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Sample records for biscyanate ester resin

  1. A New Silicon-Containing Bis(Cyanate) Ester Resin with Improved Thermal Oxidation and Moisture Resistance (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No . 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1...other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...BADCy and bis(4-cyanatophenyl)dimeth- ylsilane 3 (SiMCy). Macromolecules, Vol. 39, No . 18, 2006 Silicon-Containing Bis(cyanate) Ester Resin 6047

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and cure chemistry of renewable bis(cyanate) esters derived from 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol.

    PubMed

    Meylemans, Heather A; Harvey, Benjamin G; Reams, Josiah T; Guenthner, Andrew J; Cambrea, Lee R; Groshens, Thomas J; Baldwin, Lawrence C; Garrison, Michael D; Mabry, Joseph M

    2013-03-11

    A series of renewable bis(cyanate) esters have been prepared from bisphenols synthesized by condensation of 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol (creosol) with formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde. The cyanate esters have been fully characterized by infrared spectroscopy, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds melt from 88 to 143 °C, while cured resins have glass transition temperatures from 219 to 248 °C, water uptake (96 h, 85 °C immersion) in the range of 2.05-3.21%, and wet glass transition temperatures from 174 to 193 °C. These properties suggest that creosol-derived cyanate esters may be useful for a wide variety of military and commercial applications. The cure chemistry of the cyanate esters has been studied with FTIR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that cyanate esters with more sterically demanding bridging groups cure more slowly, but also more completely than those with a bridging methylene group. In addition to the structural differences, the purity of the cyanate esters has a significant effect on both the cure chemistry and final Tg of the materials. In some cases, post-cure of the resins at 350 °C resulted in significant decomposition and off-gassing, but cure protocols that terminated at 250-300 °C generated void-free resin pucks without degradation. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed that cured resins were stable up to 400 °C and then rapidly degraded. TGA/FTIR and mass spectrometry results showed that the resins decomposed to phenols, isocyanic acid, and secondary decomposition products, including CO2. Char yields of cured resins under N2 ranged from 27 to 35%, while char yields in air ranged from 8 to 11%. These data suggest that resins of this type may potentially be recycled to parent phenols, creosol, and other alkylated creosols by pyrolysis in the presence of excess water vapor. The ability to synthesize these high temperature resins from a phenol

  3. A New Silicon-Containing Bis(Cyanate) Ester Resin with Improved Thermal Oxidation and Moisture Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-23

    Form Approved REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No . 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1...other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...A.; Gavalda, J.; Gomez, C. M. ; Mondragon, I. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 2000, 76, 1037. [11] Harismendy, I. ; Rio, M. D.; Marieta , C. ; Gavalda, J

  4. Kinetic modelling of vinyl ester resin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dhulipala, R.; Kreig. G.; Hawley, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    The study of kinetics offers a substantional incentive in the endeavor to manufacture polymer matrix composites at high speeds. The study enables one to optimize the curing cycle based on the specific curing characteristics of the resin and also makes it possible to simulate the curing process. This paper reports the results of the modelling of the thermal curing of the vinyl ester resin. The parameters for the proposed model have been calculated based on conversion-vs-data generated at various temperatures and Benzoyl peroxide (initiator) concentrations. The extent of cure of the resin mixture was determined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. In this model the termination rate constant is considered to drop with extent of cure until a limiting value is reached. The limiting value is a consequence of the active chain ends possessing a degree of mobility due to the propagation reaction even though the translational motion of the growing for radicals in increasingly restricted with conversion. Good agreements is observed between the model predictions and the experimental data.

  5. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  6. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section...

  7. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section...

  8. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section...

  9. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section...

  10. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins... Components of Coatings § 175.260 Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins. Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins identified in this section and applied on aluminum may be safely used as...

  11. New phenolic esters from the resinous exudate of Haplopappus taeda.

    PubMed

    Faini, Francesca; Labbé, Cecilia; Torres, René; Rodilla, Jesús M; Silva, Lucía; Delle Monache, Franco

    2007-12-01

    Two new phenolic esters 9-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-alpha-terpineol (1) and 7-trans-p-coumaroyloxy-taedol (2), both endowed with free radical scavenger activity and cleroda-3,13 (E)-dien-15,18-diol (3) for which a cis stereochemistry at the decalin junction was found, were isolated from the resinous exudate from Haplopappus taeda upper parts.

  12. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-05-23

    Cyanate ester resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption, and radiation resistance. This paper describes the results of a processing study to develop a high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray TI 000G carbon fiber and YLA RS- 14A cyanate ester resin as the constituent materials. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to and during cure is also crucial as it affects the glass transition temperature of the resin and composite. Composite cylinders wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent ring tensile strengths both at room and elevated temperature. A summary of the measured mechanical and thermal property data for these composites is presented. Potential applications for these materials include flywheeI energy storage systems for space and satellite structures.

  13. Effect of ester impurities in PMR-polyimide resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral and chomatographic studies were conducted which established the presence of tri- and tetraester impurities in aged monomer solutions employed in fabrication of PMR-polyimide resin composites. The equilibrium constant and apparent rate of the esterification were determined. It was demonstrated, using differential scanning calorimetry, that the ortho-ester moiety of these impurities does not completely react at typical cure conditions. It is concluded that voids formed in composites fabricated with aged monomer solution are due to gaseous decomposition products evolved by ester impurities and/or unreacted amine during elevated temperature post-cure treatment.

  14. Elastomer-modified vinyl ester resins: Impact fracture and fatigue resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, A.R.; Guiley, C.D.; Kinloch, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Vinyl esters are a class of corrosion resistant thermoset resins. Products are available based on epoxide resins that have been addition-esterified with methacrylic acid and diluted with styrene monomer. Elastomer modification improves fracture properties and fatigue properties.

  15. 21 CFR 189.300 - Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-phosphite ester resins. 189.300 Section 189.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Surfaces § 189.300 Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins. (a) Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropylidene-diphenolphosphite ester resins are the condensation product of 1 mole of triphenyl phosphite and 1...

  16. 21 CFR 189.300 - Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-phosphite ester resins. 189.300 Section 189.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Surfaces § 189.300 Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins. (a) Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropylidene-diphenolphosphite ester resins are the condensation product of 1 mole of triphenyl phosphite and 1...

  17. 21 CFR 189.300 - Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-phosphite ester resins. 189.300 Section 189.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins. (a) Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropylidene-diphenolphosphite ester resins are the condensation product of 1 mole of triphenyl phosphite and 1.5 moles of...

  18. 21 CFR 189.300 - Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-phosphite ester resins. 189.300 Section 189.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Surfaces § 189.300 Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins. (a) Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropylidene-diphenolphosphite ester resins are the condensation product of 1 mole of triphenyl phosphite and...

  19. 21 CFR 189.300 - Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-phosphite ester resins. 189.300 Section 189.300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Surfaces § 189.300 Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropyl-idene-diphenol-phosphite ester resins. (a) Hydrogenated 4,4′-isopropylidene-diphenolphosphite ester resins are the condensation product of 1 mole of triphenyl phosphite and...

  20. Nanoporous Cyanate Ester Resins: Structure-Gas Transport Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, Kristina; Fainleib, Alexander; Espuche, Eliane; Grigoryeva, Olga; Starostenko, Olga; Gouanve, Fabrice; Boiteux, Gisèle; Saiter, Jean-Marc; Grande, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    This contribution addresses the relationships between the structure and gas transport properties of nanoporous thermostable cyanate ester resins (CERs) derived from polycyclotrimerization of 1,1'-bis(4-cyanatophenyl)ethane in the presence of 30 or 50 wt% of inert high-boiling temperature porogens (i.e., dimethyl- or dibutyl phthalates), followed by their quantitative removal. The nanopores in the films obtained were generated via a chemically induced phase separation route with further porogen extraction from the densely crosslinked CERs. To ensure a total desorption of the porogen moieties from the networks, an additional short-term thermal annealing at 250 °C was performed. The structure and morphology of such nanoporous CER-based films were investigated by FTIR and SEM techniques, respectively. Further, the gas transport properties of CER films were analyzed after the different processing steps, and relationships between the material structure and the main gas transport parameters were established.

  1. A high-performance renewable thermosetting resin derived from eugenol.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Sahagun, Christopher M; Guenthner, Andrew J; Groshens, Thomas J; Cambrea, Lee R; Reams, Josiah T; Mabry, Joseph M

    2014-07-01

    A renewable bisphenol, 4,4'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(2-methoxyphenol), was synthesized on a preparative scale by a solvent-free, Ru-catalyzed olefin metathesis coupling reaction of eugenol followed by hydrogenation. After purification, the bisphenol was converted to a new bis(cyanate) ester by standard techniques. The bisphenol and cyanate ester were characterized rigorously by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. After complete cure, the cyanate ester exhibited thermal stability in excess of 350 °C and a glass transition temperature (Tg ) of 186 °C. As a result of the four-carbon chain between the aromatic rings, the thermoset displayed a water uptake of only 1.8% after a four day immersion in 85 °C water. The wet Tg of the material (167 °C) was only 19 °C lower than the dry Tg , and the material showed no significant degradation as a result of the water treatment. These results suggest that this resin is well suited for maritime environments and provide further evidence that full-performance resins can be generated from sustainable feedstocks.

  2. Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin

    SciTech Connect

    Thunga, Mahendra; Bauer, Amy; Obusek, Kristine; Meilunas, Ray; Akinc, Mufit; Kessler, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

  3. Differential scanning calorimetry investigation on vinyl ester resin curing process for polymer nanocomposite fabrication.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanhu; Ng, Ho Wai; Yee, Gary L; Hahn, H Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Two different ceramic (cerium oxide and titanium oxide) nanoparticles were introduced into vinyl ester resin for nanocomposite fabrication. The curing process of the vinyl ester resin was investigated by a differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The incorporation of nanoparticles in the resin affects the curing process due to the physicochemical interaction between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix. The particle loading has a significant effect on the initial and peak curing temperatures, reaction heat and curing extent. The fully cured vinyl ester resin nanocomposites reinforced with cerium oxide nanoparticles were fabricated after a 24-hour room temperature curing and a one-hour postcuring at 85 degrees C. Particle functionalization favors the composite fabrication with a higher curing extent after room-temperature curing as compared to the as-received nanoparticle filled vinyl ester resin nanocomposites. The nanofiller materials were observed to significantly affect the curing process. In comparison to cerium oxide nanoparticles, titanium oxide nanoparticles prohibit the curing process with a much higher initiating curing temperatures. The fully cured nanocomposites reinforced with titanium oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by one-hour postcuring at 85 degrees C.

  4. High Performance Fatty Acid-Based Vinyl Ester Resin for Liquid Molding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A ( DGEBA ) Methacrylic Acid Figure 1: The reaction of DGEBA and methacrylic acid to produce the vinyl ester 2.3...High Performance Fatty Acid -Based Vinyl Ester Resin for Liquid Molding by Xing Geng, John J. La Scala, James M. Sands, and Giuseppe R...it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-RP-184 July 2007 High Performance Fatty Acid

  5. Predicting the Viscosity of Low VOC Vinyl Ester and Fatty Acid-Based Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    The sample was titrated with the perchloric acid / peracetic acid solution (Aldrich) until the indicator, 0.1% crystal violet in acetic acid (Aldrich...Predicting the Viscosity of Low VOC Vinyl Ester and Fatty Acid -Based Resins by John J. La Scala, Amutha Jeyarajasingam, Cherise Winston...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 ARL-TR-3681 December 2005 Predicting the Viscosity of Low VOC Vinyl Ester and Fatty Acid -Based

  6. Industrial alkyd resins: characterization of pentaerythritol and phthalic acid esters using integrated mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    La Nasa, Jacopo; Degano, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2015-02-15

    Alkyd resins are synthetic polyesters used as paints and coatings. Current approaches for their analysis do not allow the characterization of pentaerythritol and phthalic acid esters, whose detection is interesting to fully characterize the materials, e.g. for forensic or cultural heritage applications. A combined analytical approach based on Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS), High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)/MS and flow injection analysis (FIA)/MS was adopted. GC/MS was used to characterize the fatty acid profile and the polybasic acids in extracts from industrial alkyd resins. HPLC/MS and FIA/MS were used for the characterization of the triglyceride profile of the oil used to manufacture the resin and for the identification of reaction products deriving from the synthesis process. The multi-analytical approach was applied on two different industrial alkyd resins produced from two different oils. The GC/MS analysis was successful in characterizing the fatty acid profile and the aromatic fraction of the resin. The HPLC/MS analysis allowed us to characterize the pentaerythritol and phthalic acid ester and the triglycerides residues from the synthesis process, by studying their high-resolution tandem mass spectra. The application of liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry to the study of industrial alkyd resins allowed us to characterize for the first time the esters formed by the transesterification reactions involving pentaerythritol, phthalic acid and triglycerides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Epoxy resin composition containing metal tetrafluoroborate and boron ester

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, G.T.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a curable composition. It comprises: a polyepoxide; a metal tetrafluoroborate; and at least one boron ester selected from the group consisting of triesters of boric acid and diesters of boronic acid.

  8. Cyanate Ester Composite Resins Derived from Renewable Polyphenol Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-16

    time to prepare model compounds 3 and 4 (Scheme 4). Recently a chiral version of compound 4 was prepared although no cure chemistry of the cyanate ester...the cure exotherm and its peak temperature near 200 °C suggest that the system is self- catalyzing , either through the presence of impurities or...this could be due to degradation or other chemical reactions triggered at high temperature. Ester groups have been shown to catalyze the cure of

  9. The Influence of Monomer Chemical Structure on Late-Stage Cure Kinetics of Dicyanate Ester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    Kinetics of 5b. GRANT NUMBER Dicyanate Ester Resins 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J Guenthner , Kevin R. Lamison, Josiah T. Reams... Guenthner , A. J.; Davis, M. C.; Lamison, K. R.; Yandek, G. R.; Cambrea, L. R.; Groshens, T. J.; Baldwin, L. C.; Mabry, J. M. “Synthesis, Cure Kinetics

  10. Cure Characteristics of Tricyanate Ester High-Temperature Composite Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-24

    Resins 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J Guenthner , Kevin R. Lamison, Matthew C. Davis and Lee R. Cambrea, 5d...degrees of freedom for more readily obtaining full cure Guenthner , A. J.; Davis, M. C.; Lamison, K. R.; Yandek, G. R.; Cambrea, L. R.; Groshens, T. J

  11. Interfacial engineering of the interphase between carbon fibers and vinyl ester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lanhong

    Vinyl ester resins have been extensively used for the manufacture of low cost high performance composites. Carbon fibers are important reinforcement materials. The use of vinyl ester composites reinforced with carbon fibers requires an improvement in the fiber/matrix adhesion levels. The objectives of this study were to gain an understanding of the factors controlling interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and vinyl ester resin; to model the contributions of the factors controlling fiber/matrix adhesion; and to provide an engineered and optimized interface between carbon fiber and vinyl ester for tailoring structurally efficient carbon fiber/vinyl ester composites. This work consists of three parts. Part I. A partially cross-linked DGEBA epoxy polymer sizing placed onto carbon fiber surface was found to be a beneficial interphase between the carbon fiber and vinyl ester resin resulting in an increase in fiber-matrix adhesion. The adhesion was evaluated as interfacial shear strength (IFSS) with micro-indentation. Nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique were used to investigate the gradient between this epoxy sizing and vinyl ester resin. An optimized thickness of this sizing was found and the mechanism by which this sizing improved adhesion was also investigated. A set of 2-D non-linear finite element models was set up for simulation of the micro-indentation process and consistent results were found between the experimental data and numerical results. It was found that the epoxy sizing formed more chemical bonds with the surface of the carbon fiber reinforcement and an interpenetrating interphase with the vinyl ester resin. The resulting interphase between vinyl ester matrix and epoxy sizing reduced the residual stress caused by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester after curing. Part II. Since it is known that the carbon fiber surface can interfere with the vinyl ester polymerization, the effects of preferential adsorption of the catalysts and styrene on

  12. Packing Fraction and Relation to Glass Transition in Ternary Blends of Cyanate Ester Resins (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    Blends of Cyanate Ester Resins 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Guenthner , Joseph M. Mabry (AFRL/RZSM...Resins Kevin R. Lamison’, Andrew J. Guenthner , Vandana Vij’, and Joseph M. Mabrl. ’ERG Incorporated, Edwards AFB, CA 93524 2Propu/sion Directorate...in Proc. SPE Conf. High Temp. Po/ym. Society of Plastics Engineers: Cleveland, OH, 1989; pp. 127-140. 6. Guenthner . A. J ,; Yandek, G. R.; Wright, M

  13. Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Wilber Yaote

    2009-12-01

    This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

  14. Successful Initial Development of Styrene Substitutes and Suppressants for Vinyl Ester Resin Formulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    blend of vinyl ester (VE) monomers to reduce viscosities, replacing styrene with low-volatile petroleum or fatty acid (FA)-based monomers, and... acid , VARTM, composite 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON James M. Sands a. REPORT UNCLASSIFIED b. ABSTRACT...structure on resin rheology, cure kinetics, and polymer properties. In addition, fatty acid (FA)-based monomers are prepared and assessed as

  15. Structure/Property Relationships of Cyanate Ester Resins from Renewable Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-11

    derived from lignin . These materials possess favorable thermal and water uptake properties with dry glass transition temperatures above 200°C and wet...distribution is unlimited. Creosol as a Monomer Source 7 • Input material cost is an important consideration for cyanate ester resins • Lignin is...from lignin • Oxidative and reductive coupling reactions lead to precursor phenols, which are then treated with cyanogen bromide to generate cyanate

  16. Ester-free Thiol-ene Dental Restoratives – Part A: Resin Development

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Maciej; Becka, Eftalda; Claudino, Mauro; Flores, Alexander; Shah, Parag K.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To detail the development of ester-free thiol-ene dental resins with enhanced mechanical performance, limited potential for water uptake/leachables/degradation and low polymerization shrinkage stress. Methods Thiol-terminated oligomers were prepared via a thiol-Michael reaction and a bulky tetra-allyl monomer containing urethane linkages was synthesized. The experimental oligomers and/or monomers were photopolymerized using visible light activation. Several thiol-ene formulations were investigated and their performance ranked by comparisons of the thermo-mechanical properties, polymerization shrinkage stress, water sorption/solubility, and reactivity with respect to a control comprising a conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resin. Results The ester-free thiol-ene formulations had significantly lower viscosities, water sorption and solubility than the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. Depending on the resin, the limiting functional conversions were equivalent to or greater than that of BisGMA/TEGDMA. At comparable conversions, lower shrinkage stress values were achieved by the thiol-ene systems. The polymerization shrinkage stress was dramatically reduced when the tetra-allyl monomer was used as the ene in ester-free thiol-ene mixtures. Although exhibiting lower Young’s modulus, flexural strength, and glass transition temperatures, the toughness values associated with thiol-ene resins were greater than that of the BisGMA/TEGDMA control. In addition, the thiol-ene polymerization resulted in highly uniform polymer networks as indicated by the narrow tan delta peak widths. Significance Employing the developed thiol-ene resins in dental composites will reduce shrinkage stress and moisture absorption and form tougher materials. Furthermore, their low viscosities are expected to enable higher loadings of functionalized micro/nano-scale filler particles relevant for practical dental systems. PMID:26360013

  17. Environmentally Compliant Vinyl Ester Resin (VER) Composite Matrix Resin Derived from Renewable Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    that is also highly efficient for the same condensation. However, milder Lewis acids such as Zeolite or acidic ion-exchange resins saturated with...recovered monomer can be photo-polymerized by exposure to UV light or thermally cured in the pres- ence of a peroxide catalyst to form the resins...phenolic products to >25wt%. In addition, conversion of substituted phenolic byproducts to phenol via separate thermal treatment reported in the

  18. Nanoporous Polymer Films of Cyanate Ester Resins Designed by Using Ionic Liquids as Porogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainleib, Alexander; Vashchuk, Alina; Starostenko, Olga; Grigoryeva, Olga; Rogalsky, Sergiy; Nguyen, Thi-Thanh-Tam; Grande, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Novel nanoporous film materials of thermostable cyanate ester resins (CERs) were generated by polycyclotrimerization of dicyanate ester of bisphenol E in the presence of varying amounts (from 20 to 40 wt%) of an ionic liquid (IL), i.e., 1-heptylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, followed by its quantitative extraction after complete CER network formation. The completion of CER formation and IL extraction was assessed using gel fraction content determination, FTIR, 1H NMR, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). SEM and DSC-based thermoporometry analyses demonstrated the formation of nanoporous structures after IL removal from CER networks, thus showing the effective role of IL as a porogen. Pore sizes varied from 20 to 180 nm with an average pore diameter of around 45-60 nm depending on the initial IL content. The thermal stability of nanoporous CER-based films was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis.

  19. Nanoporous Polymer Films of Cyanate Ester Resins Designed by Using Ionic Liquids as Porogens.

    PubMed

    Fainleib, Alexander; Vashchuk, Alina; Starostenko, Olga; Grigoryeva, Olga; Rogalsky, Sergiy; Nguyen, Thi-Thanh-Tam; Grande, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Novel nanoporous film materials of thermostable cyanate ester resins (CERs) were generated by polycyclotrimerization of dicyanate ester of bisphenol E in the presence of varying amounts (from 20 to 40 wt%) of an ionic liquid (IL), i.e., 1-heptylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, followed by its quantitative extraction after complete CER network formation. The completion of CER formation and IL extraction was assessed using gel fraction content determination, FTIR, (1)H NMR, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). SEM and DSC-based thermoporometry analyses demonstrated the formation of nanoporous structures after IL removal from CER networks, thus showing the effective role of IL as a porogen. Pore sizes varied from ~20 to ~180 nm with an average pore diameter of around 45-60 nm depending on the initial IL content. The thermal stability of nanoporous CER-based films was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis.

  20. Relationships Among Molecular Structure, Processing, Water Uptake, and Moisture-Induced Degradation in Cyanate Ester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-23

    and Moisture- Induced Degradation in Cyanate Ester Resins 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Guenthner ...Fire Mater. 2006, 30, 89- 106. 5. Guenthner , A. J.; Yandek, G. R.; Wright, M. E.; Petteys, B. J.; Quintana, R.; Connor, D.; Gilardi, R. D.; Marchant, D... Guenthner , A. J.; Yandek, G. R.; Mabry, J. M.; Lamison, K. R.; Vij, V.; Davis, M. C.; Cambrea, L. R. Proc. SAMPE ’10, SAMPE Int’l: Covina, CA, 2010; Vol.. 55, pp. TBD.

  1. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF COMPRESSION MOLDED KENAF FIBER REINFORCED VINYL ESTER COMPOSITES THROUGH RESIN ADDITIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-05-17

    Plant-based bio-fiber has the potential to achieve weight and cost savings over glass fiber in automotive polymer composites if moisture stability and fiber-resin compatibility issues can be solved. This paper describes the compression molding of 50vol% 2 inch random nonwoven mat kenaf fiber vinyl ester composites with and without chemical resin additives intended to improve moisture stability and resin compatibility. The 2wt% addition of n-undecanoyl chloride or 10-undecenoyl chloride to the styrene-based resin prior to molding of the kenaf composites was observed to decrease the 24hr, 25oC moisture uptake of the molded panels by more than 50%. The tensile stiffness and flexural stiffness of the soaked panels containing these additives were seen to increase by more than 30% and 70%, respectively, relative to panels made with no additives. While ‘dry’ panel (50% relative humidity at 25oC) strengths did not significantly change in the presence of the additives, tensile strength was observed to increase by more than 40% and flexural strength more than doubled for the soaked panels.

  2. Development of solvent-free offset ink using vegetable oil esters and high molecular-weight resin.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Young Han; Kim, Sung Bin

    2013-01-01

    In the development of solvent-free offset ink, the roles of resin molecular weight and used solvent on the ink performance were evaluated by examining the relationship between the various properties of resin and solvent and print quality. To find the best performing resin, the soy-oil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) was applied to the five modified-phenolic resins having different molecular weights. It is found from the experimental results that the ink made of higher molecular weight and better solubility resin gives better printability and print quality. It is because larger molecular weight resin with better solubility gives higher rate of ink transfer. From the ink application of different esters to high molecular weight resin, the best printing performance was yielded from the soy-oil fatty acid butyl ester (FABE). It is due to its high kinematic viscosity resulting in the smallest change of ink transfer weight upon multiple number of printing, which improves the stability of ink quality.

  3. Anti-flammable vinyl ester resin nano-composite with nano-titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajib

    Anti-flammable material is a common expectation for any industry and household applications to protect the material from fire accident. Polymer composites also play a significant role in preparing anti flammable materials. Vinyl ester resins (VERs) are thermosetting resins that have excellent mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins and Nanotitania is an inexpensive, nontoxic and biocompatible inorganic material. In this paper to investigate the flame retardency of polymer nanocomposites VER is used as polymer matrix and TiO2 is used as inorganic nanofiller.3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino) ethylamino]propyl-trimethoxysilane (TATMS), a kind of silane is used as a coupling agent to functionalize the surface of nanoTiO2 to improve its flame retardency by adding Si and N2 group. TGA test and FTIR test have been performed and different peaks for Si and N2 in the modified nanofiller and weight loss of fabricated nanofiller confirmed that fabrication method was successful. After that, nanocomposite sample of VERs reinforced with nano TiO2 prepared and the effects of different loadings on mechanical and flame retardant properties are investigated after and before the modification of nanofillers. From tensile test result it is found that up to 5% loading of modified nanofiller the tensile strength is 62 MPa that is almost as same as pure VER and the tensile strength of unmodified nanofiller based PNC is 68 MPa which is not significant improvement in its mechanical property. From MCC test of flame retardancy it is found that the normalized heat release capacity of modified nanofiller based nanocomposite is decreased by 27.7% than unmodified nanofiller based PNC that is 9.8%. Also the normalized total heat release of modified nanofiller based PNC is 21.4% than unmodified PNC that is 12.4%.

  4. Synthetic resin-bound truncated Candida antarctica lipase B for production of fatty acid alkyl esters by transesterification of corn and soybean oils with ethanol or butanol.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Moser, Bryan R; Robinson, Samantha; Cox, Elby J; Harmsen, Amanda J; Friesen, Jon A; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Jones, Marjorie A; Pinkelman, Rebecca; Bang, Sookie S; Tasaki, Ken; Doll, Kenneth M; Qureshi, Nasib; Liu, Siqing; Saha, Badal C; Jackson, John S; Cotta, Michael A; Rich, Joseph O; Caimi, Paolo

    2012-05-31

    A gene encoding a synthetic truncated Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was generated via automated PCR and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Western blot analysis detected five truncated CALB variants, suggesting multiple translation starts from the six in-frame ATG codons. The longest open reading frame, which corresponds to amino acids 35-317 of the mature lipase, appeared to be expressed in the greatest amount. The truncated CALB was immobilized on Sepabeads® EC-EP resin and used to produce ethyl and butyl esters from crude corn oil and refined soybean oil. The yield of ethyl esters was 4-fold greater from corn oil than from soybean oil and was 36% and 50% higher, respectively, when compared to a commercially available lipase resin (Novozym 435) using the same substrates. A 5:1 (v/v) ratio of ethanol to corn oil produced 3.7-fold and 8.4-fold greater yields than ratios of 15:1 and 30:1, respectively. With corn oil, butyl ester production was 56% higher than ethyl ester production. Addition of an ionic catalytic resin step prior to the CALB resin increased yields of ethyl esters from corn oil by 53% compared to CALB resin followed by ionic resin. The results suggest resin-bound truncated CALB has potential application in biodiesel production using biocatalysts.

  5. Polycyanurate ester resins with low loss and low birefringence for use in integrated optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Christian J.; Bauer, Monika; Bauer, Joerg; Keil, Norbert; Yao, HuiHai; Zawadzki, Crispin

    2001-12-01

    In the age of information society and internet the requirements of fast transfers of large data streams for different applications are growing day by day. Killer-applications like teleconferencing, video-on-demand, online-games, virtual reality etc. are waiting in the wings. The optical network technology using the great bandwidth of glass fibre is the most suitable technology for these demands. Not only glass fibre is required, but also a broad range of optical components, such as multiplexers, demultiplexers, optical switches, optical attenuators, splitters and combiners, which are usually produced in silica technology. Polymeric materials are becoming more and more interesting for these applications, since they promise for instance lower power consumption and a reduction of production costs compared to their silica based pendants. Polycyanurate ester resins are a relatively new class of high-performance polymers with outstanding properties, for example high thermal stability, low optical loss, low dielectric constant, good adhesion and outstanding mechanical properties. This paper focuses on optical loss and birefringence of such materials at 1550 nm. The results lead the way to optimization for use in integrated optics and for the production of embedded waveguides and devices.

  6. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse adhesive using moist bonding; II) XP Bond using dry bonding; and III) Adper Prompt L-Pop, a self-etching adhesive. The control medium contained only set Portland cement and a simulated body fluid (SBF) without any biomimetic analog. Two experimental Portland cement/SBF remineralization media were evaluated: the first contained PAA as the sole biomimetic analog, the second contained PAA and PVPA as dual biomimetic analogs. No remineralization of the resin-dentin interfaces could be identified from specimens immersed in the control medium. After 2–4 months in the first experimental medium, specimens exhibited either no remineralization or large crystal formation within hybrid layers. Only specimens immersed in the second remineralization medium produced nanocrystals that accounted for intrafibrillar remineralization within hybrid layers. The null hypothesis could not be rejected; phosphoric acid esters in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during biomimetic remineralization of adhesive-bonded dentin. PMID:19481792

  7. FISSION NEUTRON IRRADIATION EFFECT ON INTERLAMINAR SHEAR STRENGTH OF CYANATE ESTER RESIN GFRP AT RT AND 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, A.; Izumi, Y.; Nishijima, S.; Hemmi, T.; Koizumi, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Shikama, T.

    2010-04-08

    A glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) with cyanate ester resin was fabricated and neutron irradiation tests up to 1x10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} of fast neutron with over 0.1 MeV energy were carried out in fission reactor. The fabrication process of cyanate ester GFRP was established and a collaboration network to perform investigations on irradiation effect of superconducting magnet materials was constructed. Three kinds of samples were fabricated. The first was CTD403 GFRP made by NIFS, the second was (cyanate ester+epoxy) GFRP provided by Toshiba, and the last was CTD403 GFRP made by Toshiba. The irradiation was carried out at JRR-3 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency using Rabbit capsules.After the irradiation, short beam tests were conducted at room temperature and 77 K and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) was evaluated. The irradiation of 1x10{sup 21} n/m{sup 2} increased ILSS a little but 1x10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} irradiation decreased ILSS to around 50 MPa. These tendencies were observed in all three kinds of GFRPs.

  8. Effect of nanolayering of calcium salts of phosphoric acid ester monomers on the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fu-Cong; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Qi; Niu, Li-Na; Mitchell, Jan; Zhang, Zheng-Yi; Prananik, Chandrani; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Ji-Hua; Breshi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the contribution of nanolayering on resin-dentin bond durability, two phosphoric acid ester resin monomers, 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl-dihydrogen-phosphate (10-MDP) or its analog, methacryloyloxy-penta-propyleneglycol-dihydrogen-phosphate (MDA), were examined for their affinity for mineralized dentin powder in a column chromatography setup. Hydroxyapatite (HA) powder was dispersed in experimental primers consisting of 10-MDP or MDA solvated in ethanol/water and examined with FTIR, (31)P MAS-NMR and XPS. Light-curable 10-MDP or MDA primers were used for bonding to dentin, and examined after 24h or one-year of water-aging by TEM for evidence of nanolayering, and for microtensile bond strength evaluation. Primer-bonded dentin was examined by thin-film XRD to identify short-range order peaks characteristic of nanolayering of resin monomer-Ca salts. Although 10-MDP had better affinity for mineralized dentin than MDA, both monomers completely eluted from the mineralized dentin powder column using ethanol-water as mobile phase, indicating that the adsorption processes were reversible. This finding was supported by chemoanalytic data. XRD of 10-MDP-bonded dentin showed three diffraction peaks hat were absent from MDA-bonded dentin. Nanolayering was identified by TEM in 10-MDP-bonded dentin, but not in MDA-bonded dentin. Significant drop in bond strength (in MPa) was observed for both groups after one-year of water-aging compared with 24-h: 10-MDP group from 48.3±6.3 to 37.4±4.6; MDA group from 50.7±5.0 to 35.7±3.8 (P<0.05), with no significant difference between the two groups at the same time-point. Because both functional monomer-primed, resin-bonded dentin exhibited similar bond strength decline after water-aging, presence of nanolayering is unlikely to contribute to the overall resin-dentin bond durability. The durability of resin-dentin bonds in 10-MDP containing self-etching adhesives has been anecdotally attributed to the presence of nanolayering of

  9. The Influence of Monomer Chemical Structure on Late-Stage Cure Kinetics of Dicyanate Ester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-03

    such as pultrusion [7], filament winding [8], and VARTM [9], with higher maximum use temperatures, better flame, smoke, and toxicity characteristics...esters: VARTM , filament winding and pultrusion.” Proceedings of SAMPE, Vol. 49. Covina, CA: SAMPE International Business Office, 2004, pp. 1895

  10. High-Performance Bio-Based Cyanate Ester Resins with Low Moisture Uptake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-22

    available as an essential oil extracted from star anise (Illicium verum), an evergreen tree native to southwest China (Yunnan and Guangxi provinces) and...the star anise fruit yields ~90% trans-anethole • The sizes of the global markets for trans-anethole and cyanate esters are similar Photograph of...fruits of star anise (’’Illicium verum’’), taken 17th October 2006 by Brian Arthur and released under the GNU Free Documentation License. All remaining

  11. Environmentally Friendly Bio-Based Vinyl Ester Resins for Military Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    DoD because of their low weight and excellent properties, enabling the production of lighter weight and stronger vehicles, ships, and structures...HAP emissions during resin processing, composite production , and painting applications. These trapping devices need to absorb most of the VOC/HAP...First, their use is not feasible in the production of large-scale structures or in field repair. Large-scale structures are typically fabricated

  12. Bio-Based Cyanate Ester Resins: Improved Performance Through Network Structure Enhancement (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-17

    a Monomer Source 6 • Trans-anethole is widely available as an essential oil extracted from star anise (Illicium verum), an evergreen tree native to...fragrance industry • Simple steam distillation of the star anise fruit yields ~90% trans-anethole • The sizes of the global markets for trans-anethole...and cyanate esters are similar Photograph of fruits of star anise (’’Illicium verum’’), taken 17th October 2006 by Brian Arthur and released under

  13. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-27

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  14. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmi, T.; Nishimura, A.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-01

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 1022 n/m2 during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  15. Acylated glycosides of hydroxy fatty acid methyl esters generated from the crude resin glycoside (pharbitin) of seeds of Pharbitis nil by treatment with indium(III) chloride in methanol.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masateru; Takigawa, Ayako; Mineno, Tomoko; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Fukuda-Teramachi, Emiko; Noda, Naoki; Miyahara, Kazumoto

    2010-11-29

    Treatment of the crude ether-insoluble resin glycoside (convolvulin) from seeds of Pharbitis nil (Pharbitis Semen), called pharbitin, with indium(III) chloride in methanol provided seven oligoglycosides of hydroxy fatty acid methyl esters partially acylated by 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyric (nilic) and 2S-methylbutyric acids. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of NMR and MS data and chemical conversions.

  16. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  17. The impact of ultra-low amounts of amino-modified MMT on dynamics and properties of densely cross-linked cyanate ester resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershtein, Vladimir; Fainleib, Alexander; Egorova, Larisa; Gusakova, Kristina; Grigoryeva, Olga; Kirilenko, Demid; Konnikov, Semen; Ryzhov, Valery; Yakushev, Pavel; Lavrenyuk, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Thermostable nanocomposites based on densely cross-linked cyanate ester resins (CER), derived from bisphenol E and doped by 0.01 to 5 wt. % amino-functionalized 2D montmorillonite (MMT) nanoparticles, were synthesized and characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), far-infrared (Far-IR), and creep rate spectroscopy (CRS) techniques. It was revealed that ultra-low additives, e.g., 0.025 to 0.1 wt. %, of amino-MMT nanolayers covalently embedded into CER network exerted an anomalously large impact on its dynamics and properties resulting, in particular, in some suppression of dynamics, increasing the onset of glass transition temperature by 30° to 40° and twofold rise of modulus in temperature range from 20°C to 200°C. Contrarily, the effects became negligibly small or even negative at increased amino-MMT contents, especially at 2 and 5 wt. %. That could be explained by TEM/EDXS data displaying predominance of individual amino-MMT nanolayers and their thin (2 to 3 nanolayers) stacks over more thick tactoids (5 to 10 nanolayers) and the large amino-MMT aggregates (100 to 500 nm in thickness) reversing the composite structure produced with increasing of amino-MMT content within CER matrix. The revealed effect of ultra-low amino-MMT content testifies in favor of the idea about the extraordinarily enhanced long-range action of the `constrained dynamics' effect in the case of densely cross-linked polymer networks.

  18. Effect of Chemical Structure and Network Formation on Physical Properties of Di(Cyanate Ester) Thermosets (Pre-Print)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    resins . A more complete understanding of these relationships is essential for the continued development of cyanate ester resins and their composites for...increase with increasing conversion at conversions of approximately 90%. The Tg decreased after exposure to hot water in resins with greater than 85...KEYWORDS: Cyanate Ester, Polycyanurate, Resin , Cure Kinetics, Water Uptake. 2 ABSTRACT Key physical properties of three dicyanate ester

  19. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal, elemi, and sandarac. Sandarac. Shellac. Utah coal resin. (v) Rosins and rosin derivatives, with or... (limed rosin). Zinc resinate. (vi) Phenolic resins as the basic polymer formed by reaction of phenols...

  20. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  1. The Effect of Post-Cure and Antimony Trioxide Addition on the Glass Transition of Polyester and Vinyl Ester Resin Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Modulus GPa Gigapascal GRP Glass Reinforced Plastic HPSEC High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography min Minute mcal Millicalories mL Milliliter MW...Tpost-cure Post-Cure Temperature Cross-Link Density -iv- 1. INTRODUCTION Reinforced polymeric materials, in particular glass reinforced plastics (GRP’s...properties of glass reinforced plastics , requires that the resin, the reinforcing fibre, the additives (such as fire retardants), and their interaction

  2. Crystallographic Analysis of Analogous Silicon and Carbon Containing Di(Cyanate Ester)s and Tri(Cyanate Ester)s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-29

    dry)  150 – 300 (wet) • Resin viscosity suitable for filament winding • Compatible with thermoplastic reinforcements • Onset of weight loss...lander are made from M55J/cyanate ester composites • The solar panel supports on the MESSENGER space probe use cyanate ester composite tie layers...Fusion reactor, photo courtesy of Gerritse ((Wikimedia Commons) • Unique cyanate ester composites have been designed by NASA for use as instrument

  3. Effect of Chemical Structure and Network Formation on Physical Properties of Di(Cyanate Ester) Thermosets (Post Print)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-06

    known for cyanate ester resins . A more complete understanding of these relationships is essential for the continued development of cyanate ester resins ...off or began to increase with increasing conversion at conversions of approximately 90%. The Tg decreased after exposure to hot water in resins with...of both traditional and more unusual structure−property−process relationships known for cyanate ester resins . A more complete understanding of these

  4. The fabrication of monolithic capillary column based on poly (bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and its applications for the separation of small molecules in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenjing; Wang, Lijuan; Bai, Ligai; Yang, Gengliang

    2013-07-05

    A new polymeric monolith was synthesized in fused-silica capillary by in situ polymerization technique. In the polymerization, bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin (VER) was used as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as the crosslinking monomer, 1,4-butanediol, 1-propanol and water as the co-porogens, and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The conditions of polymerization have been optimized. Morphology of the prepared poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith was investigated by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM); pore properties were assayed by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The optimized poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith showed a uniform structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Then, the column was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the mixture of benzene derivatives. The best column efficiency achieved for phenol was 235790 theoretical plates per meter. Baseline separations of benzene derivatives and halogenated benzene compounds under optimized isocratic mode conditions were achieved with high column efficiency. The column showed good reproducibility: the relative standard deviation (RSD) values based on the retention times (n=3) for run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch were less than 0.98, 1.68, 5.48%, respectively. Compared with poly (BMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column, the proposed monolith exhibited more efficiency in the separation of small molecules.

  5. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  6. Resin Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    resin system. 2.0 Scope This standard process description (SPD) provides a general guideline for evaluating and understanding composite resins in the...to all personnel developing and evaluating resins technology for composites applications in the Coatings, Corrosion, and Engineered Polymers Branch...relevant work within the branch. 5.0 Requirements All researchers performing composite resins development and evaluation work in the Coatings

  7. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  8. Liquid Resins With Low VOC Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    titrated with the perchloric acid / peracetic acid solution (Aldrich) until the indicator, 0.1% crystal violet in acetic acid (Aldrich), changed color from...method of reducing styrene emissions from vinyl ester (VE) resins is to replace some or all of the styrene with fatty acid -based monomers. Fatty acid ...renewable resources. VE resins with no more than 20 wt% styrene were prepared using methacrylate terminated lauric acid . The viscosities of these

  9. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-Imide, and Ester-Amide Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theodornus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); SaintClair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and were end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The resulting reactive end-capped liquid crystal oligomers exhibit a variety of improved and preferred physical properties. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,OOO grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are stable for up to an hour in the melt phase. These properties make the end-capped liquid crystal oligomers highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques including film extrusion, fiber spinning, reactive injection molding (RIM), resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film injection (RFI), powder molding, pultrusion, injection molding, blow molding, plasma spraying and thermo-forming. Once processed and shaped, the end- capped liquid crystal oligomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures. The resulting thermosets display many properties that are superior to their non-end-capped high molecular weight analogs.

  10. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-Imide, and Ester-Amide Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theodornus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); SaintClair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and were end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The resulting reactive end-capped liquid crystal oligomers exhibit a variety of improved and preferred physical properties. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,OOO grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are stable for up to an hour in the melt phase. These properties make the end-capped liquid crystal oligomers highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques including film extrusion, fiber spinning, reactive injection molding (RIM), resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film injection (RFI), powder molding, pultrusion, injection molding, blow molding, plasma spraying and thermo-forming. Once processed and shaped, the end- capped liquid crystal oligomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures. The resulting thermosets display many properties that are superior to their non-end-capped high molecular weight analogs.

  11. Liquid crystalline thermosets from ester, ester-imide, and ester-amide oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theodorous J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and were end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The resulting reactive end-capped liquid crystal oligomers exhibit a variety of improved and preferred physical properties. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are stable for up to an hour in the melt phase. These properties make the end-capped liquid crystal oligomers highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques including film extrusion, fiber spinning, reactive injection molding (RIM), resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film injection (RFI), powder molding, pultrusion, injection molding, blow molding, plasma spraying and thermo-forming. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oligomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures. The resulting thermosets display many properties that are superior to their non-end-capped high molecular weight analogs.

  12. Resin glycosides from Convolvulaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masateru

    2017-07-26

    Resin glycosides are well known as purgative ingredients, which are characteristic of certain crude drugs such as Mexican Scammony Radix, Orizabae Tuber, and Jalapae Tuber, all of which originate from Convolvulaceae plants. Depending on their solubility in ether, these are roughly classified into two groups-jalapin (soluble) and convolvulin (insoluble). Almost all jalapins hitherto isolated and characterized had common intramolecular macrocyclic ester structures. These are composed of 1 mol of oligoglycoside of hydroxyl fatty acid (glycosidic acid) partially acylated by some organic acids at the sugar moiety, some examples of which are ester-type dimers. On the other hand, convolvulin is regarded as an oligomer of a variety of acylated glycosidic acids. This review describes the isolation and structural elucidation of resin glycosides from some Convolvulaceae plants, including Ipomoea operculata, Pharbitis nil, Quamoclit pennata, Calystegia soldanella, and I. muricata.

  13. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile Impregnated Carbon Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghozian, Tane; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Gasch, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic resin has extensive heritage as a TPS (Thermal Protection Systems) material, however, alternative resin systems such as Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile may offer improved performance compared to state-of-the-art phenolic resin. These alternative resin systems may have higher char yield, higher char strength, lower thermal conductivity and improved mechanical properties. In current work at NASA Ames alternative resin systems were uniformly infused into fibrous substrates and preliminary properties characterized. The density of the cyanate ester infused in fibrous substrate ranged from 0.25-0.3 grams per cubic centimeter compared to PICA (Phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative) having a density of approximately 0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. The density of Phthalonitrile varies from 0.22-0.25 grams per cubic centimeter. Initial formulations of these new resin systems were recently tested at the LARC HyMETs (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) facility to evaluate their performance and data such as back face temperature, char yield, and recession are compared to PICA. Cyanate Ester and Phthalonitrile impregnated carbon ablative samples showed comparable performance to phenolic resin impregnated carbon ablative samples.

  14. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  15. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  16. Changes in fats and resins of Pinus radiata associated with heartwood formation

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; W.E. Hillis

    1971-01-01

    In an analysis of Australian grown P. radiata marked changes were found in the relative proportions and compositions of the resin acids, fatty acids, and fatty acid esters associated with heartwood formation. While the proportion of resin acids increased substantially in the heartwood, there was little change in resin acid composition from outer...

  17. Low HAP/VOC Compliant Resins for Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    transition temperature UPE unsaturated polyester U.S. EPA Environmental Protection Agency VARTM vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding VE vinyl ester...resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) dorsal cover replacement, in combination with the resin, Hexion 781-2140, containers 47 wt% styrene (Bartling, 2005...large amounts of styrene HAP during production. The VARTM HMMWV hood is in production from TPI Composites (in an expanded capacity vehicle [ECV] HMMWV

  18. Preparation and cured properties of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tokizawa, Makoto; Okada, Hiroyoshi; Wakabayashi, Nobukatsu; Kimura, Tomiaki . Research Center)

    1993-10-20

    Preparation and characterization of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins, which are derived from octadienyl compounds, were studied. From a model peracetic acid epoxidation reaction using 2,7-octadienyl acetate-1, the structure of the liquid resins is estimated to be mainly terminal epoxides and some amount of inner epoxide depending on the epoxide content. The epoxy resins offer lower toxicity and lower vapor pressure. The reactivity of the resin with acid anhydrides is moderate but faster than that of traditional cyclohexane epoxide-type resins and slower than that of the glycidyl ester-type resins. This reactivity was also examined using model compounds. The heat deflection temperature of the hexahydro-phthalic anhydride-cured resins is shown to be directly proportional to the number of epoxy groups in the molecules. The flexural strength of the cured resins is nearly equivalent to that of the commercial resins, although the flexural elongation of the resins is larger than that of the rigid cyclohexane epoxide-type resins. The thermal stability of the cured resins is compared to typical rigid cycloaliphatic resins; furthermore, high water resistance of the cured resins is suggested to be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the C[sub 8] chain by cross-linking.

  19. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  20. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  1. Adsorption of pesticides on resins.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulos, Grigorios; Hourdakis, Adamadia; Doulia, Danae

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the capability of organic hydrophobic polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 to remove the pesticides alachlor and amitrole from water. The pesticides adsorption on the two different adsorbents was measured by batch equilibrium technique and isotherm types and parameters were estimated. Two theoretical models were applied based on a Freundlich and a Langmuir isotherms. The effect of pesticides chemical composition and structure as well as the nature of solid surface on the efficiency of adsorption was evaluated. The influence of pH also was studied. In low pH solutions adsorption of amitrole was higher upon the nonionic aliphatic acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 in comparison to the nonionic, crosslinked macroreticular copolymer of styrene divinylbenzene XAD-4. In neutral and intermediate pH solutions the polar acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 was more effective to the retention of alachlor. The acrylic ester copolymer showed at pH 3 the lower effectiveness in alachlor removal from water. The data of the adsorption isotherms of pesticides upon the examined polymeric resins seemed to conform to both the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models.

  2. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    PubMed

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol.

  3. Water Uptake Vs. Density and Conversion in Silicon Containing Cyanate Esters (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-17

    Conversion in Silicon Containing Cyanate Esters 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Michael D. Ford...decline in density was found to be similar in magnitude to that of other cyanate ester resins which have been previously studied. The water uptake...followed similar trends as compared to other cyanate esters in that it was similarly dependent on conversion, but did not correlate with the development of

  4. Resin characterization

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Geimer; Robert A. Follensbee; Alfred W. Christiansen; James A. Koutsky; George E. Myers

    1990-01-01

    Currently, thermosetting adhesives are characterized by physical andchemical features such as viscosity, solids content, pH, and molecular distribution, and their reaction in simple gel tests. Synthesis of a new resin for a particular application is usually accompanied by a series of empirical laboratory and plant trials. The purpose of the research outlined in this...

  5. Characterization of PMR polyimides - Correlation of ester impurities with composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The presumed relationship of chemical impurities to final composite properties is the rationale for most chemical characterization studies. This study examines this relationship for PMR-polyimide resin. Ester/acid solutions of one monomer were aged at selected temperatures and chemical changes were monitored spectroscopically. At selected intervals, graphite fiber reinforced composite panels were fabricated. Changes in resin processing characteristics and composite properties were determined. The correlation of these data are discussed as are related characterization studies of PMR-polyimide resin.

  6. Characterization of PMR polyimides - Correlation of ester impurities with composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The presumed relationship of chemical impurities to final composite properties is the rationale for most chemical characterization studies. This study examines this relationship for PMR-polyimide resin. Ester/acid solutions of one monomer were aged at selected temperatures and chemical changes were monitored spectroscopically. At selected intervals, graphite fiber reinforced composite panels were fabricated. Changes in resin processing characteristics and composite properties were determined. The correlation of these data are discussed as are related characterization studies of PMR-polyimide resin.

  7. Characterization of PMR polyimides: Correlation of ester impurities with composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The presumed relationship of chemical impurities to final composite properties was investigated for PMR-polyimide resin. Ester/acid solutions of one monomer were aged at selected temperatures and chemical changes were monitored spectroscopically. At selected intervals, graphite fiber reinforced composite panels were fabricated. Changes in resin processing characteristics and composite properties were determined. The correlation of these data are discussed as are related characterization studies of PMR-polyimide resin.

  8. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  9. Terpenoid Oligomers of Dammar Resin.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Di Girolamo, Francesca; Corsi, Iacopo; Degano, Ilaria; Tinè, Maria Rosaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-04-22

    Dammar is a triterpenoid resin containing a volatile fraction, a monomeric fraction, and a high-molecular weight fraction. Although the low-molecular-weight components comprising sesquiterpenoids and triterpenoids have been extensively studied, the nature of the macromolecular components is still not fully understood, and different and sometimes contradictory theories have been proposed. The aim of this paper is to clarify the nature of the macromolecular components of dammar resin. A multianalytical approach was adopted based on thermoanalytical-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA/FTIR)--and mass spectrometric techniques-direct exposure mass spectrometry (DE/MS), pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py/GC/MS), flow injection analysis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FIA/ESI/MS), and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The data indicate that the oligomeric fraction comprises triterpenoids bound through ester bonds, and that these triterpenoids are the same as those found in the free terpenoid fraction. The oligomeric fraction also includes triterpenoids containing carbonyl moieties, such as formyl groups, thus suggesting that these are involved in the esters in their corresponding enolic form.

  10. The chemistry of dimethacrylate-styrene networks, and, Development of flame retardant, halogen-free fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, Astrid Christa

    One of the major classes of polymer matrix resins under consideration for structural composite applications in the infrastructure and construction industries is vinyl ester resin. Vinyl ester resin is comprised of low molecular weight poly(hydroxyether) oligomers with methacrylate endgroups diluted with styrene monomer. The methacrylate endgroups cure with styrene via free radical copolymerization to yield thermoset networks. The copolymerization behavior of these networks was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) at various cure conditions. Reactions of the carbon-carbon double bonds of the methacrylate (943 cm-1) and styrene (910 cm-1 ) were followed independently. Oligomers possessing number average molecular weights of 700 g/mole were studied with systematically increasing levels of styrene. The Mortimer-Tidwell reactivity ratios indicated that at low conversion more styrene was incorporated into the network at lower cure temperatures. The experimental vinyl ester-styrene network compositions deviated significantly from those predicted by the Meyer-Lowry integrated copolymer equation at higher conversion, implying that the reactivity ratios for these networks may change with conversion. The kinetic data were used to provide additional insight into the physical and mechanical properties of these materials. In addition to establishing the copolymerization kinetics of these materials, the development of halogen free fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites exhibiting good flame properties was of interest. Flame retardant vinyl ester resins are used by many industries for applications requiring good thermal resistance. The current flame-retardant technology is dependent on brominated vinyl esters, which generate high levels of smoke and carbon monoxide. A series of halogen free binder systems has been developed and dispersed in the vinyl ester to improve flame retardance. The binder approach enables the vinyl ester resin to maintain its low

  11. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  12. Microwave-assisted ester formation using O-alkylisoureas: a convenient method for the synthesis of esters with inversion of configuration.

    PubMed

    Chighine, Alessandra; Crosignani, Stefano; Arnal, Marie-Claire; Bradley, Mark; Linclau, Bruno

    2009-07-03

    The formation of carboxylic esters via reaction of carboxylic acids with O-alkylisoureas proceeds in excellent yields with very short reaction times when conducted in a monomode microwave synthesizer. Efficient processes were developed using preformed or commercially available isoureas derived from primary and secondary alcohols, with a reaction time of only 5 min or less. It was demonstrated that under these microwave conditions, ester formation proceeded in good yields with clean inversion of configuration where appropriate. The process was validated using menthol, a hindered substrate for S(N)2 reactions. In addition, starting from primary alcohols, ester formation was successfully accomplished using an in situ isourea formation procedure. A polymer-assisted solution-phase procedure was also developed by employing preformed solid-supported isoureas and by an efficient "catch and release" ester formation procedure whereby primary alcohols were caught on resin as isoureas by reaction with immobilized carbodiimide and released as esters by subsequent treatment with a carboxylic acids.

  13. Environmental and Chemical Aging of Fatty-Acid-Based Vinyl Ester Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Reactive diluents in vinyl ester and unsaturated polyester resins, such as styrene and methyl methacrylate, are used to reduce the resin viscosity to...Contamination by Fluids [11]) that were selected as a hydrocarbon fuel (JP-8), a solvent ( methyl ethyl ketone [MEK]), and saltwater exposure...Exposure of Non-Metallic Materials. Annu. Book ASTM Stand. 2005. 20 14. MIL-DTL-83133F. Detail Specification: Turbine Fuel, Aviation, Kerosene

  14. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  15. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  16. Maximization of fructose esters synthesis by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Neta, Nair Sampaio; Peres, António M; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2011-07-01

    Enzymatic synthesis of fructose fatty acid ester was performed in organic solvent media, using a purified lipase from Candida antartica B immobilized in acrylic resin. Response surface methodology with a central composite rotatable design based on five levels was implemented to optimize three experimental operating conditions (temperature, agitation and reaction time). A statistical significant cubic model was established. Temperature and reaction time were found to be the most significant parameters. The optimum operational conditions for maximizing the synthesis of fructose esters were 57.1°C, 100 rpm and 37.8 h. The model was validated in the identified optimal conditions to check its adequacy and accuracy, and an experimental esterification percentage of 88.4% (±0.3%) was obtained. These results showed that an improvement of the enzymatic synthesis of fructose esters was obtained under the optimized conditions.

  17. Graphene Oxide and Thermally Exfoliated Graphene Cyanate Ester Resin Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    depending on the method of isolation from graphite and subsequent chemical and thermal treatments. Two forms of graphene, graphene oxide and thermally...The morphology, surface chemical functionality and thermal properties of graphene vary depending on the method of isolation from graphite and...chemical vapor deposition (CVD) 5 and epitaxial growth 6 ) and top-down (micromechanical cleavage 7 and graphite oxidation 8 , 9 ) methods . Bottom-up

  18. Cure Characteristics of Tricyanate Ester High Temperature Composite Resins (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    measurements of cure kinetics were undertaken using both isothermal and non-isothermal DSC , and compared to measures of conversion obtained through IR...measurements of cure kinetics were undertaken using both isothermal and non-isothermal DSC , and compared to measures of conversion obtained through IR...the effect of impurities on cure kinetics, comparative kinetics derived from non-isothermal and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC

  19. Composition and method for making polyimide resin-reinforced fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A composition for making polyimide resin reinforced fibers or fabric is discussed. The composition includes a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end capping agent. The composition is impregnated into fibers or fabric and heated to form prepreg material. The tack retention characteristics of this prepreg material are improved by incorporating into the composition a liquid olefinic material compatible with the other ingredients of the composition. The prepreg material is heated at a higher temperature to effect formation of the polyimide resin and the monomeric additive is incorporated in the polyimide polymer structure.

  20. Effect of solution concentration and aging conditions on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography is utilized to evaluate the effect of temperature, solution concentration, and aging time on PMR-15 resin solutions. Fifty- and 70-wt percent PMR-15 resin solutions were prepared from the mixture of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic ester (NE) acid, 4.4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), methanol, and 3,3',4.4.-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dimethyl ester (BTDE) acid solution. It is observed that in PMR-15 resin solution aged for 35 days at room temperature NE and MDA react to form amide and imide intermediates. The precipitation data reveal that in the 70-wt percent solution precipitation occurs after 12 days and in the 50-wt percent solution after 20 days; however, at lower temperatures (-11 C, and 2 C) no precipitation is detected. It is concluded that storage of resin solutions and powders at reduced temperatures extends shelf life by reducing the rate of imide formation.

  1. Effect of solution concentration and aging conditions on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography is utilized to evaluate the effect of temperature, solution concentration, and aging time on PMR-15 resin solutions. Fifty- and 70-wt percent PMR-15 resin solutions were prepared from the mixture of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic ester (NE) acid, 4.4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), methanol, and 3,3',4.4.-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dimethyl ester (BTDE) acid solution. It is observed that in PMR-15 resin solution aged for 35 days at room temperature NE and MDA react to form amide and imide intermediates. The precipitation data reveal that in the 70-wt percent solution precipitation occurs after 12 days and in the 50-wt percent solution after 20 days; however, at lower temperatures (-11 C, and 2 C) no precipitation is detected. It is concluded that storage of resin solutions and powders at reduced temperatures extends shelf life by reducing the rate of imide formation.

  2. Kapok oil methyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased need for biodiesel feedstocks has caused various vegetable oils to be examined for this purpose. In the present work, the methyl esters of kapok (Ceiba pentandra) oil were prepared. The essential fuel properties were comprehensively determined and evaluated in comparison to specificati...

  3. Kenaf methyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Additional or alternative feedstocks are one of the major areas of interest regarding biodiesel. In this paper, for the first time, the fuel properties of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seed oil methyl esters are comprehensively reported. This biodiesel is also relatively unique by containing small ...

  4. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  5. Review of glycol ether and glycol ether ester solvents used in the coating industry.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R L

    1984-01-01

    Ethylene oxide-based glycol ether and glycol ether ester solvents have been used in the coatings industry for the past fifty years. Because of their excellent performance properties (evaporation rate, blush resistance, flow-out and leveling properties, solubility for coating resins, solvent activity, mild odor, good coupling ability, good solvent release) a complete line of ethylene oxide-based solvents of various molecular weights has been developed. These glycol ether and glycol ether ester solvents have better solvent activity for coating resin than ester or ketone solvents in their evaporation rate range. The gloss, flow and leveling, and general performance properties of many coating systems are dependent on the use of these products in the coating formula. Because of the concern about the toxicity of certain ethylene oxide-based solvents, other products are being evaluated as replacements in coating formulas. PMID:6499793

  6. Anomalous effects in the character of the carbonyl absorption (ca. 1700 cm/sup -1/) in the infrared spectra of petroleum resins and asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Speight, J.G.; Moschopedis, S.E.

    1981-09-01

    The presence of the carbonyl functional groups in asphaltenes and resins were detected by ir spectroscopy following saponification. By following the spectra through a reaction sequence, the bituminous extracts from fresh oil sands showed the presence of esters and carboxylic acids. The extracts from a hot water process showed either carboxylic acids or esters. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  8. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  9. Solidification of EPICOR-II resin waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Jr, R M; McConnell, Jr, J W

    1984-08-01

    One goal of the EPICOR-II Research and Disposition Program is to investigate methods of immobilizing ion exchange resin wastes by solidification. Formulations were developed for the solidification of EPICOR-II prefilter wastes from Three Mile Island Unit-2 using Portland type I-II cement and vinyl ester-styrene. In developing formulations, ion exchange resins and zeolite simulating those in EPICOR-II prefilters were used. Once suitable formulations were defined, radioactive wastes from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-7 (organic ion exchange resins) and PF-24 (organic ion exchange resins with zeolite) were solidified. A total of 267 radioactive waste form specimens were prepared in hot cell solidification operations. That total includes 136 Portland cement specimens (72 incorporating prefilter PF-7 waste and 64 with prefilter PF-24 waste) and 131 vinyl ester-styrene specimens (71 incorporating prefilter PF-7 waste and 60 with prefilter PF-24 waste). The methodologies used and products produced are described and evaluated in this report.

  10. The ESTER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.; Dintrans, B.; Lignières, F.; Corbard, T.; Pichon, B.

    2005-12-01

    The ESTER project aims at building a stellar evolution code in two dimensions of space for the study of effects of rotation. The numerical scheme is based on spectral methods with a spherical harmonic decomposition in the horizontal direction and a Chebyshev polynomial expansion in the vertical direction. Coordinates adapted to the centrifugally distorted shape are mapped to spherical coordinates. First tests on rotating polytropes are presented.

  11. Cyanate Ester Graphene Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-29

    weight Cu(II) acetylacetonate : nonylphenol • Mixture degassed at 300 mm/Hg 30 minutes at 90 °C and prior to pouring into silicone molds • Cure ...resin and well-understood; enables development of superior predictive models for failure; readily catalyzed to cure at reasonable temperatures BADCy Δ...Typical DSC Trace of CEs DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. AFRL Public Affairs Clearance Number

  12. Enlightening the past: analytical proof for the use of Pistacia exudates in ancient Egyptian embalming resins.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tim M; Gradl, Manuela; Welte, Beatrix; Metzger, Michael; Pusch, Carsten M; Albert, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Mastic, the resinous exudate of the evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus, is frequently discussed as one of the ingredients used for embalming in ancient Egypt. We show the identification of mastic in ancient Egyptian embalming resins by an unambiguous assignment of the mastic triterpenoid fingerprint consisting of moronic acid, oleanonic acid, isomasticadienonic and masticadienonic acid through the consolidation of NMR and GC/MS analysis. Differences in the observed triterpenoid fingerprints between mummy specimens suggest that more than one plant species served as the triterpenoid resin source. Analysis of the triterpenoid acids of ancient embalming resin samples in the form of their methyl- and trimethylsilyl esters is compared. In addition we show a simple way to differentiate between residues of mastic from its use as incense during embalming or from direct mastic application in the embalming resin. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Merremins A-G, resin glycosides from Merremia hederacea with multidrug resistance reversal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-qiong; Song, Wei-bin; Lan, Xiao-jing; Huang, Min; Xuan, Li-jiang

    2014-10-24

    Five new pentasaccharide resin glycosides, named merremins A-E (1-5), two new pentasaccharide resin glycoside methyl esters, named merremins F and G (6, 7), and four known resin glycosides, murucoidin IV, murucoidin V, stoloniferin IV, and murucoidin XVII, were obtained from the aerial parts of Merremia hederacea. This is the first report of resin glycosides obtained from M. hederacea. In addition, the new compounds can be divided into three types: those possessing an 18-membered ring (1-4), compound 5 with a 20-membered ring, and those with an acyclic core (6, 7). Furthermore, the different types of resin glycosides were evaluated for their multidrug resistance reversal activities. Compounds 1, 5, 6, and murucoidin V were noncytotoxic and enhanced the cytotoxicity of vinblastine by 2.3-142.5-fold at 25 μM. Compound 5 and murucoidin V, with 20-membered rings, were more active than compound 1, with an 18-membered ring.

  14. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Unsaturated Polyester/Vinyl Ester Blends Cured at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhyananta, H.; Puspadewa, F. D.; Wicaksono, S. T.; Widyastuti; Wibisono, A. T.; Kurniawan, B. A.; Ismail, H.; Salsac, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Unsaturated polyester (UP) resin containing aromatic ring was blended with vinyl ester (VE) at wide range composition (10, 20, 30, 40,and 80 wt.%) using mechanical blending method. The blends were cured at room temperature using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) (4 wt.%) as catalyst initiator without the presence of catalystaccelerator. The effect of vinyl ester composition on theenhancement of mechanical and thermal properties of unsaturated polyester/vinyl ester blends was investigated. The polymer blends were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR)spectroscopy, tensile testing, hardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). IR spectra showed UP and VE peaks. The curing copolymerization reactionoccurred at vinyl (C=C) bonds. The addition of vinyl esters enhanced mechanical and thermal properties. The UP/VE blends showed homogeneous morphology, transparent and copolymer thermoset blend.

  15. Method of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-09-14

    Methods of making alkyl esters are described herein. The methods are capable of using raw, unprocessed, low-cost feedstocks and waste grease. Generally, the method involves converting a glyceride source to a fatty acid composition and esterifying the fatty acid composition to make alkyl esters. In an embodiment, a method of making alkyl esters comprises providing a glyceride source. The method further comprises converting the glyceride source to a fatty acid composition comprising free fatty acids and less than about 1% glyceride by mass. Moreover, the method comprises esterifying the fatty acid composition in the presence of a solid acid catalyst at a temperature ranging firm about 70.degree. C. to about 120.degree. C. to produce alkyl esters, such that at least 85% of the free fatty acids are converted to alkyl esters. The method also incorporates the use of packed bed reactors for glyceride conversion and/or fatty acid esterification to make alkyl esters.

  16. Esters production via carboxylates from anaerobic paper mill wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Rodríguez, Carlos I; Moreno-González, Mónica; de Weerd, Florence A; Viswanathan, Vidhvath; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2017-02-10

    This paper describes a new option for integrated recovery and esterification of carboxylates produced by anaerobic digestion at a pH above the pKa. The carboxylates (acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate and lactate) are recovered using a strong anion exchange resin in the bicarbonate form, and the resin is regenerated using a CO2-expanded alcohol technique, which allows for low chemicals consumption and direct esterification. Paper mill wastewater was used to study the effect of pH and the presence of other inorganic anions and cations on the adsorption and desorption with CO2-expanded methanol. Calcium, which is present in paper mill wastewater, can cause precipitation problems, especially at high pH. Esters yields ranged from 1.08±0.04mol methyl acetate/mol of acetatein to 0.57±0.02mol methyl valerate/mol of valeratein.

  17. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  18. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  19. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  20. Phenolic Resin for Refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shunsuke; Rappolt, James

    Refractories are used in furnaces and boilers that process steel, cement, or glass as well as incinerators that operate at high temperatures. A variety of binders is used when refractories are manufactured. In this chapter, the use of phenolic resin as a binder for refractories is described. There are several factors that support the use of phenolic resins in comparison to other refractory binders. These include the following: 1. Both adhesion and green body strength are high.

  1. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  2. Semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid jiadifenoic acid C from callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin.

    PubMed

    González, Miguel A; Zaragozá, Ramón J

    2014-09-26

    The semisynthesis of the antiviral abietane diterpenoid (+)-jiadifenoic acid C starting from the available methyl ester of callitrisic acid (4-epidehydroabietic acid) isolated from sandarac resin is reported. A protocol for the isolation of methyl callitrisate (methyl 4-epidehydroabietate) in gram quantities from sandarac resin is also described. Allylic C-17 oxygenation was introduced by regioselective dehydrogenation of the isopropyl group of methyl callitrisate with DDQ followed by selenium-catalyzed allylic oxidation. Ester hydrolysis afforded (+)-jiadifenoic acid C in 22% overall yield from methyl callitrisate. This semisynthetic route provides a convenient source of this anti-Coxsackie virus B natural product for further biological studies.

  3. Lipoate ester multifunctional lubricant additives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seven lipoate esters were synthesized by esterification of lipoic acid with different structures of alcohols in the presence of a solid acid catalyst and without solvent. The esters were obtained in good yield, characterized using 1H NMR and GPC; and their physical properties investigated. Four of t...

  4. Synthesis of pyromellitic acid esters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorova, V. A.; Donchak, V. A.; Martynyuk-Lototskaya, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The ester acids necessary for studyng the thermochemical properties of pyromellitic acid (PMK)-based peroxides were investigated. Obtaining a tetramethyl ester of a PMK was described. The mechanism of an esterification reaction is discussed, as is the complete esterification of PMK with primary alcohol.

  5. Exploratory Development of Processable Laminating Resins with Improved Toughness and Moderate Temperature Capability. Volume 3, Phase 2 and 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    BSDA). The anticipated advantage of the DONA poly- imide resin was that the reverse Diels Alder cure would occur at ^400oF. However, the results...ester resulted in the isolation of dimethyl fumarate and 2,5-dimethylfuran. The formation of these compounds was attributed to a reverse Diels - Alder ...11 12 6- ISOTHERMAL AGING RESULTS ON DONA PMR RESIN AT 3650F .... 13 PROPERTIES OF DONA-PMR TYPE A-S GRAPHITE FIBER POLYIMIDE

  6. High temperature resistant polyimide from tetra ester, diamine, diester and N-arylnadimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The invention described relates to improved polyimide resins which are noted for their high thermal and oxidative stability, high strength at elevated temperatures and which exhibit many other outstanding physical and chemical properties, especially useful in high temperature applications. The polyimides are prepared by the reaction, with application of heat of a mixture of monomers comprising: (1) a dialkyl or tetraalkyl ester of an aromatic tetracarboxylic acid, (2) and aromatic diamine, (3) a monoalkyl or dialky ester of a dicarboxylic acid, and (4) a N-arylnadimide such as N-phenylnadimide. Polyimides of monomers (1), (2) and (3) are known.

  7. New lipophilic tyrosyl esters. Comparative antioxidant evaluation with hydroxytyrosyl esters.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Raquel; Trujillo, Mariana; Pereira-Caro, Gema; Madrona, Andrés; Cert, Arturo; Espartero, José Luis

    2008-11-26

    New lipophilic esters of tyrosol, a naturally occurring phenol with interesting biological properties, have been synthesized in good yields by a chemoselective procedure, using lipase from Candida antarctica or p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalysts. Their antioxidant activities have been evaluated by the Rancimat test in lipophilic food matrices, as well as by FRAP and ABTS assays in methanolic solutions, and compared with those of previously synthesized hydroxytyrosyl esters. Free tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, butylhydroxytoluene, and alpha-tocopherol were used as standards. All methods used for the antioxidant activity evaluation emphasized the high influence of the ortho-diphenolic structure on the antioxidant capacity, tyrosol and its derivatives being less active than hydroxytyrosol and its analogues and even less than BHT and alpha-tocopherol. In addition, the Rancimat test revealed a lower activity for ester derivatives than for their respective reference compounds (HTy or Ty), in agreement with the polar paradox. On the other hand, FRAP and ABTS methods reported an opposite behavior between the synthetic esters and their respective references. Thus, hydroxytyrosyl esters were more active than HTy, whereas tyrosyl esters were less active than Ty. The length and nature of the acyl side chain did not seem to play an important role in the antioxidant activity of either the hydroxytyrosyl or tyrosyl ester series, since no significant differences were observed among them.

  8. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL; Martin, Edward [Libertyville, IL; Arora, Michelle [Woodridge, IL; de la Garza, Linda [Woodridge, IL

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  9. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  10. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  11. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  12. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  13. Resin binders in ramming paste

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, K.R.; Oeye, H.A.; Johansen, J.A.; Ugland, R.

    1996-10-01

    Resin bonded carbon refractories avoid the emission of PAH associated with tar based binders. Six prototype novolak resins were tested as binders in ramming paste for aluminum electrolysis cells. The resins were compared with two reference binders, one tar based and one resin based. The resins were tested in the laboratory as well as in actual operation. The mixing and ramming properties were satisfactory. The baking shrinkage was low and the mechanical strength was reasonably high. Even if resin binders are baked to a glassy structure, the sodium resistance was good. The viscosity of the resin binders can be adjusted to provide the desired range of temperature of use for the ramming paste. Elkem Aluminum installed the first cell of resin bonded ramming paste in September 1991.

  14. High-Performance Bio-Based Cyanate Esters with Low Moisture Uptake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Uptake 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Andrew Guenthner , Matthew...release, distribution is unlimited. HIGH-PERFORMANCE BIO-BASED CYANATE ESTER RESINS WITH LOW MOISTURE UPTAKE Andrew J. Guenthner ,1 Matthew C. Davis,2...275. 2. Illicium, pimpinella, and foeniculum. Jodral, M. M., Ed.; CRC Press: Washington, DC, 2004. 3. Guenthner , A. J.; Lamison, K. R.; Vij, V

  15. Synthesis of Peptides Containing C-Terminal Esters Using Trityl Side-Chain Anchoring: Applications to the Synthesis of C-Terminal Ester Analogs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mating Pheromone a-Factor.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Veronica; Ganusova, Elena; Rappe, Todd M; Becker, Jeffrey M; Distefano, Mark D

    2015-11-20

    Peptides containing C-terminal esters are an important class of bioactive molecules that includes a-factor, a farnesylated dodecapeptide, involved in the mating of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, results that expand the scope of solid-phase peptide synthetic methodology that uses trityl side-chain anchoring for the preparation of peptides with C-terminal cysteine alkyl esters are described. In this method, Fmoc-protected C-terminal cysteine esters are anchored to trityl chloride resin and extended by standard solid-phase procedures followed by acidolytic cleavage and HPLC purification. Analysis using a Gly-Phe-Cys-OMe model tripeptide revealed minimal epimerization of the C-terminal cysteine residue under basic conditions used for Fmoc deprotection. (1)H NMR analysis of the unfarnesylated a-factor precursor peptide confirmed the absence of epimerization. The side-chain anchoring method was used to produce wild-type a-factor that contains a C-terminal methyl ester along with ethyl-, isopropyl-, and benzyl-ester analogs in good yield. Activity assays using a yeast-mating assay demonstrate that while the ethyl and isopropyl esters manifest near-wild-type activity, the benzyl ester-containing analog is ca. 100-fold less active. This simple method opens the door to the synthesis of a variety of C-terminal ester-modified peptides that should be useful in studies of protein prenylation and other structurally related biological processes.

  16. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  17. New Low Cost Resin Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    difference between resins 1 and 2 was the type of phosphorous containing compound, where resin 3 was the same as resin 1 with the addition of melamine ...SBIR N03-120 New Low Cost Resin Systems Applied Poleramic, Inc. Final Report Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...Feb 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Low Cost Resin Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-03-M-0304 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  18. Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

  19. Aromatic resin characterisation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Raw and archaeological materials.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2006-11-17

    An analytical procedure based on alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethyl-silylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used to study the chemical composition of benzoe and storax resins, water-insoluble exudates of trees of the Styrax and Liquidambar genus. They are chemically characterised by having aromatic acids, alcohols and esters as their main components and are thus known as aromatic and/or balsamic resins. This analytical procedure allowed us to characterise the main components of the two resins and, even though cinnamic acid is the main component of both the resins, the presence of other characteristic aromatic compounds and triterpenes permitted us to distinguish between the two materials. All the compounds identified in benzoe resin were detected in an archaeological organic residue from an Egyptian ceramic censer (fifth to seventh centuries a.d.), thus proving that this resin was used as one of the components of the mixture of organic materials burned as incense. These results provide the first chemical evidence of the presence of benzoe resin in an archaeological material from Mediterranean area.

  20. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention.

  1. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  3. Fiberite 954: cyanate ester systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almen, G. R.; Mackenzie, P. D.; Malhotra, Vinay; Maskell, R. K.

    1992-09-01

    Cost and weight savings achieved by the use of composites have allowed these materials to displace their metal counterparts in space applications. Epoxy matrix based carbon fiber reinforced composites, such as Fiberite 934, have been used for a number of years. Relative to these systems, cyanate esters offer a number of unique attributes such as excellent hydrophobicity and electrical properties, reduced residual stress and better microcrack resistance, and improved radiation resistance. The significant reduction in water sorption and the low response to uptake make it possible to achieve much improved dimensional stability and reduced outgassing. These features may be used to advantage in electro-optical applications in space. ICI Fiberite has developed cyanate ester based prepreg systems that are penetrating the satellite, military radome and structural aerospace markets. Features of these systems will be presented and the properties of the cyanate ester based prepreg, Fiberite 954- 3, will be compared to those of Fiberite 934.

  4. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  5. An Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured under Microwave Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Chan, W. L.; Trada, M.; Baddeley, D.

    2007-12-01

    The shrinkage of vinyl ester particulate composites has been reduced by curing the resins under microwave conditions. The reduction in the shrinkage of the resins by microwaves will enable the manufacture of large vinyl ester composite items possible (H.S. Ku, G. Van Erp, J.A.R. Ball, and S. Ayers, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Fibre Composites during Hardening using Microwaves Irradiation for Curing, Proceedings, Second World Engineering Congress, Kuching, Malaysia, 2002a, 22-25 July, p 177-182; H.S. Ku, Risks Involved in Curing Vinyl Ester Resins Using Microwaves Irradiation. J. Mater. Synth. Proces. 2002b, 10(2), p 97-106; S.H. Ku, Curing Vinyl Ester Particle Reinforced Composites Using Microwaves. J. Comp. Mater., (2003a), 37(22), p 2027-2042; S.H. Ku and E. Siores, Shrinkage Reduction of Thermoset Matrix Particle Reinforced Composites During Hardening Using Microwaves Irradiation, Trans. Hong Kong Inst. Eng., 2004, 11(3), p 29-34). In tensile tests, the yield strengths of samples cured under microwave conditions obtained are within 5% of those obtained by ambient curing; it is also found that with 180 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are also within the 5% of those obtained by ambient curing. While, with 360 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for all duration of exposure to microwaves are 5% higher than those obtained by ambient curing. Whereas, with 540 W microwave power, the tensile strengths obtained for most samples are 5% below those obtained by ambient curing (H. Ku, V.C. Puttgunta, and M. Trada, Young’s Modulus of Vinyl Ester Composites Cured by Microwave Irradiation: Preliminary Results, J. Electromagnet. Waves Appl., 2007, 20(14), p. 1911-1924). This project, using 33% by weight fly ash reinforced vinyl ester composite [VE/FLYSH (33%)], is to further investigate the difference in fracture toughness between microwave cured vinyl ester particulate composites and those cured

  6. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  7. Effect of chemical structure and network formation on physical properties of di(cyanate ester) thermosets.

    PubMed

    Reams, Josiah T; Guenthner, Andrew J; Lamison, Kevin R; Vij, Vandana; Lubin, Lisa M; Mabry, Joseph M

    2012-02-01

    Key physical properties of three dicyanate ester monomers, bisphenol A dicyanate (BADCy), bisphenol E dicyanate (LECy), and the dicyanate of a silicon-containing analogue of bisphenol A (SiMCy) were investigated as a function of cyanurate conversion at conversions ranging from approximately 70% to greater than 90% in order to assess the range of applicability of both traditional and more unusual structure-property-process relationships known for cyanate ester resins. A more complete understanding of these relationships is essential for the continued development of cyanate ester resins and their composites for a wide variety of aerospace applications. The degree of cure in each system was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The degree of conversion achieved at a given temperature was dependent on the structure of the repeat unit, with SiMCy displaying the highest relative ease of cure. The density at room temperature was found to decrease monotonically with increasing conversion for all monomer types studied. In contrast, the water uptake decreased with increasing cure for all three materials over most or all of the conversion range studied, but leveled off or began to increase with increasing conversion at conversions of approximately 90%. The T(g) decreased after exposure to hot water in resins with greater than 85% conversion, but unexpectedly increased in samples with lower conversions. An investigation of the effect of hot water exposure on network chemistry via infrared spectroscopy indicated that carbamate formation varied with both monomer chemistry and extent of cure, but was greatest for the BADCy polycyanurates. On the other hand, the unreacted cyanate ester band tended to disappear uniformly, suggesting that reactions other than carbamate formation (such as cyclotrimerization) may also take place during exposure to hot water, possibly giving rise to the observed unusual increases in T(g) upon exposure.

  8. Four new acylated glycosidic acid methyl esters isolated from the convolvulin fraction of seeds of Quamoclit pennata after treatment with indium(III) chloride in methanol.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masateru; Akiyama, Kousuke; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Mineno, Tomoko; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Four new acylated glycosidic acid methyl esters were isolated after treatment of the crude ether-insoluble resin glycoside (convolvulin) fraction obtained from the seeds of Quamoclit pennata BOJER (Convolvulaceae) with indium(III) chloride in methanol. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical conversions.

  9. Phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The production of fire-resistant resins particularly useful for making laminates with inorganic fibers such as graphite fibers is discussed. The resins are by (1) condensation of an ethylenically unsaturated cyclic anhydride with a bis(diaminophenyl) phosphine oxide, and (2) by addition polymerization of the bisimide so obtained. Up to about 50%, on a molar basis, of benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid anhydride can be substituted for some of the cyclic anhydride to alter the properties of the products. Graphite cloth laminates made with these resins show 800 C char yields greater than 70% by weight in nitrogen. Limiting oxygen indexes of more than 100% are determined for these resins.

  10. Evaluation of New Resin Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    Thermogravimetric behavior of HR600P resin in nitrogen ........ 15 Fig. 9 The effect of environment on the thermogravimetric behavior of HR600P resin postcured 4 h...at 371°C (700°F) in air ........ 16 Fig. 10 The effect of postcure environment on the thermogravimetric behavior of HR600P resin in air...o........ 17 Fig. 11 The effect of postcure time at 371*C (700*F) in air on the thermogravimetric behavior of HR600P resin in alr............ 17

  11. Saponification of esters of chiral alpha-amino acids anchored through their amine function on solid support.

    PubMed

    Cantel, Sonia; Desgranges, Stéphane; Martinez, Jean; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain

    2004-06-01

    Anchoring an alpha-amino acid residue by its amine function onto a solid support is an alternative to develop chemistry on its carboxylic function. This strategy can involve the use of amino-acid esters as precursors of the carboxylic function. A complete study on the Wang-resin was performed to determine the non racemizing saponification conditions of anchored alpha-amino esters. The use of LiOH, NaOH, NaOSi(Me)3, various solvents and temperatures were tested for this reaction. After saponification and cleavage from the support, samples were examined through their Marfey's derivatives by reversed phase HPLC to evaluate the percentage of racemization.

  12. Synthesis and Utility of Dihydropyridine Boronic Esters**

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Santanu; Coffin, Aaron; Nguyen, Q. Nhu; Tantillo, Dean; Ready, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    When activated by an acylating agent, pyridine boronic esters react with organometallic reagents to form a dihydropyridine boronic ester. This intermediate allows access to a number of valuable substituted pyridine, dihydropyridine and piperidine products. PMID:26694785

  13. Synthesis and Utility of Dihydropyridine Boronic Esters.

    PubMed

    Panda, Santanu; Coffin, Aaron; Nguyen, Q Nhu; Tantillo, Dean J; Ready, Joseph M

    2016-02-05

    When activated by an acylating agent, pyridine boronic esters react with organometallic reagents to form a dihydropyridine boronic ester. This intermediate allows access to a number of valuable substituted pyridine, dihydropyridine, and piperidine products.

  14. Liquid Crystalline Thermosets from Ester, Ester-imide, and Ester-amide Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theodorus J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Main chain thermotropic liquid crystal esters, ester-imides, and ester-amides were prepared from AA, BB, and AB type monomeric materials and end-capped with phenylacetylene, phenylmaleimide, or nadimide reactive end-groups. The end-capped liquid crystal oligomers are thermotropic and have, preferably, molecular weights in the range of approximately 1000-15,000 grams per mole. The end-capped liquid crystaloligomers have broad liquid crystalline melting ranges and exhibit high melt stability and very low melt viscosities at accessible temperatures. The end-capped liquid crystal oli-gomers are stable forup to an hour in the melt phase. They are highly processable by a variety of melt process shape forming and blending techniques. Once processed and shaped, the end-capped liquid crystal oigomers were heated to further polymerize and form liquid crystalline thermosets (LCT). The fully cured products are rubbers above their glass transition temperatures.

  15. A new resin-bound universal isonitrile for the Ugi 4CC reaction: preparation and applications to the synthesis of 2,5-diketopiperazines and 1,4-benzodiazepine-2,5-diones.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, April L; Fryer, Andrew M; Josey, John A

    2002-04-04

    [reaction: see text] The preparation and synthetic applications of a novel resin-bound isonitrile are described. The resin is an example of a novel convertible isonitrile that can be utilized in the Ugi multicomponent reaction. Base-activation of the resin-bound Ugi product results in cleavage via formation of a N-acyloxazolidone that is then trapped as a carboxylic acid ester. This resin and the methodology described are suitable for synthesizing diversity libraries of 2,5-diketopiperazines and 1,4-benzodiazepine-2,5-diones.

  16. REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY OF PHTHALATE ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate esters display several modes of toxicity in mammalian species. In the rat, in utero exposure at relatively low dosage levels disrupts development of the reproductive system of the male rat by altering fetal testis hormone production. This presentation is a review of t...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654) is...

  20. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654) is...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organosilane ester. 721.537 Section... § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester. 721.2805 Section 721... Acrylate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an acrylate ester (PMN P-96-824) is subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3034 - Methylamine esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methylamine esters. 721.3034 Section... Substances § 721.3034 Methylamine esters. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as methylamine esters (PMN P-94-982) is...

  9. Regioselective Synthesis of Cellulose Ester Homopolymers

    Treesearch

    Daiqiang Xu; Kristen Voiges; Thomas Elder; Petra Mischnick; Kevin J. Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Regioselective synthesis of cellulose esters is extremely difficult due to the small reactivity differences between cellulose hydroxyl groups, small differences in steric demand between acyl moieties of interest, and the difficulty of attaching and detaching many protecting groups in the presence of cellulose ester moieties without removing the ester groups. Yet the...

  10. Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  12. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  13. High performance phenolic pultrusion resin

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.P.; Ingram, W.H.; Smith, C.

    1996-11-01

    Today, Phenol-Formaldehyde (PF) resins are the materials of choice for aerospace interior applications, primarily due to low FST (flame, smoke and toxicity). Since 1990, growth of PF resins has been steadily increasing in non-aerospace applications (which include mass transit, construction, marine, mine ducting and offshore oil) due to low FST and reasonable cost. This paper describes one component phenol-formaldehyde resin that was jointly developed with Morrison Molded Fiber Glass for their pultrusion process. Physical properties of the resin with flame/smoke/toxicity, chemical resistance and mechanical performance of the pultruded RP are discussed. Neat resin screening tests to identify high-temperature formulations are explored. Research continues at Georgia-Pacific to investigate the effect of formulation variables on processing and mechanical properties.

  14. Tunable porosity and polarity of polar post-cross-linked resins and selective adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Ting; Huo, Jiaqi; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2017-02-01

    Herein we synthesized three polar post-cross-linked resins by adjusting the initial cross-linking degree of the precursor copolymers, and found that the porosity and polarity of these resins could be effectively tuned. The polar post-cross-linked resin with the initial cross-linking degree of 10% (abbreviated as PVE_10%_pc) possessed a much greater BET surface area and almost all micro/mesopores, but lower content of ester groups, while that with the initial cross-linking degree of 60% (named as PVE_60%_pc) had a much less BET surface area, less micro/mesopores and considerable macropores, but higher content of ester groups. The different porosity and polarity of these resins endowed them with different selectivity for the adsorption of aromatic compounds. PVE_10%_pc owned the largest equilibrium capacity to phenol whilst PVE_40%_pc was the most efficient for adsorption of benzoic acid, and hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking were the main driving forces for the adsorption.

  15. Process study of polycyanate resin for wet-filament wound high-strength composites

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1997-12-31

    Polycyanate (or cyanate ester) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14 polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. T1000G/RS-14 composite cylinders were wet-wound and cured using different process schedules and then evaluated for hoop tensile strength and modulus, transverse flexural strength and short beam shear strength. The results of material characterization tests performed on the T1000G carbon fiber and RS-14 resin constituents used in this study are also presented.

  16. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis

    PubMed Central

    Korinek, Michal; Wagh, Vitthal D.; Lo, I-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wu, Yang-Chang; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. We found that phorbol ester-rich fraction was responsible for the antiallergic activity of A. malaccensis seeds. One new active phorbol ester, 12-O-(2Z,4E,6E)-tetradeca-2,4,6-trienoylphorbol-13-acetate, aquimavitalin (1) was isolated. The structure of 1 was assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR data and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aquimavitalin (1) showed strong inhibitory activity in A23187- and antigen-induced degranulation assay with IC50 values of 1.7 and 11 nM, respectively, with a therapeutic index up to 71,000. The antiallergic activities of A. malaccensis seeds and aquimavitalin (1) have never been revealed before. The results indicated that A. malaccensis seeds and the pure compound have the potential for use in the treatment of allergy. PMID:27007372

  17. Antiallergic Phorbol Ester from the Seeds of Aquilaria malaccensis.

    PubMed

    Korinek, Michal; Wagh, Vitthal D; Lo, I-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Ming; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wu, Yang-Chang; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2016-03-21

    The Aquilaria malaccensis (Thymelaeaceae) tree is a source of precious fragrant resin, called agarwood, which is widely used in traditional medicines in East Asia against diseases such as asthma. In our continuous search for active natural products, A. malaccensis seeds ethanolic extract demonstrated antiallergic effect with an IC50 value less than 1 µg/mL. Therefore, the present research aimed to purify and identify the antiallergic principle of A. malaccensis through a bioactivity-guided fractionation approach. We found that phorbol ester-rich fraction was responsible for the antiallergic activity of A. malaccensis seeds. One new active phorbol ester, 12-O-(2Z,4E,6E)-tetradeca-2,4,6-trienoylphorbol-13-acetate, aquimavitalin (1) was isolated. The structure of 1 was assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR data and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). Aquimavitalin (1) showed strong inhibitory activity in A23187- and antigen-induced degranulation assay with IC50 values of 1.7 and 11 nM, respectively, with a therapeutic index up to 71,000. The antiallergic activities of A. malaccensis seeds and aquimavitalin (1) have never been revealed before. The results indicated that A. malaccensis seeds and the pure compound have the potential for use in the treatment of allergy.

  18. Forced torsional properties of PMR composites with varying nadic ester concentrations and processing histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1982-01-01

    PMR polyimide resin was prepared from 4,4'-methylenedianiline, the dimethyl ester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid and the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (NE). The NE group serves as a chain terminator and crosslinking site. PMR/Celion 6000 composites were fabricated from resins having varying NE concentrations using two molding processes, and the laminates characterized in forced torsion. Glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of 360-390 C were observed in the crosslinked resins, as compared with the literature value of 284 C reported for the uncrosslinked system. T(g) did not decrease with decreasing NE concentrations over the range from 2.0 to 1.25 moles. Stoichiometry, within the range studied, showed little influence on shear properties; however, a 25% variation in matrix shear modulus with processing was observed. The G(12) values determined in forced torsion were in excellent agreement with those reported from tensile tests of + or - 45 deg laminates. A branching and possible secondary crosslink mechanism is proposed based on dynamic mechanical behavior and infrared spectra of the composites.

  19. Multifunctional properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes/cyanate-ester nanocomposites and CFRPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltopoulos, A.; Fiamegkou, E.; Vavouliotis, A.; Karapappas, P.; Athanasopoulos, N.; Fotiou, I.; Kostopoulos, V.; Maagt, P. D.; Rohr, T.

    2009-07-01

    The incorporation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes at weight fractions of 0.5% wt. and 1% wt. in a PRIMASET cyanate ester system (PT-30) was examined. The thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of the developed nanopolymers were investigated and were compared with the neat matrix properties. A preparation method was developed for the incorporation of the fillers in the resin system. The phenomenon of re-agglomeration of nanotubes took place in the first stages of curing schedule but nevertheless according to the SEM images a good dispersion was generally achieved. DSC, DMA, TGA and thermal conductivity tests were performed for the thermal characterization. For the electrical characterization, AC and DC measurements took place. No significant change in the glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal conductivity and mass loss values was observed in comparison with the neat resin systems. However, in both cases the improvement of electrical conductivity was about nine orders of magnitude, indicating that percolation had been achieved. The elastic modulus in bending was examined and a slight increase was observed in direct comparison with the neat resin. Finally, the developed doped nanopolymer was used as matrix for the CFRPs manufacturing. A full manufacturing protocol was developed in order to overcome the challenging issues concerning the cyanate esters' handling and manufacturing processes. Moreover AC and DC measurements were performed along with thermal conductivity measurements and TMA. The produced modified composites were tested for short beam strength.

  20. Forced torsional properties of PMR composites with varying nadic ester concentrations and processing histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1982-01-01

    PMR polyimide resin was prepared from 4,4'-methylenedianiline, the dimethyl ester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid and the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (NE). The NE group serves as a chain terminator and crosslinking site. PMR/Celion 6000 composites were fabricated from resins having varying NE concentrations using two molding processes, and the laminates characterized in forced torsion. Glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of 360-390 C were observed in the crosslinked resins, as compared with the literature value of 284 C reported for the uncrosslinked system. T(g) did not decrease with decreasing NE concentrations over the range from 2.0 to 1.25 moles. Stoichiometry, within the range studied, showed little influence on shear properties; however, a 25% variation in matrix shear modulus with processing was observed. The G(12) values determined in forced torsion were in excellent agreement with those reported from tensile tests of + or - 45 deg laminates. A branching and possible secondary crosslink mechanism is proposed based on dynamic mechanical behavior and infrared spectra of the composites.

  1. Comparison of fatigue and static physical properties of plaques made with various resins constructed using a vacuum infusion process and conventional lay-up method

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, D.J.; Ross, L.R.; Brown, T.B.; Kastl, M.C.

    1996-11-01

    The resin infusion molding process is one of the new techniques used to reduce VOC emissions and manufacture a composite typically with 60--80% reinforcement. A database of the physical performance of these new composites and a comparison to the more common hand lay-up manufacturing techniques is lacking. This paper will compare the fatigue and static physical properties of plaques made with various resins using a vacuum assisted method and conventional lay-up method. Three resins were selected: a typical bisphenol A epichlorohydrin vinyl ester, a flexible isophthalic polyester, and a high performance modified vinyl ester resin. Static physical property data and fatigue data run on the three resins will be discussed. Included is a statistical analysis of the flexural and tensile fatigue performance of the panels with a high loading of reinforcement and constructed from the three resins. An analysis of the fatigue data compared to previous work at lower reinforcement levels will be done. A model will be generated to predict the fatigue performance of resins at various levels and types of reinforcements.

  2. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  3. Metabolic properties of phosphonate esters.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, G; Buchwald, P; Bodor, N

    2004-05-01

    The object of the present work was to investigate the difference in the metabolism of the phosphonate derivatives of primary or secondary hydroxyl groups. To study the phosphorolytic cleavage of such P-O bonds, zidovudine (AZT) hexanoyloxymethyl-methylphosphonate (HOM-AZT-P), an ester of a primary OH functionality, and methyl-pivaloyloxymethyl-testosterylphosphonate (POM-T-P), an ester of a secondary OH functionality, were prepared. The actions of pure enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase and phosphodiesterase on the corresponding phosphonate compounds (AZT-P and T-P) were investigated at various pH values. The phosphonate derivative of the secondary hydroxyl group of testosterone proved completely resistant to such phosphorolytic attacks, and release of free testosterone could not be detected. The phosphonate derivative of the primary hydroxyl group of zidovudine proved resistant to phosphodiesterase, but not to alkaline phosphatase, and in this second case, release of free zidovudine could be detected.

  4. ESTER: Evolution STEllaire en Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The ESTER code computes the steady state of an isolated star of mass larger than two solar masses. The only convective region computed as such is the core where isentropy is assumed. ESTER provides solutions of the partial differential equations, for the pressure, density, temperature, angular velocity and meridional velocity for the whole volume. The angular velocity (differential rotation) and meridional circulation are computed consistently with the structure and are driven by the baroclinic torque. The code uses spectral methods, both radially and horizontally, with spherical harmonics and Chebyshev polynomials. The iterations follow Newton's algorithm. The code is object-oriented and is written in C++; a python suite allows an easy visualization of the results. While running, PGPLOT graphs are displayed to show evolution of the iterations.

  5. Methods of making alkyl esters

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian

    2010-08-03

    A method comprising contacting an alcohol, a feed comprising one or more glycerides and equal to or greater than 2 wt % of one or more free fatty acids, and a solid acid catalyst, a nanostructured polymer catalyst, or a sulfated zirconia catalyst in one or more reactors, and recovering from the one or more reactors an effluent comprising equal to or greater than about 75 wt % alkyl ester and equal to or less than about 5 wt % glyceride.

  6. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1655 Polysulfone resins. Polysulfone resins... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1) Poly(oxy-p-phenylenesulfonyl-p-phenyleneoxy-p...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polysulfone resins. 177.1655 Section 177.1655 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1655 Polysulfone resins. Polysulfone resins... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1) Poly(oxy-p-phenylenesulfonyl-p-phenyleneoxy-p...

  8. Five new resin glycoside derivatives isolated from the convolvulin fraction of seeds of Quamoclit pennata after treatment with indium(III) chloride in methanol.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kousuke; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Mineno, Tomoko; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru

    2014-01-01

    Three new acylated methyl glycosides and two new acylated glycosidic acid methyl esters were isolated after treatment of the crude ether-insoluble resin glycoside (convolvulin) fraction from seeds of Quamoclit pennata BOJER (Convolvulaceae) with indium(III) chloride in methanol. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and chemical conversions.

  9. (Meth)Acrylate Vinyl Ester Hybrid Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, TaiYeon; Cramer, Neil; Hoyle, Charles; Stansbury, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    In this study vinyl ester monomers were synthesized by an amine catalyzed Michael addition reaction between a multifunctional thiol and the acrylate double bond of vinyl acrylate. The copolymerization behavior of both methacrylate/vinyl ester and acrylate/vinyl ester systems was studied with near-infrared spectroscopy. In acrylate/vinyl ester systems, the acrylate groups polymerize faster than the vinyl ester groups resulting in an overall conversion of 80% for acrylate double bonds in the acrylate/vinyl ester system relative to only 50% in the bulk acrylate system. In the methacrylate/vinyl ester systems, the difference in reactivity is even more pronounced resulting in two distinguishable polymerization regimes, one dominated by methacrylate polymerization and a second dominated by vinyl ester polymerization. A faster polymerization rate and higher overall conversion of the methacrylate double bonds is thus achieved relative to polymerization of the pure methacrylate system. The methacrylate conversion in the methacrylate/vinyl ester system is near 100% compared to only ~60% in the pure methacrylate system. Utilizing hydrophilic vinyl ester and hydrophobic methacrylate monomers, polymerization-induced phase separation is observed. The phase separated domain size is on the order of ~1 μm under the polymerization conditions. The phase separated domains become larger and more distinct with slower polymerization and correspondingly increased time for diffusion. PMID:19855853

  10. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  11. Indirect resin composites

    PubMed Central

    Nandini, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were ‘indirect resin composites,’ composite inlays,’ and ‘fiber-reinforced composites.’ PMID:21217945

  12. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  13. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  14. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  15. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  16. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde textile resins.

    PubMed

    Reich, Hilary C; Warshaw, Erin M

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde-based resins have been used to create permanent-press finishes on fabrics since the 1920s. These resins have been shown to be potent sensitizers in some patients, leading to allergic contact dermatitis. This review summarizes the history of formaldehyde textile resin use, the diagnosis and management of allergic contact dermatitis from these resins, and current regulation of formaldehyde resins in textiles.

  18. Nonaqueous enzymatic synthesis of ester fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.; Singh, H.K.; Yagelowich, M.L.

    1993-12-31

    The application of nonaqueous enzyme slurries for the production of fatty ester fuels from coal-derived alcohols and triglyceride oils was investigated. Nonaqueous enzyme systems can greatly facilitate many organic reactions, especially those that result in formation of esters and amides. The production of biomass ester fuels from triglyceride oils involves transesterification of the triglyceride with an alcohol. Phenolic tars from coal gasification wastes were fractionated and treated to convert them to an alcohol form, and the intermediate alcohols were converted to the fatty ester in a nonaqueous lipase system. Lipases in a variety of organic solvents were intensively investigated for acylation of coal derivatives containing alcohol functional groups. The two-step process transformed the black poorly soluble phenolics to clean paraffin-soluble esters. Diesel testing demonstrated that the product esters could be substituted for diesel fuels.

  19. Phthalonitrile Resins and Preparation Thereof.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The present invention pertains generally to organic synthesis and in particular to a rapid synthesis of a diether-linked polyphthalonitrile resin by polymerizing a phthalonitrile monomer with a primary amine.

  20. Stereoselective synthesis of functionalized gamma-amino esters: azetidinium salts and epoxy esters.

    PubMed

    Concellón, José M; Riego, Estela; Bernad, Pablo L

    2002-04-18

    Addition of several lithium ester enolates to chiral 1-aminoalkyl chloromethyl ketones 1 affords enantiomerically pure 3-hydroxyazetidinium salts 3 or 3-(1'-aminoalkyl)-3,4-epoxy esters 4, depending on the reaction conditions. [reaction: see text

  1. NMR investigation of non-brominated and brominated epoxy ester prepolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žigon, M.; Osredkar, U.; Šebenik, A.

    1992-03-01

    1H, 13C and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structure of epoxy ester prepolymers, based on non-brominated DGEBA-type or brominated DGETBBA-type epoxy resins, and on an oligomeric carboxylic acid. In the presence of a quaternary phosphonium salt, besides diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) or diglycidylether of tetrabromobisphenol A (DGETBBA) and their higher oligomers, monoesters with characteristic R-CH 2-CH(OH)-CH 2-OCOR' groups were detected in prevailing quantities. In dependence of the epoxy-carboxy ratio, isomeric monoesters with hydroxymethyl groups, diesters and diols might also be present.

  2. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  3. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  4. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  5. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.859 Sucrose fatty acid esters. Sucrose fatty acid esters identified...) Sucrose fatty acid esters are the mono-, di-, and tri-esters of sucrose with fatty acids and are derived...

  6. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.859 Sucrose fatty acid esters. Sucrose fatty acid esters identified...) Sucrose fatty acid esters are the mono-, di-, and tri-esters of sucrose with fatty acids and are derived...

  7. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.859 Sucrose fatty acid esters. Sucrose fatty acid esters identified...) Sucrose fatty acid esters are the mono-, di-, and tri-esters of sucrose with fatty acids and are derived...

  8. Prodrug behaviour of nicotinoylmorphine esters.

    PubMed

    Broekkamp, C L; Oosterloo, S K; Rijk, H W

    1988-06-01

    Morphine and its nicotinoyl esters, dinicotinoylmorphine (nicomorphine), 6-mononicotinoylmorphine (6-MNM) and 3-mononicotinoylmorphine (3-MNM) were tested in mice for central activity to obtain time-effect profiles of these compounds in rats. Two effects, analgesia with the hot plate test and locomotor stimulation in activity cages were measured and nicomorphine, 6-MNM and 3-MNM were found to have a faster onset of action compared with morphine. The effects of 3-MNM and morphine lasted longer than the effect of nicomorphine and 6-MNM. The prodrug behaviour of 3-MNM and nicomorphine for morphine and 6-MNM, respectively, is discussed.

  9. Cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to alcohols: unexpected reactivity trend indicates ester enolate intermediacy.

    PubMed

    Srimani, Dipankar; Mukherjee, Arup; Goldberg, Alexander F G; Leitus, Gregory; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Shimon, Linda J W; Ben David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2015-10-12

    The atom-efficient and environmentally benign catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic acid esters to alcohols has been accomplished in recent years mainly with precious-metal-based catalysts, with few exceptions. Presented here is the first cobalt-catalyzed hydrogenation of esters to the corresponding alcohols. Unexpectedly, the evidence indicates the unprecedented involvement of ester enolate intermediates.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). (a... generically as alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and...

  11. Structure-property relationships in addition polyimides. 1: Resins from four-ring aromatic diamines containing carbonyl and methylene groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, Peter; Klopotek, David L.; Cavano, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to improve the processing characteristics of addition-type polyimide resins the use of flexibilized four-ring aromatic diamine moieties was investigated. A series of 12 diamines containing carbonyl and methylene, as well as oxo and thio bridging groups, was synthesized. The diamines were polymerized with the dimethyl ester of 3.3', 4.4' - benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), using the monomethyl ester of nadic acid (NE) as an end-cap. The effect of diamine structure on the solubility and rheological properties during cure was determined. This paper also describes the effect of diamine structure and formulated molecular weight on the glass transition temperature and thermo-oxidative stability at elevated temperatures after various post-cure regimes. The results indicate that polyimides from some of the diamines containing methylene connecting groups have potential as matrix resins for long-term applications at temperatures up to 300 C.

  12. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

  13. Bonding of resin composites to resin-modified glass ionomers.

    PubMed

    Fortin, D; Vargas, M A; Swift, E J

    1995-08-01

    To evaluate the bonding between resin composites and resin-modified glass ionomer restorative materials. Bar-shaped specimens of Fuji II LC, Photac-Fil, and Vitremer were fabricated in a mold. After application of unfilled resin, resin composite (either Silux Plus or Restorative Z100) was condensed into the mold against the glass ionomer substrate and was light-cured. These bonded specimens, as well as intact specimens of each material, were placed on a three-point bending apparatus and were loaded until failure using a Zwick testing machine. The transverse strength of each specimen was calculated. Mean transverse strengths of bonded specimens ranged from 50% to 78% of the transverse strength of the intact glass ionomer materials. The lowest transverse strength was 18.1 MPa, for Photac-Fil/Z100, and the highest was 29.6 MPa, for Fuji II LC/Silux. Statistical analysis indicated that the type of composite used had no significant effect on transverse strength. However, the type of resin-modified glass ionomer used was significant. Although there was much overlap between materials, bonded specimens made with Fuji II LC had the highest absolute strength, and those made with Photac-Fil had the lowest absolute strength. Bonded Vitremer specimens had the highest transverse strength relative to the cohesive strength of the material.

  14. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer`s specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  15. FB-Line resin testing final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1992-01-23

    The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer's specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

  16. Sugar Ester Compounds for Arthropod Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar esters, also known as acyl sugars or polyol esters, are a class of compounds that are internationally recognized as food additives. They are commonly used in bakery goods, drugs, cosmetics, food packaging plastics, and in other applications because of their surfactant and emulsifying properti...

  17. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l−1). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters. PMID:24609358

  18. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.537 - Organosilane ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.537 Organosilane ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an organosilane ester (PMN P-96-1661/P-95-1654)...

  20. Stable and versatile active acridinium esters II.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Z; McCapra, F

    2000-01-01

    The synthesis of acridinium esters with a linking group directly attached to the acridine nucleus is described. This strategy will allow the widest possible choice of variously substituted phenyl esters without restricting them to those structures bearing linking groups on the phenol. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  2. Briareolate Esters from the Gorgonian Briareum asbestinum

    PubMed Central

    Meginley, Rian J.; Gupta, Prasoon; Schulz, Thomas C.; McLean, Amanda B.; Robins, Allan J.; West, Lyndon M.

    2012-01-01

    Two new briarane diterpenoids briareolate esters J (1) and K (2) were isolated from the methanolic extract of the octocoral Briareum asbestinum collected off the coast of Boca Raton, Florida. The structures of briaranes 1 and 2 were elucidated by interpretation of spectroscopic data. Briareolate ester K (2) showed weak growth inhibition activity against human embryonic stem cells (BG02). PMID:23015768

  3. Synthesis of biodiesel from pongamia oil using heterogeneous ion-exchange resin catalyst.

    PubMed

    Jaya, N; Selvan, B Karpanai; Vennison, S John

    2015-11-01

    Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable substitute fuel for petroleum. Biodiesel could be effectively produced by transesterification reaction of triglycerides of vegetable oils with short-chain alcohols in the presence of homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysts. Conventionally, biodiesel manufacturing processes employ strong acids or bases as catalysts. But, separation of the catalyst and the by-product glycerol from the product ester is too expensive to justify the product use as an automobile fuel. Hence heterogeneous catalysts are preferred. In this study, transesterification of pongamia oil with ethanol was performed using a solid ion-exchange resin catalyst. It is a macro porous strongly basic anion exchange resin. The process parameters affecting the ethyl ester yield were investigated. The reaction conditions were optimized for the maximum yield of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) of pongamia oil. The properties of FAEE were compared with accepted standards of biodiesel. Engine performance was also studied with pongamia oil diesel blend and engine emission characteristics were observed.

  4. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    PubMed

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct amidation of esters with nitroarenes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Ploeger, Marten Leendert; Hu, Xile

    2017-01-01

    Esters are one of the most common functional groups in natural and synthetic products, and the one-step conversion of the ester group into other functional groups is an attractive strategy in organic synthesis. Direct amidation of esters is particularly appealing due to the omnipresence of the amide moiety in biomolecules, fine chemicals, and drug candidates. However, efficient methods for direct amidation of unactivated esters are still lacking. Here we report nickel-catalysed reductive coupling of unactivated esters with nitroarenes to furnish in one step a wide range of amides bearing functional groups relevant to the development of drugs and agrochemicals. The method has been used to expedite the syntheses of bio-active molecules and natural products, as well as their post-synthetic modifications. Preliminary mechanistic study indicates a reaction pathway distinct from conventional amidation methods using anilines as nitrogen sources. The work provides a novel and efficient method for amide synthesis. PMID:28345585

  6. Direct amidation of esters with nitroarenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Ploeger, Marten Leendert; Hu, Xile

    2017-03-01

    Esters are one of the most common functional groups in natural and synthetic products, and the one-step conversion of the ester group into other functional groups is an attractive strategy in organic synthesis. Direct amidation of esters is particularly appealing due to the omnipresence of the amide moiety in biomolecules, fine chemicals, and drug candidates. However, efficient methods for direct amidation of unactivated esters are still lacking. Here we report nickel-catalysed reductive coupling of unactivated esters with nitroarenes to furnish in one step a wide range of amides bearing functional groups relevant to the development of drugs and agrochemicals. The method has been used to expedite the syntheses of bio-active molecules and natural products, as well as their post-synthetic modifications. Preliminary mechanistic study indicates a reaction pathway distinct from conventional amidation methods using anilines as nitrogen sources. The work provides a novel and efficient method for amide synthesis.

  7. Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

  8. Resin technologies: construction and staining of resin TMA's.

    PubMed

    Howat, William J; Wilson, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    The traditional formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, and therefore the tissue microarrays created from it, provide good morphology but with a compromised antigenicity when compared to frozen tissue. In contrast, while solving the issue of antigenicity, frozen tissue suffers from a lack of morphology. We have demonstrated that tissue microarrays constructed in glycol methacrylate resin, when combined with a cold acetone fixation step, have been able to combine the superior morphology of resin-embedded sections with the superior antigenicity of frozen tissue for prospectively collected material.

  9. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  10. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  11. Soluble high molecular weight polyimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Lubowitz, H. R.

    1970-01-01

    High molecular weight polyimide resins have greater than 20 percent /by weight/ solubility in polar organic solvents. They permit fabrication into films, fibers, coatings, reinforced composite, and adhesive product forms. Characterization properties for one typical polyimide resin are given.

  12. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  13. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  14. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  15. [Benzenedithiol esters with antimycotic activity].

    PubMed

    Pavanetto, F; Montanari, L; Modena, T; Mazza, M

    1982-06-01

    Some diesters of benzen-1,2-dithiol wit aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids were prepared and tested for in vitro antifungal activity. The diacetate and dipropionate of benzen-1,3- and 1,4-dithiol were used as comparison compounds. The substances (Table I; substances I leads to X) were obtained by condensation of benzenedithiols with suitable acylating agents. The fungistatic activity of the products was tested in vitro against the following fungal strains: Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The results show that the diester of benzen-1,2-dithiols with alkanoic acids (Table I) have marked antimycotic activity, much greater than that of clotrimazol. The diaroyl esters of benzen-1,2-dithiol and the diesters of benzen-1,3- and 1,4-dithiols are inactive or only slightly active.

  16. Imide Modified Epoxy Matrix Resin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    the cure cycle. Two approaches were tested to obtain a homogeneous mixture of the curing agent and MY 720 epoxy resin. One involved the use of acetone...before exposure to any of the cure cycles. This was indicated by the solubility test and the IR spectra of the solventless resin mixtures. More evidence...muffle furnace at 800’C. The results of the tests listed in Table 22 show that about all IME systems exhibit good char forming capabilities, with IME-l and

  17. Method for loading resin beds

    DOEpatents

    Notz, Karl J.; Rainey, Robert H.; Greene, Charles W.; Shockley, William E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H.sup.+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145.degree.-200.degree. C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145.degree. C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO.sub.3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate.

  18. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert,George W.; Hand,Thomas E.; Delaurentiis,Gary M.

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  19. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  20. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  1. SRM filament wound case resin characterization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The amine cured epoxy wet winding resin used in fabrication of the SRM filament wound case is analyzed. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPSC) is utilized extensively to study lot-to-lot variation in both resin and curing agent. The validity of quantitative hplc methodology currently under development in-process resin/catalyst assay is assessed.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a.... 10. (i) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with distilled water at reflux temperature for...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Perfluorocarbon resins can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not... viscosity of the perfluorocarbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall not vary...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Perfluorocarbon resins can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not... viscosity of the perfluorocarbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall not vary...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Perfluorocarbon resins can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not... viscosity of the perfluorocarbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall not vary...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a.... 10. (i) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with distilled water at reflux temperature for...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a Single.... 10. (i) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with distilled water at reflux temperature for...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Perfluorocarbon resins can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not... viscosity of the perfluorocarbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall not vary...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a.... 10. (i) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with distilled water at reflux temperature for...

  10. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a.... 10. (i) Polyestercarbonate resins, when extracted with distilled water at reflux temperature for...

  11. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used... polymer obtained by polymerizing terpene hydrocarbons derived from wood. It has a softening point of...

  12. Biodegradation of resin acid sodium salts

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; H. Greaves

    1973-01-01

    The sodium salts of resin acids were readily degraded by microflora from two types of river water and from an activated sewage sludge. A lag phase with little or no resin acid salt degradation but rapid bacterial development occurred which was greatly extended by a decrease in incubation temperature. After this initial lag phase, the resin acid salts were rapidly...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly...) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and CAS Reg. No. 60015-05-6 and commonly referred to as...

  14. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN..., Films and Related Substances § 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section... Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section... Substances § 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are subject...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...-phenyleneisopropylidene-p-phenylene) resins (CAS Reg. No. 25154-01-2) consisting of basic resins produced when the.... (b) The basic polysulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may contain optional...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components...-phenyleneisopropylidene-p-phenylene) resins (CAS Reg. No. 25154-01-2) consisting of basic resins produced when the.... (b) The basic polysulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may contain optional...

  19. Application of 2-chlorotrityl resin in solid phase synthesis of (Leu15)-gastrin I and unsulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide. Selective O-deprotection of tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Kapolos, S; Poulos, C; Schäfer, W; Yao, W Q

    1991-12-01

    The carboxyl terminal dipeptide amide, Fmoc-Asp-Phe-NH2, of gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK) has been attached in high yield through its free side chain carboxyl group to the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl resin. The obtained peptide resin ester has been applied in the solid phase synthesis of partially protected (Leu15)-gastrin I utilising Fmoc-amino acids. Quantitative cleavage of this peptide from resin, with the t-butyl type side chain protection intact is achieved using mixtures of acetic acid/trifluoroethanol/dichloromethane. Under the same conditions complete detritylation of the tyrosine phenoxy function occurs simultaneously. Thus, the solid-phase synthesis of peptides selectively deprotected at the side chain of tyrosine is rendered possible by the use of 2-chlorotrityl resin and Fmoc-Tyr(Trt)-OH. The efficiency of this approach has been proved by the subsequent high-yield synthesis of three model peptides and the CCK-octapeptide.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10679 - Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester (generic). 721.10679 Section 721... Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester... identified generically as carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products...

  1. Sunflower oil methyl ester as diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Hasan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methyl ester formation represents one approach to overcome the problems associated with the relatively high viscosity of sunflower oil when used as a diesel fuel replacement. Sunflower oil methyl ester is being prepared at the University of North Dakota Engieering Experiment Station. Physical and chemical properties of this material at varying levels of refinement and purity will be used to define fuel properties. Engine testing is being carried out to determine if the fouling characteristics of methyl ester are significantly less than those of sunflower oil. 1 figure, 1 table.

  2. Identification of allyl esters in garlic cheese.

    PubMed

    Herbrand, Klaus; Hammerschmidt, Franz J; Brennecke, Stefan; Liebig, Margit; Lösing, Gerd; Schmidt, Claus Oliver; Gatfield, Ian; Krammer, Gerhard; Bertram, Heinz-Jürgen

    2007-09-19

    This study describes the identification of six allyl esters in a garlic cheese preparation and in a commercial cream cheese. The extracts were prepared by liquid/liquid extraction and concentrated by the SAFE process. The identification of the allyl esters of acetic, butyric, hexanoic, heptanoic, octanoic, and decanoic acids is based on the correlation of their mass spectrometric data and chromatographic retention time data obtained from the extracts with those of authentic standards. In addition to the gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry analysis, the flavor ingredients were characterized by GC sniffing by a trained flavorist. Some of the esters were isolated by preparative GC.

  3. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  4. Three new resin glycosides and a new tetrahydropyran derivative from the seeds of Quamoclit pennata.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masateru; Takaki, Yoshinari; Takatsuji, Masamitsu; Akiyama, Kousuke; Okawa, Masafumi; Kinjo, Junei; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Yoshimitsu, Hitoshi; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Three new resin glycosides, quamoclins V (1), VI (2), and VII (3) and a new tetrahydropyran derivative, quamopyran (4), were isolated from the seeds of Quamoclit pennata BOJER (Convolvulaceae). The chemical structures of these compounds were determined primarily on the basis of spectroscopic data. The carboxyl group of the aglycone, 11S-convolvulinolic acid, of 1 and 2 was linked intermoleculary with a hydroxy group of the sugar moiety to form a macrocyclic ester structure, as in already known jalapins, and 3 was an acylated glycosidic acid methyl ester. All of the sugar moieties of 1-3 were acylated by one 2S-methylbutyric acid. Compound 4 was a diketone having a tetrahydropyran ring.

  5. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  6. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  7. A Method for Characterizing PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Lauver, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative analysis technique based on reverse-phase, highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and paired-ion chromatography (PIC) developed for PMR-15 resins. In reverse-phase HPLC experiment, polar solvent containing material to be analyzed passed through column packed with nonpolar substrate. Composition of PMR-15 Resin of 50 weight percent changes as resin ages at room temperature. Verification of proper resin formulation and analysis of changes in resin composition during storage important to manufacturers of PMR-15 polymer matrix composite parts. Technique especially suitable for commercial use by manufacturers of high-performance composite components.

  8. Fractionation and utilization of gossypol resin

    SciTech Connect

    Tursunov, A.K.; Dzhailov, A.T.; Fatkhullaev, E.; Sadykov, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    Gossypol resin is formed as a secondary waste product during distillation of fatty acides isolated from cottonseed oil soap stocks; it is insoluble in water but soluble in products of petroleum distillation. For fractionation, gossypol resin was saponified with caustic soda or caustic potash. Using this method, the resin was separated into unsaponifiable (21-24%) and saponifiable (76-79%) parts. Details of the individual fractions of gossypol resin are presented. The unsaponifiable fraction contains hydrocarbons, alcohols, beta-sito-sterol, beta-amyrin, and vitamin E. The fatty acid fraction of the resin is a mixture of fatty acids and lactones.

  9. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  10. 21 CFR 172.859 - Sucrose fatty acid esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sucrose fatty acid esters. 172.859 Section 172.859... Sucrose fatty acid esters. Sucrose fatty acid esters identified in this section may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Sucrose fatty acid esters are the mono-, di-, and...

  11. Seasonal variation and resin composition in the Andean tree Austrocedrus chilensis.

    PubMed

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Soto, Alex; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2014-05-21

    Little is known about the changes in resin composition in South American gymnosperms associated with the different seasons of the year. The diterpene composition of 44 resin samples from seven Austrocedrus chilensis (Cupressaceae) trees, including male and female individuals, was investigated in three different seasons of the year (February, June and November). Twelve main diterpenes were isolated by chromatographic means and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The diterpene composition was submitted to multivariate analysis to find possible associations between chemical composition and season of the year. The principal component analysis showed a clear relation between diterpene composition and season. The most characteristic compounds in resins collected in summer were Z-communic acid (9) and 12-oxo-labda-8(17),13E-dien-19 oic acid methyl ester (10) for male trees and 8(17),12,14-labdatriene (7) for female trees. For the winter samples, a clear correlation of female trees with torulosic acid (6) was observed. In spring, E-communic acid (8) and Z-communic acid (9) were correlated with female trees and 18-hydroxy isopimar-15-ene (1) with male tree resin. A comparison between percent diterpene composition and collection time showed p < 0.05 for isopimara-8(9),15-diene (2), sandaracopimaric acid (4), compound (7) and ferruginol (11).

  12. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    As part of an effort on tougher/solvent resistant matrix resins for composites, research was directed towards exploring methods to improve the solvent resistance of linear amorphous thermoplastics. Ethyl reactive groups were placed on the ends of oligomers and pendent along the polymer chain and subsequently thermally reacted to provide crosslinking and thus improvement in solvent resistance. This concept is extended to another thermoplastic, a phenoxy resin. A commercially available phenoxy resin (PKHH) was systematically modified by reaction of the pendent hydroxyl groups on the phenoxy resin with various amounts of 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride. As the pendent ethynyl group content in the phenoxy resin increased, the cured resin exhibited a higher glass transition temperature, better solvent resistance and less flexibility. The solvent resistance was further improved by correcting a low molecular weight diethynyl compound, 2,2-bis(4-ethynylbenzoyloxy-4'-phenyl)propane, with a phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups.

  13. Preparation of glycerol carbonate esters by using hybrid Nafion-silica catalyst.

    PubMed

    Climent, María J; Corma, Avelino; Iborra, Sara; Martínez-Silvestre, Sergio; Velty, Alexandra

    2013-07-01

    Glycerol carbonate esters (GCEs), which are valuable biomass-derivative compounds, have been prepared through the direct esterification of glycerol carbonate and long organic acids with different chain lengths, in the absence of solvent, and with heterogeneous catalysts, including acidic-organic resins, zeolites, and hybrid organic-inorganic acids. The best results, in terms of activity and selectivity towards GCEs, were obtained using a Nafion-silica composite. A full reaction scheme has been established, and it has been demonstrated that an undesired competing reaction results in the generation of glycerol and esters derived from a secondary hydrolysis of the endocyclic ester group, which is attributed to water formed during the esterification reaction. The influence of temperature, substrate ratio, catalyst-to-substrate ratio, and the use of solvent has been studied and, under optimized reaction conditions and with the adequate catalyst, it was possible to achieve 95% selectivity for the desired product at 98% conversion. It was demonstrated that the reaction rate decreased as the number of carbon atoms in the linear alkyl chain of the carboxylic acid increased for both p-toluenesulfonic acid and Nafion-silica nanocomposite (Nafion SAC-13) catalysts. After fitting the experimental data to a mechanistically based kinetic model, the reaction kinetic parameters for Nafion SAC-13 catalysis were determined and compared for reactions involving different carboxylic acids. A kinetic study showed that the reduced reactivity of carboxylic acids with increasing chain lengths could be explained by inductive as well as steric effects.

  14. Radiolabeled cholesteryl ethers trace LDL cholesteryl esters but not HDL cholesteryl esters in the rat.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, A H

    1995-01-06

    The intravascular metabolism of cholesteryl [1-14C]oleoyl ester and [1,2-3H(N)]cholesteryl palmityl ether was compared in the rat, an animal species without plasma cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA). The tracers had identical plasma disappearance rates when they were incorporated into human or rat low density lipoproteins (LDL). Fractional catabolic rates (FCR) were 0.081 +/- 0.014 h-1 and 0.080 +/- 0.013 h-1 for human LDL ester and ether and 0.098 +/- 0.007 h-1 and 0.101 +/- 0.007 h-1 for rat LDL ester and ether, respectively. In contrast, the ether had plasma disappearance rates that were 24%-25% lower than the ester when they were incorporated into human or rat high density lipoproteins (HDL). FCR were 0.230 +/- 0.020 and 0.173 +/- 0.030 h-1 for human HDL ester and ether and 0.131 +/- 0.020 h-1 and 0.100 +/- 0.017 h-1 for rat HDL ester and ether respectively. Biological screening of the rat HDL preparations did not affect these differences. The results of these studies indicate that in the absence of plasma CETA, cholesteryl ethers can be used to trace LDL cholesteryl esters but not to trace HDL cholesteryl esters.

  15. Dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate - an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylates to zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Tay, Franklin R.; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Huaiqin; Tian, Fucong; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    The present work examined the effects of dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate (PENTA) as an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylate-based resins to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and further investigated the potential bonding mechanism involved. Shear bond strength testing was performed to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PENTA-containing primers (5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 wt% PENTA in acetone) in improving resin-Y-TZP bond strength. Bonding without the use of a PENTA-containing served as the negative control, and a Methacryloyloxidecyl dihydrogenphosphate(MDP)-containing primer was used as the positive control. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the potential existence of chemical affinity between PENTA and Y-TZP. Shear bond strengths were significant higher in the 15 and 20 wt% PENTA groups. The ICP-MS, XPS and FTIR data indicated that the P content on the Y-TZP surface increased as the concentration of PENTA increased in the experimental primers, via the formation of Zr–O–P bond. Taken together, the results attest that PENTA improves resin bonding of Y-TZP through chemical reaction with Y-TZP. Increasing the concentration of PENTA augments its binding affinity but not its bonding efficacy with zirconia. PMID:28000765

  16. Dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate - an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylates to zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Tay, Franklin R.; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Huaiqin; Tian, Fucong; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-12-01

    The present work examined the effects of dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate (PENTA) as an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylate-based resins to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and further investigated the potential bonding mechanism involved. Shear bond strength testing was performed to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PENTA-containing primers (5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 wt% PENTA in acetone) in improving resin-Y-TZP bond strength. Bonding without the use of a PENTA-containing served as the negative control, and a Methacryloyloxidecyl dihydrogenphosphate(MDP)-containing primer was used as the positive control. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the potential existence of chemical affinity between PENTA and Y-TZP. Shear bond strengths were significant higher in the 15 and 20 wt% PENTA groups. The ICP-MS, XPS and FTIR data indicated that the P content on the Y-TZP surface increased as the concentration of PENTA increased in the experimental primers, via the formation of Zr–O–P bond. Taken together, the results attest that PENTA improves resin bonding of Y-TZP through chemical reaction with Y-TZP. Increasing the concentration of PENTA augments its binding affinity but not its bonding efficacy with zirconia.

  17. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers...

  18. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers...

  19. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers...

  20. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers...

  1. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28213 thermoplastic resins including those resins and resin groups... *Polyimides *Polypropylene Resins Polystyrene (Crystal) Polystyrene (Crystal) Modified *Polystyrene—Copolymers...

  2. Stereodivergent Olefination of Enantioenriched Boronic Esters

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Roly J.; García‐Ruiz, Cristina; Myers, Eddie L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A stereodivergent coupling reaction between vinyl halides and boronic esters is described. This coupling process proceeds without a transition‐metal catalyst, instead proceeding by electrophilic selenation or iodination of a vinyl boronate complex followed by stereospecific syn or anti elimination. Chiral, nonracemic boronic esters could be coupled with complete enantiospecificity. The process enables the highly stereoselective synthesis of either the E or Z alkene from a single isomer of a vinyl coupling partner. PMID:27958668

  3. New daucane esters from Ferula tingitana.

    PubMed

    Miski, M; Mabry, T J

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the three known daucane esters (2,3,8) and one phenylpropanoid (9), the petroleum ether extract of the roots of Ferula tingitana yielded four new daucane esters: 14-p-anisoyloxy-dauc-4,8-diene (1), acetyltingitanol (4), acetyldesoxodehydrolaserpitine (5), and 4-beta-hydroxy-6-alpha-p-hydroxybenzoyloxy-10-alpha-angeloyloxy dauc-8-ene (6). A possible biogenetic pathway for 1,5-cis- and 1,5-trans-daucanes is presented.

  4. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, David E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). (a...

  6. Esters of valerenic acid as potential prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Hintersteiner, Juliane; Haider, Maximilian; Luger, Denise; Schwarzer, Christoph; Reznicek, Gottfried; Jäger, Walter; Khom, Sophia; Mihovilovic, Marko D.; Hering, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Valerenic acid (VA) is a β2/3 subunit-specific modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptors inducing anxiolysis. Here we analyze if VA-esters can serve as prodrugs and if different ester structures have different in vitro/in vivo effects. Modulation of GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was studied with 2-microelectrode-voltage-clamp. Anxiolytic effects of the VA-esters were studied on male C57BL/6N mice by means of the elevated plus maze-test; anticonvulsant properties were deduced from changes in seizure threshold upon pentylenetetrazole infusion. VA was detected in plasma confirming hydrolysis of the esters and release of VA in vivo. Esterification significantly reduced the positive allosteric modulation of GABAA (α1β3γ2S) receptors in vitro. in vivo, the studied VA-ester derivatives induced similar or even stronger anxiolytic and anticonvulsant action than VA. While methylation and propylation of VA resulted in faster onset of anxiolysis, the action of VA-ethylester was longer lasting, but occurred with a significant delay. The later finding is in line with the longer lasting anticonvulsant effects of this compound. The estimated VA plasma concentrations provided first insight into the release kinetics from different VA-esters. This might be an important step for its future clinical application as a potential non-sedative anxiolytic and anticonvulsant. PMID:24680924

  7. Cyanate Ester Resin Modified with Nano-particles for Inclusion in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-25

    characterize the effect of CNT type on the exothermic cure reaction of BECy for a filler loading of 0.5 wt . %. The dynamic DSC data was fit with...onset and peak temperatures of the reaction exotherms . The exotherm onset temperature (To) represents the temperature where the cure is initiated...the reaction exotherm . Phenomenological models can be used to fit dynamic DSC measurements by describing the reaction rate as a function of the

  8. Cyanate Ester Resin Modified with Nano-particles for Inclusion in Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-25

    the effect of CNT type on the exothermic cure reaction of BECy for a filler loading of 0.5 wt . %. The dynamic DSC data was fit with phenomenological...temperatures of the reaction exotherms . The exotherm onset temperature (To) represents the temperature where the cure is initiated while the... exotherm . Phenomenological models can be used to fit dynamic DSC measurements by describing the reaction rate as a function of the conversion, α

  9. Low Temperature Thermal Degradation Studies of Styrene Cross-Linked Vinyl Ester and Polyester Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    Programming 4 2.1.3 Capillary Gas Chromatography 5 2.1.4 Mass Spectrometer/Data System (MS/DS) 6 2.2 Materials 7 3.0 Results and Discussion 9 3.1 Thermal...a number of analytical methods including pyrolysis- gas chromatography /mass spectrometry 2 (pyr-GC/MS) pyrolysis- gas chromatography3- 5 (pyr-GC...pyrolysis/mass spectrometry 6 (pyr-MS), and thermal desorption/ gas chromatography /mass spectrometry 7𔄂 (TD-GC/MS). This paper describes an analytical

  10. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  11. Petroleum resins and their production

    SciTech Connect

    Luvinh, Q.

    1989-04-25

    A process is described for the production of petroleum resins compatible with base polymers in hot melt formulations and having a softening point of from about 60/sup 0/C. to about 120/sup 0/C. and Gardner color of about 4 or less, comprising copolymerizing using a Friedel-Crafts catalyst. The mixture is substantially free form cyclopentadiene and dicyclopentadiene. This patent also describes a resin consisting essentially of a copolymer containing from 5 to 80 wt. % of units derived from an olefinically unsaturated aromatic compound form 5 to 80 wt. % of units derived from C/sub 5/ olefines or diolefines or C/sub 6/ olefines diolefines or a mixture of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ olefines or diolefines and from 7 to 45 wt. % of units derived from a terpene.

  12. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.

    1991-01-01

    High temperature structural resins are required for use on advanced aerospace vehicles as adhesives and composite matrices. NASA-Langley developed polyimide resins were evaluated as high temperature structural adhesives for metal to metal bonding and as composite matrices. Adhesive tapes were prepared on glass scrim fabric from solutions of polyamide acids of the semicrystalline polyimide LARC-CPI, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center. Using 6Al-4V titanium adherends, high lap shear bond strengths were obtained at ambient temperature (45.2 MPa, 6550 psi) and acceptable strengths were obtained at elevated temperature (14.0 MPa, 2030 psi) using the Pasa-Jell 107 conversion coating on the titanium and a bonding pressure of 1.38 MPa (200 psi). Average zero degree composite tensile and compressive strengths of 1290 MPa (187 ksi) and 883 MPa (128 ksi) respectively were obtained at ambient temperature with unsized AS-4 carbon fiber reinforcement.

  13. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  14. Copper-catalyzed cascade reactions of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chongnian; Li, Zengchang

    2015-01-01

    Summary A copper-catalyzed cascade reaction of α,β-unsaturated esters with keto esters is reported. It features a copper-catalyzed reductive aldolization followed by a lactonization. This method provides a facile approach to prepare γ-carboxymethyl-γ-lactones and δ-carboxymethyl-δ-lactones under mild reaction conditions. PMID:25815072

  15. Methyl esters from vegetable oils with hydroxy fatty acids: Comparison of lesquerella and castor methyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The search for alternative feedstocks for biodiesel as partial replacement for petrodiesel has recently extended to castor oil. In this work, the castor oil methyl esters were prepared and their properties determined in comparison to the methyl esters of lesquerella oil, which in turn is seen as alt...

  16. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b)...

  17. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Flame-resistant reinforced bodies are disclosed which are composed of reinforcing fibers, filaments or fabrics in a cured body of bis- and tris-imide resins derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, or of addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a mono-imide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride.

  19. Epoxy-Resin Cable Terminations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-03

    of epoxy- resin terminations , or end -fittings, to small diameter cables. Test samples were made using steel, titanium, and amorphous metal cable...15 vi NSWC TR 88-400 CHAITER 1 INTROIDUCTION The general function of end fittings, also referred to as terminations , is to allow the attachment of...instructions require that the termination body (henceforth referred to as’body’) be slipped over the end of the cable which is then unlaid and cleaned

  20. Synthesis of Improved Polyester Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-05

    peroxides as initiator. The peroxides used were benzoyl peroxide , cumene hydroperoxide, t-butyl peroxybenzoate and 2,5... benzoyl peroxide , while allyl type polyester resins require a higher temperature cure and use a peroxide such as dicumyl peroxide . Numerous other peroxides ...using MEKP (methylethylketone peroxide ) or BZP ( benzoyl peroxide ) catalysts. 47 01 "I 4 C C~ >~> .0 00 Q) . x> x (. C. a, 0 + 0) 0. 0 0 a,. E S- >0>

  1. Synthesis of improved polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, A. H.; Delano, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen aromatic unsaturated polyester prepolymers prepared by a modified interfacial condensation technique were investigated for their solubility in vinyl monomers and ability to provide high char yield forming unsaturated polyester resins. The best resin system contained a polyester prepolymer of phthalic, fumaric and diphenic acids reacted with 2,7-naphthalene diol and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene. This prepolymer is very soluble in styrene, divinyl benzene, triallyl cyanurate, diallyl isophthalate and methylvinylpyridine. It provided anaerobic char yields as high as 41 percent at 800 C. The combination of good solubility and char yield represents a significant improvement over state-of-the-art unsaturated polyester resins. The majority of the other prepolymers had only low or no solubility in vinyl monomers. Graphite composites from this prepolymer with styrene were investigated. The cause for the observed low shear strengths of the composites was not determined, however 12-week aging of the composites at 82 C showed that essentially no changes in the composites had occurred.

  2. ELUTION OF URANIUM FROM RESIN

    DOEpatents

    McLEan, D.C.

    1959-03-10

    A method is described for eluting uranium from anion exchange resins so as to decrease vanadium and iron contamination and permit recycle of the major portion of the eluats after recovery of the uranium. Diminution of vanadium and iron contamination of the major portion of the uranium is accomplished by treating the anion exchange resin, which is saturated with uranium complex by adsorption from a sulfuric acid leach liquor from an ore bearing uranium, vanadium and iron, with one column volume of eluant prepared by passing chlorine into ammonium hydroxide until the chloride content is about 1 N and the pH is about 1. The resin is then eluted with 8 to 9 column volumes of 0.9 N ammonium chloride--0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution. The eluants are collected separately and treated with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate which is filtered therefrom. The uranium salt from the first eluant is contaminated with the major portion of ths vanadium and iron and is reworked, while the uranium recovered from the second eluant is relatively free of the undesirable vanadium and irons. The filtrate from the first eluant portion is discarded. The filtrate from the second eluant portion may be recycled after adding hydrochloric acid to increase the chloride ion concentration and adjust the pH to about 1.

  3. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  4. Production and biological function of volatile esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Saerens, Sofie M G; Delvaux, Freddy R; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Thevelein, Johan M

    2010-03-01

    The need to understand and control ester synthesis is driven by the fact that esters play a key role in the sensorial quality of fermented alcoholic beverages like beer, wine and sake. As esters are synthesized in yeast via several complex metabolic pathways, there is a need to gain a clear understanding of ester metabolism and its regulation. The individual genes involved, their functions and regulatory mechanisms have to be identified. In alcoholic beverages, there are two important groups of esters: the acetate esters and the medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) ethyl esters. For acetate ester synthesis, the genes involved have already been cloned and characterized. Also the biochemical pathways and the regulation of acetate ester synthesis are well defined. With respect to the molecular basis of MCFA ethyl ester synthesis, however, significant progress has only recently been made. Next to the characterization of the biochemical pathways and regulation of ester synthesis, a new and more important question arises: what is the advantage for yeast to produce these esters? Several hypotheses have been proposed in the past, but none was satisfactorily. This paper reviews the current hypotheses of ester synthesis in yeast in relation to the complex regulation of the alcohol acetyl transferases and the different factors that allow ester formation to be controlled during fermentation.

  5. Production and biological function of volatile esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Saerens, Sofie M. G.; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The need to understand and control ester synthesis is driven by the fact that esters play a key role in the sensorial quality of fermented alcoholic beverages like beer, wine and sake. As esters are synthesized in yeast via several complex metabolic pathways, there is a need to gain a clear understanding of ester metabolism and its regulation. The individual genes involved, their functions and regulatory mechanisms have to be identified. In alcoholic beverages, there are two important groups of esters: the acetate esters and the medium‐chain fatty acid (MCFA) ethyl esters. For acetate ester synthesis, the genes involved have already been cloned and characterized. Also the biochemical pathways and the regulation of acetate ester synthesis are well defined. With respect to the molecular basis of MCFA ethyl ester synthesis, however, significant progress has only recently been made. Next to the characterization of the biochemical pathways and regulation of ester synthesis, a new and more important question arises: what is the advantage for yeast to produce these esters? Several hypotheses have been proposed in the past, but none was satisfactorily. This paper reviews the current hypotheses of ester synthesis in yeast in relation to the complex regulation of the alcohol acetyl transferases and the different factors that allow ester formation to be controlled during fermentation. PMID:21255318

  6. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  7. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  8. Wear rates of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Erickson, R I; Latta, M A; Wilwerding, T M

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using a generalized wear simulation model. Ten specimens each of five resin composites (Esthet•X [EX], Filtek Supreme Plus [SP], Filtek Z250 [Z2], Tetric EvoCeram [EC], and Z100 Restorative [Z1]) were subjected to wear challenges of 100,000, 400,000, 800,000, and 1,200,000 cycles. The materials were placed in cylinder-shaped stainless-steel fixtures, and wear was generated using a flat stainless-steel antagonist in a slurry of polymethylmethacrylate beads. Wear (mean facet depth [μm] and volume loss [mm(3)]) was determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2000) with Proscan and ProForm software. Statistical analysis of the laboratory data using analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) for mean wear facet depth and volume loss for both the number of cycles and resin composite material. Linear regression analysis was used to develop predictive wear rates and volume loss rates. Linear wear was demonstrated with correlation coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.914 to 0.995. Mean wear values (mean facet depth [μm]) and standard deviations (SD) for 1200K cycles were as follows: Z1 13.9 (2.0), Z2 26.7 (2.7), SP 30.1 (4.1), EC 31.8 (2.3), and EX 67.5 (8.2). Volume loss (mm(3)) and SDs for 1200K cycles were as follows: Z1 0.248 (0.036), Z2 0.477 (0.044), SP 0.541 (0.072), EC 0.584 (0.037), and EX 1.162 (0.139). The wear rate (μm) and volume loss rate (mm(3)) per 100,000 cycles for the five resin composites were as follows: wear rate Z1 0.58, EC 1.27, Z2 1.49, SP 1.62, and EX 4.35, and volume loss rate Z1 0.009, EC 0.024, Z2 0.028, SP 0.029, and EX 0.075. The generalized wear model appears to be an excellent method for measuring relative wear of resin composite materials.

  9. Xanthophyll esters are found in human colostrum.

    PubMed

    Ríos, José J; Xavier, Ana Augusta Odorissi; Díaz-Salido, Elena; Arenilla-Vélez, Isabel; Jarén-Galán, Manuel; Garrido-Fernández, Juan; Aguayo-Maldonado, Josefa; Pérez-Gálvez, Antonio

    2017-06-06

    Carotenoids in human milk are associated with other lipid counterparts in several metabolic processes. One interesting association that has not been demonstrated to date is the presence of xanthophyll esters. Colostrum and mature milk samples were analyzed to determine the occurrence of xanthophyll esters and identify the compounds. Thus, the association of the amounts of these compounds with lactation and whether they are significant contributors to the carotenoid profile of human milk was assessed. Pre-term and term delivering mothers were included in the study to donate colostrum at 3-5 days postpartum and mature milk at 15 days postpartum. Carotenoids extracts were subjected to a clean-up procedure to remove the triacylglycerol fraction and then analyzed by HPLC-MS(n) . Identification of xanthophyll esters was achieved by considering their chromatographic behaviour, UV-visible characteristics and MS(n) features. Xanthophyll esters are significant contributors to the carotenoid profile in the colostrum, while mature milk does not contain these compounds. Therefore, fatty acid acylation to xanthophylls is activated during the accumulation of carotenoids in the human mammary gland. The sharp decline in the amount of xanthophyll esters in mature milk indicates that the lipophilic components are those recently incorporated in the mammary epithelium. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Curdlan ester derivatives: synthesis, structure, and properties.

    PubMed

    Marubayashi, Hironori; Yukinaka, Kazuyori; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Takemura, Akio; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2014-03-15

    A series of ester derivatives of curdlan, which is a β-(1 → 3)-D-glucan extracellularly produced by microorganism, with varying alkyl chain lengths (C2-C12) were synthesized by the heterogeneous reaction using trifluoroacetic anhydride. As a result, high-molecular-weight (Mw ≥ 6 × 10(5)) and fully-acylated curdlan was obtained with relatively high yield (>70%). Thermal stability of curdlan was greatly improved by esterification. Crystallization was observed for curdlan esters with C2-C6 side chains. Both Tg (170 → 50 °C) and Tm (290 → 170 °C) of curdlan esters decreased with increasing the side-chain length. By the increase in the side-chain carbon number, curdlan esters showed lower Young's modulus and tensile strength, and larger elongation at break. Thus, material properties of curdlan esters can be controlled by changing the side-chain length. It was found that the increase of the side-chain length resulted in the decrease of crystallinity and the change of crystal structures.

  11. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  12. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  13. Color stability of different composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Falkensammer, Frank; Arnetzl, Gerwin Vincent; Wildburger, Angelika; Freudenthaler, Josef

    2013-06-01

    Data are needed to better predict the color stability of current composite resin materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different storage solutions on the color stability of different composite resin materials. Different restorative and adhesive composite resin specimens (dual-polymerizing self-adhesive resin cement, autopolymerizing resin-based composite resin, dual-polymerizing resin-based composite resin, nanohybrid composite resin, and microhybrid composite resin) were fabricated and stored in red wine, black tea, chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, tea tree oil, or distilled water for 4 weeks at 37°C. Color parameters were measured with a colorimeter before and after storage. Total color differences and specific coordinate differences were expressed as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. A 2-way and 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons were applied for statistical calculations (α=.05). Red wine caused the most severe discoloration (ΔE >10), followed by black tea with perceptible (ΔE >2.6) to clinically unacceptable discoloration (ΔE >5.5). Colored mouth rinses discolored the materials to a lesser extent with clinically acceptable values. Dual-polymerizing resin adhesives showed a higher amount of discoloration. Current restorative and adhesive composite resin materials discolor over time under the influence of different storage solutions. The composition related to the polymerizing mode seemed to be a causative factor. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of flow and cure monitoring using direct current and alternating current sensing in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Uday K.; Jadhav, Nitesh C.; Hosur, Mahesh V.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.; Fink, Bruce K.

    2000-12-01

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is an emerging manufacturing technique that holds promise as an affordable alternative to traditional autoclave molding and automated fiber placement for producing large-scale structural parts. In VARTM, the fibrous preform is laid on a single-sided tool, which is then bagged along with the infusion and vacuum lines. The resin is then infused through the preform, which causes simultaneous wetting in its in-plane and transverse directions. An effective sensing technique is essential so that comprehensive information pertaining to the wetting of the preform, arrival of resin at various locations, cure gradients associated with thickness and presence of dry spots may be monitored. In the current work, direct current (dc) and alternating current sensing/monitoring techniques were adopted for developing a systematic understanding of the resin position and cure on plain weave S2-glass preforms with Dow Derakane vinyl ester VE 411-350, Shell EPON RSL 2704/2705 and Si-AN epoxy as the matrix systems. A SMARTweave dc sensing system was utilized to conduct parametric studies: (a) to compare the flow and cure of resin through the stitched and non-stitched preforms; (b) to investigate the influence of sensor positioning, i.e. top, middle and bottom layers; and (c) to investigate the influence of positioning of the process accessories, i.e. resin infusion point and vacuum point on the composite panel. The SMARTweave system was found to be sensitive to all the parametric variations introduced in the study. Furthermore, the results obtained from the SMARTweave system were compared to the cure monitoring studies conducted by using embedded interdigitated (IDEX) dielectric sensors. The results indicate that SMARTweave sensing was a viable alternative to obtaining resin position and cure, and was more superior in terms of obtaining global information, in contrast to the localized dielectric sensing approach.

  15. Direct Determination of MCPD Fatty Acid Esters and Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters in Vegetable Oils by LC-TOFMS.

    PubMed

    Haines, Troy D; Adlaf, Kevin J; Pierceall, Robert M; Lee, Inmok; Venkitasubramanian, Padmesh; Collison, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in vegetable oils using the indirect method proposed by the DGF gave inconsistent results when salting out conditions were varied. Subsequent investigation showed that the method was destroying and reforming MCPD during the analysis. An LC time of flight MS method was developed for direct analysis of both MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in vegetable oils. The results of the LC-TOFMS method were compared with the DGF method. The DGF method consistently gave results that were greater than the LC-TOFMS method. The levels of MCPD esters and glycidyl esters found in a variety of vegetable oils are reported. MCPD monoesters were not found in any oil samples. MCPD diesters were found only in samples containing palm oil, and were not present in all palm oil samples. Glycidyl esters were found in a wide variety of oils. Some processing conditions that influence the concentration of MCPD esters and glycidyl esters are discussed.

  16. Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

  17. Conservative full-mouth resin renewal.

    PubMed

    Morgan, M J

    1999-12-01

    The treatment of this patient involved the coordination of periodontal, orthodontic, restorative, and aesthetic considerations. It was unique because it involved only resin as the primary restorative material, which allowed for conservative preparations and restorations. In the posterior, the use of direct and indirect resins resulted in the removal of little or no healthy tooth structure. In the anterior, the use of direct resin veneers required minimal removal of enamel, while still achieving proper function and aesthetics. Resin restorations in this particular case allowed for an acceptable clinical result and a highly satisfied patient.

  18. Aesthetic resin onlay restorations: 'rationale and methods'.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Neel; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir; Millar, Brian J

    2011-10-01

    Resin composite restorations have gained increasing popularity over the past two decades. This has been largely driven by a patient-orientated demand for the use of aesthetic restorative materials. It has occurred concomitantly with an improvement in the mechanical properties of available materials, and advances in our knowledge of resin bonding. Onlay restorations are advocated for a plethora of clinical applications. This paper considers the role of adhesive onlay restorations fabricated in resin composite in contemporary restorative practice, including the presentation of two case reports. This case report describes a minimally invasive, aesthetic solution to provide cuspal coverage by means of either a direct or indirect resin composite onlay restoration, respectively.

  19. Sand control with resin and explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, J.M.; Begnaud, W.J.; Sahr, N.L.

    1992-09-08

    This patent describes a method for treating a well having perforated casing to prevent solids movement through the perforations and into the wellbore. It comprises positioning a quantity of liquid resin solution such that the solution occupies the interval of the casing having perforations; positioning an explosive in proximity with the liquid resin solution; detonating the explosive; displacing the liquid resin solution remaining in the wellbore after step (c) through the perforations with a displacing fluid; and injecting a chemical solution through the perforations to cause the resin to polymerize to form a consolidated permeable matrix.

  20. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  1. Oxidative stability of DHA phenolic ester.

    PubMed

    Roby, Mohamed H H; De Castro, Vanessa C; Targino, Brenda N; Alves Da Silva, Paulo H; Mangavel, Cécile; Chretien, Françoise; Humeau, Catherine; Desobry, Stephane

    2015-02-15

    Docosahexaenoic acid vanillyl ester (DHA-VE) was synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid ethyl ester (DHA-EE) and vanillyl alcohol by a solvent-free alcoholysis process catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B. Oxidative stability of pure DHA-VE and the crude reaction medium consisting of 45% DHA-VE and 55% DHA-EE were compared with that of DHA-EE under various storage conditions. Oxidation progress was followed by determination of conjugated dienes and FTIR measurements. Analyses showed that DHA-EE was rapidly oxidised under all storage conditions in comparison with DHA-VE and crude reaction medium, whatever the temperature and the storage time. The grafting of vanillyl alcohol appeared as a powerful way to stabilize DHA against oxidation. Thanks to their stability, both DHA-VE and the crude reaction medium, allowing the production of the ester, offer huge potential as functional ingredients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycerol esters as fuel economy additives

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, P.W.; Smith, C.R.; Gowland, F.W.

    1987-07-28

    A lubricating oil composition formulated is described for use as a crankcase lubricating oil composition for gasoline or diesel engines consisting essentially of a major amount of a mineral oil of a lubricating viscosity which has incorporated about 0.20 weight percent of a glycerol partial ester. The partial ester is a mixture of glycerol monooleate and glycerol dioleate. The mixture has a weight ratio of 3 parts of glycerol monooleate to 2 parts of glycerol dioleate the ester providing a fuel economy improvement of about 1 to 3 percent when the lubricating oil composition is employed in the crankcase of the engine. An ashless dispersant, a metal detergent additive, a zinc dihdyrocarbyl dithiophosphate anti-wear additive and an antioxidant. The dispersant, detergent, anti-wear additive and antioxidant are present in conventional amounts to provide their normal attendant functions.

  3. Fate of dietary phytosteryl/-stanyl esters: analysis of individual intact esters in human feces.

    PubMed

    Lubinus, Tim; Barnsteiner, Andreas; Skurk, Thomas; Hauner, Hans; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    The objective was to investigate the metabolic fate of phytosteryl/-stanyl fatty acid and ferulic acid esters upon consumption by healthy humans. A capillary gas chromatographic methodology was employed to follow a randomized, single-blind three group crossover clinical trial and to quantify simultaneously individual intact esters, liberated phytosterols/-stanols and their metabolites in feces. Skimmed milk drinking yogurts enriched with complex mixtures of phytosteryl/-stanyl fatty acid esters and ferulates, respectively, were employed as food carriers. On average, 73 % of total plant stanyl fatty acid esters and 80 % of total plant steryl fatty acid esters were hydrolyzed. Among the individuals, the hydrolysis rates ranged from 40 to 96 %. In addition, there were subject-dependent discrepancies between the amounts of phytosterols/-stanols actually determined in the feces and the calculated hydrolysis rates. On average, 69 % of the amounts of sterols/stanols expected from the amounts of remaining intact esters were found. The study revealed large interindividual variability regarding the recoveries of dietary phytosteryl/-stanyl esters upon gastrointestinal passage in healthy humans. Nevertheless, there was a significant impact of the acid moiety (oleate=linoleate=linolenate>eicosanoate>palmitate>ferulate) on the hydrolysis rates; the influence of the phytosterol/-stanol moiety was less pronounced.

  4. Zero birefringence films of pullulan ester derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Danjo, Takahiro; Enomoto, Yukiko; Shimada, Hikaru; Nobukawa, Shogo; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2017-01-01

    High-performance films with almost zero-birefringence and zero-wavelength dispersion were succeeded to prepare from pullulan esters derivatives (PLEs) without any additives. Optical transmittance analysis, birefringence measurement of PLE cast film and hot stretched films, and infrared dichroism analysis were conducted to characterize optical properties of PLE films comparing with cellulose triacetate which is commercially used as low-birefringence in optical devices. The aims of this study, characterization of optical properties of pullulan esters, can develop a deep understanding of the fundamental knowing and applicability of polysaccharides. Accordingly, authors believe this paper will open the gate for researches in the application of polysaccharides. PMID:28417955

  5. Bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithiophosphinic Methyl Ester

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Klaehn; Dean R. Peterman; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Lee M. Daniels

    2011-05-01

    When bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithiophosphinic acid (1) was dissolved in methanol, crystals of bis(o-trifluoromethylphenyl)dithiophosphinic methyl ester (2) were isolated. The structure of dithiophosphinic methyl ester (2) has been identified via single-crystal X-ray diffraction and multinuclear NMR studies. Compound 2 is remarkable in that the dithiophosphinic (PS2) core is preserved during this transformation. Many dithiophosphinic acids degrade to other compounds over time which results in formation of dithiophosphinic dimers, like the bis(dithiophosphinic) anhydride. The transformation to 2 suggests that the o-trifluoromethylphenyl groups on phosphorus assist in retaining the PS2 core, possibly by steric hindrance.

  6. Phthalate esters: Testing for ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Thompson, R.; Croudace, C.; Stewart, K.; Williams, N.

    1995-12-31

    Ortho-phthalate esters are produced in high tonnages for use as plasticizers, in particular for PVC. Their physical chemical properties are typically very low water solubility and high octanol/water partition coefficient. This combination of properties presents a number of experimental difficulties in the design and interpretation of ecological effect studies. These difficulties are described and results presented showing techniques for the performance of reproduction studies with the water flea, Daphnia magna, in aqueous solution and with the midge, Chironomus riparius, in sediments. The results which showed no effect for the phthalate esters tested are discussed in the context of other ecotoxicity data obtained on these products.

  7. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to... include resins produced by the condensation of allyl ether of mono-, di-, or trimethylol phenol and...

  8. Electrical properties of resin monomers used in restorative dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Breschi, Marco; Fabiani, Davide; Sandrolini, Leonardo; Colonna, Martino; Sisti, Laura; Vannini, Micaela; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Pashley, David H.; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The application of an electric field has been shown to positively influence the impregnation of the resin monomers currently used in dentin bonding systems during hybrid layer formation. This study presents an experimental characterization of the electrical properties of these monomers with the aim of both correlating them to their chemical structures and seeking an insight into the mechanisms of the monomer migration under an applied electric field. Methods Some common monomers examined were TEGDMA (triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate), HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), UDMA (urethane dimethacrylate), 2-MP (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate, TCDM di(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) ester of 5-(2,5-dioxotetrahydrofurfuryl)-3-methyl-3-cyclohexenyl-1,2-dicarboxylic anhydride) and Bis-GMA [2,2-bis(4-2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxyphenyl)propane]. A customized cell produced for the measurement of the electrical properties of monomers was manufactured and electrical conductivity and permittivity of resin monomers were measured. Results The permittivity of the tested monomers is largely affected by electrical frequency. The large values of permittivity and dielectric losses observed as frequency decreased, indicate a dominant effect of ionic polarization, particularly evident in materials showing the highest conductivity. Permittivity and conductivity of the tested monomers showed a similar behavior, i.e. materials with the lowest permittivity also show small values of conductivity and vice versa. Significance The results of the present study revealed a good correlation between electrical properties and Hoy solubility parameters and, in particular, the higher the polar contribution (polar forces plus hydrogen bonding) the higher the permittivity and conductivity. The most relevant outcome of this study is that the electrophoretic mechanism prevails on the electroendoosmotic effect in determining the monomer migration under the application of electric fields

  9. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  10. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  11. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin, gum rosin, or tall oil rosin may be safely... or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of citrus oils used in the preparation of...

  12. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  13. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  14. Novel Membrane Based Process for Producing Lactate Esters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    Lactate Esters from Renewable Carbohydrate Feedstocks can Replace Petroleum-Derived Solvents. Lactate esters are versatile solvents that are biodegradable, nontoxic, and applicable to a wide range of industrial and consumer uses.

  15. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polymers of bis and tris-imides derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, and addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a monoimide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride prior to curing are disclosed and claimed. Such polymers are flame resistant. Also disclosed are an improved method of producing tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides from the nitro analogues by reduction with hydrazine hydrate using palladized charcoal or Raney nickel as the catalyst and fiber reinforced cured resin composites.

  16. Coupling Agents - HME Resin System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    and test results of the sized fiber impregnated with lIME 5803—53 resin and laminated are shown in Table 2. The slig htl y improved SBS strength of...inherent in the 9 - - -~~~~ . ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~- % . - ~, - • - - - ~~~~~~~~~~~~ — — ~~~~~~~~ free radical—induced crosslink cures. As this shrinkage

  17. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  18. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2017-08-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  19. Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water.

  20. Surface preparations for metal frameworks of composite resin veneered prostheses made with an adhesive opaque resin.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, H; Kawahara, M; Tanaka, T; Atsuta, M

    1991-07-01

    Bond strengths of a laboratory developed light-cured composite resin to dental casting alloys were evaluated with a new adhesive opaque resin. The metal specimens were type III gold, nickel-chromium, and cobalt-chromium alloys, while the surface treatments for bonding were heating, Sn plating, and ion coating. The cast metal specimens were "particle blasted" with aluminum oxide and were surface treated. Adhesive 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin was applied and a light-cured composite resin was placed over the opaque layer. The prepared specimens were thermocycled in water and shear bond strengths were recorded. The light-cured composite resin was bonded strongly to heated or Sn-plated type III alloy with 4-META/MMA-TBB opaque resin. Copper ion coating in a sputter coater was effective for all three alloys, with only slightly diminished bond strengths. These methods were satisfactory for making composite resin veneered prostheses.

  1. Experience with NuResin, a mobile ion exchange resin reprocessing system

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, K.R.; Bell, M.J.; Concklin, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Ion exchange resin used in condensate polishing, steam generator blowdown, and radwaste systems is a major contributor to the volume of low-level waste (LLW) at operating nuclear plants. Plant regeneration systems for resins use large quantities of demineralized water for cleaning, separating, and regenerating resins. These systems generate a tremendous volume of LLW from boiling water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized water reactors (PWRs) that have experienced steam generator tube leaks. At essentially all BWRs and those PWRs that replace rather than regenerate condensate polishing resin, the LLW volume contribution from the resin alone is significant. This report describes a process for the treatment of resins with the objective of returning the resin to service.

  2. Interface enhancement of glass fiber/vinyl ester composites with carbon nanotubes synthesized from ethanol flames.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Hanming; Fang, Pengfei; Liao, Lingmin; Pan, Chunxu; Liew, K M

    2010-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized from ethanol flames (F-MWCNTs) and nanotubes functionalized by n-hexadecylamine (H-MWCNTs) were applied to the preparation of glass fiber/vinyl ester composites by overcoating the original glass fiber. Scanning electron microscopy of the composites containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) showed better bonding between the glass fiber and the resin matrix which may be attributed to the existence of a flexible interphase introduced by the nanotubes. It was found that the bonding in the composites treated with H-MWCNTs was much stronger. Moreover, the dynamic mechanical properties and impact strengths of the resulting composites were investigated. The results revealed that treating glass fiber with MWCNTs effectively improved the mechanical properties of the composite materials. Furthermore, the dynamic properties showed that H-MWCNTs have become integral parts of the crosslinked polymer structure, rather than acting as separate fillers.

  3. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  4. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1993-07-27

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  5. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... boiling 4.2N HC1 Viscosity No.(mL/g) Maximum extractable fractionin selected solvents (expressed in percent by weight of resin) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14... determined by weighing a 1-gram to 5-gram sample first in air and then in freshly boiled distilled water...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: Nylon resins Specific gravity Melting point(degrees Fahrenheit) Solubilityin boiling 4.2N HC1 Viscosity...) Water 95percent ethyl alcohol Ethyl acetate Benzene 1. Nylon 66 resins 1.14±.015 475-495 Dissolves in 1... and then in freshly boiled distilled water at 23 °C±2 °C. (2) Melting point. The melting point...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... resins can be identified by their characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins identified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not less than.../federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. The melt viscosity of the...

  8. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  9. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  10. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  11. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Six silicone modified resins were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 6-63%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 1,220 MPa and a modulus of 105 GPa. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 72 MPa.

  12. TMI-2 purification demineralizer resin study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J D; Osterhoudt, T R

    1984-05-01

    Study of the Makeup and Purification System demineralizers at TMI-2 has established that fuel quantities in the vessels are low, precluding criticality, that the high radioactive cesium concentration on the demineralizer resins can be chemically removed, and that the demineralizer resins can probably be removed from the vessels by sluicing through existing plant piping. Radiation measurements from outside the demineralizers establishing that there is between 1.5 and 5.1 (probably 3.3) lb of fuel in the A vessel and less than that amount in the B vessel. Dose rates up to 2780 R per hour were measured on contact with the A demineralizer. Remote visual observation of the A demineralizer showed a crystalline crust overlaying amber-colored resins. The cesium activity in solid resin samples ranged from 220 to 16,900 ..mu..Ci/g. Based on this information, researchers concluded that the resins cannot be removed through the normal pathway in their present condition. Studies do show that the resins will withstand chemical processing designed to rinse and elute cesium from the resins. The process developed should work on the TMI-2 resins.

  13. Plant-mediated stereoselective biotransformation of phenylglyoxylic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Maczka, Wanda Krystyna; Grabarczyk, Małgorzata; Wińska, Katarzyna; Anioł, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    Enantioselective reduction of the carbonyl group of three phenylglyoxylic acid esters (methyl, ethyl, and n-propyl esters, 2-4) was conducted using blended plant materials (roots of carrot, beetroot, celeriac and parsley; apple). All used biocatalysts transformed these esters to the corresponding mandelic acid esters with high yield, preferably into the respective R-enantiomer. Butanedione addition improved the enantioselectivity of the reaction.

  14. Cyanate ester-nanoparticle composites as multifunctional structural capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leon, J. Eliseo

    An important goal of engineering is to increase the energy density of electrical energy storage devices used to deliver power onboard mobile platforms. Equally important is the goal to reduce the overall mass of the vehicles transporting these devices to achieve increased fuel and cost efficiency. One approach to meeting both these objectives is to develop multifunctional systems that serve as both energy storage and load bearing structural devices. Multifunctional devices consist of constituents that individually perform a subset of the overall desired functions. However, the synergy achieved by the combination of each constituent's characteristics allows for system-level benefits that cannot be achieved by simply optimizing the separate subsystems. We investigated multifunctional systems consisting of light weight polymer matrix and high dielectric constant fillers to achieve these objectives. The monomer of bisphenol E cyanate ester exhibited excellent processing ability because of its low room temperature viscosity. Additionally, the fully cured thermoset demonstrated excellent thermal stability, specific strength and stiffness. Fillers, including multi-walled carbon nanotubes, nanometer scale barium titanate and nanometer scale calcium copper titanate, offer high dielectric constants that raised the effective dielectric constant of the polymer matrix composite. The combination of high epsilon'and high dielectric strength produce high energy density components exhibiting increased electrical energy storage. Mechanical (load bearing) improvements of the PMCs were attributed to covalently bonded nanometer and micrometer sized filler particles, as well as the continuous glass fiber, integrated into the resin systems which increased the structural characteristics of the cured composites. Breakdown voltage tests and dynamic mechanical analysis were employed to demonstrate that precise combinations of these constituents, under the proper processing conditions, can

  15. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

  16. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  17. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resin was formulated. The model is developed by modifying the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By assuming a linear relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants were determined from the isothermal cure data of Lee, Loos, and Springer for the Hercules 3501-6 resin system. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data reported by Carpenter. A chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformations of the thermosetting resin systems during cure was established.

  18. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  19. Sensomics analysis of key bitter compounds in the hard resin of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and their contribution to the bitter profile of Pilsner-type beer.

    PubMed

    Dresel, Michael; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2015-04-08

    Recent brewing trials indicated the occurrence of valuable bitter compounds in the hard resin fraction of hop. Aiming at the discovery of these compounds, hop's ε-resin was separated by means of a sensory guided fractionation approach and the key taste molecules were identified by means of UV/vis, LC-TOF-MS, and 1D/2D-NMR studies as well as synthetic experiments. Besides a series of literature known xanthohumol derivatives, multifidol glucosides, flavon-3-on glycosides, and p-coumaric acid esters, a total of 11 bitter tastants are reported for the first time, namely, 1",2"-dihydroxanthohumol F, 4'-hydroxytunicatachalcone, isoxantholupon, 1-methoxy-4-prenylphloroglucinol, dihydrocyclohumulohydrochinone, xanthohumols M, N, and P, and isoxanthohumols M, N, and P, respectively. Human sensory analysis revealed low bitter recognition threshold concentrations ranging from 5 (co-multifidol glucopyranoside) to 198 μmol/L (trans-p-coumaric acid ethyl ester) depending on their chemical structure. For the first time, LC-MS/MS quantitation of these taste compounds in Pilsner-type beer, followed by taste re-engineering experiments, revealed the additive contribution of iso-α-acids and the identified hard resin components to be truly necessary and sufficient for constructing the authentic bitter percept of beer. Finally, brewing trails using the ε-resin as the only hop source impressively demonstrated the possibility to produce beverages strongly enriched with prenylated hop flavonoids.

  20. Transesterification catalyzed by polystyrene-supported chymotrypsin in toluene: the effect of neutralization of basic or acidic groups attaching to polystyrene resins.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, N; Inoue, Y; Kobayashi, A; Sugawara, T

    1995-10-05

    Crosslinked polystyrene resins containing a low level of either basic or acidic groups were used for supports of alpha-chymotrypsin (CT), which catalyzed the transesterification of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester (AcPheOEt) with propanol in toluene. With a minimal amount of water, CT was sorbed to the resins, basic or acidic groups of which were partly or fully neutralized by several soluble acids or bases. With an increasing degree of neutralization of basic resins by free acids, the rate of disappearance of AcPheOEt was decreased, whereas the by-product formation of AcPheOH, due to hydrolysis, was considerably suppressed, compared with the ester-exchange product, AcPheOPr. The pK(a) value of the neutralizing acid was also important for both CT activity and reaction selectivity. AcPheOPr was selectively produced at a certain range of pK(a) values. On the other hand, the neutralization of acidic resins with free amines enhanced the CT activity but a strong base promoted the formation of hydrolysis product.

  1. Viscoelastic and shock response of nanoclay and graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almagableh, Ahmad Mohammad

    The focus of ongoing research at University of Mississippi is to develop stronger, safer and more cost-effective structural materials for the new generation naval ships with an emphasis on lightweight nanoparticle reinforced glass/carbon polymeric based composites and structural foams for blast, shock and impact mitigation. Brominated 510A-40 vinyl ester nanocomposite resin systems are planned to be used in the composite face sheets of sandwich structures with fire-resistant foam layered in between to further reduce flammability along with optimal flexural rigidity, vibration damping and enhanced energy absorption. In this work, the viscoelastic and dynamic performance of brominated nanoclay and graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester nanocomposites for blast (shock) loading applications are studied. The Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA Q800) was used to obtain the viscoelastic properties, modulus (stiffness), creep/ stress relaxation, and damping (energy dissipation), of 1.25 and 2.5 wt. percent nanoclay and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced brominated vinyl ester. Effects of frequency (time) on the viscoelastic behavior were investigated by sweeping the frequency over three decades: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 Hz, and temperature range from 30-150°C at a step rate of 4°C per minute. Master curves were generated by time-temperature superpositioning of the experimental data at a reference temperature. Bromination of vinyl ester resin was found to significantly increase the glass transition temperature (Tg) and damping for all nanocomposites. The nano reinforced composites, however showed a drop in initial storage modulus with bromination. Nanocomposites with 1.25 and 2.5 M. percent graphite had the highest storage modulus along with the lowest damping among brominated specimens. In this research, a shock Tube, servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) and Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) are used to characterize the mechanical response and energy

  2. Avocado and olive oil methyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel, the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils, animal fats or other triacylglycerol-containing materials and an alternative to conventional petroleum-based diesel fuel, has been derived from a variety of feedstocks. Numerous feedstocks have been investigated as potential biodiesel sources, incl...

  3. Lipid encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid methyl ester

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Encapsulation of structurally sensitive compounds within a solid lipid matrix provides a barrier to prooxidant compounds and effectively limits the extent of oxidative degradation. Encapsulated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) methyl ester was examined as a model compound for functional foods and feeds. S...

  4. Oxidative stability of estolide esters using PDSC

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estolides are obtained by the formation of a carbocation that can undergo nucleophilic addition with or without carbocation migration along the length of the chain. The carboxylic acid functionality of one fatty acid links to the site of unsaturation of another fatty acid to form oligomeric esters. ...

  5. Total synthesis of zincophorin methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Defosseux, Magali; Blanchard, Nicolas; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine

    2003-10-30

    [reaction: see text]. A convergent total synthesis of the methyl ester of zincophorin, an ionophore antibiotic, has been realized relying on a diastereoselective titanium-mediated aldol coupling between the C1-C12 and C13-C25 subunits. The latter fragment was prepared by using a Carroll-Claisen rearrangement.

  6. 40 CFR 721.2805 - Acrylate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2805 Acrylate ester. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June 18, 2014. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an...

  7. The MPEG monophosphate ester: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Penczek, Stanislaw; Kaluzynski, Krzysztof; Wisniewski, Blazej; Pretula, Julia; Szymanski, Ryszard; Lapienis, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Methods of preparation of the phosphoric ester of monomethyl ether of poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG-P) from MPEG (M(n) = 550 and 2000) and phosphoric acid (P), or its derivatives - pyrophosphoric acid (PY), polyphosphoric acid (PP) and POCl(3)- are described and compared. MPEG-P was isolated in a pure state (no detectable impurities) and characterized.

  8. CELLULOSE NITRATE-ACETATE MIXED ESTERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    cellulose acetate . The degree of polymerization of the products, as estimated from viscosity data, shows the occurrence of chain degradation for both...mixed esters showed tensile strength at least comparable to that of films of cellulose nitrate or cellulose acetate . The impact sensitivity of the

  9. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN P-95-1128...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this section...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN P-97...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581) is...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl ester...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  18. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the following...

  19. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin...

  20. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section... § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are prepared from lactic acid and fatty acids...

  1. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid ester...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid ester...

  4. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids... prepared from lactic acid and fatty acids meeting the requirements of § 172.860(b) and/or oleic acid...

  5. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN P-93-343...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl ester...

  7. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid ester...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl ester...

  9. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid ester...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl ester...

  11. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN P-93-343...

  12. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN P-93-343...

  13. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN P-93-343...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs P...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN P-97...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5310 - Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.5310 Neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as neononanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN P-92...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4215 - Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4215 Hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexanedioic acid, diethenyl ester (PMN P-90...

  18. Synthesis and physical properties of new estolide esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Estolides are a class of esters based on vegetable oils that, in this case, are formed when the carboxylic acid functionality of one fatty acid reacts at the site of unsaturation of another fatty acid to form an ester linkage. The objective of this preliminary study was to synthesize new esters of e...

  19. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854... § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including..., safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty acids derived from these substances...

  20. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581) is...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2950 - Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. 721... Substances § 721.2950 Carboxylic acid glycidyl esters. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as carboxylic acid glycidyl ester...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3110 - Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic... Substances § 721.3110 Polycarboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polycarboxylic acid ester...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...

  5. 40 CFR 721.8660 - Propionic acid methyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Propionic acid methyl ester (generic... Substances § 721.8660 Propionic acid methyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a propionic acid methyl ester...

  6. 40 CFR 721.1732 - Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.1732 Nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as nitrobenzoic acid octyl ester (PMN P-93-343...

  7. An overview of the properties of fatty acid alkyl esters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acid alkyl esters of plant oils, especially in the form of methyl esters, have numerous applications with fuel use having received the most attention in recent times due to the potential high volume. Various properties imparted by neat fatty acid alkyl esters have been shown to influence fuel ...

  8. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN P-95-1128...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this section...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN P-97...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10685 - Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10685 Phosphoric acid, mixed esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphoric acid, mixed esters (PMN P-13-170) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10431 - Phosphoric acid esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid esters (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10431 Phosphoric acid esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as phosphoric acid esters (PMNs P...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10305 - Modified cyclohexane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified cyclohexane esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10305 Modified cyclohexane esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... cyclohexane esters (PMN P-00-1108) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10560 - Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10560 Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... dialkyl esters (PMNs P-07-143 and P-07-144) are subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10715 - Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10715 Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and..., dialkyl ester (PMN P-13-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10438 - Dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ester (generic). 721.10438 Section 721.10438 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10438 Dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (PMN P-00-346) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10314 - Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10314 Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance... dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (PMNs P-02-778, P-02-779, and P-02-780) are subject to reporting under...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4158 - Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. 721... Substances § 721.4158 Hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as hexadecanoic acid, ethenyl ester (PMN...

  11. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10560 - Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10560 Alkanoldioic dialkyl esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... dialkyl esters (PMNs P-07-143 and P-07-144) are subject to reporting under this section for...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3140 - Vinyl epoxy ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl epoxy ester. 721.3140 Section... Substances § 721.3140 Vinyl epoxy ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance vinyl epoxy ester (PMN P-85-527) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10180 - Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10180 Trifunctional acrylic ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylic ester (PMN P-04-692) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10305 - Modified cyclohexane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified cyclohexane esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10305 Modified cyclohexane esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... cyclohexane esters (PMN P-00-1108) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  3. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10305 - Modified cyclohexane esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified cyclohexane esters (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10305 Modified cyclohexane esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... cyclohexane esters (PMN P-00-1108) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10314 - Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10314 Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance... dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (PMNs P-02-778, P-02-779, and P-02-780) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10314 - Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10314 Dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance... dialkyl dithiocarbamate esters (PMNs P-02-778, P-02-779, and P-02-780) are subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10477 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10477... Substances § 721.10477 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-04-290) is subject...

  11. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section 172.848 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10255 - Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10255 Vinyl carboxylic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... carboxylic acid ester (PMN P-09-400) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2121 - Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Thiosubstituted carbonate ester... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2121 Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance... Thiosubstituted carbonate ester (PMN P-99-0654) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  16. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section 172.848 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2825 - Alkyl ester (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl ester (generic name). 721.2825... Substances § 721.2825 Alkyl ester (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance alkyl ester (PMN P-84-968) is subject to reporting under this...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10438 - Dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ester (generic). 721.10438 Section 721.10438 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10438 Dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl hydroxybenzenealkanoic acid ester (PMN P-00-346) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10537 - Acrylate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate ester (generic). 721.10537... Substances § 721.10537 Acrylate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acrylate ester (PMN P-01-579) is subject...

  20. 21 CFR 556.240 - Estradiol and related esters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol and related esters. 556.240 Section 556... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.240 Estradiol and related esters. No residues of estradiol, resulting from the use of estradiol or any of the related esters, are permitted in excess of the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.329 - Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.329 Halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated benzyl ester acrylate (PMN P-90-1527) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3080 - Substituted phosphate ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted phosphate ester (generic... Substances § 721.3080 Substituted phosphate ester (generic). (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted phosphate ester...

  7. QSAR for cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus esters and CNDO/2 calculations for organophosphorus ester hydrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were derived for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by various organophosphorus esters. Bimolecular inhibition rate constants correlate well with hydrophobic substituent constants, and with the presence or absence of catonic groups on the inhibitor, but not with steric substituent constants. CNDO/2 calculations were performed on a separate set of organophosphorus esters, RR'P(O)X, where R and R' are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. For each subset with the same X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom in the ester correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant. For the whole set of esters with different X, two equations were derived that relate either charge and leaving group steric bulk, or orbital energy and bond order to the hydrogen hydrolysis rate constant.

  8. QSAR for cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphorus esters and CNDO/2 calculations for organophosphorus ester hydrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H.; Kenley, R. A.; Rynard, C.; Golub, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were derived for acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition by various organophosphorus esters. Bimolecular inhibition rate constants correlate well with hydrophobic substituent constants, and with the presence or absence of catonic groups on the inhibitor, but not with steric substituent constants. CNDO/2 calculations were performed on a separate set of organophosphorus esters, RR'P(O)X, where R and R' are alkyl and/or alkoxy groups and X is fluorine, chlorine or a phenoxy group. For each subset with the same X, the CNDO-derived net atomic charge at the central phosphorus atom in the ester correlates well with the alkaline hydrolysis rate constant. For the whole set of esters with different X, two equations were derived that relate either charge and leaving group steric bulk, or orbital energy and bond order to the hydrogen hydrolysis rate constant.

  9. Ordered SiO2 (phenolic-formaldehyde resin) in situ nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Padrón, G.; Rojas, F.; Castaño, V. M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanocomposite materials consisting of monodisperse SiO2 particles embedded in a polymerized resin matrix were produced by the adhesion of silica globules on the surface of a chemically modified phenolic-formaldehyde resin (MPFR) substrate that incorporates carboxylic groups in its molecules. Two routes were followed to obtain SiO2 nanoparticles-MPFR materials. The first procedure consisted of the growth of an SiO2 phase concurrently with the presence of MPFR molecules. The second procedure involved the preparation of a monodisperse SiO2 sol that was subsequently mixed with an MPFR solution. The thermal curing of the MPFR resin phase at 80 °C brought about thin SiO2-MPFR flakes from samples obtained from procedure 1 whilst monolithic pieces arose from samples from procedure 2. During the curing process, silanol surface groups of the silica globules reacted with carboxylic groups of the MPFR molecules to create a reinforced SiO2-MPFR substance that displayed ester bonds across the interface. Thermal treatments of specimens prepared by procedure 2 were performed at 150, 250, 400, 600 and 800 °C to monitor the integrity of the resultant hybrid substrates. To assess the characteristics of SiO2-MPFR materials, some of the main chemical, structural and textural characteristics of several specimens have been determined via FTIR, SEM and N2 adsorption studies.

  10. Resin-bound chiral derivatizing agents for assignment of configuration by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Porto, Silvia; Seco, José Manuel; Espinosa, Juan Félix; Quiñoá, Emilio; Riguera, Ricardo

    2008-08-01

    A general methodology for assigning the configuration of chiral mono- and polyfunctional compounds by NMR is presented. The approach is based on the use of polystyrene-bound chiral derivatizing agents (CDA-resins) specifically designed to achieve the high-yield formation of the covalent linkages (amide or ester bonds) between the substrate and the chiral auxiliary within the NMR tube, without the need for other manipulations, on a microscale level and in a short time. The deuterated NMR solvents (CDCl3, CD3CN, CS2/CD2Cl2) are also the reaction solvents and separations, purifications or workups of any kind are not necessary prior to recording the spectra. The CDA-resins prepared included MPA, 9-AMA, BPG, MTPA, and 2-NTBA as auxiliary agents incorporated either as single enantiomers or as mixed combinations of the (R)- and the (S)-enantiomers at unequal and known ratios. The high versatility of these systems was successfully demonstrated in a variety of ways based on double and single derivatization, low temperature experiments, or the formation of metal complexes. The approach allowed the absolute configurations of chiral primary amines, primary and secondary alcohols, cyanohydrins, thiols, diols, triols, and amino alcohols to be determined. Extensive high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR experiments allowed the characterization of the new CDA-resins and enabled the study of their stability and regioselectivity.

  11. Selective concentration of aromatic bases from water with a resin adsorbent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuber, H.A.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Aromatic bases are concentrated from water on columns of a resin adsorbent and recovered by aqueous-acid elution. The degree of concentration attainable depends on the ratio of the capacity factor (k) of the neutral form of the amine to that of the ionized form. Capacity factors of ionic forms of amines on XAD-8 resin (a methylacrylic ester polymer) are greater than zero, ranging from 20 to 250 times lower than those of their neutral forms; they increase with increasing hydrophobicity of the amine. Thus, desorption by acid is an edition (k during desorption >0) rather than a displacement (k during desorption = 0) process. The degree of concentration attainable on XAD-8 resin varies with the hydrophobicity of the amine, being limited for hydrophilic solutes (for example, pyridine) by small neutral-form k's, reaching a maximum for amines of intermediate hydrophobicity (for example, quinoline), and decreasing for more hydrophobc solutes (for example, acridine) because of their large ionic-form k's.

  12. Cubé resin insecticide: identification and biological activity of 29 rotenoid constituents.

    PubMed

    Fang, N; Casida, J E

    1999-05-01

    Cubé resin, the root extract from Lonchocarpus utilis and urucu, is an important insecticide, acaricide, and piscicide. The four major active ingredients are rotenone, deguelin, rotenolone, and tephrosin, totaling 77 wt %. As a commercial pesticide, the minor constituents are also of chemical interest and toxicological relevance. This study identifies 25 minor rotenoids in cubé resin "brittle" of which 12 are new compounds, the most unusual being 7'-chloro-5'-hydroxy-4',5'-dihydrodeguelin (the first chlororotenoid from a plant extract) and four isomers of 4',5'-dihydro-4', 5'-dihydroxytephrosin. Several of the minor rotenoids may be decomposition products from free radical processes during sample preparation, extraction with trichloroethylene, and processing the resin. Assays of the 29 rotenoids as inhibitors of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity (primary target for toxicity) and phorbol ester-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity (indicator of cancer chemopreventive action) and for cytotoxicity establish similar structure-activity relationships in each system and the importance of the overall molecular conformation and the E-ring substituents.

  13. Expanding the modular ester fermentative pathways for combinatorial biosynthesis of esters from volatile organic acids.

    PubMed

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic acids are byproducts of fermentative metabolism, for example, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass or organic wastes, and are often times undesired inhibiting cell growth and reducing directed formation of the desired products. Here, we devised a general framework for upgrading these volatile organic acids to high-value esters that can be used as flavors, fragrances, solvents, and biofuels. This framework employs the acid-to-ester modules, consisting of an AAT (alcohol acyltransferase) plus ACT (acyl CoA transferase) submodule and an alcohol submodule, for co-fermentation of sugars and organic acids to acyl CoAs and alcohols to form a combinatorial library of esters. By assembling these modules with the engineered Escherichia coli modular chassis cell, we developed microbial manufacturing platforms to perform the following functions: (i) rapid in vivo screening of novel AATs for their catalytic activities; (ii) expanding combinatorial biosynthesis of unique fermentative esters; and (iii) upgrading volatile organic acids to esters using single or mixed cell cultures. To demonstrate this framework, we screened for a set of five unique and divergent AATs from multiple species, and were able to determine their novel activities as well as produce a library of 12 out of the 13 expected esters from co-fermentation of sugars and (C2-C6) volatile organic acids. We envision the developed framework to be valuable for in vivo characterization of a repertoire of not-well-characterized natural AATs, expanding the combinatorial biosynthesis of fermentative esters, and upgrading volatile organic acids to high-value esters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1764-1776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reactive and Nonreactive Binders in Glass/Vinyl Ester Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    composite molding processes such as vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ), resin transfer molding ( RTM ), and the Seeman composite resin...Composite Fabrication Composite laminates were manufactured from the preforms using a VARTM technique. Preforms consisted of 8 plies of reinforcement

  15. Triterpene hexahydroxydiphenoyl esters and a quinic acid purpurogallin carbonyl ester from the leaves of Castanopsis fissa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Lin; Tsujita, Takaaki; Tanaka, Takashi; Matsuo, Yosuke; Kouno, Isao; Li, Dian-Peng; Nonaka, Gen-ichiro

    2011-11-01

    Triterpene hexahydroxydiphenoyl (HHDP) esters have only been isolated from Castanopsis species, and the distribution of these esters in nature is of chemotaxonomical interest. In this study, the chemical constituents of the leaves of Castanopsis fissa were examined in detail to identify and isolate potential HHDP esters. Together with 53 known compounds, 3,4-di-O-galloyl-1-O-purpurogallin carbonyl quinic acid (1) and 3,24-(S)-HHDP-2α,3β,23,24-tetrahydroxytaraxastan-28,20β-olide (2) were isolated and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical methods. The polyphenols of the leaves were mainly composed of galloyl quinic acids, triterpenes HHDP esters, ellagitannins and flavonol glycosides. In particular, the isolation yields of 1,3,4-trigalloyl quinic acid and compound 2 were 1.53% and 0.27%, respectively, from the fresh leaves. The presence of lipid soluble HHDP esters of oleanane-type triterpenes as one of the major metabolites is an important chemotaxonomical discovery. Lipase inhibition activities and ORAC values of the major constituents were compared. The triterpene HHDP ester showed moderate lipase inhibition activity and myricitrin gave the largest ORAC value.

  16. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of phosphonate ester and phosphonic acid containing polymers and blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamber, Harinder Singh

    1997-12-01

    Vinylbenzylphosphonate ester (VBP) was homopolymerized and copolymerized with methyl methacrylate and the reactivity ratio of this pair of monomers was calculated from Finneman-Ross and Kelen-Tudos methods. These methods provided identical values, which are rsb1 (VBP) = 1.23 and rsb2(MMA) = 0.43. The phosphonate ester group, -P = O(OEt)sb2; in VBP and poly(VBP-MMA) copolymers was hydrolysed to phosphonic acid, -P = O(OH)sb2; at room temperature to obtain vinylbenzylphosphonic acid (VBPa) and poly(VBPa-MMA) copolymers. sp1H, sp{13}C & sp{31}P NMR spectroscopy, DSC and FTIR were used to monitor the hydrolysis of these phosphorylated monomers and polymers. The glass transition temperature of PVBP was 13sp°C as compared to 198sp°C of PVBPa. The phosphoryl group in the parent polymers acts as a self plasticizing agent resulting in lower glass transition temperature, on the other hand inter and intra hydrogen bonding results in broad and high Tsbg in these hydrolysed polymers. VBP was also polymerized with BisGMA or TEGDM to low conversions. These oligomers were tested in vitro as potential adhesive materials for dental/enamel and composite resins. The phosphonate esters containing polymers show substantial capacity to dissolve the heavy metal salts, e.g., UOsb2(NO)sb3.6Hsb2O and thus provides radiopaque polymers. Excessive sorption of water lead to phase separation and, hence, loss of radiopacity. Thus, an alternate method of synthesis of radiopaque polymers is also described in which radiopacifying agent is covalently linked to polymer backbone. Styryldiphenylbismuth was prepared by the reaction of diphenylbismuthchloride and Grignard of p-bromostyrene, but some other by-products such as triphenylbismuth, distyrylphenyl bismoth were also obtained as revealed by reverse phase HPLC and the yield of the reaction was low. Iodinated monomers VBTIsb3 and IEMIsb3 were prepared by reacting VBC or IEM to triiodophenol in high yields. Decomposition kinetic analysis was done by

  18. Bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a chairside autopolymerizing reline resin to injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four kinds of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, a polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and a polycarbonate) and PMMA, as a control, were tested. The eight types of surface treatment: ((1) no treatment, (2) air abrasion, (3) dichloromethane, (4) ethyl acetate, (5) 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (6) air abrasion and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin, (7) tribochemical silica coating, and (8) tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin) were applied to each specimen. The chairside autopolymerizing reline resins were bonded to disks of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. All of the specimens were immersed in water for 4 months and then thermocycled for 10,000 cycles in water between 5 and 55°C. The shear bond strengths were determined. The shear bond strengths of the two polyamides treated using air abrasion, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate and no treatment were exceedingly low. The greatest bond strength was recorded for the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer specimens treated with tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin (22.5MPa). The bond strengths of the other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins increased using 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Tribochemical silica coating and 4-META/MMA-TBB resin were the most effective surface treatments among all denture base resins tested. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Color difference of composite resins after cementation with different shades of resin luting cement.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Karakaya, Izgen; Aktore, Huseyin

    2017-07-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color difference of nanohybrid and ormocer-based composite resins with different thicknesses when 4 different shades of resin luting cement were used. 56 disc specimens of each composite resin (Aelite aesthetic enamel, Ceram-X mono) with 0.5 and 1 mm thicknesses were fabricated. Baseline color measurements were performed using a clinical spectrophotometer. The specimens of each thicknesses of each resin were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the shades of resin luting cement (white/A1, yellow/universal/A3, transparent and white opaque) (n = 7). Mixed resin cement was applied onto the resin specimens using a Teflon mold in 0.1 mm thickness. Color measurements of cemented composite resin specimens were repeated and color difference (∆E) between baseline and after cementation measurements was calculated. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis. The opaque shade had significantly increased ∆E values as compared to the other shades (p < 0.05). For all shades except white opaque in both thicknesses, ∆E values of aelite aesthetic enamel were higher as compared to Ceram-X mono. There is no significant difference between 2 thicknesses for both resins in terms of ∆E values. The shade of resin cement and the type of the resin affected the final color; however, the thickness of composite resin had no influence on the final color of restoration. Selecting the shade of resin luting cement before cementation of indirect composite laminate restoration is important to achieve final color match.

  20. Two cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis from a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin in a neat oil: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Charlotte D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2003-01-01

    Background Metal-working fluids contain complex mixtures of chemicals and metal workers constitute a potential risk group for the development of allergic contact dermatitis. Case presentation Two metal workers developed allergic contact dermatitis on the hands and lower arms from exposure to a neat oil used in metal processing. Patch testing revealed that the relevant contact allergen was a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin, 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, bis(oxiranylmethyl) ester, added to the oil as a stabilizer. None of the patients had positive reactions to the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin in the standard series. Conclusions These cases emphasize that well-known contact allergens may show up from unexpected sources of exposure. Further, it can be a long-lasting, laborious process to detect an occupational contact allergen and cooperation from the patient and the manufacturer of the sensitizing product is essential. PMID:12685935

  1. Fatty and resin acid analysis in tall oil products via supercritical fluid extraction-supercritical fluid reaction using enzymatic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S L; King, J W

    2001-07-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is combined with supercritical fluid reaction (SFR) in an analytical mode to assess tall oil products for their fatty or resin acid content or both. The SFR consists of an inline enzymatically catalyzed reaction in which a lipase transesterifies specific lipids with methanol. The SFE-SFR sequence is conducted employing commercially available extractors using supported lipases in the extraction cell to form methyl esters. In this study, six different commercially available lipases are screened for activity. The SFE-SFR extracts are analyzed by capillary gas chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography and then compared with tall oil products derivatized by conventional chemical derivatization techniques.

  2. Light transmission on dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, G B; Alto, R V Monte; Filho, H R Sampaio; da Silva, E M; Fellows, C E

    2008-05-01

    The purposes of this study was: (1) to examine the light transmittance characteristics of two light-cured resin composites, for different thickness, (2) to correlate the light transmittance through the resin composites and the filler contents, and (3) to determine the penetration depth of the light as a function of the wavelength. Two resin composites (Filtek Z250, shade A2 and Filtek Supreme XT, shade A2E) were used. Specimens of six different thicknesses (0.15, 0.25, 0.30, 0.36, 0.47 and 0.75 mm) were prepared (n=3). The transmittance at wavelengths from 400 to 800 nm was measured using a UV-visible spectrophotometer, before and after light polymerization. Significant differences were found in the wavelength dependence of transmittance between the two materials, and between the unpolymerized and polymerized stages of each resin composite. At lower wavelengths, the light transmittance of the Filtek Supreme XT resin composite was lower than the Filtek Z250. At the higher wavelengths, however, Filtek Supreme XT presented higher light transmittance. For both resin composites, the penetration depth was higher after polymerization. However, Filtek Supreme XT showed a higher gain in transmittance at the 0.15 mm thickness. The difference in light transmittance characteristics of the resin composites may affect their depth of polymerization.

  3. Restorative resins: abrasion vs. mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K D

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to examine whether it is possible by simple and reliable laboratory tests to evaluate the abrasion by food of Class 1 restorative resins. The results point to the following main conclusions: for the smooth-surface resins, i.e. the micro-filled composite and the unfilled resins, the Wallace hardness test appears to be a valid parameter for abrasion; the greater the depth of penetration of the Vickers diamond of this apparatus, the more severe abrasion is to be expected. The mode of abrasion in this type of resin is scratching. Porosity in the resins strongly enhances the abrasion. For the rough-surface resins, i.e. the conventional composites, a dual effect of the filler particles was concluded. The filler particles on the one hand protect the matrix against abrasion, but cause, on the other hand, in time an increase of the surface roughness of the composite and thereby via increased friction an increase of the abrasion. Considerations on possible ways to improve the present-day restorative resins are presented. It is stressed that the results obtained refer only to abrasion of Class 1 fillings by food.

  4. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be...) Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins are produced by the polymerization of acrylamide with partial hydrolysis or by...

  5. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Polyester resin kits consisting of a base material component (Class 3, Packing..., according to the criteria for Class 3, applied to the base material. Additionally, polyester resin kits...

  6. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base... resin kits consisting of a base material component (Class 3, Packing Group II or III) and an...

  7. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Polyester resin kits consisting of a base material component (Class 3, Packing..., according to the criteria for Class 3, applied to the base material. Additionally, polyester resin kits...

  8. Traumatic resin ducts as indicators of bark beetle outbreaks

    Treesearch

    R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) represents an important induced defense in woody plants that enhances oleoresin production and flow in response to environmental perturbations. In some genera (Pinus), resin ducts are copious and conspicuous; however, in others (Picea), resin ducts are relatively rare. The occurrence and strength of resin ducts, in...

  9. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Treesearch

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  10. Continuous biodiesel production in a fixed bed reactor packed with anion-exchange resin as heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanbiao; He, Benqiao; Yan, Feng; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Yu; Lin, Ligang; Feng, Yaohui; Li, Jianxin

    2012-06-01

    A continuous biodiesel production from the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol was investigated in a fixed bed reactor packed with D261 anion-exchange resin as a heterogeneous catalyst. The conversion to biodiesel achieved 95.2% within a residence time 56 min under the conditions: reaction temperature of 323.15K, n-hexane/soybean oil weight rate of 0.5, methanol/soybean oil molar ratio of 9:1 and feed flow rate of 1.2 ml/min. The resin can be regenerated in-situ and restored to the original activity to achieve continuous production after the resin deactivation. The product obtained was mainly composed of methyl esters. No glycerol in the product was detected due to the resin adsorbing glycerol in the fixed bed, which solved the issue of glycerol separation from biodiesel. It is believed that the fixed bed reactor with D261 has a potential commercial application in the transesterification of triglyceride. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Flavor-active esters: adding fruitiness to beer.

    PubMed

    Verstrepen, Kevin J; Derdelinckx, Guy; Dufour, Jean-Pierre; Winderickx, Joris; Thevelein, Johan M; Pretorius, Isak S; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2003-01-01

    As they are responsible for the fruity character of fermented beverages, volatile esters constitute an important group of aromatic compounds in beer. In modern high-gravity fermentations, which are performed in tall cylindroconical vessels, the beer ester balance is often sub-optimal, resulting in a clear decrease in beer quality. Despite the intensive research aimed at unravelling the precise mechanism and regulation of ester synthesis, our current knowledge remains far from complete. However, a number of factors that influence flavor-active ester production have already been described, including wort composition, wort aeration and fermentor design. A thoughtful adaptation of these parameters allows brewers to steer ester concentrations and thus to control the fruity character of their beers. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the biochemistry behind yeast ester synthesis and discusses the different factors that allow ester formation to be controlled during brewery fermentation.

  12. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  13. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  14. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  15. Toughening vinyl ester matrix composites by tailoring nanoscale and mesoscale interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinette, Eric Jason

    Elastomer modification of epoxy resins has shown a great deal of success for increasing fracture toughness. There are inherent characteristics of vinyl esters (VEs), however, that make them less conducive for elastomer toughening. Therefore, the first objective of this work was to identify these characteristics. The next objective of this work was to develop a toughening method that circumvents obstacles associated with rubber toughening. We proposed that by imbedding electrospun micro- and nano-fibers as toughening composite interlayers, we could avoid the dependence of the initial compatibility of the modifier and cure behavior of the VE. As was found with rubber modified VEs, the diffusion of styrene into the electrospun fibers was observed, resulting in void formation around the fibers and reduced resin and composite properties. The final objective of this work involved designing the interface between the electrospun fibers and VE to mitigate this problem. We investigated the effects of a reactive and non-reactive "shell" to distinguish which mechanism, a cross linked or reactive interface, limits styrene diffusion. It was found that styrene was able to permeate the non-reactive cross linked polysiloxane. However, the reactive interface provided a chemical link between the two phases that did not allow for void formation. The final part of this work entailed evaluating the effects on composite properties of surface modified PS electrospun fiber mats used as interlayers in carbon fiber composites. The interlayer toughened composites were compared to rubber toughened composites. The resins and composites containing fibers with surface treatments yielded the worst properties. The most significant losses included flexural and shear properties. The rubber toughened composite experiences a crack-tip blunting and increased stress concentration zones during delamination. The interlayer composite proved to increase the surface area of fracture during delamination by

  16. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use.

  17. Improved microbial-check-valve resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Improved microbial-check-valve resins have been tested for their microbicidal effectiveness and long-term stability. Resins give more-stable iodine concentrations than previous preparations and do not impart objectionable odor or taste to treated water. Microbial check valve is small cylindrical device, packed with iodide-saturated resin, that is installed in water line where contamination by micro-organisms is to be prevented. Prototype microbial check valve was tested for stability and performance under harsh environmental conditions. Effectiveness was 100 percent at 35 deg, 70 deg, and 160 deg F (2 deg, 21 deg, and 71 deg C).

  18. Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

  19. Improved microbial-check-valve resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Improved microbial-check-valve resins have been tested for their microbicidal effectiveness and long-term stability. Resins give more-stable iodine concentrations than previous preparations and do not impart objectionable odor or taste to treated water. Microbial check valve is small cylindrical device, packed with iodide-saturated resin, that is installed in water line where contamination by micro-organisms is to be prevented. Prototype microbial check valve was tested for stability and performance under harsh environmental conditions. Effectiveness was 100 percent at 35 deg, 70 deg, and 160 deg F (2 deg, 21 deg, and 71 deg C).

  20. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.