless diagnosed in the absence of the other in the vast majority of cases (80% to 90%). In studies examining personality disorders broadly, other personality disorders were more commonly diagnosed in bipolar patients than was BPD. Likewise, the converse is also true: other axis I disorders such as major depression, substance abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder are also more commonly diagnosed in patients with BPD than is bipolar disorder. These findings challenge the notion that BPD is part of the bipolar spectrum.

  1. Bipolar Transurethral Incision of Bladder Neck Stenoses with Mitomycin C Injection

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Timothy D.; Ayyash, Omar M.; Ferroni, Matthew C.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Chen, Mang L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. To determine the efficacy of bipolar transurethral incision with mitomycin C (MMC) injection for the treatment of refractory bladder neck stenosis (BNS). Materials and Methods. Patients who underwent bipolar transurethral incision of BNS (TUIBNS) with MMC injection at our institution from 2013 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 2 mg of 40% mitomycin C solution was injected in four quadrants of the treated BNS. Treatment failure was defined as the need for subsequent intervention. Results. Thirteen patients underwent 17 bipolar TUIBNS with MMC injection. Twelve (92%) patients had failed a mean of 2.2 ± 1.1 prior endoscopic procedures. Median follow-up was 16.5 months (IQR: 14–18.4 months). Initial success was 62%; five (38%) patients had a recurrence with a median time to recurrence of 7.3 months. Four patients underwent a repeat procedure, 2 (50%) of which failed. Overall success was achieved in 77% (10/13) of patients after a mean of 1.3 ± 0.5 procedures. BNS recurrence was not significantly associated with history of pelvic radiation (33% versus 43%, p = 0.9). There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions. Bipolar TUIBNS with MMC injection was comparable in efficacy to previously reported techniques and did not result in any serious adverse events. PMID:26635876

  2. Bipolar disorder in women

    PubMed Central

    Parial, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder in women is a challenging disorder to treat. It is unique in its presentation in women and characterized by later age of onset, seasonality, atypical presentation, and a higher degree of mixed episodes. Medical and psychiatric co-morbidity adversely affects recovery from the bipolar disorder (BD) more often in women. Co-morbidity, particularly thyroid disease, migraine, obesity, and anxiety disorders occur more frequently in women while substance use disorders are more common in men. Treatment of women during pregnancy and lactation is challenging. Pregnancy neither protects nor exacerbates BD, and many women require continuation of medication during the pregnancy. The postpartum period is a time of high risk for onset and recurrence of BD in women. Prophylaxis with mood stabilizers might be needed. Individualized risk/benefits assessments of pregnant and postpartum women with BD are required to promote the health of the women and to avoid or limit exposure of the fetus or infant to potential adverse effects of medication. PMID:26330643

  3. Brain lithium, N-acetyl aspartate and myo-inositol levels in older adults with bipolar disorder treated with lithium: a lithium-7 and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Forester, Brent P; Finn, Chelsea T; Berlow, Yosef A; Wardrop, Megan; Renshaw, Perry F; Moore, Constance M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the relationship between brain lithium levels and the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (myo-Ino) in the anterior cingulate cortex of a group of older adults with bipolar disorder (BD). Methods This cross-sectional assessment included nine subjects (six males and three females) with bipolar I disorder and currently treated with lithium, who were examined at McLean Hospital’s Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program and Brain Imaging Center. The subjects’ ages ranged from 56 to 85 years (66.0 ± 9.7 years) and all subjects had measurements of serum and brain lithium levels. Brain lithium levels were assessed using lithium magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All subjects also had proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to obtain measurements of NAA and myo-Ino. Results Brain lithium levels were associated with higher NAA levels [df = (1, 8), B = 12.53, t = 4.09, p < 0.005] and higher myo-Ino levels [df = (1, 7), F = 16.81, p < 0.006]. There were no significant effects of serum lithium levels on any of the metabolites. Conclusion Our findings of a relationship between higher brain lithium levels and elevated NAA levels in older adult subjects with BD may support previous evidence of lithium’s neuroprotective, neurotrophic, and mitochondrial function-enhancing effects. Elevated myo-Ino related to elevated brain lithium levels may reflect increased inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) activity, which would lead to an increase in myo-Ino levels. This is the first study to demonstrate alterations in NAA and myo-Ino in a sample of older adults with BD treated with lithium. PMID:18837863

  4. Pachymetric Changes of the Cornea Amongst Patients Treated with LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Afrim; Asani, Minir; Kaçaniku, Gazmend; Ajazaj, Valbon; Dida, Ermal; Lutaj, Pajtim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we have researched the possible parametrically changes before and after LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) and the influence of these changes in the cause of post LASIK ectasia. Materials and methods: In this study 204 eyes with different refractive anomalies were included. Candidates that underwent refractive surgery first have to undergo many ophthalmological examinations, firstly by evaluating their visual acuity, subjective and objective refraction with and without cycloplegia, slight lamp evaluation, computerized topography, pupillometry, retina examination and measurement of intraocular pressure. Pachymetric values were measured with Orbscan IIz (Bausch – Lomb). Refractive surgery was done with LASIK under local anesthesia. Results: In this study 102 patients were treated with LASIK who were with different refractive anomalies. According to the group age 44 or 43.1% were of the age 20 – 29, 46 or 45.1% were of the age 30 – 39, 11 or 10.8% were 40 – 49 years of age and 1 or 1% were above the age of 50 +. Pachymetric before surgery in right eye was approximately 565.4 µm (DS+- 39.4), from 507 µm up to 678 µm, but after surgery it was approximately 497.5 µm (DS+-61.7) from 346 µm up to 644 µm. Pachymetric on the left eye before surgery was approximately 564.8 µm (DS+-41.5) from 504 µm up to 696 µm but after surgery it was approximately 498.3 µm (DS+-62.2), from 329 µm up to 646 µm. Pachymetric in both eyes before surgery was approximately 549.1 µm (DS+=73.9), from 263 µm up to 687 µm. Pachymetric on both eyes after surgery was approximately 496.9 µm (DS+-60.1), from 337.5 µm up to 645 µm. With the “ Paired T – test “ we have reached a significant statistical change between the pachymetric values in both eyes before and after the surgery (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Corneal thickness is one of the main criteria in order to allow refractive surgeries, and as the main criteria it was evaluated at our

  5. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Over 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes. Effectively treating comorbid anxiety in individuals with BD has been recognized as one of the biggest unmet needs in the field of bipolar disorder. Recently, the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) was developed to be applicable to the full range of anxiety and mood disorders, based upon converging evidence from genetics, cognitive and affective neuroscience, and behavioral research suggesting common, core emotion-related pathology. Here, we present a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of the UP for the treatment of BD with comorbid anxiety, in a clinical replication series consisting of three cases. PMID:22822175

  6. Independent predictors for lifetime and recent substance use disorders in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder: focus on anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gao, Keming; Chan, Philip K; Verduin, Marcia L; Kemp, David E; Tolliver, Bryan K; Ganocy, Stephen J; Bilali, Sarah; Brady, Kathleen T; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    We set out to study independent predictor(s) for lifetime and recent substance use disorders (SUDs) in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (RCBD). Extensive Clinical Interview and Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were used to ascertain DSM-IV Axis I diagnoses of RCBD, anxiety disorders, and SUDs. Data from patients enrolling into four similar clinical trials were used. Where appropriate, univariate analyses with t-test or chi-square were applied. Stepwise logistic regression was used to examine the relationship among predictor variables and lifetime and recent SUDs. Univariate analysis showed that patients with co-occurring anxiety disorders (n = 261) had significantly increased rates of lifetime (odds ratio [OR]= 2.1) and recent (OR = 1.9) alcohol dependence as well as lifetime (OR = 3.4) and recent (OR = 2.5) marijuana dependence compared to those without co-occurring anxiety disorder (n = 303). In logistic regression analyses, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (OR = 2.34), alcohol dependence (OR = 1.73), and marijuana dependence (OR = 3.36) and recent marijuana dependence (OR = 3.28). A history of physical abuse was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (OR = 1.71) and recent marijuana dependence (OR = 3.47). Earlier onset of first mania/hypomania was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (5% per year), and recent marijuana dependence (12% per year) and later treatment with a mood stabilizer were also associated with increased risk for recent SUDs (8% per year). Positive associations between GAD, later treatment with a mood stabilizer, and early childhood trauma and history of SUDs suggest that adequate treatment of comorbid anxiety, early treatment with a mood stabilizer, and prevention of childhood trauma may reduce the risk for the development of SUDs in patients with bipolar disorder.

  7. [Holter monitoring of patients treated with cytostatic agents].

    PubMed

    Kozáková, M; Beńesová, E; Cieslar, P; Sálková, J

    1989-01-20

    After cytostatic treatment severe arrhythmias, the development of angina pectoris and even the development of acute myocardial infarction and sudden death were observed. Therefore we made in 42 patients with malignant haematological disease treated with cytostatics 96 Holter monitorings of the electrocardiographic signal. The monitoring was made during the administration of cytostatics as well as during the time interval between the administration of combinations of cytostatics. In both instances (during the administration and during the interval between administration) we recorded a surprisingly high, mean all-day as well as maximal, heart rate. In the group monitored during administration of chemotherapeutic drugs we observed 5-8 hours after administration of cytostatics serious ventricular arrhythmias [incl. ventricular tachycardia], denivelization of the ST segment, paroxysms of supraventricular tachycardia. In the group monitored during the interval between administration of cytostatics the sick-sinus syndrome was recorded, as well as a passive nodal rhythm, disorders of the intraventricular conduction. The described changes are explained by the release of vasoactive substances after administration of cytostatics, by a change of the transmembrane calcium transport leading to an increased excitability of the heart muscle and possibly to coronary spasms and direct irreversible damage of the conduction system.

  8. [Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gabriele; Schaffer, Markus; Winklbaur, Bernadette

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorders are often associated with cognitive deficits which have an influence on social functioning and the course of the illness. These deficits have an impact on occupational ability and social integration. To date, specific cognitive domains have been found which characterize bipolar affective disorders. However, there is evidence of stable and lasting cognitive impairment in all phases of the disorder, including the remission phase, in the following domains: sustained attention, memory and executive functions (e.g. cognitive flexibility and problem solving). Although their cognitive deficits are comparable the deficits in patients with schizophrenia are more severe than those with bipolar disorder. Recent brain imaging findings indicate structural and functional abnormalities in the cortical and limbic networks of the brain in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy controls. Mood stabilizer and atypical antipsychotics may reduce cognitive deficits in certain domains (e.g. executive functions and word fluency) and may have a positive effect on quality of life and social functioning. PMID:17640495

  9. Current issues: women and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Marangell, Lauren B.

    2008-01-01

    While the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) is typically complex, the treatment of women with bipolar disorder is even more challenging because clinicians must also individualize treatment based on the potential for pregnancy, drug interactions with oral contraceptives, and an increased risk of endocrine diseases that can either impact the course of illness or become manifest with some treatments. Women with BD should be checked for hypothyroidism, and if prescribed antidepressants, carefully watched for rapid cycling or a mood switch to mania, hypomania, or a mixed state. Several medications interact with oral contraceptives or increase the risk of developing polycystic ovary syndrome. Consideration of possible pregnancy is essential, and should be planned in advance whenever possible. Rates of recurrence have been shown to be equal in pregnant and nonpregnant women with BD. Risks of medication to the fetus at various points of development must be balanced against the risks of not treating, which is also detrimental to both fetus and mother. The postpartum period is a time of especially high risk; as many as 40% to 67% of women with BD report experiencing a postpartum mania or depression. The decision to breastfeed must also take into account the adverse impact of sleep deprivation in triggering mood episodes. In order to best address these issues, clinicians must be familiar with the data and collaborate with the patient to assess risks and benefits for the individual women and her family. PMID:18689292

  10. Cognitive enhancing agents in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vreeker, Annabel; van Bergen, Annet H; Kahn, René S

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of schizophrenia and is also present in bipolar disorder (BD). Whereas decreased intelligence precedes the onset of psychosis in schizophrenia and remains relatively stable thereafter; high intelligence is a risk factor for bipolar illness but cognitive function decreases after onset of symptoms. While in schizophrenia, many studies have been conducted on the development of cognitive enhancing agents; in BD such studies are almost non-existent. This review focuses on the pharmacological agents with putative effects on cognition in both schizophrenia and bipolar illness; specifically agents targeting the dopaminergic, cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmitter pathways in schizophrenia and the cognitive effects of lithium, anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in BD. In the final analysis we conclude that cognitive enhancing agents have not yet been produced convincingly for schizophrenia and have hardly been studied in BD. Importantly, studies should focus on other phases of the illness. To be able to treat cognitive deficits effectively in schizophrenia, patients in the very early stages of the illness, or even before - in the ultra-high risk stages - should be targeted. In contrast, cognitive deficits occur later in BD, and therefore drugs should be tested in BD after the onset of illness. Hopefully, we will then find effective drugs for the incapacitating effects of cognitive deficits in these patients.

  11. Heritability of cognitive functions in families with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Antila, Mervi; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Kieseppä, Tuula; Soronen, Pia; Palo, Outi M; Paunio, Tiina; Haukka, Jari; Partonen, Timo; Lönnqvist, Jouko

    2007-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is highly heritable. Cognitive dysfunctions often observed in bipolar patients and their unaffected relatives implicate that these impairments may be associated with genetic predisposition to bipolar disorder and thus fulfill the criteria of a valid endophenotype for the disorder. However, the most fundamental criterion, their heritability, has not been directly studied in any bipolar population. This population-based study estimated the heritability of cognitive functions in bipolar disorder. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to a population-based sample of 110 individuals from 52 families with bipolar disorder. Heritability of cognitive functions as assessed with neuropsychological test scores were estimated using the Solar package. Significant additive heritabilities were found in verbal ability, executive functioning, and psychomotor processing speed. Genetic contribution was low to verbal learning functions. High heritability, in executive functioning and psychomotor processing speed suggest that these may be valid endophenotypic traits for genetic studies of bipolar disorder.

  12. Clinical variables and implications of the personality on the outcome of bipolar illness: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Barquero, Nieves; García-López, Olga; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro; Camacho-Laraña, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Outcome in bipolar patients is affected by comorbidity. Comorbid personality disorders are frequent and may complicate the course of bipolar illness. This pilot study examined a series of 40 euthymic bipolar patients (DSM-IV criteria) (bipolar I disorder 31, bipolar II disorder 9) to assess the effect of clinical variables and the influence of comorbid personality on the clinical course of bipolar illness. Bipolar patients with a diagnosis of comorbid personality disorder (n = 30) were compared with “pure” bipolar patients (n = 10) with regard to demographic, clinical, and course of illness variables. Comorbid personality disorder was diagnosed in 75% of patients according to ICD-10 criteria, with obsessive-compulsive personality disorder being the most frequent type. Sixty-three per cent of subjects had more than one comorbid personality disorder. Bipolar patients with and without comorbid personality disorder showed no significant differences regarding features of the bipolar illness, although the group with comorbid personality disorder showed a younger age at onset, more depressive episodes, and longer duration of bipolar illness. In subjects with comorbid personality disorders, the number of hospitalizations correlated significantly with depressive episodes and there was an inverse correlation between age at the first episode and duration of bipolar illness. These findings, however, should be interpreted taking into account the preliminary nature of a pilot study and the contamination of the sample with too many bipolar II patients. PMID:19300559

  13. [Antidepressant-resistant depression and the bipolar spectrum -- diagnostic and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Gonda, Xénia; Rihmer, Annamária; Döme, Péter

    2016-01-01

    According to the results of epidemiological studies mood disorders with unipolar (major and minor depressive disorder; dysthymia) or bipolar features are among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders. These disorders with their frequent comorbidities (alcohol and/or drug use disorders, smoking, suicide, cardiovascular disorders) pose great public health challenge and cause substantial individual and familar burdens as well. Since SSRIs and other new antidepressant agents entered the market the possibilities to treat depression improved substantially but 25-35 percent of major depressives do not respond even to the second antidepressant trial but the rate of patients who are resistant after the third and fourth adequate antidepressant trial are around only 15-25 and 10 percent, respectively. Pharmacotherapy-resistant depression is a multicausal phenomenon. Along with its well-known risk-factors investigations of the past decade have revealed that unrecognised or hidden (subsyndromal or subthreshold) bipolarity is one of the most frequent causes of treatment resistance. In the case of bipolar depression (either as a part of syndromal bipolar I or II disorder or a subsyndromal manifestation) antidepressant monotherapy should be avoided and, instead of it, the administration of a mood stabilizer (primarily lithium and lamotrigine) or some atypical antipsychotics (preferably quetiapine) are recommended. If antidepressant is inevitably necessary in bipolar depression, we should use it always in combination with mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. PMID:27244871

  14. [Prodromal phase in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Da Fonseca, D; Maurel, M; Adida, M; Besnier, N; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-01-01

    The prodromal phase is generally described as a subsyndromal stage preceding the disease onset. The characterization of such phase found its main purpose in secondary prevention. Up to now, clinical research relating to this topic in mental health has primarily focus on schizophrenic disorders. Over the last years, some studies have applied similar methods in order to characterize a preclinical phase in bipolar disorders. In spite of the fact that this strategy appears less adequate in bipolar disorders, these studies have demonstrated the existence of prodromal signs in a majority of patients. However, these features appear for the moment neither sufficiently characteristic, nor sufficiently specific to allow the construction of suitable assessment instruments, or to suggest precise guidelines in the management of these subjects. Also, these prodromal features show considerable overlap with other psychiatric disorders, especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia Interestingly, a limited number of studies have looked at the number of patients considered in a prodromal phase of schizophrenia which later developed a bipolar disorder and reported substantial proportions of subjects in this case, further highlighting the obvious bias in favor of schizophrenia in the actual prevention politics. In order to identify potential candidates at a prodromal phase of bipolar disorders that could benefit from early intervention, studies have relied on both high genetic risk and symptoms at the boundary of the actual classification. However, even within such approach, pharmacological treatments have not proven obvious advantage in terms of prevention. It is suggested that adopting a more longitudinal vision of the disease and, given the mean age of onset of bipolar disorder and a fortiori of its prodromal phase, a more developmental perspective of individuals, could help lowering the confusion in this field ; Also, given the considerable overlap

  15. Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on mood and cortisol release in first-degree relatives of type I and type II bipolar patients and healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, S; Honig, A; Nicolson, N A; Riedel, W J

    2002-11-01

    Biological vulnerability for bipolar disorders (BD) in relatives of BD patients has not as yet been established. Serotonergic vulnerability was studied, using acute tryptophan depletion (ATD), in healthy first-degree relatives of BD patients and healthy controls. The effects of ATD on mood and cortisol release in 30 healthy adult, lifetime symptom free, unaffected first-degree relatives of BD patients (Family History; FH) were compared with effects in 15 healthy matched controls in a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover design. During ATD and placebo, salivary cortisol response was also assessed during a stress-inducing speech task (SIST). First-degree relatives of type II BD patients (FH II) showed an elevation of mood, whereas control subjects and relatives of type I BD patients (FH I) showed a lowering of mood after ATD. ATD was followed by a decrease in cortisol level in both FH subgroups, but not in the controls. The results suggest serotonergic vulnerability that affected mood in FH II subjects and cortisol release in both FH I and FH II subjects.

  16. Actimetric evidence that CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP influences sleep and activity patterns in patients affected by bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Dallaspezia, Sara; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Lorenzi, Cristina; Serretti, Alessandro; Barbini, Barbara; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Depressive insomnia and diurnal fluctuations of mood and activity are core clinical features of mood disorders. Here we studied the effect of CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP (rs1801260) on the actimetric recorded diurnal activity and nocturnal sleep of 39 bipolar depressed inpatients. Compared to T/T homozygotes, carriers of the C allele had a similar degree of severity of depression, but showed higher activity levels in the evening, a delayed sleep onset (mean 79 min later), and a reduced amount of sleep during the night (mean 75 min less). Ongoing lithium treatment significantly interacted with rs1801260 by enhancing activity levels in the evening and reducing the differences among genotype groups. Individual characteristics of the molecular clock can influence sleep symptoms in mood disorders.

  17. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Swann, Alan C; Steinberg, Joel L; Lijffijt, Marijn; Moeller, Gerard F

    2009-10-01

    Bipolar mixed states combine depressive and manic features, presenting diagnostic and treatment challenges and reflecting a severe form of the illness. DSM-IV criteria for a mixed state require combined depressive and manic syndromes, but a range of mixed states has been described clinically. A unified definition of mixed states would be valuable in understanding their diagnosis, mechanism and treatment implications. We investigated the manner in which depressive and manic features combine to produce a continuum of mixed states. In 88 subjects with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV), we evaluated symptoms and clinical characteristics, and compared depression-based, mania-based, and other published definitions of mixed states. We developed an index of the extent to which symptoms were mixed (Mixed State Index, MSI) and characterized its relationship to clinical state. Predominately manic and depressive mixed states using criteria from recent literature, as well as Kraepelinian mixed states, had similar symptoms and MSI scores. Anxiety correlated significantly with depression scores in manic subjects and with mania scores in depressed subjects. Discriminant function analysis associated mixed states with symptoms of hyperactivity and negative cognitions, but not subjective depressive or elevated mood. High MSI scores were associated with severe course of illness. For depressive or manic episodes, characteristics of mixed states emerged with two symptoms of the opposite polarity. This was a cross-sectional study. Mixed states appear to be a continuum. An index of the degree to which depressive and manic symptoms combine appears useful in identifying and characterizing mixed states. We propose a depressive or manic episode with three or more symptoms of the opposite polarity as a parsimonious definition of a mixed state.

  18. Treatment Guidelines for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowatch, Robert A.; Fristad, Mary; Birmaher, Boris; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Findling, Robert L.; Hellander, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians who treat children and adolescents with bipolar disorder desperately need current treatment guidelines. These guidelines were developed by expert consensus and a review of the extant literature about the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric bipolar disorders. The four sections of these guidelines include diagnosis, comorbidity, acute…

  19. Optimising the management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MsAbda Mahmood; Ebmeler, Klaus R

    2015-05-01

    NICE recommends that when adults present in primary care with depression, they should be asked about previous periods of overactivity or disinhibited behaviour. If this behaviour lasted for four or more days referral for a specialist mental health assessment should be considered. Although depressive episodes are not necessary for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, they are common and dominate the lifetime pattern of the condition: 50% of the time is spent in a euthymic (well) state, 38% in a depressed and 12% in a manic state. If there have only been depressive symptoms, it is not possible to exclude bipolar disorder. A diagnosis of bipolar disorder is supported by diagnostic criteria and usually confirmed by a psychiatrist. If the GP suspects mania or severe depression, or if patients are a danger to themselves or others, an urgent referral should be made for a specialist mental health assessment. If a manic episode has been present during the history the diagnosis is bipolar I disorder, while a hypomanic episode is indicative of bipolar disorder. The patient's care plan should include current health status, social situation, social support, co-ordination arrangements with secondary care, details of early warning signs, and the patient's preferred course of action in the event of a clinical relapse. Physical health checks should focus on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and respiratory disease given the heightened risk for these illnesses in bipolar disorder. PMID:27254890

  20. Optimising the management of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    MsAbda Mahmood; Ebmeler, Klaus R

    2015-05-01

    NICE recommends that when adults present in primary care with depression, they should be asked about previous periods of overactivity or disinhibited behaviour. If this behaviour lasted for four or more days referral for a specialist mental health assessment should be considered. Although depressive episodes are not necessary for a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, they are common and dominate the lifetime pattern of the condition: 50% of the time is spent in a euthymic (well) state, 38% in a depressed and 12% in a manic state. If there have only been depressive symptoms, it is not possible to exclude bipolar disorder. A diagnosis of bipolar disorder is supported by diagnostic criteria and usually confirmed by a psychiatrist. If the GP suspects mania or severe depression, or if patients are a danger to themselves or others, an urgent referral should be made for a specialist mental health assessment. If a manic episode has been present during the history the diagnosis is bipolar I disorder, while a hypomanic episode is indicative of bipolar disorder. The patient's care plan should include current health status, social situation, social support, co-ordination arrangements with secondary care, details of early warning signs, and the patient's preferred course of action in the event of a clinical relapse. Physical health checks should focus on cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and respiratory disease given the heightened risk for these illnesses in bipolar disorder.

  1. Personality Disorders in Substance Abusers: A Comparison of Patients Treated in a Prison Unit and Patients Treated in Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Ragnar; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown a high prevalence of personality disorders in substance abusers. We compared a sample of substance abusers treated in a prison setting with substance abusers treated in a non-prison inpatient setting rated with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III. Base-rate scores indicated a prevalence of 95% of…

  2. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  3. Mutation/SNP analysis in EF-hand calcium binding domain of mitochondrial Ca[Formula: see text] uptake 1 gene in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Salimi, Reza; Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Sakizli, Meral

    2016-06-01

    Calcium signaling is important for synaptic plasticity, generation of brain rhythms, regulating neuronal excitability, data processing and cognition. Impairment in calcium homeostasis contributed to the development of psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (BP). MCU is the most important calcium transporter in mitochondria inner membrane responsible for influx of Ca[Formula: see text]. MICU1 is linked with MCU and has two canonical EF hands that are vital for its activity and regulates MCU-mediated Ca[Formula: see text] influx. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic alteration of EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1 on the development of BP. We examined patients with BP, first degree relatives of these patients and healthy volunteers for mutations and polymorphisms in EF hand calcium binding motifs of MICU1. The result showed no SNP/mutation in BP patients, in healthy subjects and in first degree relatives. Additionally, alignment of the EF hand calcium binding regions among species (Gallus-gallus, Canis-lupus-familiaris, Bos-taurus, Mus-musculus, Rattus-norvegicus, Pan-troglodytes, Homosapiens and Danio-rerio) showed exactly the same amino acids (DLNGDGEVDMEE and DCDGNGELSNKE) except in one of the calcium binding domain of Danio-rerio that there was only one difference; leucine instead of Methionine. Our results showed that the SNP on EF-hand Ca[Formula: see text] binding domains of MICU1 gene had no effect in phenotypic characters of BP patients. PMID:27297032

  4. Reduction in Clostridium difficile environmental contamination by hospitalized patients treated with fidaxomicin.

    PubMed

    Biswas, J S; Patel, A; Otter, J A; Wade, P; Newsholme, W; van Kleef, E; Goldenberg, S D

    2015-07-01

    Fidaxomicin is sporicidal and may be associated with a reduced time to resolution of diarrhoea when used to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This study investigated whether fidaxomicin for treatment of all patients with CDI reduced C. difficile environmental contamination. Surfaces in the rooms of 66 hospitalized patients treated with metronidazole and/or vancomycin and 68 hospitalized patients treated with fidaxomicin were sampled. Patients treated with fidaxomicin were less likely to contaminate their environment (25/68, 36.8%) than patients treated with metronidazole and/or vancomycin (38/66 57.6%) (P = 0.02). Treatment with fidaxomicin was associated with reduced environmental contamination with C. difficile.

  5. Diagnostic features, prevalence, and impact of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Terrence A

    2010-06-01

    Bipolar disorder shares depressive symptoms with unipolar major depressive disorder but is defined by episodes of mania or hypomania. Bipolar disorder in its broadest sense has a community lifetime prevalence of 4% and is a severely impairing illness that impacts several aspects of patients' lives. Race, ethnicity, and gender have no effect on prevalence rates, but women are more likely to experience rapid cycling, mixed states, depressive episodes, and bipolar II disorder than men. Patients with bipolar disorder have high rates of disability and higher rates of mortality than individuals without bipolar disorder. Natural causes such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as suicide and other "unnatural" causes are key contributors to the high mortality rate. The costs associated with bipolar disorder include not only the direct costs of treatment, but also the much greater indirect costs of decreased productivity, excess unemployment, and excess mortality. PMID:20573324

  6. The developmental stages of Bipolar Disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Fatima Imam; Verdolini, Norma; Agius, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a developing disorder; its early stages are sometimes misdiagnosed as anxiety or depressive disorders. At the same time, these disorders are often in comorbidity with bipolar disorder. This complex symptomatology can lead to misinterpretation and underdiagnosis of bipolar disorders, mainly at the earliest stages. Consequently, one of the most important challenges for clinicians is to recognize the non specific early symptoms with the aid of clinical information, for example a family history of bipolar disorder. Furthermore, it is well-known that comorbid anxiety disorders can lead to a worse prognosis in bipolar patients but it is not exactly clear to what extent. A deeper understanding of the relationship between these comorbidities and their stage of development will hopefully lead to better care of patients with bipolar disorder from a younger age. PMID:26417761

  7. Selecting appropriate treatments for maintenance therapy for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Long-term management of bipolar disorder is a crucial component of treatment because the recurrence of the illness negatively affects patients' daily lives and increases their risks for poor health and suicide. An ideal maintenance treatment for bipolar disorder is relatively simple to take, prevents recurrence of both manic and depressive episodes, and is well-tolerated over the long term. Although many different types of medications are used for maintenance therapy of bipolar disorder, none can be considered ideal for a majority of people with bipolar disorder, and each specific form of therapy has different strengths and limitations. Clinicians need to be aware of unique efficacy and side effect factors when choosing long-term therapy and consider treatment components, goals, and individual patient characteristics, which are essential to the successful long-term management of bipolar disorder. Additionally, several forms of psychotherapy specifically tailored to the needs of people with bipolar disorder should be considered as an adjunct to medication.

  8. Clinical and neuroimaging features of severely brain-injured patients treated in a neurosurgical unit compared with patients treated in peripheral non-neurosurgical hospitals.

    PubMed

    Visca, A; Faccani, G; Massaro, F; Bosio, D; Ducati, A; Cogoni, M; Kraus, J; Servadei, F

    2006-04-01

    Most European TBI patients are managed in peripheral hospitals without benefit of guidelines for transfer of such patients to neurosurgical units as needed. This report compares clinical features and outcomes in two series of severe TBI patients: those admitted to a neurosurgical centre or to a general hospital, all in the Piedmont Region of Italy. Of 630 patients with a GCS of 3-8, 351 were admitted to a centralized neurosurgical unit, and 279 were admitted and treated at a peripheral hospital. All patients had a CT scan read by a neurosurgeon on duty and were classified using the Marshall criteria as having a diffuse injury or non-surgical mass lesions. Outcomes were assessed between 6 months and 6 years using either the GOS Extended or the GOS. Independent variables were age, sex, GCS score and Marshall classification. All the examined factors were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.001). For patients admitted to the neurosurgical centre, age, Marshall classification of the CT and GCS were predictors of a favourable outcome, while for patients treated in general hospitals, Marshall classification of the CT, gender and age were predictors of a favourable outcome. Patients admitted to neurosurgical centres are different from those treated in general hospitals not having these specialized facilities and personnel. The absence of guidelines for the transfer of these patients for more advanced care are lacking and should be the focus of new studies on patient referral.

  9. Tardive dyskinesia in 2 patients treated with ziprasidone

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, Jambur; Burgoyne, Karl S.; Niz, David; Smith, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Ziprasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug that is believed to have a low propensity for inducing extrapyramidal symptoms, including tardive dyskinesia (TD). Two of our patients developed TD after 23 months and 34 months of ziprasidone monotherapy, respectively. One of the patients had had earlier exposure to typical antipsychotic drugs, but no other predisposing factors for TD were noted. Therefore, patients on long-term therapy with atypical antipsychotic drugs should be screened periodically for TD. PMID:15644988

  10. Impaired reticuloendothelial function in patients treated with methyldopa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelton, J.G.

    1985-09-05

    In about 20 per cent of patients taking the antihypertensive agent methyldopa, IgG autoantibodies form against red cells, but most such patients do not have hemolysis. The reason for this is uncertain; it does not appear to be explained by known characteristics of the autoantibody. Since antibody-dependent reticuloendothelial function is an important determinant of cell clearance, the authors measured reticuloendothelial function in nine patients taking methyldopa. They did this by measuring the rate of clearance of radiolabeled autologous red cells sensitized with anti-D alloantibody. Five patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test, and four did not. Only one patient had laboratory evidence of hemolysis. The patients without hemolysis had significantly impaired reticuloendothelial clearance. In contrast, the patient with hemolysis did not have impaired reticuloendothelial function. This study suggests that in patients taking methyldopa who have a positive direct antiglobulin test the absence of hemolysis may be caused by an impairment in reticuloendothelial function. That the drug itself may be responsible for the impairment is suggested by the occurrence of abnormal reticuloendothelial function in patients taking the drug who have a negative direct antiglobulin test.

  11. [Personality and emesis in the patient treated with antineoplastic chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Llorca, G; Martín, T; Derecho, J; Gómez, M J

    1991-01-01

    A sample of twenty cancer patients following chemotherapy realize MMPI questionnaire, and another one for valuation of emetic and anticipatory phenomena in relation to said therapy. The authors came to the conclusion that 36.8% of the sample had anticipatory nausea and vomiting, 63.6% anticipatory dysphoria, and 66% emetic incidents after chemotherapy. The conclusion, through comparison of personality variables, is that all patients showed neuroticism and depression scales increased, in relation to healthy population. Depression variable increased especially in patients that didn't present anticipatory nausea and vomiting. Likewise, patients with anticipatory symptoms or emetic incidents after chemotherapy present an increased social introversion variable.

  12. The development of lurasidone for bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Antony; Xu, Jane; Hsu, Jay; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Pikalov, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, recurrent illness that ranks among the top 10 causes of disability in the developed world. As the illness progresses, major depressive episodes increasingly predominate. However, few treatment options are available that have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy in combination with mood stabilizers. Lurasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug that was initially developed for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since no previous atypical antipsychotic development program had proceeded directly from work on schizophrenia to bipolar depression, the decision to focus on this indication represented an innovation in central nervous system drug development and was designed to address a clinically significant unmet need. The current review summarizes key results of a clinical development program undertaken to characterize the efficacy and safety of lurasidone in patients diagnosed with bipolar depression. Lurasidone is currently the only treatment for bipolar depression approved in the United States as both a monotherapy and an adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. The approval of lurasidone expands available treatment options for patients with bipolar depression and provides a therapy with an overall favorable risk-benefit profile. PMID:26771990

  13. Ixabepilone in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-13

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Alveolar Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Embryonal Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  14. Cixutumumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive; Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Retinoblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  15. To Treat or Not to Treat: The Role of Adjuvant Radioiodine Therapy in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, Marilee; Quiros, Roderick M.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) is used in treatment of patients with differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. It is typically used after thyroidectomy, both as a means of imaging to detect residual thyroid tissue or metastatic disease, as well as a means of treatment by ablation if such tissue is found. In this paper, we discuss the indications for and the mechanisms of RAI in the treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. We discuss the attendant risks and benefits that come with its use, as well as techniques used to optimize its effectiveness as an imaging tool and a therapeutic modality. PMID:23193402

  16. Laser radiation of blood in treating patients with postinfarction heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchuk, V.; Polyanskaya, O.; Chaplinsky, R.; Ilashchuk, I.; Kulyk, T.

    1999-11-01

    168 patients on the postclinical stage of treatment of acute myocardial infarction were examined by means of the use of basic antiischemic therapy and intravenous laser radiation of blood (LRB). All patients were studied with the help of transesophageal electrocardiostimulation, bicycle ergometry, echocardiography and Holter ECG monitoring in the dynamics of prolonged observation and treatment. The analysis of efficiency of the LRB has shown that the most minimal degree of myocardial ischemization was marked in patients after intravenous LRB. The patients before LRB had the greater reduction of coronary reserve. The use of LRB has given the possibility to the optimization of therapy in patients on the stage of the forming of `the postinfarction heart'.

  17. Treating Insomnia: A Review of Patient Perceptions Toward Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Saini, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Patient views about their treatment for insomnia often dictate outcome. This review explores the literature relating to the patients' global perceptions toward treatment for insomnia. A strategic literature search was conducted using five databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase). The 57 research articles included for this review were mapped out chronologically across three key stages of treatment-seeking (pretreatment appraisal, actual treatment experiences, and posttreatment evaluation). Patient perceptions played an important role across these three key stages and influenced subsequent health behaviors such as the initiation of help-seeking, treatment uptake, treatment adherence, and treatment adjustment. Patients' perceptions toward treatment were heavily grounded by their psychosocial contexts. Clinical implications and future directions for including patient-centered metrics in mainstream practice and research are discussed.

  18. Classification of schizophrenia and bipolar patients using static and dynamic resting-state fMRI brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Barnaly; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; Damaraju, Eswar; Cetin, Mustafa S; Miller, Robyn; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-07-01

    Recently, functional network connectivity (FNC, defined as the temporal correlation among spatially distant brain networks) has been used to examine the functional organization of brain networks in various psychiatric illnesses. Dynamic FNC is a recent extension of the conventional FNC analysis that takes into account FNC changes over short periods of time. While such dynamic FNC measures may be more informative about various aspects of connectivity, there has been no detailed head-to-head comparison of the ability of static and dynamic FNC to perform classification in complex mental illnesses. This paper proposes a framework for automatic classification of schizophrenia, bipolar and healthy subjects based on their static and dynamic FNC features. Also, we compare cross-validated classification performance between static and dynamic FNC. Results show that the dynamic FNC significantly outperforms the static FNC in terms of predictive accuracy, indicating that features from dynamic FNC have distinct advantages over static FNC for classification purposes. Moreover, combining static and dynamic FNC features does not significantly improve the classification performance over the dynamic FNC features alone, suggesting that static FNC does not add any significant information when combined with dynamic FNC for classification purposes. A three-way classification methodology based on static and dynamic FNC features discriminates individual subjects into appropriate diagnostic groups with high accuracy. Our proposed classification framework is potentially applicable to additional mental disorders.

  19. Quality of life of patients surgically treated for ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hammed Sikiru; Adebola, Rafel Adetokunbo; Arotiba, Juwon Tunde; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Uchenna Kelvin; Amole, Taiwo Gboluwaga; Adeoye, Joshua Biodun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical management of ameloblastoma can have a profound functional and psychological effect on a patient's quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the pre- and post-operative QoL outcomes of patients requiring surgical treatment for ameloblastoma. Patients and Methods: A total number of 30 patients were identified as fulfilling the criteria for this study. They included 18 males and 12 females, aged between 14 and 47 years with a mean of 27.3 years (standard deviation 10.2). Each patient completed a modified version of the University of Washington QoL questionnaire version 4, a day to surgery and postoperatively on the 7th day, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: Following surgical treatment of patients for ameloblastoma, the QoL decreased immediately after surgery. It then gradually improved over time and exceeded the preoperative value at 6 months postoperatively. When analyzed with respect to location, posteriorly placed tumors had the best postoperative QoL outcome. Patients expressed concern more about their appearance preoperatively while postoperative concerns were mostly focused on their ability to chew. Conclusion: Significant improvement occurred in QoL scores following surgical management of ameloblastoma. The small sample size utilized in this study limits a definitive conclusion. A larger multicenter study is therefore recommended. PMID:27226682

  20. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset.

  1. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset. PMID:15482352

  2. [A new method for treating patients with chronic prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, M I

    1995-01-01

    A new preparation is reported for treatment of chronic inflammation of the prostate, which substantially lowers rates of patients' complaints and depresses the secretion leucocyte reaction. Prostatilen was shown to be capable of normalization of immunity status of the chronic prostatitis patients thus lowering the microbial index of the cultured prostate secretion microorganisms. The following new nonantibacterial strategy of treatment of chronic prostatitis patients is proposed: prostatilen given as a single agent or in combination with immunomodulators and physiotherapeutic methods. Antibacterial therapy is to be instituted on a short-term basis only during the period of exacerbation of the inflammatory process.

  3. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  4. [Effectiveness of treating periodontitis in patients with thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Moskvina, T S

    2001-01-01

    Efficiency of some drugs in the treatment of periodontitis in combination with corrective treatment of thyroid function was evaluated in 70 patients with hypo- and hyperthyrosis with different initial level of nonspecific resistance. The therapeutic complex including drugs commonly used in the treatment of periodontitis and irrigation of the periodontium with lithium chloride and chlorohexidine solutions was highly effective in patients with thyroid dysfunction and relatively favorable status of nonspecific resistance of the organism. In patients with hypo- and hyperthyrosis with poor nonspecific resistance the best effect in the treatment of periodontitis was attained with potassium orotate as an immunomodulator and lithium chloride. PMID:11236145

  5. How I treat influenza in patients with hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Corey; Englund, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has heightened the interest of clinicians for options in the prevention and management of influenza virus infection in immunocompromised patients. Even before the emergence of the novel 2009 H1N1 strain, influenza disease was a serious complication in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy or undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Here we review the clinical manifestations of seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza and discuss current diagnosis, antiviral treatment, and prophylaxis options. We also summarize infection control and vaccination strategies for patients, family members, and caregivers. PMID:20009037

  6. [A Patient with Cavitated Pulmonary Metastases Treated with Regorafenib].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masatake; Mori, Misuzu; Sata, Naohiro; Fujii, Hirofumi

    2016-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman underwent surgical resection of rectal cancer(SI, N3, Stage IIIb)and received 12 courses of adjuvant mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy. Six months after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, she was found to have pulmonary metastases, and was treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the pulmonary nodules showed central cavitation without any change in size. After 6 additional courses of chemotherapy, pulmonary lesions increased in and had consolidated. She was treated with regorafenib as second-line chemotherapy for recurrent disease. After 6 courses of regorafenib, the pulmonary nodules became cavitated. According to the RECIST criteria, the tumor response was stable disease. However, the morphology was significantly changed and tumor growth had been controlled for a long time. Assessment of tumor response depends not onlyon size according to the RECIST criteria, but also on the morphologic response when we assess tumor response to molecular targeted drugs. PMID:27306815

  7. Suicidality in bipolar disorders--psychoanalytic contribution.

    PubMed

    Etzersdorfer, Elmar; Schell, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of psychoanalytic contributions to the understanding of suicidal behavior in bipolar patients. Although little specific literature is available, many authors have contributed to the understanding of these patients' psychodynamics and suicidality in various papers. Different points of emphasis are described, among these are defensive strategies, narcissistic personality structure, and dealing with intense feelings such as object loss. Using detailed case descriptions, the inner world of bipolar patients as it relates to their suicidality, along with the appropriate psychoanalytically oriented approach to treatment, are highlighted. PMID:16717045

  8. Treating Patients with High-Risk Smoldering Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, patients with smoldering myeloma classified as high risk for progression will be randomly assigned to undergo standard observation or six 4-week courses of treatment with the drug lenalidomide.

  9. Serial thyroid iodine content in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.S.; Sandler, M.P.; Patton, J.A.; Brill, A.B.

    1986-02-01

    X-ray fluorescent scanning was used to measure initial thyroidal iodine content in 64 patients diagnosed as being hyperthyroid and selected for I-131 therapy, and serially in 48 of these patients after therapy in an attempt to determine those patients that were at high risk of becoming hypothyroid. Iodine content fell rapidly after therapy, reaching a nadir at about three months. Based on the population studied, the chance of early hypothyroidism (within 12 months) is about 80% if the iodine content measured at three months is less than 2 mg. If the iodine content is greater than 2 mg, the chance is only about 14%. The serial measurement of thyroidal iodine content (with x-ray fluorescent scanning) may allow early identification of those patients at high risk of developing permanent hypothyroidism following a therapeutic dose of I-131.

  10. Antipsychotic Medicines for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    Antipsychotic Drugs for Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: What You Should Know What are antipsychotic drugs? Antipsychotics are prescription drugs used to treat schizophrenia. They can also be used— ...

  11. [Diabetics in population of patients treated by pars plana vitrectomy].

    PubMed

    Bezdésová-Bohunická, N; Skorkovská, S; Synek, S; Kanovský, R; Masková, Z; Synková, M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate visual and anatomic outcomes following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for complications of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and to assess risk factors that might influence the visual outcome after successful PPV. The medical records of 35 diabetic patients of both types 1 and 2 of diabetes, who underwent vitrectomy for complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) between 2004 and 2005, were analyzed retrospectively. Certain preoperative systemic and ophthalmic variables, intraoperative variables and postoperative complications with negative influence on visual outcome after PPV were recorded. The postoperative follow-up time was 6 months. The collected data as well as visual outcomes after PPV were statistically analyzed. Statistically significant visual improvement was achieved in 51.4 % of the patients; visual acuity (VA) deteriorated in 25.7% of the patients and remained unchanged in 22.9 % of the patients. Preoperative median of VA was 0.0167, changed to 0.1 postoperatively and remained stable on 0.1 level during the 6 months follow-up. VA > or = 0.1 was achieved in 60 % of the patients 6 months after PPV. Some of the followed variables associated with deteriorated or unchanged postoperative VA can be considered as risk factors of an unfavorable prognosis. Evaluated risk factors include preoperative VA worse than 0.1, presence of systemic complications of DM accompanying ocular complications, postoperative occurrence of iris neovascularization and neovascular glaucoma. In conclusion, anatomically successful PPV in diabetic patients is not always followed by an improvement of VA. The optimal timing of vitrectomy is very important not only in order to obtain good visual acuity but also to maintain good visual function for long time. We suppose that an adequate control of DM, sufficient screening for DR and timely laser intervention of DR might decrease the progression of DR and onset of sight threatening complications

  12. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  13. [Diabetics in population of patients treated by pars plana vitrectomy].

    PubMed

    Bezdésová-Bohunická, N; Skorkovská, S; Synek, S; Kanovský, R; Masková, Z; Synková, M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate visual and anatomic outcomes following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for complications of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and to assess risk factors that might influence the visual outcome after successful PPV. The medical records of 35 diabetic patients of both types 1 and 2 of diabetes, who underwent vitrectomy for complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) between 2004 and 2005, were analyzed retrospectively. Certain preoperative systemic and ophthalmic variables, intraoperative variables and postoperative complications with negative influence on visual outcome after PPV were recorded. The postoperative follow-up time was 6 months. The collected data as well as visual outcomes after PPV were statistically analyzed. Statistically significant visual improvement was achieved in 51.4 % of the patients; visual acuity (VA) deteriorated in 25.7% of the patients and remained unchanged in 22.9 % of the patients. Preoperative median of VA was 0.0167, changed to 0.1 postoperatively and remained stable on 0.1 level during the 6 months follow-up. VA > or = 0.1 was achieved in 60 % of the patients 6 months after PPV. Some of the followed variables associated with deteriorated or unchanged postoperative VA can be considered as risk factors of an unfavorable prognosis. Evaluated risk factors include preoperative VA worse than 0.1, presence of systemic complications of DM accompanying ocular complications, postoperative occurrence of iris neovascularization and neovascular glaucoma. In conclusion, anatomically successful PPV in diabetic patients is not always followed by an improvement of VA. The optimal timing of vitrectomy is very important not only in order to obtain good visual acuity but also to maintain good visual function for long time. We suppose that an adequate control of DM, sufficient screening for DR and timely laser intervention of DR might decrease the progression of DR and onset of sight threatening complications

  14. Altered serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 in manic, depressive, mixed state of bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yayan; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Minling; Huang, Xini; Fan, Ni

    2016-10-30

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with alterations of cytokines in the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 in manic, depressive, mixed state patients of BD. The correlations between the serum cytokines levels with the demographic characteristics and the psychiatric symptoms were also assessed. We measured serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from 59 BD patients (37 in manic state, 12 in depressive state, 10 in mixed state) and 80 healthy control subjects. The psychotic symptoms of BD were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). The results showed that serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in manic, depressive and mixed state BD patients were significantly higher than that in controls, while serum IL-18 level was only significantly higher in depressive patients. Serum IL-6 level was significantly positively correlated with YMRS scores in manic episode as well as in mixed episode. When gender and age were added as potentially confounding covariate terms, the differences between controls and each mood state patients were still significant. Our findings provided additional evidence that elevated TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 pathway activities may be involved in the psychopathology of BD. Due to the lack of controlling important confounding factors, such as BMI, smoking status and alcohol use, further studies are required to confirm the roles of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18. PMID:27455146

  15. Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder and Fibromyalgia

    MedlinePlus

    Anticonvulsant Drugs for Nerve Pain, Bipolar Disorder &Fibromyalgia: Choosing What’sRight for You What are anticonvulsant drugs? Anticonvulsants are drugs used to treat seizures. They are also used ...

  16. The microtubular cytoskeleton of olfactory neurons derived from patients with schizophrenia or with bipolar disorder: Implications for biomarker characterization, neuronal physiology and pharmacological screening.

    PubMed

    Benítez-King, G; Valdés-Tovar, M; Trueta, C; Galván-Arrieta, T; Argueta, J; Alarcón, S; Lora-Castellanos, A; Solís-Chagoyán, H

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) are highly inheritable chronic mental disorders with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Despite that many efforts had been made to characterize biomarkers in order to allow for biological testing for their diagnoses, these disorders are currently detected and classified only by clinical appraisal based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Olfactory neuroepithelium-derived neuronal precursors have been recently proposed as a model for biomarker characterization. Because of their peripheral localization, they are amenable to collection and suitable for being cultured and propagated in vitro. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells can be obtained by a non-invasive brush-exfoliation technique from neuropsychiatric patients and healthy subjects. Neuronal precursors isolated from these samples undergo in vitro the cytoskeletal reorganization inherent to the neurodevelopment process which has been described as one important feature in the etiology of both diseases. In this paper, we will review the current knowledge on microtubular organization in olfactory neurons of patients with SZ and with BD that may constitute specific cytoskeletal endophenotypes and their relation with alterations in L-type voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents. Finally, the potential usefulness of neuronal precursors for pharmacological screening will be discussed.

  17. Use of NSAIDs in treating patients with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, almost universally describe pain and stiffness as important contributors to reduced health-related quality of life. Of the treatment options available, NSAIDs are the most widely used agents for symptomatic treatment. NSAIDs are effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs by virtue of their ability to inhibit biosynthesis of prostaglandins at the level of the cyclooxygenase enzyme. However, many of the adverse effects of NSAIDs are also related to inhibition of prostaglandin production, making their use problematic in some patient populations. For the clinician, understanding the biology of prostaglandin as it relates to gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular physiology and the pharmacologic properties of specific NSAIDs is key to using these drugs safely. Of particular importance is the recognition of co-morbid conditions and concomitant drugs that may increase the risk of NSAIDs in particular patients. In patients with risk factors for NSAID toxicity, using the lowest dose of a drug with a short half-life only when it is needed is likely to be the safest treatment option. For those patients whose symptoms cannot be managed with intermittent treatment, using protective strategies is essential. PMID:24267197

  18. Why treat noncompliant patients? Beyond the decent minimum account.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Nir

    2011-12-01

    Patients' medical conditions can result from their own avoidable risk taking. Some lung diseases result from avoidable smoking and some traffic accidents result from victims' reckless driving. Although in many nonmedical areas we hold people responsible for taking risks they could avoid, it is normally harsh and inappropriate to deny patients care because they risked needing it. Why? A popular account is that protecting everyone's "decent minimum," their basic needs, matters more than the benefits of holding people accountable. This account is deficient. Protecting the decent minimum is not always served by offering noncompliant patients either nonbasic or basic care. Nor is protecting that minimum always served by unconditional medical care better than by nonmedical interventions. To interpret the decent minimum in democratic terms is a futile response to these challenges. Ideas for new accounts are suggested.

  19. Neutrophil activation in ivermectin-treated onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed

    Njoo, F L; Hack, C E; Oosting, J; Stilma, J S; Kijlstra, A

    1993-11-01

    Ivermectin is a safe and effective drug for onchocerciasis treatment. In certain individuals, however, therapy is accompanied by adverse reactions. The mechanisms underlying these reactions are not yet known. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether neutrophils are involved in the development of these adverse reactions. Elastase and lactoferrin, two markers for the release of neutrophil azurophilic and specific granule contents respectively, were measured by radioimmunoassays in plasma of onchocerciasis patients with varying degrees of side effects, as well as in control subjects before and 1 and 2 days after ivermectin treatment. A considerable increase of elastase levels after treatment was observed, whereas lactoferrin levels did not change. The percentage of patients with elevated elastase levels was significantly correlated with the degree of side effects. These findings suggest that neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of adverse reactions in these patients.

  20. [Adherence and fidelity in patients treated with intragastric balloon].

    PubMed

    Mazure, R A; Cancer, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; De Castro, M L; Abilés, V; Abilés, J; Bretón, I; Álvarez, V; Peláez, N; Culebras, J M

    2014-01-01

    A correct treatment of obesity needs a program of habits modification regardless of the selected technique, especially if it is minimally invasive as the intragastric balloon (BIG). The adherence of the obese patients with regard to recommended drugs measures to medium- and long-term is less than 50%. Given that the results obtained using the technique of gastric balloon must be seen influenced by adherence to the modification of habits program and its fulfillment, we reviewed series published in attention to the program proposed with the BIG. The series published to date provide few details about the used Therapeutic Programs as well as the adherence of patients to them, and even less concerning the Monitoring Plan and the loyalty of the patient can be seen. We conclude the convenience to agree on a follow-up strategy, at least the 6 months during which the BIG remain in the stomach. PMID:24483961

  1. Relatives’ Emotional Involvement Moderates the Effects of Family Therapy for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Steffany J.; Baucom, Donald H.; Boeding, Sara; Miklowitz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The “critical comments” dimension of the expressed emotion (EE) construct has been found to predict the illness course of patients with bipolar disorder, but less is known about the “emotional overinvolvement” (EOI) component. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether relatives’ observed appropriate and inappropriate emotional involvement (intrusiveness, self-sacrifice, and distress about patients’ well-being) moderated the effectiveness of a family-based intervention for bipolar disorder. Method 108 patients with bipolar disorder (mean age = 35.61 years [SD = 10.07]), 57% female) and their relatives (62% spouses) from two clinical trials completed 10-minute problem-solving interactions prior to being treated with pharmacotherapy plus family-based therapy (FBT) or brief psychoeducation (crisis management, CM). Patients were interviewed every 3–6 months over 2 years to assess mood symptoms. Results When relatives showed low levels of inappropriate self-sacrifice, CM and FBT were both associated with improvements in patients’ manic symptoms over 2 years. When relatives showed high levels, patients in CM became more manic over time, whereas patients in FBT became less manic. Group differences in mania trajectories were also observed at high levels of inappropriate emotional response but not at low. When relatives showed high levels of appropriate self-sacrifice, patients in both groups became less depressed. At low levels of appropriate self-sacrifice, patients in CM did not improve, whereas patients in FBT became less depressed. Conclusions Future studies of bipolar disorder should consider the prognostic value of the amount and appropriateness of relatives’ emotional involvement with patients in addition to their critical behaviors. PMID:25198285

  2. The use of bipolar technology in hysteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Stefania; DE Alberti, Davide; Garuti, Giancarlo

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar technology was introduced in the hysteroscopic clinical use in 1999, by the design of both loop electrodes addressed to resectoscopic surgery and miniaturized electrodes adaptable to small-size hysteroscopes. The need of an electrolytic solution as distension medium and the spatial relationships between the active and return bipolar electrode avoid, by definition, the risks of severe electrolyte imbalance syndromes and unpredictable electrical burns, sometimes complicating monopolar surgery. The true revolution in the hysteroscopy care has achieved through the availability of mini-hysteroscopes not requiring cervical dilatation, thus limiting uterine wall damages and allowing surgeons to manage several endometrial pathologies by mini-invasive procedures using an effective electrosurgical bipolar instrumentation. Many surgical interventions, traditionally accomplished by the resectoscope in a surgical room theatre, can be now carried out in an outpatient setting without any support from anesthesia. The patients' avoidance of surgical room access and the quick return to daily activities lead to an obvious - but not fully demonstrated - improvement in the medical and social costs associated to outpatient operative hysteroscopy. In the field of resectoscopy, bipolar electrodes are clinically as effective as monopolar devices. Randomized trials showed that bipolar resectoscopic technology prevents the electrolyte imbalance observed after monopolar surgery. However, in daily clinical practice the assumedly safer profile of bipolar with respect to monopolar resectoscopy has not been demonstrated yet.

  3. Patient Report: Autism Spectrum Disorder Treated With Camel Milk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This patient report is about my son, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 3 years of age, and the effects I observed when he began drinking camel milk daily. Beginning at age 9, he drank one half cup of raw camel milk a day and experienced overnight an improvement in his symptoms. His continued regular consumption of camel milk was associated with sustained symptom improvements for 6 consecutive years (2007-2013). This patient report is a road map of my navigations, consultations with experts and autism care providers, and the apparent effect of camel milk on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). PMID:24349886

  4. Multimorbidity in bipolar disorder and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with serious mental disorders experience poor physical health, especially increased rates of cardiometabolic morbidity and premature morbidity. Recent evidence suggests that individuals with schizophrenia have numerous comorbid physical conditions that may be under-recorded and undertreated, but to date very few studies have explored this issue for bipolar disorder. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a dataset of 1,751,841 registered patients within 314 primary care practices in Scotland, UK. Bipolar disorder was identified using Read Codes recorded within electronic medical records. Data on 32 common chronic physical conditions were also assessed. Potential prescribing inequalities were evaluated by analysing prescribing data for coronary heart disease (CHD) and hypertension. Results Compared to controls, individuals with bipolar disorder were significantly less likely to have no recorded physical conditions (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.63) and significantly more likely to have one physical condition (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.39), two physical conditions (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.62) and three or more physical conditions (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.64). People with bipolar disorder also had higher rates of thyroid disorders, chronic kidney disease, chronic pain, chronic obstructive airways disease and diabetes but, surprisingly, lower recorded rates of hypertension and atrial fibrillation. People with bipolar disorder and comorbid CHD or hypertension were significantly more likely to be prescribed no antihypertensive or cholesterol-lowering medications compared to controls, and bipolar individuals with CHD or hypertension were significantly less likely to be on two or more antihypertensive agents. Conclusions Individuals with bipolar disorder are similar to individuals with schizophrenia in having a wide range of comorbid and multiple physical health conditions. They are also less likely than controls to have a primary

  5. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  6. Treating Families of Demented Patients: Two Group Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Joel

    The prevalence of dementias in the elderly is steadily increasing. While caring for a dementing patient at home, families are subject to tremendous physical stresses and emotional reactions such as guilt, anger, grief, role confusion, depression, resentment, and loneliness. Two group treatment models addressing the mental health needs of…

  7. Long term evolution of patients treated in a TIA unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) entail a high risk of stroke recurrence, which depends on the etiology. New organizational models have been created, but there is not much information about the long-term evolution of patients managed according to these premises. Our aim is to refer the follow-up of patients attended according to our model of TIA Unit. Methods TIA Unit is located in the Emergency Department and staffed by vascular neurologists. Patients admitted during the Neurology night shift stayed in such Unit <48h with complete etiological study. Preventive treatment is instituted in patients discharged to a high resolution Neurology consult, in order to review in <2 weeks and subsequent follow-up. Results During a year 161 patients were attended, being admitted to the hospital 8.6%. A total of 1470 hospital days were avoided. Recurrence at 90 days was of 0.6%. Mean follow-up was 18.14 ± 8.02 months (0–34), total recurrence 6.2% (70% cardioembolic strokes). There were no complications derived from treatment. Cardiological events were recorded in 10.6%, neoplastic in 5%, cognitive impairment in 11%. There were 3 deaths unrelated nor to the stroke or its treatment. Conclusions This model allows an early diagnosis and treatment of TIA, preventing recurrences of stroke in a long term. It detects atherothrombotic strokes, most of them admitted to the hospital, and it shows a greater difficulty for detecting all cardioembolic strokes. TIA Unit appeared to be safe in using anticoagulation therapy, as the follow-up shows. It shows the same quality of management than hospital admission, with a significant saving in hospital stays. PMID:23635082

  8. Cardiovascular disease in lupus patients: should all patients be treated with statins and aspirin?

    PubMed

    Bruce, Ian N

    2005-10-01

    Premature coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In certain age groups, the risk can be >50 times that of an age-matched population. This population also has an increased prevalence of several key classic risk factors that contribute to the CHD development. Chronic inflammation, anti-phospholipid antibodies and exposure to steroid therapy are also likely to have an impact. We have adopted a proactive approach to classic risk factor management with 'ideal targets' based on viewing SLE as a CHD equivalent condition. In this context, a significant proportion of SLE patients (approximately 30%) will require statins and the majority would be treated with aspirin prophylaxis. Better control of the underlying inflammatory disease is also likely to play an important role and the relative safety of anti-malarials allows their consideration as an adjunct in a large proportion of patients. Well-conducted clinical trials are now needed to advance beyond these initial recommendations.

  9. Risk factors for suicide among children and youths with bipolar spectrum and early bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rajewska-Rager, Aleksandra; Sibilski, Piotr; Lepczyńska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years much attention has been given to determine risk factors for suicide among adults with bipolar disorder. Such studies concerning children and youths, which would also take into account the specificity of the developmental age, are still too few. The ability to identify risk factors for children and youths with mood disorders, as well as the possibility to monitor them, is an essential element in preventing suicidal behaviours. Previous studies have clearly indicated that in the group of patients with an early onset of the bipolar disorder the occurrence of suicidal thoughts and intentions were significantly increased. Identifying the risk of suicide is hindered further by the complexity of the phenomenon, which is a compound interaction of various factors: biological, environmental, sociological, psychological and clinical. This is especially true with young adults suffering from mental illness and presenting a number of other psychopathological symptoms. The following paper introduces and reviews the results of current studies, which analysed the risk factors for suicide among children and youths with bipolar spectrum or already diagnosed with bipolar disorder. For this purpose we conducted the overview of recent years literature available in PubMed/MEDLINE database, including the following search criteria: early onset bipolar disorder, bipolar disorder in children and young people, the spectrum of bipolar disorder, and suicidal ideation, suicidal intent, suicide.

  10. Genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to antidepressants in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Domenici, Enrico; Lewis, Glyn; Malafosse, Alain; O'Donovan, Michael; Wendland, Jens R; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of response to antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) makes individual treatment outcomes currently unpredictable. It has been suggested that resistance to antidepressant treatment might be due to undiagnosed bipolar disorder or bipolar spectrum features. Here, we investigate the relationship between genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants in MDD. Polygenic scores indexing risk for bipolar disorder were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder whole genome association study. Linear regressions tested the effect of polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder on proportional reduction in depression severity in two large samples of individuals with MDD, treated with antidepressants, NEWMEDS (n=1,791) and STAR*D (n=1,107). There was no significant association between polygenic scores for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants. Our data indicate that molecular measure of genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder does not aid in understanding non-response to antidepressants.

  11. Neuropsychological evidence of impaired cognitive empathy in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Harari, Hagai; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2009-01-01

    The empathic abilities have never been examined in bipolar disorder patients, despite frequent observations of impaired social behavior. To examine the neuropsychological processes that underlie the affective and cognitive empathic ability in bipolar disorder, the authors compared affective and cognitive empathic abilities, as well as theory of mind and executive functions, of euthymic bipolar disorder patients and healthy comparison subjects. Significant deficits in cognitive empathy and theory of mind were observed, while affective empathy was elevated in bipolar disorder. Patients showed impaired cognitive flexibility (shifting and reversal learning) but intact planning behavior. Impaired cognitive empathy was related with performance in neurocognitive tasks of cognitive flexibility, suggesting that prefrontal cortical dysfunction may account for impaired cognitive empathy in bipolar disorder. PMID:19359453

  12. Risk Factors of Attempted Suicide in Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates of bipolar patients are among the highest of any psychiatric disorder, and improved identification of risk factors for attempted and completed suicide translates into improved clinical outcome. Factors that may be predictive of suicidality in an exclusively bipolar population are examined. White race, family suicide history, and…

  13. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder.

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Knauz, Robert O.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Between 10% and 24% of bipolar patients experience a rapid cycling course, with 4 or more mood episodes occurring per year. Characterized by nonresponse to standard mood-stabilizing medications, rapid cyclers are…

  15. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder. PMID:26369921

  16. Being Ready to Treat Ebola Virus Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brett-Major, David M.; Jacob, Shevin T.; Jacquerioz, Frederique A.; Risi, George F.; Fischer, William A.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Houlihan, Catherine F.; Crozier, Ian; Bosa, Henry Kyobe; Lawler, James V.; Adachi, Takuya; Hurley, Sara K.; Berry, Louise E.; Carlson, John C.; Button, Thomas. C.; McLellan, Susan L.; Shea, Barbara J.; Kuniyoshi, Gary G.; Ferri, Mauricio; Murthy, Srinivas G.; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lamontagne, Francois; Porembka, David T.; Schieffelin, John S.; Rubinson, Lewis; O'Dempsey, Tim; Donovan, Suzanne M.; Bausch, Daniel G.; Fowler, Robert A.; Fletcher, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa continues, clinical preparedness is needed in countries at risk for EVD (e.g., United States) and more fully equipped and supported clinical teams in those countries with epidemic spread of EVD in Africa. Clinical staff must approach the patient with a very deliberate focus on providing effective care while assuring personal safety. To do this, both individual health care providers and health systems must improve EVD care. Although formal guidance toward these goals exists from the World Health Organization, Medecin Sans Frontières, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other groups, some of the most critical lessons come from personal experience. In this narrative, clinicians deployed by the World Health Organization into a wide range of clinical settings in West Africa distill key, practical considerations for working safely and effectively with patients with EVD. PMID:25510724

  17. Being ready to treat Ebola virus disease patients.

    PubMed

    Brett-Major, David M; Jacob, Shevin T; Jacquerioz, Frederique A; Risi, George F; Fischer, William A; Kato, Yasuyuki; Houlihan, Catherine F; Crozier, Ian; Bosa, Henry Kyobe; Lawler, James V; Adachi, Takuya; Hurley, Sara K; Berry, Louise E; Carlson, John C; Button, Thomas C; McLellan, Susan L; Shea, Barbara J; Kuniyoshi, Gary G; Ferri, Mauricio; Murthy, Srinivas G; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lamontagne, Francois; Porembka, David T; Schieffelin, John S; Rubinson, Lewis; O'Dempsey, Tim; Donovan, Suzanne M; Bausch, Daniel G; Fowler, Robert A; Fletcher, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    As the outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa continues, clinical preparedness is needed in countries at risk for EVD (e.g., United States) and more fully equipped and supported clinical teams in those countries with epidemic spread of EVD in Africa. Clinical staff must approach the patient with a very deliberate focus on providing effective care while assuring personal safety. To do this, both individual health care providers and health systems must improve EVD care. Although formal guidance toward these goals exists from the World Health Organization, Medecin Sans Frontières, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other groups, some of the most critical lessons come from personal experience. In this narrative, clinicians deployed by the World Health Organization into a wide range of clinical settings in West Africa distill key, practical considerations for working safely and effectively with patients with EVD. PMID:25510724

  18. Hepatitis C: Treatment of difficult to treat patients

    PubMed Central

    Hilgenfeldt, Eric G; Schlachterman, Alex; Firpi, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, more so recently, treatment options for hepatitis C virus (HCV) have seemed to exponentially grow. Up until recently, the regimen of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) stood as the standard of care. Direct acting antivirals, which target nonstructural proteins involved in replication and infection of HCV were first approved in 2011 as an addition to the peg-IFN and RBV regimen and with them have come increased sustained virological response rates (SVR). The previously reported 50%-70% SVR rates using the combination of peg-IFN and RBV are no longer the standard of care with direct acting antiviral (DAA) based regimens now achieving SVR of 70%-90%. Peg-IFN free as well as “all oral” regimens are also available. The current randomized controlled trials available show favorable SVRs in patients who are naive to treatment, non-cirrhotic, and not human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-co-infected. What about patients who do not fit into these categories? In this review, we aim to discuss the currently approved and soon to be approved DAAs while focusing on their roles in patients that are treatment experienced, cirrhotic, or co-infected with HIV. In this discussion, review of the clinical trials leading to recent consensus guidelines as well as discussion of barriers to treatment will occur. A case will attempt will be made that social services, including financial support and drug/alcohol treatment, should be provided to all HCV infected patients to improve chances of cure and thus prevention of late stage sequela. PMID:26244069

  19. Options for treating postherpetic neuralgia in the medically complicated patient

    PubMed Central

    Bruckenthal, Patricia; Barkin, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Patients with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) are often of advanced age or immunocompromised and likely to have ≥1 comorbid medical condition for which they receive ≥1 medication (polypharmacy). Comorbidities affecting renal or hepatic function can alter pharmacokinetics, thereby impacting the efficacy or tolerability of PHN analgesic therapies. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or psychiatric comorbidities may increase patient vulnerability to potential adverse events associated with some PHN analgesic therapies. Because PHN is a localized condition, localized therapy with a topical analgesic (lidocaine patch 5% and capsaicin 8% patch or cream) may provide adequate efficacy while mitigating the risk of systemic adverse events compared with oral analgesics (eg, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids). However, combined therapy with a topical and an oral analgesic or with >1 oral analgesic may be needed for optimal pain management in some patients. This review summarizes how comorbidities and concomitant medications should be taken into account when selecting among available pharmacotherapies for PHN and provides recommendations for the selection of therapies that will provide analgesia while minimizing the risk of adverse events. PMID:23990726

  20. Oral isotretinoin. How can we treat difficult acne patients?

    PubMed

    Leyden, J J

    1997-01-01

    Isotretinoin (Roaccutane/Accutane) therapy (120 mg/kg) normally results in complete clearing of nodulocystic acne followed by prolonged remission, and many patients remain free of disease. Four groups of patients respond poorly or have a high rate of relapse. Preteens and young teenagers show a high rate of relapse and several courses of treatment are usually needed; 14 of 20 under the age of 12 years, 21 of 47 aged 12-14 and 23 of 66 aged 14-16 relapsed within 1 year. Individuals with linear lesions consisting of undermining tracks of follicular epithelium often show only a partial response. These individuals typically have a history of other 'sinus track' disease such as pilonidial sinus and hidradenitis, either themselves or other family members. Hemorrhagic or crusted lesions can be exacerbated by full doses of isotretinoin and patients develop pyrogenic-granuloma-type lesions and even acne-fulminans-like eruptions. Women with adrenal or ovarian syndrome associated with elevated androgens commonly relapse with 6-12 months after isotretinoin therapy.

  1. Oral isotretinoin. How can we treat difficult acne patients?

    PubMed

    Leyden, J J

    1997-01-01

    Isotretinoin (Roaccutane/Accutane) therapy (120 mg/kg) normally results in complete clearing of nodulocystic acne followed by prolonged remission, and many patients remain free of disease. Four groups of patients respond poorly or have a high rate of relapse. Preteens and young teenagers show a high rate of relapse and several courses of treatment are usually needed; 14 of 20 under the age of 12 years, 21 of 47 aged 12-14 and 23 of 66 aged 14-16 relapsed within 1 year. Individuals with linear lesions consisting of undermining tracks of follicular epithelium often show only a partial response. These individuals typically have a history of other 'sinus track' disease such as pilonidial sinus and hidradenitis, either themselves or other family members. Hemorrhagic or crusted lesions can be exacerbated by full doses of isotretinoin and patients develop pyrogenic-granuloma-type lesions and even acne-fulminans-like eruptions. Women with adrenal or ovarian syndrome associated with elevated androgens commonly relapse with 6-12 months after isotretinoin therapy. PMID:9310743

  2. Identification of multidrug resistance in previously treated tuberculosis patients: a mixed methods study in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Royce, S; Khann, S; Yadav, RP; Mao, ET; Cattamanchi, A; Sam, S; Handley, MA

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting Previously treated tuberculosis (TB) patients are a priority for drug susceptibility testing (DST) to identify cases with multidrug resistance (MDR). In Cambodia, a recent study found that only one-third of smear-positive previously treated patients had DST results. Objective To quantify the gaps in detecting MDR in previously treated TB patients in Cambodia, and describe health workers’ perspectives on barriers, facilitators and potential interventions. Design We analyzed case notifications in Cambodia (2004–2012) and conducted semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders Results The proportion of previously treated notifications varied significantly across provinces 2010–12, in the context of longer term trends of decreasing relapse and increasing “other” retreatment notifications. Correct classification of patients’ TB treatment history and ensuring specimens from previously-treated patients are collected and reach the laboratory could nearly double the number of detected MDR-TB cases. Identified barriers include patients’ reluctance to disclose and staff difficulty eliciting treatment history, partly due to availability of streptomycin only in hospitals. Facilitators include trained health workers, collection of sputum for DST even if previously treated patients are not taking streptomycin, streamlining sputum transportation and promptly reporting results. Conclusion Improved monitoring, supportive supervision, and correctly classifying previously treated patients are essential for improving detection of MDR-TB. PMID:25299861

  3. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lingos, T.I.; Recht, A.; Vicini, F.; Abner, A.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The likelihood of radiation pneumonitis and factors associated with its development in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy have not been well established. To assess these, the authors retrospectively reviewed 1624 patients treated between 1968 and 1985. Median follow-up for patients without local or distant failure was 77 months. Patients were treated with either tangential fields alone (n = 508) or tangents with a third field to the supraclavicular (SC) or SC-axillary (AX) region (n = 1116). Lung volume treated in the tangential fields was generally limited by keeping the perpendicular distance (demagnified) at the isocenter from the deep field edges to the posterior chest wall (CLD) to 3 cm or less. Seventeen patients with radiation pneumonitis were identified (1.0%). Radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed when patients presented with cough (15/17, 88%), fever (9/17, 53%), and/or dyspnea (6/17, 35%) and radiographic changes (17/17) following completion of RT. Radiographic infiltrates corresponded to treatment portals in all patients, and in 12 of the 17 patients, returned to baseline within 1-12 months. Five patients had permanent scarring on chest X ray. No patient had late or persistent pulmonary symptoms. The incidence of radiation pneumonitis was correlated with the combined use of chemotherapy (CT) and a third field. Three percent (11/328) of patients treated with a 3-field technique who received chemotherapy developed radiation pneumonitis compared to 0.5% (6 of 1296) for all other patients (p = 0.0001). When patients treated with a 3-field technique received chemotherapy concurrently with radiation therapy, the incidence of radiation pneumonitis was 8.8% (8/92) compared with 1.3% (3/236) for those who received sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy (p = 0.002).

  4. Long-Term Outcomes of Patients With Spinal Cord Gliomas Treated by Modern Conformal Radiation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Jenna; Loeffler, Jay Steven; Niemierko, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: This study retrospectively examines the long-term therapeutic outcomes of 32 patients with primary spinal cord gliomas at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1991 and 2005 treated by either photon intensity-modulated radiotherapy or conformal proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Individual patient tumor types included 14 ependymomas, 17 astrocytomas, and one oligodendroglioma. Twenty-two patients were treated with photon beam radiation therapy, and 10 patients were treated with proton beam therapy. The overall survival and time to progression were analyzed. Average radiation dose for patients was 51 Gy in 1.8 median daily fractions over 29 treatments. Results: For all 32 patients, the overall 5-year survival was 65% and the progression-free survival was 61%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly worse for patients more than 55 years of age (p = 0.02). Ependymoma patients had significantly longer survival times than astrocytoma patients (p = 0.05). Patients who had undergone a biopsy developed worse outcomes then those with a resection (p = 0.05). With the caveat of a limited number of patients, the multivariate model seems to suggest improved overall survival for younger patients (<54 years of age), ependymoma histology, and photon vs. proton treatment. Conclusion: For patients with spinal cord gliomas, significant factors associated with patient outcome include tumor pathology, age, extent of surgery, and treatment.

  5. Bipolar aphthosis presenting as mutilating genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Somesh; Ajith, C; Malhotra, S; Kumar, Bhushan

    2004-01-01

    Three women with large, mutilating genital ulcers of long duration, destroying almost the lower half of the external genitalia, are reported. They had a history of recurrent oral ulcers as well. All patients had been diagnosed as having 'genital ulcer syndrome' in the past and had been treated with antimicrobials. Histopathology of the biopsy from the margin of the ulcer revealed features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Considering the history, clinical features and histology, a diagnosis of bipolar aphthosis was made in all patients. All patients responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. The cases are reported because of the presence of genital ulcers of an unusually large size, mutilating character and their close similarity to genital ulcers due to sexually transmitted diseases, especially genital herpes and donovanosis.

  6. [The use of prostatilen in treating patients with prostatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vozianov, A F; Gorpinchenko, I I; Boĭko, N I; Drannik, G N; Khavinson, V Kh

    1991-01-01

    A clinical trial of polypeptide prostatic preparation prostatilen has been performed in 37 and 15 patients with chronic prostatitis and prostatic adenoma, respectively. The treatment resulted in attenuation of algetic and dysuria symptoms. Copulative function and spermatogenesis improved. The uroflowmetric index rose, while residual urine and leukocyte count in prostatic secretion reduced. The drug demonstrated antibacterial and immunomodulation effects in the absence of adverse reactions. Prostatilen is indicated in: chronic prostatitis, prostatic adenoma stage I, normospermatogenic and toxic sterility, interoceptive copulative dysfunction, dysuria. The drug in recommended for clinical application.

  7. XK469R in Treating Patients With Refractory Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-07

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. The Differential Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines and BDNF among Bipolar Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chung, Yi-Lun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Chiu, Yen-Chu; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao-Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that inflammation and neurodegeneration underlies bipolar disorder. To investigate biological markers of cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor between bipolar I, bipolar II, and other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania may support the association with inflammatory dysregulation and bipolar disorder and, more specifically, provide evidence for other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania patients were similar to bipolar II disorder patients from a biological marker perspective. Methods: We enrolled patients with bipolar I disorder (n=234), bipolar II disorder (n=260), other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania (n=243), and healthy controls (n=140). Their clinical symptoms were rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. Inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-α, C-reactive protein, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-8) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured in each group. Multivariate analysis of covariance and linear regression controlled for possible confounders were used to compare cytokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels among the groups. Results: Multivariate analysis of covariance adjusted for age and sex and a main effect of diagnosis was significant (P<.001). Three of the 5 measured biomarkers (tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-8) were significantly (P=.006, .01, and <.001) higher in all bipolar disorder patients than in controls. Moreover, covarying for multiple associated confounders showed that bipolar I disorder patients had significantly higher IL-8 levels than did bipolar II disorder and other specified bipolar disorder with short duration hypomania patients in multivariate analysis of covariance (P=.03) and linear regression (P=.02) analyses. Biomarkers differences between bipolar II disorder and other specified bipolar

  9. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Christina J; Godwin, Douglass; Mamah, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP) screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established SCZ or BPD. Participants consisted of 35 BPD and 34 SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON), aged 18-30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p < 0.001), affective section of the WERCAP (aWERCAP; p = 0.001), and stress severity (p = 0.027). No significant group differences were found in the rates of substance use as measured by the WERC Substance Screen (p = 0.267). Only the aWERCAP and pWERCAP scores were useful predictors of diagnostic category. ROC curve analysis showed the optimal cut point on the aWERCAP to identify BPD among our participant groups was a score of >20 [area under the curve (AUC): 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 0.71], while that for the pWERCAP to identify SCZ was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.82). These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for BPD and SCZ and that identifying stress and substance-use severity can be

  10. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Christina J.; Godwin, Douglass; Mamah, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP) screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established SCZ or BPD. Participants consisted of 35 BPD and 34 SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON), aged 18–30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p < 0.001), affective section of the WERCAP (aWERCAP; p = 0.001), and stress severity (p = 0.027). No significant group differences were found in the rates of substance use as measured by the WERC Substance Screen (p = 0.267). Only the aWERCAP and pWERCAP scores were useful predictors of diagnostic category. ROC curve analysis showed the optimal cut point on the aWERCAP to identify BPD among our participant groups was a score of >20 [area under the curve (AUC): 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 0.71], while that for the pWERCAP to identify SCZ was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.82). These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for BPD and SCZ and that identifying stress and substance-use severity can be

  11. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Christina J.; Godwin, Douglass; Mamah, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP) screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established SCZ or BPD. Participants consisted of 35 BPD and 34 SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON), aged 18–30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p < 0.001), affective section of the WERCAP (aWERCAP; p = 0.001), and stress severity (p = 0.027). No significant group differences were found in the rates of substance use as measured by the WERC Substance Screen (p = 0.267). Only the aWERCAP and pWERCAP scores were useful predictors of diagnostic category. ROC curve analysis showed the optimal cut point on the aWERCAP to identify BPD among our participant groups was a score of >20 [area under the curve (AUC): 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 0.71], while that for the pWERCAP to identify SCZ was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.82). These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for BPD and SCZ and that identifying stress and substance-use severity can be

  12. Peripheral Endocannabinoid System Activity in Patients Treated With Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Janke, Jürgen; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judith; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Objective The endocannabinoid system (ECS) promotes weight gain and obesity-associated metabolic changes. Weight loss interventions may influence obesity-associated risk indirectly through modulation of the peripheral ECS. We investigated the effect of acute and chronic treatment with sibutramine on components of the peripheral ECS. Methods and Procedures Twenty obese otherwise healthy patients received randomized, double-blind, crossover treatment with placebo and 15 mg/day sibutramine for 5 days each, followed by 12 weeks open-label sibutramine treatment. We determined circulating anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol and expression levels of endocannabinoid genes in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies. Results Body weight was stable during the acute treatment period and decreased by 6.0 ± 0.8 kg in those patients completing 3 months of sibutramine treatment (P < 0.05). Circulating endocannabinoids and the expression of ECS genes did not change with acute or chronic sibutramine treatment. Discussion The ECS is activated in obesity. We did not find any influence of 5% body weight loss induced by sibutramine on circulating levels of endocannabinoids and adipose-tissue expression of endocannabinoid genes in obese subjects. These data confirm our previous findings on dietary weight loss and suggest that the dysregulation of the ECS may be a cause rather than a consequence of obesity. PMID:18356837

  13. Ethical challenges of treating the critically ill pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    van Bogaert, Louis-Jacques; Dhai, A

    2008-10-01

    Most ethical issues in obstetrics, both in the critical care and non-emergency situations, hinge around the maternal-fetal relationship. With access to the necessary information and support, most women strive to improve their chance of having healthy babies. However, there could be situations where their interests do not correspond with fetal interests, thereby giving rise to conflict situations. At the centre of the debate about a possible conflict is the notion of the fetus as a patient. A pregnant woman's autonomy and informed refusal should be respected. Where she is not competent to make an informed decision, proxy consent should be obtained or the doctrine of substituted judgement be applied. A decision to withhold or withdraw treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU) should only occur once a definitive diagnosis of terminal illness is made. Standards for the management of the human-immunodeficiency-virus-positive woman in the obstetric ICU situtation should be no different from standards employed to manage a critically ill pregnant patient in ICU with a chronic medical disease.

  14. Immunological evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with itolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Aira, Lazaro E.; Hernández, Patricia; Prada, Dinorah; Chico, Araceli; Gómez, Jorge A.; González, Zuyén; Fuentes, Karla; Viada, Carmen; Mazorra, Zaima

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation that affects approximately 1% of the general population. Itolizumab, a monoclonal antibody specific for the human CD6 molecule mainly expressed on T lymphocytes, has been shown to inhibit proliferation of T cells and proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriasis patients. We have now assessed the immunological effect of itolizumab in combination with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing clinical samples taken from 30 patients enrolled in a clinical trial. T and B cell subpopulations were measured at different time points of the study. Plasma cytokine levels and anti-idiotypic antibody response to itolizumab were also evaluated. The combined treatment of itolizumab and methotrexate led to a reduction in the frequency of T cell subpopulations, and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines showed a significant decrease up to at least 12 weeks after treatment ended. No anti-idiotypic antibody response was detected. These results support the relevance of the CD6 molecule as a therapeutic target for the treatment of this disease. PMID:26466969

  15. [Regression of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertensive patients treated with captopril].

    PubMed

    Olivan Martínez, J; Hoyos Jiménez, M; Moreno Alba, R; Justo Alpañes, E; Pérez Cano, R

    1994-05-01

    We studied the echographic LVH indexes early detected in recent AHT. We analyzed the LVH regression after 12 months of treatment with Captopril. We describe the modifications observed in the lipidic metabolism. We studied 25 patients with an average age of 40 years and maximum essential arterial hypertension with 15 months of evolution. Septal thickness showed a reduction in systole and diastole at 6 months (p < 0.01). The posterior wall thickness decreased 3 mm in systole and diastole at 12 months (p < 0.001). Afterload diastolic diameter improved at 6 months. LV mass decreased from 321 gr to 279 gr at 6 months and to 268 at 12 months (p < 0.001); the same reduction was observed in mass index. At six months, total cholesterol and LDL had decreased (p < 0.05) and HDL-cholesterol had increased, although without statistical significance. Triglycerides showed a significant decrease at 12 months (p < 0.001). Seventy per cent of the patients were controlled with Captropil 100 mg/day and the remainder, with 50 mg.

  16. [The use of prostatilen in treating patients with chronic prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Tkachuk, V N; Gorbachev, A G; Khavinson, V Kh

    1991-01-01

    Conventional methods of chronic prostatitis treatment aimed at destruction of pathogenic microflora have certain shortcomings. A promising approach is biologic control of prostatic function. A trial was performed of a new drug prostatilen which is a polypeptide isolated from the animal prostate. The study included 307 patients with chronic prostatitis of 4 mon to 36 years duration. Their age ranged from 18 to 74 years. The drug dose of 5-10 mg was administered once a day i.m. for 5-10 days. The immediate effect and long-term one were measured upon the treatment completion and 4-6 months later. A clinical effect manifested following 2-3 injections and grew to maximal values after 5-6 ones. In rare cases the treatment lasted up to 8-10 injections. The drug promoted disappearance or attenuation of the symptoms in 96.7% of the patients. Positive shifts were achieved in pain complaints, diuresis, sexual function, sleep, general condition. The subjective response agreed with objective laboratory and urodynamic evidence. Prostatilen proved effective for chronic prostatitis because it is tolerable, induces no side effects, beneficial in combinations with other modalities in management of this persistent and prone to recurrences disease.

  17. Immunological evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with itolizumab.

    PubMed

    Aira, Lazaro E; Hernández, Patricia; Prada, Dinorah; Chico, Araceli; Gómez, Jorge A; González, Zuyén; Fuentes, Karla; Viada, Carmen; Mazorra, Zaima

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation that affects approximately 1% of the general population. Itolizumab, a monoclonal antibody specific for the human CD6 molecule mainly expressed on T lymphocytes, has been shown to inhibit proliferation of T cells and proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriasis patients. We have now assessed the immunological effect of itolizumab in combination with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing clinical samples taken from 30 patients enrolled in a clinical trial. T and B cell subpopulations were measured at different time points of the study. Plasma cytokine levels and anti-idiotypic antibody response to itolizumab were also evaluated. The combined treatment of itolizumab and methotrexate led to a reduction in the frequency of T cell subpopulations, and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines showed a significant decrease up to at least 12 weeks after treatment ended. No anti-idiotypic antibody response was detected. These results support the relevance of the CD6 molecule as a therapeutic target for the treatment of this disease.

  18. Response to lithium in bipolar disorder: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-06-18

    The use of lithium is a cornerstone for preventing recurrences in bipolar disorder (BD). The response of patients with bipolar disorder to lithium has different levels of magnitude. About one-third of lithium-treated patients are excellent lithium responders (ELR), showing total prevention of the episodes. A number of clinical characteristics were delineated in patients with favorable response to lithium as regards to clinical course, family history of mood disorders, and psychiatric comorbidity. We have also demonstrated that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. A degree of prevention against manic and depressive episodes has been regarded as an endophenotype for pharmacogenetic studies. The majority of data have been gathered from so-called "candidate" gene studies. The candidates were selected on the basis of neurobiology of bipolar disorder and mechanisms of lithium action including, among others, neurotransmission, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection or circadian rhythms. We demonstrated that response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels and have shown that ELR have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of BD have been also performed in recent years, some of which also focused on lithium response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has established the large sample for performing the genome-wide association study (GWAS) of lithium response in BD, and the first results have already been published.

  19. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients Many ... arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that involves surgically removing the torn part of the meniscus and stabilizing it, or ...

  20. Cerebral thrombotic complications in adolescent leukemia/lymphoma patients treated with L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira; Kato, Ryuichi; Izumi, Moriatu; Murakami, Aki; Matuo, Satoshi; Kiyosawa, Nobuyuki; Kano, Gen; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2005-05-01

    We described the cerebral thrombotic complications developed in 2 adolescent patients treated with L-asparaginase-containing regimens. For determining risk factors, we retrospectively analysed hemostatic markers in 19 pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma who were treated with either 1 of the 2 L-asparaginase-containing regimens; 11 were treated with VLP1 and the remaining 8 were treated with the VLAD protocol. The data indicated that low coagulation factors in association with increased plasma D-dimer levels during or post-L-asparaginase administration combined with fresh frozen plasma infusion might have activated coagulation processes in these patients. Careful management is required to prevent such episodes in patients with markedly decreased coagulation factors and increased D-dimer levels following L-asparaginase administration.

  1. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  2. Enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy treated with erucic acid (22:1)-rich triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Pour, R B; Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, S; Hunneman, D H; Gahr, M; Korenke, G C; Pabst, W; Hanefeld, F; Peters, A

    2000-03-01

    Lymphocytopenia and depression of natural killer cells have been observed in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) treated with glycerol trioleate and glycerol trierucate ('Lorenzo's oil'). To investigate possible alterations of cellular immunoreactivity, we measured lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens (PHA, Con A, PWM, OKT3) in 27 patients on treatment and in 14 patients without treatment. In patients on treatment, lymphocyte proliferation in response to the mitogens PHA and Con A was significantly higher than in patients without treatment. Lymphocyte proliferation in patients without treatment was comparable to that of normal control lymphocytes. Additionally, we found increased concentrations of erucic acid, C22:1, in lymphocytes from patients with treatment. The enhanced proliferation of lymphocytes in response to mitogens is an indication of increased reactivity of cellular immunity to unspecific immunological stimuli. Long-term side-effects on cellular immunoreactivity have to be considered in ALD patients treated with Lorenzo's oil.

  3. A clinical contrast: physical therapists with low back pain treating patients with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Zimney, Kory

    2015-01-01

    Patients with low back pain (LBP) often display faulty beliefs and cognitions regarding their pain experience. Pain neuroscience education (PNE) aims to alter the pain experience by targeting these faulty beliefs and cognitions. One PNE strategy aims specifically to reframe commonly held beliefs about tissues by patients with LBP as the single source of pain. In line with this reasoning, it is hypothesized that physical therapists (PT) treating patients with LBP may indeed experience similar, if not worse, pain experiences while treating a patient with LBP. To date, this assumption has never been studied. A PT LBP questionnaire was developed, validated and distributed to a convenience sample of attendees of an international PT conference. One-hundred and ten PTs completed the questionnaire for a 71% response rate. Ninety percent of the PTs reported having experienced LBP, with 27% at the conference experiencing LBP at the time. Of the PTs that have experienced LBP 75% reported not having received any imaging; 81% no formal diagnoses, 58% no treatment and 86% not having missed work due to LBP. Eighty-six percent of therapists reported having experienced LBP while treating a patient with LBP, with 50% convinced their LBP was higher than the LBP experienced by the patient they were treating. The results from this study indicate PTs often treat patients with LBP while suffering LBP. It is suggested that this knowledge may potentially help patients with LBP reconceptualize their LBP experience leading to expedited recovery.

  4. Syncope in a patient being treated for hepatic and intestinal amoebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Yelve, Kavita; Phatak, Sanat; Patil, Meenakshi Amit; Pazare, Amar R

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old man presented to our hospital with amoebic liver abscess and was treated successfully for the same. During the course of his treatment, he developed syncopal attacks and was found to have Torsades de Pointes on electrocardiogram. The patient was treated with intravenous magnesium and direct current cardioversion. Hypokalaemia, chloroquine and sepsis were suspected to have precipitated the arrhythmia. The patient remained arrhythmia-free following the correction of these factors. PMID:23203174

  5. [Confusing clinical presentations and differential diagnosis of bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Gorwood, P

    2004-01-01

    An early recognition of bipolar disorders may have an important impact on the prognosis of this disorder according to different mechanisms. Bipolar disorder is nevertheless not easy to detect, the diagnosis being correctly proposed after, in average more than a couple of Years and three different doctors assessments. A short delay before introducing the relevant treatment should help avoiding inappropriate treatments (prescribing, for example, neuroleptics for long periods, antidepressive drugs each time depressive symptoms occurs, absence of treatment despite mood disorders), with their associated negative impact such as mood-switching, rapid cycling or presence of chronic side-effects stigmates. Furthermore, non-treated mood disorders in bipolar disorder are longer, more stigmatizing and may be associated with an increased risk of suicidal behaviour and mortality. Lastly, compliance, an important factor regarding the long term prognosis of bipolar disorder, should be improved when there is a short delay between correct diagnosis and treatment and onset of the disorder. We therefore propose to review the literature for the different pitfalls involved in the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Non-bipolar mood-disorders are frequently quoted as one of the alternative diagnosis. Hyperthymic temperament, side-effects of prescribed treatments and organic comorbid disorders may be involved. Bipolar disorders have a sex-ratio closer to 1 (men are thus more frequently of the bipolar type in mood-disorders), with earlier age at onset, and more frequent family history of suicidal attempts and bipolar disorder. Schizo-affective disorders are also a major concern regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. This is explained by flat affects sometimes close to anhedonia, presence of a schizoïd personality in bipolar disorder, persecutive hostility that can be considered to be related to irritability rather than a schizophrenic symptom. Rapid cycling, mixed episodes and short

  6. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Annam, Kiran; Voznesensky, Maria; Kreder, Karl J

    2016-04-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  7. Dawn of a new era: the completely interventionally treated patient.

    PubMed

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Lichtenauer, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    A frail 75-year-old woman with permanent atrial fibrillation and angina pectoris was admitted to our department for further evaluation. Echocardiography revealed concurrent severe aortic valve stenosis. Furthermore, significant coronary artery stenoses were identified on the coronary angiogram. We chose the following treatment strategy: first, two drug eluting stents were implanted successfully in the left anterior descending and circumflex artery, respectively. Second, a 23 mm Core Valve bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was implanted without complications within the same session. Two weeks after hospital discharge, the patient showed up at our outpatient department, with a symptomatic complete atrioventricular-block with an escape rhythm of 35 bpm. Thus, finally, a leadless pacemaker Micra (Medtronic Inc) was implanted via a transvenous transfemoral access without any complications. PMID:26994050

  8. Effectiveness of the Dader Method for pharmaceutical care in patients with bipolar I disorder: EMDADER-TAB: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bipolar I disorder (BD-I) is a chronic mental illness characterized by the presence of one or more manic episodes, or both depressive and manic episodes, usually separated by asymptomatic intervals. Pharmacists can contribute to the management of BD-I, mainly with the use of effective and safe drugs, and improve the patient’s life quality through pharmaceutical care. Some studies have shown the effect of pharmaceutical care in the achievement of therapeutic goals in different illnesses; however, to our knowledge, there is a lack of randomized controlled trials designed to assess the effect of pharmacist intervention in patients with BD. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the Dader Method for pharmaceutical care in patients with BD-I. Methods/design Randomized, controlled, prospective, single-center clinical trial with duration of 12 months will be performed to compare the effect of Dader Method of pharmaceutical care with the usual care process of patients in a psychiatric clinic. Patients diagnosed with BD-I aged between 18 and 65 years who have been discharged or referred from outpatients service of the San Juan de Dios Clinic (Antioquia, Colombia) will be included. Patients will be randomized into the intervention group who will receive pharmaceutical care provided by pharmacists working in collaboration with psychiatrists, or into the control group who will receive usual care and verbal-written counseling regarding BD. Study outcomes will be assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcome will be to measure the number of hospitalizations, emergency service consultations, and unscheduled outpatient visits. Effectiveness, safety, adherence, and quality of life will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses will be performed using two-tailed McNemar tests, Pearson chi-square tests, and Student’s t-tests; a P value <0.05 will be considered as statistically significant

  9. Performance of steroid eluting bipolar epicardial leads in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients: 15 years of single center experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiac pacing is sometimes required for patients with congenital heart disease for various reasons. Because of complex anatomy, repetitive previous heart surgery and patient size, epicardial leads are of special importance in these patients. Using epicardial leads has been discussed controversly regarding pacing performance and lead survival. The aim of this study was to review the long-term data on pacing performance as well as lead survival of epicardial leads implanted in our center. Methods Retrospective chart review and review of the literature. Results 82 consecutive pediatric patients or adult patients with congenital heart disease with 158 epicardial leads (Medtronic 4968, bipolar, steroid - eluting) were included. We found 1.2% pacemaker-related early postoperative complications. The incidence of lead dysfunction was 7.5% (12/158) for primary (i.e. directly related to the lead itself) lead dysfunction and 3.2% (5/158) of lead abandonment for reasons not directly related to the lead itself. Primary lead dysfunction occured after a median of 3.83 years. Lead survival at 2, 5 and 10 years was 98.7%, 93% and 92.4%. There were no infections reported. Stable median measurements for impedance (RA/RV/LV of 577/483/610 Ohm), sensing threshold (RA/RV/LV of 2.0/11.0/10.0 mV) and pacing threshold (RA/RV/LV of 0.75 V at 0.4 ms/1.0 V at 0.49 ms/1.0 V at 0.45 ms) indicated a good mid- to longterm performance. The only risk factor for primary lead dysfunction was young age at implantation. Conclusion The use of epicardial leads in pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease shows good longterm outcomes in terms of pacing performance and lead survival. The authors encourage using epicardial leads in patients with congenital heart disease based on the patient‘s individual characteristics. PMID:24886320

  10. Interventions for Sleep Disturbance in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Kaplan, Kate A.; Soehner, Adriane

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic disorder, ranked in the top 10 leading causes of disability worldwide. Sleep disturbances are strongly coupled with inter-episode dysfunction and symptom worsening in bipolar disorder. Experimental studies suggest that sleep deprivation can trigger manic relapse. There is evidence that sleep deprivation can have an adverse impact on emotion regulation the following day. The clinical management of the sleep disturbances experienced by bipolar patients, including insomnia, hypersomnia delayed sleep phase and irregular sleep-wake schedule, may include medication approaches, psychological interventions, light therapies and sleep deprivation. Psychological interventions, as described here, are advantageous in that they are low in side effects, may be preferred by patients, are durable and have no abuse potential. PMID:25750600

  11. Decreased microglial activation in MS patients treated with glatiramer acetate

    PubMed Central

    Ratchford, John N.; Endres, Christopher J.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Shiee, Navid; McGready, John; Pham, Dzung L.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Activated microglia are thought to be an important contributor to tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). The level of microglial activation can be measured non-invasively using [11C]-R-PK11195, a radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET). Prior studies have identified abnormalities in the level of [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake in patients with MS, but treatment effects have not been evaluated. Nine previously untreated relapsing-remitting MS patients underwent PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain at baseline and after one year of treatment with glatiramer acetate. Parametric maps of [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake were obtained for baseline and post-treatment PET scans, and the change in [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake pre- to post-treatment was evaluated across the whole brain. Region of interest analysis was also applied to selected subregions. Whole brain [11C]-R-PK11195 binding potential per unit volume decreased 3.17% (95% CI: −0.74%, −5.53%) between baseline and one year (p = 0.018). A significant decrease was noted in cortical gray matter and cerebral white matter, and a trend towards decreased uptake was seen in the putamen and thalamus. The results are consistent with a reduction in inflammation due to treatment with glatiramer acetate, though a larger controlled study would be required to prove that association. Future research will focus on whether the level of baseline microglial activation predicts future tissue damage in MS and whether [11C]-R-PK11195 uptake in cortical gray matter correlates with cortical lesion load. PMID:22160466

  12. Zonisamide for Bipolar Disorder, Mania or Mixed States: A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Adjunctive Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dauphinais, Deborah; Knable, Michael; Rosenthal, Joshua; Polanski, Mark; Rosenthal, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Objective This is the first multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adjunctive zonisamide for the treatment of bipolar mania or mixed state. Experimental design One hundred four patients with Bipolar Disorder, Type I, II or NOS, in a manic, hypomanic or mixed state of illness were randomized to either adjunctive zonisamide or placebo. The study consisted of three phases: a 7 to 30 day screening and stabilization phase, 6 weeks of blinded treatment and a 1 to 3 week discontinuation phase. The primary outcome variable for manic and hypomanic patients was the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) both the YMRS and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) served as primary outcome variables for patients in mixed states. Secondary outcome measures included the Clinical Global Impression for Bipolar Disorder (CGI-BP), the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q) and an a priori analysis of response and remission. Metabolic parameters including weight, waist-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were also analyzed. Side effects were measured using the SAFTEE. Principal observations There were no statistically significant differences for any of the primary or secondary outcome measures between zonisamide and placebo-treated patients. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies that suggested efficacy of adjunctive zonisamide in bipolar mania or mixed state, these results were not confirmed in this double blind controlled study. PMID:22506436

  13. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; McCarthy, Michael J; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Tabaton, Massimo; Martino, Matteo; Colicchio, Salvatore; Cattaneo, Carlo Ignazio; D’Angelo, Emanuela; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD) suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute) or II cases of bipolar depression. Patients and methods Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime) for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index. Results Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64%) showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint), while 24 of the 28 subjects (86%) responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6%) valproate and six of the 11 (54.5%) lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4%) and 10 lithium treated (90.9%) subjects responded. At 36 weeks, there was a slight yet statistically significant (P = 0.001) reduction in body mass index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores compared to respective baseline values, regardless of mood stabilizer/outcome. Treatment related drop-out cases included four patients (14.28%) at week 6 two valproate-treated subjects with pseudo-vertigo and drug-induced hypomania, respectively, and two lithium-treated subjects with insomnia and mania, respectively. Week 36 drop outs were two hypomanic cases, one per group. Conclusion Agomelatine 25 mg/day was an effective and well-tolerated adjunct to valproate/lithium for acute depression in BD-II, suggesting the need for confirmation by future double blind, controlled clinical trials. PMID:23430979

  14. Lost and found: how to treat Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Zygowicz, Wayne M; Spaulding, Sara

    2010-06-01

    The address of the call was a familiar one, but today we knew time was of the essence. Mary, an Alzheimer's patient living with her family, had wandered off on a cold, wet morning. Our concern was exacerbated by the fact that Mary left home without a jacket or hat to keep her warm, and forecasters were predicting dangerously low temperatures and increased precipitation. The location of Mary's neighborhood also put her at risk of a mountain lion attack. The later it got, we knew she could be facing other potentially life-threatening hazards. We realized the farther away from home she wandered, the more disoriented she would get. We had to locate her quickly. She was always very pleasant on past EMS calls, but as her disease advanced, there had been a noticeable change in her mood, behavior and ability to communicate. As we searched frantically, statistics reminded us that 60% of those with Alzheimer's will wander, with risk of serious injury or death if not found in the first 24 hours.(1) As day turned to night, we all hoped and prayed for the best outcome. PMID:20569865

  15. Lifestyle related factors & impact of metabolic syndrome on quality of life, level of functioning & self-esteem in patients with bipolar disorder & schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Nidhi; Kulhara, Parmanand; Chakrabarti, Subho; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Though studies have reported high prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome among patients with bipolar disorder (BPAD) and schizophrenia, there is lack of data on the impact of the same on the patients’ life. This study was aimed to assess the lifestyle related factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to study the impact of MetS on functioning and quality of life (QOL) in patients with BPAD and schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 102 patients with BPAD and 72 patients with schizophrenia attending the output unit of a tertiary care hospital in north India were evaluated for MetS. These patients were assessed on Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile scale II (HPLP II), World Health Organization QOL -Bref Version (WHOQOL-Bref), Impact of Weight on Quality of Life- Lite version (IWOQOL -Lite), Body weight, Image and Self-esteem Evaluation questionnaire (BWISE), Obesity-related Problem scale (OP scale) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale. Results: MetS was associated with lower scores on domains of health responsibility and nutrition habit domain on HPLP-II scale in both groups, and additionally on physical activity and stress management domain in BPAD group. On WHOQOL-Bref, MetS was associated with lower scores on the domains of physical and psychological health in both groups. On IWQOL–Lite, scores on personal distress and self esteem domains were higher in those with obesity in both groups and also on physical activity domain in schizophrenia group. Those with MetS had lower level of functioning as measured by GAF in schizophrenia group. Fulfillment of higher number of criteria of MetS correlated with poorer quality of life and higher problems in both groups. Interpretation & conclusions: Many modifiable lifestyle factors increase the risk of MetS. MetS was found to be associated with poorer QOL in patients with BPAD and schizophrenia; in addition, obesity led to poor self-esteem and excessive personal distress. PMID

  16. Treatment of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Geddes, John R; Miklowitz, David J

    2013-05-11

    We review recent developments in the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar disorder and identify promising future routes to therapeutic innovation. Overall, advances in drug treatment remain quite modest. Antipsychotic drugs are effective in the acute treatment of mania; their efficacy in the treatment of depression is variable with the clearest evidence for quetiapine. Despite their widespread use, considerable uncertainty and controversy remains about the use of antidepressant drugs in the management of depressive episodes. Lithium has the strongest evidence for long-term relapse prevention; the evidence for anticonvulsants such as divalproex and lamotrigine is less robust and there is much uncertainty about the longer term benefits of antipsychotics. Substantial progress has been made in the development and assessment of adjunctive psychosocial interventions. Long-term maintenance and possibly acute stabilisation of depression can be enhanced by the combination of psychosocial treatments with drugs. The development of future treatments should consider both the neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms underlying the disorder. We should continue to repurpose treatments and to recognise the role of serendipity. We should also investigate optimum combinations of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments at different stages of the illness. Clarification of the mechanisms by which different treatments affect sleep and circadian rhythms and their relation with daily mood fluctuations is likely to help with the treatment selection for individual patients. To be economically viable, existing psychotherapy protocols need to be made briefer and more efficient for improved scalability and sustainability in widespread implementation. PMID:23663953

  17. Increased risk of solid renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, Mohamad; Stucker, Fabien; Stengel, Bénédicte; Vasiliu, Viorel; Hummel, Aurélie; Landais, Paul; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Ronco, Pierre; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Aude

    2014-07-01

    Cystic kidney diseases and toxic interstitial nephritis may be complicated by renal tumors. Long-term lithium intake is associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal cysts but to date such an association with tumors has not been determined. We evaluated this in a retrospective study to determine whether lithium-treated patients were at higher risk of renal tumors compared with lithium-free patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to the general population. Over a 16-year period, 14 of 170 lithium-treated patients had renal tumors, including seven malignant and seven benign tumors. The mean duration of lithium exposure at diagnosis was 21.4 years. The renal cancers included three clear-cell and two papillary renal cell carcinomas, one hybrid tumor with chromophobe and oncocytoma characteristics, and one clear-cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma. The benign tumors included four oncocytomas, one mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and two angiomyolipomas. The percentage of renal tumors, particularly cancers and oncocytomas, was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with 340 gender-, age-, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-matched lithium-free patients. Additionally, the Standardized Incidence Ratio of renal cancer was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with the general population: 7.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) (1.51-21.95)) and 13.69 (95% CI (3.68-35.06)) in men and women, respectively. Thus, there is an increased risk of renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.

  18. Adjunctive Minocycline in Clozapine Treated Schizophrenia Patients with Persistent Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deanna L.; Sullivan, Kelli M.; McEvoy, Joseph P; McMahon, Robert P.; Wehring, Heidi J.; Liu, Fang; Warfel, Dale; Vyas, Gopal; Richardson, Charles M.; Fischer, Bernard A.; Keller, William R.; Mathew Koola, Maju; Feldman, Stephanie; Russ, Jessica C.; Keefe, Richard S.; Osing, Jennifer; Hubzin, Leeka; August, Sharon; Walker, Trina M.; Buchanan, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic for treatment refractory people with schizophrenia, yet many patients only partially respond. Accumulating preclinical and clinical data suggest benefits with minocycline. We tested adjunct minocycline to clozapine in a 10 week, double blind placebo-controlled trial. Primary outcomes tested were positive and cognitive symptoms, while avolition, anxiety/depression and negative symptoms were secondary outcomes. Methods Schizophrenia and schizoaffective participants (N=52) with persistent positive symptoms were randomized to receive adjunct minocycline (100 mg oral capsule twice daily) (N=29) or placebo (N=23). Results Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) psychosis factor (p=0.098, effect size ES=0.39) and BPRS total score (p=0.075, effect size 0.55) were not significant. A ≥30% change in total BPRS symptoms was observed in 7/28 (25%) among minocycline and 1/23 (4%) among placebo participants, respectively (p=0.044). Global cognitive function (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery, MCCB) did not differ, although there was a significant variation in size of treatment effects among cognitive domains (p=0.03), with significant improvement in working memory favoring minocycline (p=0.023, ES 0.41). The SANS total score did not differ, but significant improvement in avolition with minocycline was noted (p=0.012, ES=0.34). Significant improvement in the BPRS anxiety/depression factor was observed with minocycline (p=0.028, ES=0.49). Minocycline was well tolerated with significantly fewer headaches and constipation compared to placebo. Conclusion Minocycline’s effect on the MCCB composite score and positive symptoms were not statistically significant. Significant improvements with minocycline were seen in working memory, avolition and anxiety/depressive symptoms in a chronic population with persistent symptoms. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26082974

  19. Characterization of Bipolar Disorder Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Family Reveals Neurodevelopmental and mRNA Expression Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Jon M.; Zhou, Fen; Nigam, Aparna; Hussain, Ali; Barker, Douglas D.; Nehme, Ralda; van der Ven, Karlijn; Hsu, Jenny; Wolf, Pavlina; Fleishman, Morgan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Rose, Sam; Chambert, Kimberly; Lau, Frank H.; Ahfeldt, Tim; Rueckert, Erroll H.; Sheridan, Steven D.; Fass, Daniel M.; Nemesh, James; Mullen, Thomas E.; Daheron, Laurence; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Perlis, Roy H.; Haggarty, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic recurrent episodes of depression and mania. Despite evidence for high heritability of BD, little is known about its underlying pathophysiology. To develop new tools for investigating the molecular and cellular basis of BD we applied a family-based paradigm to derive and characterize a set of 12 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from a quartet consisting of two BD-affected brothers and their two unaffected parents. Initially, no significant phenotypic differences were observed between iPSCs derived from the different family members. However, upon directed neural differentiation we observed that CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor-4) expressing central nervous system (CNS) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from both BD patients compared to their unaffected parents exhibited multiple phenotypic differences at the level of neurogenesis and expression of genes critical for neuroplasticity, including WNT pathway components and ion channel subunits. Treatment of the CXCR4+ NPCs with a pharmacological inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a known regulator of WNT signaling, was found to rescue a progenitor proliferation deficit in the BD-patient NPCs. Taken together, these studies provide new cellular tools for dissecting the pathophysiology of BD and evidence for dysregulation of key pathways involved in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Future generation of additional iPSCs following a family-based paradigm for modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders in conjunction with in-depth phenotyping holds promise for providing insights into the pathophysiological substrates of BD and is likely to inform the development of targeted therapeutics for its treatment and ideally prevention. PMID:25733313

  20. Peripheral artery occlusive disease in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with nilotinib or imatinib.

    PubMed

    Kim, T D; Rea, D; Schwarz, M; Grille, P; Nicolini, F E; Rosti, G; Levato, L; Giles, F J; Dombret, H; Mirault, T; Labussière, H; Lindhorst, R; Haverkamp, W; Buschmann, I; Dörken, B; le Coutre, P D

    2013-06-01

    Several retrospective studies have described the clinical manifestation of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) in patients receiving nilotinib. We thus prospectively screened for PAOD in patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP CML) being treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), including imatinib and nilotinib. One hundred and fifty-nine consecutive patients were evaluated for clinical and biochemical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Non-invasive assessment for PAOD included determination of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and duplex ultrasonography. A second cohort consisted of patients with clinically manifest PAOD recruited from additional collaborating centers. Pathological ABI were significantly more frequent in patients on first-line nilotinib (7 of 27; 26%) and in patients on second-line nilotinib (10 of 28; 35.7%) as compared with patients on first-line imatinib (3 of 48; 6.3%). Clinically manifest PAOD was identified in five patients, all with current or previous nilotinib exposure only. Relative risk for PAOD determined by a pathological ABI in first-line nilotinib-treated patients as compared with first-line imatinib-treated patients was 10.3. PAOD is more frequently observed in patients receiving nilotinib as compared with imatinib. Owing to the severe nature of clinically manifest PAOD, longitudinal non-invasive monitoring and careful assessment of risk factors is warranted.

  1. Impulsivity and risk taking in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, L Felice; Lee, Junghee; Davis, Michael C; Altshuler, Lori; Glahn, David C; Miklowitz, David J; Green, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive risk taking contributes to deleterious outcomes among clinical populations. Indeed, pathological impulsivity and risk taking are common in patients with serious mental illness, and have severe clinical repercussions including novelty seeking, response disinhibition, aggression, and substance abuse. Thus, the current study seeks to examine self-reported impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale) and performance-based behavioral risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task) in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Participants included 68 individuals with bipolar disorder, 38 with schizophrenia, and 36 healthy controls. Self-reported impulsivity was elevated in the bipolar group compared with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, who did not differ from each other. On the risk-taking task, schizophrenia patients were significantly more risk averse than the bipolar patients and controls. Aside from the diagnostic group differences, there was a significant effect of antipsychotic (AP) medication within the bipolar group: bipolar patients taking AP medications were more risk averse than those not taking AP medications. This difference in risk taking because of AP medications was not explained by history of psychosis. Similarly, the differences in risk taking between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were not fully explained by AP effects. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:23963117

  2. Calcium-dependent intracellular signal pathways in primary cultured adipocytes and ANK3 gene variation in patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, A; Le Gal, K; Södersten, K; Vizlin-Hodzic, D; Ågren, H; Funa, K

    2015-08-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder of public health importance affecting >1% of the Swedish population. Despite progress, patients still suffer from chronic mood switches with potential severe consequences. Thus, early detection, diagnosis and initiation of correct treatment are critical. Cultured adipocytes from 35 patients with BD and 38 healthy controls were analysed using signal pathway reporter assays, that is, protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)), Myc, Wnt and p53. The levels of activated target transcriptional factors were measured in adipocytes before and after stimulation with lithium and escitalopram. Variations were analysed in the loci of 25 different single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Activation of intracellular signals in several pathways analysed were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls upon drug stimulation, especially with escitalopram stimulation of PKC, JNK and Myc, as well as lithium-stimulated PKC, whereas no meaningful difference was observed before stimulation. Univariate analyses of contingency tables for 80 categorical SNP results versus diagnoses showed a significant link with the ANK3 gene (rs10761482; likelihood ratio χ(2)=4.63; P=0.031). In a multivariate ordinal logistic fit for diagnosis, a backward stepwise procedure selected ANK3 as the remaining significant predictor. Comparison of the escitalopram-stimulated PKC activity and the ANK3 genotype showed them to add their share of the diagnostic variance, with no interaction (15% of variance explained, P<0.002). The study is cross-sectional with no longitudinal follow-up. Cohorts are relatively small with no medication-free patients, and there are no 'ill patient' controls. It takes 3 to 4 weeks of culture to expand adipocytes that may change epigenetic profiles but remove the possibility of medication effects

  3. Assessing and Interpreting Personality Change and Continuity in Patients Treated for Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fruyt, Filip; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Bagby, R. Michael; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Rouillon, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Structural, mean- and individual-level, differential, and positive personality continuity were examined in 599 patients treated for major depression assigned to 1 of 6 forms of a 6-month pharmacy-psychotherapy program. Covariation among traits from the Five Factor model remained invariant across treatment, and patients described themselves as…

  4. Improving Treatment Adherence in Bipolar Disorder: A Review of Current Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy and Recommendations for Future Treatment Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment adherence is a frequent problem in bipolar disorder, with research showing that more than 60% of bipolar patients are at least partially nonadherent to medications. Treatment nonadherence is consistently predictive of a number of negative outcomes in bipolar samples, and the discontinuation of mood stabilizers places these patients at…

  5. [Use of hypnosis in treating a patient with dental anxiety: A case study].

    PubMed

    Meyerson, J; Ratson, T

    2015-10-01

    Dental anxiety is quite common and may lead to dental neglect due to lack of regular visits to the dental clinic. The difficulties in managing anxious patients are characterized by prolonged visits, a tendency to cancel appointments and a tense atmo- sphere during treatment. The use of hypnosis while treating an anxious patient can help create a posi- tive environment and shorten the duration of dental appointments as well. The article describes a case in which hypnosis was used while treating a patient who had suffered from dental anxiety for over 20 years.

  6. Q Fever Risk in Patients Treated with Chronic Antitumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Astrahan, Anna; Odeh, Majed; Elias, Nizar; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays a pivotal role in the defense against infection with this Gram-negative coccobacillus. Theoretically, patients who are treated with anti-TNF-α medications are at risk for developing chronic Q fever. We present two patients who developed Q fever while being treated with anti-TNF-α agents and discuss the significance of timely diagnosis of C. burnetii infection in these patients. PMID:27656302

  7. Q Fever Risk in Patients Treated with Chronic Antitumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Astrahan, Anna; Odeh, Majed; Elias, Nizar; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic bacterial disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays a pivotal role in the defense against infection with this Gram-negative coccobacillus. Theoretically, patients who are treated with anti-TNF-α medications are at risk for developing chronic Q fever. We present two patients who developed Q fever while being treated with anti-TNF-α agents and discuss the significance of timely diagnosis of C. burnetii infection in these patients.

  8. Case report: bipolar disorder as the first manifestation of CADASIL

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an inherited cerebrovascular disease, clinically characterized by variable manifestations of migraine, recurrent transient ischemic attack or lacunar strokes, cognitive decline, and mood disturbances. However, manic episodes have rarely been documented as an initial symptom of CADASIL and bipolar disorder presenting as the first manifestation in CADASIL has not been reported previously from evaluations by psychiatrists or psychological testing by psychologists. Case presentation A 53 year old woman developed symptoms of mania in her 50s leading to a personality change involving a continuously labile mood and irritability over a number of years. Neuropsychological testing revealed an intact memory, but impairment in attention and executive function. In the Rorschach test, she showed a high level of cognitive rigidity. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were very consistent with a diagnosis of CADASIL, which was confirmed by genetic testing for NOTCH3 mutations. Atypical antipsychotics proved to be helpful in treating her manic symptoms and for behavior control. Conclusion We present a novel case of CADASIL that first presented as bipolar disorder. We contend that when patients show a late onset personality change or chronically irritable mood that deteriorates over many years, an organic cause such as CADASIL must be considered. Further studies are needed to better understand the exact impacts of cerebral tissue lesions and psychiatric symptoms in CADASIL patients. PMID:24929957

  9. Association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control in patients with untreated versus treated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Chollet, Sylvaine; Pigeanne, Thierry; Masson, Philippe; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Goupil, François; Ducluzeau, Pierre-Henri; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the association between obstructive sleep apnea severity and glucose control differs between patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, and patients with known and treated type 2 diabetes. This multicentre cross-sectional study included 762 patients investigated by sleep recording for suspected obstructive sleep apnea, 497 of whom were previously diagnosed and treated for type 2 diabetes (treated diabetic patients), while 265 had no medical history of diabetes but had fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg dL(-1) and/or glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) ≥6.5% consistent with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (untreated diabetic patients). Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent association between HbA1c and obstructive sleep apnea severity in treated and untreated patients with diabetes. In untreated diabetic patients, HbA1c was positively associated with apnea-hypopnea index (P = 0.0007) and 3% oxygen desaturation index (P = 0.0016) after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, alcohol habits, metabolic dyslipidaemia, hypertension, statin use and study site. The adjusted mean value of HbA1c increased from 6.68% in the lowest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (<17) to 7.20% in the highest quartile of the apnea-hypopnea index (>61; P = 0.033 for linear trend). In treated patients with diabetes, HbA1c was associated with non-sleep variables, including age, metabolic dyslipidaemia and insulin use, but not with obstructive sleep apnea severity. Obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect glucose control in patients with newly diagnosed and untreated type 2 diabetes, but may have a limited impact in patients with overt type 2 diabetes receiving anti-diabetic medications. PMID:25703309

  10. Putative Drugs and Targets for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zarate, Carlos A.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder (BPD) is generally unsatisfactory for a large number of patients. Even with adequate modern bipolar pharmacological therapies, many afflicted individuals continue to have persistent mood episode relapses, residual symptoms, functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Creating novel therapeutics for BPD is urgently needed. Promising drug targets and compounds for BPD worthy of further study involve the following systems: purinergic, dynorphin opioid neuropeptide, cholinergic (muscarinic and nicotinic), melatonin and serotonin (5-HT2C receptor), glutamatergic, hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis have all been implicated. Intracellular pathways and targets worthy of further study include glycogen synthase kinase-3 protein, protein kinase C, arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:18704977

  11. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of fractional bipolar radiofrequency for the treatment of moderate to severe acne scars.

    PubMed

    Verner, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Several treatment modalities are used for the treatment of acne scars with variable results. Recent studies showed that fractional radiofrequency may be an effective treatment modality for acne scars. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, tolerability and patient satisfaction of fractional bipolar radiofrequency (RF), the eTwo™ system (Syneron Candela Ltd., Yokneam, Israel) for treating acne scars. Twelve patients with moderate to severe acne scars received 3-5 treatments with the Sublative fractionated bipolar RF applicator of the eTwo device at 1-month intervals. Patients were evaluated clinically and photographically at each visit and 3 months after the final treatment. Very good improvement (at least one scale) was seen after completing the five treatments. The patient satisfaction survey (Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale scores) revealed that half (6 out of 12) of the patients reported to be satisfied with treatment results, while the other half reported to be very satisfied. Beyond the expected erythema and minimal scab formation in the treated areas, which was mild and transient, none of the participants reported any adverse events. The data presented here support the high efficacy and safety of fractionated bipolar RF for the aesthetic improvement of moderate to severe acne scars. PMID:26279170

  12. Memory and Learning in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Erin B.; Treland, Julia E.; Snow, Joseph; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Towbin, Kenneth E.; Charney, Dennis S.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that patients with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBPD) would demonstrate impairment relative to diagnosis-free controls of comparable age, gender, and IQ on measures of memory functioning. Method: The authors administered a battery of verbal and visuospatial memory tests to 35 outpatients with PBPD and 20 healthy…

  13. [Primary hyperparathyroidism: studies of 4,000 urinary calculi patients treated with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, R; Behrendt, U; Gräf, K; Christians, T; Borgmann, V; Nagel, R

    1991-09-01

    The incidence of primary hyperparathyroidism was determined in 4000 renal stone formers treated by ESWL at our institution from 1983 to 1990. Based on repeated measurements of serum calcium and serum parathyroid hormone an incidence of 2.8% was found. In 60% of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism stone disease occurred for the first time. The majority of patients (68%) were more than 50 years of age. 56% of patients were men, 44% were women.

  14. Sideroblastic anemia as a preleukemic event in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, M.; Cosgriff, T.M.; Eyre, H.J.

    1980-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemia after treatment for Hodgkin's disease was seen in two patients 3 years after completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This was followed in both by the development of myelomonoblastic leukemia. No evidence of recurrent Hodgkin's disease was present in either patient. Our observation suggests that development of sideroblastic anemia in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease is probably secondary to the treatment and is a preleukemic event.

  15. Long-Term Survival in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Treated with DTIC or Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christina; Lee, Christopher W.; Kovacic, Laurel; Shah, Amil; Klasa, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background. Patients with metastatic melanoma typically have a poor outcome; however, a small proportion of patients achieve long-term survival (LTS). It is unclear how often LTS is related to sensitivity to chemotherapy. Methods. All patients with metastatic melanoma treated with either dacarbazine (DTIC) or temozolomide (TMZ) at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) from January 1, 1988 to February 1, 2006 were identified through the BCCA pharmacy electronic database, which was then linked to the surveillance and outcomes unit to identify patients with LTS, defined as survival ≥18 months following chemotherapy. Results. In total, 397 patients were treated with either DTIC (n = 349) or TMZ (n = 48) and 43 patients (10.8%) were identified with LTS. Two additional patients with LTS were added prior to 1988 for a total of 45 patients. The 5-year overall and progression-free survival rates for patients with LTS were 33% and 16%, respectively. In total, 16% had a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy, which was the only factor identified that correlated with survival in the multivariate analysis. However, most patients with LTS had an incomplete response to chemotherapy. Conclusions. LTS occurs in select patients who achieve a CR to chemotherapy. However, this occurs in only a minority of patients and, in most cases, the longer survival is likely the result of indolent disease biology or host factors. PMID:20538743

  16. The pharmacology of bipolar disorder during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Treating bipolar disorder in women during reproduction presents a significant challenge to the physician. The pharmaceutical agents most commonly used for treating bipolar disorder have been associated with adverse effects when used during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Of particular concern has been the association of lithium with cardiac malformations, and the association of carbamazepine and valproate with neural tube defects including spina bifida. Toxicity in neonates has also been reported for the most commonly used mood-stabilising agents. Treatment options for mood stabilisation are either associated with risks of adverse events, have been used less frequently and their associated risks are unknown, or may not provide effective prophylaxis against recurrences of bipolar episodes. However, strategies are available that minimise the risk to the fetus and infant whilst still providing effective prophylaxis against bipolar disorder in the mother. Ideally, a treatment regimen tailored to suit the individual should consider both mother and baby and should be planned prior to conception.

  17. Attentional and emotional functioning in schizophrenia patients treated with conventional and atypical antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna; Tylec, Aneta; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej; Mortimer, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Effectiveness of antipsychotics in treating emotional and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia still remains controversial. The aim of our study was to assess emotional and cognitive functioning in schizophrenic inpatients currently treated with typical antipsychotics (perphenazine, perazine, fluphenazine, and haloperidol) and in another group of schizophrenic inpatients currently on atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, amisulpride, and quetiapine). Material/Methods One hundred patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders (39 treated using typical antipsychotics and 61 treated with atypical antipsychotics) under naturalistic treatment conditions, and 50 healthy controls were given the following: Test of Everyday Attention, Facial Emotion Recognition Test, Facial Memory Recognition Test, and “Reading the mind in the eyes” Test. Results Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia revealed the following deficits: facial emotion perception, empathy/theory of mind, visual selective attention/speed, attentional switching, and auditory-verbal working memory. Our results show a significant difference between schizophrenic and healthy controls in all tasks, with schizophrenic patients performing worse than controls. Interestingly, our patients on atypical neuroleptics performed similarly compared to schizophrenic patients treated with conventional neuroleptics on all tasks provided. There were some significant relationships between emotional and cognitive deficits and clinical variables. Conclusions Our findings remain consistent with other recent studies in which atypical antipsychotics did not show a clear advantage over typical antipsychotics on both emotional and cognitive functioning. PMID:22207119

  18. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    SciTech Connect

    Sirvent, P.; Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S.; Hillaire-Buys, D.; Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J.

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  19. Are Some Blood Pressure Meds Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161421.html Are Some Blood Pressure Meds Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk? Researchers add ... TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some blood pressure drugs may boost the risk that patients will ...

  20. Lightweight bipolar storage battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus [10] is disclosed for a lightweight bipolar battery of the end-plate cell stack design. Current flow through a bipolar cell stack [12] is collected by a pair of copper end-plates [16a,16b] and transferred edgewise out of the battery by a pair of lightweight, low resistance copper terminals [28a,28b]. The copper terminals parallel the surface of a corresponding copper end-plate [16a,16b] to maximize battery throughput. The bipolar cell stack [12], copper end-plates [16a,16b] and copper terminals [28a,28b] are rigidly sandwiched between a pair of nonconductive rigid end-plates [20] having a lightweight fiber honeycomb core which eliminates distortion of individual plates within the bipolar cell stack due to internal pressures. Insulating foam [30] is injected into the fiber honeycomb core to reduce heat transfer into and out of the bipolar cell stack and to maintain uniform cell performance. A sealed battery enclosure [ 22] exposes a pair of terminal ends [26a,26b] for connection with an external circuit.

  1. Duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Miyu; Koide, Tetsuro; Imanishi, Yoshinori; Matsui, Yuriyo; Matsuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a known adverse effect of duloxetine, and it can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Administration of thiazide diuretics also has been the cause of hyponatremia. We report a case of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia in an elderly patient treated with thiazide diuretics. An 86-year-old woman treated with the trichlormethiazide was admitted for vertebral compression fracture with disorientation and nausea on the 6th day of treatment with duloxetine. Laboratory findings revealed hyponatremia, hypo-osmolality, concentrated urine, and increased urine sodium. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone was considered, therefore, duloxetine, and trichlormethiazide was discontinued and treated with fluid restriction, furosemide and sodium chloride administered orally. Disorientation and nausea were improved after correction of hyponatremia. Health care practitioners should be aware of the possibility of duloxetine-induced hyponatremia, particularly in patients treated with thiazide diuretics. PMID:25538343

  2. [Prevention of medication errors in healthcare transition of patients treated with apomorphine].

    PubMed

    Ucha Sanmartin, M; Martín Vila, A; López Vidal, C; Caaamaño Barreiro, M; Piñeiro Corrales, G

    2014-05-01

    The transition of patients between different levels of care process is a particular risk in the production of medication errors. The aim of this paper is to analyze the role of the pharmacist in preventing errors transition care to ensure a safe and cross pharmacotherapy of patients.Transversal, observational and descriptive study in a University Hospital that has a pharmacy service that integrates specialized inpatient care and health centers. Transition of care a patient treated with Apormorfina was analyzed to determine the keypoints of action of the pharmacist. Demographics, disease and medication history, and care transition episodes were collected through the pharmacy program and electronics history.The pharmacist did tasks adapting, reconciliation, management and reporting of medication to the health care team to prevent medication errors in care transition of patients treated with drugs requiring special handling .In conclusion, this work represents perfectly the key role of the pharmacist as coordinator of safe and transverse pharmacotherapy of patients.

  3. Long-term cardiovascular evaluation of patients with Hodgkin's disease treated by thoracic mantle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Applefeld, M.M.; Slawson, R.G.; Spicer, K.M.; Singleton, R.T.; Wesley, M.N.; Wiernik, P.H.

    1982-04-01

    The long-term cardiac effects of anterior-weighted thoracic mantle field radiotherapy were assessed in 25 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease. These patients underwent an evaluation that included a careful history and physical examination, ECG, M-mode echocardiogram, exercise ECG-gated radionuclide ventriculography, and cardiac catheterization. In these 25 patients evaluated 37-144 months (median, 96) after completion of thoracic mantle radiotherapy, eight had constrictive pericarditis; eight had occult constrictive pericarditis; three had an abnormal response to fluid challenge; three had suspected or proven occlusive coronary artery disease; and one each had a cardiomyopathy and diminished functional capacity on exercise testing. Only one patient appears to be normal after evaluation. The clinical spectrum of delayed-appearing radiation-induced cardiac disease in patients treated by anterior-weighted thoracic mantle fields and our suggestions for its treatment are discussed.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH PROXIMAL HUMERUS FRACTURE TREATED AT HOSPITAL SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula Cortes; Mestieri, Mariana Christovam; Pontin, José Carlos Baldocchi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the epidemiological aspects of proximal humerus fractures and describe the profile of patients with proximal humerus fractures hospitalized and treated at Hospital São Paulo, between 2008 and 2013. Methods: Hospital records were retrospectively analyzed for surgically treated patients diagnosed with proximal humerus fracture. Age, gender, injury mechanism, length of hospital stay, performed treatment and associated diseases were considered. Results: From all patients studied, 52 were female at their sixth decade of life. As for the injury mechanism, fall from height was the main cause for women (88.46%) and for man it was motorcycle accidents (31.42%). Fixation with locked plate was the most frequently used treatment. Conclusion: Most patients were female in their fifth decade of life, injured mainly by fall from height. Fixation with locked plate was the most frequently used treatment and the patients were admitted for 7 days, on average. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:26981037

  5. [General practitioners' commitment to treating excessive alcohol consumption: A question of role security in treating affected patients?].

    PubMed

    Fankhänel, Thomas; Rascher, Anja; Thiel, Carolin; Schulz, Katrin; Klement, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Only a few general practitioners (GPs) are committed to screen their patients for alcohol consumption and, in case of excessive alcohol consumption conduct by a brief intervention according to WHO recommendations. Apart from inadequate compensation and work load, another barrier identified by the GPs was their uncertainty about how to deal with affected patients. Most German universities presently spend no more than 90minutes lecture time on addiction medicine teaching. Our research aims to investigate the question whether medical studies and advanced medical education increases the role security of medical students and physicians and their commitment to implementing alcohol screening and brief intervention. Moreover, we will explore whether lack of therapeutic commitment can be related to lack of role security. Questionnaires were administered to pre-clinical and clinical medical students as well as senior house officers. Role security and therapeutic commitment of students and senior house officers were assessed using the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Questionnaire (SAAPPQ) subscales "Role Security" and "Therapeutic Commitment". Analysis was based on 367 questionnaires. As expected, senior house officers reported more Role Security than clinical medical students who showed a higher level of Role Security than pre-clinical medical students. No differences could be found for Therapeutic Commitment. An association between Role Security and Therapeutic Commitment was only revealed for clinical medical students. Medical studies and advanced medical education can increase students' and senior house officers' Role Security to treat patients with excessive alcohol consumption, but not Therapeutic Commitment. Moreover, no association between Role Security and Therapeutic Commitment could be found for senior house officers. Hence, it may be assumed that educational activities aiming to increase Role Security do not promote the development of motivational aspects such as

  6. [General practitioners' commitment to treating excessive alcohol consumption: A question of role security in treating affected patients?].

    PubMed

    Fankhänel, Thomas; Rascher, Anja; Thiel, Carolin; Schulz, Katrin; Klement, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Only a few general practitioners (GPs) are committed to screen their patients for alcohol consumption and, in case of excessive alcohol consumption conduct by a brief intervention according to WHO recommendations. Apart from inadequate compensation and work load, another barrier identified by the GPs was their uncertainty about how to deal with affected patients. Most German universities presently spend no more than 90minutes lecture time on addiction medicine teaching. Our research aims to investigate the question whether medical studies and advanced medical education increases the role security of medical students and physicians and their commitment to implementing alcohol screening and brief intervention. Moreover, we will explore whether lack of therapeutic commitment can be related to lack of role security. Questionnaires were administered to pre-clinical and clinical medical students as well as senior house officers. Role security and therapeutic commitment of students and senior house officers were assessed using the Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Questionnaire (SAAPPQ) subscales "Role Security" and "Therapeutic Commitment". Analysis was based on 367 questionnaires. As expected, senior house officers reported more Role Security than clinical medical students who showed a higher level of Role Security than pre-clinical medical students. No differences could be found for Therapeutic Commitment. An association between Role Security and Therapeutic Commitment was only revealed for clinical medical students. Medical studies and advanced medical education can increase students' and senior house officers' Role Security to treat patients with excessive alcohol consumption, but not Therapeutic Commitment. Moreover, no association between Role Security and Therapeutic Commitment could be found for senior house officers. Hence, it may be assumed that educational activities aiming to increase Role Security do not promote the development of motivational aspects such as

  7. Occurrence of odontogenic infections in patients treated in a postgraduation program on maxillofacial surgery and traumatology.

    PubMed

    Saito, Celia Tomiko Matida Hamata; Gulinelli, Jessica Lemos; Marão, Heloisa Fonseca; Garcia, Idelmo Rangel; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Panzarini, Sônia Regina

    2011-09-01

    This study assessed the occurrence and characteristics of oral and maxillofacial infections in patients treated at a Brazilian oral and maxillofacial emergency service during a 7-year period. The clinical files of all patients treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Traumatology Service of the Araçatuba Dental School, São Paulo State University, Brazil, between 2002 and 2008 were reviewed. From a population of 3645 patients treated in this period, the study sample consisted of 93 subjects who presented odontogenic infections. Data referring to the patients' sex, age, medical history, and the etiology, diagnosis, complications, drug therapy/treatment, and evolution of the pathologic diseases were collected and analyzed using the Epi Info 2000 software. Of these patients, 54 were men (58.1%) and 39 were women (41.9%). Most patients were in the 31- to 40-year-old (20.7%) and 21- to 30-year-old (19.6%) age groups. The most frequent etiology was pulp necrosis due to caries (80.6%). Regarding the treatment, antibiotics were administered to all patients, surgical drainage was done in 75 patients (82.4%), and 44 patients (47.3%) needed hospital admission. First-generation cephalosporin alone or combined with other drugs was the most prescribed antibiotic (n = 26) followed by penicillin G (n = 25). Most patients (n = 85, 91.4%) responded well to the treatment. Five cases had complications: 3 patients needed hospital readmission, 1 case progressed to descending mediastinitis, and 1 patient died. Odontogenic infections can be life-threatening and require hospital admission for adequate patient care. Complications from odontogenic infections, although rare, may be fatal if not properly managed.

  8. Is primary endocrine therapy effective in treating the elderly, unfit patient with breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, G; Jones, M; Champ, C; Gower-Thomas, K; Vaughan-Williams, E

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Elderly patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer wishing to avoid surgery or those who are considered unsuitable for a general anaesthetic may be treated with primary endocrine therapy. We have reviewed all patients with ER-positive breast cancer who were initially treated with primary hormone therapy (PHT) at a district general hospital in south Wales and investigated their outcome in order to evaluate the appropriateness of this method of managing breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS All patients with breast cancer who were initially treated with PHT between January 2002 and December 2008 were identified from a single consultant's prospectively maintained database. For each patient the Charlson co-morbidity index was calculated to give an estimate of ten-year survival. Patients who had died during the study period were identified from hospital and cancer registries. RESULTS A total of 83 cancers in 82 patients with a median age of 81 years (range: 62–93 years) were included. All cancers were ER-positive. Six patients (7%) had a greater than 50% chance of surviving ten years, calculated using the Charlson index. The median follow-up period was 24 months (range: 6–72 months). Twelve patients (15%) had disease progression while taking PHT. Twenty-three patients (28%) have died (median time from diagnosis to death of 10.5 months, range: 1–77 months). Two patients (2%) experienced disease progression within six months of starting PHT and the number of patients whose cancer progressed increased with increasing length of follow up. Fourteen patients (17%) eventually underwent a wide local excision under local anaesthetic. CONCLUSIONS PHT can be considered an effective treatment in this elderly, unfit population with the aim of stopping disease progression so that these patients die with their breast cancer, not of it. PMID:21944793

  9. Executive dysfunction in patients with chronic primary insomnia treated with clonazepam.

    PubMed

    Contreras-González, Noé; Téllez-Alanís, Bernarda; Haro, Reyes; Jiménez-Correa, Ulises; Poblano, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Clonazepam (CNZ) is a drug used for insomnia treatment. Our objective was to search CNZ effects on executive functions (EF) in patients with chronic primary insomnia (CPI)-CNZ treated. Ninety participants were studied divided into three groups: a group of patients with CPI only (n = 30), a group of patients with CPI-CNZ treated (n = 30) and a healthy control drug-free subjects group (n = 30). EF were examined by means of E-Prime and by the Tower of London tests. Data of the EF were compared between groups, and correlation calculations between EF and CNZ dose were performed. Patients with CPI-CNZ treated showed more deleterious effects on EF (attention, inhibition, working memory, planning, cognitive flexibility, and monitoring) than patients with CPI only. Attention and cognitive flexibility correlated with CNZ dose. In conclusion, CNZ treatment was associated with deficits in some EF in patients with CPI-CNZ treated compared to CPI only and controls. We found a dose dependency between CNZ and some EF deficits. PMID:26923575

  10. Repair of radiographic hip joint in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with etanercept plus methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Remy, Anouck; Combe, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    For patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), structural damage, i.e. bone erosion and joint space narrowing, is a major factor leading to functional disability. Negative radiographic progression has been shown in joints, especially in RA patients treated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors in combination with methotrexate. Bone erosion repair in small joints have been observed but only one study selected large weight-bearing joints. We reported 2 cases of patients with severe seropositive juvenile RA who shown improvement of joint space narrowing and subchondral erosion in hip joint when treated with etanercept in combination with methotrexate for at least 1year. Two Japanese cases were also published but with different TNF inhibitors. The mechanisms of bone erosion or joint space narrowing repair are unclear. One study investigated whether bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis patients show evidence of repair in metacarpophalangeal joints when treated with TNF inhibitors and MTX. These results suggested that repair in RA emerged from the bone marrow and the endosteal lining rather than the periosteal compartment. No study investigated joint space narrowing repair in hip joint in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Larger studies needed to confirm joint space narrowing improvement in hip joint in patients treated with TNF inhibitors and to explain the mechanisms of repair.

  11. Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Treated with Radiofrequency Ablation in a Patient with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianyi; Liu, Xiaosun; Zhang, Qing; Hong, Yanyun; Song, Bin; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Standard therapy has not been established for thyroid cancer when a thyroidectomy is contraindicated due to systemic disease. Herein, we reported a patient who had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by radiofrequency ablation because of inability to tolerate a thyroidectomy. Radiofrequency ablation can be used to treat thyroid cancer when surgery is not feasible, although the long-term outcome needs further observation. PMID:27390548

  12. Peribulbar block in patients scheduled for eye procedures and treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Emile; Lamothe, Laure; Genevois, Olivier; Cardon, Annie; Muraine, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Our hypothesis was that the continuation of clopidogrel does not increase the risk of eye hemorrhage, compared to patients not treated with clopidogrel, when a peribulbar anesthesia is required. Our prospective case-control study enrolled two groups of 1,000 patients scheduled for intraocular eye surgery requiring a peribulbar block. Patients treated with clopidogrel were included in group A (1,000 patients). Patients who had never been treated with clopidogrel constituted the control group (group B, 1,000 patients). Hemorrhages were graded as follows: 1 = spot ecchymosis of eyelid and or subconjunctival hemorrhage; 2 = eyelid ecchymosis involving half the lid surface area; 3 = eyelid ecchymosis all around the eye, no increase in intraocular pressure; 4 = retrobulbar hemorrhage with increased intraocular pressure. Grade 1 hemorrhages were observed in 30 patients (3.0 %) in group A and in 20 patients (2.0 %) in group B. No grade 2, 3, or 4 hemorrhage was encountered. There was no significant difference in the grading of hemorrhage between the groups (p = 0.017). Clopidogrel was not associated with a significant increase in potentially sight-threatening local anesthetic complications. PMID:22581096

  13. Peribulbar block in patients scheduled for eye procedures and treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Emile; Lamothe, Laure; Genevois, Olivier; Cardon, Annie; Muraine, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Our hypothesis was that the continuation of clopidogrel does not increase the risk of eye hemorrhage, compared to patients not treated with clopidogrel, when a peribulbar anesthesia is required. Our prospective case-control study enrolled two groups of 1,000 patients scheduled for intraocular eye surgery requiring a peribulbar block. Patients treated with clopidogrel were included in group A (1,000 patients). Patients who had never been treated with clopidogrel constituted the control group (group B, 1,000 patients). Hemorrhages were graded as follows: 1 = spot ecchymosis of eyelid and or subconjunctival hemorrhage; 2 = eyelid ecchymosis involving half the lid surface area; 3 = eyelid ecchymosis all around the eye, no increase in intraocular pressure; 4 = retrobulbar hemorrhage with increased intraocular pressure. Grade 1 hemorrhages were observed in 30 patients (3.0 %) in group A and in 20 patients (2.0 %) in group B. No grade 2, 3, or 4 hemorrhage was encountered. There was no significant difference in the grading of hemorrhage between the groups (p = 0.017). Clopidogrel was not associated with a significant increase in potentially sight-threatening local anesthetic complications.

  14. New developments in the management of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: potential use of cariprazine

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Cariprazine is a recently developed antipsychotic drug with a partial agonism for the D2 and D3 receptors. It shows a tenfold greater affinity for the D3 receptor. In clinical trials, its therapeutic effect has been tested in patients with an acute exacerbation of schizophrenia and in patients with acute mania in bipolar disorder. Like risperidone, cariprazine improves positive and negative schizophrenic symptoms, and ameliorates cognitive functions. Cariprazine induces extrapyramidal symptoms less often than risperidone and can cause acute akathisia. It is a prolactin-sparing antipsychotic drug and has a favorable metabolic profile. In acute mania in bipolar disorder, it treats manic symptoms significantly better than placebo. As a consequence of its improved adverse effects, cariprazine improves patients’ quality of life to a greater extent than other second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Cariprazine is a promising antipsychotic drug in the treatment of schizophrenia, acute mania in bipolar disorder, and in schizophrenia with mania. In these patients, its long-term therapeutic effect and its action in comparison with other second-generation antipsychotic drugs, above all aripiprazole, remain to be tested in clinical trials. PMID:26586950

  15. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  16. Bifurcation analysis of parametrically excited bipolar disorder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nana, Laurent

    2009-02-01

    Bipolar II disorder is characterized by alternating hypomanic and major depressive episode. We model the periodic mood variations of a bipolar II patient with a negatively damped harmonic oscillator. The medications administrated to the patient are modeled via a forcing function that is capable of stabilizing the mood variations and of varying their amplitude. We analyze analytically, using perturbation method, the amplitude and stability of limit cycles and check this analysis with numerical simulations.

  17. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  18. [Clinical aspects of the evolution of dental caries and periodontal disease in patients treated with corticosteroids].

    PubMed

    Lăcătuşu, St; Ghiorghe, Angela

    2004-01-01

    Patients treated with adrenal glucocorticoids may run a higher risk of dental caries, both as a result of their medical condition and of the physical and physiological effects of their pharmacotherapy. Our clinical study reports about patients treated with glucocorticoids who were also having an odonto-periodontal condition. They were examined and we found rampant caries and periodontal diseases. The slow evolution of asymptomatic periodontal disease encouraged destruction of teeth in root caries. The rampant caries were correlated with immunodeficiency and treatment of these caries must take into account the general treatment.

  19. Acute- or subacute-onset lung complications in treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Reiko; Sakai, Fumikazu; Mimura, Toshihide; Tokuda, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kimura, Fumiko

    2013-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic disease that manifests as inflammatory arthritis of multiple joints and produces a wide variety of intrathoracic lesions, including pleural diseases, diffuse interstitial pneumonia, rheumatoid nodules, and airway disease. Patients treated for RA can have associated lung disease that commonly manifests as diffuse interstitial pneumonia, drug-induced lung injury, and infection. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate the radiographic and clinical features of lung complications of acute or subacute onset in patients treated for RA and to show the computed tomography features of these complications.

  20. Lymphomatoid papulosis in a patient treated with adalimumab for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jun; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Dong-Youn; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2012-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are now well regarded as highly effective treatment modalities for multiple immunologically mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. The mechanism of action for this particular class of medications involves the blockade of multiple intracellular signaling pathways originating from TNF-α, ultimately inducing a generalized immunosuppressed state. In fact, several cases of lymphomas have been reported in patients treated with anti-TNF-α agents, though it has been difficult to prove any degree of causality. Herein, we described a patient who developed lymphomatoid papulosis after being treated with adalimumab, whereby a clear causality could be established. PMID:23257839

  1. How do we manage and treat a patient with multiple sclerosis at risk of tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Adoni, Tarso; Anacleto, Andrea; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Carvalho, Margarete de Jesus; Claudino, Rinaldo; Damasceno, Alfredo; Ferreira, Maria Lucia Brito; Gama, Paulo Diniz da; Goncalves, Marcus Vinicus Magno; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Matta, Andre Palma da Cunha; Parolin, Monica Fiuza Koncke

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a serious health problem worldwide. The disease continues to be underdiagnosed and not properly treated. In conditions that affect the immune system, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), latent tuberculosis may thrive and reactivate during the use of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Among the best treatment options for patients with latent or active tuberculosis who have MS are IFN-β, glatiramer acetate and mitoxantrone. Drugs leading to a reduced number and/or function of lymphocytes should be avoided or used with caution. Tuberculosis must always be investigated in patients with MS and treated with rigor.

  2. How do we manage and treat a patient with multiple sclerosis at risk of tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Adoni, Tarso; Anacleto, Andrea; Brooks, Joseph Bruno Bidin; Carvalho, Margarete de Jesus; Claudino, Rinaldo; Damasceno, Alfredo; Ferreira, Maria Lucia Brito; Gama, Paulo Diniz da; Goncalves, Marcus Vinicus Magno; Grzesiuk, Anderson Kuntz; Matta, Andre Palma da Cunha; Parolin, Monica Fiuza Koncke

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a serious health problem worldwide. The disease continues to be underdiagnosed and not properly treated. In conditions that affect the immune system, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), latent tuberculosis may thrive and reactivate during the use of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Among the best treatment options for patients with latent or active tuberculosis who have MS are IFN-β, glatiramer acetate and mitoxantrone. Drugs leading to a reduced number and/or function of lymphocytes should be avoided or used with caution. Tuberculosis must always be investigated in patients with MS and treated with rigor. PMID:25242167

  3. Prognostic biomarkers in patients with localized natural killer/T-cell lymphoma treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Motoko; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Ishizuka, Naoki; Oguchi, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Yukio; Isobe, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Kubota, Nobuko; Itoh, Kuniaki; Usui, Noriko; Miyazaki, Kana; Wasada, Izumi; Nakamura, Shigeo; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become one of the standard management approaches for newly diagnosed localized nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Few data are available on the prognostic biomarkers of NKTCL among patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. To evaluate the prognostic significance of immunophenotypic biomarkers for patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) and cell origin were examined in samples from 32 patients who were enrolled in the Japan Clinical Oncology Group 0211 trial and treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. LMP1 and CLA were positive in 66% (19/29) and 29% (9/31) of the cases examined, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 68 months (range, 61–94). The patients with LMP1-positive tumors showed a better overall survival (OS) than the patients with LMP1-negative tumors (hazard ratio, 0.240; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.057–1.013; 80% CI, 0.093–0.615; P = 0.035). All five patients with LMP1-negative tumors who experienced disease progression died of lymphoma, and both patients with local failure had LMP1-negative tumors. There was no significant difference in OS according to CLA expression. A total of 27 (84%) cases were of NK-cell origin, two were of αβ T-cell origin and three were of γδ T-cell origin. In contrast to those with tumors of NK-cell origin, all five patients with NKTCL of T-cell origin were alive without relapse at the last follow up. Our results indicate that LMP1 expression is a favorable prognostic marker and suggest that a T-cell origin of the tumor may be a favorable prognostic marker for patients with localized NKTCL treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. PMID:25181936

  4. Reporting Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Curative Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Souhami, Luis; Joshua, Bosede; Vuong, Te; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Long-term rectal toxicity is a concern for patients with prostate cancer treated with curative radiation. However, comparing results of late toxicity may not be straightforward. This article reviews the complexity of reporting long-term side effects by using data for patients treated in our institution with hypofractionated irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy alone to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions were prospectively assessed for late rectal toxicity according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3, scoring system. Ninety percent of patients had more than 24 months of follow-up. Results are compared with data published in the literature. Results: We found an actuarial incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 27% at 30 months and a crude incidence of Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity of 18%. This was mostly severe toxicity documented during follow-up. The incidence of Grade 3 rectal toxicity at the last visit was 3% compared with 13% documented at any time during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparison of late toxicity after radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer must be undertaken with caution because many factors need to be taken into consideration. Because accurate assessment of late toxicity in the evaluation of long-term outcome after radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer is essential, there is a need to develop by consensus guidelines for assessing and reporting late toxicity in this group of patients.

  5. Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Geoffrey S. . E-mail: geoffrey.higgins@luht.scot.nhs.uk; McLaren, Duncan B.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Elliott, Tony; Howard, Grahame

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used.

  6. Breast Retraction Assessment: an objective evaluation of cosmetic results of patients treated conservatively for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pezner, R.D.; Patterson, M.P.; Hill, L.R.; Vora, N.; Desai, K.R.; Archambeau, J.O.; Lipsett, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Breast Retraction Assessment (BRA) is an objective evaluation of the amount of cosmetic retraction of the treated breast in comparison to the untreated breast in patients who receive conservative treatment for breast cancer. A clear acrylic sheet supported vertically and marked as a grid at 1 cm intervals is employed to perform the measurements. Average BRA value in 29 control patients without breast cancer was 1.2 cm. Average BRA value in 27 patients treated conservatively for clinical Stage I or II unilateral breast cancer was 3.7 cm. BRA values in breast cancer patients ranged from 0.0 to 8.5 cm. Patients who received a local radiation boost to the primary tumor bed site had statistically significantly less retraction than those who did not receive a boost. Patients who had an extensive primary tumor resection had statistically significantly more retraction than those who underwent a more limited resection. In comparison to qualitative forms of cosmetic analysis, BRA is an objective test that can quantitatively evaluate factors which may be related to cosmetic retraction in patients treated conservatively for breast cancer.

  7. Bipolar battery construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor); Edwards, Dean B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A lightweight, bipolar battery construction for lead acid batteries in which a plurality of thin, rigid, biplates each comprise a graphite fiber thermoplastic composition in conductive relation to lead stripes plated on opposite flat surfaces of the plates, and wherein a plurality of nonconductive thermoplastic separator plates support resilient yieldable porous glass mats in which active material is carried, the biplates and separator plates with active material being contained and maintained in stacked assembly by axial compression of the stacked assembly. A method of assembling such a bipolar battery construction.

  8. Central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Farde, L.; Wiesel, F.A.; Halldin, C.; Sedvall, G.

    1988-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography and the carbon 11-labeled ligand raclopride, central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy in the putamen was determined in psychiatric patients treated with clinical doses of psychoactive drugs. Receptor occupancy in drug-treated patients was defined as the percent reduction of specific carbon 11-raclopride binding in relation to the expected binding in the absence of drug treatment. Clinical treatment of schizophrenic patients with 11 chemically distinct antipsychotic drugs (including both classic and atypical neuroleptics such as clozapine) resulted in a 65% to 85% occupancy of D2-dopamine receptors. In a depressed patient treated with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, no occupancy was found. The time course for receptor occupancy and drug levels was followed after withdrawal of sulpiride or haloperidol. D2-dopamine receptor occupancy remained above 65% for many hours despite a substantial reduction of serum drug concentrations. In a sulpiride-treated patient, the dosage was reduced in four steps over a nine-week period and a curvilinear relationship was demonstrated between central D2-dopamine receptor occupancy and serum drug concentrations. The results demonstrate that clinical doses of all the currently used classes of antipsychotic drugs cause a substantial blockade of central D2-dopamine receptors in humans. This effect appears to be selective for the antipsychotics, since it was not induced by the antidepressant nortriptyline.

  9. Thyroid abnormalities in patients previously treated with irradiation for acne vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.B.; Grammes, C.F.; Starkey, R.H.; Monsaert, R.P.; Sunderlin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    Of 1,203 patients who received radiation treatment for acne vulgaris between 1940 and 1968, 302 patients were recalled and examined, 121 at Geisinger Medical Center and the remainder by their local physicians. Radiation records were reviewed on all patients. Lead-rubber and cones had been used as shielding. Mean age at the time of exposure was 21 years and mean total exposure was 692 R. Palpable nodular thyroid disease was found in eight patients (2.6%). Of these, thyroid carcinoma was detected in two patients (0.66%). Although the number of patients examined was small, the incidence of carcinomas was unexpectedly high. We conclude that follow-up examination is worthwhile for patients previously treated by irradiation for acne vulgaris.

  10. Long-term results in 144 localized Ewing's sarcoma patients treated with combined therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, G.; Toni, A.; Avella, M.; Manfrini, M.; Sudanese, A.; Ciaroni, D.; Boriani, S.; Emiliani, E.; Campanacci, M.

    1989-04-15

    The results of 144 previously untreated cases of primary Ewing's sarcoma of bone are reported with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. This series was treated between 1972 and 1982 at Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli with a combined therapy. The local control of the disease consisted of amputation (ten cases), resection followed by radiation therapy (35-45 Gy) (48 cases) and radiation therapy alone (40-60 Gy) (86 cases). Adjuvant chemotherapy, rigorously standardized, was performed according two different protocols: the first (85 cases treated in the period 1972-1978) consisted of vincristine (VCR) Adriamycin (doxorubicin) (ADM), and cyclophosphamide (EDX); the second (59 cases treated in the period 1979-1982) of VCR, ADM, EDX and dactinomycin (DACT). At a follow-up of 5 to 16 years (median, 9), 59 patients (41%) are continuously disease-free (CDF), 81 (56%) developed metastatic disease and/or local recurrence, and four (3%) had a second malignancy. Three factors seem to be correlated to prognosis: the site of the initial lesion (only 23% of the pelvic lesions are represented in the CDF group versus 46% of the other locations); the chemotherapy protocol (32% of the cases in the first protocol are CDF versus 54% in the second); the type of local treatment (60% of the patients treated with amputation or resection plus radiotherapy versus 28% of those treated with radiation therapy alone are CDF). A local recurrence was observed in 24% of the patients (8% in the group locally treated with surgery or surgery plus radiation therapy versus 36% in the group treated with radiation therapy alone). These data suggest that even though adjuvant chemotherapy can improve the long-term results in localized Ewing's sarcoma patients, this disease still represents, in a high percentage of cases, a lethal process whose final prognosis widely depends on the local control of the lesion.

  11. Comorbidity of Asperger's syndrome and Bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective Asperger's Syndrome (AS) is a pervasive developmental disorder that is sometimes unrecognized, especially in the adult psychiatric setting. On the other hand, in patients with an AS diagnosis, comorbid psychiatric disorders may be unrecognized in the juvenile setting. The aim of the paper is to show and discuss some troublesome and complex problems of the management of patients with AS and comorbid Bipolar Disorder (BD). Methods The paper describes three patients affected by AS and bipolar spectrum disorders. Results and conclusion Mood stabilizers and 2nd generation antipsychotics were effective in the treatment of these AS patients with comorbid BD, while the use of antidepressants was associated with worsening of the mood disorder. It is of importance to recognize both the psychiatric diagnoses in order to arrange an exhaustive therapeutic program and to define specific and realistic goals of treatment. PMID:19014623

  12. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status.

  13. Severe Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Patients Treated for Hepatitis C With Sofosbuvir.

    PubMed

    Renard, Sébastien; Borentain, Patrick; Salaun, Erwan; Benhaourech, Sanaa; Maille, Baptiste; Darque, Albert; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Colson, Philippe; Laugier, Delphine; Gaubert, Martine Reynaud; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    Development of direct-acting antiviral agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) has changed the management of chronic HCV infection. We report three cases of newly diagnosed or exacerbated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients treated with sofosbuvir. All patients had PAH-associated comorbidities (HIV coinfection in two, portal hypertension in one) and one was already being treated for PAH. At admission, all patients presented with syncope, World Health Organization functional class IV, right-sided heart failure, and extremely severe hemodynamic parameters. After specific PAH therapy, the clinical and hemodynamic properties for all patients were improved. Severity and acuteness of PAH, as well as chronology, could suggest a causal link between HCV treatment and PAH onset. We hypothesize that suppression of HCV replication promotes a decrease in vasodilatory inflammatory mediators leading to worsening of underlying PAH. The current report suggests that sofosbuvir-based therapy may be associated with severe PAH.

  14. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population.

  15. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Ekenberg, Christina; Friis-Møller, Nina; Ulstrup, Thomas; Aalykke, Claus

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations in this population. PMID:27571912

  16. Nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Louise; Pereira, John Xavier; Shir, Yoram

    2007-09-01

    Methadone treatment in chronic pain patients is still limited owing to misconceptions about addiction, safety, and its unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Nevertheless, patients with chronic noncancer pain are frequently treated with methadone at our Pain Centre either as the first opioid of choice, for specific pain conditions, or as a second-line opioid in patients developing tolerance or intractable side effects with other opioids. The aim of this study was to examine whether a nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone is feasible and safe in trying to improve patients' care in an ambulatory setting. This program consisted of three phases: initial primary education session, telephone follow-up during methadone titration, and a subsequent maintenance period. The nurse case manager functioned autonomously and when required reported to and consulted the physician. The study included 75 subjects and was done over a nine-month period by completing follow-up questionnaires for every call. Of a total of 194 recorded calls, 41% were unscheduled. Forty-four percent of phone calls resulted in a methadone increase and 11% led to a decrease or cessation of methadone. No patients developed serious morbidity or mortality. Fifty-seven percent of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. A nurse-led case management program of methadone in chronic pain patients can improve patient care in an ambulatory setting. PMID:17723930

  17. Melatonin receptor 1B gene associated with hyperglycemia in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hukic, Dzana S; Lavebratt, Catharina; Frisén, Louise; Backlund, Lena; Hilding, Agneta; Gu, Harvest F; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Erlinge, David; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Schalling, Martin; Ösby, Urban

    2016-06-01

    Bipolar patients are at a higher risk of developing metabolic disorders. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is twice the rate reported in the population. Antipsychotic medication increases the risk of metabolic abnormalities. However, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have a similarly increased mortality from cardiovascular causes of death, although bipolar patients medicate with antipsychotic drugs to a much smaller extent than schizophrenic patients. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share substantial genetic risk components; thus, increased metabolic abnormalities is hypothesized to be an effect of specific sets of metabolic risk genes, which might overlap with the metabolic risk genes in schizophrenia. This study reports that a functional genetic variant of MTNR1B, previously implicated in the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release also in schizophrenia, was associated with elevated fasting glucose levels in bipolar patients and controls. This finding suggests that the MTNR1B-dependent vulnerability for elevated fasting plasma glucose levels is shared between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. PMID:26991397

  18. Altered biodistribution of gallium-67 in a patient with aluminum toxicity treated with desferoxamine

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Slizofski, W.J.; Dadparvar, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Markedly altered biodistribution of ({sup 67}Ga)citrate was observed in a 66-yr-old hemodialysis patient imaged at 48 hr postinjection. A review of the patient's hospital records revealed toxic serum levels of aluminum, treated with the chelating agent desferoxamine. Based on what is known about the biologic interactions between gallium, aluminum, transferrin, and desferoxamine, we believe that both toxic serum aluminum levels and desferoxamine therapy may cause altered biodistribution on ({sup 67}Ga)citrate scintigraphy.

  19. Measurement of radiation exposure in relatives of thyroid cancer patients treated with (131)I.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Garzón, Y T; Ávila, O; Medina, L A; Gamboa-deBuen, I; Rodríguez-Laguna, A; Buenfil, A E; Ruíz-Trejo, C; Estrada, E; Brandan, M E

    2014-11-01

    This work evaluates the radiological risk that patients treated with I for differentiated thyroid cancer could present to relatives and occupationally exposed workers. Recently, the International Atomic Energy Agency issued document K9010241, which recommends that patient discharge from the hospital must be based on the particular status of each patient. This work measures effective dose received by caregivers of patients treated with I at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were carried during a 15-d period by 40 family caregivers after patient release from hospital. Relatives were classified into two groups, ambulatory and hospitalized, according to the release mode of the patient, and three categories according to the individual patient home and transport facilities. Categories A, B, and C were defined going from most to least adequate concerning public exposure risk. Measurements were performed for 20 family caregivers in each group. The effective dose received by all caregivers participating in this study was found to be less than 5 mSv, the recommended limit per event for caregivers suggested by ICRP 103. In addition, 70 and 90% of ambulatory and hospitalized groups, respectively, received doses lower than 1 mSv. Caregivers belonging to category C, with home situations that are not appropriate for immediate release, received the highest average doses; i.e., 2.2 ± 1.3 and 3.1 ± 1.0 mSv for hospitalized and ambulatory patients, respectively. Results of this work have shown that the proper implementation of radiation protection instructions for relatives and patients can reduce significantly the risk that differentiated thyroid cancer patients treated with I can represent for surrounding individuals. The results also stress the relevance of the patient's particular lifestyle and transport conditions as the prevailing factors related to the dose received by the caregiver. Therefore, the patient's status should be

  20. Clinical results evaluation of dentinary hypersensitivity patients treated with laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Cruz, Fabio M.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to show the percentage of cured patients treated with low level laser therapy clinically diagnosed dentinary hypersensitivity. The authors report on this investigation more than 300 human teeth treated at the Laser Center of Camilo Castelo Branco University during the years of 1995, 1996 and 1997. Pulpal vitality was verified using thermal tests, and only reversible process was treated. The teeth were dried with cotton pellets and laser beam was applied, using He-Ne (632.8 nm)laser, and ArGaAl Lasers(780 nm and 830 nm). All teeth received 4 joules/session, and were treated until 5 sessions. 79.13% of our patients were treated in 3 sessions with success; 8.58% were cure in 4 sessions; and 4.29% were successfully treated in 5 sessions, obtaining a 92% of success. The authors concluded that low level laser therapy is an effective and useful treatment to dentinary hypersensibility.

  1. Survival Predictors for Severe ARDS Patients Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Retrospective Study in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yonghao; Zhang, Rong; Huang, Yongbo; He, Weiqun; Sang, Ling; Chen, Sibei; Nong, Lingbo; Li, Xi; Mao, Pu; Li, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being applied as life support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, the outcomes of this procedure have not yet been characterized in severe ARDS patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of severe ARDS patients supported with ECMO and to identify potential predictors of mortality in these patients. A total of 38 severe ARDS patients (aged 51.39±13.27 years, 32 males) who were treated with ECMO in the specialized medical intensive care unit of Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases from July 2009 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical data of the patients on the day before ECMO initiation, on the first day of ECMO treatment and on the day of ECMO removal were collected and analyzed. All patients were treated with veno-venous ECMO after a median mechanical ventilation duration of 6.4±7.6 days. Among the 20 patients (52.6%) who were successfully weaned from ECMO, 16 patients (42.1%) survived to hospital discharge. Of the identified pre-ECMO factors, advanced age, a long duration of ventilation before ECMO, a higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, underlying lung disease, and pulmonary barotrauma prior to ECMO were associated with unsuccessful weaning from ECMO. Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that both barotrauma pre-ECMO and underlying lung disease were independent predictors of hospital mortality. In conclusion, for severe ARDS patients treated with ECMO, barotrauma prior to ECMO and underlying lung disease may be major predictors of ARDS prognosis based on multivariate analysis. PMID:27336170

  2. [Infrastructure for new drug development to treat muscular dystrophy: current status of patient registration (remudy)].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Harumasa; Kimura, En; Kawai, Mitsuru

    2011-11-01

    Clinical trials for new therapeutic strategies are now being planned for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD); however, many challenges exist in the planning and conduction of a clinical trial for rare diseases. The epidemiological data, total number of patients, natural history, and clinical outcome measures are unclear. Adequate numbers of patients are needed to achieve significant results in clinical trials. As solutions to these problems, patient registries are an important infrastructure worldwide, especially in the case of rare diseases such as DMD/BMD. In Europe, TREAT-NMD, a clinical research network for neuromuscular disorders, developeda global database for dystrophinopathy patients. We developed a national registry of Japanese DMD/BMD patients in collaboration with TREAT-NMD. The database includes clinical and molecular genetic data as well as all required items for the TREAT-NMD global patient registry. As of July 2011, 750 patients were registered in the database. The purpose of this registry is the effective recruitment of eligible patients for clinical trials, and it may also provide timely information to individual patients about upcoming trials. This registry data also provides more detailed knowledge about natural history, epidemiology, and clinical care. In recent years, drug development has become dramatically globalized, and global clinical trials (GCTs) are being conducted in Japan. It is appropriate, particularly with regard to orphan diseases, to include Japanese patients in GCTs to increase evidence for evaluation, because such large-scale trials would be difficult to conduct solely within Japan. GCTs enable the synchronization of clinical drug development in Japan with that in Western countries, minimizing drug approval delays.

  3. Testicular function in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Pacini, F.; Gasperi, M.; Fugazzola, L.

    1994-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether {sup 131}I therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) can affect endocrine testicular function. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T) concentrations were measured in 103 patients periodically submitted for radioiodine therapy for residual or metastatic disease. Mean follow-up was 93.7{+-}54 mo (range 10-243 mo). Mean FSH values in {sup 131}I-treated patients tested after their last treatment were 15.3{+-}9.9 mU/ml, significantly higher than those of 19 untreated patients (6.5{+-}3.1 mU/ml). Considering the mean +3 s.d. FSH of untreated subjects as the upper limit of normal range, 36.8% of the patients had an abnormal increase in serum FSH. Longitudinal analysis performed in 21 patients showed that the behavior of FSH in response to {sup 131}I therapy was not universal. Six patients had no change or a slight increase in serum FSH after {sup 131}I administration; eleven patients had a transient increase above normal values 6-12 mo after {sup 131}I treatment, with return to normal levels in subsequent months. The administration of a second dose was followed by a similar increase in FSH levels. Finally, four patients, followed for a long period of time and treated with several {sup 131}I doses, showed a progressive increase in serum FSH, which eventually became permanent. Semen analysis, performed in a small subgroup of patients, showed a consistent reduction in the number of normokinetic sperm. No change was found in serum T levels between treated and untreated patients. The results indicate that {sup 131}I therapy for thyroid carcinoma is associated with transient impairment of testicular germinal cell function. The damage may become permanent for high-radiation activities delivered year after year and might pose a significant risk of infertility. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Dialysis Complications in AKI Patients Treated with Extended Daily Dialysis: Is the Duration of Therapy Important?

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    This trial aimed to compare the dialysis complications occurring during different durations of extended daily dialysis (EDD) sessions in critically ill AKI patients. We included patients older than 18 years with AKI associated with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit and using noradrenaline dose ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 μg/kg/min. Patients were divided into two groups randomly: in G1, 6 h sessions were performed and, in G2, 10 h sessions were performed. Seventy-five patients were treated with 195 EDD sessions for 18 consecutive months. The prevalence of hypotension, filter clotting, hypokalaemia, and hypophosphataemia was 82.6, 25.3, 20, and 10.6%, respectively. G1 and G2 were similar in male predominance and SOFA. There was no significant difference between the two groups in hypotension, filter clotting, hypokalaemia, and hypophosphataemia. However, the group treated with sessions of 10 hours showed higher refractory to clinical measures for hypotension and dialysis sessions were interrupted more often. Metabolic control and fluid balance were similar between G1 and G2. In conclusion, intradialysis hypotension was common in AKI patients treated with EDD. There was no difference in the prevalence of dialysis complications in patients undergoing different durations of EDD. PMID:25177682

  5. A patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome treated with chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew K; Teoh, Daren; Matthews, Paul; Fresco, Lydia

    2013-09-17

    We present the first published case of a patient with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) who was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for an oropharyngeal carcinoma. In view of this newly recognised connective tissue disease, the uncertainty of severe toxicity from chemoradiotherapy to treat a potentially curative cancer posed a management challenge. The patient was treated with chemoradiotherapy and remains well with no evidence of recurrence at 3 years. Furthermore, we have observed minimal late effects secondary to chemoradiotherapy at 3 years following the completion of treatment suggesting that the underlying pathogenesis of LDS may provide an interesting human model to further elucidate the complex interactions of tr