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Sample records for bivalent hpv vaccine

  1. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  2. Safety of the HPV Bivalent and Quadrivalent Vaccines During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Forinash, Alicia B; Yancey, Abigail M; Pitlick, Jamie M; Myles, Thomas D

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the safety of the human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in pregnancy. PubMed (1966-August 2010) was searched using the terms human papillomavirus, human papillomavirus vaccine, and pregnancy. References were reviewed for relevant information. All studies including humans that were published in English with data describing HPV vaccine administration in pregnancy were evaluated. Two combined analyses of 7 Phase 3 efficacy trials have retrospectively evaluated the safety of unintentional administration of either the bivalent (n = 1786) or quadrivalent (n = 2085) HPV vaccine during pregnancy. In addition, postmarketing pregnancy registry surveillance data (prospective, n = 787; retrospective, n = 76) for the quadrivalent HPV vaccine have been published. However, only 279 pregnancies from the studies and 90 pregnancies from the registry occurred within 30 days of receiving the vaccination. Overall, the vaccine does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion, fetal malformations, or adverse pregnancy outcomes beyond that found in the general population. Although the data are limited, neither HPV vaccine appears to be associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, limitations of the data include small patient populations, minimal to no adjustments for factors known to influence pregnancy outcomes or malformations, and the majority of the available pregnancy data are from retrospective analysis of Phase 3 efficacy trials. Neither HPV vaccine should be routinely administered during pregnancy. If a pregnancy occurs midseries, the remaining vaccines should be given after pregnancy completion. Further studies are required to determine actual risk. © 2011 SAGE Publications.

  3. Cross-protective vaccine efficacy of the bivalent HPV vaccine against HPV31 is associated with humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J.; Pan, David Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Cortes, Bernal; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiller, John T.; Gonzalez, Paula; Penrose, Kerri; Lowy, Douglas R.; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: We investigated the role of antibody responses as potential mechanism for the cross-protective vaccine-efficacies (VE) observed from randomized clinical trials of the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine. Results: HPV31 cases had lower HPV16 antibody levels than controls (OR4th quartile compared with 1st quartile = 0.63; 95%CI: 0.36–1.08; p-trend = 0.03). HPV31 cases were also less likely to have detectable HPV31 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity than controls. No statistically significant differences by HPV18 antibody or HPV45 neutralization were observed among HPV45 cases and controls. Protection against HPV58 was not associated with any of the markers, confirming the specificity of our findings. Methods: Samples are from three-dose HPV vaccine recipients from the Costa Rica HPV16/18 vaccine trial. Women with a new HPV31, HPV45, or HPV58 infections over four years of follow-up were compared with randomly selected control women—with no new infection with HPV31/45/58—with respect to HPV16 and HPV18 antibody, HPV31, HPV45, and HPV58 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity. Conclusions: High HPV16 levels and avidity, and the ability to neutralize HPV31 were associated with protection against newly detected HPV31 infections, suggesting that the partial VE demonstrated for HPV31 is likely to be mediated at least in part through antibodies induced by HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:23571174

  4. Cross-protective vaccine efficacy of the bivalent HPV vaccine against HPV31 is associated with humoral immune responses: results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J; Pan, David Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Cortes, Bernal; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiller, John T; Gonzalez, Paula; Penrose, Kerri; Lowy, Douglas R; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the role of antibody responses as potential mechanism for the cross-protective vaccine-efficacies (VE) observed from randomized clinical trials of the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine. Results HPV31 cases had lower HPV16 antibody levels than controls (OR 4th quartile compared with 1st quartile = 0.63; 95%CI: 0.36-1.08; p-trend = 0.03). HPV31 cases were also less likely to have detectable HPV31 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity than controls. No statistically significant differences by HPV18 antibody or HPV45 neutralization were observed among HPV45 cases and controls. Protection against HPV58 was not associated with any of the markers, confirming the specificity of our findings. Samples are from three-dose HPV vaccine recipients from the Costa Rica HPV16/18 vaccine trial. Women with a new HPV31, HPV45, or HPV58 infections over four years of follow-up were compared with randomly selected control women--with no new infection with HPV31/45/58--with respect to HPV16 and HPV18 antibody, HPV31, HPV45, and HPV58 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity. High HPV16 levels and avidity, and the ability to neutralize HPV31 were associated with protection against newly detected HPV31 infections, suggesting that the partial VE demonstrated for HPV31 is likely to be mediated at least in part through antibodies induced by HPV16/18 vaccination.

  5. Impact of partial bivalent HPV vaccination on vaccine-type infection: a population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuschieri, K; Kavanagh, K; Moore, C; Bhatia, R; Love, J; Pollock, K G

    2016-05-24

    Data on the effectiveness of one dose of HPV vaccine are lacking, particularly in population-based settings. Data from a national HPV immunisation catch-up programme of 14-18-year-old girls were used to assess the effectiveness of<3 doses of the bivalent vaccine on vaccine-type and cross-reactive-type HPV infection. Cervical samples from women attending for their first cervical smear, which had been genotyped for HPV as part of a longitudinal HPV surveillance programme were linked to immunisation records to establish the number of vaccine doses (0, 1, 2 and 3) administered. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) adjusted for deprivation and age at first dose, was assessed for prevalent HPV 16/18 and HPV 31/33/45 infection. VE for prevalent HPV 16/18 infection associated with 1, 2 and 3 doses was 48.2% (95% CI 16.8, 68.9), 54.8% (95% CI 30.7, 70.8) and 72.8% (95% CI 62.8, 80.3). Equivalent VE for prevalent HPV 31/33/45 infection was -1.62% (95% CI -85.1, 45.3), 48.3% (95% CI 7.6, 71.8) and 55.2% (95% CI 32.6, 70.2). Consistent with recent aggregated trial data, we demonstrate the potential effectiveness of even one dose of HPV vaccine on vaccine-type infection. Given that these women were immunised as part of a catch-up campaign, the VE observed in this study is likely to be an underestimate of what will occur in girls vaccinated at younger ages. Further population-based studies which look at the clinical efficacy of one-dose schedules are warranted.

  6. Immunogenicity of bivalent HPV vaccine among partially vaccinated young adolescent girls in Uganda.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, D Scott; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Pan, Yuanji; Kumakech, Edward; Ssemaganda, Aloysius; Kemp, Troy J; Cover, Jane; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-10-29

    Investigations of vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity for adult females receiving fewer than three doses of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have suggested protection against infection and precancerous lesions. We investigated the immunogenicity of bivalent HPV vaccines among adolescent girls from Uganda who received one, two, or three vaccine doses. Young girls vaccinated through a government program in Uganda were invited to participate. HPV16- and HPV18-specific antibodies were measured at ≥24 months after the last vaccine dose using an enzyme linked immunoassay in girls who received one (n=36), two (n=145), or three (n=195) doses. Nearly all subjects (99%) were HPV16 and HPV18 seropositive at the time of blood-draw. Geometric mean antibody levels (GMTs) were: HPV16₁-dose=230 EU/mL, HPV16₂-dose=808 EU/mL, and HPV16₃-dose=1607 EU/mL; HPV18₁-dose=87 EU/mL, HPV18₂-dose=270 EU/mL, and HPV18₃-dose=296 EU/mL. The GMT ratio for 2:3 doses was 0.50 (HPV16) and 0.68 (HPV18) and did not meet the non-inferiority criteria (i.e., lower bound of 97.5% confidence interval of the GMT ratio greater than 0.50). The GMT ratio for 1:3 doses for HPV16 and HPV18 was inferior, but absolute GMTs for one dose were higher than adult women who received one dose (HPV16=124 EU/mL, HPV18=69 EU/mL) where efficacy has been demonstrated. Even though immunogenicity with less than three doses did not meet a priori non-inferiority thresholds, antibody levels measured ≥24 months after last dose were similar to those of adult women who have been followed for more than eight years for efficacy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The Health Technology Assessment of bivalent HPV vaccine Cervarix in Italy.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Giuseppe; de Waure, Chiara; Chiaradia, Giacomina; Mannocci, Alice; Capri, Stefano; Ricciardi, Walter

    2010-04-26

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) approach was applied to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine in the Italian context. Epidemiology and costs of HPV infection and related diseases, vaccine efficacy, clinical and economic impact of the HPV vaccination and women's knowledge and attitudes towards vaccination were assessed. HPV infections pooled prevalence in Italy was 19% (95%CI: 10-30%) and cervical cancer incidence was 9.8/100,000 per year. The mean costs for in situ and invasive carcinoma hospitalisation were estimated respectively in euro1745.87 and euro2616.16. HPV vaccines have demonstrated high efficacy and good safety profile. The meta-analysis on efficacy results in preventing persistent cervical infections by HPV16 and 18 for both HPV vaccines resulted in 87% (95%CI: 80-91%) and 78% (95%CI: 62-87%). Modelling the impact of vaccination with bivalent vaccine, it would reduce cancer cases by 67% and be cost-effective, with a cost per Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) gained of euro22,055. The thoroughness of the evaluation allowed us accounting for all the aspects of HPV infection/diseases. The HTA report on the HPV vaccine demonstrated to be a comprehensive tool for an informed decision making process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D.; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background. Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. Methods. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage–specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for <2 years. For efficiency, incident infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. Results. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were −7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], −33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%–97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Conclusions. Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. PMID:26518044

  9. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections.

    PubMed

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-03-15

    Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage-specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for <2 years. For efficiency, incident infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were -7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], -33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%-97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A cost-utility analysis of adding a bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccine to the Irish cervical screening programme.

    PubMed

    Dee, Anne; Howell, Fenton

    2010-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and in Ireland it is the ninth most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Almost 100% of these cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Two newly developed vaccines against HPV infection have become available. This study is a cost-utility analysis of the HPV vaccine in Ireland, and it compares the cost-effectiveness profiles of the two vaccines. A cost-utility analysis of the HPV vaccine in Ireland was performed using a Markov model. A cohort of screened and vaccinated women was compared with an unvaccinated screened cohort, and both cohorts were followed over their lifetimes. The model looked at uptake of services related to HPV disease in both cohorts. Outcomes were measured in quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Extensive sensitivity analysis was done. For the base case analysis, the model showed that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for quadrivalent HPV vaccination would be 25,349 euros/QALY and 30,460 euros/QALY for the bivalent vaccine. The ICER for the quadrivalent vaccine ranged from 2877 euros to 36,548 euros, and for the bivalent from 3399 euros to 45,237 euros. At current prices, the bivalent vaccine would need to be 22% cheaper than the quadrivalent vaccine in order to have equivalent cost effectiveness. HPV vaccination has the potential to be very cost effective in Ireland. The quadrivalent vaccine is more cost effective than the bivalent vaccine.

  11. Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, K; Pollock, K G J; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M

    2014-05-27

    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 12-13 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 12-13 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%. To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV. From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated. This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake.

  12. Introduction and sustained high coverage of the HPV bivalent vaccine leads to a reduction in prevalence of HPV 16/18 and closely related HPV types

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, K; Pollock, K G J; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Donaghy, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme began in Scotland for 12–13 year old females with a three-year catch-up campaign for those under the age of 18. Since 2008, three-dose uptake of bivalent vaccine in the routine cohort aged 12–13 has exceeded 90% annually, while in the catch-up cohort overall uptake is 66%. Methods: To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation, a programme of national surveillance was established (pre and post introduction) which included yearly sampling and HPV genotyping of women attending for cervical screening at age 20. By linking individual vaccination, screening and HPV testing records, we aim to determine the impact of the immunisation programme on circulating type-specific HPV infection particularly for four outcomes: (i) the vaccine types HPV 16 or 18 (ii) types considered to be associated with cross-protection: HPV 31, 33 or 45; (iii) all other high-risk types and (iv) any HPV. Results: From a total of 4679 samples tested, we demonstrate that three doses (n=1100) of bivalent vaccine are associated with a significant reduction in prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 from 29.8% (95% confidence interval 28.3, 31.3%) to 13.6% (95% confidence interval 11.7, 15.8%). The data also suggest cross-protection against HPV 31, 33 and 45. HPV 51 and 56 emerged as the most prevalent (10.5% and 9.6%, respectively) non-vaccine high-risk types in those vaccinated, but at lower rates than HPV 16 (25.9%) in those unvaccinated. Conclusions: This data demonstrate the positive impact of bivalent vaccination on the prevalence of HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 in the target population and is encouraging for countries which have achieved high-vaccine uptake. PMID:24736582

  13. FDA licensure of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2, Cervarix) for use in females and updated HPV vaccination recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    2010-05-28

    On October 16, 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV2; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline) for use in females aged 10 through 25 years. Cervarix is the second human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine licensed for use in females in the United States. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4; Gardasil, Merck & Co, Inc.) was licensed in 2006 for use in females aged 9 through 26 years, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended routine HPV4 vaccination of females aged 11 or 12 years, and catch-up vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years. This report provides updated recommendations for routine and catch-up vaccination of females with either HPV2 or HPV4.

  14. Significantly Reduced Genoprevalence of Vaccine-Type HPV-16/18 Infections among Vaccinated Compared to Non-Vaccinated Young Women 5.5 Years after a Bivalent HPV-16/18 Vaccine (Cervarix®) Pilot Project in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Vanja; Wabinga, Henry; Lillsunde-Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela; Kaliff, Malin; Karlsson, Mats; Kirimunda, Samuel; Musubika, Caroline; Andersson, Sören

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and some predictors for vaccine and non-vaccine types of HPV infections among bivalent HPV vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda. This was a comparative cross sectional study 5.5 years after a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccination (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) pilot project in western Uganda. Cervical swabs were collected between July 2014-August 2014 and analyzed with a HPV genotyping test, CLART® HPV2 assay (Genomica, Madrid Spain) which is based on PCR followed by microarray for determination of genotype. Blood samples were also tested for HIV and syphilis infections as well as CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte levels. The age range of the participants was 15–24 years and mean age was 18.6(SD 1.4). Vaccine-type HPV-16/18 strains were significantly less prevalent among vaccinated women compared to non-vaccinated women (0.5% vs 5.6%, p 0.006, OR 95% CI 0.08(0.01–0.64). At type-specific level, significant difference was observed for HPV16 only. Other STIs (HIV/syphilis) were important risk factors for HPV infections including both vaccine types and non-vaccine types. In addition, for non-vaccine HPV types, living in an urban area, having a low BMI, low CD4 count and having had a high number of life time sexual partners were also significant risk factors. Our data concurs with the existing literature from other parts of the world regarding the effectiveness of bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine in reducing the prevalence of HPV infections particularly vaccine HPV- 16/18 strains among vaccinated women. This study reinforces the recommendation to vaccinate young girls before sexual debut and integrate other STI particularly HIV and syphilis interventions into HPV vaccination packages. PMID:27482705

  15. Significantly Reduced Genoprevalence of Vaccine-Type HPV-16/18 Infections among Vaccinated Compared to Non-Vaccinated Young Women 5.5 Years after a Bivalent HPV-16/18 Vaccine (Cervarix®) Pilot Project in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kumakech, Edward; Berggren, Vanja; Wabinga, Henry; Lillsunde-Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela; Kaliff, Malin; Karlsson, Mats; Kirimunda, Samuel; Musubika, Caroline; Andersson, Sören

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and some predictors for vaccine and non-vaccine types of HPV infections among bivalent HPV vaccinated and non-vaccinated young women in Uganda. This was a comparative cross sectional study 5.5 years after a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccination (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) pilot project in western Uganda. Cervical swabs were collected between July 2014-August 2014 and analyzed with a HPV genotyping test, CLART® HPV2 assay (Genomica, Madrid Spain) which is based on PCR followed by microarray for determination of genotype. Blood samples were also tested for HIV and syphilis infections as well as CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte levels. The age range of the participants was 15-24 years and mean age was 18.6(SD 1.4). Vaccine-type HPV-16/18 strains were significantly less prevalent among vaccinated women compared to non-vaccinated women (0.5% vs 5.6%, p 0.006, OR 95% CI 0.08(0.01-0.64). At type-specific level, significant difference was observed for HPV16 only. Other STIs (HIV/syphilis) were important risk factors for HPV infections including both vaccine types and non-vaccine types. In addition, for non-vaccine HPV types, living in an urban area, having a low BMI, low CD4 count and having had a high number of life time sexual partners were also significant risk factors. Our data concurs with the existing literature from other parts of the world regarding the effectiveness of bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine in reducing the prevalence of HPV infections particularly vaccine HPV- 16/18 strains among vaccinated women. This study reinforces the recommendation to vaccinate young girls before sexual debut and integrate other STI particularly HIV and syphilis interventions into HPV vaccination packages.

  16. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; ...

  17. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Toft, Lars; Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Bonde, Jesper; Forslund, Ola; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-03-18

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were <1 international unit (IU) in 87% of study subjects before vaccination but >10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil™ vaccination for >50% of vaccinated females for HPV 31, 35 and 73 and for >50% of Cervarix™-vaccinated females for HPV 31, 33, 35, 45, 56 and 58. Cross-reactivity with non-genital HPV types was also detected. In conclusion, HIV-infected subjects responded to HPV vaccination with induction of neutralizing antibodies against both vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  18. Reduced Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 4 Years after Bivalent HPV Vaccination in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. Methods and Findings A total of 7,466 women 18–25 years old were randomized (1∶1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI = 63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI = 63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE = 0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. Conclusions HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661 PMID:23873171

  19. Reduced prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) 4 years after bivalent HPV vaccination in a randomized clinical trial in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Rolando; Quint, Wim; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Struijk, Linda; Katki, Hormuzd A; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Wacholder, Sholom; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly with type 16, causes a growing fraction of oropharyngeal cancers, whose incidence is increasing, mainly in developed countries. In a double-blind controlled trial conducted to investigate vaccine efficacy (VE) of the bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against cervical infections and lesions, we estimated VE against prevalent oral HPV infections 4 years after vaccination. A total of 7,466 women 18-25 years old were randomized (1∶1) to receive the HPV16/18 vaccine or hepatitis A vaccine as control. At the final blinded 4-year study visit, 5,840 participants provided oral specimens (91·9% of eligible women) to evaluate VE against oral infections. Our primary analysis evaluated prevalent oral HPV infection among all vaccinated women with oral and cervical HPV results. Corresponding VE against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection was calculated for comparison. Oral prevalence of identifiable mucosal HPV was relatively low (1·7%). Approximately four years after vaccination, there were 15 prevalent HPV16/18 infections in the control group and one in the vaccine group, for an estimated VE of 93·3% (95% CI = 63% to 100%). Corresponding efficacy against prevalent cervical HPV16/18 infection for the same cohort at the same visit was 72·0% (95% CI = 63% to 79%) (p versus oral VE = 0·04). There was no statistically significant protection against other oral HPV infections, though power was limited for these analyses. HPV prevalence four years after vaccination with the ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine was much lower among women in the vaccine arm compared to the control arm, suggesting that the vaccine affords strong protection against oral HPV16/18 infection, with potentially important implications for prevention of increasingly common HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer. ClinicalTrials.gov, Registry number NCT00128661.

  20. Cervarix®: a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, with cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, Anne

    2012-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide and often affects women under 40 years of age with young families. Vaccination against HPV is a major advancement, as it offers primary prevention against the infectious agent that is the main cause of the disease. The bivalent AS04-adjuvanted prophylactic HPV vaccine provides high efficacy against disease associated with HPV 16 and 18, as well as significant cross-protection against some HPV types not included in the vaccine. Protection against HPV 45 may be particularly important, as it is relatively more common in adenocarcinoma. The vaccine's antibody response profile suggests a long duration of immunity. Safety data have been reassuring, which is not unexpected, given that the vaccine is composed of virus-like particles, rather than being a live-virus vaccine.

  1. Immunogenicity to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine among adolescent African students exposed to helminths and malaria.

    PubMed

    Nakalembe, Miriam; Banura, Cecily; Namujju, Proscovia Bazanye; Mirembe, Florence Maureen

    2015-02-19

    Efficacious vaccines that prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the recognized cause of cervical cancer, are now available. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, immune-modulating infections such as helminths and malaria may affect immunogenicity to the HPV vaccine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of helminth infections and exposure to malaria on the immune response to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine. AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccinated students between 10 and 16 years of age from western Uganda, at 18 months-post vaccination were followed up for six months. After consent was obtained, demographic data, blood, and stool samples were collected. Multiplex HPV serology technology was used to determine HPV-16/18 antibody levels expressed as median fluorescent intensity (MFI). The malaria antibody immunoassay test was used to detect antibodies to malaria parasites. The Kato-Katz method was used to detect the presence of helminths. HPV-16/18 antibody levels among students exposed to malaria or helminths were compared with those who were not exposed using the Student's t-test. A total of 211 students participated in the study. There was no difference between MFI levels to HPV-16/18 antibodies at 18- and 24-month follow-ups among students who were positive and negative to malaria or helminth exposure. There was an increase in HPV-18 MFI antibody levels at month 24 among the students who were positive for malaria at enrolment (p = 0.05). Immune-modulating parasites (malaria/helminths) were not associated with reduced immune response to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine. The data may support the use of this vaccine in sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. Use of the nonavalent HPV vaccine in individuals previously fully or partially vaccinated with bivalent or quadrivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Bonanni, Paolo; Bosch, F Xavier; Joura, Elmar; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Meijer, Chris J L M; Petry, Karl-Ulrich; Soubeyrand, Benoit; Verstraeten, Thomas; Stanley, Margaret

    2016-02-03

    With the availability of the nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, vaccinees, parents and healthcare providers need guidance on how to complete an immunization course started with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine and whether to revaccinate individuals who have completed a full immunization course with the bi- or quadrivalent vaccine. To answer these questions three parameters should be considered: age at the start of vaccination (9 to 14 years of age versus 15 years and older, the cut-off for 2 or 3 doses schedule), the number of doses already received and the time interval between doses. Based on a number of scenarios, we propose that the 9-valent vaccine can be used to complete an incomplete vaccination regimen or might be added to a previous completed schedule to extend protection. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety and tolerability of bivalent HPV vaccine: an Italian post-licensure study.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Levi, Miriam; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara; Tiscione, Emilia; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Sulaj, Klodiana; Patria, Antonio Giuseppe; Panatto, Donatella

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important scientific discoveries of the last century was that persistent infection by some types of HPV is a precondition for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogenic types of HPV are also associated with other tumours (vaginal, vulvar and anal carcinomas, tumours of the head and neck, urethra and penis). Two preventive vaccines are currently available (Cervarix and Gardasil). Both have shown very good efficacy, safety and tolerability profiles. Nonetheless, extensive vaccination requires long-term monitoring of safety and tolerability. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the bivalent vaccine Cervarix in Italy. Every participant in the study completed a questionnaire after each dose of vaccine received, with a view to recording adverse events during the first 7 days after vaccination. We registered local (pain, redness, swelling) and systemic symptoms (fever, headache, myalgia, fatigue, arthralgia, itching, gastrointestinal disorders, rash and urticaria). A total of 4,643 subjects were recruited. In all, 7,107 questionnaires were collected: 3,064 after the first dose, 2,367 after the second and 1,676 after the third. No serious adverse events were observed. The most frequent local symptom was pain at the injection site, while fatigue, headache and myalgia were the most common systemic reactions. Pain was reported more frequently after the first dose than after the others, while all the other local and general symptoms were reported most frequently after the third dose. Almost all of the local and general reactions proved to be of negligible intensity and duration and required no medical intervention. Our results show better tolerability of the vaccine in comparison with the data from some controlled clinical studies and from other surveillance programmes conducted internationally. That tolerability proved to be better than in clinical studies could be explained by the absence of the typical apprehension felt

  4. Cost-consequences evaluation between bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines in Italy: the potential impact of different cross-protection profiles.

    PubMed

    Capri, S; Gasparini, R; Panatto, D; Demarteau, N

    2011-06-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are currently available: a bivalent HPV-16/18 and a quadrivalent HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. The vaccines may have different sustained- and cross-protection levels against non-vaccine oncogenic HPV-types. This study investigated the potential difference in clinical and economic impacts provided by two HPV vaccines in Italy. A prevalence-based model estimated the potential net difference in HPV-related lesions (abnormal pap smear, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts (GW)) and associated costs generated by the two vaccines. Incidence and treatment costs were obtained from Italian and European sources. Vaccine efficacy rates were based on published data for each vaccine. Lifetime vaccine efficacy was assumed. Results are reported over one year after reaching a steady state. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the lesion incidence, vaccine effectiveness, treatment costs and sustained protection. The bivalent vaccine would prevent an additional reduction of 7976 abnormal pap smears; 601 CIN1; 1826 CIN2/3 and 295 CC cases compared to the quadrivalent vaccine while 25,848 genital wart cases would be prevented by the quadrivalent vaccine. The additional cost averted with the bivalent vaccine was estimated at €2,385,354 per year compared to the quadrivalent vaccine. The most influential parameters were CC- and GW-related costs and the difference in sustained protection. Our model suggests that, in the Italian setting, the bivalent vaccine would prevent more precancerous and CC lesions than the quadrivalent vaccine. This translates into a greater cost averted for the bivalent vaccine, which could completely offset savings in GW-related costs associated with the quadrivalent vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated genotypes induced by the bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Sara L; Godi, Anna; Jit, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2017-07-13

    Human papillomavirus vaccines have demonstrated remarkable efficacy against persistent infection and disease associated with vaccine-incorporated genotypes and a degree of efficacy against some genetically related, non-vaccine-incorporated genotypes. The vaccines differ in the extent of cross-protection against these non-vaccine genotypes. Data supporting the role for neutralizing antibodies as a correlate or surrogate of cross-protection are lacking, as is a robust assessment of the seroconversion rates against these non-vaccine genotypes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of available data on vaccine-induced neutralizing antibody seropositivity to non-vaccine incorporated HPV genotypes. Of 304 articles screened, 9 were included in the analysis representing ca. 700 individuals. The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV31 for the bivalent vaccine (86%; 95%CI 78-91%) was higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (61%; 39-79%; p=0.011). The pooled estimate for seropositivity against HPV45 for the bivalent vaccine (50%; 37-64%) was also higher than that for the quadrivalent vaccine (16%; 6-36%; p=0.007). Seropositivity against HPV33, HPV52 and HPV58 were similar between the vaccines. Mean seropositivity rates across non-vaccine genotypes were positively associated with the corresponding vaccine efficacy data reported from vaccine trials. These data improve our understanding of vaccine-induced functional antibody specificity against non-vaccine incorporated genotypes and may help to parameterize vaccine-impact models and improve patient management in a post-vaccine setting. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Design Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Setting Single center study in Costa Rica. Participants 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Intervention Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Main outcome measure Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Results Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at

  7. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J; Wacholder, Sholom

    2015-09-07

    To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Single center study in Costa Rica. 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at vaccination (relative risk 1.15, one sided P=0.17), age at conception (1.03, P=0

  8. Neutralization of non-vaccine human papillomavirus pseudoviruses from the A7 and A9 species groups by bivalent HPV vaccine sera

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Eve; Bissett, Sara L.; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Edwards, Debbie; Munslow, Graham; Soldan, Kate; Beddows, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are associated with infection by one or more Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types from just two distinct Alpha-Papillomavirus species groups, A7 and A9. The extent to which the current HPV16/18 vaccines will protect against other genetically related HPV types is of interest to inform vaccine implementation, cervical disease surveillance and the development of second generation HPV vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and titer of neutralizing antibodies against a range of A7 (18, 39, 45, 59, 68) and A9 (16, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58) HPV types using sera from individuals immunized with the bivalent HPV vaccine within the school-based, UK national HPV immunization programme. Serum samples were collected from 69 girls aged 13–14 years, a median 5.9 months (inter-quartile range, IQR, 5.7–6.0) after their third vaccine dose. Cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV31, HPV33, HPV35 and HPV45 were common and strongly associated with the titer for the related vaccine-type, but were considerably lower (<1%) than their related vaccine type-specific response. The low prevalence of these HPV types in the population and the ages within the study cohort suggest these responses are due to vaccination. It is unclear whether such low levels of neutralizing antibodies would be sufficient to protect at the site of infection in the absence of other immune effectors but the coincidence with HPV types reported from efficacy studies is intriguing. The utility of neutralizing antibodies as surrogate markers of protection remains to be determined. PMID:21939712

  9. Neutralization of non-vaccine human papillomavirus pseudoviruses from the A7 and A9 species groups by bivalent HPV vaccine sera.

    PubMed

    Draper, Eve; Bissett, Sara L; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Edwards, Debbie; Munslow, Graham; Soldan, Kate; Beddows, Simon

    2011-11-03

    The majority of cervical cancers are associated with infection by one or more Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types from just two distinct Alpha-Papillomavirus species groups, A7 and A9. The extent to which the current HPV16/18 vaccines will protect against other genetically related HPV types is of interest to inform vaccine implementation, cervical disease surveillance and the development of second generation HPV vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and titer of neutralizing antibodies against a range of A7 (18, 39, 45, 59, 68) and A9 (16, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58) HPV types using sera from individuals immunized with the bivalent HPV vaccine within the school-based, UK national HPV immunization programme. Serum samples were collected from 69 girls aged 13-14 years, a median 5.9 months (inter-quartile range, IQR, 5.7-6.0) after their third vaccine dose. Cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV31, HPV33, HPV35 and HPV45 were common and strongly associated with the titer for the related vaccine-type, but were considerably lower (<1%) than their related vaccine type-specific response. The low prevalence of these HPV types in the population and the ages within the study cohort suggest these responses are due to vaccination. It is unclear whether such low levels of neutralizing antibodies would be sufficient to protect at the site of infection in the absence of other immune effectors but the coincidence with HPV types reported from efficacy studies is intriguing. The utility of neutralizing antibodies as surrogate markers of protection remains to be determined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HPV Vaccine KidsHealth > For Teens > HPV Vaccine A A A ... starting at age 9. continue How Does the Vaccine Work? The HPV vaccine is approved for people ...

  11. Reduction of low- and high-grade cervical abnormalities associated with high uptake of the HPV bivalent vaccine in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Pollock, K G J; Kavanagh, K; Potts, A; Love, J; Cuschieri, K; Cubie, H; Robertson, C; Cruickshank, M; Palmer, T J; Nicoll, S; Donaghy, M

    2014-10-28

    In Scotland, a national HPV immunisation programme began in 2008 for 12- to 13-year olds, with a catch-up campaign from 2008 to 2011 for those under the age of 18. To monitor the impact of HPV immunisation on cervical disease at the population level, a programme of national surveillance was established. We analysed colposcopy data from a cohort of women born between 1988 and 1992 who entered the Scottish Cervical Screening Programme (SCSP) and were aged 20-21 in 2008-2012. By linking datasets from the SCSP and colposcopy services, we observed a significant reduction in diagnoses of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN 1; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87; P=0.0008), CIN 2 (RR 0.5, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.63; P<0.0001) and CIN 3 (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.58; P<0.0001) for women who received three doses of vaccine compared with unvaccinated women. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to show a reduction of low- and high-grade CIN associated with high uptake of the HPV bivalent vaccine at the population level. These data are very encouraging for countries that have achieved high HPV vaccine uptake.

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of the bivalent HPV vaccine in female patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a prospective controlled observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Heijstek, Marloes W; Scherpenisse, Mirte; Groot, Noortje; Tacke, Carline; Schepp, Rutger M; Buisman, Anne-Marie; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2014-08-01

    To compare the immunogenicity and safety of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV)16/18 vaccine between female patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and healthy female adolescents. 68 patients and 55 healthy girls aged 12-18 years were included in a prospective controlled observational cohort and were vaccinated at 0, 1 and 6 months. Primary outcomes were immunogenicity expressed as seropositivity rate after three vaccine doses at 7 and 12 months and HPV-specific geometric mean antibody concentrations. Secondary outcomes were HPV16/18-specific memory B cell responses in a subset of participants and safety, defined as adverse events and the effect of vaccination on JIA disease activity. All participants were seropositive for HPV16 and HPV18 at 7 months. One patient turned seronegative at 12 months for HPV16/18. No significant differences were found between patients and controls in HPV-specific antibody concentrations; however, antibody concentrations were consistently lower in patients. No effect of methotrexate on HPV16 antibodies (p=0.79) or HPV18 antibodies (p=0.37) was detected. All patients on anti-TNFα treatment were seropositive after vaccination. The kinetics of HPV16/18 memory B cell responses was comparable between patients and controls, but the magnitude of B cell responses at 7 and 12 months appeared lower in patients. No relevant differences in adverse events were found. HPV vaccination did not aggravate JIA disease. The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine is immunogenic and well tolerated in JIA patients. However, HPV-specific antibodies and B cell responses tended to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls. NCT00815282. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12–13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9–10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0–6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99–100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88–98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93–99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4–1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses. PMID:25714044

  14. The effect of a booster dose of quadrivalent or bivalent HPV vaccine when administered to girls previously vaccinated with two doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; Boulianne, Nicole; De Serres, Gatson; Crajden, Mel; Ouakki, Manale; Trevisan, Andrea; Dionne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, blinded study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of Gardasil (qHPV) or Cervarix (bHPV) when administered to 12-13 year-old girls who were vaccinated at the age of 9-10 with 2 doses of qHPV (0-6 months). 366 out of 416 eligible girls participated in this follow-up study. Antibody titers were measured just before and one month post-booster. A Luminex Total IgG assay was used for antibody assessment and results are presented in Liminex Units (LU). Three years post-primary vaccination, 99-100% of subjects had detectable antibodies to 4HPV genotypes included in the qHPV with GMTs varying from 50 to 322 LU depending on genotype. After a booster dose of qHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to genotypes included in the vaccine was observed in 88-98% of subjects. Post-booster GMTs varied from 1666 to 4536 LU depending on genotype. These GMTs were 1.1 to 1.8-fold higher when compared to those observed one month post-second dose. After a booster of bHPV, a ≥4 fold increase of antibody titers to HPV16 and HPV18 was observed in 93-99% of subjects. The anti-HPV16 and HPV18 GMTs were 5458 and 2665 LU, respectively. These GMTs were 1.2 and 1.8 higher than those observed in the qHPV group (both P < 0.01). In bHPV group a 1.4-1.6-fold increase of antibody GMTs to HPV6 and HPV11was also observed (P < 0.001). The safety profile was acceptable for both vaccines. Both qHPV and bHPV increase antibody titers when given as a booster to girls previously vaccinated with 2 doses of qHPV. The magnitude of the immune response after booster is vaccine-dependent and has the same pattern as that reported after primary vaccination with qHPV or bHPV. When given as a booster, both vaccines have an acceptable safety profile. Longer follow-up studies are warranted to assess the need of booster doses.

  15. Sustained Antibody Responses 6 Years Following 1, 2, or 3 Doses of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine in Adolescent Fijian Girls, and Subsequent Responses to a Single Dose of Bivalent HPV Vaccine: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Toh, Zheng Quan; Russell, Fiona M; Reyburn, Rita; Fong, James; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Ratu, Tupou; Nguyen, Cattram D; Devi, Rachel; Kama, Mike; Matanitobua, Silivia; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Sinha, Rohit; Frazer, Ian; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Kado, Joseph; Rafai, Eric; Mulholland, Edward K; Licciardi, Paul V

    2017-04-01

    The duration of antibody response following reduced human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doses has not been determined. We compared the antibody responses in girls previously vaccinated with zero, 1, 2, or 3 doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV; Gardasil, Merck) 6 years previously. A prospective cohort study was undertaken in 200 Fijian girls 15-19 years of age. Approximately equal numbers of girls from 2 main ethnic groups (Fijians of Indian descent [FID] and Indigenous Fijians [iTaukei]) in Fiji were recruited for each dosage groups. Blood was drawn before and 28 days following a single dose of bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV; Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline). We measured neutralizing antibodies (NAb) against HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 using the pseudovirion-based neutralization assay. After 6 years (before a dose of 2vHPV was given), the geometric mean NAb titers for all 4 HPV types were not statistically different between 2-dose (2D) and 3-dose (3D) recipients: HPV-6 (3D: 2216 [95% confidence interval {CI},1695-2896]; 2D: 1476 [95% CI, 1019-2137]; P = .07), HPV-11 (3D: 4431 [95% CI, 3396-5783]; 2D: 2951 [95% CI, 1984-4390]; P = .09), HPV-16 (3D: 3373 [95% CI, 2511-4530]; 2D: 3275 [95% CI, 2452-4373]; P = .89); HPV-18 (3D: 628 [95% CI: 445-888]; 2D: 606 [95% CI, 462-862]; P = .89), and were higher in FID than iTaukei girls. Although 1-dose recipients had significantly lower NAb titers than 2-/3-dose recipients, their NAb titers were 5- to 30-fold higher than unvaccinated girls. Post-2vHPV NAb titers against HPV-16 and -18 were not statistically different between girls who received 1, 2, or 3 doses of 4vHPV previously. Two doses of 4vHPV provide similar NAb titers as 3 doses for 6 years, although the clinical significance is unknown. A single dose of 4vHPV elicits antibodies that persisted for at least 6 years, and induced immune memory, suggesting possible protection against HPV vaccine types after a single dose of 4vHPV.

  16. Risk of miscarriage with bivalent vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18: pooled analysis of two randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingshu Eric; Wilcox, Allen; Macones, George; Gonzalez, Paula; Befano, Brian; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Herrero, Rolando; Schiffman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess whether vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of miscarriage. Design Pooled analysis of two multicentre, phase three masked randomised controlled trials Setting Multicentre trials in several continents and in Costa Rica. Participants 26 130 women aged 15-25 at enrolment; 3599 pregnancies eligible for analysis. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV 16/18 VLP vaccine with AS04 adjuvant (n=13 075) or hepatitis A vaccine as control (n=13 055) over six months. Main outcome measures Miscarriage and other pregnancy outcomes. Results The estimated rate of miscarriage was 11.5% in pregnancies in women in the HPV arm and 10.2% in the control arm. The one sided P value for the primary analysis was 0.16; thus, overall, there was no significant increase in miscarriage among women assigned to the HPV vaccine arm. In secondary descriptive analyses, miscarriage rates were 14.7% in the HPV vaccine arm and 9.1% in the control arm in pregnancies that began within three months after nearest vaccination. Conclusion There is no evidence overall for an association between HPV vaccination and risk of miscarriage. Trial registration Clinical Trials NCT00128661 and NCT00122681. PMID:20197322

  17. Risk of miscarriage with bivalent vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18: pooled analysis of two randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wacholder, Sholom; Chen, Bingshu Eric; Wilcox, Allen; Macones, George; Gonzalez, Paula; Befano, Brian; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Herrero, Rolando; Schiffman, Mark

    2010-03-02

    To assess whether vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) increases the risk of miscarriage. Pooled analysis of two multicentre, phase three masked randomised controlled trials Multicentre trials in several continents and in Costa Rica. 26 130 women aged 15-25 at enrolment; 3599 pregnancies eligible for analysis. Participants were randomly assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV 16/18 VLP vaccine with AS04 adjuvant (n=13 075) or hepatitis A vaccine as control (n=13 055) over six months. Miscarriage and other pregnancy outcomes. The estimated rate of miscarriage was 11.5% in pregnancies in women in the HPV arm and 10.2% in the control arm. The one sided P value for the primary analysis was 0.16; thus, overall, there was no significant increase in miscarriage among women assigned to the HPV vaccine arm. In secondary descriptive analyses, miscarriage rates were 14.7% in the HPV vaccine arm and 9.1% in the control arm in pregnancies that began within three months after nearest vaccination. There is no evidence overall for an association between HPV vaccination and risk of miscarriage. Clinical Trials NCT00128661 and NCT00122681.

  18. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV 16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Aimée R; González, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-09-01

    Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of about 1·5 per 100,000 women yearly), but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 infections cause most cases of anal cancer. We assessed efficacy of an AS04-adjuvanted HPV 16 and HPV 18 vaccine against anal infection with HPV 16, HPV 18, or both (HPV 16/18). Women from Costa Rica were registered between June 28, 2004, and Dec 21, 2005, in a randomised double-blind controlled trial that was designed to assess vaccine efficacy against persistent cervical HPV 16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions. Eligible women were residents of Guanacaste and selected areas of Puntarenas, Costa Rica, age 18-25 years, in good general health, willing to provide informed consent, and were not pregnant or breastfeeding. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive an HPV vaccine (Cervarix, GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) or a control hepatitis A vaccine (modified preparation of Havrix, GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium). Vaccines were administered in three 0·5 mL doses at enrolment, 1 month, and 6 months. Women, selected at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination, provided anal specimens for assessment of vaccine efficacy against anal HPV 16/18 infection. Prevalence of anal HPV 16/18 infections, reported as vaccine efficacy, was the primary endpoint of the study described here. Vaccine efficacy against cervical HPV 16/18 infection in the same women at the 4-year visit was used as a comparator. Analyses were done in a restricted cohort of women who were negative for both cervical HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA and who were HPV 16 and HPV 18 seronegative before enrolment (HPV naive), and also in the full cohort of women who provided an anal specimen. Investigators were masked to group assignment. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00128661. All women who attended the final blinded study visit and consented to anal specimen collection were included in

  19. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Gonzalèz, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Background Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of ∼1.5 per 100,000 women annually) but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV16) infection causes most cases. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) of an ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection. Methods In a randomized double-blind controlled trial designed to evaluate VE against persistent cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions in Costa Rica, 4210 healthy women underwent anal specimen collection (4224 of 5968= 70.8% of eligible women) at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination to evaluate anal HPV16/18 VE. Cervical HPV16/18 VE among the same women at the same visit was calculated as a comparator. For this ancillary work, analyses were conducted in a restricted cohort of women both cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative and HPV 16/18 seronegative prior at enrollment (N=1989), and in the full cohort (all women with an anal specimen). Findings In the restricted cohort, VE against prevalent HPV16/18 anal infection measured one-time, four-years post-vaccination was 83.6% (95%CI 66.7% to 92.8%), which was comparable to cervical HPV16/18 VE (87.9%, 95%CI 77.4% to 94.0%). In the full cohort, HPV16/18 VE was statistically lower at the anus (62.0%, 95%CI 47.1% to 73.1%) compared to the cervix (76.4%, 95%CI 67.0% to 83.5%) (p for anatomic-site interaction =0.03). Significant and comparable VE estimates against a composite endpoint of HPV31/33/45 (i.e.: cross-protection) was observed at the anus and cervix. Interpretation The ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine affords strong protection against anal HPV, particularly among women more likely to be HPV naïve at vaccination. Funding. The Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial is sponsored and funded by the NCI (contract N01-CP-11005), with funding support from the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, and conducted with support from the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica. Vaccine was

  20. Decline in genital warts diagnoses among young women and young men since the introduction of the bivalent HPV (16/18) vaccination programme in England: an ecological analysis.

    PubMed

    Canvin, M; Sinka, K; Hughes, G; Mesher, D

    2017-03-01

    For several decades, diagnoses of genital warts at genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England had been increasing. In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme was introduced using the bivalent vaccine (types 16 and 18 only). A decrease in genital warts was not anticipated. However, rates of genital warts in GUM clinics have declined significantly since the introduction of the vaccine. Using data from GUM clinics across England, we analysed rates of genital warts by age, gender, sexual orientation and estimated vaccine coverage. The reduction in rates of genital warts diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2009 and 2014 was 30.6% among young women aged 15-19 years and 25.4% among same age heterosexual young men. Overall there was an association showing higher warts reduction with increasing vaccination coverage with the largest declines in warts diagnoses observed in young women aged 15 years (50.9%) with the highest vaccination coverage. No such declines were observed in men who have sex with men (MSM) of the same age. The results of these ecological analyses are strongly in keeping with the bivalent HPV vaccine providing modest protection against genital warts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV) in young women in Britain: Population-based evidence of the effectiveness of the bivalent immunisation programme and burden of quadrivalent and 9-valent vaccine types.

    PubMed

    Tanton, Clare; Mesher, David; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate; Clifton, Soazig; Panwar, Kavita; Field, Nigel; Mercer, Catherine H; Johnson, Anne M; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2017-06-01

    In 2008, the UK introduced an HPV immunisation programme in girls. Population-based prevalence estimates of bivalent (HPV-16/18), quadrivalent (HPV-6/11/16/18) and 9-valent (HPV-6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) vaccine types, and comparison over time, are needed to monitor impact, evaluate effectiveness and guide decision-making on vaccination strategies. The third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) in 2010-12, tested urine for HPV from 2569 sexually-experienced women aged 16-44. We report type-specific HPV prevalence and compare results with 1798 women in Natsal-2 (1999-2001) using age-adjusted prevalence ratios (APR). In Natsal-3, 4.2% of women aged 16-44y were positive for HPV-16/18 and 2.9% for HPV-6/11. In 16-20 year olds, 4.5%, 10.8% and 20.7% had at least one bivalent, quadrivalent or 9-valent vaccine type, respectively. Three-dose vaccine coverage was 52.0% in women aged 18-20y. In this age group, HPV-16/18 prevalence was lower in Natsal-3 than Natsal-2 (5.8% vs 11.2%; APR=0.48[95%CI: 0.24-0.93]), however, prevalences of HPV-6/11, HPV-31/33/45 and HPV-52/58 were unchanged. HPV-16/18 prevalence was also unchanged in women aged 21-44y (APR=0.85[0.61-1.19]). These probability surveys provide evidence of the impact of the bivalent immunisation programme. Reductions were specific to HPV-16/18 and to the age group eligible for vaccination. However, substantial vaccine-preventable HPV remains.

  2. The impact of bivalent HPV vaccine on cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by deprivation in Scotland: reducing the gap.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ross L; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Cameron Watt, D; Robertson, Chris; Cuschieri, Kate; Ahmed, Syed; Pollock, Kevin G

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects women from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. A human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme was introduced in Scotland in 2008 with uptake being lower and inequitable in a catch-up cohort run for the first three years of the programme compared with the routine programme. The socioeconomic differences in vaccine uptake have the potential to further increase the inequality gap in regards to cervical disease. Vaccination status was linked to demographic, cytological and colposcopic data, which are routinely collected by the Scottish HPV surveillance system. Incidence rates and relative risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, 2 and 3 in unvaccinated and vaccinated women were stratified by birth year and deprivation status using Poisson regression. Women who received three doses of HPV vaccine have significantly decreased risk of CIN 1, 2 and 3. Vaccine effectiveness was greater in those women from the most deprived backgrounds against CIN 2 and 3 lesions. Compared with the most deprived, unvaccinated women, the relative risk of CIN 3 in fully vaccinated women in the same deprivation group was 0.29 (95% CI 0.2 to 0.43) compared with 0.62 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.97) in vaccinated women in the least-deprived group. The HPV vaccine is associated with significant reductions in both low-grade and high-grade CIN for all deprivation categories. However, the effect on high-grade disease was most profound in the most-deprived women. These data are welcoming and allay the concern that inequalities in cervical cancer may persist or increase following the introduction of the vaccine in Scotland. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Continuing reductions in HPV 16/18 in a population with high coverage of bivalent HPV vaccination in England: an ongoing cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mesher, David; Panwar, Kavita; Thomas, Sara L; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme in England was introduced in 2008. Monitoring changes in type-specific HPV prevalence allows assessment of the population impact of this vaccination programme. Methods Residual vulva-vaginal swab specimens were collected from young sexually active women (aged 16–24 years) attending for chlamydia screening across England. Specimens were collected between 2010 and 2013 for type-specific HPV-DNA testing. HPV prevalence was compared to a similar survey conducted in 2008 prior to the introduction of HPV vaccination. Results A total of 7321 specimens collected in the postvaccination period, and 2354 specimens from the prevaccination period were included in this analysis. Among the individuals aged 16–18 years, with an estimated vaccination coverage of 67%, the prevalence of HPV16/18 infection decreased from 17.6% in 2008 to 6.1% in the postvaccination period. Within the postvaccination period, there was a trend towards lower HPV16/18 prevalence with higher vaccination coverage and increasing time since vaccine introduction from 8.5% in the period 2–3 years postvaccination to 4.0% in the period 4–5 years postvaccination. The prevalence of HPV31 reduced from 3.7% in the prevaccination period to 0.9% after vaccine introduction, although this no longer reached statistical significance after additional consideration of the uncertainty due to the assay change. Smaller reductions were seen in the individuals aged 19–21 years with lower estimated vaccination coverage, but there was no evidence of a reduction in the older unvaccinated women. Some overall increase in non-vaccine types was seen in the youngest age groups (ORs (95% CI); 1.3 (1.0 to 1.7) and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.0) for individuals aged 16–18 and 19–21 years, respectively, when adjusted for known population changes and the change in assay) although this should be interpreted with caution given the potential unmasking effect

  4. Continuing reductions in HPV 16/18 in a population with high coverage of bivalent HPV vaccination in England: an ongoing cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mesher, David; Panwar, Kavita; Thomas, Sara L; Beddows, Simon; Soldan, Kate

    2016-02-11

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme in England was introduced in 2008. Monitoring changes in type-specific HPV prevalence allows assessment of the population impact of this vaccination programme. Residual vulva-vaginal swab specimens were collected from young sexually active women (aged 16-24 years) attending for chlamydia screening across England. Specimens were collected between 2010 and 2013 for type-specific HPV-DNA testing. HPV prevalence was compared to a similar survey conducted in 2008 prior to the introduction of HPV vaccination. A total of 7321 specimens collected in the postvaccination period, and 2354 specimens from the prevaccination period were included in this analysis. Among the individuals aged 16-18 years, with an estimated vaccination coverage of 67%, the prevalence of HPV16/18 infection decreased from 17.6% in 2008 to 6.1% in the postvaccination period. Within the postvaccination period, there was a trend towards lower HPV16/18 prevalence with higher vaccination coverage and increasing time since vaccine introduction from 8.5% in the period 2-3 years postvaccination to 4.0% in the period 4-5 years postvaccination. The prevalence of HPV31 reduced from 3.7% in the prevaccination period to 0.9% after vaccine introduction, although this no longer reached statistical significance after additional consideration of the uncertainty due to the assay change. Smaller reductions were seen in the individuals aged 19-21 years with lower estimated vaccination coverage, but there was no evidence of a reduction in the older unvaccinated women. Some overall increase in non-vaccine types was seen in the youngest age groups (ORs (95% CI); 1.3 (1.0 to 1.7) and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.0) for individuals aged 16-18 and 19-21 years, respectively, when adjusted for known population changes and the change in assay) although this should be interpreted with caution given the potential unmasking effect. These data demonstrate a reduction in the HPV vaccine types in

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  6. [HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Stronski Huwiler, Susanne; Spaar, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Viruses are associated with genital carcinoma (of the cervix, anus, vulva, vagina and the penis) as well as with non-genital carcinoma (oropharyngeal carcinoma) and genital warts. In Switzerland two highly efficient and safe vaccines are available. The safety of these vaccines has been repeatedly subject of controversial discussions, however so far post marketing surveillance has always been able to confirm the safety. In Switzerland girls and young women have been offered the HPV vaccination within cantonal programmes since 2008. 2015 the recommendation for the HPV-vaccination for boys and young men was issued, and starting July 1, 2016 they as well will be offered vaccination free of charge within the cantonal programmes. This article discusses the burden of disease, efficacy and safety of the vaccines and presents facts which are important for vaccinating these young people. Specifically, aspects of the decisional capacity of adolescents to consent to the vaccination are presented. Finally, the future perspective with a focus on a new vaccine with an enlarged spectrum of HPV-types is discussed.

  7. Proof-of-Principle Evaluation of the Efficacy of Fewer Than Three Doses of a Bivalent HPV16/18 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; González, Paula; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Quint, Wim; Sherman, Mark E.; Schussler, John; Wacholder, Sholom

    2011-01-01

    Background Three-dose regimens for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are expensive and difficult to complete, especially in settings where the need for cervical cancer prevention is greatest. Methods We evaluated the vaccine efficacy of fewer than three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine Cervarix in our Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine and were followed for incident HPV16 or HPV18 infection that persisted in visits that were 10 or more months apart (median follow-up 4.2 years). After excluding women who had no follow-up or who were HPV16 and HPV18 DNA positive at enrollment, 5967 women received three vaccine doses (2957 HPV vaccine vs 3010 control vaccine), 802 received two doses (422 HPV vs 380 control), and 384 received one dose (196 HPV vs 188 control). Reasons for receiving fewer doses and other pre- and post-randomization characteristics were balanced within each dosage group between women receiving the HPV and control vaccines. Results Incident HPV16 or HPV18 infections that persisted for 1 year were unrelated to dosage of the control vaccine. Vaccine efficacy was 80.9% for three doses of the HPV vaccine (95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.1% to 87.7%; 25 and 133 events in the HPV and control arms, respectively), 84.1% for two doses (95% CI = 50.2% to 96.3%; 3 and 17 events), and 100% for one dose (95% CI = 66.5% to 100%; 0 and 10 events). Conclusion Four years after vaccination of women who appeared to be uninfected, this nonrandomized analysis suggests that two doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine, and maybe even one dose, are as protective as three doses. PMID:21908768

  8. Proof-of-principle evaluation of the efficacy of fewer than three doses of a bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kreimer, Aimée R; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; González, Paula; Solomon, Diane; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Quint, Wim; Sherman, Mark E; Schussler, John; Wacholder, Sholom

    2011-10-05

    Three-dose regimens for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are expensive and difficult to complete, especially in settings where the need for cervical cancer prevention is greatest. We evaluated the vaccine efficacy of fewer than three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine Cervarix in our Costa Rica Vaccine Trial. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine and were followed for incident HPV16 or HPV18 infection that persisted in visits that were 10 or more months apart (median follow-up 4.2 years). After excluding women who had no follow-up or who were HPV16 and HPV18 DNA positive at enrollment, 5967 women received three vaccine doses (2957 HPV vaccine vs 3010 control vaccine), 802 received two doses (422 HPV vs. 380 control), and 384 received one dose (196 HPV vs. 188 control). Reasons for receiving fewer doses and other pre- and post-randomization characteristics were balanced within each dosage group between women receiving the HPV and control vaccines. Incident HPV16 or HPV18 infections that persisted for 1 year were unrelated to dosage of the control vaccine. Vaccine efficacy was 80.9% for three doses of the HPV vaccine (95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.1% to 87.7%; 25 and 133 events in the HPV and control arms, respectively), 84.1% for two doses (95% CI = 50.2% to 96.3%; 3 and 17 events), and 100% for one dose (95% CI = 66.5% to 100%; 0 and 10 events). Four years after vaccination of women who appeared to be uninfected, this nonrandomized analysis suggests that two doses of the HPV16/18 vaccine, and maybe even one dose, are as protective as three doses.

  9. The HPV vaccines--which to prefer?

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jacob

    2009-05-01

    This review presents an unbiased comparison between the two vaccines available against human papillomavirus (HPV). We conducted a PUBMED and Google search for the years 1998 to October 2008 using the terms: cervical cancer vaccine, HPV vaccine, Gardasil, and Cervarix; and also reviewed abstracts from international meetings. Both vaccines are intended to protect against cervical cancer and high-grade CIN caused by HPV 16 and HPV 18. Only the quadrivalent vaccine is designed to prevent condylomata acuminata and low-grade CIN caused by HPV 6 and HPV 11. It has been approved by the FDA for women aged 9 to 26 years against vulvar and vaginal cancer, and against cervical cancer and precancer. The adjuvant of the bivalent vaccine more significantly accelerates an immune reaction. Both vaccines demonstrate cross-protection, although against different HPV types. The bivalent vaccine is registered for above age 26 in Australia and Israel, and the quadrivalent vaccine in the Philippines and Ecuador. Time will verify claims and reveal differences. In the meantime, both vaccines are safe and effective for their approved indications and, recommendations should be based on individual patient characteristics. Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians. After completion of this article, the reader should be able to describe the viral targets of the two HPV vaccines, explain the potential benefits of HPV vaccination to patients, and compare the data regarding the two HPV vaccines.

  10. Evaluation of bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine safety and tolerability in a sample of 25 year old Tuscan women.

    PubMed

    Levi, Miriam; Bonanni, Paolo; Burroni, Elena; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara; Sani, Cristina; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Indiani, Laura; Azzari, Chiara; Lippi, Francesca; Carozzi, Francesca

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to gather data on the safety of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvated vaccine among women aged 25, evaluating the frequency and severity of adverse events reported after vaccination and to compare the results obtained with previously published data regarding a sample of Italian preadolescents. Every woman residing in the province of Florence and in the age group targeted by the cervical cancer screening was invited to participate. Participants registered daily, for 14 d post-vaccination, solicited local and systemic reactions, as well as unsolicited adverse events in a developed ad hoc safety diary card. Data were collected in a database in Access and analyzed using STATA 11 SE statistical software. A total of 271 participants were recruited in the study group. All three diary cards were completed and delivered by 186 subjects (85.7% of participants). In all, a total of 616 diary cards were collected: 216 after the 1st dose, 209 after the 2nd dose and 191 after the 3rd dose. No severe symptoms were registered. The most frequently reported adverse reaction proved to be pain at the site of injection (83.4% of doses), followed by local swelling (20.8%) and pyrexia (14.6%). The safety and tolerability of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvated vaccine in this sample of adult women aged 25 did not differ much from that previously observed in a sample of preadolescents Italian girls. Fever and local pain were however more frequently registered in our sample of adult women.

  11. Spotlight on the 9-valent HPV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Starting in 2006, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) has been progressively implemented in most developed countries. Two vaccines have been successfully used, a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-related cancers (bHPV) and a quadrivalent vaccine (qHPV) targeting both HPV-related cancers and genital warts. Between December 2014 and June 2015, a new nonavalent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) was granted marketing authorization in the USA and Europe. The 9vHPV was developed from the qHPV and includes five additional HPV types that should increase the level of protection toward HPV-related cancers. Efficacy and/or immunogenicity of 9vHPV has been assessed in eight clinical studies. The 9vHPV vaccine induced a very robust immune response against all vaccine types, with seroconversion rates close to 100%. The safety profile of 9vHPV is comparable to that of qHPV. Local reactions, especially swelling, have been more frequently reported after 9vHPV than qHPV, and this slightly increases when the 9vHPV is coadministered with other vaccines. The additional coverage offered by the 9vHPV may prevent a significant proportion of HPV-related cancers (variable between 8% and 18%) depending on the local distribution of high-risk HPV types in the population. It is impossible, at present, to anticipate the actual impact of the wide use of the 9vHPV in comparison with the bHPV or the qHPV, since it depends on many variables including duration of protection, potential cross-protection toward nonvaccine types, and herd immunity effect. PMID:28053505

  12. Spotlight on the 9-valent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Starting in 2006, vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) has been progressively implemented in most developed countries. Two vaccines have been successfully used, a bivalent vaccine targeting HPV-related cancers (bHPV) and a quadrivalent vaccine (qHPV) targeting both HPV-related cancers and genital warts. Between December 2014 and June 2015, a new nonavalent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) was granted marketing authorization in the USA and Europe. The 9vHPV was developed from the qHPV and includes five additional HPV types that should increase the level of protection toward HPV-related cancers. Efficacy and/or immunogenicity of 9vHPV has been assessed in eight clinical studies. The 9vHPV vaccine induced a very robust immune response against all vaccine types, with seroconversion rates close to 100%. The safety profile of 9vHPV is comparable to that of qHPV. Local reactions, especially swelling, have been more frequently reported after 9vHPV than qHPV, and this slightly increases when the 9vHPV is coadministered with other vaccines. The additional coverage offered by the 9vHPV may prevent a significant proportion of HPV-related cancers (variable between 8% and 18%) depending on the local distribution of high-risk HPV types in the population. It is impossible, at present, to anticipate the actual impact of the wide use of the 9vHPV in comparison with the bHPV or the qHPV, since it depends on many variables including duration of protection, potential cross-protection toward nonvaccine types, and herd immunity effect.

  13. Characterization of an Escherichia coli-derived human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 bivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Wei, Minxi; Wang, Daning; Li, Zhihai; Xie, Minghui; Pan, Huirong; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-08-16

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of cervical cancer worldwide. Neutralizing HPV prophylactic vaccines offer significant benefit, as they block HPV infection and prevent subsequent disease. However, the three licensed HPV vaccines that cover these two genotypes were produced in eukaryotic cells, which is expensive, particularly for low-income countries where HPV is highest. Here, we report a new HPV16 and -18 bivalent candidate vaccine produced from Escherichia coli. We used two strategies of N-terminal truncation of HPV L1 proteins and soluble non-fusion expression to generate HPV16 and HPV18 L1-only virus-like particles (VLPs) in a scalable process. Through comprehensive characterization of the bivalent candidate vaccine, we confirm lot consistency in a pilot scale-up of 30L, 100L and 500L. Using cryo-EM 3D reconstruction, we found that HPV16 and -18VLPs present in a T=7 icosahedral arrangement, similar in shape and size to that of the native virions. This HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine shares comparable immunogenicity with the licensed vaccines. Overall, we show that the production of a HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine from an E. coli expression system is robust and scalable, with potentially good accessibility worldwide as a population-based immunization strategy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... STDs) . HPV is the virus that causes genital warts . Besides genital warts, an HPV infection can cause these other problems ... or problems. People do not always develop genital warts, but the virus is still in their system ...

  15. Comparing bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines: economic evaluation based on transmission model.

    PubMed

    Jit, Mark; Chapman, Ruth; Hughes, Owain; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2011-09-27

    To compare the effect and cost effectiveness of bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, taking into account differences in licensure indications, protection against non-vaccine type disease, protection against disease related to HPV types 6 and 11, and reported long term immunogenicity. A model of HPV transmission and disease previously used to inform UK vaccination policy, updated with recent evidence and expanded to include scenarios where the two vaccines differ in duration of protection, cross protection, and end points prevented. United Kingdom. Population Males and females aged 12-75 years. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios for both vaccines and additional cost per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective as the bivalent vaccine. The bivalent vaccine needs to be cheaper than the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective, mainly because of its lack of protection against anogenital warts. The price difference per dose ranges from a median of £19 (interquartile range £12-£27) to £35 (£27-£44) across scenarios about vaccine duration, cross protection, and end points prevented (assuming one quality adjusted life year (QALY) is valued at £30,000 and both vaccines can prevent all types of HPV related cancers). The quadrivalent vaccine may have an advantage over the bivalent vaccine in reducing healthcare costs and QALYs lost. The bivalent vaccine may have an advantage in preventing death due to cancer. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the differential benefit of the two vaccines.

  16. Enhancement of humoral and cell mediated immune response to HPV16 L1-derived peptides subsequent to vaccination with prophylactic bivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle vaccine in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Yokomine, Masato; Matsueda, Satoko; Kawano, Kouichiro; Sasada, Tetsuro; Fukui, Akimasa; Yamashita, Takuto; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Tasaki, Kazuto; Matsukuma, Ken; Itoh, Kyogo; Kamura, Toshiharu; Ushijima, Kimio

    2017-04-01

    Currently prophylactic HPV16/18 L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are employed with great success for the prevention of HPV infection. However, limited information is available regarding the immune responses against human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 L1 subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination, primarily due to the lack of widely used assays for immune monitoring. The aim of the present study was to identify HPV16 L1-derived B and T cell epitopes for monitoring the immune responses after HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination in healthy females. The levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgE, IgA and IgM reactive to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were measured by multiplex bead suspension assay. Following detailed B cell epitope mapping, T cell responses specific to HPV16 L1-derived peptides were evaluated by an IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. The levels of IgG, IgM and IgA reactive to 20-mer peptides (PTPSGSMVTSDAQIFNKPYW) at positions 293-312 and 300-319 of HPV16 L1 were significantly increased in the plasma after 2, 7, and 12 months after first vaccination. Detailed epitope mapping identified the amino acid sequence (TSDAQIFNKP) at position 301-310 of HPV16 L1 as an immunogenic B cell epitope. In addition, T cell responses to an HLA-A2- and HLA-A24-restricted epitope (QIFNKPYWL) at position 305-313 of HPV16 L1 were increased following immunization, suggesting that the HPV16/18 L1-VLP vaccination as able to induce specific immune responses in T and B cells simultaneously. The identified B and T cell epitopes may be useful as a biomarker for monitoring the immune responses subsequent to HPV16/18 L1 VLP vaccination. Thus, the present study may provide novel information to improve the understanding of the immune responses to HPV16 L1.

  17. Immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of a bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Corona, Fabrizia; Barzon, Luisa; Cuoco, Federica; Squarzon, Laura; Marcati, Giorgia; Torcoletti, Marta; Gambino, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of the bivalent HPV vaccine in female patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Twenty-one patients with JIA aged 12-25 years and 21 healthy controls were enrolled and received three doses of the bivalent HPV vaccine. All of the subjects were seronegative at baseline and seroconverted after the scheduled doses. The JIA patients showed significantly lower HPV16 neutralising antibody titres than controls 1 month after the administration of the third dose (p < 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed in HPV18 neutralising antibody titres. Local and systemic reactions were similarly frequent in the patients and controls, and there were no significant changes in 27-joint juvenile arthritis disease activity score or laboratory tests. The bivalent HPV vaccine is safe in patients with stable JIA and regardless of the use of medications the vaccine assures an adequate degree of protection for a certain time.

  18. Reduced prevalence of vulvar HPV16/18 infection among women who received the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Chen, Sabrina; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John T; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2014-12-15

    Vaccine efficacy (VE) against vulvar human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has not been reported and data regarding its epidemiology are sparse. Women (n = 5404) age 22-29 present at the 4-year study visit of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided vulvar and cervical samples. A subset (n = 1044) was tested for HPV DNA (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1). VE against 1-time detection of vulvar HPV16/18 among HPV vaccinated versus unvaccinated women was calculated and compared to the cervix. Prevalence of and risk factors for HPV were evaluated in the control arm (n = 536). Vulvar HPV16/18 VE (54.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9%-79.1%) was comparable to cervix (45.8%; 95% CI, 6.4%-69.4%). Vulvar and cervical HPV16 prevalence within the control arm was 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively. Independent risk factors for vulvar HPV were similar to cervix and included: age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.5 [95% CI, .3-.9] ≥28 vs 22-23]); marital status (aOR 2.3 [95% CI, 1.5-3.5] single vs married/living-as-married); and number of sexual partners (aOR 3.6 [95% CI, 1.9-7.0] ≥6 vs 1). In this intention-to-treat analysis, VE against vulvar and cervical HPV16/18 were comparable 4 years following vaccination. Risk factors for HPV were similar by anatomic site. NCT00128661. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Reduced Prevalence of Vulvar HPV16/18 Infection Among Women Who Received the HPV16/18 Bivalent Vaccine: A Nested Analysis Within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Chen, Sabrina; Quint, Wim; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; DelVecchio, Corey; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Schiller, John T.; Wacholder, Sholom; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccine efficacy (VE) against vulvar human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has not been reported and data regarding its epidemiology are sparse. Methods Women (n = 5404) age 22–29 present at the 4-year study visit of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided vulvar and cervical samples. A subset (n = 1044) was tested for HPV DNA (SPF10/LiPA25 version 1). VE against 1-time detection of vulvar HPV16/18 among HPV vaccinated versus unvaccinated women was calculated and compared to the cervix. Prevalence of and risk factors for HPV were evaluated in the control arm (n = 536). Results Vulvar HPV16/18 VE (54.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9%–79.1%) was comparable to cervix (45.8%; 95% CI, 6.4%–69.4%). Vulvar and cervical HPV16 prevalence within the control arm was 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively. Independent risk factors for vulvar HPV were similar to cervix and included: age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.5 [95% CI, .3–.9] ≥28 vs 22–23]); marital status (aOR 2.3 [95% CI, 1.5–3.5] single vs married/living-as-married); and number of sexual partners (aOR 3.6 [95% CI, 1.9–7.0] ≥6 vs 1). Conclusions In this intention-to-treat analysis, VE against vulvar and cervical HPV16/18 were comparable 4 years following vaccination. Risk factors for HPV were similar by anatomic site. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00128661. PMID:24958910

  20. Bacterially expressed human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 bivalent vaccine: Characterization, antigenicity and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huirong; Li, Zhihai; Wang, Jin; Song, Shuo; Wang, Daning; Wei, Minxi; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao

    2017-05-31

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6 and HPV11 are the major etiological causes of condylomata acuminate. HPV neutralization by vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies can block viral infection and prevent subsequent disease. Currently, two commercially available HPV vaccines cover these two genotypes, expressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we describe another HPV6/11 bivalent vaccine candidate derived from Escherichia coli. The soluble expression of N-terminally truncated L1 proteins was optimized to generate HPV6- and HPV11 L1-only virus-like particles (VLPs) as a scalable process. In a pilot scale, we used various biochemical, biophysical and immunochemical approaches to comprehensively characterize the scale and lot consistency of the vaccine candidate at 30L and 100L. Cryo-EM structure analysis showed that these VLPs form a T=7 icosahedral lattice, imitating the L1 capsid of the authentic HPV virion. This HPV6/11 bivalent vaccine confers a neutralization titer and antibody production profile in monkey that is comparable with the quadrivalent vaccine, Gardasil. This study demonstrates the robustness and scalability of a potential HPV6/11 bivalent vaccine using a prokaryotic system for vaccine production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. [The 2-dose schedule of HPV vaccines in young adolescents].

    PubMed

    Sehnal, B; Neumannová, N; Driák, D; Halaška, M; Kotoulová, M; Sláma, J

    2015-01-01

    To summarize new knowledge about the 2-dose HPV vaccine schedule in young adolescents. Review article. Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and Hospital Na Bulovce in Prague; Oncogynaecological Center, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague. The goal of immunization programs in many countries is the prevention of cervical cancer using either the bivalent or the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. The vaccines, which were designed to prevent cervical cancer outcomes in adults, need to be administered before the onset of sexual activity. Since the HPV vaccines are among the most expensive of all the widely recommended vaccines, limited financial resources restrain the HPV vaccination in some countries around the word. Higher immunogenicity of both HPV vaccines in young adolescents, as well as potential cost savings, have prompted discussions about the efficacy of the 2-dose HPV vaccine schedule. Results of the immunobridging studies showed that two doses of the bivalent and the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in young girls induced geometric mean antibody titers that were non-inferior to geometric mean antibody titers elicited in older girls and women with three doses of the same vaccine. Non-inferiority for HPV-16, -18, -31 and -45 was obtained for the 2-dose of the bivalent HPV vaccine in girls 9-14 years old in the period of 48 months and for HPV-6, -11, -16 and -18 for the 2-dose of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in girls 9-13 years old in the period of 36 months. These results indicate that the bivalent and the quadrivalent vaccine HPV vaccine applied in 2 doses has sufficient immunogenity in young girls.

  2. [The importance of HPV vaccination in men].

    PubMed

    Sehnal, Borek; Chlíbek, Roman; Sláma, Jiří

    The important goal of immunization programs in many countries is the reduction of the incidence of cervical cancer using either the quadrivalent (Silgard/Gardasil) or the bivalent (Cervarix) HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine. Nevertheless, HPV infection is associated with the development of cancers of anus, vagina, vulva and penis, and cancers of the head and neck and genital warts, too. Large trials for both vaccines find efficacy against HPV-related infection and different HPV associated diseases.Infection with HPV and diseases caused by HPV are common in boys and men, too. Approximately 5.2 % of all cancers are HPV associated and the burden of HPV associated disease in men is now comparable to that in women in economically developed countries. Randomized control trials demonstrate robust antibody responses and high efficacy also in men. Several countries recommend gender-neutral vaccination.Detailed cost effective modeling has preceded these decisions showing that when the burden of disease in men is included in the models then, depending upon vaccine price, coverage of a vaccinated population, and other factors male vaccination can become cost effective. Vaccine price had a decisive impact on results. However, increasing coverage in girls is substantially more effective and cost-effective than expanding vaccination coverage to boys and should be considered a priority. Since 2012, vaccination of girls at the age of 13-14 years has been covered from the health insurance in the Czech Republic.

  3. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  4. Ten years of HPV vaccines: State of art and controversies.

    PubMed

    Angioli, Roberto; Lopez, Salvatore; Aloisi, Alessia; Terranova, Corrado; De Cicco, Carlo; Scaletta, Giuseppe; Capriglione, Stella; Miranda, Andrea; Luvero, Daniela; Ricciardi, Roberto; Montera, Roberto; Plotti, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) represents one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and it has been related to cervical cancer. The HPV vaccines prevent infection with certain species of HPV associated with the development of cervical cancer or genital warts. We carried out a PubMed search up to 2015 evaluating all randomized studies published in literature. This review discusses the current status of HPVs vaccines on the global market, efficacy, safety profiles, controversies and future vaccine developments. Three HPVs vaccines are currently on the global market: bivalent, quadrivalent and ninevalent. Bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines can protect against almost 70% of cervical HPV-related cancerous and precancerous conditions and the ninevalent vaccine, instead, provides a protection against almost 90%. The use of vaccinations raised several controversies in the last years and, currently, is not possible to establish which type of vaccine is most effective, however all of them are safe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: updated HPV vaccination recommendations of the advisory committee on immunization practices.

    PubMed

    Petrosky, Emiko; Bocchini, Joseph A; Hariri, Susan; Chesson, Harrell; Curtis, C Robinette; Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth R; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-03-27

    During its February 2015 meeting, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) (Gardasil 9, Merck and Co., Inc.) as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for routine vaccination. HPV vaccine is recommended for routine vaccination at age 11 or 12 years. ACIP also recommends vaccination for females aged 13 through 26 years and males aged 13 through 21 years not vaccinated previously. Vaccination is also recommended through age 26 years for men who have sex with men and for immunocompromised persons (including those with HIV infection) if not vaccinated previously. 9vHPV is a noninfectious, virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine. Similar to quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), 9vHPV contains HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 VLPs. In addition, 9vHPV contains HPV 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 VLPs. 9vHPV was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 10, 2014, for use in females aged 9 through 26 years and males aged 9 through 15 years. For these recommendations, ACIP reviewed additional data on 9vHPV in males aged 16 through 26 years. 9vHPV and 4vHPV are licensed for use in females and males. Bivalent HPV vaccine (2vHPV), which contains HPV 16, 18 VLPs, is licensed for use in females. This report summarizes evidence considered by ACIP in recommending 9vHPV as one of three HPV vaccines that can be used for vaccination and provides recommendations for vaccine use.

  6. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Cancer.gov

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  7. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    HPV Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a birth defect. This is ... pregnancy. Additionally, studies in pregnant animals with the HPV vaccine ... close to the start of their pregnancy. However, the rate of miscarriage ...

  8. Integrating Clinical, Community, and Policy Perspectives on HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, María E.; Allen, Jennifer D.; Mistry, Ritesh; Kahn, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with genital human papillomavirus (HPV) may cause anogenital cancers, oropharyngeal cancers, anogenital warts, and respiratory papillomas. Two prophylactic vaccines (a bivalent and a quadrivalent vaccine) are now licensed and currently in use in a number of countries. Both vaccines prevent infection with HPV-16 and HPV-18, which together cause approximately 70% of cervical cancers, and clinical trials have demonstrated 90%-100% efficacy in preventing precancerous cervical lesions attributable to HPV-16 and HPV-18. One vaccine also prevents HPV-6 and HPV-11, which cause 90% of genital warts. A growing literature describes associations between psychosocial, interpersonal, organizational, and societal factors that influence HPV vaccination acceptability. This paper summarizes the current literature and presents an integrated perspective, taking into account these diverse influences. The resulting integrated model can be used as a heuristic tool for organizing factors at multiple levels to guide intervention development and future research. PMID:20001821

  9. Comparing bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines: economic evaluation based on transmission model

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Ruth; Hughes, Owain; Choi, Yoon Hong

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effect and cost effectiveness of bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, taking into account differences in licensure indications, protection against non-vaccine type disease, protection against disease related to HPV types 6 and 11, and reported long term immunogenicity. Design A model of HPV transmission and disease previously used to inform UK vaccination policy, updated with recent evidence and expanded to include scenarios where the two vaccines differ in duration of protection, cross protection, and end points prevented. Setting United Kingdom. Population Males and females aged 12–75 years. Main outcome measure Incremental cost effectiveness ratios for both vaccines and additional cost per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective as the bivalent vaccine. Results The bivalent vaccine needs to be cheaper than the quadrivalent vaccine to be equally cost effective, mainly because of its lack of protection against anogenital warts. The price difference per dose ranges from a median of £19 (interquartile range £12–£27) to £35 (£27–£44) across scenarios about vaccine duration, cross protection, and end points prevented (assuming one quality adjusted life year (QALY) is valued at £30 000 and both vaccines can prevent all types of HPV related cancers). Conclusions The quadrivalent vaccine may have an advantage over the bivalent vaccine in reducing healthcare costs and QALYs lost. The bivalent vaccine may have an advantage in preventing death due to cancer. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the differential benefit of the two vaccines. PMID:21951758

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Cervarix)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a previous dose of HPV vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person getting vaccinated has any severe allergies, including an allergy to latex. HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. However, receiving HPV vaccine when pregnant is ...

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a previous dose of HPV vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person getting vaccinated has any severe allergies, including an allergy to yeast. HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. However, receiving HPV vaccine when pregnant is ...

  12. Prophylactic HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, A

    2007-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular HPV 16 and HPV 18, is the main cause of cervical cancer. Two prophylactic vaccines against types 6, 11, 16 and 18 have shown great promise in clinical trials, with recent results demonstrating 100% efficacy against persistent HPV infection and development of CIN up to five years of follow-up. One of these (Gardasil, recently licensed) contains all four HPV types, offering protection against genital warts (types 6 and 11) as well as cervical cancer. The other (Cervarix) contains types 16 and 18, targeting cervical cancer alone. Recent data suggest a degree of cross-protection, against types 31 and 45; this could significantly increase the level of protection afforded by the vaccines. It is envisaged that girls between 11 and 12 will be the target, and this is what has been recommended in the United States. There is still debate about the issue of vaccinating boys. A fundamental issue is the lack of education of both the public and health professionals about HPV. In theory, an HPV vaccine could prevent almost all cervical cancer, eventually removing the need for cervical smears. However, there is at least one whole generation of women for whom the vaccine will come too late, and who will continue to require screening.

  13. Overview of the benefits and potential issues of the nonavalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Luciano; Preti, Mario; Cristoforoni, Paolo; Stigliano, Carlo M; Perino, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    HPV-related diseases affect anogenital and oropharyngeal regions, heavily affecting the psychosexual dimension of both male and female individuals. HPV vaccination programs based on a bivalent or quadrivalent vaccine have opened broad perspectives for primary prevention. A nonavalent HPV vaccine (9vHPV), covering nine genotypes (HPV6, HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58), might provide further improvement in terms of direct protection. In the present report, efficacy and safety data from 9vHPV vaccine development programs are examined. Efficacy data come from a pivotal trial, which was conducted among women aged 16-26 years randomly assigned to receive either the 9vHPV or the quadrivalent HPV (4vHPV) vaccine. The 9vHPV vaccine was shown to have potential benefits as compared with 4vHPV, increasing the overall estimated rate of prevention to 90% for cervical cancer and up to 80% for precancerous cervical lesions. For all other HPV-related pre-invasive and invasive lesions, 9vHPV showed potentially greater disease reduction, depending on the anatomic region examined. Thus, the 9vHPV vaccine shows clinical potential for the prevention of HPV-related diseases in both sexes. Future adoption of 9vHPV will depend on factors including market price, cost-effectiveness data, use of a two-dose schedule, and safety and efficacy monitoring in real-life programs.

  14. Immunogenicity, Tolerability and Safety in Adolescents of Bivalent rLP2086, a Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine, Coadministered with Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Senders, Shelly; Bhuyan, Prakash; Jiang, Qin; Absalon, Judith; Eiden, Joseph J; Jones, Thomas R; York, Laura J; Jansen, Kathrin U; O'Neill, Robert E; Harris, Shannon L; Ginis, John; Perez, John L

    2016-05-01

    This study in healthy adolescents (11 to <18 years) evaluated coadministration of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV-4), with bivalent rLP2086, a meningococcal serogroup B (MnB) vaccine. Subjects received bivalent rLP2086 + HPV-4, bivalent rLP2086 + saline or saline + HPV-4 at 0, 2 and 6 months. Immune responses to HPV-4 antigens were assessed 1 month after doses 2 and 3. Serum bactericidal assays using human complement (hSBAs) with 4 MnB test strains expressing vaccine-heterologous human complement factor H binding protein (fHBP) variants determined immune responses to bivalent rLP2086. Coprimary objectives were to demonstrate noninferior immune responses with concomitant administration compared with either vaccine alone. Additional endpoints included the proportions of subjects achieving prespecified protective hSBA titers to all 4 MnB test strains (composite response) and ≥4-fold increases in hSBA titer from baseline for each test strain after dose 3; these endpoints served as the basis of licensure of bivalent rLP2086 in the US. The noninferiority criteria were met for all MnB test strains and HPV antigens except HPV-18; ≥99% of subjects seroconverted for all 4 HPV antigens. Bivalent rLP2086 elicited a composite response in >80% of subjects and increased hSBA titers ≥4-fold in ≥77% of subjects for each test strain after dose 3. A substantial bactericidal response was also observed in a large proportion of subjects after dose 2. Local reactions and systemic events did not increase with concomitant administration. Concomitant administration of bivalent rLP2086 and HPV-4 elicits robust immune responses to both vaccines without increasing reactogenicity compared with bivalent rLP2086 alone. Concurrent administration may increase compliance with both vaccine schedules.

  15. 9-Valent HPV vaccine for cancers, pre-cancers and genital warts related to HPV.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Velicer, Christine; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of nearly all cervical cancer cases as well as a substantial proportion of anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal cancers, making it responsible for approximately 5% of the global cancer burden. The first-generation HPV vaccines that is, quadrivalent HPV type 6/11/16/18 vaccine and bivalent HPV type 16/18 vaccine were licensed in 2006 and 2007, respectively. A second-generation 9-valent HPV type 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine with broader cancer coverage was initiated even before the first vaccines were approved. By preventing HPV infection and disease due to HPV31/33/45/52/58, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to increase prevention of cervical cancer from 70 to 90%. In addition, the 9vHPV vaccine has the potential to prevent 85-95% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Overall, the 9vHPV vaccine addresses a significant unmet medical need, although further health economics and implementation research is needed.

  16. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccines are given as an injection in a series of three doses at three different times. They are licensed for males and females between ... pregnancy to complete any remaining shots in the series. Can I receive ... baby received the HPV vaccine around the time that I got pregnant. Is there a risk ...

  17. [Nine-valent HPV vaccine - new generation of HPV vaccine].

    PubMed

    Fait, T; Dvořák, V; Pilka, R

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate current knowledge about new generation of HPV vaccine - nine-valent vaccine Gardasil9. Review article. The nine-valent vaccine against HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 could improve efficacy of quadrivalent vaccine from 70 to 90 percent for cervical cancer. In addition this vaccine has covered around85-90% of HPV-related vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Efficacy and immunogenicity against HPV 6/11/16/18 is the same as for quadrivalent vaccine. Efficacy against HPV 31/33/45/52/58 associated lesions is 97%.

  18. Vaccinating women previously exposed to human papillomavirus: a cost-effectiveness analysis of the bivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Turner, Hugo C; Baussano, Iacopo; Garnett, Geoff P

    2013-01-01

    Recent trials have indicated that women with prior exposure to Human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes 16/18 receive protection against reinfection from the HPV vaccines. However, many of the original models investigating the cost effectiveness of different vaccination strategies for the protection of cervical cancer assumed, based on the trial results at that time, that these women received no protection. We developed a deterministic, dynamic transmission model that incorporates the vaccine-induced protection of women with prior exposure to HPV. The model was used to estimate the cost effectiveness of progressively extending a vaccination programme using the bivalent vaccine to older age groups both with and without protection of women with prior exposure. We did this under a range of assumptions on the level of natural immunity. Our modelling projections indicate that including the protection of women with prior HPV exposure can have a profound effect on the cost effectiveness of vaccinating adults. The impact of this protection is inversely related to the level of natural immunity. Our results indicate that adult vaccination strategies should potentially be reassessed, and that it is important to include the protection of non-naive women previously infected with HPV in future studies. Furthermore, they also highlight the need for a more thorough investigation of this protection.

  19. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, A.F.; Andrade, C.V.; Russomano, F.B.; Rodrigues, L.L.S.; Oliveira, N.S.; Provance, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits. PMID:27074168

  20. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    PubMed

    Nicol, A F; Andrade, C V; Russomano, F B; Rodrigues, L L S; Oliveira, N S; Provance, D W

    2016-01-01

    Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits.

  1. Immunogenicity of bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine using human endogenous retrovirus envelope-coated baculoviral vectors in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Hur, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Youn-Dong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV) as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1) and 3.9-(HPV18L1) fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines.

  2. HPV vaccine cross-protection: Highlights on additional clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    De Vincenzo, Rosa; Ricci, Caterina; Conte, Carmine; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are administered in vaccination programs, targeted at young adolescent girls before sexual exposure, and in catch-up programs for young women in some countries. All the data indicate that HPV-virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively prevent papillomavirus infections with a high level of antibodies and safety. Since non-vaccine HPV types are responsible for about 30% of cervical cancers, cross-protection would potentially enhance primary cervical cancer prevention efforts. High levels of specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated after immunization with HPV VLPs. Immunity to HPV is type-specific. However, if we consider the phylogenetic tree including the different HPV types, we realize that a certain degree of cross-protection is possible, due to the high homology of some viral types with vaccine ones. The assessment of cross-protective properties of HPV vaccines is an extremely important matter, which has also increased public health implications and could add further value to their preventive potential. The impact of cross-protection is mostly represented by a reduction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia CIN2-3 more than what expected. In this article we review the mechanisms and the effectiveness of Bivalent (HPV-16/-18) and Quadrivalent (HPV-6/-11/-16/-18) HPV vaccine cross-protection, focusing on the critical aspects and the potential biases in clinical trials, in order to understand how cross-protection could impact on clinical outcomes and on the new perspectives in post-vaccine era.

  3. Neutralizing and cross-neutralizing antibody titres induced by bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines in the target population of organized vaccination programmes.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Squarzon, Laura; Masiero, Serena; Pacenti, Monia; Marcati, Giorgia; Mantelli, Barbara; Gabrielli, Liliana; Pascucci, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Caputo, Antonella; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-09-15

    Aim of this investigator-initiated study was to evaluate and compare the titres of neutralizing and cross-neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) induced by the bivalent (Cervarix(®)) and quadrivalent (Gardasil(®)) HPV vaccines in a cohort of girls aged 11-13 years from organized vaccination programmes. To this aim, HPV16 and HPV18 NAbs were measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assays in serum collected at 1-6 months after the third vaccine dose in 107 girls vaccinated with Cervarix(®) and 126 vaccinated with Gardasil(®), while HPV31 and HPV45 cross-NAbs were tested in the first 50 consecutive girls of both vaccine groups. The results of this study demonstrated that all vaccinated girls developed HPV16 and HPV18 NAbs, with the exception of two Gardasil(®) vaccinees with undetectable HPV18 NAbs. Geometric mean titres (GMTs) of both HPV16 and HPV18 NAbs were significantly higher in Cervarix(®) than in Gardasil(®) vaccinees [HPV16 NAb GMT 22,136 (95% CI, 18,811-26,073) vs 5092 (4230-6151), respectively; P<0.0001; HPV18 NAb GMT 11,962 (9536-14,363) vs 1804 (1574-2110), respectively; P<0.0001]. Cross-NAbs to HPV31 and HPV45 were detected more frequently Cervarix(®) (HPV31 NAb positivity rates 92.7% and 36%, respectively; P<0.05) than in Gardasil(®) vaccinees (HPV45 NAb positivity rates 56% and 6%, respectively; P<0.0001). The titres of cross-NAbs against HPV31 and HPV45 were also significantly higher in Cervarix(®) than in Gardasil(®) vaccinees [HPV31 NAb GMT 157.2 (95% CI, 92-269) vs 13.0 (6.5-25.8), respectively; P<0.0001; HPV45 NAb GMT 4.7 (2.1-10.2) vs 1.3 (0.3-3.1), respectively; P<0.01]. In conclusion, in adolescent girls vaccinated within organized vaccination programmes, HPV vaccines drive the generation not only of NAbs to HPV vaccine types, but also of cross-NAbs. The bivalent vaccine induced significantly higher HPV16 and HPV18 NAb titres and more frequently and at higher titre HPV31 and HPV45 cross-NAbs than the quadrivalent vaccine. Copyright

  4. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. The HPV vaccine mandate controversy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Gillian; Malow, Robert M; Zimet, Gregory D

    2007-12-01

    In this editorial we address the controversies surrounding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine school-entry mandate legislation, but differentiate between the mandate debate and issues specific to the vaccine itself. Our goal is not to take a stand in favor of or opposed to mandates, but rather to critically examine the issues. We discuss the following arguments against HPV vaccine school-entry requirements: 1. The public health benefit of mandated HPV vaccination is not sufficient to warrant the intrusion on parental autonomy; 2. A vaccine that prevents a non-casually transmitted infection should not be mandated; 3. Opt-out provisions are inherently unfair to parents who oppose HPV vaccination; 4. Limited health care dollars should not be directed toward cervical cancer prevention; and 5. The vaccine is expensive and potential problems with supply suggest that mandates should not be implemented until insurance coverage and supply issues are resolved. Next, we critically evaluate the following critiques of HPV vaccination itself: 1. Giving girls HPV vaccine implies tacit consent to engage in sexual activity; 2. Giving girls this vaccine will confer a false sense of protection from sexually transmitted infections and will lead to sexual disinhibition; 3. Children already have too many vaccinations on the immunization schedule; 4. Long-term side effects of HPV vaccine are unknown; 5. The vaccine's enduring effectiveness is unknown and booster shots may be required; and 6. It is wrong to only target girls with HPV vaccine; boys should be vaccinated as well.

  6. Comparative cost-effectiveness of the quadrivalent and bivalent human papillomavirus vaccines: a transmission-dynamic modeling study.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Marc; Laprise, Jean-François; Drolet, Mélanie; Van de Velde, Nicolas; Franco, Eduardo L; Kliewer, Erich V; Ogilvie, Gina; Deeks, Shelley L; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2013-08-20

    The quadrivalent and bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are now licensed in several countries. We compared the cost-effectiveness of the HPV vaccines to provide evidence for policy decisions. We developed HPV-ADVISE, a multi-type individual-based transmission-dynamic model of HPV infection and disease (anogenital warts, and cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers). We calibrated the model to sexual behavior and epidemiologic data from Canada, and estimated quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) lost and costs ($CAN 2010) from the literature. Vaccine-type efficacy was based on a systematic literature review. The analysis was performed from the healthcare provider perspective, and costs and benefits were discounted at 3%. Predictions are presented using the median [10th;90th percentiles] of simulations. Under base-case assumptions (vaccinating 10-year-old girls, 80% coverage, $95/dose), using the quadrivalent and bivalent vaccines is estimated to cost $15,528 [12,056;19,140] and $20,182 [15,531;25,240] per QALY-gained, respectively. At equal price, the quadrivalent vaccine is more cost-effective than bivalent under all scenarios investigated, except when assuming longer duration of protection for the bivalent and minimal anogenital warts burden. Under base-case assumptions, the maximum additional cost per dose for the quadrivalent vaccine to remain more cost-effective than the bivalent is $32 [17;46] (using a $40,000/QALY-gained threshold). Results were most sensitive to discounting, time-horizon, differences in durations of protection and anogenital warts burden. Vaccinating pre-adolescent girls against HPV is predicted to be highly cost-effective. If equally priced, the quadrivalent is the most economically desirable vaccine. However, ultimately, the most cost-effective HPV vaccine will be determined by their relative price. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent HPV vaccines on morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Rebecca; Feldman, Sarah

    2016-06-02

    Cervical cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cervical cancers are associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), and vaccination with any of 3 available HPV vaccines is anticipated to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. This review provides an overview of the burden of HPV, the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of the bivalent (HPV 16, 18), quadrivalent (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) and 9vHPV (HPV 6, 11, 16, 1831, 33, 45, 52, 58) vaccines in order to assess the anticipated impact on cervical cancer. All three vaccines show high efficacy in prevention of vaccine-specific HPV-type infection and associated high-grade cervical dysplasia in HPV-naïve women. Early clinical effectiveness data for the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccine demonstrate reduced rates of HPV 16 and 18 prevalence in vaccinated cohorts; data evaluating cervical dysplasia and cervical procedures as outcomes will shed further light on the clinical effectiveness of both vaccines. The bivalent vaccine has demonstrated cross-protection to non-vaccine HPV types, including the types in the 9vHPV vaccine. No clinical effectiveness data is yet available for the 9vHPV vaccine.  While HPV vaccination has great promise to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, estimated benefits are largely theoretical at present. Large population-based clinical effectiveness studies will provide long-term immunogenicity and effectiveness, as well as assessment of cervical cancer as an endpoint, particularly as young vaccinated women enter the appropriate age range to initiate screening for cervical cancer. Strengthening screening and treatment programs will likely have the greatest impact in the short-term on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality.

  8. Impact of 2-, 4- and 9-valent HPV vaccines on morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luckett, Rebecca; Feldman, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cervical cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most cervical cancers are associated with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), and vaccination with any of 3 available HPV vaccines is anticipated to greatly reduce the burden of cervical cancer. This review provides an overview of the burden of HPV, the efficacy and clinical effectiveness of the bivalent (HPV 16, 18), quadrivalent (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) and 9vHPV (HPV 6, 11, 16, 1831, 33, 45, 52, 58) vaccines in order to assess the anticipated impact on cervical cancer. All three vaccines show high efficacy in prevention of vaccine-specific HPV-type infection and associated high-grade cervical dysplasia in HPV-naïve women. Early clinical effectiveness data for the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccine demonstrate reduced rates of HPV 16 and 18 prevalence in vaccinated cohorts; data evaluating cervical dysplasia and cervical procedures as outcomes will shed further light on the clinical effectiveness of both vaccines. The bivalent vaccine has demonstrated cross-protection to non-vaccine HPV types, including the types in the 9vHPV vaccine. No clinical effectiveness data is yet available for the 9vHPV vaccine.  While HPV vaccination has great promise to reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, estimated benefits are largely theoretical at present. Large population-based clinical effectiveness studies will provide long-term immunogenicity and effectiveness, as well as assessment of cervical cancer as an endpoint, particularly as young vaccinated women enter the appropriate age range to initiate screening for cervical cancer. Strengthening screening and treatment programs will likely have the greatest impact in the short-term on cervical cancer morbidity and mortality PMID:26588179

  9. Population-level impact of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccines: a model-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Nicolas; Boily, Marie-Claude; Drolet, Mélanie; Franco, Eduardo L; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Kliewer, Erich V; Coutlée, François; Laprise, Jean-François; Malagón, Talía; Brisson, Marc

    2012-11-21

    Bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are now licensed in several countries. Furthermore, clinical trials examining the efficacy of a nonavalent vaccine are underway. We aimed to compare the potential population-level effectiveness of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and candidate nonavalent HPV vaccines. We developed an individual-based, transmission-dynamic model of HPV infection and disease in a population stratified by age, gender, sexual activity, and screening behavior. The model was calibrated to highly stratified sexual behavior, HPV epidemiology, and cervical screening data from Canada. Under base case assumptions, vaccinating 12-year-old girls (70% coverage) with the bivalent (quadrivalent) vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative incidence of anogenital warts (AGWs) by 0.0% (72.1%), diagnosed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions 2 and 3 (CIN2 and -3) by 51.0% (46.1%), and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by 31.9% (30.5%), over 70 years. Changing from a bivalent (quadrivalent) to a nonavalent vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative number of AGW episodes by an additional 66.7% (0.0%), CIN2 and -3 episodes by an additional 9.3% (12.5%), and SCC cases by an additional 4.8% (6.6%) over 70 years. Differences in predicted population-level effectiveness between the vaccines were most sensitive to duration of protection and the time horizon of analysis. The vaccines produced similar effectiveness at preventing noncervical HPV-related cancers. The bivalent vaccine is expected to be slightly more effective at preventing CIN2 and -3 and SCC in the longer term, whereas the quadrivalent vaccine is expected to substantially reduce AGW cases shortly after the start of vaccination programs. Switching to a nonavalent vaccine has the potential to further reduce precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.

  10. HPV Vaccine - Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Media Resources News Newsletters Events Redirect for HPV Vaccine FAQ Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... to the address below. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/questions-answers.html File Formats Help: How ...

  11. Protecting our patients from HPV and HPV-related diseases: the role of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Martin C

    2006-11-01

    The clinical burden of disease resulting from human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is substantial and extends from genital warts to cytologic abnormalities to cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers and their associated precursor lesions. In addition, HPV is implicated in anal, penile, and head and neck cancers. Thus, HPV-related disease constitutes a significant burden for both men and women. Large phase 2 and 3 clinical trials with a quadrivalent preventive HPV vaccine (HPV 6/11/16/18) and phase 2 trials with a bivalent preventive HPV vaccine (HPV 16/18) have demonstrated that both products are highly efficacious in preventing type-specific HPV infections and HPV-related disease and are well tolerated. Nearly all recipients demonstrate a robust immunologic response that currently appears to be durable for 4 or more years. Immunogenicity data among girls 9 to 15 years of age were used to "bridge" efficacy data from quadrivalent HPV vaccine trials completed to date. In June 2006, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the quadrivalent HPV vaccine for use among females 9 to 26 years of age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended the 3-dose series for girls 11 to 12 years of age, catch-up vaccination for girls and women 13 to 26 years of age, and permissive use as early as age 9. Computer models projecting the impact of these preventive HPV vaccines predict that they will be cost-effective and beneficial to the population; the use of preventive HPV vaccines will complement continued cytologic screening programs. Trials are under way to evaluate the duration of immune response as well as efficacy among men and women 27 years of age and older. Girls and women within the targeted age ranges should be offered vaccination to achieve the disease prevention potential of these vaccines.

  12. First generation prophylactic HPV vaccines: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Fruscalzo, A; Londero, A; Bertozzi, S; Lellé, R

    2015-10-01

    A chronic infection with "high risk" human papillomavirus (HPV) is as an obligated step in the development of cervical dysplasia and cancer and, less frequently, other types of cancers. It has been suggested to be responsible for an estimated 100% of cases of cervical cancer, 90% of anal cancers, 40% of vulvar, vaginal and penile cancers and very likely about 18% of oropharyngeal cancers. Furthermore, infection with "low risk" HPV types is responsible for some benign conditions such as genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Even if it is only very rarely a causative factor leading to cancer, these benign diseases have a high socio-economic impact. HPV vaccination has been shown to be viable method in the prevention of HPV-related pathologies. Currently, there are two vaccine formulas belonging to the very low particles (VLPs) first generation vaccines. The first is the bivalent vaccine Cervarix®, which is active against high risk HPV 16 and 18. The second is the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil®, which is active against high risk HPV 16 and 18, as well as against the low risk HPV types 6, 11. In this paper, we will discuss typical HPV-related pathologies, the effectiveness of these two first generation vaccines, existing advices, potential side effects and limits as well as new directions for HPV-vaccines implementation.

  13. Prophylactic HPV vaccination for women over 18 years of age.

    PubMed

    Adams, M; Jasani, B; Fiander, A

    2009-05-26

    Cervical screening has resulted in a major reduction in the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in the UK and other developed countries. Nevertheless approximately 2700 women present with cervical cancer in the UK each year with mortality in excess of 1000 cases. Prophylactic HPV vaccination against HPV 16 and 18 has been shown to be highly effective in preventing HPV related malignancy in clinical trials. Newly introduced HPV vaccination programmes in the UK and elsewhere are ultimately likely to result in a further significant reduction in the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. These vaccination programmes will be most effective in early adolescence when prevalence of HPV infection is low. Consequently, vaccination programmes in the UK have been initially targeted at 12 to 13-year olds. In Australia favourable estimates of cost effectiveness have supported funding of a 'catch-up' programme to 26 years. In the UK the catch up programme has for the present been restricted to 18 years for cost effectiveness reasons. In addition the value of HPV vaccination beyond 26 years has not yet been fully clarified. Nevertheless women up to 45 years of age have been shown to exhibit strong immune responses to the bivalent HPV vaccine which might be expected to reduce the risk of HPV re-infection and address the second peak of HPV related malignancy in later life, evident over 45 years of age. Early data from randomised trials testing the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in women over 25 years has suggested high vaccine efficacy comparable to younger women. This paper will explore the evidence supporting HPV vaccination in HPV naïve and HPV exposed sexually active women up to 26 years and beyond this age group.

  14. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  15. From the monovalent to the nine-valent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pils, S; Joura, E A

    2015-09-01

    An investigational monovalent human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 virus-like particle vaccine has been shown to prevent persistent infection and cervical disease related to HPV 16 and was proof of concept (2002). Designed to prevent the bulk of invasive cervical cancer, quadrivalent (HPV 6/11/16/18) and bivalent (HPV 16/18) vaccines have been available since 2006 and 2007, respectively. They are highly effective in preventing HPV 16/18-related cervical precancer; the quadrivalent version also prevents genital warts related to HPV 6/11. It has been shown that the precursors of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer related to the vaccine types are effectively prevented. This led to a paradigm shift from a female-only cervical cancer vaccine to a vaccine for the prevention of HPV-related disease and cancer for both sexes. Vaccination before the start of sexual activity is most effective, and consequently most programs target 9- to 12-year-olds. Additionally, recent studies have proven the noninferior immunoresponse of a two-dose schedule in these age cohorts. Gender-neutral vaccination has become more common; it improves coverage and also provides protection to all males. Recently a nine-valent HPV vaccine (HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) was licensed; it provides high and consistent protection against infections and diseases related to these types, with ∼90% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers and precancers potentially being avoided. Coverage is key. Efforts must be made to provide HPV vaccination in low-resource countries that lack screening programs. In countries with cervical cancer screening, HPV vaccination will greatly affect screening algorithms.

  16. Vietnamese Health Care Providers' Preferences Regarding Recommendation of HPV Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Kremers, Walter K; Ngo, Quang V; Nguyen, Nguyen V; Barenberg, Benjamin J; Tran, Vinh D; Dinh, Tri A

    2015-01-01

    Physician recommendation is an important predictor of HPV vaccine acceptance; however, physician willingness and preferences regarding HPV vaccination may be influenced by factors including patient age, vaccine type, and cost. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers in Da Nang, Vietnam, to evaluate awareness, perceptions about HPV and HPV vaccines, and willingness to vaccinate a female patient. Willingness to vaccinate was evaluated using a full-factorial presentation of scenarios featuring the following factors: vaccine cost (free vs 1,000,000 VND), patient age (12, 16, or 22 years), and HPV vaccine type (bivalent vs quadrivalent). Responses from 244 providers were analyzed; providers had a mean age of 34±11.9 years; a majority were female, married, and had children of their own. Thirty-six percent specialized in obstetrics/gynecology and 24% were providers in family medicine. Of the three factors considered in conjoint analysis, vaccine cost was the most important factor in willingness to vaccinate, followed by patient age, and vaccine type. The most favorable scenario for vaccinating a female patient was when the vaccine was free, the patient was 22 years of age, and the HPV4 vaccine was described. In multivariable analysis, older age, being a physician, being married, and having children were all associated with increased willingness to recommend HPV vaccination (p<0.05). Provider willingness is an important aspect of successful HPV vaccination programs; identifying preferences and biases in recommendation patterns will highlight potential areas for education and intervention.

  17. Does intention to recommend HPV vaccines impact HPV vaccination rates?

    PubMed

    Feemster, Kristen A; Middleton, Maria; Fiks, Alexander G; Winters, Sarah; Kinsman, Sara B; Kahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Despite recommendations for routine vaccination, HPV vaccination rates among adolescent females have remained low. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether clinician intention to recommend HPV vaccines predicts HPV vaccine series initiation among previously unvaccinated 11 to 18 year-old girls (N=18,083) who were seen by a pediatric clinician (N=105) from a large primary care network within 3 years of vaccine introduction. We used multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations, Cox Regression and standardized survival curves to measure the association between clinician intention and time to and rate of first HPV vaccine receipt among eligible females. All models adjusted for patient age, race/ethnicity, payor category, visit type, and practice location. Eighty-5 percent of eligible 11 to 12 year-old and 95% of 13 to 18 year-old girls were seen by a provider reporting high intention to recommend HPV vaccines. However, only 30% of the cohort initiated the HPV vaccine series and the mean number of days from first eligible visit to series initiation was 190 (95% C.I. 184.2, 195.4). After adjusting for covariates, high clinician intention was modestly associated with girls' likelihood of HPV vaccine series initiation (OR 1.36; 95 % C.I. 1.07, 1.71) and time to first HPV vaccination (HR 1.22; 95% 1.06, 1.40). Despite high intention to vaccinate among this cohort of pediatric clinicians, overall vaccination rates for adolescent girls remained low. These findings support ongoing efforts to develop effective strategies to translate clinician intention into timely HPV vaccine receipt.

  18. Young Hungarian Students' Knowledge about HPV and Their Attitude Toward HPV Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Balla, Bettina Claudia; Terebessy, András; Tóth, Emese; Balázs, Péter

    2016-12-29

    (1) Background: Hungarys's estimated cervical cancer mortality was 6.9/100,000 in 2012, above the average of the EU27 countries (3.7/100,000) in the same year. Since 2014, the bivalent HPV vaccine has been offered to schoolgirls aged 12-13. (2) Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 1022 high school seniors (492 girls, 530 boys) in 19 randomly selected schools in Budapest. Our anonymous questionnaire contained 54 items: basic socio-demographic data, knowledge about HPV infection/cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. (3) Results: 54.9% knew that HPV caused cervical cancer, and 52.1% identified HPV as an STD. Knowledge of risk factors such as promiscuity (46.9%) and early sexual activity (15.6%) was low, but higher than that of further HPV-induced diseases: genital warts (in females 9.9%, in males 9%), anal cancer (in females 2.2%, in males 1.9%), penile cancer (9.4%), and vulvar cancer (7.8%). A percentage of 14.6% feared getting infected, and 35.7% supported compulsory HPV vaccination. A percentage of 51.2% would have their future children vaccinated-significantly more girls than boys. (4) Conclusion: Our results support the findings of previous studies about young adults' HPV-related knowledge, which was poor, especially regarding pathologies in men. Despite the low level of awareness, the students' attitude was mostly positive when asked about vaccinating their future children.

  19. No evidence for cross-protection of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against HPV-6/11 positivity in female STI clinic visitors.

    PubMed

    Woestenberg, Petra J; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Donken, Robine; Leussink, Suzan; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Bogaards, Johannes A; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2017-04-01

    Data from a vaccine trial and from post-vaccine surveillance in the United Kingdom have suggested that the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine offers cross-protection against HPV-6/11 and protection against anogenital warts (AGW). We studied the effect of the bivalent vaccine on genital HPV-6/11 positivity and AGW in the Netherlands. We included all vaccine-eligible women from the PASSYON study, a biennial cross-sectional study among 16- to 24-year-old sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic attendants. Vaginal self-swabs were analyzed for type specific HPV and AGW were diagnosed at the STI-clinic. Prevalence of HPV-6 and/or HPV-11 and AGW were compared between self-reported vaccinated and unvaccinated women by log-binomial regression analysis, adjusted for demographics and risk behavior. Of the 1198 women included, 56% reported to be vaccinated at least once. Relative to unvaccinated women, the adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for HPV-6/11 was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74-1.43) for women vaccinated at least once. The crude PR for AGW was 0.67 (95% CI 0.22-2.07) for women vaccinated at least once. Adjustment did not change these results. We observed no cross-protective effect of the bivalent vaccine on genital HPV-6/11 positivity and a non-significant partially protective effect on AGW. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Perspectives for therapeutic HPV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andrew; Farmer, Emily; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2016-11-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and associated diseases remain a serious burden worldwide. It is now clear that HPV serves as the etiological factor and biologic carcinogen for HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Although preventative HPV vaccines are available, these vaccines do not induce strong therapeutic effects against established HPV infections and lesions. These concerns create a critical need for the development of therapeutic strategies, such as vaccines, to treat these existing infections and diseases. Unlike preventative vaccines, therapeutic vaccines aim to generate cell-mediated immunity. HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 are responsible for the malignant progression of HPV-associated diseases and are consistently expressed in HPV-associated diseases and cancer lesions; therefore, they serve as ideal targets for the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines. In this review we revisit therapeutic HPV vaccines that utilize this knowledge to treat HPV-associated lesions and cancers, with a focus on the findings of recent therapeutic HPV vaccine clinical trials. Great progress has been made to develop and improve novel therapeutic HPV vaccines to treat existing HPV infections and diseases; however, there is still much work to be done. We believe that therapeutic HPV vaccines have the potential to become a widely available and successful therapy to treat HPV and HPV-associated diseases in the near future.

  1. Adolescent girls' preferences for HPV vaccines: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derek S; Poulos, Christine; Johnson, F Reed; Chamiec-Case, Linda; Messonnier, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    To measure adolescent girls' preferences over features of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in order to provide quantitative estimates of the perceived benefits of vaccination and potential vaccine uptake. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey was developed to measure adolescent girls' preferences over features of HPV vaccines. The survey was fielded to a U.S. sample of 307 girls aged 13-17 years who had not yet received an HPV vaccine in June 2008. In a latent class logit model, two distinct groups were identified--one with strong preferences against vaccination which largely did not differentiate between vaccine features, and another that was receptive to vaccination and had well-defined preferences over vaccine features. Based on the mean estimates over the entire sample, we estimate that girls' valuation of bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines ranged between $400 and $460 in 2008, measured as willingness-to-pay (WTP). The additional value of genital warts protection was $145, although cervical cancer efficacy was the most preferred feature. We estimate maximum uptake of 54-65%, close to the 53% reported for one dose in 2011 surveillance data, but higher than the 35% for three doses in surveillance data. We conclude that adolescent girls do form clear opinions and some place significant value on HPV vaccination, making research on their preferences vital to understanding the determinants of HPV vaccine demand. DCE studies may be used to design more effective vaccine-promotion programs and for reassessing public health recommendations and guidelines as new vaccines are made available.

  2. Post-licensure monitoring of HPV vaccine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan; Unger, Elizabeth R; Saraiya, Mona; Datta, S Deblina; Dunne, Eileen F

    2010-07-05

    Post-licensure evaluation of vaccines plays an important role in monitoring the progress of immunization programs, demonstrating population impact of vaccines, and providing data for ongoing policy decisions. Two human papillomovirus (HPV) vaccines are licensed and recommended for use in females in the United States, a quadrivalent human HPV vaccine, licensed in 2006 and a bivalent vaccine HPV vaccine licensed in 2009. HPV vaccination is recommended for females 11 or 12 years of age with catch-up vaccination through age 26 years. Post-licensure monitoring of the HPV vaccine program has included some of the same systems established for other vaccines, such as those for vaccine safety and coverage monitoring. However, monitoring HPV vaccine impact on infection and disease outcomes has required new efforts. While there are well established cancer registries in the United States, it will take decades before the impact of vaccine on cervical cancer is observed. More proximal measures of vaccine impact include outcomes such as prevalence of HPV vaccine types, incidence of cervical precancers and genital warts. We review systems in place or being established for post-licensure monitoring of HPV vaccine in the United States. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... of Cancer, 1975-2009, featuring the burden and trends in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and HPV ...

  4. Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines: current options and future strategies for vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Fruscalzo, Arrigo; Londero, Ambrogio P; Bertozzi, Serena; Lellè, Ralf J

    2016-02-01

    Two vaccines focused on the prevention of HPV-related diseases have been introduced in the last decade, the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil and the bivalent vaccine Cervarix. They are targeted to prevent precancerous and cancerous lesions not only of the cervix, but also of the vulva, vagina, anal and head-neck region. Furthermore, the protection of the quadrivalent vaccine Gardasil includes also genital warts and recurrent respiratory Papillomatosis, two benign conditions with high socio-economic impact. Although their efficacy in reducing the burden of HPV-related pathologies has been already documented, second-generation HPV vaccines are being developed in order to overcome major limitations, above all the cost of production, distribution and acceptance, thus promoting an easier access to vaccination, especially in developing countries. Recently a new multivalent VLP vaccine active against nine HPV subtypes, called Gardasil 9 (Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA), has been approved, showing promising preliminary results. In this article, we outline the strategies adopted for second-generation HPV vaccine engineering, the latest HPV vaccines available at this time, as well as those currently in development.

  5. Effectiveness of HPV vaccines against genital warts in women from Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Illana, Esther; López-Lacort, Mónica; Navarro-Illana, Pedro; Vilata, Juan José; Diez-Domingo, Javier

    2017-06-05

    To assess the effectiveness of the HPV vaccines in preventing genital warts in young women. Population-based study using health databases. Valencian Community (Spain). All girls and women aged 14-19years who were registered in the Valencian Community between January 2009 and December 2014 (n=279,787). Incident cases of genital warts were defined as the first activation of diagnosis code ICD-9-CM 078.11 (Condyloma acuminatum) in primary care and outpatient clinics during the study period. There were 612 cases of genital warts. The overall incidence rate was 75.8/100,000 person-years (95% CrI 69.7-81.8). There was a decrease in genital warts when female candidates to be vaccinated with quadrivalent HPV vaccine reached the age of 18 (in 2012), compared to previous years. Incidence of genital warts in unvaccinated women and those who received the bivalent vaccine was higher than in girls and women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. The effectiveness of a three-dose regimen of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was 77% (95 CrI: 66-85%), whereas that of a single dose was 61% (95 CrI: 20-87%). No effectiveness was seen with a full vaccination course with the bivalent HPV vaccine. Three doses of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine were effective against genital warts in our population. Moreover, with low vaccine coverage the incidence of genital warts decreased only in the vaccinated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Construction of an enantiopure bivalent nicotine vaccine using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, David F; Roque, Richard; Clegg, Christopher H

    2017-01-01

    Clinical outcomes of anti-nicotine vaccines may be improved through enhancements in serum antibody affinity and concentration. Two strategies were explored to improve vaccine efficacy in outbred mice: the use of enantiopure haptens and formulation of a bivalent vaccine. Vaccines incorporating natural (-) nicotine haptens improved relative antibody affinities >10-fold over (+) haptens, stimulated a two-fold boost in nicotine serum binding capacity, and following injection with 3 cigarette equivalents of nicotine, prevented a larger proportion of nicotine (>85%) from reaching the brain. The activity of a bivalent vaccine containing (-) 3'AmNic and (-) 1'SNic haptens was then compared to dose-matched monovalent groups. It was confirmed that antisera generated by these structurally distinct haptens have minimal cross-reactivity and stimulate different B cell populations. Equivalent antibody affinities were detected between the three groups, but the bivalent group showed two-fold higher titers and an additive increase in nicotine serum binding capacity as compared to the monovalent groups. Mice immunized with the bivalent formulation also performed better in a nicotine challenge experiment, and prevented >85% of a nicotine dose equivalent to 12 cigarettes from reaching the brain. Overall, enantiopure conjugate vaccines appear to improve serum antibody affinity, while multivalent formulations increase total antibody concentration. These findings may help improve the performance of future clinical candidate vaccines.

  7. HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts: an update.

    PubMed

    Dochez, Carine; Bogers, Johannes J; Verhelst, Rita; Rees, Helen

    2014-03-20

    Cervical cancer is an important public health problem worldwide, and especially in developing countries. The link between cervical cancer and oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been clearly established. Furthermore, non-oncogenic HPV are responsible for the majority of genital warts. Two prophylactic HPV vaccines are available, which have the potential of considerably reducing HPV-related morbidity and mortality. Both vaccines are based on virus-like particles of the L1 capsid protein, and are highly efficacious and immunogenic if given before exposure to HPV, i.e. to adolescent girls between 9 and 13 years of age in a three-dose schedule. This review describes the immunology of natural HPV infections and the immune response evoked through vaccination. The current duration of protection is 8.4 years with the bivalent vaccine (HPV16/18) and 5 years with the quadrivalent vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18). Research is on-going to evaluate the efficacy of the current vaccines in a two-dose schedule, as compared to the recommended three-dose schedule. To increase the protection, the development and testing of a nine-valent prophylactic HPV vaccine (HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) is being undertaken. Research is also directed towards therapeutic vaccines and the development of a prophylactic L2 vaccine.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Belize.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, Leslie; Janusz, Cara Bess; Clark, Andrew David; Prieto, Elise; Waight, Eufemia; Largaespada, Natalia

    2015-05-07

    Among women in Belize, cervical cancer is both the leading cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths. Both the quadrivalent and bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are licensed in Belize. The Ministry of Health of Belize convened a multidisciplinary team to estimate the costs, health benefits, and cost-effectiveness of adding an HPV vaccine to the national immunization schedule. The CERVIVAC cost-effectiveness model (Version 1.123) was used to assess the lifetime health and economic outcomes of vaccinating one cohort of girls aged 10 years against HPV. The comparator was no HPV vaccination. The PAHO Revolving Fund negotiated price of US$ 13.79 per dose was used (for the quadrivalent vaccine) and national data sources were used to define demography, cervical cancer incidence and mortality, cervical cancer treatment costs, and vaccine delivery costs. Estimates from international agencies were used in scenario analysis. In a cohort of ∼4000 Belizean girls tracked over a lifetime, HPV vaccination is estimated to prevent 69 new cases of cervical cancer (undiscounted), and 51 cervical cancer deaths (undiscounted). Considering the potential cervical cancer treatment costs and lost wages avoided by households (societal perspective), the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted was estimated to be US$ 429. This increased to US$ 1320 when cervical cancer treatment costs and lost wages were excluded from the analysis. Both estimates are far below the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of Belize (US$ 4795). The lifetime health care costs saved by the women and their families represent more than 60% of the investment cost needed by the Government for the vaccine. Routine HPV vaccination would be highly cost-effective in Belize. If affordable, efforts should be made to expedite the introduction of this vaccine into the Belizean national immunization program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  10. Durable antibody responses following one dose of the bivalent human papillomavirus L1 virus-like particle vaccine in the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Pan, Yuanji; Kreimer, Aimee; Schiller, John T; Gonzalez, Paula; Lowy, Douglas R; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana C; Herrero, Rolando; Kemp, Troy; Shelton, Gloriana; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A

    2013-11-01

    The Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial (CVT) showed that four-year vaccine efficacy against 12-month HPV16/18 persistent infection was similarly high among women who received one, two, or the recommended three doses of the bivalent HPV16/18 L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine. Live-attenuated viral vaccines, but not simple-subunit vaccines, usually induce durable lifelong antibody responses after a single dose. It is unclear whether noninfectious VLP vaccines behave more like live-virus or simple-subunit vaccines in this regard. To explore the likelihood that efficacy will persist longer term, we investigated the magnitude and durability of antibodies to this vaccine by measuring HPV16- and HPV18-specific antibodies by VLP-ELISA using serum from enrollment, vaccination, and annual visits through four years in four vaccinated groups; one-dose (n = 78), two-doses separated by one month (n = 140), two doses separated by six months (n = 52), and three scheduled doses (n = 120, randomly selected). We also tested enrollment sera from n = 113 HPV16- or HPV18 L1-seropositive women prevaccination, presumably from natural infection. At four years, 100% of women in all groups remained HPV16/18 seropositive; both HPV16/18 geometric mean titers (GMT) among the extended two-dose group were non-inferior to the three-dose group, and ELISA titers were highly correlated with neutralization titers in all groups. Compared with the natural infection group, HPV16/18 GMTs were, respectively, at least 24 and 14 times higher among the two-dose and 9 and 5 times higher among one-dose vaccinees. Antibody levels following one-dose remained stable from month 6 through month 48. Results raise the possibility that even a single dose of HPV VLPs will induce long-term protection. ©2013 AACR.

  11. Cervical cancer screening in the era of HPV vaccination: A review of shifting paradigms in cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Barroeta, Julieta E; Adhikari-Guragain, Deepti; Grotkowski, Carolyn E

    2017-10-01

    Significant changes in cervical cancer screening practice, guidelines, and prevention of cervical cancer have taken place in recent years including the raising of initial cervical cancer screening age, changes in frequency of cytology screening, and the adoption of high risk HPV and cytology co-testing for some patients; the introduction of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and 9-valent HPV vaccines; and the recent approval of high risk HPV testing as primary screening with the use of cytology as triage in positive cases. This review discusses the significance of primary HPV screening, the impact of HPV vaccination in the prevalence of cervical cancer and its precursors, the interplay between high risk HPV testing and vaccination, and the implications for clinical and cytological management. Future strategies for cervical screening in the post-vaccination era are also discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Prophylactic HPV vaccination: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Castle, P E; Maza, M

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary cause of cervical cancer, the fourth most common cancer and cause of cancer-related death in females worldwide. HPV also causes anal, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and oropharyngeal cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines based on recombinantly expressed virus-like particles have been developed. Two first-generation, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines prevent infections and disease caused by HPV16 and HPV18, the two HPV genotypes that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer, and one of these vaccines also prevents HPV6 and HPV11, the two HPV genotypes that cause 90% of genital warts. A next-generation vaccine, recently approved by the U.S. FDA, targets HPV16, HPV18, and five additional HPV genotypes that together causes approximately 90% of cervical cancer as well as HPV6 and HPV11. In clinical trials, these vaccines have shown high levels of efficacy against disease and infections caused by the targeted HPV genotypes in adolescent females and males and older females. Data indicate population effectiveness, and therefore cost effectiveness, is highest in HPV-naive young females prior to becoming sexually active. Countries that implemented HPV vaccination before 2010 have already experienced decreases in population prevalence of targeted HPV genotypes and related anogenital diseases in women and via herd protection in heterosexual men. Importantly, after more than 100 million doses given worldwide, HPV vaccination has demonstrated an excellent safety profile. With demonstrated efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety, universal HPV vaccination of all young, adolescent women, and with available resources at least high-risk groups of men, should be a global health priority. Failure to do so will result in millions of women dying from avertable cervical cancers, especially in low- and middle-income countries, and many thousands of women and men dying from other HPV-related cancers.

  13. HPV vaccine: immersed in controversy.

    PubMed

    Ohri, Linda K

    2007-11-01

    There has been substantial media coverage of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine since the Food and Drug Administration approved Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) on June 8, 2006. The most vocal complaints maintain that its use will promote promiscuity among teenagers, and condemn proposed mandated use for school entry. Some also question evidence for the vaccine's safety. There have been concerns raised by both providers and patients regarding financial barriers to access. Still others argue that additional populations could benefit who have not been included in current recommendations. Clarification of these issues is essential to advance optimal use of this important new vaccine. There is strong evidence to support HPV vaccine as an effective, safe, and efficient public health measure. School mandates are valuable tools to reduce disparities in availability of immunizations. The time has come to consider universal funding as a means to improve access to all recommended vaccines.

  14. [Health economic evaluation of bivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in China: based on the dynamic model].

    PubMed

    Song, X B; Zhao, Q J; Zhou, Z; Fang, Y

    2017-09-06

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate the prevention effect and cost-effectiveness of a prophylactic bivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Methods: A multiple health status dynamic model was developed, including natural history of diseases and prevention strategies. We built 19 prevention strategies including visual inspection with acetic acid/lugol's iodine (VIA/VILI) and/or 3 does prophylactic bivalent HPV vaccine administered to adolescent girls at the age of 15 years old every year under the assumption that vaccine coverage and screening coverage were 70%. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), optimal price of 3 does vaccine and cost-effectiveness frontier of these strategies were analyzed compared with no-intervention. The ICER threshold is 152 087 CNY. Results: Compared with no-intervention, Routine vaccination reduced the incidence of cervical cancer by 69.5%, superior to 5 strategies including VIA/VILI screening only. The range of effect was between 9.0% and 69.2%, and the effect of strategy increased significantly with the increase of screening frequency. Combination vaccination with screening at ages of 35 reduced the incidence of cervical cancer by 72.0%, and the effect increased with the increase of screening frequency. Combination vaccination with screening every 3 years between (35-64) years old reduced the incidence by 89.4%. Compared with no-intervention, the ICER of combination vaccination with screening twice between 35 years and 64 years was 121 292 CNY/life-year, which was cost-effective. The price of vaccine had a significant impact on the ICER of the strategy; when the vaccine price was less than 600 CNY, only routine vaccination or supplementary vaccination between 16-39 years old after routine vaccination was cost-effective; when the vaccine price was less than 1 200 CNY, supplementary vaccination between 16-19 years old plus VIA/VILI was cost-effective. Conclusion: Ther prevention strategy was cost-effective, which could

  15. Immunogenicity and safety of an E. coli-produced bivalent human papillomavirus (type 16 and 18) vaccine: A randomized controlled phase 2 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Hu, Yue-Mei; Li, Juan; Chu, Kai; Huang, Shou-Jie; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zhong-Ze; Yang, Chang-Lin; Jiang, Han-Min; Wang, Yi-Jun; Lin, Zhi-Jie; Pan, Hui-Rong; Sheng, Wei; Wei, Fei-Xue; Li, Shao-Wei; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Li, Chang-Gui; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-07-31

    This study aimed to investigate the dosage, immunogenicity and safety profile of a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 bivalent vaccine produced by E. coli. This randomized, double-blinded, controlled phase 2 trial enrolled women aged 18-25 years in China. Totally 1600 eligible participants were randomized to receive 90μg, 60μg, or 30μg of the recombinant HPV 16/18 bivalent vaccine or the control hepatitis B vaccine on a 0, 1 and 6 month schedule. The designated doses are the combined micrograms of HPV16 and 18 VLPs with dose ratio of 2:1. The immunogenicity of the vaccines was assessed by measuring anti-HPV 16 and 18 neutralizing antibodies and total IgG antibodies. Safety of the vaccine was assessed. All but one of the seronegative participants who received 3 doses of the HPV vaccines seroconverted at month 7 for anti-HPV 16/18 neutralizing antibodies and IgG antibodies. For HPV 16, the geometric mean titers (GMTs) of the neutralizing antibodies were similar between the 60μg (GMT=10,548) and 90μg (GMT=12,505) HPV vaccine groups and were significantly higher than those in the 30μg (GMT=7596) group. For HPV 18, the GMTs of the neutralizing antibodies were similar among the 3 groups. The HPV vaccine was well tolerated. No vaccine-associated serious adverse events were identified. The prokaryotic-expressed HPV vaccine is safe and immunogenic in women aged 18-25 years. The 60μg dosage formulation was selected for further investigation for efficacy. NCT01356823. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parents' knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow young males to receive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muhwezi, Wilson Winstons; Banura, Cecily; Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008-2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent's knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10-23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p = 0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p = 0.006), thought their son(s) couldn't contract HPV (p = 0.010), didn't know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p = 0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p = 0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p = 0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital.

  17. Parents' Knowledge, Risk Perception and Willingness to Allow Young Males to Receive Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Muhwezi, Wilson Winstons; Banura, Cecily; Turiho, Andrew Kampikaho; Mirembe, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in Uganda in collaboration with the Program for Appropriate Technology for Health (PATH) supported by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2008–2009 vaccinated approximately 10,000 girls with the bivalent humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. We assessed parent's knowledge, risk perception and willingness to allow son(s) to receive HPV vaccines in future through a cross-sectional survey of secondary school boys aged 10–23 years in 4 districts. 377 questionnaires were distributed per district and 870 were used in analysis. Parents that had ever heard about cervical cancer and HPV vaccines; those who would allow daughter(s) to be given the vaccine and those who thought that HPV infection was associated with genital warts were more willing to allow son(s) to receive the HPV vaccine. Unwilling parents considered HPV vaccination of boys unimportant (p = 0.003), believed that only females should receive the vaccine (p = 0.006), thought their son(s) couldn't contract HPV (p = 0.010), didn't know about HPV sexual transmissibility (p = 0.002), knew that males could not acquire HPV (p = 0.000) and never believed that the HPV vaccines could protect against HPV (p = 0.000). Acceptance of HPV vaccination of daughters and likelihood of recommending HPV vaccines to son(s) of friends and relatives predicted parental willingness to allow sons to receive HPV vaccines. Probable HPV vaccination of boys is a viable complement to that of girls. Successfulness of HPV vaccination relies on parental acceptability and sustained sensitization about usefulness of HPV vaccines even for boys is vital. PMID:25203053

  18. Young Hungarian Students’ Knowledge about HPV and Their Attitude Toward HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Bettina Claudia; Terebessy, András; Tóth, Emese; Balázs, Péter

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Hungarys’s estimated cervical cancer mortality was 6.9/100,000 in 2012, above the average of the EU27 countries (3.7/100,000) in the same year. Since 2014, the bivalent HPV vaccine has been offered to schoolgirls aged 12–13. (2) Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 1022 high school seniors (492 girls, 530 boys) in 19 randomly selected schools in Budapest. Our anonymous questionnaire contained 54 items: basic socio-demographic data, knowledge about HPV infection/cervical cancer and HPV vaccination. (3) Results: 54.9% knew that HPV caused cervical cancer, and 52.1% identified HPV as an STD. Knowledge of risk factors such as promiscuity (46.9%) and early sexual activity (15.6%) was low, but higher than that of further HPV-induced diseases: genital warts (in females 9.9%, in males 9%), anal cancer (in females 2.2%, in males 1.9%), penile cancer (9.4%), and vulvar cancer (7.8%). A percentage of 14.6% feared getting infected, and 35.7% supported compulsory HPV vaccination. A percentage of 51.2% would have their future children vaccinated—significantly more girls than boys. (4) Conclusion: Our results support the findings of previous studies about young adults’ HPV-related knowledge, which was poor, especially regarding pathologies in men. Despite the low level of awareness, the students’ attitude was mostly positive when asked about vaccinating their future children. PMID:28036070

  19. Potential impact of a nonavalent HPV vaccine on the occurrence of HPV-related diseases in France.

    PubMed

    Riethmuller, Didier; Jacquard, Anne-Carole; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Aubin, François; Carcopino, Xavier; Pradat, Pierre; Dahlab, André; Prétet, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-02

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to be associated with a number of conditions including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal neoplasias and cancers, oropharynx cancers and genitals warts (GW). Two prophylactic vaccines are currently available: a bivalent vaccine designed to prevent HPV type 16 and 18 infection and a quadrivalent vaccine targeting HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18. In France, HPV vaccination is recommended in 11-14 year-old girls with a catch-up for girls aged 15-19. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impact of an HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 nonavalent vaccine on anogenital and oropharyngeal HPV-related diseases in France. HPV genotype distributions from 6 multicentric retrospective studies (EDiTH I to VI) were analyzed including 516 cases of invasive cervical cancers (ICC), 493 high-grade cervical neoplasias (CIN2/3), 397 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 423 GW, 366 anal cancer and 314 oropharyngeal carcinomas. Low and high estimates of HPV vaccine impact were calculated as follows: low estimate: prevalence of HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 genotypes alone or in association but excluding presence of another HPV type; high estimate: prevalence of HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 genotypes alone or in association, possibly in presence of another HPV type. Estimates of potential impact varied from 85% (low estimate) to 92% (high estimate) for ICC, 77% to 90% for CIN2/3, 26% to 56% for LSIL, 69% to 90% for GW, 81% to 93% for anal cancer, and 41% to 44% for oropharyngeal carcinomas. Compared to the quadrivalent vaccine, the proportion of additional cases potentially prevented by the nonavalent vaccine was 9.9%-15.3% for ICC, 24.7%-33.3% for CIN2/3, 12.3%-22.7% for LSIL, 2.1%-5.4% for GW, 8.5%-10.4% for anal cancer, and 0.0%-1.6% for oropharyngeal carcinoma. The nonavalent HPV vaccine showed significant increased potential impact compared to the HPV 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent vaccine for ICC, CIN2/3 and LSIL

  20. An anal cancer screening program for MSM in Italy: Prevalence of multiple HPV types and vaccine-targeted infections.

    PubMed

    Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Gentile, Marco; Del Nonno, Franca; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Lapa, Daniele; Lupi, Federico; Pinnetti, Carmela; Baiocchini, Andrea; Libertone, Raffaella; Cicalini, Stefania; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ammassari, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    Elevated HPV infection rates have been described in HIV-positive males, placing these subjects at high risk of anal neoplasia. Bivalent, quadrivalent, and nonavalent vaccines to prevent HPV infection have been developed, and recently proposed for gender-neutral immunization programs. In order to estimate the benefit that could be obtained by vaccination of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), we aimed at describing the frequency of multiple and vaccine-targeted HPV infections in MSM enrolled in an anal cancer screening program. The anal cancer screening program was conducted between July 2009 and October 2012. Mucosal anal samples were tested for HPV DNA using MY09/MY11 PCR primers and, if positive, genotyped using the CLART2HPV Clinical Array (35HPV types). A total of 220 MSM were screened and 88.6% were positive for HPV DNA: in 86.5% at least one high-risk (HR) type was found and in 13% only low-risk (LR) HPV were found. Multiple infections accounted for 84.5% of HPV DNA-positive cases and overall 160 different HPV genotype combinations were recognized (only three combinations were detected in more than one patient each). Based on strain coverage, at least one vaccine-targeted HPV type was found in 38.9%, 64%, and 78.4% of cases when considering bivalent, quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines, respectively. At least one HR vaccine-targeted strain was found in 39% of MSM for bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines, and in 64% of cases for nonavalent prevention. Anal HPV infections in unvaccinated mostly HIV-infected MSM are highly prevalent. The majority of this population has multiple infections with an extremely heterogeneous number of genotype combinations. The nonavalent vaccine could theoretically have prevented a minimum of one HR HPV type in two thirds of subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Burden of disease associated with cervical cancer in malaysia and potential costs and consequences of HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Aljunid, S; Zafar, A; Saperi, S; Amrizal, M

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 70% of cervical cancers worldwide are attributable to persistent infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 and 18. Vaccination against HPV 16/18 has been shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of associated precancerous and cancerous lesions. The aims of the present analyses were, firstly, to estimate the clinical and economic burden of disease attributable to HPV in Malaysia and secondly, to estimate long-term outcomes associated with HPV vaccination using a prevalence-based modeling approach. In the first part of the analysis costs attributable to cervical cancer and precancerous lesions were estimated; epidemiologic data were sourced from the WHO GLOBOCAN database and Malaysian national data sources. In the second part, a prevalence-based model was used to estimate the potential annual number of cases of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions that could be prevented and subsequent HPV-related treatment costs averted with the bivalent (HPV 16/18) and the quadrivalent (HPV 16/18/6/11) vaccines, at the population level, at steady state. A vaccine efficacy of 98% was assumed against HPV types included in both vaccines. Effectiveness against other oncogenic HPV types was based on the latest results from each vaccine's respective clinical trials. In Malaysia there are an estimated 4,696 prevalent cases of cervical cancer annually and 1,372 prevalent cases of precancerous lesions, which are associated with a total direct cost of RM 39.2 million with a further RM 12.4 million in indirect costs owing to lost productivity. At steady state, vaccination with the bivalent vaccine was estimated to prevent 4,199 cervical cancer cases per year versus 3,804 cases for the quadrivalent vaccine. Vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine was projected to prevent 1,721 cases of genital warts annually, whereas the annual number of cases remained unchanged with the bivalent vaccine. Furthermore, vaccination with the bivalent vaccine was estimated to avert RM 45

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccines from a societal perspective in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Aponte-González, Johanna; Fajardo-Bernal, Luisa; Diaz, Jorge; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Gamboa, Oscar; Hay, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    To compare costs and effectiveness of three strategies used against cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts: (i) Screening for CC; (ii) Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccine added to screening; (iii) Quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine added to screening. A Markov model was designed in order to simulate the natural history of the disease from 12 years of age (vaccination) until death. Transition probabilities were selected or adjusted to match the HPV infection profile in Colombia. A systematic review was undertaken in order to derive efficacy values for the two vaccines as well as for the operational characteristics of the cytology test. The societal perspective was used. Effectiveness was measured in number of averted Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYS). At commercial prices reported for 2010 the two vaccines were shown to be non-cost-effective alternatives when compared with the existing screening strategy. Sensitivity analyses showed that results are affected by the cost of vaccines and their efficacy values, making it difficult to determine with certainty which of the two vaccines has the best cost-effectiveness profile. To be 'cost-effective' vaccines should cost between 141 and 147 USD (Unite States Dollars) per vaccinated girl at the most. But at lower prices such as those recommended by WHO or the price of other vaccines in Colombia, HPV vaccination could be considered very cost-effective. HPV vaccination could be a convenient alternative for the prevention of CC in Colombia. However, the price of the vaccine should be lower for this vaccination strategy to be cost-effective. It is also important to take into consideration the willingness to pay, budgetary impact, and program implications, in order to determine the relevance of a vaccination program in this country, as well as which vaccine should be selected for use in the program.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Bivalent and Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccines from a Societal Perspective in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-González, Johanna; Fajardo-Bernal, Luisa; Diaz, Jorge; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Gamboa, Oscar; Hay, Joel W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare costs and effectiveness of three strategies used against cervical cancer (CC) and genital warts: (i) Screening for CC; (ii) Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccine added to screening; (iii) Quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine added to screening. Methods A Markov model was designed in order to simulate the natural history of the disease from 12 years of age (vaccination) until death. Transition probabilities were selected or adjusted to match the HPV infection profile in Colombia. A systematic review was undertaken in order to derive efficacy values for the two vaccines as well as for the operational characteristics of the cytology test. The societal perspective was used. Effectiveness was measured in number of averted Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYS). Results At commercial prices reported for 2010 the two vaccines were shown to be non-cost-effective alternatives when compared with the existing screening strategy. Sensitivity analyses showed that results are affected by the cost of vaccines and their efficacy values, making it difficult to determine with certainty which of the two vaccines has the best cost-effectiveness profile. To be ‘cost-effective’ vaccines should cost between 141 and 147 USD (Unite States Dollars) per vaccinated girl at the most. But at lower prices such as those recommended by WHO or the price of other vaccines in Colombia, HPV vaccination could be considered very cost-effective. Conclusions HPV vaccination could be a convenient alternative for the prevention of CC in Colombia. However, the price of the vaccine should be lower for this vaccination strategy to be cost-effective. It is also important to take into consideration the willingness to pay, budgetary impact, and program implications, in order to determine the relevance of a vaccination program in this country, as well as which vaccine should be selected for use in the program. PMID:24260441

  4. [Human PAPILLOMA Virus (HPV) vaccine].

    PubMed

    Safra, Tamar

    2007-10-01

    A solid tumor related to viral infection is a rare and challenging condition to the medical community raising the possibility to fight and prevent this cancer by vaccine. Cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is a major health problem worldwide. The two HPV vaccines approved lately could lead to more than a 70% reduction in cases of cervical cancer and a similar reduction in deaths from the cancer. Pap smear screening significantly (80%) reduced disease incidence and is still useful and needed. In addition to early detection, vaccination will prevent the development of precancerous and cancerous lesion and reduce morbidity, mortality and psychological and social stress as well as stressful and expensive follow-ups in women with suspicious lesions. The vaccinations described will bring to a significant reduction in genital warts incidence, a serious social and psychological burden to the infected population. Practical social and psychological issues are still to be addressed, some of them are: time and frequency of administration, use of vaccination in men, public acceptance and behavior, appropriate populations to be vaccinated, etc. Most unresolved questions will be answered over time. The new vaccines embody a big promise to humanity, although we still have to overcome the financial burden and possible late side effects of the vaccine.

  5. GTL001, a bivalent therapeutic vaccine against human papillomavirus 16 and 18, induces antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses leading to tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Michaël; Bouillette-Marussig, Myriam; Goubier, Anne; Momot, Marie; Gonindard, Christophe; Keller, Hélène; Navarro, Astrid; Bissery, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    Prophylactic vaccines are available for women and girls not yet infected with HPV, but women already infected with HPV need a treatment to prevent progression to high-grade cervical lesions and cancer. GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine for eradicating HPV-infected cells that contains HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7 both fused to detoxified adenylate cyclase from Bordetella pertussis, which binds specifically to CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells. This study examined the ability of therapeutic vaccination with GTL001 adjuvanted with topical imiquimod cream to induce functional HPV16 E7- and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Binding of GTL001 to human CD11b was assessed by a cell-based competition binding assay. Cellular immunogenicity of intradermal vaccination with GTL001 was assessed in C57BL/6 mice by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and in vivo killing assays. In vivo efficacy of GTL001 vaccination was investigated in the TC-1 murine HPV16 E7-expressing tumor model. GTL001 bound specifically to the human CD11b/CD18 receptor. GTL001 adjuvanted with topical 5% imiquimod cream induced HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses. This CD8+ T-cell response mediated in vivo killing of HPV E7-expressing cells. In the HPV16 E7-expressing tumor model, GTL001 adjuvanted with imiquimod but not imiquimod alone or a combination of unconjugated HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7 caused complete tumor regression. GTL001 adjuvanted with topical 5% imiquimod is immunogenic and induces HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses that can kill HPV E7-expressing cells and eliminate HPV E7-expressing tumors.

  6. GTL001, a bivalent therapeutic vaccine against human papillomavirus 16 and 18, induces antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses leading to tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Michaël; Bouillette-Marussig, Myriam; Goubier, Anne; Momot, Marie; Gonindard, Christophe; Keller, Hélène; Navarro, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background Prophylactic vaccines are available for women and girls not yet infected with HPV, but women already infected with HPV need a treatment to prevent progression to high-grade cervical lesions and cancer. GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine for eradicating HPV-infected cells that contains HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7 both fused to detoxified adenylate cyclase from Bordetella pertussis, which binds specifically to CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells. This study examined the ability of therapeutic vaccination with GTL001 adjuvanted with topical imiquimod cream to induce functional HPV16 E7- and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Methods Binding of GTL001 to human CD11b was assessed by a cell-based competition binding assay. Cellular immunogenicity of intradermal vaccination with GTL001 was assessed in C57BL/6 mice by enzyme-linked immunospot assay and in vivo killing assays. In vivo efficacy of GTL001 vaccination was investigated in the TC-1 murine HPV16 E7-expressing tumor model. Results GTL001 bound specifically to the human CD11b/CD18 receptor. GTL001 adjuvanted with topical 5% imiquimod cream induced HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses. This CD8+ T-cell response mediated in vivo killing of HPV E7-expressing cells. In the HPV16 E7-expressing tumor model, GTL001 adjuvanted with imiquimod but not imiquimod alone or a combination of unconjugated HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7 caused complete tumor regression. Conclusions GTL001 adjuvanted with topical 5% imiquimod is immunogenic and induces HPV16 E7 and HPV18 E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses that can kill HPV E7-expressing cells and eliminate HPV E7-expressing tumors. PMID:28301611

  7. Age considerations when vaccinating against HPV.

    PubMed

    Wright, Thomas C; Huh, Warner K; Monk, Bradley J; Smith, Jennifer S; Ault, Kevin; Herzog, Thomas J

    2008-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been shown to be both highly effective and safe, and there is now considerable enthusiasm among healthcare providers to use the vaccines to reduce the burden of HPV-associated disease in women. When considering who should be vaccinated, it is important that providers understand the complex relationships between age and HPV infections. HPV infections and cervical cancer have a widespread impact on society. Cervical cancer is the cause of a significant amount of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, making it crucial to implement prophylactic HPV vaccines to prevent cervical cancer. Nationally, the target group for vaccination is pre-adolescent females who have not been sexually active or who have recently become sexually active. In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends HPV vaccination for females aged 11 to 12 years. "Catch-up" vaccination of females aged 13 to 26 years who have not been previously vaccinated or who have missed a vaccination is also recommended, as females within this age group have the highest prevalence of HPV infection. Vaccination can still benefit females over the age of 26 years who have not been previously exposed to HPV 6, 11, 16, or 18 and those who may have new sexual partners in the future. This review discusses the various considerations that should be addressed when making recommendations of who should be vaccinated against HPV.

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infections and the Importance of HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chia-ching J.

    2016-01-01

    HPV persistence is necessary for the development of anogenital cancer. Studies show that cervical and anal HPV infections in women and in men who have sex with men are common. Clearance of HPV infection is similarly common; few individuals show persistence unless they are HIV-infected. HIV strongly influences the development of cervical and anal cancer, as well as their pre-malignant counterparts. Women with cervical and vulvar HPV-associated lesions have higher rates of anal cancer than the general population. HPV also plays an important role in pathogenesis of head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal cancer. Two commercially available HPV vaccines have been proven to be safe and efficacious against cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions; one of these has also been shown to prevent HPV16/18-associated anal lesions. The FDA has also just approved a new nonavalent HPV vaccine. HPV vaccines will play an important role in prevention of HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27500080

  9. Parent HPV vaccine perspectives and the likelihood of HPV vaccination of adolescent males.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah J; Cowan, Anne E; Filipp, Stephanie L; Fisher, Allison M; Stokley, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, approximately one-third of US adolescent males age 13-17 y had received ≥1 doses of HPV vaccines and only 14% had received ≥3 doses. This study used a nationally representative, online survey to explore experiences and attitudes related to HPV vaccination among parents with adolescent sons. Analyses compared the perspective of parents who do not intend to initiate HPV vaccine for ≥1 adolescent son to that of parents who are likely to initiate or continue HPV vaccination. Of 809 parents of sons age 11-17 years, half were classified as Unlikely to Initiate HPV vaccination and 39% as Likely to Vaccinate. A higher proportion of the Likely to Vaccinate group felt their son's doctor was knowledgeable about HPV vaccine, did a good job explaining its purpose, and spent more time discussing HPV vaccine; in contrast, over half of the Unlikely to Initiate group had never discussed HPV vaccine with their child's doctor. The majority of parents in both groups showed favorable attitudes to adolescent vaccination in general, with lower levels of support for HPV vaccine-specific statements. Physician-parent communication around HPV vaccine for adolescent males should build on positive attitude toward vaccines in general, while addressing parents' HPV vaccine-specific concerns.

  10. Literature review of vaccine-related adverse events reported from HPV vaccination in randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Dabaja, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) infections were addressed with two FDA-approved HPV vaccines: quadrivalent and bivalent vaccine. The objective of this manuscript is to determine the safety of the HPV vaccine. A search of PubMed articles for "human papillomavirus vaccine" was used to identify all-type HPV clinical studies prior to October 2014. A refined search of clinical trials, multicenter studies, and randomized studies were screened for only randomized controlled trials comparing HPV vaccine to controls (saline placebo or aluminum derivatives). Studies were limited to the two FDA-approved vaccines. Following PRISMA guidelines, the literature review rendered 13 publications that met inclusion/ exclusion criteria. Gender was limited to females in 10 studies and males in 1 study. Two studies included both males and females. Of the 11,189 individuals in 7 publications reporting cumulative, all-type adverse events (AE), the AE incidence of 76.52 % (n = 4544) in the vaccinated group was statistically significantly higher than 67.57 % (n = 3548) in the control group (p < 0.001). The most common AE were injection-site reactions. On the other hand, systemic symptoms did not statistically significantly differ between the vaccination cohort (35.28 %, n = 3351) and the control cohort (36.14 %, n = 3198) (p = 0.223). The pregnancy/ perinatal outcomes rendered no statistically significant difference between the vaccine group and control group. Because the statistically significantly higher incidence of AE in the HPV vaccine group was primarily limited to injection-site reactions, the vaccinations are safe preventative measures in both males and females.

  11. Mother-daughter communication about HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Reiter, Paul L; Gottlieb, Sami L; Brewer, Noel T

    2011-03-01

    Parent-child conversations about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may provide parents with the opportunity to talk with their daughters about sexual health. We sought to characterize mothers' communication with their adolescent daughters about HPV vaccine. We surveyed 609 mothers of girls aged between 11 and 20 years living in North Carolina in Fall 2008. We used logistic regression to identify the correlates of mother-daughter communication. Most mothers (81%) reported having discussed HPV vaccine with their daughters. For almost half of these families (47%), discussion of HPV vaccine led to a conversation about sex. This was more common among mothers who believed that their daughters may be sexually active (odds ratio [OR]: 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-2.83), had greater knowledge of HPV vaccine (OR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.07-5.64), lived in urban areas (OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 1.21-2.54), or reported being born-again Christians (OR: 1.74; 95% CI: 1.17-2.58). Most mothers who talked with their daughters about HPV vaccine reported having discussed the reasons for and against getting vaccinated (86%). Mothers most commonly reported having discussed the potential HPV vaccine benefits, usually protection against cervical cancer (56%), and less frequently reported having discussed the perceived disadvantages of HPV vaccine. HPV vaccine conversations may provide opportunities for sexual health promotion and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Mother-daughter communication about HPV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Reiter, Paul L.; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Parent-child conversations about HPV vaccine may provide parents with opportunities to talk with their daughters about sexual health. We sought to characterize mothers’ communication with their adolescent daughters about HPV vaccine. Methods We surveyed 609 mothers of girls aged 11–20 living in North Carolina in fall 2008. We used logistic regression to identify correlates of mother-daughter communication. Results Most mothers (81%) reported discussing HPV vaccine with their daughters. For almost half of these families (47%), discussing HPV vaccine led to a conversation about sex. This was more common among mothers who believed their daughters may be sexually active (OR: 1.88, 95%CI: 1.25–2.83), had greater knowledge of HPV vaccine (OR: 2.46, 95%CI: 1.07–5.64), lived in urban areas (OR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.21–2.54), or reported being born-again Christians (OR: 1.74, 95%CI: 1.17–2.58). Most mothers who talked with their daughters about HPV vaccine reported discussing reasons for and against getting vaccinated (86%). Mothers most commonly reported discussing potential HPV vaccine benefits, usually protection against cervical cancer (56%), and less frequently reported discussing perceived negatives of HPV vaccine. Conclusions HPV vaccine conversations may provide opportunities for sexual health promotion and STI prevention. PMID:21338906

  13. HPV Vaccine utilization, Alberta 2008/09-2013/14 School year.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianfang C; Bell, Christopher A; Simmonds, Kimberley A; Russell, Margaret L; Svenson, Lawrence W

    2016-01-13

    In Canada both bivalent (bHPV) vaccine and quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV) are authorized for use. In Alberta, while both vaccines are available for private purchase, only qHPV is publicly funded for school girls in grades 5 and 9 as of 2013. We describe HPV vaccine uptake in Alberta, by school year, from the start of the publicly funded program in the Fall of 2008 through to August 31(st) 2014 and estimate the cumulative proportion of the female population who were vaccinated by the end of the 2013/14 school year. We used data from the Alberta Ministry of Health Immunization and Adverse Reaction to Immunization repository (publicly funded vaccine), the population-based Pharmaceutical Information Network information systems (privately purchased vaccine) for the period September 1, 2008 to August 31, 2014 and demographic data from the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan Registry. We estimate vaccine uptake rates and explore them by attributes of person, time, place, vaccine funding, and number of doses received. We estimated the cumulative proportions of the female population (by age group and number of doses received) who had received HPV vaccine by the end of the 2013/14 school year. Of the 169,259 unique individuals who received one or more doses of HPV vaccine over the period, 98.3% were females, and 83.8% received publicly funded vaccines. Vaccine uptake increased over the period. The cumulative proportion of females aged 9-26 years as of 2013/14 who had received two or more doses of vaccine was 34.3%; for those aged 10-11 years 59.6% and for those aged 14-15 years, 76.0%. For those aged 9-26 years, 31.3% had received three doses of vaccine. HPV vaccine uptake rates have increased in Alberta over the study period, most prominently among the age groups targeted by the publicly funded school-girl vaccine program.

  14. A comparative analysis of the epidemiological impact and disease cost-savings of HPV vaccines in France.

    PubMed

    Bresse, Xavier; Adam, Marjorie; Largeron, Nathalie; Roze, Stephane; Marty, Rémi

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to compare the epidemiological and economic impact of 16/18 bivalent and 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent HPV vaccination in France, considering differences in licensed outcomes, protection against non-vaccine HPV types and prevention of HPV-6/11-related diseases. The differential impact of the two vaccines was evaluated using a published model adapted to the French setting. The target population was females aged 14-23 y and the time horizon was 100 y. A total of eight different scenarios compared vaccination impact in terms of reduction in HPV-16/18-associated carcinomas (cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile and head and neck), HPV-6/11-related genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and incremental reduction in cervical cancer due to potential cross-protection. Quadrivalent vaccine was associated with total discounted cost savings ranging from EUR 544-1,020 million vs. EUR 177-538 million with the bivalent vaccination (100-y time horizon). Genital wart prevention thanks to quadrivalent HPV vaccination accounted for EUR 306-380 million savings (37-56% of costs saved). In contrast, the maximal assumed cross-protection against cervical cancer resulted in EUR 13-33 million savings (4%). Prevention of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers accounted for additional EUR 71-89 million savings (13%). In France, the quadrivalent HPV vaccination would result in significant incremental epidemiological and economic benefits vs. the bivalent vaccination, driven primarily by prevention of genital. The present analysis is the first in the French setting to consider the impact of HPV vaccination on all HPV diseases and non-vaccine types.

  15. A comparative analysis of the epidemiological impact and disease cost-savings of HPV vaccines in France

    PubMed Central

    Bresse, Xavier; Adam, Marjorie; Largeron, Nathalie; Roze, Stephane; Marty, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to compare the epidemiological and economic impact of 16/18 bivalent and 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent HPV vaccination in France, considering differences in licensed outcomes, protection against non-vaccine HPV types and prevention of HPV-6/11-related diseases. The differential impact of the two vaccines was evaluated using a published model adapted to the French setting. The target population was females aged 14–23 y and the time horizon was 100 y. A total of eight different scenarios compared vaccination impact in terms of reduction in HPV-16/18-associated carcinomas (cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal, penile and head and neck), HPV-6/11-related genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and incremental reduction in cervical cancer due to potential cross-protection. Quadrivalent vaccine was associated with total discounted cost savings ranging from EUR 544–1,020 million vs. EUR 177–538 million with the bivalent vaccination (100-y time horizon). Genital wart prevention thanks to quadrivalent HPV vaccination accounted for EUR 306–380 million savings (37–56% of costs saved). In contrast, the maximal assumed cross-protection against cervical cancer resulted in EUR 13–33 million savings (4%). Prevention of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers accounted for additional EUR 71–89 million savings (13%). In France, the quadrivalent HPV vaccination would result in significant incremental epidemiological and economic benefits vs. the bivalent vaccination, driven primarily by prevention of genital. The present analysis is the first in the French setting to consider the impact of HPV vaccination on all HPV diseases and non-vaccine types. PMID:23563511

  16. Innovations in HPV vaccination and roles of nurses in cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Julide Gulizar; Arabaci, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is the main aetiological agent for cervical cancer, one of the most frequent cancers observed in women throughout the world. There are effective programs for reducing the incidence of cervical cancer with HPV vaccination. The objective of this study was to discuss the applicability of the HPV vaccination and the role of nurses in prevention of cervical cancer. Use of bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines has been initiated against the types of HPV which are the primary cause of cancer. The quadrivalent HPV vaccination has entered into the routine vaccination schedule in many European countries for use in children and adolescents between 9-15 years of age and for women between 16-26 years of age, whereas it has been proposed that the bivalent vaccination should be given to girls between 9-18 years of age. While cervical cancer is among the cancers that can be prevented, it is essential to continue screening tests while introducing vaccination in a systematic manner for protection. On this subject, among the most important roles of nurses is to implement the screening programs by fulfilling the caregiving, training and consultancy roles for the society and especially, for high risk groups and to increase the awareness of the people.

  17. Detection of systemic and mucosal HPV-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in adolescent girls one and two years after HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; de Melker, Hester E.; Berbers, Guy A.M.; van der Klis, Fiona R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine induces high antibody concentrations in serum while data about antibody responses in the cervix are limited. In this study, we investigated pre- and post-vaccination antibody responses against seven high-risk HPV types by detection of IgG and IgA HPV-specific antibodies in cervical secretion samples (CVS) and serum. From an HPV vaccine monitoring study CVS and serum samples were available (pre-vaccination (n = 297), one year (n = 211) and two years (n = 141) post-dose-one vaccination) from girls aged 14–16 y. The girls were vaccinated with the bivalent HPV vaccine at months 0, 1 and 6. CVS was self-sampled using a tampon. Samples were tested for HPV-specific antibodies (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) by a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Post-vaccination, IgG and IgA antibody levels for HPV16/18 were detectable in CVS and amounted to 2% and 1% of the IgG and IgA antibody levels observed in serum, respectively. The antibody levels remained constant between one and two years after vaccination. The correlation between CVS and serum was similar for IgG and IgA vaccine-derived antibody levels for HPV16 (rs = 0.58, rs = 0.54) and HPV18 (rs = 0.50, rs = 0.55). Vaccine-derived IgG antibody levels against cross-reactive HPV types in CVS and in serum were highest for HPV45. No IgA cross-reactive antibody responses could be detected in CVS. Post-vaccination, HPV16/18 IgG and IgA antibodies are not only detectable in serum but also in CVS. The correlation of HPV16/18 IgG antibody levels between serum and CVS suggests that vaccine induced HPV antibodies transudate and/or exudate from the systemic circulation to the cervical mucosa to provide protection against HPV infections. PMID:23149693

  18. Detection of systemic and mucosal HPV-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in adolescent girls one and two years after HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Mollers, Madelief; Schepp, Rutger M; Meijer, Chris J L M; de Melker, Hester E; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-02-01

    The bivalent HPV16/18 vaccine induces high antibody concentrations in serum while data about antibody responses in the cervix are limited. In this study, we investigated pre- and post-vaccination antibody responses against seven high-risk HPV types by detection of IgG and IgA HPV-specific antibodies in cervical secretion samples (CVS) and serum. From an HPV vaccine monitoring study CVS and serum samples were available (pre-vaccination (n = 297), one year (n = 211) and two years (n = 141) post-dose-one vaccination) from girls aged 14-16 y. The girls were vaccinated with the bivalent HPV vaccine at months 0, 1 and 6. CVS was self-sampled using a tampon. Samples were tested for HPV-specific antibodies (HPV16/18/31/33/45/52/58) by a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay. Post-vaccination, IgG and IgA antibody levels for HPV16/18 were detectable in CVS and amounted to 2% and 1% of the IgG and IgA antibody levels observed in serum, respectively. The antibody levels remained constant between one and two years after vaccination. The correlation between CVS and serum was similar for IgG and IgA vaccine-derived antibody levels for HPV16 (rs = 0.58, rs = 0.54) and HPV18 (rs = 0.50, rs = 0.55). Vaccine-derived IgG antibody levels against cross-reactive HPV types in CVS and in serum were highest for HPV45. No IgA cross-reactive antibody responses could be detected in CVS. Post-vaccination, HPV16/18 IgG and IgA antibodies are not only detectable in serum but also in CVS. The correlation of HPV16/18 IgG antibody levels between serum and CVS suggests that vaccine induced HPV antibodies transudate and/or exudate from the systemic circulation to the cervical mucosa to provide protection against HPV infections.

  19. Safety and perception: What are the greatest enemies of HPV vaccination programmes?

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Paolo; Zanella, Beatrice; Santomauro, Francesca; Lorini, Chiara; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2017-06-10

    Vaccines stimulate a person's immune system to produce an adequate reaction against a specific infectious agent; i.e. the person is protected from that disease without having to get it first. As vaccines are administrated to healthy subjects, they are held to the highest standards of safety. Regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, at present three prophylactic vaccines are licensed (bivalent HPV 16/18, quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 and the nonovalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine). Pre- and post-licensure studies (i.e. not yet for nonovalent HPV vaccine) confirm that HPV vaccines are generally safe and well-tolerated, site injections symptoms are the most common adverse events (AEs) reported, and pain is the most frequently referred local symptom. Serious AEs are rare and not associated with severe sequelae, at least no vaccine-related deaths have occurred. Despite these scientific evidences, it is still difficult to explain to the population the importance of a good vaccination programme. There are many determinants for HPV vaccines hesitancy which represent a barrier that must be overcome in order to increase vaccine coverage, including psychological reactions, religious or cultural aspects, and fear of possible AEs (demyelinating diseases, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - CRPS, or Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome - POTS). A weak communication strategy which frequently suffers due to spread of unverified news by media and websites may lead to the failure of a vaccination programme. Such a situation happened in Japan (2013), due to which a great number of women remain vulnerable to HPV-related cancers. In order to resolve the issues around HPV vaccines acceptance, it is necessary to use good communication strategies. Multicomponent and dialogue-based interventions seem to be the most effective, especially if an adequate language is used, customized according to the vaccination programme target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. HPV vaccine: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushil; Biswas, Manash; Jose, Tony

    2015-01-01

    HPV Vaccine was introduced to prevent cervical cancer known to be caused by infection with one or more of the high risk subtypes of the Human papilloma virus (HPV). Since introduction, trials have proven its efficacy in preventing Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) beyond doubt and its effectiveness in preventing cervical cancer though presumptive is reasonably certain as per mathematical modelling. It also prevents other HPV related anogenital and oropharyngeal malignancies in both sexes. HPV vaccines have courted many controversies related to its efficacy, safety, ideal age of vaccination, use in HPV infected individuals and use in males. The currently available vaccines are based on L1 Viral like particles (VLP) and hence highly species specific, thermolabile, costly and are purely prophylactic. The quest for a cheaper, thermostable and broad spectrum vaccine has led to many newer prophylactic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines were born out of the inescapable necessity considering high HPV related morbidity projected in the non HPV naïve population. Therapeutic vaccines would immediately reduce this burden and also help in the management of HPV related cancers alone or as part of combination strategies. Ongoing research is aimed at a total control over HPV related malignancies in the near future. PMID:25859081

  1. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Cancer.gov

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  2. Strategies for Fostering HPV Vaccine Acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Gonik, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Vaccines that protect against infection with the types of human papillomavirus (HPV) commonly associated with cervical cancer (HPV 16 and 18) and genital warts (HPV 6 and 11) are expected to become available in the near future. Because HPV vaccines are prophylactic, they must be administered prior to exposure to the virus, ideally during preadolescence or adolescence. The young age of the target vaccination population means that physicians, parents, and patients will all be involved in the decision-making process. Research has shown that parents and patients are more likely to accept a vaccine if it is efficacious, safe, reasonably priced, and recommended by a physician. Widespread education of physicians, patients, and parents about the risks and consequences of HPV infection and the benefits of vaccination will be instrumental for fostering vaccine acceptance. PMID:16967911

  3. Adult women's attitudes toward the HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Short, Mary B; Rosenthal, Susan L; Sturm, Lynne; Black, Lora; Loza, Melissa; Breitkopf, Daniel; Zimet, Gregory D

    2010-07-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have demonstrated efficacy in preventing HPV infection and are currently being administered to adolescent girls in several countries. Although the most efficient HPV prevention strategy is immunizing adolescents before there is any risk of exposure, adult women also may benefit from vaccination. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of women aged 27-55 years toward the HPV vaccine. Thirty-eight women were recruited from a university-based gynecological practice, completed a demographic questionnaire, and then were interviewed. Most participants had heard about the vaccine and were positive about the HPV vaccine for adult women. Women advocated universal access to this vaccine, indicating that all women should have the option. They assessed their risk level in several ways, including level of monogamy, relationship status, previous sexual risk behaviors, history of an abnormal Pap smear, and family history. All but 2 woman described barriers to vaccination, including cost, side effects, and hassle factors. Most women did not believe the vaccine would change risk behaviors. The women from this convenience sample knew the HPV vaccine existed and in general found it acceptable. If an HPV vaccine becomes available to adult women, healthcare professionals will be faced with the challenge of providing accurate information, being sensitive and willing to help each individual woman make a decision, and being creative when developing new ways to eliminate barriers to getting the vaccine.

  4. GTL001 and bivalent CyaA-based therapeutic vaccine strategies against human papillomavirus and other tumor-associated antigens induce effector and memory T-cell responses that inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Michaël; Momot, Marie; Goubier, Anne; Gonindard, Christophe; Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Misseri, Yolande; Bissery, Marie-Christine

    2017-03-13

    GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine containing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 E7 proteins inserted in the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase (CyaA) vector intended to prevent cervical cancer in HPV-infected women with normal cervical cytology or mild abnormalities. To be effective, therapeutic cervical cancer vaccines should induce both a T cell-mediated effector response against HPV-infected cells and a robust CD8(+) T-cell memory response to prevent potential later infection. We examined the ability of GTL001 and related bivalent CyaA-based vaccines to induce, in parallel, effector and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses to both vaccine antigens. Intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with GTL001 adjuvanted with a TLR3 agonist (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or a TLR7 agonist (topical 5% imiquimod cream) induced strong HPV16 E7-specific T-cell responses capable of eradicating HPV16 E7-expressing tumors. Tumor-free mice also had antigen-specific memory T-cell responses that protected them against a subsequent challenge with HPV18 E7-expressing tumor cells. In addition, vaccination with bivalent vaccines containing CyaA-HPV16 E7 and CyaA fused to a tumor-associated antigen (melanoma-specific antigen A3, MAGEA3) or to a non-viral, non-tumor antigen (ovalbumin) eradicated HPV16 E7-expressing tumors and protected against a later challenge with MAGEA3- and ovalbumin-expressing tumor cells, respectively. These results show that CyaA-based bivalent vaccines such as GTL001 can induce both therapeutic and prophylactic anti-tumor T-cell responses. The CyaA platform can be adapted to different antigens and adjuvants, and therefore may be useful for developing other therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  6. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  7. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  8. Vaccine Reduces HPV Infections in Young Men

    Cancer.gov

    An international randomized clinical trial has shown that the vaccine Gardasil can reduce the incidence of anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in young men 16 to 26 years of age at the time of vaccination.

  9. [One decade of HPV vaccination in Germany].

    PubMed

    Schneede, P

    2017-06-01

    As a worldwide very common sexually transmitted infection (STI), HPV causes millions of genital warts every year and is responsible for 5% of all cancers in men and women. With strong empirical evidence for both vaccine safety and efficacy, the HPV vaccines proved to protect against these HPV-related conditions over the last decade. But current HPV vaccination coverage is suboptimal in many countries. Even in Germany the absence of a school-based immunization program and the recommendation of a publicly funded girls-only HPV vaccination strategy are the main reasons for a female coverage rate under 40%, which does not achieve herd immunity for the boys. Therefore, the German immunization program urgently needs revision to fight an increasing number of young Germans missing out on the most important development in cancer prevention. Gender-neutral bundling of the HPV vaccine to other routinely recommended vaccines for preteens at one visit will have many advantages at the same time: Lowering the age of HPV vaccination to 9-12 years will improve the cost-effectiveness because a two-dose vaccination schedule is established on this score. Time-consuming and redundant explanations of the attending physician as well as parent's discussion on feeling stigmatized by the STI nature of HPV could be avoided in a combined vaccination setting. By expanding the HPV vaccination to boys, the resulting gender-neutral vaccination program can be cost-effective if all HPV-related diseases which can be prevented by vaccination are considered.

  10. Deconstructing the measure of vaccine efficacy against disease irrespective of HPV in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Oliver M; Luxembourg, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines were licensed by demonstrating prevention of anogenital disease caused by specific HPV types in clinical studies. Measuring the impact of HPV vaccination on the overall burden of anogenital disease (irrespective of HPV) is an important public health question which is ideally addressed in post-licensure epidemiological studies. Attempts were made to use clinical trial data for that purpose. However, the interpretation of vaccine efficacy on the endpoint of disease irrespective of HPV is not widely understood. We used the 9-valent HPV vaccine clinical program as a case study to determine the value of measuring vaccine efficacy in such endpoint. This assessment was rigorously performed by heuristic reasoning and through probability calculations. The measure of vaccine efficacy in the irrespective of HPV endpoint is driven simultaneously in opposite directions by the high estimate of prophylactic efficacy and a numerically negative estimate of risk reduction that is also a reflection of high prophylactic efficacy and no cross-protection. The vaccine efficacy estimate in the irrespective of HPV endpoint is ambiguous and difficult to interpret. Comparing this estimate across different HPV vaccine studies requires an understanding of the contributions of vaccine HPV type efficacy and the incidence of disease not related to vaccine HPV types for each study. Without such understanding, comparing studies and drawing conclusions from such comparison are highly misleading. Approaches are proposed to divide this endpoint in components that are easier to interpret. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [HPV vaccine acceptability and knowledge among gynecologists in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Mazzadi, Alejandro; Paolino, Melisa; Arrossi, Silvina

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate HPV vaccine acceptability and prescription; knowledge about HPV vaccine; and knowledge about HPV infection and cervical cancer among Argentinean gynecologists. Between November 2009 and March 2010 we carried out an internet survey of 686 gynecologists. More than 80% of gynecologists prescribed HPV vaccine, knew characteristics of HPV vaccines, and knew that women will still need regular cervical cancer screening after HPV vaccination; 37% had global knowledge about relationship between vaccine, detection and treatment of cervical cancer; 25% underestimated the epidemiological extent of HPV infections, ≈30% was not aware of the causative relationship between HPV infection and cervical cancer and ≈40% had global knowledge about management of HPV infection. HPV vaccine acceptability is high. Physicians need to be fully informed on HPV vaccination and cervical cancer as well as HPV infection management.

  12. Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163464.html Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA Agency recommends getting ... by the human papillomavirus (HPV). An FDA-approved vaccine called Gardasil 9 protects against 9 HPV types ...

  13. Approaching a decade since HPV vaccine licensure: racial and gender disparities in knowledge and awareness of HPV and HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Adjei Boakye, Eric; Tobo, Betelihem B; Rojek, Rebecca P; Mohammed, Kahee A; Geneus, Christian J; Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba

    2017-08-30

    Gaps remain in the public's knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV). We assessed racial/ethnic and gender disparities in knowledge and awareness of HPV and the HPV vaccine among US adults. Data from the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 3 (September - December 2013) and Cycle 4 (August - November 2014) were analyzed for 6,862 respondents aged 18 years and older. Weighted multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate racial/ethnic and gender disparities in HPV knowledge and HPV vaccination awareness. Sixty-six percent of respondents had heard of HPV and the HPV vaccine (57% of men vs. 75% of women). In multivariable analyses, compared with men, women were 225% (95% CI: 2.60 - 4.07) more likely to have heard of HPV, and 281% (95% CI: 3.06 - 4.74) more likely to have heard of the HPV vaccine. Non-Hispanic Blacks were 33% (95% CI: 0.47 - 0.96) and 44% (95% CI: 0.39 - 0.81) less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to have heard of HPV and the HPV vaccine, respectively. Hispanics were 27% (95% CI: 0.52 - 1.02) and 53% (95% CI: 0.34 - 0.64) less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to have heard of HPV and the HPV vaccine, respectively. There was evidence of disparities in HPV and HPV vaccine awareness among men compared with women and non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites. To foster improvements in HPV vaccine uptake and reduce disparities in HPV associated cancers, future interventions must target men and minority populations, for whom knowledge gaps exist.

  14. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection.

  15. Peruvian FSWs: understanding HPV and barriers to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Brown, Brandon; Carcamo, Cesar; Blas, Magaly M; Valderrama, Maria; Halsey, Neal

    2010-11-16

    Vaccine acceptability and vaccine-related knowledge data were collected from female sex workers (FSWs) in Lima, Peru to determine their awareness of HPV and barriers to the potential acceptability of HPV vaccine. FSWs were found to have low knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccine, and cervical cancer. Due to high reported sexual exposure, FSWs are likely at increased risk of cervical cancer, and should have access to HPV vaccine. FSWs should be targeted for HPV education campaigns and barriers to vaccination should be addressed. Future studies should assess HPV prevalence in this population and examine retention issues for vaccine dose completion.

  16. HPV vaccines: Today and in the future

    PubMed Central

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases and an estimated 5% of all cancers worldwide. The largest burden from HPV-associated cervical cancers is in developing nations where effective cervical cancer screening programs are non-existent. Even in developed nations, diagnosis and treatment of cervical precancers continue to be large economic burdens. Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an ideal method for the prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV associated diseases. Safe and effective virus-like-particle-derived prophylactic vaccines are available to most nations. The high cost of the current vaccines makes it out of reach for most developing nations. Since millions of women are already infected with HPV and have serious disease, therapeutic HPV vaccines are being developed to treat these women. The article presents the natural history, oncogenesis, and host immune interactions of HPV and associated diseases. The article also discusses the safety and efficacy of commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV, as well as novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine delivery strategies in early clinical development. PMID:18809143

  17. HPV Vaccinations in Lublin Region, Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Paweł; Grządziel, Anna

    2017-02-14

    Secondary prophylaxis of cervical cancer consisting in cytology screening tests, despite its effectiveness, does not achieve the desired results. For several years, primary prophylaxis has been available in the form of protective vaccinations. At present, two vaccine preparations are available on the market, and studies conducted on these preparations confirm their almost 100% effectiveness in the prevention of types of HPV present in the vaccine. Analysis of the programmes of protective vaccinations against HPV carried out during the period 2008-2013 in the Lublin Region. The material used in the study was data obtained from the relevant organs of the territorial self-government concerning programmes of vaccinations against HPV, demographic data pertaining to girls aged 10-18 living in the Lublin Region, as well as data published by the National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene (NIZP-PZH). The method applied in the study was analysis of records. During the period 2008-2013, in the Lublin Region a total of 5,496 girls were vaccinated within the health programmes. The mean immunization coverage in Lublin is 50%, and in Radzyń Podlaski 59%. The percentage contribution of vaccinations guaranteed free by the local authorities, with relation to the total number of vaccinations performed in the Lublin Region, was from 60 to 77%. The units of territorial self-government allocated the amount of PLN 5,125,359 for the performance of projects associated with execution of free vaccinations. Among the total number of girls vaccinated against HPV, a considerable percentage were those vaccinated within the prophylactic programmes carried out by the units of territorial self-government. The programmes of free protective vaccinations against HPV began in 4 cities in the Lublin Region, and are continued only in two (Lublin and Radzyń Podlaski). Long-term observation of girls subjected to vaccinations from the aspect of maintenance of the immune response

  18. Potential impact of a nonavalent HPV vaccine on HPV related low-and high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions: A referral hospital-based study in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Capra, Giuseppina; Giovannelli, Lucia; Matranga, Domenica; Bellavia, Carmelina; Guarneri, Maria Francesca; Fasciana, Teresa; Scaduto, Giovanna; Firenze, Alberto; Vassiliadis, Alessandra; Perino, Antonio

    2017-08-03

    While bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines have been used for about 10 years, a nonavalent vaccine against HPV types 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52 and 58 has been recently approved by FDA and EMA and is now commercially available. The objective of our study was to evaluate the potential impact of the nonavalent vaccine on HPV infection and related low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, HSIL), compared to the impact of the quadrivalent vaccine, in a female population living in Sicily (Italy). Low estimates of HPV vaccine impact were calculated as prevalence of HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52 and 58 genotypes, alone or in association, but excluding presence of other HPV types; high estimates were calculated as prevalence of HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52 and 58 genotypes alone or in association, in the presence of other HPV types. The nonavalent HPV vaccine showed increased impact, compared to the quadrivalent vaccine. Estimates of potential impact varied from 30.9% (low estimate) to 53.3% (high estimate) for LSIL, and from 56.9% to 81,0% for HSIL. The proportion of additional cases potentially prevented by the nonavalent vaccine was 14.4%-23.8% for LSIL, and 19.0%-32.8% for HSIL. The benefit of the nonavalent vaccine compared to the quadrivalent vaccine was more than 80% for both low and high impact estimates for LSIL and more than 50% for both low and high impact estimates for HSIL. The present study confirms that the switch from a first generation HPV vaccines to a nonavalent vaccine would increase the prevention of cervical HSIL in up to 90% of cases.

  19. No evidence that HPV vaccination leads to sexual risk compensation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bo T

    2016-06-02

    Uptake of the HPV vaccine has been lower than the uptake of most other childhood vaccines offered in public programs. Since the HPV vaccine protects against a sexually transmitted virus, one barrier to uptake specific to the HPV vaccine may be the concern that vaccination may encourage risky sexual behaviour. Unanimous findings from recent studies show that HPV vaccination does not lead to sexual risk compensation, which is an important message to parents, clinicians and other decision-makers regarding HPV vaccination. Some issues remain to be investigated, like HPV vaccination and sexual risk compensation among boys.

  20. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-02

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer.

  1. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine efficacy against disease related to vaccine and non-vaccine HPV types in males.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Stephen E; Jessen, Heiko; Palefsky, Joel M; Giuliano, Anna R; Moreira, Edson D; Vardas, Eftyhia; Aranda, Carlos; Hillman, Richard J; Ferris, Daron G; Coutlee, Francois; Marshall, J Brooke; Vuocolo, Scott; Haupt, Richard M; Guris, Dalya; Garner, Elizabeth

    2013-08-20

    A small number of HPV types are related to a majority of HPV-related neoplastic lesions in humans. High-risk types such as HPV 16 and 18 are most often implicated, although other oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV types can cause disease in men. The efficacy of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV) against external genital lesions and intra-anal disease related to HPV in men has been demonstrated. This report examines the vaccine's efficacy against disease due to 10 additional non-vaccine HPV types, as well as efficacy regardless of HPV detection. The data presented suggest that vaccinating males against HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 protects them against most vaccine HPV-type related anogenital disease. However, significant efficacy against disease due to non-vaccine HPV types was not seen. In addition, the data do not provide any evidence that vaccination with qHPV vaccine will increase the likelihood of disease caused by non-vaccine types in the short term.

  2. Serious adverse events after HPV vaccination: a critical review of randomized trials and post-marketing case series.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lavín, Manuel; Amezcua-Guerra, Luis

    2017-07-20

    This article critically reviews HPV vaccine serious adverse events described in pre-licensure randomized trials and in post-marketing case series. HPV vaccine randomized trials were identified in PubMed. Safety data were extracted. Post-marketing case series describing HPV immunization adverse events were reviewed. Most HPV vaccine randomized trials did not use inert placebo in the control group. Two of the largest randomized trials found significantly more severe adverse events in the tested HPV vaccine arm of the study. Compared to 2871 women receiving aluminum placebo, the group of 2881 women injected with the bivalent HPV vaccine had more deaths on follow-up (14 vs. 3, p = 0.012). Compared to 7078 girls injected with the 4-valent HPV vaccine, 7071 girls receiving the 9-valent dose had more serious systemic adverse events (3.3 vs. 2.6%, p = 0.01). For the 9-valent dose, our calculated number needed to seriously harm is 140 (95% CI, 79-653). The number needed to vaccinate is 1757 (95% CI, 131 to infinity). Practically, none of the serious adverse events occurring in any arm of both studies were judged to be vaccine-related. Pre-clinical trials, post-marketing case series, and the global drug adverse reaction database (VigiBase) describe similar post-HPV immunization symptom clusters. Two of the largest randomized HPV vaccine trials unveiled more severe adverse events in the tested HPV vaccine arm of the study. Nine-valent HPV vaccine has a worrisome number needed to vaccinate/number needed to harm quotient. Pre-clinical trials and post-marketing case series describe similar post-HPV immunization symptoms.

  3. HPV Vaccine - Gardasil: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... a previous dose of HPV vaccine, should not get the vaccine. Tell your doctor if the person getting vaccinated has any severe allergies, including an allergy to yeast. • HPV vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. However, receiving HPV vaccine when pregnant is ...

  4. HPV vaccination in boys and men.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses are DNA viruses that infect skin or mucosal cells. In the genital tract HPV (especially types 6 and 11) cause genital warts, the commonest viral sexually transmitted disease. At least 13 of the more than 100 known HPV genotypes are oncogenic "high-risk" genotypes. The 2 most common of these (genotypes 16 and 18) cause approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Oncogenic HPVs particularly HPV 16 are associated with other anogenital cancers, anus, vagina, vulva and penis, and cancers of the head and neck and current estimates are that 5.2% of all cancers are HPV associated. In industrialised countries cervical cancer is controlled by secondary intervention other HPV associated malignancies are increasing in incidence and the burden of HPV associated disease in men is now comparable to that in women in economically developed countries. Randomized control trials with the quadrivalent HPV VLP vaccine demonstrate robust antibody responses and high efficacy against genital warts anal precancers in men. Few countries have recommended male vaccination on the basis that this is not cost effective. However gender-neutral vaccination has been recommended in the USA, Canada, Austria, and Australia. Careful cost effective modeling has preceded these decisions showing that when the burden of disease in men is included in the models then, depending upon coverage, vaccine price, and other factors male vaccination can become cost effective.

  5. Achieving High Adolescent HPV Vaccination Coverage.

    PubMed

    Farmar, Anna-Lisa M; Love-Osborne, Kathryn; Chichester, Katherine; Breslin, Kristin; Bronkan, Kristi; Hambidge, Simon J

    2016-11-01

    Despite national recommendations for adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, rates have lagged behind those of other adolescent vaccines. We implemented interventions and examined rates of vaccination coverage in a large, urban, safety net health care system to understand whether our tactics for achieving high rates of adolescent vaccination were successful. Denver Health is an integrated urban safety net health system serving >17 000 adolescents annually. The process for achieving high vaccination rates in our health system includes "bundling" of vaccines, offering vaccines at every visit, and standard orders. Data from vaccine registry and utilization statistics were used to determine vaccination rates in adolescents aged 13 to 17 years from 2004 to 2014, and these findings were compared with state and national rates for 2013. Regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with vaccination. In 2013 (N = 11 463), HPV coverage of ≥1 dose was 89.8% (female subjects) and 89.3% (male subjects), compared with national rates of 57.3% and 34.6%. Rates of HPV coverage (≥3 doses) were 66.0% for female subjects and 52.5% for male subjects, versus 37.6% and 13.9% nationally. For both sexes, tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis, adsorbed, vaccine coverage was 95.9% (86.0% nationally), and meningococcal conjugate vaccine coverage was 93.5% (77.8% nationally). Female subjects, Hispanic subjects, non-English speakers, and teenagers <200% below the federal poverty level were more likely to have received 3 doses of HPV. Through low-cost, system-wide standard procedures, Denver Health achieved adolescent vaccination rates well above national coverage rates. Avoiding missed opportunities for vaccination and normalizing the HPV vaccine were key procedures that contributed to high coverage rates. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. HPV Vaccine Slashes Rates of Oral Infection.

    PubMed

    2017-07-01

    Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) reduces the prevalence of oral infection by an estimated 88% among young adults in the United States, a protection that could help reduce rates of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers, according to data that will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL. However, the population-level benefit will remain low unless more people get vaccinated. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Review of current knowledge on HPV vaccination: an appendix to the European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Cervical Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Dillner, Joakim

    2007-03-01

    The recognition of a strong etiological relationship between infection with high-risk human papillomavirusses and cervical cancer has prompted research to develop and evaluate prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. One prophylactic quadrivalent vaccine using L1 virus-like particles (VLP) of HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 is available on the European market since the end of 2006 and it is expected that a second bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of HPV16 and HPV18 will become available in 2007. Each year, HPV16 and HPV18 cause approximately 43,000 cases of cervical cancer in the European continent. Results from the phase-IIb and III trials published thus far indicate that the L1 VLP HPV vaccine is safe and well-tolerated. It offers HPV-naive women a very high level of protection against HPV persistent infection and cervical intra-epithelial lesions associated with the types included in the vaccine. HPV vaccination should be offered to girls before onset of sexual activity. While prophylactic vaccination is likely to provide important future health gains, cervical screening will need to be continued for the whole generation of women that is already infected with the HPV types included in the vaccine. Phase IV studies are needed to demonstrate protection against cervical cancer and to verify duration of protection, occurrence of replacement by non-vaccine types and to define future policies for screening of vaccinated cohorts. The European Guidelines on Quality Assurance for Cervical Cancer Screening provides guidance for secondary prevention by detection and management of precursors lesions of the cervix. The purpose of the appendix on vaccination is to present current knowledge. Developing guidelines for future use of HPV vaccines in Europe, is the object of a new grant offered by the European Commission.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the nine-valent HPV vaccine in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Bonanni, Paolo; Bianic, Florence; de Waure, Chiara; Baio, Gianluca; Plazzotta, Giacomo; Uhart, Mathieu; Rinaldi, Alessandro; Largeron, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    In Italy HPV vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil(®)) is offered actively and free of charge to girls aged 12 since 2007. A nine-valent vaccine (Gardasil 9(®)) received the European market authorization in 2015 to protect, with only 2 doses, against around 90% of all HPV positive cancers, over 80% of high-grade precancerous lesions and 90% of genital warts caused by HPV types 6/11. A dynamic transmission model simulating the natural history of HPV-infections was calibrated to the Italian setting and used to estimate costs and QALYs associated with vaccination strategies. The analyses compared two strategies with the nine-valent vaccine (cervical cancer screening and vaccination in girls only or vaccination in boys and girls) to four alternative strategies (cervical cancer screening and vaccination with quadrialent vaccine in girls only, in both boys and girls, with bivalent vaccine in girls and screening strategy only). The National Health Service perspective was considered. The switch to the nine-valent vaccine in Italy can further reduce the burden associated to cervical cancer and HPV-related diseases and is highly cost-effective. Compared to the current vaccination program with quadrivalent vaccine, the nine-valent vaccine in a programme including girls and boys shows further reductions of 17% in the incidence of cervical cancer, 35 and 14% in anal cancer for males and females, as well as over a million cases of genital warts avoided after 100 years. The new technology is associated with an ICER of 10,463€ per QALY gained in universal vaccination, decreasing to 4483€ when considering the vaccine switch for girls-only.

  9. National- and state-level impact and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent HPV vaccination in the United States.

    PubMed

    Durham, David P; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L; Skrip, Laura A; Jones, Forrest K; Bauch, Chris T; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-05-03

    Every year in the United States more than 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, a disease principally caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines protect against 66% of HPV-associated cervical cancers, and a new nonavalent vaccine protects against an additional 15% of cervical cancers. However, vaccination policy varies across states, and migration between states interdependently dilutes state-specific vaccination policies. To quantify the economic and epidemiological impacts of switching to the nonavalent vaccine both for individual states and for the nation as a whole, we developed a model of HPV transmission and cervical cancer incidence that incorporates state-specific demographic dynamics, sexual behavior, and migratory patterns. At the national level, the nonavalent vaccine was shown to be cost-effective compared with the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines at any coverage despite the greater per-dose cost of the new vaccine. Furthermore, the nonavalent vaccine remains cost-effective with up to an additional 40% coverage of the adolescent population, representing 80% of girls and 62% of boys. We find that expansion of coverage would have the greatest health impact in states with the lowest coverage because of the decreasing marginal returns of herd immunity. Our results show that if policies promoting nonavalent vaccine implementation and expansion of coverage are coordinated across multiple states, all states benefit both in health and in economic terms.

  10. National- and state-level impact and cost-effectiveness of nonavalent HPV vaccination in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L.; Skrip, Laura A.; Jones, Forrest K.; Bauch, Chris T.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Every year in the United States more than 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer, a disease principally caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines protect against 66% of HPV-associated cervical cancers, and a new nonavalent vaccine protects against an additional 15% of cervical cancers. However, vaccination policy varies across states, and migration between states interdependently dilutes state-specific vaccination policies. To quantify the economic and epidemiological impacts of switching to the nonavalent vaccine both for individual states and for the nation as a whole, we developed a model of HPV transmission and cervical cancer incidence that incorporates state-specific demographic dynamics, sexual behavior, and migratory patterns. At the national level, the nonavalent vaccine was shown to be cost-effective compared with the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines at any coverage despite the greater per-dose cost of the new vaccine. Furthermore, the nonavalent vaccine remains cost-effective with up to an additional 40% coverage of the adolescent population, representing 80% of girls and 62% of boys. We find that expansion of coverage would have the greatest health impact in states with the lowest coverage because of the decreasing marginal returns of herd immunity. Our results show that if policies promoting nonavalent vaccine implementation and expansion of coverage are coordinated across multiple states, all states benefit both in health and in economic terms. PMID:27091978

  11. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/ ... statements/hpv.html . CDC review information for HPV (Human Papillomavirus) VIS: Page last reviewed: December 2, 2016 ...

  12. Are the Two Human Papillomavirus Vaccines Really Similar? A Systematic Review of Available Evidence: Efficacy of the Two Vaccines against HPV

    PubMed Central

    Di Mario, Simona; Basevi, Vittorio; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Balduzzi, Sara; D'Amico, Roberto; Magrini, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background. When the bivalent and the quadrivalent HPV vaccines were marketed they were presented as having comparable efficacy against cervical cancer. Differences between the vaccines are HPV types included and formulation of the adjuvant. Method. A systematic review was conducted to assess the efficacy of the two vaccines against cervical cancer. Outcomes considered were CIN2+, CIN3+, and AIS. Results. Nine reports (38,419 women) were included. At enrolment mean age of women was 20 years, 90% had negative cytology, and 80% were seronegative and/or DNA negative for HPV 16 or 18 (naïve women). In the TVC-naïve, VE against CIN2+ was 58% (95% CI: 35, 72); heterogeneity was detected, VE being 65% (95% CI: 54, 74) for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 23, 57) for the quadrivalent. VE against CIN3+ was 78% (95% CI: <0, 97); heterogeneity was substantial, VE being 93% (95% CI: 77, 98) for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 12, 63) for the quadrivalent. VE in the TVC was much lower. No sufficient data were available on AIS. Conclusions. In naïve girls bivalent vaccine shows higher efficacy, even if the number of events detected is low. In women already infected the benefit of the vaccination seems negligible. PMID:26380321

  13. Are the Two Human Papillomavirus Vaccines Really Similar? A Systematic Review of Available Evidence: Efficacy of the Two Vaccines against HPV.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, Simona; Basevi, Vittorio; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Balduzzi, Sara; D'Amico, Roberto; Magrini, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    When the bivalent and the quadrivalent HPV vaccines were marketed they were presented as having comparable efficacy against cervical cancer. Differences between the vaccines are HPV types included and formulation of the adjuvant. A systematic review was conducted to assess the efficacy of the two vaccines against cervical cancer. Outcomes considered were CIN2+, CIN3+, and AIS. Nine reports (38,419 women) were included. At enrollment mean age of women was 20 years, 90% had negative cytology, and 80% were seronegative and/or DNA negative for HPV 16 or 18 (naïve women). In the TVC-naïve, VE against CIN2+ was 58% (95% CI: 35, 72); heterogeneity was detected, VE being 65% (95% CI: 54, 74) for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 23, 57) for the quadrivalent. VE against CIN3+ was 78% (95% CI: <0, 97); heterogeneity was substantial, VE being 93% (95% CI: 77, 98) for the bivalent and 43% (95% CI: 12, 63) for the quadrivalent. VE in the TVC was much lower. No sufficient data were available on AIS. In naïve girls bivalent vaccine shows higher efficacy, even if the number of events detected is low. In women already infected the benefit of the vaccination seems negligible.

  14. Young multiethnic women's attitudes toward the HPV vaccine and HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the acceptability of the HPV vaccine among a multiethnic sample of young women in Malaysia. A qualitative study of 40 young women aged between 13 and 27 years recruited into 7 focus groups to discuss their knowledge of HPV infection, and their attitudes toward and acceptance of the HPV vaccine. The women were divided into Malay, Chinese, and Indian groups to allow for comparison among ethnicities. Poor knowledge about HPV did not influence the HPV vaccine's acceptability. Although participants were in favor of the vaccine, the majority preferred to delay vaccination because it is newly introduced, they did not perceive themselves to be at risk of HPV infection, or because of cost factors. Concerns were raised regarding the vaccine's safety, the potential to be perceived as promiscuous and sexually active, and whether the vaccine was halal. Promotion of the HPV vaccine should take account of social and cultural acceptability. The findings will help develop strategies for effective vaccination initiatives in a multiethnic and multireligious Asian society.

  15. Immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Asian populations from six countries: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Pouwels, Koen B; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2017-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a serious public-health problem in Asian countries. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main risk factor for cervical cancer, HPV vaccination is considered a promising strategy to prevent cervical cancer. However, comprehensive immunogenicity and safety information for Asian populations is lacking. We searched four electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and clinicaltrials.gov. We reviewed selected manuscripts and extracted the pooled relative risk (RR) from immunogenicity and safety information on HPV vaccination among women in Asian countries. We identified two quadrivalent-vaccine studies and eight bivalent-vaccine studies conducted in Asian countries. Analysis across these studies suggested that the HPV vaccines significantly enhanced HPV16- and HPV18-specific antibody among both uninfected (RR 85.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) 31.51-233.04 and 62.77; 95% CI 37.4-105.51) and infected individuals (RR 8.60; 95% CI 6.95-10.64 and RR 8.13; 95% CI 5.96-11.11). Furthermore, HPV vaccination among Asian populations has a favorable safety profile, with only slightly higher risks of local (RR: 1.89; 95% CI 1.65-2.17) and systemic (RR: 1.33; 95% CI 1.18-1.50) adverse events in vaccinated individuals compared with controls. For Asian populations, HPV vaccines enhance the level of HPV16- and HPV18-specific antibodies for both uninfected and infected individuals. Also, the risk of adverse events related to vaccination are acceptable. More data are needed to establish vaccine efficacy with regard to prevention of HPV infection and further outcomes including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer.

  16. The prevalence of HPV infections in HPV-vaccinated women from the general population.

    PubMed

    Hamsikova, Eva; Smahelova, Jana; Ludvikova, Viera; Salakova, Martina; Rychla, Jana; Skrenkova, Jana; Rob, Lukas; Tachezy, Ruth

    2017-03-15

    Currently, three prophylactic HPV vaccines are commercially available to prevent HPV 16/18 infection and associated lesions. The aim of the study was to assess markers of HPV infection in women/girls before vaccination and to ascertain the prevalence and spectrum of post-vaccination HPV types. Three hundred and thirty subjects of which 75 were virgins were enrolled. Before the first dose of the HPV vaccine and 1, 3 and 5 years after the completion of HPV vaccination, the samples for cytology, HPV detection and anti-HPV antibody response were taken. At enrolment, HPV DNA was detected in 38% of sexually active girls/women. At the first, second and third follow-up, HPV DNA was found in 40, 45, and 39% of them. The seroprevalence rates to HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 in these subjects were 31, 21, 18 and 10%. On the follow-up significantly higher levels of antibodies to HPV 16/18 were found after application of divalent vaccine. Results of the study demonstrate high prevalence of HPV infection in young women. In a substantial number of women, HPV-specific antibodies as well as high-risk HPV types were detected. HPV-specific antibodies were also frequently found in non-sexually active girls. The acquisition of HPV after the onset of sexual life was very fast.

  17. HPV Vaccine Doesn't Eliminate Need for Pap Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163218.html HPV Vaccine Doesn't Eliminate Need for Pap Test Women ... TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The HPV vaccine helps prevent cervical cancer but that doesn't ...

  18. HPV Vaccine May Also Prevent Cancers Affecting Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165705.html HPV Vaccine May Also Prevent Cancers Affecting Men Study finds ... The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved HPV vaccines for prevention of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal ...

  19. HPV vaccination: Population approaches for improving rates

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Kristin; Frawley, Alean; Garland, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To review the literature on interventions to increase HPV vaccinations and assess whether The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendations are supported by current evidence. Methods: We used a PubMed search to identify studies that assessed interventions that looked at provider assessment and feedback, provider reminders, client reminder and recall, and clinic based education programs. Results: Of the 13 studies identified, 8 included client reminder and recall interventions, 4 included provider assessment and feedback and/or provider reminders and 2 included clinic based education. 11 of the 13 studies demonstrated a positive effect on HPV vaccine initiation or completion. Provider assessment and feedback studies were more likely to report a positive effect on HPV vaccine initiation than on series completion, while client reminder recall interventions more frequently produced an effect on series completion than on initiation. Conclusions: There is evidence to support the application of the Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendations specifically to HPV vaccination both for client reminder and recall programs and for provider assessment and feedback interventions. Multiple targeted approaches will be needed to substantially impact HPV vaccine rates. PMID:26890685

  20. Multisite HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Against Cervical, Anal, and Oral HPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Quint, Wim; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Struijk, Linda; Schussler, John; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) reports separately demonstrated vaccine efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (HPV16/18) infections at the cervical, anal, and oral regions; however, the combined overall multisite efficacy (protection at all three sites) and vaccine efficacy among women infected with HPV16 or HPV18 prior to vaccination are less known. Methods: Women age 18 to 25 years from the CVT were randomly assigned to the HPV16/18 vaccine (Cervarix) or a hepatitis A vaccine. Cervical, oral, and anal specimens were collected at the four-year follow-up visit from 4186 women. Multisite and single-site vaccine efficacies (VEs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for one-time detection of point prevalent HPV16/18 in the cervical, anal, and oral regions four years after vaccination. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was highest among “naïve” women (HPV16/18 seronegative and cervical HPV high-risk DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 83.5%, 95% CI = 72.1% to 90.8%). Multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was also demonstrated among women with evidence of a pre-enrollment HPV16 or HPV18 infection (seropositive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 but cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 57.8%, 95% CI = 34.4% to 73.4%), but not in those with cervical HPV16 and/or HPV18 DNA at vaccination (anal/oral HPV16/18 VE = 25.3%, 95% CI = -40.4% to 61.1%). Concordant HPV16/18 infections at two or three sites were also less common in HPV16/18-infected women in the HPV vaccine vs control arm (7.4% vs 30.4%, P < .001). Conclusions: This study found high multisite vaccine efficacy among “naïve” women and also suggests the vaccine may provide protection against HPV16/18 infections at one or more anatomic sites among some women infected with these types prior to HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:26467666

  1. A Cross-Sectional Study to Assess HPV Knowledge and HPV Vaccine Acceptability in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Danielle N.; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Levitz, Lauren; Rochas, Mali; Sangare, Kotou; Yekta, Shahla; Tounkara, Karamoko; Aboubacar, Ben; Koita, Ousmane; Lurie, Mark; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer mortality, HPV vaccination is not currently available in Mali. Knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer in Mali, and thereby vaccine readiness, may be limited. Research staff visited homes in a radial pattern from a central location to recruit adolescent females and males aged 12–17 years and men and women aged ≥18 years (N = 51) in a peri-urban village of Bamako, Mali. Participants took part in structured interviews assessing knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccination. We found low levels of HPV and cervical cancer knowledge. While only 2.0% of respondents knew that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), 100% said they would be willing to receive HPV vaccination and would like the HPV vaccine to be available in Mali. Moreover, 74.5% said they would vaccinate their child(ren) against HPV. Men were found to have significantly greater autonomy in the decision to vaccinate themselves than women and adolescents (p = 0.005), a potential barrier to be addressed by immunization campaigns. HPV vaccination would be highly acceptable if the vaccine became widely available in Bamako, Mali. This study demonstrates the need for a significant investment in health education if truly informed consent is to be obtained for HPV vaccination. Potential HPV vaccination campaigns should provide more information about HPV and the vaccine. Barriers to vaccination, including the significantly lower ability of the majority of the target population to autonomously decide to get vaccinated, must also be addressed in future HPV vaccine campaigns. PMID:23431375

  2. A cross-sectional study to assess HPV knowledge and HPV vaccine acceptability in Mali.

    PubMed

    Poole, Danielle N; Tracy, J Kathleen; Levitz, Lauren; Rochas, Mali; Sangare, Kotou; Yekta, Shahla; Tounkara, Karamoko; Aboubacar, Ben; Koita, Ousmane; Lurie, Mark; De Groot, Anne S

    2013-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer mortality, HPV vaccination is not currently available in Mali. Knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer in Mali, and thereby vaccine readiness, may be limited. Research staff visited homes in a radial pattern from a central location to recruit adolescent females and males aged 12-17 years and men and women aged ≥ 18 years (N = 51) in a peri-urban village of Bamako, Mali. Participants took part in structured interviews assessing knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccination. We found low levels of HPV and cervical cancer knowledge. While only 2.0% of respondents knew that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), 100% said they would be willing to receive HPV vaccination and would like the HPV vaccine to be available in Mali. Moreover, 74.5% said they would vaccinate their child(ren) against HPV. Men were found to have significantly greater autonomy in the decision to vaccinate themselves than women and adolescents (p = 0.005), a potential barrier to be addressed by immunization campaigns. HPV vaccination would be highly acceptable if the vaccine became widely available in Bamako, Mali. This study demonstrates the need for a significant investment in health education if truly informed consent is to be obtained for HPV vaccination. Potential HPV vaccination campaigns should provide more information about HPV and the vaccine. Barriers to vaccination, including the significantly lower ability of the majority of the target population to autonomously decide to get vaccinated, must also be addressed in future HPV vaccine campaigns.

  3. HPV and HPV vaccine information among a national sample of college and university websites.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Holly B; Fantasia, Heidi Collins; Sutherland, Melissa A; Lee-St John, Terrence

    2016-04-01

    To describe the availability of human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine information accessible to college students via official college and university websites. A review and analysis of HPV and HPV vaccination information abstracted from a national sample (n = 214) of college/university websites. Three abstractors systematically evaluated quality and quantity of vaccination, sexual health, and HPV disease information from health service webpages. The majority of colleges/universities had designated student health service webpages (n = 181). Of these, 86% provided information on vaccinations, but less than 50% mentioned HPV or the HPV vaccine specifically and only 32% provided any HPV educational information. Colleges/university webpages that provide sexual health and or general vaccination information had higher odds of providing information on HPV and HPV vaccination. Nurse practitioners who care for college-aged persons need to be cognizant of the many ways they can promote HPV vaccination. Providing accurate information about resources available at student health centers is a way to promote health on campus; the findings from this study indicate that HPV and HPV vaccine information may be lacking on many college/university websites. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. HPV vaccination: vaccine acceptance, side effects and screening intentions.

    PubMed

    Paul-Ebhohimhen, Virginia; Huc, Sara; Tissington, Helen; Oates, Ken; Stark, Cameron

    2010-06-01

    As part of an evaluation of the introductory campaign of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in a Scottish health board, self-administered questionnaires were offered to all 5007 eligible girls in school following the third dose of HPV to identify side-effects, reasons for non-vaccination and future cervical screening intentions, and 2775 (56.2%) replied. In all, 630 (23.5%) of vaccinated girls reported side effects to the vaccination, about half of which were common injection-site reactions. Main reported reasons for non-vaccination related to perceived inadequate evidence for HPV safety and efficacy, and lack of perceived need or desire to be vaccinated. A total of 2430 (89.2%) of the girls expressed plans to take up cervical screening when older. Reasons for not planning to take up cervical smear were lack of knowledge about cervical screening, anticipated discomfort or embarrassment with the process and no perceived need for a cervical smear. Unvaccinated girls were less likely to report planning to attend for cervical smears in later life (Yates chi-square = 24.30, p < 0.001). The findings emphasise the importance of information on safety and efficacy in future communications about HPV with schoolage girls. The relationship between vaccination and screening intention, and its implications for widening the gap in health inequalities, also requires careful attention in local implementation of the national HPV vaccination programme.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in the context of high cervical cancer incidence and low screening coverage.

    PubMed

    Võrno, Triin; Lutsar, Katrin; Uusküla, Anneli; Padrik, Lee; Raud, Terje; Reile, Rainer; Nahkur, Oliver; Kiivet, Raul-Allan

    2017-09-09

    Estonia has high cervical cancer incidence and low screening coverage. We modelled the impact of population-based bivalent, quadrivalent or nonavalent HPV vaccination alongside cervical cancer screening. A Markov cohort model of the natural history of HPV infection was used to assess the cost-effectiveness of vaccinating a cohort of 12-year-old girls with bivalent, quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccine in two doses in a national, school-based vaccination programme. The model followed the natural progression of HPV infection into subsequent genital warts (GW); premalignant lesions (CIN1-3); cervical, oropharyngeal, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer. Vaccine coverage was assumed to be 70%. A time horizon of 88years (up to 100years of age) was used to capture all lifetime vaccination costs and benefits. Costs and utilities were discounted using an annual discount rate of 5%. Vaccination of 12-year-old girls alongside screening compared to screening alone had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €14,007 (bivalent), €14,067 (quadrivalent) and €11,633 (nonavalent) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) in the base-case scenario and ranged between €5367-21,711, €5142-21,800 and €4563-18,142, respectively, in sensitivity analysis. The results were most sensitive to changes in discount rate, vaccination regimen, vaccine prices and cervical cancer screening coverage. Vaccination of 12-year-old girls alongside current cervical cancer screening can be considered a cost-effective intervention in Estonia. Adding HPV vaccination to the national immunisation schedule is expected to prevent a considerable number of HPV infections, genital warts, premalignant lesions, HPV related cancers and deaths. Although in our model ICERs varied slightly depending on the vaccine used, they generally fell within the same range. Cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination was found to be most dependent on vaccine cost and duration of vaccine immunity, but not on the type of vaccine

  6. Morbidity and mortality of vulvar and vaginal cancers: Impact of 2-, 4-, and 9-valent HPV vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Tommy R.; Graybill, Whitney S.; Pierce, Jennifer Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaginal and vulvar cancers do not account for a large proportion of gynecologic malignancies but their impact is significant. Both vaginal and vulvar lesions have precursors and display levels of dysplasia before progression to invasive disease. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a known causative agent of such dysplasia and can be detected now more readily than ever with adequate recognition techniques and provider awareness. Although HPV vaccination is still lagging compared to other recommended childhood vaccinations, the impact on lower genital tract neoplasia is promising. The bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines have been shown to be efficacious and the newest nonavalent vaccine should add even more of impact on coverage of cancer-causing HPV types. Although it is still early to show true clinical and population-based disease reduction due to low disease incidence and relatively short time of vaccine availability, the potential is noteworthy. PMID:26901390

  7. Current State in the Development of Candidate Therapeutic HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Andrew; Jeang, Jessica; Cheng, Kevin; Cheng, Ting; Yang, Benjamin; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological factor for HPV-associated malignancies creates the opportunity to control these cancers through vaccination. Currently, available preventive HPV vaccines have not yet demonstrated strong evidences for therapeutic effects against established HPV infections and lesions. Furthermore, HPV infections remain extremely common. Thus, there is urgent need for therapeutic vaccines to treat existing HPV infections and HPV-associated diseases. Therapeutic vaccines differ from preventive vaccines in that they are aimed at generating cell-mediated immunity rather than neutralizing antibodies. The HPV-encoded early proteins, especially oncoproteins E6 and E7, form ideal targets for therapeutic HPV vaccines since they are consistently expressed in HPV-associated malignancies and precancerous lesions, playing crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of HPV-associated disease. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we review strategies to enhance vaccine efficacy and the latest clinical trials on therapeutic HPV vaccines. PMID:26901118

  8. Current state in the development of candidate therapeutic HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andrew; Jeang, Jessica; Cheng, Kevin; Cheng, Ting; Yang, Benjamin; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2016-08-01

    The identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological factor for HPV-associated malignancies creates the opportunity to control these cancers through vaccination. Currently, available preventive HPV vaccines have not yet demonstrated strong evidences for therapeutic effects against established HPV infections and lesions. Furthermore, HPV infections remain extremely common. Thus, there is urgent need for therapeutic vaccines to treat existing HPV infections and HPV-associated diseases. Therapeutic vaccines differ from preventive vaccines in that they are aimed at generating cell-mediated immunity rather than neutralizing antibodies. The HPV-encoded early proteins, especially oncoproteins E6 and E7, form ideal targets for therapeutic HPV vaccines since they are consistently expressed in HPV-associated malignancies and precancerous lesions, playing crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of HPV-associated disease. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we review strategies to enhance vaccine efficacy and the latest clinical trials on therapeutic HPV vaccines.

  9. Comparative immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Meric, Dorothée; Dessy, Francis J; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique; Dubin, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In this observer-blind study (NCT00423046), women (N = 1,106), stratified by age (18–26, 27–35, 36–45 y), were randomized (1:1) to receive the HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Months 0, 1, 6) or the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (Gardasil® Merck and Co., Inc., Months 0, 2, 6). Month 7 results were previously reported; we now report Month 24 results. In the according-to-protocol cohort for immunogenicity (seronegative and DNA-negative at baseline for HPV type analyzed), seropositivity rates of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) [pseudovirion-based neutralization assay] were, across all age strata, 100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 97.5–100% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-16, and 99.0–100% (HPV-16/18 vaccine) and 72.3–84.4% (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine) for HPV-18. Corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2.4–5.8-fold higher for HPV-16 and 7.7–9.4-fold higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine; HPV-16 and HPV-18 GMTs were significantly higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (p < 0.0001) in the total vaccinated cohort (received ≥1 vaccine dose, irrespective of baseline sero/DNA-status). Similar results were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ). Positivity rates and GMTs of antigen-specific IgG antibodies in cervicovaginal secretions (ELISA) were not significantly different between vaccines. At Month 24, CD4+ T-cell responses for HPV-16 and HPV-18 were higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine; memory B-cell response was higher for HPV-18 with the HPV-16/18 vaccine and similar between vaccines for HPV-16. Both vaccines were generally well tolerated. Although an immunological correlate of protection has not been defined, differences in the magnitude of immune response between vaccines may represent determinants of duration of protection. PMID:22048173

  10. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  11. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  12. Increasing HPV vaccination through policy for public health benefit

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Heather M.; Pierce, Jennifer Young; Crary, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines against specific types of human papillomavirus (HPV) linked to cancer and other diseases have been met with mixed acceptance globally and in the United States. Policy-level interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing public health benefit. Government policies and mandates may result in improved HPV vaccination coverage and reduced disease burden, and alternative policies that improve unhindered access to HPV vaccination may allow success as well. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize policy efforts to maximize the public health benefit of HPV vaccination. We examine selected examples of HPV vaccination policy in global contexts and in the United States. PMID:26669416

  13. Increasing HPV vaccination through policy for public health benefit.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Heather M; Pierce, Jennifer Young; Crary, Ashley

    2016-06-02

    Vaccines against specific types of human papillomavirus (HPV) linked to cancer and other diseases have been met with mixed acceptance globally and in the United States. Policy-level interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing public health benefit. Government policies and mandates may result in improved HPV vaccination coverage and reduced disease burden, and alternative policies that improve unhindered access to HPV vaccination may allow success as well. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize policy efforts to maximize the public health benefit of HPV vaccination. We examine selected examples of HPV vaccination policy in global contexts and in the United States.

  14. Predictors of Adults' Knowledge and Awareness of HPV, HPV-Associated Cancers, and the HPV Vaccine: Implications for Health Education.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kimberly R; Singh, Shipra

    2017-06-01

    High human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and low HPV vaccine uptake are significant public health concerns. Disparities in HPV-associated cancers and HPV vaccine uptake rates suggest the need for additional research examining factors associated with vaccine acceptance. This study assessed HPV awareness and knowledge and identified sociodemographic characteristics associated with HPV knowledge at the population level. Data from adult men ( n = 1,197) and women ( n = 1,906) who participated in the National Cancer Institute's 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to identify predictors of four HPV knowledge categories: (1) general knowledge, (2) cervical cancer knowledge, (3) "other" cancer knowledge (i.e., anal, oral, penile), and (4) vaccine knowledge. Significant gender differences in awareness and knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccine were revealed. Most participants (>70%) knew that HPV could cause cervical cancer, but fewer (14.9% to 31.5%) knew of the association between HPV and "other" cancers. Women were more likely to report that a health care provider recommended vaccination. Significant predictors of general HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge included gender, education, income, race, and other sociodemographic characteristics. Age and income predicted cervical cancer knowledge. Knowledge of "other" HPV-associated cancers was predicted by having a child under 18 years in the household and relationship status. HPV knowledge appears to be socially patterned. Low HPV knowledge among men and some racial minorities suggests a need for further intervention. Health education should emphasize risks of noncervical HPV-associated cancers. Patient-provider communication that includes education, counseling, and clear recommendations favoring vaccination may improve uptake.

  15. Provider communication about HPV vaccination: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gilkey, Melissa B.; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2016-01-01

    abstract Background. Improving HPV vaccination coverage in the US will require healthcare providers to recommend the vaccine more effectively. To inform quality improvement efforts, we systematically reviewed studies of provider communication about HPV vaccination. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and POPLINE in August 2015 to identify studies of provider communication about HPV vaccination. Results. We identified 101 qualitative and quantitative studies. Providers less often recommended HPV vaccine if they were uncomfortable discussing sex, perceived parents as hesitant, or believed patients to be low risk. Patients less often received recommendations if they were younger, male, or from racial/ethnic minorities. Despite parents' preference for unambiguous recommendations, providers often sent mixed messages by failing to endorse HPV vaccine strongly, differentiating it from other vaccines, and presenting it as an “optional” vaccine that could be delayed. Conclusion. Interventions are needed to help providers deliver effective recommendations in the complex communication environment surrounding HPV vaccination. PMID:26838681

  16. Trivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) VLP vaccine covering HPV type 58 can elicit high level of humoral immunity but also induce immune interference among component types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Xu, Yufei; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Youchun; Wu, Xueling; Fan, Dongsheng; Peng, Qinglin; Xu, Xuemei

    2010-04-26

    Both Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18 bivalent vaccine and type 16/18/6/11 quadrivalent vaccine have been proved to be safe and effective, and licensed for public use. However, these two vaccines do not quite match the distribution of HPV types in China, Southeast Asia and Latin America, where HPV 58 is highly prevalent. Here we produced three types of virus-like particles (VLPs) in baculovirus expression system, formulated a trivalent vaccine containing HPV 16, 18, and 58 L1 VLPs and examined its in vitro neutralizing titers. This vaccine could induce high level and long-term humoral immunity against the component types. But immune interference was observed when comparing type specific neutralizing antibody levels induced by trivalent vaccine to those by corresponding monovalent vaccines. This kind of interference would become more obvious when formulating more types of VLPs into multivalent vaccines, but could be greatly overcome by decreasing the antigen dosage and adding a proper adjuvant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acceptability of HPV Vaccines and Associations with Perceptions Related to HPV and HPV Vaccines Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joseph T. F.; Wang, Zixin; Kim, Jean H.; Lau, Mason; Lai, Coco H. Y.; Mo, Phoenix K. H.

    2013-01-01

    HPV vaccines are available to men but there are few studies investigating the acceptability of HPV vaccines among men who have sex with men (MSM), a high risk group. We assessed the intention to take up HPV vaccines among MSM in Hong Kong and the associated factors related to cognitions on HPV and HPV vaccines, basing on the Health Belief Model (n = 542). The acceptability of HPV vaccines was 20% (unconditional on efficacies and price), 29.2% (conditional on efficacies and market price), 51.7% (conditional on efficacies and discounted price) and 79.1% (conditional on efficacies and free price). Adjusting for background variables, composite scores of perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived barriers and cue to actions were significantly associated with acceptability of HPV vaccines conditional on specific efficacies and the market price. Acceptability of HPV vaccines was highly price sensitive. Future studies need to use conditional measures. Implementation and translational researches are warranted. PMID:23451188

  18. HPV and oral lesions: preventive possibilities, vaccines and early diagnosis of malignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    TESTI, D.; NARDONE, M.; MELONE, P.; CARDELLI, P.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The importance of HPV in world healthy is high, in fact high-risk HPV types contribute significantly to viral associated neoplasms. In this article we will analyze vary expression of HPV in oral cavity both benign and malignant, their prevalence and the importance in early diagnosis and prevention. The classical oral lesions associated with human papillomavirus are squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. Transmission of the virus can occur with direct contact, genital contact, anal and oral sex; latest studies suggest a salivary transmission and from mother to child during delivery. The number of lifetime sexual partners is an important risk factor for the development of HPV-positive head-neck cancer. Oral/oropharyngeal cancer etiologically associated with HPV having an increased survival and a better prognostic (85%–90% to five years). There is no cure for the virus. There are two commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV today: the bivalent (16 and 18) Cervarix® and the tetravalent (6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil® and new vaccine Gardasil 9 (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) was approved in the United States. To be effective, such vaccination should start before “sexual puberty”. The vaccine could be an important preventive strategy, in fact the scientific community is in agreement on hypothesis that blocking the contagion it may also limit the distance complications as the oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:27555904

  19. HPV and oral lesions: preventive possibilities, vaccines and early diagnosis of malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Testi, D; Nardone, M; Melone, P; Cardelli, P; Ottria, L; Arcuri, C

    2015-01-01

    The importance of HPV in world healthy is high, in fact high-risk HPV types contribute significantly to viral associated neoplasms. In this article we will analyze vary expression of HPV in oral cavity both benign and malignant, their prevalence and the importance in early diagnosis and prevention. The classical oral lesions associated with human papillomavirus are squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. Transmission of the virus can occur with direct contact, genital contact, anal and oral sex; latest studies suggest a salivary transmission and from mother to child during delivery. The number of lifetime sexual partners is an important risk factor for the development of HPV-positive head-neck cancer. Oral/oropharyngeal cancer etiologically associated with HPV having an increased survival and a better prognostic (85%-90% to five years). There is no cure for the virus. There are two commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV today: the bivalent (16 and 18) Cervarix® and the tetravalent (6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil® and new vaccine Gardasil 9 (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) was approved in the United States. To be effective, such vaccination should start before "sexual puberty". The vaccine could be an important preventive strategy, in fact the scientific community is in agreement on hypothesis that blocking the contagion it may also limit the distance complications as the oropharyngeal cancer.

  20. Parents' Internet use for information about HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Reiter, Paul L; Brewer, Noel T

    2012-05-28

    The Internet is an increasingly common source of health-related information. We sought to examine associations between parents' Internet information-seeking and their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. We interviewed parents within a year after approval of HPV vaccine for females and males. Participants were North Carolina parents with daughters ages 10-18 surveyed by telephone in Fall 2007 (n=773); and a national sample of parents with sons ages 11-17 surveyed online in Fall 2010 (n=115). We used multivariate regression to examine associations of past and intended Internet seeking for HPV vaccine information with knowledge and health belief model-related constructs. Among parents of daughters, having heard of HPV vaccine through the Internet (8%) was associated with higher HPV knowledge, perceived likelihood of HPV, and vaccination willingness, and with receiving a doctor's recommendation. It was also associated with lower perceived vaccine harms, uncertainty, and anticipated regret. Parents of sons who heard of HPV vaccine through the Internet (10%) perceived greater barriers to vaccination than parents who learned about HPV vaccine for males through other sources. Intended future Internet information-seeking among parents of daughters (69%) was more likely if they perceived a lower likelihood that their daughters would get HPV if they were vaccinated (all p<.05). Our findings suggest a positive influence of accessing information on the Internet about HPV vaccine. It was associated with higher knowledge and mostly positive parental attitudes and beliefs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors impacting HPV vaccination: lessons for health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Annika M; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2014-08-01

    HPV infection leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The HPV vaccine is currently licensed and recommended for adolescents and young adults in many countries. Nonetheless, coverage levels remain low, especially in settings using a clinic-based rather than school-based delivery model. Health care professionals (HCPs) have the potential to strongly impact HPV vaccine acceptability and uptake, yet often fail to discuss and/or strongly recommend HPV vaccination. This article reviews the myriad factors that influence HPV vaccination, focusing, in particular, on those relevant to HCP communication with patients and families. It also provides a historical framework and highlights recent evidence related to HPV vaccination that may be valuable for these conversations. Lastly, it discusses strategies targeting HCPs and their practices that may increase HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates globally.

  2. Views on HPV and HPV Vaccination: The Experience at a Federal Qualified Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth M.; Conde-Toro, Alexandra; Serra-Rivera, Michelle J.; Martínez, Tania M.; Rodríguez, Verónica; Rios, Ana M.; Berdiel, Luis; Villanueva, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to understand through a quantitative assessment, the views of HPV and HPV vaccination among parents of sons from a FQHC in PR. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 200 parents of sons 9–17 years old. Results Nearly 30% of the parents reported that their sons had initiated the HPV vaccine regimen. Health care provider recommendation was significantly associated with vaccine initiation. Among parents of unvaccinated sons, the main reason for not getting the HPV vaccine was they did not know that boys were allowed to get the vaccine. Conclusions Future efforts should focus on multilevel interventions aimed to increase knowledge as well as other modified behavioral determinants in parents of young males about HPV and the vaccine. Capacity building efforts should be targeted also to increase health providers’ education and communication skills to promote HPV vaccination effectively. PMID:27524776

  3. Views on HPV and HPV Vaccination: The Experience at a Federal Qualified Clinic in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Colón-López, Vivian; Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth M; Conde-Toro, Alexandra; Serra-Rivera, Michelle J; Martínez, Tania M; Rodríguez, Verónica; Ríos, Ana M; Berdiel, Luis; Villanueva, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand through a quantitative assessment, the views of HPV and HPV vaccination among parents of sons from a FQHC in PR. A self-administered questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 200 parents of sons 9-17 years old. Nearly 30% of the parents reported that their sons had initiated the HPV vaccine regimen. Health care provider recommendation was significantly associated with vaccine initiation. Among parents of unvaccinated sons, the main reason for not getting the HPV vaccine was they did not know that boys were allowed to get the vaccine. Future efforts should focus on multilevel interventions aimed to increase knowledge as well as other modified behavioral determinants in parents of young males about HPV and the vaccine. Capacity building efforts should be targeted also to increase health providers' education and communication skills to promote HPV vaccination effectively.

  4. Immunogenicity of a Bivalent Adjuvanted Glycoconjugate Vaccine against Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Fabio; Rondini, Simona; Micoli, Francesca; Lanzilao, Luisa; Alfini, Renzo; Mancini, Francesca; MacLennan, Calman A.; Medaglini, Donata

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are the predominant causes of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease. Considering the co-endemicity of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis, a bivalent vaccine formulation against both pathogens is necessary for protection against iNTS disease, thus investigation of glycoconjugate combination is required. In the present work, we investigated the immune responses induced by S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis monovalent and bivalent glycoconjugate vaccines adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (alum) only or in combination with cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG). Humoral and cellular, systemic and local, immune responses were characterized in two different mouse strains. All conjugate vaccines elicited high levels of serum IgG against the respective O-antigens (OAg) with bactericidal activity. The bivalent conjugate vaccine induced systemic production of antibodies against both S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis OAg. The presence of alum or alum + CpG adjuvants in vaccine formulations significantly increased the serum antigen-specific antibody production. The alum + CpG bivalent vaccine formulation triggered the highest systemic anti-OAg antibodies and also a significant increase of anti-OAg IgG in intestinal washes and fecal samples, with a positive correlation with serum levels. These data demonstrate the ability of monovalent and bivalent conjugate vaccines against S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis to induce systemic and local immune responses in different mouse strains, and highlight the suitability of a bivalent glycoconjugate formulation, especially when adjuvanted with alum + CpG, as a promising candidate vaccine against iNTS disease. PMID:28289411

  5. HPV antibody levels and clinical efficacy following administration of a prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M; Sigurdsson, Kristján; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Hernandez-Avila, Mauricio; Perez, Gonzalo; Brown, Darron R; Koutsky, Laura A; Tay, Eng Hseon; García, Patricia; Ault, Kevin A; Garland, Suzanne M; Leodolter, Sepp; Olsson, Sven-Eric; Tang, Grace W K; Ferris, Daron G; Paavonen, Jorma; Lehtinen, Matti; Steben, Marc; Bosch, Xavier; Dillner, Joakim; Kurman, Robert J; Majewski, Slawomir; Muñoz, Nubia; Myers, Evan R; Villa, Luisa L; Taddeo, Frank J; Roberts, Christine; Tadesse, Amha; Bryan, Janine; Lupinacci, Lisa C; Giacoletti, Katherine E D; Lu, Shuang; Vuocolo, Scott; Hesley, Teresa M; Haupt, Richard M; Barr, Eliav

    2008-12-09

    The efficacy of the quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is thought to be mediated by humoral immunity. We evaluated the correlation between quadrivalent HPV vaccine-induced serum anti-HPV responses and efficacy. 17,622 women were vaccinated at day 1, and months 2 and 6. At day 1 and at 6-12 months intervals for up to 48 months, subjects underwent Papanicolaou and genital HPV testing. No immune correlate of protection could be found due to low number of cases. Although 40% of vaccine subjects were anti-HPV 18 seronegative at end-of-study, efficacy against HPV 18-related disease remained high (98.4%; 95% CI: 90.5-100.0) despite high attack rates in the placebo group. These results suggest vaccine-induced protection via immune memory, or lower than detectable HPV 18 antibody titers.

  6. Opportunities for Increasing HPV Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Leighton, Ashley; O’Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uptake of HPV vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods We conducted structured interviews in Fall 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North Carolina that stocked HPV vaccine. Results Centers had heterogeneous policies and procedures. Out-of-pocket costs for children to receive privately-purchased HPV vaccine were a key barrier to providing HPV vaccine within school health centers. Other barriers included students not returning consent forms, costs to clinics of ordering and stocking privately-purchased HPV vaccine, and difficulty using the statewide immunization registry. Most (82%) school health centers were interested in hosting interventions to increase HPV vaccine uptake, especially those that the centers could implement themselves, but many had limited staff to support such efforts. Activities rated as more likely to raise HPV vaccine uptake were student incentives, parent reminders, and obtaining consent from parents while they are at school (all p < .05). Conclusions While school health centers reported facing several key barriers to providing HPV vaccine, many were interested in partnering with outside organizations on low-cost interventions to increase HPV vaccine uptake among adolescent students. PMID:24749919

  7. Parental acceptance of a mandatory human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Daron; Horn, Leslie; Waller, Jennifer L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine factors that influence parent's acceptance of a mandatory school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program. A convenience sample of 325 parents, with children aged 9 to 17 years old, completed a 53-item survey. Survey questions targeted their opinions about HPV, the HPV vaccine, and a mandatory HPV vaccination program. chi(2) tests were used to examine relationships between survey items. Characteristics of parents who believed the HPV vaccine should be mandated included limited financial resources (P = .03), history of HPV-related disease (P = .04), understanding their child's susceptibility (P = .03), interest in HPV vaccination for their child (P = .0001), and knowledge that the vaccine reduces the risk of cervical cancer (P = .001). Parents of children aged 12 to 14 years old (P = .02) or who knew the vaccine reduced their child's risk of developing genital warts (P = .02) and cervical cancer (P = .001) would be more likely to comply with a mandatory HPV vaccine program. Certain characteristics define parents who support a mandatory HPV vaccination program. Greater education of parents and health care providers should improve vaccination uptake, which ultimately reduces morbidity and mortality from HPV related diseases.

  8. Not just a woman's business! Understanding men and women's knowledge of HPV, the HPV vaccine, and HPV-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Adjei Boakye, Eric; Mohammed, Kahee A; Tobo, Betelihem B; Geneus, Christian J; Schootman, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Few studies have included men when assessing differences in knowledge about HPV, and HPV-associated cancers. We examined gender differences in knowledge about HPV, HPV vaccine, and HPV-associated cancers. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze data of 3,677 survey respondents aged 18 years and older from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey. Covariates included age, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, income level, regular provider, general health, internet use, and family structure aged 9 to 27 years. Analyses were conducted in 2015. Sixty-four percent of respondents had heard of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Seventy-eight percent of respondents knew HPV causes cervical cancer, but only 29% knew it causes penile cancer, 26% knew it causes anal cancer, and 30% knew it causes oral cancer. In multivariable analyses, males were less likely to have heard of HPV (aOR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.25-0.45), and less likely to have heard of the HPV vaccine (aOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.18-0.32) compared to females. No differences existed between males and females regarding knowledge about HPV-associated cancers. In conclusion, knowledge of HPV, the vaccine, and HPV-associated cancers in both males and females in the United States remains very low, especially among men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Burden of HPV-caused cancers in Denmark and the potential effect of HPV-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Skorstengaard, Malene; Thamsborg, Lise Holst; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2017-10-13

    Denmark is one of the countries where Human papillomavirus (HPV)-vaccination at present includes only girls. However, the burden of HPV-related cancer in men is increasing, which would argue for gender-neutral vaccination. The aim of this study was to examine the burden of HPV-caused cancers in women and men, and to evaluate the potential of HPV-vaccination in cancer control. Data were retrieved from the literature on population prevalence of high risk (HR) HPV, on HR HPV-prevalence and genotypes in HPV-related cancers, and on number of cytology samples in cervical screening. Data on annual biopsies and conisations were retrieved from the Danish National Health Service Register and the Danish National Patient Register. Incidences of HPV-related cancers in Denmark were extracted from NORDCAN. Number of HPV-caused cancers was calculated from number of HPV-related cancers and the proportion known to be caused by high-risk (HR) HPV. In cross-sectional surveys in Denmark, one fifth of women and almost one third of men were found to be positive for HR HPV. Per year, 548 HPV-caused cancer cases were diagnosed in women and 234 in men, and twice as many cancers in women as in men were preventable with HPV vaccination. However, including screening prevented cervical cancers, the burden of cancers caused by HPV-infection would be 1300-2000 in women as compared to 234 in men. Taking screening prevented cervical cancers into account, the cancer control potential of HPV-vaccination is considerably higher in women than in men. HPV-vaccination could reduce the burden of screening on women and on health care resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Alternative dosage schedules with HPV VLP vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Margaret A.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines can prevent multiple cancers in women and men. Difficulties in the cost and completion of the three-dose vaccine series have led to considerations of alternative dose schedules. In clinical trials, three doses given within a 12-month period versus the standard six-month period yielded comparable results, and immunogenicity appears comparable with two doses in adolescent females compared to the three-dose series in adult females. While the data are generally supportive of moving to a two-dose vaccine schedule among young female adolescents, the adoption of a two-dose vaccine schedule still poses a potential risk to the strength and longevity of the immune response. Public health authorities implementing a two-dose vaccine schedule should devise risk management strategies to minimize the potential impact on cancer prevention. PMID:25001893

  11. Human papillomavirus (HPV), HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer, and HPV vaccine in the United States--do we need a broader vaccine policy?

    PubMed

    Osazuwa-Peters, N

    2013-11-12

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) of global importance; it is the most prevalent STI in the United States, with strains causally linked to oropharyngeal and other cancers. Efforts to prevent HPV have been made to varying degrees by policies implemented by different state governments; however, HPV and associated oropharyngeal cancer continue to show increasing incidence rates in the US. A narrative review based on search on SciVerse, PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, and EMBASE databases, as well as literature/documents from the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Cancer Society, National Conference of State legislatures, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services relevant to HPV and HPV vaccine policy in the US. Vaccination has proved to be a successful policy in the US, and an extant recommendation aimed at preventing HPV and associated cervical and other anogenital cancers is the routine use of HPV vaccines for males and females. However, HPV vaccines are presently not recommended for preventing oropharyngeal cancer, although they have been shown to be highly effective against the HPV strains that are most commonly found in the oropharynx. And while there is a history of successful vaccine mandate in the US with resulting decrease in occurrence of infectious diseases, implementing HPV vaccine mandate has proved to be very unpopular. With emerging evidence of the efficacy of the use of the HPV vaccine in preventing oral-HPV, more focus should be put on extending HPV vaccine to present oral HPV infection and oropharyngeal cancer. Also, implementing a broader HPV vaccine policy that include mandating HPV vaccines as a school-entry requirement for both sexes may increase vaccine use in the US for the greater good of the public. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Women Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Wigfall, L T; Bynum, S A; Brandt, H M; Hébert, J R

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer risk is increased among women living with HIV (WLH). Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has been shown to be safe and immunogenic among WLH. We examined HPV vaccine awareness and HPV knowledge among WLH. This cross-sectional study collected data from 145 WLH between March 2011 and April 2012. An interviewer-administered survey assessed HPV vaccine awareness and knowledge. Stata/IC 13 was used to perform chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Our sample was 90 % non-Hispanic black and 64 % earned <$10,000/year. Few (38 %) had heard of the HPV vaccine. Half (50 %) knew that HPV caused cervical cancer. HPV vaccine awareness was ten times higher among WLH who knew HPV caused cervical cancer (OR = 10.17; 95 % CI 3.82-27.06). HPV vaccine awareness is low among WLH. Cancer prevention efforts aimed at raising awareness about the HPV vaccine and increasing knowledge about HPV are necessary first steps in reducing cervical cancer disparities among WLH.

  13. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil® Vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  14. The HPV vaccine: a content analysis of online news stories.

    PubMed

    Habel, Melissa A; Liddon, Nicole; Stryker, Jo E

    2009-03-01

    Approximately 73 million adults in the United States report using the Internet as a source for health information. This study examines the quality, content, and scope of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Internet news coverage starting on the day of its licensure. Information about the HPV vaccine in the media may influence personal attitudes and vaccine uptake. Using four search engines and six search terms, a sample of 250 Internet articles on the HPV vaccine were identified between June 8, 2006, and September 26, 2006. The coding instrument captured how the headline was depicted and how the vaccine was labeled in addition to information about HPV, cervical cancer, the HPV vaccine, and current social issues and concerns about the vaccine. Analysis revealed balanced Internet news coverage; 52.4% of Internet news stories were coded as neutral toward the vaccine. Eighty-eight percent of articles labeled the vaccine as a cervical cancer vaccine; 73.5% explained the link between HPV and cervical cancer, although without providing background information on HPV or cervical cancer. Vaccine affordability was the most cited social concern (49.2%). Information about vaccine safety and side effects, duration of vaccine protection, and availability of the catchup vaccine for females aged 13-26 was repeatedly missing. The HPV vaccine is being marketed as a vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. Comprehensive information on the vaccine, HPV, and cervical cancer continues to be missing from media coverage. Public health educators should monitor online media in an effort to respond to inaccurate information. Barriers to vaccine cost and funding mechanisms need to be addressed more effectively by states. Knowledge of particular media messages could provide a starting point for tackling opposition and uptake issues for future sexually transmitted infection (STI) vaccines.

  15. Control of HPV infection and related cancer through vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nam Phuong; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard; Wu, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus, and its associated diseases continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in over 600 million infected individuals. Major progress has been made with preventative vaccines, and clinical data have emerged regarding the efficacy and cross-reactivity of the two FDA approved L1 virus like particle (VLP)-based vaccines. However, the cost of the approved vaccines currently limits their widespread use in developing countries which carry the greatest burden of HPV-associated diseases. Furthermore, the licensed preventive HPV vaccines only contain two high-risk types of HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) which can protect only up to 75 % of all cervical cancers. Thus, second generation preventative vaccine candidates hope to address the issues of cost and broaden protection through the use of more multivalent L1-VLPs, vaccine formulations, or alternative antigens such as L1 capsomers, L2 capsid proteins, and chimeric VLPs. Preventative vaccines are crucial to controlling the transmission of HPV, but there are already hundreds of millions of infected individuals who have HPV-associated lesions that are silently progressing toward malignancy. This raises the need for therapeutic HPV vaccines that can trigger T cell killing of established HPV lesions, including HPV-transformed tumor cells. In order to stimulate such antitumor immune responses, therapeutic vaccine candidates deliver HPV antigens in vivo by employing various bacterial, viral, protein, peptide, dendritic cell, and DNA-based vectors. This book chapter will review the commercially available preventive vaccines, present second generation candidates, and discuss the progress of developing therapeutic HPV vaccines.

  16. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine safety review and safety monitoring plans for nine-valent HPV vaccine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Julianne; Weinbaum, Cindy; Sukumaran, Lakshmi; Markowitz, Lauri E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccine was licensed for use in the United States in 2006 and through 2015 was the predominate HPV vaccine used. With the exception of syncope, a known preventable adverse event after any injected vaccination, both pre-licensure and post-licensure 4vHPV safety data have been reassuring with no confirmed safety signals identified. Nine-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV) was licensed in 2014. This review includes post-licensure 4vHPV safety findings published to date that have informed the US vaccination program; these data will inform US safety monitoring and evaluation for 9vHPV. PMID:27029786

  17. Chemical conjugate TMV-peptide bivalent fusion vaccines improve cellular immunity and tumor protection.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Alison A; Corbo, Tina A; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Palmer, Kenneth E; Pogue, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Chemical conjugation of CTL peptides to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has shown promise as a molecular adjuvant scaffold for augmentation of cellular immune responses to peptide vaccines. This study demonstrates the ease of generating complex multipeptide vaccine formulations using chemical conjugation to TMV for improved vaccine efficacy. We have tested a model foreign antigen target-the chicken ovalbumin-derived CTL peptide (Ova peptide), as well as mouse melanoma-associated CTL epitopes p15e and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (Trp2) peptides that are self-antigen targets. Ova peptide fusions to TMV, as bivalent formulations with peptides encoding additional T-help or cellular uptake via the integrin-receptor binding RGD peptide, showed improved vaccine potency evidenced by significantly enhanced numbers of antigen-reactive T cells measured by in vitro IFNgamma cellular analysis. We measured the biologically relevant outcome of vaccination in protection of mice from EG.7-Ova tumor challenge, which was achieved with only two doses of vaccine ( approximately 600 ng peptide) given without adjuvant. The p15e peptide alone or Trp2 peptide alone, or as a bivalent formulation with T-help or RGD uptake epitopes, was unable to stimulate effective tumor protection. However, a vaccine with both CTL peptides fused together onto TMV generated significantly improved survival. Interestingly, different bivalent vaccine formulations were required to improve vaccine efficacy for Ova or melanoma tumor model systems.

  18. Immunogenicity of an HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hitzeroth, Inga I.; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Shephard, Enid; Stewart, Debbie; Müller, Martin; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P.; Kast, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    The ability to elicit cross-neutralizing antibodies makes human papillomavirus (HPV) L2 capsid protein a possible HPV vaccine. We examined and compared the humoral response of mice immunised with a HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine or with HPV-16 L2 protein. The L2 DNA vaccine elicited a non-neutralising antibody response unlike the L2 protein. L2 DNA vaccination suppressed the growth of L2-expressing C3 tumor cells, which is a T cell mediated effect, demonstrating that the lack of non-neutralizing antibody induction by L2 DNA was not caused by lack of T cell immunogenicity of the construct. PMID:19559114

  19. Assessing mandatory HPV vaccination: who should call the shots?

    PubMed

    Javitt, Gail; Berkowitz, Deena; Gostin, Lawrence O

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, many legislatures considered, and two enacted, bills mandating HPV vaccination for young girls as a condition of school attendance. Such mandates raise significant legal, ethical, and social concerns. This paper argues that mandating HPV vaccination for minor females is premature since long-term safety and effectiveness of the vaccine has not been established, HPV does not pose imminent and significant risk of harm to others, a sex specific mandate raises constitutional concerns, and a mandate will burden financially existing government health programs and private physicians. Absent careful consideration and public conversation, HPV mandates may undermine coverage rates for other vaccines.

  20. HPV vaccination with Gardasil: a breakthrough in women's health.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Engy; Bachmann, Gloria

    2006-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) represents one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. Although infection is often self-limited, a percentage of women with HPV infection will go on to develop cervical precancerous or cancerous lesions. It is estimated that HPV16 is responsible for approximately half of all cervical cancers worldwide. Several studies have tested vaccines directed against specific HPV types, namely types 6, 11, 16 and 18. This paper reviews these studies, particularly focusing on a quadrivalent (type 6, 11, 16 and 18) HPV L1 virus-like particle vaccine under investigation in Phase III trials at present. Data indicate that this vaccine, referred to as Gardasil, can prevent precancerous cervical lesions and early in situ cervical cancers with few adverse effects, and the vaccine has been approved by the FDA for this indication. Another vaccine, HPV16 L1, directed solely against HPV16, has also been demonstrated to be effective (at present, follow-up has been for up to 48 months) in providing protection against persistent infection with this viral strain and preventing HPV16-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3, while producing minimal adverse effects in recipients. Given the lack of a pharmacological intervention that can eradicate HPV in infected individuals and the prevalence of cervical cancer secondary to HPV infection across the world, the HPV vaccine represents a significant breakthrough in women's health.

  1. Evaluation of an Intervention Providing HPV Vaccine in Schools

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Brenda W.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; Moss, Jennifer L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Whitesell, Dianne H.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To conduct outcome and process evaluations of school-located HPV vaccination clinics in partnership with a local health department. Methods Temporary clinics provided the HPV vaccine to middle school girls in Guilford County, North Carolina, in 2009–2010. Results HPV vaccine initiation was higher among girls attending host schools than satellite schools (6% vs. 1%, OR = 6.56, CI = 3.99–10.78). Of the girls who initiated HPV vaccine, 80% received all 3 doses. Private insurance or federal programs paid for most vaccine doses. Conclusions Lessons learned for creating more effective school-health department partnerships include focusing on host schools and delivering several vaccines to adolescents, not just HPV vaccine alone. PMID:24034684

  2. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Rösl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented. PMID:25692212

  3. Racial Differences in HPV Knowledge, HPV Vaccine Acceptability, and Related Beliefs among Rural, Southern Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Joan R.; Brewer, Noel T.; Fazekas, Karah I.; Mitchell, Cicely E.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Because cervical cancer mortality in the United States is twice as high among black women as white women and higher in rural areas, providing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to rural black adolescents is a high priority. Purpose: To identify racial differences in knowledge and attitudes about HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine…

  4. Racial Differences in HPV Knowledge, HPV Vaccine Acceptability, and Related Beliefs among Rural, Southern Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Joan R.; Brewer, Noel T.; Fazekas, Karah I.; Mitchell, Cicely E.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Because cervical cancer mortality in the United States is twice as high among black women as white women and higher in rural areas, providing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to rural black adolescents is a high priority. Purpose: To identify racial differences in knowledge and attitudes about HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine…

  5. Formative Research on HPV Vaccine Acceptability Among Latina Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Luque, John S.; Castañeda, Heide; Tyson, Dinorah Martinez; Vargas, Natalia; Meade, Cathy D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers and benefits to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in a low-income, Latina farmworker population in central Florida. This study reports on formative qualitative research conducted on perceptions of benefits, barriers, costs, place, and promotion related to the HPV vaccine from surveys and interviews with a sample of 46 low-income, Latina farm workers and 19 health care workers serving this population. It was found that Latina farmworkers hold many misperceptions about the HPV vaccine and the potential links between HPV infection and cervical cancer. In addition, it was observed that HPV vaccination intention was inversely related to concerns about adolescent sexual behavior and low perceived risk of infection but might be positively influenced by belief in illness prevention and physician recommendation. These findings add to the growing research on HPV vaccine acceptability among Latina subgroups to inform intervention development, marketing materials, education, and policy. PMID:21881079

  6. Ethnic and racial differences in HPV knowledge and vaccine intentions among men receiving HPV test results.

    PubMed

    Daley, Ellen M; Marhefka, Stephanie; Buhi, Eric; Hernandez, Natalie D; Chandler, Rasheeta; Vamos, Cheryl; Kolar, Stephanie; Wheldon, Christopher; Papenfuss, Mary R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2011-05-23

    We examined factors associated with HPV vaccine intentions by racial/ethnic group among men participating in a HPV natural history study. HPV knowledge, vaccine intentions and perceived barriers were assessed among non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic men. Men were tested for HPV every 6 months. After receiving test results from their previous visit, participants (N=477) reported their intentions for HPV vaccination in a computer-assisted survey instrument (CASI). Vaccine intentions were high among all respondents, although differences were found between racial and ethnic groups in awareness and knowledge of HPV and, vaccine intentions and perceived access and barriers to receiving the HPV vaccine. In order to effectively disseminate the vaccine among men, factors that may promote or inhibit vaccine acceptability need to be identified. Identifying these factors related to vaccine intentions among minority and majority men offers an opportunity for addressing barriers to health equity and, in turn, reductions in HPV-related disparities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Increasing Parental Knowledge Related to the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Joseph J; Scoloveno, Robert; Kelly, Angela

    2017-08-16

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate parental attitudes toward general vaccination protocols and increase parental knowledge of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. A nonprobability convenience sample (N = 75) using a pre-/postintervention study design was conducted in a pediatric office in southern New Jersey. The Parental Attitudes Module measured the general disposition toward having children receive any type of vaccine. The HPV Knowledge Survey was a second tool used to specifically measures knowledge of the HPV vaccine. A self-directed computer-based learning was part of the educational intervention. A paired t test showed that HPV Knowledge Survey postintervention scores were significantly higher than HPV Knowledge Survey preintervention scores (t = -10.585, p < .001). The Parental Attitudes Module and the HPV Knowledge Survey pretest showed a positive moderate relationship (rs = .552, p < .001). In the 10 years since the HPV vaccine has been on the market, there is a continued need to increase parental knowledge about the HPV vaccine to close the gap on vaccine nonadherence. A self-directed, computer-based learning tablet appears to be an effective tool to educate parents or legal guardians about the purpose, efficacy, and safety of the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Canadian school-based HPV vaccine programs and policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Gilla K; Guichon, Juliet; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-09-08

    The National Advisory Committee on Immunization in Canada recommends human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for females and males (ages 9-26). In Canada, the HPV vaccine is predominantly administered through publicly funded school-based programs in provinces and territories. This research provides an overview of Canadian provincial and territorial school-based HPV vaccination program administration and vaccination rates, and identifies foreseeable policy considerations. We searched the academic and grey literature and contacted administrators of provincial and territorial vaccination programs to compile information regarding HPV vaccine program administration and vaccination rates in Canada's 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions. As of October 2016, all 13 Canadian jurisdictions vaccinate girls, and six jurisdictions include boys in school-based publicly funded HPV vaccination programs. Eleven jurisdictions administer the HPV vaccine in a two-dose schedule. The quadrivalent vaccine (HPV4) has been the vaccine predominantly used in Canada; however, the majority of provinces will likely adopt the nonavalent vaccine in the future. According to available data, vaccination uptake among females ranged between 46.7% and 93.9%, while vaccination uptake among males (in programs with available data to date) ranged between 75.0% and 87.4%. Future research and innovation will beneficially inform Canadian jurisdictions when considering whether to administer the nonavalent vaccine, whether to implement a two or one-dose vaccination schedule, and how to improve uptake and rates of completion. The usefulness of standardizing methodologies for collecting and reporting HPV vaccination coverage and implementing a national registry were identified as important priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What college women know, think, and do about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T; Cheng, An-Lin; Enriquez, Maithe

    2013-02-27

    This cross-sectional study, guided by Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior, aimed to identify factors that influence the decision to obtain an HPV vaccine among college women and to examine the relationships among these factors. An electronic self-administered survey was utilized to collect data. An email invitation was sent to 3074 college women attending a large, public university in southern California, aged between 18 and 26 years. The email directed the recipient to click on a link to a web-based survey if she wanted to participate in the study. Participants in this study were college women (n=384; 175 HPV non-vaccinees and 209 HPV vaccinees). Women in this study knew that a Pap test is still needed after HPV vaccination and that the HPV vaccine does not protect against other Sexually Transmitted Infections. Both non-vaccinees and vaccinees had positive attitudes about mandating HPV vaccine. Knowledge and attitudes toward the vaccine were not directly linked to the outcome predictors - intention to obtain the vaccine and vaccine uptake. Attitude about receiving HPV vaccine, subjective norms (complying with the expectations of others), and perceived behavioral control were correlated with the outcome predictors. Subjective norms consistently predicted intention to obtain HPV vaccine and vaccine uptake. A proposal to mandate the HPV vaccine among young girls/women was acceptable to this population. Vaccination promotion strategies to increase the vaccine uptake rate among the catch-up group (aged 13-26) should include attention to college women's subjective norms. Health care provider's recommendation and encouragement from significant others (i.e., mother and peers) are critical in order for the college women to obtain the vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    PubMed

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  11. African American parents' HPV vaccination intent and concerns.

    PubMed

    Sanders Thompson, Vetta L; Arnold, Lauren D; Notaro, Sheri R

    2012-02-01

    This study describes attitudes and social and environmental factors that affect African American parents' intent to vaccinate their daughters against human papillomavirus (HPV). Thirty African American parents of daughters aged nine to 17 years and no history of HPV infection completed semi-structured interviews. Interviews addressed factors that influenced intent to vaccinate, perception of community norms related to vaccination, vaccination scenarios involving place of vaccination, and vaccination prior to or after the child's initiation of sexual activity. A recurring theme was the influence of physician recommendation on African American parents' intent to obtain HPV vaccination for their daughters. Most parents reported that they could overcome barriers to vaccination, except vaccine costs and lack of insurance. While religious beliefs were important to parents, they reported that they would not interfere with vaccination decisions; fears of early sexuality due to vaccination were limited. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Factors Associated with HPV Vaccination among Cambodian American Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeok; Kim, Minjin; Kiang, Peter; Shi, Ling; Tan, Kevin; Chea, Phala; Peou, Sonith; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C

    2016-11-01

    Parents have general influence over their children's health and health behavior. However, given the dearth of specific literature regarding knowledge level and social and cultural factors influencing HPV vaccination behaviors among Cambodian American (CA) parent, it is difficult to develop an effective, evidence-based public health HPV vaccination program. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the HPV vaccine uptakes among CA teenagers and to examine factors influencing HPV vaccine uptakes. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey design and a combination of network and targeted sampling methods were used. CA mothers (n = 130) completed a health survey through face-to-face interviews in either English or Khmer language. Girls vaccination rates were 29% while that of boys was 16%. Awareness and knowledge of HPV among CA mothers was very low, and many believed that their daughters, who speak English and were educated in the U.S., had more knowledge about health than they did. Logistic regression analysis showed that CA girls had significantly higher odds of vaccination when their mothers possessed a higher level of English reading ability and had greater awareness and knowledge of HPV. The strikingly low rates of HPV vaccination among CA girls and boys underscore the need to improve vaccination outreach, education, and uptake. The findings can be used to develop targeted public health HPV vaccination programs for CAs, which will reduce cervical cancer disparities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. U.S. Vaccine Guidelines for Flu, HPV Updated

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163466.html U.S. Vaccine Guidelines for Flu, HPV Updated CDC panel revises ... need to know about: No more nasal flu vaccine. Unlike traditional flu shots made from dead virus, ...

  14. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance and perceived effectiveness, and HPV infection concern among young New Zealand university students.

    PubMed

    Chelimo, Carol; Wouldes, Trecia A; Cameron, Linda D

    2010-09-01

    Two-hundred undergraduate students completed an anonymous questionnaire after viewing a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine television commercial. Eight-four percent of participants would accept a free HPV vaccine, whereas 47% were unconcerned about future personal HPV infection risk. Males were less likely to accept a free HPV vaccine and to be concerned about future personal HPV infection risk. Perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness was significantly greater among participants who had previously heard of the vaccine and who knew that HPV is sexually transmitted. More education on the role of sexual behavioural characteristics of both males and females in HPV transmission is necessary to promote awareness and concern of personal HPV infection risk and acceptance of HPV vaccination.

  15. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose.

  16. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose. PMID:25483632

  17. Perceptions of HPV and attitudes towards HPV vaccination amongst men who have sex with men: A qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Nadarzynski, Tom; Smith, Helen; Richardson, Daniel; Pollard, Alex; Llewellyn, Carrie

    2017-05-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk of genital warts and anal cancer due to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This study explores MSMs' perceptions of HPV and HPV vaccination prior to the introduction of this programme. Focus groups and one-to-one interviews with self-identified MSM were conducted between November 2014 and March 2015 in Brighton, UK. Participants were recruited from community-based lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender (LGBT) venues and organizations. Discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using framework analysis. Thirty-three men took part (median age 25 years, IQR: 21-27), most of whom (n = 25) did not know about HPV, anal cancer (31), or HPV vaccination (26). While genital warts and anal cancer were perceived as severe, men did not perceive themselves at risk of HPV. All MSM would accept the HPV vaccine if offered by a health care professional. The challenges of accessing sexual health services or openly discussing same-sex experiences with health care professionals were perceived as barriers to accessing HPV vaccination. Two participants were concerned that selective HPV vaccination could increase stigma and prejudice against MSM, comparable to the AIDS epidemic. Ten MSM were unsure about the effectiveness of HPV vaccination for sexually active men and were in favour of vaccinating all adolescent boys at school. Most MSM have poor knowledge about HPV and associated anal cancer. Despite the lack of concern about HPV, most MSM expressed willingness to receive HPV vaccination. There is a need for health education about the risks of HPV and HPV-related diseases so that MSM can appraise the benefits of being vaccinated. Concerns about HPV vaccine effectiveness in sexually active men and possible stigmatization need to be addressed to optimize HPV vaccine acceptability. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Men who have sex with men (MSM) have poor knowledge about HPV and HPV

  18. Knowledge and awareness of HPV and the HPV vaccine among young women in the first routinely vaccinated cohort in England.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Harriet L; Marlow, Laura A V; Hibbitts, Sam; Pollock, Kevin G; Waller, Jo

    2013-02-04

    A national school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme has been available for 12-13 year old females in the UK since 2008, offering protection against HPV types 16 and 18, which are responsible for the majority of cervical cancer. Little is known about HPV knowledge in girls who have been offered the vaccine. Girls offered the school-based vaccine in the first routine cohort (n=1033) were recruited from 13 schools in London three years post-vaccination. Participants completed a questionnaire about HPV awareness, knowledge about HPV and the vaccine, and demographic characteristics including vaccine status. About a fifth of the girls reported they were unaware of the HPV infection. Among those who reported being aware of HPV (n=759) knowledge was relatively low. Approximately half of the participants knew that HPV infection causes cervical cancer, condoms can reduce the risk of transmission and that cervical screening is needed regardless of vaccination status. These results are helpful in benchmarking HPV-related knowledge in vaccinated girls and could be used in the development of appropriate educational messages to accompany the first cervical screening invitation in this cohort in the future.

  19. Factors Motivating HPV Vaccine Uptake Among Vaccinated and Nonvaccinated Hispanic Young Adult Women.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dionne P; Tamir, Hod; Thomas, Tami L

    2016-12-01

    To identify factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination up taking decision making among vaccinated and nonvaccinated Hispanic college women. Hispanic young women between the ages of 18 and 24 years (N = 49). In total, 26 had not received the HPV vaccine, and 23 had started/completed the vaccine series. Participants registered for the study via a psychology research pool at a large public university in the southeast United States after institutional review board approval. After completing a demographic information and HPV knowledge Web-based survey, participants were individually interviewed. Differences in HPV vaccine knowledge emerged between vaccinated and nonvaccinated women. Fear of side effects, perceptions of risk, and sources of encouragement influenced willingness to be vaccinated against HPV. Health care providers played a central role in addressing concerns and promoting vaccination. Health care providers must address and integrate unique decision-making processes influencing Hispanic young adult women's perceptions of HPV vaccination. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements

    PubMed Central

    Califano, Sophia; Calo, William A.; Weinberger, Morris; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT School-entry requirements in the US have led to high coverage for several vaccines, but few states and jurisdictions have adopted these policies for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Because physicians play a key role in advocating for vaccination policies, we assessed physician support of requiring HPV vaccine for school entry and correlates of this support. Participants were a national sample of 775 physicians who provide primary care, including vaccines, to adolescents. Physicians completed an online survey in 2014 that assessed their support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination of 11 and 12 y olds. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for these requirements. The majority of physicians (74%) supported some form of school-entry requirements, with or without opt-out provisions. When opt-out provisions were not specified, 47% agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance were a “good idea.” Physicians more often agreed with requirements, without opt-out provisions, if they: had more years in practice (OR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.09-2.04), gave higher quality HPV vaccine recommendations (OR=2.06; 95% CI: 1.45-2.93), believed that having requirements for Tdap, but not HPV, vaccination undermined its importance (OR=3.33; 95% CI: 2.26-4.9), and believed HPV vaccination was as or more important than other adolescent vaccinations (OR=2.30; 95% CI: 1.65-3.18). In conclusion, we found that many physicians supported school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. More research is needed to investigate the extent to which opt-out provisions might weaken or strengthen physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements. PMID:26900726

  1. Physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements.

    PubMed

    Califano, Sophia; Calo, William A; Weinberger, Morris; Gilkey, Melissa B; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-06-02

    School-entry requirements in the US have led to high coverage for several vaccines, but few states and jurisdictions have adopted these policies for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Because physicians play a key role in advocating for vaccination policies, we assessed physician support of requiring HPV vaccine for school entry and correlates of this support. Participants were a national sample of 775 physicians who provide primary care, including vaccines, to adolescents. Physicians completed an online survey in 2014 that assessed their support for school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination of 11 and 12 y olds. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess correlates of support for these requirements. The majority of physicians (74%) supported some form of school-entry requirements, with or without opt-out provisions. When opt-out provisions were not specified, 47% agreed that laws requiring HPV vaccination for school attendance were a "good idea." Physicians more often agreed with requirements, without opt-out provisions, if they: had more years in practice (OR=1.49; 95% CI: 1.09-2.04), gave higher quality HPV vaccine recommendations (OR=2.06; 95% CI: 1.45-2.93), believed that having requirements for Tdap, but not HPV, vaccination undermined its importance (OR=3.33; 95% CI: 2.26-4.9), and believed HPV vaccination was as or more important than other adolescent vaccinations (OR=2.30; 95% CI: 1.65-3.18). In conclusion, we found that many physicians supported school-entry requirements for HPV vaccination. More research is needed to investigate the extent to which opt-out provisions might weaken or strengthen physician support of HPV vaccination school-entry requirements.

  2. Provider communication and HPV vaccination: The impact of recommendation quality

    PubMed Central

    Gilkey, Melissa B.; Calo, William A.; Moss, Jennifer L.; Shah, Parth D.; Marciniak, Macary W.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Receiving a healthcare provider’s recommendation is a strong predictor of HPV vaccination, but little is known empirically about which types of recommendation are most influential. Thus, we sought to investigate the relationship between recommendation quality and HPV vaccination among U.S. adolescents. Methods In 2014, we conducted a national, online survey of 1,495 parents of 11- to 17-year-old adolescents. Parents reported whether providers endorsed HPV vaccination strongly, encouraged same-day vaccination, and discussed cancer prevention. Using an index of these quality indicators, we categorized parents as having received no, low-quality, or high-quality recommendations for HPV vaccination. Separate multivariable logistic regression models assessed associations between recommendation quality and HPV vaccine initiation (≥1 dose), follow through (3 doses, among initiators), refusal, and delay. Results Almost half (48%) of parents reported no provider recommendation for HPV vaccination, while 16% received low-quality recommendations and 36% received high-quality recommendations. Compared to no recommendation, high-quality recommendations were associated with over nine times the odds of HPV vaccine initiation (23% vs. 74%, OR=9.31, 95% CI, 7.10–12.22) and over three times the odds of follow through (17% vs. 44%, OR=3.82, 95% CI, 2.39–6.11). Low-quality recommendations were more modestly associated with initiation (OR=4.13, 95% CI, 2.99–5.70), but not follow through. Parents who received high-versus low-quality recommendations less often reported HPV vaccine refusal or delay. Conclusions High-quality recommendations were strongly associated with HPV vaccination behavior, but only about one-third of parents received them. Interventions are needed to improve not only whether, but how providers recommend HPV vaccination for adolescents. PMID:26812078

  3. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: a review of safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics.

    PubMed

    Pomfret, T C; Gagnon, J M; Gilchrist, A T

    2011-02-01

    The introduction of vaccines has lead to a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality from diseases such as measles, rubella and poliomyelitis, as well as the eradication of smallpox (Ertl HC, Xiang Z (1996) The Journal of Immunology, 156, 3579-3582). A recent vaccine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the recombinant quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (Merck, Gardasil®). Concerns raised with this preventive measure include safety and efficacy issues as well as the financial implications. Furthermore, the use of the vaccine in women outside the currently approved age ranges and in adolescent boys and men has also been a source of debate. A review of two licensed HPV vaccines (Gardasil, Merck and Cervarix, GalxoSmithKline) in the light of these issues. Literature searches were conducted using the MEDLINE (1966-December 2008) and PubMed databases in addition to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Bibliographies of selected references were also evaluated for relevant articles. Published guidelines and press releases were utilized as were the manufacturer's package inserts. The collection of information for this review was limited to the most recently available human data. The HPV quadrivalent vaccine has been effective in the management of HPV by preventing vaccine subtype-related persistent infection and precancerous lesions as evidenced by numerous clinical trials. It is also regarded as a generally safe and well-tolerated vaccine, based on an assessment of reported adverse events submitted through governmental databases and analyzed by independent researchers. The majority of adverse events were non-serious and the vaccine has not been conclusively implicated with serious events. The FDA continues to focus on routine post-marketing surveillance monitoring of reported adverse events. The bivalent vaccine has also been shown to be effective in reported trials. Its adverse effect profile also appears

  4. Statewide HPV Vaccine Initiation Among Adolescent Females in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Cates, Joan R.; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Shafer, Autumn; Smith, Jennifer S.; Brewer, Noel T

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer incidence in the United States may be greatly reduced through widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. We estimated the statewide level of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescent girls in North Carolina and identified correlates of vaccine initiation. Methods We used data from 617 parents of adolescent females from North Carolina who completed the population-based 2008 Child Health Assessment and Monitoring Program survey. Analyses used weighted multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 31.3% of parents reported their daughters had received at least 1 dose of HPV vaccine. Vaccine initiation was higher among daughters aged 13 to 15 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.03, 95% CI, 1.12–3.67) or 16 to 17 years (OR = 3.21, 95% CI, 1.76 –5.86) compared with those 10 to 12 years old. Additional correlates of HPV vaccine initiation included the daughter having a preventive check-up in the last 12 months (OR = 5.09, 95% CI, 2.43–10.67), having received meningococcal vaccine (OR = 2.50, 95% CI, 1.55– 4.01), or being from an urban area (OR = 1.81, 95% CI, 1.02–3.21). Among parents of unvaccinated daughters, intent to vaccinate in the next year was higher among those with daughters aged 13 to 17 years. Parents of unvaccinated non-Hispanic white daughters reported lower levels of intent to vaccinate within the next year compared with parents of unvaccinated daughters of other races. Conclusions HPV vaccine initiation in North Carolina is comparable with other US areas. Potential strategies for increasing HPV vaccination levels include reducing missed opportunities for HPV vaccination at preventive check-ups and increasing concomitant administration of HPV vaccine with other adolescent vaccines. PMID:20414146

  5. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine initiation in minority Americans.

    PubMed

    De, P; Budhwani, H

    2017-03-01

    Transmission of the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a significant public health concern. HPV is preventable through a series of vaccinations; however, knowledge gaps exist as to which groups are least likely to initiate vaccination. Considering this gap, the aim of this study is to examine HPV vaccine initiation rates in racial minorities, comparing foreign-born individuals to their American-born peers. Population-based data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a repeated large-scale household interview survey of a statistically representative sample of the United States civilian non-institutionalized population, were applied. Data were derived from two survey modules: the family and summary adult modules. Sampling weights were employed to logistic regression modelling the outcome of HPV vaccine initiation. Foreign-born persons, African Americans, males, those lacking health insurance coverage and those without a medical home (usual place to receive care) held statistically lower rates of HPV vaccine initiation. Being college educated was associated with higher odds of HPV vaccine initiation. Our findings support the persistence of health disparities in racial minorities and foreign-born persons residing in the United States. Addressing these gaps will likely require both individual-level (e.g. targeted health education) and system-level (e.g. HPV vaccine promoting policies) interventions. Since health insurance coverage and having a medical home were significant associates of HPV vaccine initiation, attempts to coverage may improve HPV vaccine initiation rates. Additionally, policies which require HPV vaccination for school entry could boost coverage across all population groups, including boys, foreign-born persons and racial minorities. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HPV and Cervical Cancer Epidemiology - Current Status of HPV Vaccination in India.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sharmila; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Samanta, Luna; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CaCx) is the second most fatal cancer contributing to 14% of cancers in Indian females, which account for 25.4% and 26.5% of the global burden of CaCx prevalence and mortality, respectively. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV- strains 16 and 18) is the most important risk factor for precursors of invasive CaCx. Comprehensive prevention strategies for CaCx should include screening and HPV vaccination. Three screening modalities for CaCx are cytology, visual inspection with acetic acid, and HPV testing. There is no Indian national policy on CaCx prevention, and screening of asymptomatic females against CaCx is practically non-existent. HPV vaccines can make a major breakthrough in the control of CaCx in India which has high disease load and no organized screening program. Despite the Indian Government's effort to introduce HPV vaccination in the National Immunization Program and bring down vaccine cost, challenges to implementing vaccination in India are strong such as: inadequate epidemiological evidence for disease prioritization, duration of vaccine use, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance. This paper reviews the current epidemiology of CaCx and HPV in India, and the current status of HPV vaccination in the country. This article stresses the need for more research in the Indian context, to evaluate interventions for CaCx and assess their applicability, success, scalability and sustainability within the constraints of the Indian health care system.

  7. Reported adverse events in girls aged 13-16 years after vaccination with the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Klooster, T M; Kemmeren, J M; van der Maas, N A T; de Melker, H E

    2011-06-20

    In 2009, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was offered to girls born in 1993-1996 in a catch-up campaign, followed in 2010 by the implementation of the vaccination in the National Immunization Programme (NIP) for girls born in 1997. To monitor the tolerability of the 2009 catch-up campaign, we investigated the occurrence of adverse events within 7 days after vaccination with the bivalent HPV vaccine. A total of 6000 girls were asked to participate, including 1500 from each birth cohort from 1993 to 1996. One week after each of the required three successive doses, the participants received by e-mail a Web-based questionnaire focused on local reactions and systemic events. One or more questionnaires were returned by 4248 girls. Any local reaction was reported by 92.1% of the girls after the first dose, 79.4% after the second dose, and 83.3% after the third dose, and 91.7%, 78.7%, and 78.4% reported any systemic event after the three doses, respectively. Pain in the arm was the most frequently reported local reaction, of which 24.0%, 11.7%, and 14.7% was classified as pronounced. Myalgia was the most often reported systemic event. The proportion of local reactions and most systemic events was significantly lower after the second and third dose compared with the first dose (Odds ratio [OR], 0.33-0.76). Older girls reported a higher proportion of adverse events than younger girls. After vaccination with the bivalent HPV vaccine, girls 13-16 years of age reported a high proportion of short-term adverse events. These are maximum estimates and not necessarily caused by the vaccination itself. Although, girls experienced HPV vaccination as painful, no serious or unexpected adverse events were reported. The results of this survey are being communicated to health care workers and the public. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. US Assessment of HPV Types in Cancers: Implications for Current and 9-Valent HPV Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Elizabeth R.; Thompson, Trevor D.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lyu, Christopher W.; Steinau, Martin; Watson, Meg; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Peters, Edward S.; Huang, Youjie; Saber, Maria Sibug; Altekruse, Sean; Goodman, Marc T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to determine the prevaccine type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)–associated cancers in the United States to evaluate the potential impact of the HPV types in the current and newly approved 9-valent HPV vaccines. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention partnered with seven US population-based cancer registries to obtain archival tissue for cancers diagnosed from 1993 to 2005. HPV testing was performed on 2670 case patients that were fairly representative of all participating cancer registry cases by age and sex. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated by anatomic site and HPV status. Current US cancer registry data and the detection of HPV types were used to estimate the number of cancers potentially preventable through vaccination. Results: HPV DNA was detected in 90.6% of cervical, 91.1% of anal, 75.0% of vaginal, 70.1% of oropharyngeal, 68.8% of vulvar, 63.3% of penile, 32.0% of oral cavity, and 20.9% of laryngeal cancers, as well as in 98.8% of cervical cancer in situ (CCIS). A vaccine targeting HPV 16/18 potentially prevents the majority of invasive cervical (66.2%), anal (79.4%), oropharyngeal (60.2%), and vaginal (55.1%) cancers, as well as many penile (47.9%), vulvar (48.6%) cancers: 24 858 cases annually. The 9-valent vaccine also targeting HPV 31/33/45/52/58 may prevent an additional 4.2% to 18.3% of cancers: 3944 cases annually. For most cancers, younger age at diagnosis was associated with higher HPV 16/18 prevalence. With the exception of oropharyngeal cancers and CCIS, HPV 16/18 prevalence was similar across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions: In the United States, current vaccines will reduce most HPV-associated cancers; a smaller additional reduction would be contributed by the new 9-valent vaccine. PMID:25925419

  9. HPV vaccines and pregnancy: the situation in early 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11/16/18 (Gardasil) and 16/18 (Cervarix) are non-viable vaccines composed of recombinant HPV proteins. As a precaution, they should not be given during pregnancy. However, some women are vaccinated shortly before conceiving or early during an undiagnosed pregnancy. What are the risks for the unborn child exposed in utero to these vaccines? We examined data available in late 2011. After in utero exposure to the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine during the first trimester, animal studies, only conducted in rats, showed no increase in the risk of malformations. Five clinical trials and the latest annual update of the Pregnancy Registry for Gardasil, released in 2010 and including more than 1000 vaccinated pregnant women, showed no particular pattern of malformations with the quadrivalent vaccine. A few reports of very rare abnormalities are troubling, but they do not clearly implicate the vaccine. Most data on the HPV 16/18 vaccine come from two clinical trials comparing this vaccine with hepatitis A vaccine or placebo vaccination. Fewer than 400 pregnancies exposed to the HPV 16/18 vaccine have been studied. The rate of congenital malformations was similar to that in the control population. In practice, there are few data on exposure to HPV vaccines during the first trimester of pregnancy. There are more, relatively reassuring, data on the HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine. Women who are vaccinated just before conceiving or early in pregnancy should receive appropriate information. Active pharmacovigilance must continue.

  10. Antibody Secreting Cell Responses following Vaccination with Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine among Haitian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Richelle C.; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Teng, Jessica E.; Xu, Peng; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.; Qadri, Firdausi; Franke, Molly F.; Ivers, Louise C.; Harris, Jason B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The bivalent whole-cell (BivWC) oral cholera vaccine (Shanchol) is effective in preventing cholera. However, evaluations of immune responses following vaccination with BivWC have been limited. To determine whether BivWC induces significant mucosal immune responses, we measured V. cholerae O1 antigen-specific antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses following vaccination. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled 24 Haitian adults in this study, and administered doses of oral BivWC vaccine 14 days apart (day 0 and day 14). We drew blood at baseline, and 7 days following each vaccine dose (day 7 and 21). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated, and ASCs were enumerated using an ELISPOT assay. Significant increases in Ogawa (6.9 cells per million PBMCs) and Inaba (9.5 cells per million PBMCs) OSP-specific IgA ASCs were detected 7 days following the first dose (P < 0.001), but not the second dose. The magnitude of V. cholerae-specific ASC responses did not appear to be associated with recent exposure to cholera. ASC responses measured against the whole lipolysaccharide (LPS) antigen and the OSP moiety of LPS were equivalent, suggesting that all or nearly all of the LPS response targets the OSP moiety. Conclusions/Significance Immunization with the BivWC oral cholera vaccine induced ASC responses among a cohort of healthy adults in Haiti after a single dose. The second dose of vaccine resulted in minimal ASC responses over baseline, suggesting that the current dosing schedule may not be optimal for boosting mucosal immune responses to V. cholerae antigens for adults in a cholera-endemic area. PMID:27308825

  11. Antibody Secreting Cell Responses following Vaccination with Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine among Haitian Adults.

    PubMed

    Matias, Wilfredo R; Falkard, Brie; Charles, Richelle C; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Teng, Jessica E; Xu, Peng; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Franke, Molly F; Ivers, Louise C; Harris, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    The bivalent whole-cell (BivWC) oral cholera vaccine (Shanchol) is effective in preventing cholera. However, evaluations of immune responses following vaccination with BivWC have been limited. To determine whether BivWC induces significant mucosal immune responses, we measured V. cholerae O1 antigen-specific antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses following vaccination. We enrolled 24 Haitian adults in this study, and administered doses of oral BivWC vaccine 14 days apart (day 0 and day 14). We drew blood at baseline, and 7 days following each vaccine dose (day 7 and 21). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated, and ASCs were enumerated using an ELISPOT assay. Significant increases in Ogawa (6.9 cells per million PBMCs) and Inaba (9.5 cells per million PBMCs) OSP-specific IgA ASCs were detected 7 days following the first dose (P < 0.001), but not the second dose. The magnitude of V. cholerae-specific ASC responses did not appear to be associated with recent exposure to cholera. ASC responses measured against the whole lipolysaccharide (LPS) antigen and the OSP moiety of LPS were equivalent, suggesting that all or nearly all of the LPS response targets the OSP moiety. Immunization with the BivWC oral cholera vaccine induced ASC responses among a cohort of healthy adults in Haiti after a single dose. The second dose of vaccine resulted in minimal ASC responses over baseline, suggesting that the current dosing schedule may not be optimal for boosting mucosal immune responses to V. cholerae antigens for adults in a cholera-endemic area.

  12. Intent to Receive an HPV Vaccine among University Men and Women and Implications for Vaccine Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melissa; Cook, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: In 2006, the authors examined intention to receive an HPV vaccine among 340 college students. Methods: A total of 138 men and 202 women completed questionnaires. The authors measured intention by asking participants how likely they would be to accept an HPV vaccine that prevented against (1) all HPV, (2) cervical cancer…

  13. Intent to Receive an HPV Vaccine among University Men and Women and Implications for Vaccine Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Melissa; Cook, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: In 2006, the authors examined intention to receive an HPV vaccine among 340 college students. Methods: A total of 138 men and 202 women completed questionnaires. The authors measured intention by asking participants how likely they would be to accept an HPV vaccine that prevented against (1) all HPV, (2) cervical cancer…

  14. Mothers' acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for daughters in a country with a high prevalence of HPV.

    PubMed

    Alder, Susanna; Gustafsson, Sofia; Perinetti, Claudia; Mints, Miriam; Sundström, Karin; Andersson, Sonia

    2015-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in Argentina and the mortality rate is not declining despite opportunistic screening. Free-of-charge human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of 11-year-old girls was introduced in 2011. Parental acceptance of HPV vaccination is considered to be of great importance for HPV vaccine uptake. However, little is known regarding this factor in Argentina. The aim of the present study was to explore maternal HPV vaccination acceptance, willingness to pay for HPV vaccination and correlates of this willingness, awareness of HPV and HPV-associated disease and behaviors and attitudes associated with HPV vaccination acceptance. A total of 180 mothers of girls aged 9-15 years comprised this quantitative, cross-sectional, survey-based study, conducted at two hospitals in the Mendoza Province. Correlates of willingness to pay for HPV vaccination were obtained using multivariable logistic regression models. Maternal HPV vaccination acceptance was 90%, and 60% of mothers were willing to pay for HPV vaccination. Mothers who were gainfully employed and had a higher disposable household income were significantly more willing to pay for HPV vaccination [odds ratio (OR)=2.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-6.38; OR=3.28, 95% CI 1.36-7.94, respectively], as were mothers who were aware of cervical cancer prior to the study (OR=3.22, 95% CI 1.02-10.14). Only one in 10 mothers were informed that HPV vaccination does not offer complete protection against cervical cancer. In conclusion, the present study showed high maternal HPV vaccination acceptance, although acceptance decreased when vaccination was not free-of-charge. Continuous public education campaigns are needed to improve knowledge of HPV, HPV vaccines and HPV-associated disease.

  15. Social media microblogs as an HPV vaccination forum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chupei; Gotsis, Marientina; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice

    2013-11-01

    The 2006 US FDA approval of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine brought new hope for cancer prevention. Gardasil and Cervarix are widely available vaccines that can deter HPV infection, which causes 70% of cervical cancer. Acceptance of vaccination varies due to a lack of HPV awareness and HPV vaccine knowledge. Recent observations of the Chinese microblog "SinaWeibo" suggest a new approach to engage health professionals and consumer website bloggers. Websites that present the latest fashion, fitness or beauty news and ways to obtain "deals" have created informative blogs or online communities that appeal to female users. Some users raise health questions of their peers. Health professionals, as website bloggers, can introduce vaccine news or respond to conversations between bloggers and their followers. By transforming medical vocabulary into ordinary chat, microblogs may promote efficiency in vaccine education and communication. A web-based, interactive social media-microblog could offer an ideal platform to speed up information dissemination and increase targeted communication.

  16. HPV vaccines - A review of the first decade.

    PubMed

    Harper, Diane M; DeMars, Leslie R

    2017-07-01

    Pre-adolescent girls (9-15years) have the option of receiving a two dose HPV vaccine series at either a six month or one year interval to provide protection from HPV 16, the most prevalent type associated with cervical cancers, as well as several other less prevalent types. This series of vaccinations is highly likely to protect her from HPV infection until she enters the routine screening program, whether that be primary HPV testing or a combination of HPV testing and cytology. The two dose program has been recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) since 2015. For women 15years and older, the three dose vaccine schedule is still recommended. The past ten years of Gardasil use has provided evidence of reduced HPV 16/18 infections in countries where there has been high coverage. Gardasil9 has replaced Gardasil. Gardasil9 has the same rapid anti-HPV 18 and HPV45 titer loss as Gardasil did. Cervarix remains equivalent to Gardasil9 in the prevention of HPV infections and precancers of any HPV type; Cervarix also has demonstrated sustained high antibody titers for at least 10years. One dose of Cervarix provides protection against HPV 16/18 infection with robust antibody titers well above natural infection titers. This may offer the easiest and most cost effective vaccination program over time, especially in low and lower middle income countries. Cervical cancer screening must continue to control cancer incidence over the upcoming decades. Future studies of prophylactic HPV vaccines, as defined by the WHO, must demonstrate protection against six month type specific persistent infections, not actual cervical cancer precursor disease endpoints, such as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3) or adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). This simplifies and makes less expensive future comparative studies between existing and new generic vaccines. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Promoting HPV Vaccination Online: Message Design and Media Choice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon J; Cho, Jieun

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of message framing and online media channel on young adults' perceived severity of human papillomavirus (HPV), perceived barriers and benefits of getting HPV vaccination, and behavioral intention to get vaccinated. An experiment was conducted with 142 college students. We found an interaction effect: The loss-framed message posted on Facebook was more effective in increasing the number of people who expressed their willingness to get HPV vaccination than the gain-framed message presented on Facebook. However, this framing effect was not found when the identical message was presented on an online newspaper. People's perceptions of severity of HPV and barriers of getting HPV vaccination were also influenced, depending on which media channel the information was circulated.

  18. Impact and Cost-effectiveness of 3 Doses of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Among US Females Previously Vaccinated With 4-Valent HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chesson, Harrell W.; Laprise, Jean-François; Brisson, Marc; Markowitz, Lauri E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. We estimated the potential impact and cost-effectiveness of providing 3-doses of nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) to females aged 13–18 years who had previously completed a series of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), a strategy we refer to as “additional 9vHPV vaccination.” Methods. We used 2 distinct models: (1) the simplified model, which is among the most basic of the published dynamic HPV models, and (2) the US HPV-ADVISE model, a complex, stochastic, individual-based transmission-dynamic model. Results. When assuming no 4vHPV cross-protection, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination was $146 200 in the simplified model and $108 200 in the US HPV-ADVISE model ($191 800 when assuming 4vHPV cross-protection). In 1-way sensitivity analyses in the scenario of no 4vHPV cross-protection, the simplified model results ranged from $70 300 to $182 000, and the US HPV-ADVISE model results ranged from $97 600 to $118 900. Conclusions. The average cost per QALY gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination exceeded $100 000 in both models. However, the results varied considerably in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Additional 9vHPV vaccination is likely not as efficient as many other potential HPV vaccination strategies, such as increasing primary 9vHPV vaccine coverage. PMID:26908738

  19. Impact and Cost-effectiveness of 3 Doses of 9-Valent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Among US Females Previously Vaccinated With 4-Valent HPV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Harrell W; Laprise, Jean-François; Brisson, Marc; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2016-06-01

    We estimated the potential impact and cost-effectiveness of providing 3-doses of nonavalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (9vHPV) to females aged 13-18 years who had previously completed a series of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV), a strategy we refer to as "additional 9vHPV vaccination." We used 2 distinct models: (1) the simplified model, which is among the most basic of the published dynamic HPV models, and (2) the US HPV-ADVISE model, a complex, stochastic, individual-based transmission-dynamic model. When assuming no 4vHPV cross-protection, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination was $146 200 in the simplified model and $108 200 in the US HPV-ADVISE model ($191 800 when assuming 4vHPV cross-protection). In 1-way sensitivity analyses in the scenario of no 4vHPV cross-protection, the simplified model results ranged from $70 300 to $182 000, and the US HPV-ADVISE model results ranged from $97 600 to $118 900. The average cost per QALY gained by additional 9vHPV vaccination exceeded $100 000 in both models. However, the results varied considerably in sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. Additional 9vHPV vaccination is likely not as efficient as many other potential HPV vaccination strategies, such as increasing primary 9vHPV vaccine coverage. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Effective Strategies for HPV Vaccine Delivery: The Views of Pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, Abbigail M.; Zimet, Gregory D.; Rosenthal, Susan L.; Bernstein, David I.; Wetzel, Caitlin; Kahn, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Pediatricians will play a critical role in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine delivery. The objectives of this research were to examine pediatricians' views about key issues related to HPV vaccine delivery and identify their strategies for effective vaccine delivery. Methods A diverse sample of practicing pediatricians was recruited from a three-state region using a purposeful sampling strategy. Participants completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results The mean age of the 31 participants was 47 (range 30-78) years, 17 (55%) were female, 9 (29%) black, and 4 (13%) Latino. Participants noted that cultural issues, including a family's religious and ethnic background, were important considerations when recommending an HPV vaccine. Almost all participants believed that vaccination should be universal rather than targeted, but opinions regarding legislative mandates for vaccination varied. Those in favor of mandates cited their potential to maximize the public health impact of immunization, while those opposed noted that HPV is not transmitted casually and were concerned about limited data on the long-term safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines. Pediatricians noted that specific strategies for effective vaccine delivery would be needed for an STI vaccine targeted toward adolescents, especially considering the poor public understanding of HPV. These included provision of HPV vaccines in alternative settings, guidance for pediatricians as to how to address parental concerns, and specific educational initiatives. Conclusions The views of pediatricians, who have extensive experience administering vaccines to children and adolescents, will be valuable as HPV vaccine delivery strategies are designed. PMID:17659214

  1. HPV vaccine acceptability in high-risk Greek men.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Lea; Tsikis, Savas; Bethimoutis, George; Nicolaidou, Electra; Paparizos, Vassilios; Antoniou, Christina; Kanelleas, Antonios; Chardalias, Leonidas; Stavropoulos, Georgios-Emmanouil; Schneider, John; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella

    2017-09-22

    HPV is associated with malignancy in men, yet there is a lack of data on HPV knowledge, vaccine acceptability, and factors affecting vaccine acceptability in Greek men. This study aims to identify determinants of knowledge and willingness to vaccinate against HPV among high-risk Greek men. Men (n = 298) between the ages of 18 and 55 were enrolled from the STI and HIV clinics at "Andreas Syggros" Hospital in Athens, Greece from July-October 2015. Participants completed a survey on demographics, economic factors, sexual history, HPV knowledge, and vaccine acceptability. The majority of participants were younger than 40 (76.6%) and unmarried (84.6%). Our sample was 31.2% MSM (men who have sex with men), and 20.1% were HIV-positive. Most participants (>90%) were aware that HPV is highly prevalent in both men and women; however, fewer identified that HPV causes cancers in both sexes (68%) and that vaccination protects men and women (67%). Amongst participants, 76.7% were willing to vaccinate themselves against HPV, 71.4% an adolescent son, and 69.3% an adolescent daughter. HIV-positive men were more likely to be willing to vaccinate themselves (OR 2.83, p = .015), a son (OR 3.3, p = .015) or a daughter (3.01, p = .020). Higher income levels were associated with increased willingness to vaccinate oneself (OR 1.32, p = .027), a son (1.33, p = .032) or daughter (1.34, p = .027). Although there is a HPV knowledge gap, HPV vaccine acceptability is high despite lack of vaccine promotion to Greek men. Future studies should include lower-risk men to adequately inform public health efforts.

  2. Knowledge and Awareness of Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV Vaccine Among HPV-Infected Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Zulqarnain; Yasmeen, Nafeesa; Li, Yuanyue; Zhang, Wenhui; Lu, Hongyu; Wu, Xiaomei; Xia, Xueshan; Yang, Shihua

    2017-09-04

    BACKGROUND It is important to understand the knowledge that various groups of a population have about cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) and their attitudes toward HPV vaccination, as it will ultimately influence their decision-making for or against the acceptability of vaccines and other preventive methods. This study was designed to determine the level of knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer, HPV, and the HPV vaccine among Chinese women in Yunnan province. MATERIAL AND METHODS A survey was conducted in Yunnan province by the Laboratory of Molecular Virology in collaboration with the Yunnan First People's Hospital in Feb 2015. A total of 388 women were recruited and asked to participate in a questionnaire-based interview that collected information related to their awareness and knowledge about: (1) cervical cancer, (2) HPV and HPV vaccine and willingness to have their children receive vaccination, and (3) demographic characteristics. RESULTS A total of 388 HPV-positive women were included; 300/388 (73.3%) were Han, and 88/388 (22.7%) were other ethnicities. Overall, 204/388 (52.6%) of the women were aware of cervical cancer, with a significant difference between Han women and women of other ethnic groups (168/388, 56.0% and 36/88, 40.9%; P=0.015). Overall, 26.5% of the women were aware of the role of HPV in cervical cancer; 29.0% of the Han women and 18.2% of women of other ethnic groups were aware of this role of HPV (P=0.05). The knowledge that HPV infection leads to cervical cancer was higher among Han women (29.0%) compared to women of other ethnicities (18.2%). Knowledge about the HPV vaccine was very low in all ethnic groups, but the Han women were more willing to allow their children to be vaccinated before they become sexually active. A similar difference has also been found in women from various regions. CONCLUSIONS Although level of awareness and knowledge about cervical cancer was moderate, knowledge and awareness of HPV and the HPV

  3. Low HPV vaccine coverage among female community college students.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Erica; Glenn, Beth A; Bastani, Roshan

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed HPV vaccination and its correlates among culturally diverse 18-26 year-old community college women in Los Angeles. Specific research questions were: (1) What proportion of respondents have initiated the HPV vaccine, and what proportion have completed the three-dose series? (2) What demographic (e.g., age, ethnicity), psychosocial (e.g., vaccine-related beliefs, perceived social norms), and health care-related variables (e.g., health insurance status, provider recommendation, health care trust and satisfaction) are associated with vaccine initiation for this sample? Participants were recruited from the campus of a community college in central Los Angeles. All female students between 18 and 26 were eligible to participate. An anonymous web-based survey assessed number of HPV vaccine doses received as well as demographic information, HPV- and HPV vaccine-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, perceived social norms, provider & health care system factors, sexual behavior, cervical health, and mother-daughter communication about sex. Analyses were conducted using 178 surveys. Multivariate logistic regression tested the relationships of statistically significant bivariate predictors to vaccine initiation. Those who initiated the vaccine were younger, more often had a health-related academic major, thought the vaccine to be safer, perceived HPV severity lower, and perceived higher social approval for HPV vaccination than those unvaccinated. All who had initiated the vaccine had a doctor's recommendation. To increase uptake among 18-26-year-old women, research should explore provider interventions to increase vaccine recommendation, and also identify individuals and groups who may have negative beliefs about vaccine safety and efficacy to provide support in vaccine decision-making.

  4. Impact of Louisiana's HPV Vaccine Awareness Policy on HPV Vaccination Among 13- to 17-Year-Old Females.

    PubMed

    Pierre-Victor, Dudith; Trepka, Mary Jo; Page, Timothy F; Li, Tan; Stephens, Dionne P; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2017-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends routine human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization for 11- to 12-year-old adolescents. In 2008, Louisiana required the school boards to distribute HPV vaccine information to parents or guardian of students in Grades 6 to 12. This article investigates the impact of this policy on HPV vaccination among 13- to 17-year-old female adolescents using National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen) data. Drawing on the data from the 2008 to 2012 NIS-Teen, we compared the difference in proportions of females who have been vaccinated before and after the policy. Using difference-indifference estimation, we explored the change in vaccination rates before and after the policy implementation in Louisiana compared with Alabama and Mississippi, two states that did not have such a policy in place. The difference-in-differences estimates for HPV vaccination were not significant. Physician recommendation for HPV vaccination was significantly associated with vaccination among females in Louisiana and Alabama (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 7.74; 95% confidence interval [CI; 5.22, 11.5]), and for those in Louisiana and Mississippi (aOR = 7.05; 95% CI [4.6, 10.5]). Compared to the proportion of female adolescents who had received physician recommendation in Alabama or Mississippi, the proportion in Louisiana did not increase significantly in the postpolicy period. HPV vaccination rates did not increase significantly in Louisiana compared to Alabama or Mississippi following the implementation of the policy. Despite Louisiana's policy, physician recommendation remains the key determinant of HPV vaccination. HPV vaccine awareness does not necessarily result in HPV vaccination.

  5. Chapter 15: HPV vaccine use in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kane, Mark A; Sherris, Jacqueline; Coursaget, Pierre; Aguado, Teresa; Cutts, Felicity

    2006-08-31

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer primarily occurs in the developing world, where, unfortunately, access to vaccines in general, and expensive newer vaccines in particular, is often more limited than in the industrialized world. In addition, secondary prevention methods such as HPV screening, Pap testing, or visual inspection are uncommon in the developing world. The HPV vaccine will be first introduced into the industrialized countries and it will then, over the course of time, become used in the developing countries. HPV vaccine should be introduced in the framework of comprehensive cervical cancer control, and offers an opportunity to bring together a wide range of constituents who have not to date worked closely on vaccination. Ultimately, the decision of whether and when a vaccine will be introduced will depend on individual countries. To prepare for decisions on HPV vaccine use, the sexual and reproductive health (SRH; including adolescent health), immunization, and cancer control communities need to work together to analyze the appropriate data and build international and national consensus. The timeframe for other newer vaccines, such as hepatitis B and Hib, has been measured in decades, and the challenge to the public sector is to greatly shorten the time needed to make HPV vaccines available and affordable for the developing world, where their impact will be greatest.

  6. The next generation of HPV vaccines: nonavalent vaccine V503 on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Archana

    2014-11-01

    HPV infection with 'high-risk' genotypes is associated with ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers. Two currently licensed prophylactic HPV vaccines designed to prevent disease associated with HPV 16 and 18 are in use around the world. Both vaccines have very high efficacy for prevention of vaccine type-associated cervical precancers, preventing approximately 70% of these lesions. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine has also been shown to prevent HPV16/18-associated vaginal, vulvar and anal precancers, and HPV6/11-associated ano-genital warts. To broaden protection against HPV genotypes not in the current vaccines, 'second-generation' vaccines with additional genotypes are under development. Merck, Sharp and Dohme has submitted a Biologics License Application for its investigational nonavalent HPV vaccine V503 to the US FDA, with standard review being granted. The nonavalent HPV vaccine appears to be safe and effective in preventing persistent infection and precancerous lesions associated with HPV types 16/18/31/33/45/52/58, as well as genital warts related to HPV types 6 and 11.

  7. Knowledge of HPV infection and vaccination among vaccinated and unvaccinated teenaged girls.

    PubMed

    Sopracordevole, Francesco; Cigolot, Federica; Mancioli, Francesca; Agarossi, Alberto; Boselli, Fausto; Ciavattini, Andrea

    2013-07-01

    To assess the knowledge of teenaged girls on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and vaccination 12 months after the start of a vaccine administration and information campaign. Between May 15 and June 15, 2009, an anonymous questionnaire was given to 629 girls attending a secondary school in a northeastern Italian city (286 were vaccinated against HPV, 343 were unvaccinated) to investigate their knowledge on HPV infection, transmission, prevention, vaccination, and post-vaccination behaviors. The responses were evaluated with respect to the vaccination status of the participants. Vaccinated teenaged girls had no more knowledge than unvaccinated ones about the route of HPV transmission, and the relationship between HPV and AIDS. Vaccinated girls had less knowledge than unvaccinated girls about preventing transmission by condom (P=0.003) and about the correlation between HPV and penile cancer (P=0.034) and warts (P=0.001). Furthermore, compared with unvaccinated girls, more vaccinated girls believed that contraceptive pills might prevent HPV-related disease (P=0.001). Vaccinated girls better understood the importance of performing regular Pap smears after vaccination (P=0.021). Knowledge on HPV infection and vaccination remains suboptimal, especially among vaccinated teenaged girls, despite a broad information campaign. Misconceptions about the utility of secondary prevention may increase risky sexual behaviors. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. HPV vaccination series completion and co-vaccination: Pairing vaccines may matter for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; McKim Mitchell, Emma; Camacho, Fabian

    2015-10-26

    Very little is known about the effect of concurrent co-vaccination on HPV series completion. This study utilized a retrospective review of a Clinical Data Repository to assess whether concurrent vaccination had an impact on HPV vaccination series completion, and whether there were differences based on age. 3371 patients who received the HPV vaccine at a single academic medical center between the years 2009-2013 were included in this analysis. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for effect of concurrent vaccination on series completion for the age group 9-18 was 1.32 (95% CI 1.09, 1.60). Although not statistically significant, the aOR for effect of concurrent vaccination on completion changed direction for the 19-25 age group and was 0.44 (95% CI 0.17, 1.12). This study provides preliminary evidence that pairing the HPV vaccine with one or more co-vaccines may yield a higher HPV vaccination completion rate among adolescents age 9-18.

  9. Human papillomavirus (HPV) awareness and vaccine receptivity among Senegalese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Massey, Philip M; Boansi, Ruth K; Gipson, Jessica D; Adams, Rachel M; Riess, Helene; Dieng, Thierno; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C

    2017-01-01

    To examine HPV vaccine awareness and receptivity among adolescents and young adults in Senegal. Participants from six high schools and five community centres across five regions of Senegal (n = 2286) completed a self-administered questionnaire in October and November 2014. The study assessed HPV awareness and receptivity towards receiving the HPV vaccine. Multivariable logistic regression explored statistically significant relationships between the predictor variables and both outcomes. Twenty-seven percent had heard of HPV. Among those who had heard of HPV (n = 616), only 28% indicated willingness to vaccinate. Multivariable analysis showed that respondents from rural areas had 63% higher odds (95% CI: 1.24, 2.12) of having heard of HPV than those in urban areas. Respondents with fathers who had completed higher education had 41% higher odds (95% CI: 1.04, 1.92) of being aware of HPV (P < 0.05); however, every level of father's education (as compared to no education at all) was negatively associated with willingness to vaccinate. Respondents who had previously spoken to a healthcare professional about the HPV vaccine had 80% higher odds (95% CI: 1.16, 2.81) of willingness to vaccinate than those who did not speak to a provider about the vaccine. Healthcare providers and parents are important stakeholders in disseminating HPV vaccine information. Given the overall low levels of awareness, there is a great opportunity for public health communication efforts to craft health messaging and information in a way to maximise receptivity, outlining benefits and providing information on the minimal risks associated with the vaccine. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. HPV vaccination coverage of teen girls: the influence of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip J; Stokley, Shannon; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B

    2016-03-18

    Between 2010 and 2014, the percentage of 13-17 year-old girls administered ≥3 doses of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine ("fully vaccinated") increased by 7.7 percentage points to 39.7%, and the percentage not administered any doses of the HPV vaccine ("not immunized") decreased by 11.3 percentage points to 40.0%. To evaluate the complex interactions between parents' vaccine-related beliefs, demographic factors, and HPV immunization status. Vaccine-related parental beliefs and sociodemographic data collected by the 2010 National Immunization Survey-Teen among teen girls (n=8490) were analyzed. HPV vaccination status was determined from teens' health care provider (HCP) records. Among teen girls either unvaccinated or fully vaccinated against HPV, teen girls whose parent was positively influenced to vaccinate their teen daughter against HPV were 48.2 percentage points more likely to be fully vaccinated. Parents who reported being positively influenced to vaccinate against HPV were 28.9 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP talked about the HPV vaccine, 27.2 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP gave enough time to discuss the HPV shot, and 43.4 percentage points more likely to report that their daughter's HCP recommended the HPV vaccine (p<0.05). Among teen girls administered 1-2 doses of the HPV vaccine, 87.0% had missed opportunities for HPV vaccine administration. Results suggest that an important pathway to achieving higher ≥3 dose HPV vaccine coverage is by increasing HPV vaccination series initiation though HCP talking to parents about the HPV vaccine, giving parents time to discuss the vaccine, and by making a strong recommendation for the HPV. Also, HPV vaccination series completion rates may be increased by eliminating missed opportunities to vaccinate against HPV and scheduling additional follow-up visits to administer missing HPV vaccine doses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Sexual healthcare professionals' views on HPV vaccination for men in the UK.

    PubMed

    Nadarzynski, Tom; Smith, Helen E; Richardson, Daniel; Ford, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Carrie D

    2015-12-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for men could prevent anal cancers amongst men who have sex with men (MSM). An e-survey of attitudes towards vaccination for men in the UK was conducted in July-August 2014. Among 325 sexual health professionals, 14% were already vaccinating men against HPV, 83% recommended gender-neutral HPV vaccination and 65% recommended targeting MSM. Over 50% reported having poor knowledge about the use of HPV vaccine for MSM and the skills to identify MSM likely to benefit from HPV vaccination. Clear advice and guidelines on HPV vaccine use for men at sexual health clinics are required to ensure equitable opportunities for vaccination.

  12. Immunogenicity of Individual Vaccine Components in a Bivalent Nicotine Vaccine Differ According to Vaccine Formulation and Administration Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Katherine E.; de Villiers, Sabina H. L.; Pravetoni, Marco; Pentel, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Structurally distinct nicotine immunogens can elicit independent antibody responses against nicotine when administered concurrently. Co-administering different nicotine immunogens together as a multivalent vaccine could be a useful way to generate higher antibody levels than with monovalent vaccines alone. The immunogenicity and additivity of monovalent and bivalent nicotine vaccines was studied across a range of immunogen doses, adjuvants, and routes to assess the generality of this approach. Rats were vaccinated with total immunogen doses of 12.5 - 100 μg of 3′-aminomethyl nicotine conjugated to recombinant Pseudomonas exoprotein A (3′-AmNic-rEPA), 6-carboxymethylureido nicotine conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (6-CMUNic-KLH), or both. Vaccines were administered s.c. in alum or i.p. in Freund’s adjuvant at matched total immunogen doses. When administered s.c. in alum, the contributions of the individual immunogens to total nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) titers and concentrations were preserved across a range of doses. Antibody affinity for nicotine varied greatly among individuals but was similar for monovalent and bivalent vaccines. However when administered i.p. in Freund’s adjuvant the contributions of the individual immunogens to total NicAb titers and concentrations were compromised at some doses. These results support the possibility of co-administering structurally distinct nicotine immunogens to achieve a more robust immune response than can be obtained with monovalent immunogens alone. Choice of adjuvant was important for the preservation of immunogen component activity. PMID:24312662

  13. Rationale and design of a long term follow-up study of women who did and did not receive HPV 16/18 vaccination in Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Porras, Carolina; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Jimenez, Silvia; Darragh, Teresa M; Cortes, Bernal; Befano, Brian; Schiffman, Mark; Carvajal, Loreto; Palefsky, Joel; Schiller, John; Ocampo, Rebeca; Schussler, John; Lowy, Douglas; Guillen, Diego; Stoler, Mark H; Quint, Wim; Morales, Jorge; Avila, Carlos; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2015-04-27

    The Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) was a randomized clinical trial conducted between 2004 and 2010, which randomized 7466 women aged 18 to 25 to receive the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine or control Hepatitis-A vaccine. Participants were followed for 4 years with cross-over vaccination at the study end. In 2010 the long term follow-up (LTFU) study was initiated to evaluate the 10-year impact of HPV-16/18 vaccination, determinants of the immune response, and HPV natural history in a vaccinated population. Herein, the rationale, design and methods of the LTFU study are described, which actively follows CVT participants in the HPV-arm 6 additional years at biennial intervals (3 additional study visits for 10 years of total follow-up), or more often if clinically indicated. According to the initial commitment, women in the Hepatitis-A arm were offered HPV vaccination at cross-over; they were followed 2 additional years and exited from the study. 92% of eligible CVT women accepted participation in LTFU. To provide underlying rates of HPV acquisition and cervical disease among unvaccinated women to compare with the HPV-arm during LTFU, a new unvaccinated control group (UCG) of women who are beyond the age generally recommended for routine vaccination was enrolled, and will be followed by cervical cancer screening over 6 years. To form the UCG, 5000 women were selected from a local census, of whom 2836 women (61% of eligible women) agreed to participate. Over 90% of participants complied with an interview, blood and cervical specimen collection. Evaluation of comparability between the original (Hepatitis-A arm of CVT) and new (UCG) control groups showed that women's characteristics, as well as their predicted future risk for cervical HPV acquisition, were similar, thus validating use of the UCG. LTFU is poised to comprehensively address many important questions related to long-term effects of prophylactic HPV vaccines.

  14. [HPV vaccination: active offer in an Italian region].

    PubMed

    Terracciano, Elisa; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Aquilani, Silvia; Aversa, Anna Maria; Bartolomei, Giuseppina; Calenda, Maria Gabriella; Catapano, Raffaele; Compagno, Silvio; Della Rovere, Piera; Fraioli, Angelo; Ieraci, Roberto; Reggiani, Daniela; Sgricia, Stefano; Spadea, Antonietta; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus is responsible for 4.8% of cancers, and is the main cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer can be reduced by mean of secondary prevention (PAP-test, HPV-DNA test), while through primary prevention (anti-HPV vaccine) the incidence of other HPV-attributable cancers can also be reduced. In Italy, anti-HPV vaccination is part of the immunization schedule in girls since 2008, and in 2017 it was extended to boys. However, vaccine coverage is decreasing nationwide. This study aims to examine anti-HPV vaccination practices in Health care services of Lazio Region, Italy. Questionnaires were sent or administered directly to those in charge of vaccinations. Data, collected from 11/12 (92%) Lazio Local Health Units and from 116 vaccination centers, show a remarkable diversity in the offer: 41% of the centers open only 1-2 days/week, 42% only in the morning, and only 7% are open on Saturday. Vaccination is available by reservation only in 62% of the centers, while vaccines are not administered to ≥18 years subjects in 33%; 93% of the centers call actively the girls in the target cohort, while 70% and 94% recall the patients who had not received the first or the second dose of vaccine, respectively. Collaboration with family physicians and/or pediatricians was declared by 80% of the centers. Vaccine coverage could probably be improved by addressing the highlighted critical issues and applying best practices widely.

  15. Knowledge of HPV, Perception of Risk, and Intent to Obtain HPV Vaccination among Male University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus in the world, is associated with almost all cases of cervical cancer. It is also related to vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for both boys and girls. Unfortunately,…

  16. Projected impact of HPV vaccination and primary HPV screening on cervical adenocarcinoma: Example from Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan A; Canfell, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Cytology-based cervical screening appears to have had a limited effect on the incidence of adenocarcinoma, however HPV vaccination and HPV-based screening will likely play a role in reducing future burden. Using Australia as an example, we estimated the future burden (2015-2040) of adenocarcinoma in the absence of other interventions; and the impact of HPV vaccination (introduced 2007) and HPV-based screening (commencing 2017). Future burden was estimated considering underlying trends in adenocarcinoma, using national data (1982-2010). The relative reduction in adenocarcinoma due to HPV vaccination and HPV-based screening was derived from observed clinical data. Adenocarcinoma incidence rates have been increasing since the early-mid 2000s (average annual increases from 3.0%(25-49 years) -8.1%(20-24 years)). If these trends continue, rates would increase from 1.4 to 2.4/100,000 in <50 years and from 2.2 to 4.4/100,000 in 50+ years by 2040. Taking into account coverage, HPV vaccination will reduce 2040 incidence by 36-39%, mainly in women <50 years (61% reduction). Taking into account uncertainties in trends and screening effectiveness, HPV-based screening will reduce incidence by an additional 19-43%, mainly in women 50+ years (additional 30-68% reduction). Together, these interventions will reduce incidence by 55-81%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Knowledge of HPV, Perception of Risk, and Intent to Obtain HPV Vaccination among Male University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus in the world, is associated with almost all cases of cervical cancer. It is also related to vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for both boys and girls. Unfortunately,…

  18. Young Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Post HPV Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Murithi, Lydia Karuta

    2014-01-01

    In the present study the authors sought to explore, in greater depth, the impact that HPV vaccination has on college-aged women's reproductive and sexual health. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 HPV-vaccinated, college women and analyzed for reoccurring themes. Although findings revealed that women's HPV-related knowledge was suboptimal, most women correctly believed that they were still at risk for HPV after having received the vaccination. Women indicated that having the HPV vaccine made them more aware of sexually transmitted infections and prompted them to continue to take care of their sexual health. Women reported that having the HPV vaccine did not influence their condom use or birth control choices, and they believed that obtaining Pap smears was still important. These results help us to understand the impact of HPV vaccination on women's reproductive and sexual health. These findings are promising and reinforce the importance of educating women about behaviors that will help them maintain reproductive and sexually healthy lives.

  19. Influence of patient's relationship status and HPV history on physicians' decisions to recommend HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zimet, Gregory D; Stupiansky, Nathan W; Weiss, Thomas W; Rosenthal, Susan L; Good, Margaret B; Vichnin, Michelle D

    2011-01-10

    This study asked whether physicians would prioritize HPV vaccination on the basis of a young woman's relationship status and HPV history (i.e., abnormal Pap test, HPV infection or HPV-related disease). Eight hundred physicians identified as HPV vaccinators in a US claims database were surveyed. Prioritization was assessed on a 0-10 rating scale (from extremely low to extremely high priority). Physicians gave lower priority to vaccinating patients who were married or in a long-term monogamous relationship, with mean (SD) scores of 5.76 (2.82) and 6.80 (2.48), respectively, than for patients who were single and either dating or not dating, with mean (SD) scores of 9.8 (0.68) and 9.22 (1.61), respectively; p<.0001 for all pair-wise comparisons. Physicians did not differentially prioritize vaccination on the basis of previous HPV-related disease or abnormal Pap test. Despite epidemiologic evidence that women in long-term relationships remain at risk for HPV infection, physicians gave them lower priority for vaccination.

  20. Tumor prevention in HPV8 transgenic mice by HPV8-E6 DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Awerkiew, Sabine; Hufbauer, Martin; Schädlich, Lysann; Gissmann, Lutz; Eming, Sabine; Pfister, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    The genus beta human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in individuals with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. Immunosuppressed transplant recipients are prone to harbor particularly high betapapillomavirus DNA loads, which may contribute to their highly increased risk of SCC. Tumor induction in HPV8 transgenic mice correlates with increased expression of viral oncogenes E6 and E2. In an attempt to prevent skin tumor development, we evaluated an HPV8-E6-DNA vaccine, which was able to stimulate a detectable HPV8-E6-specific cell-mediated immune response in 8/15 immunized mice. When skin of HPV8 transgenic mice was grafted onto non-transgenic littermates, the grafted HPV8 transgenic tissue was not rejected and papillomas started to grow within 14 days all over the transplant of 9/9 non-vaccinated and 7/15 not successfully vaccinated mice. In contrast, no papillomas developed in 6/8 successfully vaccinated mice. In the other two of these eight mice, a large ulcerative lesion developed within the initial papilloma growth or papilloma development was highly delayed. As the vaccine completely or partially prevented papilloma development without rejecting the transplanted HPV8 positive skin, the immune system appears to attack only keratinocytes with increased levels of E6 protein, which would give rise to papillomas.

  1. European consensus statement on "HPV Vaccination and Colposcopy".

    PubMed

    Shafi, Mahmood I; Petry, Ulrich; Bosch, Xavier F; Gissman, Lutz; Kocken, Marielle; Helmerhorst, Theo J M; Stanley, Margaret; Nazeer, Saloney; European Federation for Colposcopy

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a Europe-wide consensus statement on "HPV Vaccination and Colposcopy" under the aegis of the European Federation for Colposcopy. We look at the historical perspective, the currently available vaccines, cervical vaccination programs, future perspectives, and the impact all this will have on cervical cancer screening and colposcopy services.

  2. Integrating epidemiology, psychology, and economics to achieve HPV vaccination targets.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Chapman, Gretchen B; Galvani, Alison P

    2008-12-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide an opportunity to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. Optimization of cervical cancer prevention programs requires anticipation of the degree to which the public will adhere to vaccination recommendations. To compare vaccination levels driven by public perceptions with levels that are optimal for maximizing the community's overall utility, we develop an epidemiological game-theoretic model of HPV vaccination. The model is parameterized with survey data on actual perceptions regarding cervical cancer, genital warts, and HPV vaccination collected from parents of vaccine-eligible children in the United States. The results suggest that perceptions of survey respondents generate vaccination levels far lower than those that maximize overall health-related utility for the population. Vaccination goals may be achieved by addressing concerns about vaccine risk, particularly those related to sexual activity among adolescent vaccine recipients. In addition, cost subsidizations and shifts in federal coverage plans may compensate for perceived and real costs of HPV vaccination to achieve public health vaccination targets.

  3. Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males and preferences for future education programs among Appalachian residents.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Paul L; Oldach, Benjamin R; Randle, Katherine E; Katz, Mira L

    2014-03-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with several disparities related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, yet little is known about acceptability of HPV vaccine for males among Appalachian residents. HPV vaccine acceptability and preferences for future HPV vaccine education programs were examined among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with Appalachian Ohio residents between July and October 2011. Participants (n = 102 from 24 focus groups and 5 in-depth interviews) included four key stakeholder groups: health care providers, community leaders, parents with adolescent sons, and young adult men ages 18 to 26 years. Support for vaccinating males against HPV was high among participants, despite low awareness and knowledge about HPV vaccine for males. Participants reported three categories of potential barriers to vaccinating males against HPV: concerns about vaccine safety and side effects, access to care and vaccination logistics, and gender and cultural issues. Participants reported that HPV vaccine was viewed as being only for females in their communities and that receiving the vaccine may be emasculating or embarrassing to males. Participants suggested that future HPV vaccine education programs mainly target parents, include basic information about HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccine (e.g., number of doses, cost), and present the vaccine as having the potential to prevent cancer (as opposed to preventing genital warts). Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males was high among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Future HPV vaccine education programs in Appalachia should address common potential barriers to vaccination and help destigmatize vaccination among males.

  4. HPV vaccination and sexual behavior in a community college sample.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Erica; Glenn, Beth A; Bastani, Roshan

    2013-12-01

    Many US parents are concerned that vaccinating daughters against human papillomavirus (HPV) will communicate implicit approval for sexual activity and be associated with early or risky sexual behavior (Scarinci et al. in J Womens Health 16(8):1224-1233, 2007; Schuler et al. in Sex Transm Infect 87:349-353, 2011). The aims of this study were to understand (a) whether the HPV vaccine was associated with risky sexual behavior among a diverse sample of female adolescents and young adults, and (b) to better understand the chronology of HPV vaccination and sexual behavior. An anonymous web-based survey was used to collect data from 114 female community college students. T test and Chi square analyses were used to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated groups on age at first intercourse and proportion who had ever had sexual intercourse. Linear multiple regression was used to predict frequency of condom use and number of sexual partners in the past year, using vaccination status and demographic factors as predictors. About 38% reported receiving at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. Many of those vaccinated (45%) received the vaccine after having initiated sexual activity. The proportion of women who were sexually experienced did not differ by HPV vaccine status, nor did age at first intercourse, number of partners in the past year, or frequency of condom use. Current findings suggest that HPV vaccination is not associated with riskier sexual activity for the young women in this sample. Adolescents and their parents may benefit from education about the need to receive the HPV vaccine before onset of sexual activity.

  5. Perceptions of HPV Vaccine amongst UK University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ellen; Senior, Naomi; Abdullah, Ammar; Brown, Janine; Collings, Suzanne; Racktoo, Sophie; Walpole, Sarah; Zeiton, Moez; Heffernan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this small-scale focus group study is to explore the impact the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has on attitudes towards HPV, cervical cancer and sexual risk taking amongst university students in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were recruited through advertisements placed on notice boards throughout the…

  6. Perceptions of HPV Vaccine amongst UK University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ellen; Senior, Naomi; Abdullah, Ammar; Brown, Janine; Collings, Suzanne; Racktoo, Sophie; Walpole, Sarah; Zeiton, Moez; Heffernan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this small-scale focus group study is to explore the impact the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has on attitudes towards HPV, cervical cancer and sexual risk taking amongst university students in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Participants were recruited through advertisements placed on notice boards throughout the…

  7. Educational interventions to increase HPV vaccination acceptance: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Linda Y.; Bonhomme, Lize-Anne; Cooper, Spring Chenoa; Joseph, Jill G.; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been available for protection against HPV-associated cervical cancer and genital warts since 2006. Nonetheless, uptake has varied among countries and populations within countries. Studies have found that individuals’ knowledge and attitudes toward the vaccine are associated with immunization uptake. The purpose of the current review is to summarize and evaluate the evidence for educational interventions to increase HPV vaccination acceptance. Methods We searched the databases of PubMed and Web of Science for English-language articles describing educational interventions designed to improve HPV vaccination uptake, intention or attitude. Results We identified 33 studies of HPV vaccination educational interventions: 7 tested the effectiveness of interventions with parents, 8 with adolescents or young adults, and 18 compared the effectiveness of different message frames in an educational intervention among adolescents, young adults or their parents. Most studies involved populations with higher educational attainment and most interventions required participants to be literate. The minority of studies used the outcome of HPV vaccine uptake. Well-designed studies adequately powered to detect change in vaccine uptake were rare and generally did not demonstrate effectiveness of the tested intervention. Conclusions There is not strong evidence to recommend any specific educational intervention for wide-spread implementation. Future studies are required to determine the effectiveness of culturally-competent interventions reaching diverse populations. PMID:24530401

  8. Estimating long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HPV 16/18 vaccine in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yi-Jun; Hu, Shang-Ying; Zhao, Fang-Hui

    2016-11-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the two most common HPV oncogenic types that can be prevented by vaccination. This study aimed at assessing the cost-effectiveness of 3 doses of the bivalent HPV vaccine in rural and urban settings in China. A Markov model was adapted to reflect the lifetime of a modelled 100,000 12-year-old girls cohort in rural and urban settings in China. Input parameters were obtained from published literature, official reports and a two-round expert review panel. Clinical and economic outcomes of vaccination at age 12 with screening was compared to screening only. In the base case analysis, a 3 % discount rate, the vaccine cost of 247 CNY (US$ 39, PAHO vaccine cost in 2013), two rounds of screening in a life time and 70 % coverage for both screening and vaccination were used. One-way, two-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. We used different thresholds of cost-effectiveness to reflect the diversity of economic development in China. Vaccination in addition to screening could prevent 60 % more cervical cancer cases and deaths than screening only. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio varied largely when changing cost of vaccination and discount in one way analysis. Vaccination was very cost-effective when the vaccine cost ranged 87-630 CNY (US$ 13.8-100) in rural and 87-750 CNY (US$ 13.8-119) in urban; and remained cost-effective when the vaccine cost ranged 630-1,700 CNY (US$ 100-270) in rural and 750-1,900 CNY (US$ 119-302) in urban in two way analysis. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that model results were robust. In both rural and urban, the vaccination cost and discounting are important factors determining the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination; policy makers in China should take these into account when making a decision on the introduction of HPV vaccine. In areas with a high burden of cervical cancer and limited screening activities, HPV vaccination should be prioritized. However, the vaccine

  9. Parent and adolescent knowledge of HPV and subsequent vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jessica; Taylor, Lynne; Kooker, Patricia; Frank, Ian

    2014-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has been shown to have important health benefits, but vaccination rates are low. Parental and adolescent knowledge could possibly promote vaccination, but the relationship between knowledge and subsequent vaccination is unclear. This study examines how strongly HPV vaccination among high-risk adolescents is related to their or their parents' previous knowledge. A longitudinal cohort study enrolled participants from low-income, predominantly African American neighborhoods. Baseline questionnaires measuring knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccination, as well other variables, were completed by 211 adolescents and 149 parents of another adolescent sample. Adolescent vaccination was tracked prospectively for 12 months after baseline by using clinic reporting data. Analyses tested if parent or adolescent knowledge was associated with or predictive of adolescent HPV vaccination. On average, parents and adolescents answered slightly less than 50% of knowledge items correctly at baseline, with 5% of parents and 10% of adolescents not answering any knowledge items correctly. Within 12 months, 20 of 149 (13.4%) of the parents' daughters received an HPV vaccination and 32 of 211 (15.2%) of the other adolescent sample did so. Neither parental nor adolescent knowledge was associated with or predictive of adolescent vaccination. For example, when testing the relationship between adolescent vaccination and parental knowledge scores, all R(2) values were <0.005. Results were independent of available potential confounders. Those with higher levels of knowledge were not more likely to obtain vaccination for themselves or their daughters. Ideally, future interventions will target factors related to vaccination. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Controlled viral glycoprotein expression as a safety feature in a bivalent rabies-ebola vaccine.

    PubMed

    Papaneri, Amy B; Bernbaum, John G; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B; Schnell, Matthias J; Johnson, Reed F

    2015-02-02

    Using a recombinant rabies (RABV) vaccine platform, we have developed several safe and effective vaccines. Most recently, we have developed a RABV-based ebolavirus (EBOV) vaccine that is efficacious in nonhuman primates. One safety feature of this vaccine is the utilization of a live but replication-deficient RABV construct. In this construct, the RABV glycoprotein (G) has been deleted from the genome, requiring G trans complementation in order for new infectious viruses to be released from the initial infected cell. Here we analyze this safety feature of the bivalent RABV-based EBOV vaccine comprised of the G-deleted RABV backbone expressing EBOV glycoprotein (GP). We found that, while the level of RABV genome in infected cells is equivalent regardless of G supplementation, the production of infectious virus is indeed restricted by the lack of G, and most importantly, that the presence of EBOV GP does not substitute for G. These findings further support the safety profile of this replication-deficient RABV-EBOV bivalent vaccine.

  11. Bivalent inactivated hepatitis A and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Beran, Jiri

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis A and B remain serious global public health problems. Monovalent vaccines against hepatitis A and B have been available for many years. Since 1996, licenses have been gradually introduced for different formulations and immunization schedules of the first combined vaccines against both diseases. Twinrix Adult (with conventional and accelerated schedules) is available for the immunization of individuals aged 16 years or older in Europe and 18 years or older the USA. Twinrix Pediatric, with its three-dose schedule, and AmBirix, with its two-dose schedule, are licensed in Europe for ages 1-15 years. These vaccines offer a single injection for satisfactory protection against hepatitis A and B and an excellent safety and reactogenicity profile in comparison with monovalent vaccines. This article focuses on immunogenicity of the vaccines and proposes expert opinion and future directions in this field.

  12. Chapter 25: Education, training, and communication for HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sherris, Jacqueline; Friedman, Allison; Wittet, Scott; Davies, Philip; Steben, Marc; Saraiya, Mona

    2006-08-31

    As human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines come to market, they will face education and training challenges similar to those of other new vaccines, along with HPV-specific issues. Recent studies document stark knowledge gaps about HPV at all levels--among policy makers, healthcare providers, parents, and teens--in both the industrialized and developing worlds. Pharmaceutical companies, public health advocates, medical trainers, and health educators need to understand their diverse audiences and respond appropriately to the needs of each. They also must use research-based communication strategies and materials to most effectively, and accurately, convey the need for an HPV vaccine and to manage expectations about how the vaccine can, and cannot, protect women and men.

  13. Interventions to increase HPV vaccination coverage: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Smulian, Elizabeth A.; Mitchell, Krista R.; Stokley, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We reviewed intervention studies designed to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage to further understand the impact interventions can have on HPV vaccination coverage. We searched 5 databases for intervention studies published from June 2006 to May 2015. Studies were included if they quantitatively measured HPV vaccination coverage as an outcome and were conducted in the United States. We abstracted outcomes, methods, and results from each study and classified by type of intervention conducted. Findings from 34 studies suggest many types of intervention strategies can increase HPV vaccination coverage in different settings, and with modest cost. Interventions were effective especially when implemented in combination at both provider and community levels. However, not all interventions showed significant effects on coverage. More research is needed to identify the best methods for widespread implementation of effective strategies. PMID:26838959

  14. Studies on the protective immunity of Schistosoma japonicum bivalent DNA vaccine encoding Sj23 and Sj14.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hu; You-En, Shi; Long-Jiang, Yu; Xiao-Hua, Zhu; Liu-Zhe, Li; Cash, Melanie; Lu, Zhu; Zhi, Liu; Deng-Xin, Song

    2007-04-01

    In order to explore the high performance bivalent DNA vaccine of Schistosoma japonicum, the fatty-acid-binding protein (Sj14) and the 23 kDa transmembrane protein (Sj23) two proteins were selected to construct the DNA-based vaccine. It was successful to construct a bivalent DNA vaccine using three strategies: the co-expression of two genes, a fusion gene expression and two kinds of plasmids in combination (cocktail vaccine). The bivalent DNA was proven to express well in vitro and in vivo by indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protective immunity of bivalent DNA vaccine was higher than that of univalent DNA vaccine (p<0.05). There were four groups of bivalent vaccine whose protective immunity was higher than 50%. Granuloma diameter reduction rates were in the range of 18-39%. There was no significant impact on immunity protection exerted by the four factors including dosage, inoculated times, inoculated routes and challenge time after the last immunization in three levels (p>0.05).

  15. Viremia in a Recipient of HPV-77 Rubella Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Jeanette; Salvatore, Margaret A.; Leedom, John M.; Portnoy, Bernard

    1969-01-01

    A live rubella virus vaccine, HPV-77 (High Passage Virus - 77 tissue culture passages) was administered subcutaneously to eight rubella-susceptible children housed in an isolation ward. One blood specimen, taken on the tenth day after vaccination, from one of the eight vaccines, yielded a rubella virus. This virus had laboratory markers which were “vaccine-like.” To our knowledge, this represents the first isolation of rubella virus from the blood of a recipient of HPV-77 vaccine. However, the consistent antibody responses among vaccinees and the regular presence of rubella virus in their pharynges argue that viremia occurs in almost every susceptible recipient. The most logical explanation for the failure to document viremia in other recipients of HPV-77 vaccine is that the viremia is ordinarily low grade or transient or both. PMID:5773481

  16. Factors influencing uptake of HPV vaccination among girls in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schülein, Stefanie; Taylor, Katherine J; König, Jochem; Claus, Matthias; Blettner, Maria; Klug, Stefanie J

    2016-09-20

    Adequate coverage is key to the success of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes. There is currently no organised HPV vaccination programme in Germany. The aim of this analysis was to determine HPV vaccine uptake as well as factors associated with uptake in nine to 17 year-old girls in Germany during the first year of vaccine availability. This analysis is based on data from the Healthcare Access Panel, an established population-based household panel consisting of 55 000 representative households in Germany who were contacted between September and October 2007. A total of 4 747 households included at least one girl aged nine to 17 years. After reading a description of the HPV vaccine, these girls were asked, "Would you have yourself vaccinated against HPV?" Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between vaccination status and socio-demographic characteristics of the girls and their mothers. Of the 4 747 girls in the households who received questionnaires, 2 224 (46.9 %) participated in the study and 1 906 (40.2 %) answered the vaccination question. A total of 17.4 % of the girls were already vaccinated, 61.5 % felt positively about doing so, 4.7 % said they would not be vaccinated, and 16.3 % were not sure. The probability of a girl being vaccinated increased with each additional year of age (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.6, 95 % Confidence Interval (CI) 1.5-1.7). Among the 17 year-old girls, 38.5 % (95 % CI 32.6-44.4 %) had been vaccinated. Having a mother with high education (OR: 1.5, 95 % CI 1.0-2.3) or medium education (OR: 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-2.1) versus basic education was a significant predictor for having been vaccinated. Similarly, medium (OR: 1.5, 95 % CI 1.0-2.4) versus low SES was significantly associated with having been vaccinated. Our analysis showed that during the first year of HPV vaccine availability in Germany, vaccination uptake was low. Countries with organised HPV vaccination programmes showed

  17. Impact of Louisiana's HPV Vaccine Awareness Policy on HPV Vaccination among 13- to 17-Year-Old Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierre-Victor, Dudith; Trepka, Mary Jo; Page, Timothy F.; Li, Tan; Stephens, Dionne P.; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2017-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends routine human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization for 11- to 12-year-old adolescents. In 2008, Louisiana required the school boards to distribute HPV vaccine information to parents or guardian of students in Grades 6 to 12. This article investigates the impact of this policy on HPV…

  18. Elimination of Cancer Health Disparities through the Acceleration of HPV Vaccines and Vaccinations: A Simplified Version of the President's Cancer Panel Report on HPV Vaccinations.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Eva; Harper, Hill; Ume, Adaku; Baker, Melanie; Diarra, Cheick; Uyanne, John; Afework, Sebhat; Partlow, Keosha; Tran, Lucy; Okoro, Judith; Doan, Anh; Tate, Karen; Rouse, Mechelle; Tyler, Meidrah; Evans, Kamilah; Sanchez, Tonya; Hasan, Ishmum; Smith-Joe, Enijah; Maniti, Jasmine; Zarate, Liliana; King, Camille; Alugbue, Antoinette; Opara, Chiamaka; Wissa, Bileko; Maniti, Joanne; Pattillo, Roland

    2017-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major public health concern affecting both females and males. HPV is associated with cervical, anal, head and neck cancers. About 99% of all cervical cancers are related to HPV. HPV vaccines, Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9 are used in the primary prevention of HPV related cancers. Gardasil and Gardasil 9 are available for use in both females and males ages 9 to 26, while Cervarix is available for females ages 9 to 25. Gardasil 9 was approved by the FDA for prevention against additional HPV types. Despite the availability of this preventative measure against cervical cancer, the rate of HPV vaccination in the United States remains lower than that of other industrialized nations. The purpose of this study is to elucidate mechanisms to help increase the HPV vaccination rate by using education as a tool; by simplifying the president report so that lay person can understand the information presented in the report. Through the quantitative examination of the data from the states with the lowest and highest vaccination rates, using SPSS statistical analysis; we analyzed several factors involved with the low uptake of the vaccines. The results collected show that socioeconomic status, misconceptions about HPV, and misconceptions about the safety of the vaccines were identified as possible obstacles to the effective uptake of HPV vaccinations. The proposals made by the President's Cancer Panel to accelerate the uptake of vaccines include, increasing coverage of the vaccines through government-sponsored programs, and the Affordable Care Act; increasing accessibility to vaccines through pharmacies, schools, and clinics; and disseminating more information on HPV to healthcare providers, parents, caregivers, and patients. Allowing greater accessibility to the vaccines for all populations regardless of income, education, and eliminating misconceptions of the vaccines would play a significant role in eliminating cancer.

  19. Elimination of Cancer Health Disparities through the Acceleration of HPV Vaccines and Vaccinations: A Simplified Version of the President’s Cancer Panel Report on HPV Vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    McGhee, Eva; Harper, Hill; Ume, Adaku; Baker, Melanie; Diarra, Cheick; Uyanne, John; Afework, Sebhat; Partlow, Keosha; Tran, Lucy; Okoro, Judith; Doan, Anh; Tate, Karen; Rouse, Mechelle; Tyler, Meidrah; Evans, Kamilah; Sanchez, Tonya; Hasan, Ishmum; Smith-Joe, Enijah; Maniti, Jasmine; Zarate, Liliana; King, Camille; Alugbue, Antoinette; Opara, Chiamaka; Wissa, Bileko; Maniti, Joanne; Pattillo, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major public health concern affecting both females and males. HPV is associated with cervical, anal, head and neck cancers. About 99% of all cervical cancers are related to HPV. HPV vaccines, Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9 are used in the primary prevention of HPV related cancers. Gardasil and Gardasil 9 are available for use in both females and males ages 9 to 26, while Cervarix is available for females ages 9 to 25. Gardasil 9 was approved by the FDA for prevention against additional HPV types. Despite the availability of this preventative measure against cervical cancer, the rate of HPV vaccination in the United States remains lower than that of other industrialized nations. The purpose of this study is to elucidate mechanisms to help increase the HPV vaccination rate by using education as a tool; by simplifying the president report so that lay person can understand the information presented in the report. Through the quantitative examination of the data from the states with the lowest and highest vaccination rates, using SPSS statistical analysis; we analyzed several factors involved with the low uptake of the vaccines. The results collected show that socioeconomic status, misconceptions about HPV, and misconceptions about the safety of the vaccines were identified as possible obstacles to the effective uptake of HPV vaccinations. The proposals made by the President’s Cancer Panel to accelerate the uptake of vaccines include, increasing coverage of the vaccines through government-sponsored programs, and the Affordable Care Act; increasing accessibility to vaccines through pharmacies, schools, and clinics; and disseminating more information on HPV to healthcare providers, parents, caregivers, and patients. Allowing greater accessibility to the vaccines for all populations regardless of income, education, and eliminating misconceptions of the vaccines would play a significant role in eliminating cancer. PMID:28845336

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a 9-valent HPV vaccine in females 12-26 years of age who previously received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Suzanne M; Cheung, Tak-Hong; McNeill, Shelly; Petersen, Lone Kjeld; Romaguera, Josefina; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge; Bautista, Oliver; Shields, Christine; Vuocolo, Scott; Luxembourg, Alain

    2015-11-27

    To assess the safety and immunogenicity of the investigational 9-valent (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) HPV (9vHPV) vaccine in prior recipients of a 3-dose regimen of quadrivalent (6/11/16/18) HPV (qHPV) vaccine. V503-006 was a randomized, double-blinded, safety/tolerability and immunogenicity study of the 9vHPV vaccine in females 12-26 years of age who were previously vaccinated with qHPV vaccine. Subjects were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive 3 doses of 9vHPV vaccine (n=618) or saline placebo (n=306) at day 1, month 2, and month 6. Systemic, injection-site and serious adverse experiences (AEs) were monitored. Serum samples were collected at day 1, month 2, and month 7. Anti-HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 titers were measured using the 9-valent HPV competitive Luminex Immunoassay (cLIA). The frequency of injection-site AEs (days 1-5 following any vaccination) was higher in the 9vHPV vaccine group than in the placebo group (91.1% and 43.9%, respectively). The frequencies of vaccine-related systemic AEs (days 1-15 following any vaccination) were generally comparable between the 2 groups (30.6% in the 9vHPV vaccine group, and 25.9% in the placebo group). One vaccine-related serious AE was reported in each of the 9vHPV vaccine and placebo groups. Few subjects (9vHPV=0.5%; placebo=0%) discontinued due to an AE. At 4 weeks post-dose 3, over 98% of subjects in the 9vHPV vaccine group were seropositive for HPV types 31/33/45/52/58, with marked elevations in cLIA geometric mean titers (GMTs) to these HPV types. Anti-HPV 31/33/45/52/58 GMTs were lower than in subjects administered 9vHPV vaccine who had not previously received qHPV vaccine (based on cross-study analyses); the clinical significance of this difference is unknown. Administration of a 3-dose regimen of 9vHPV vaccine to adolescent girls and young women 12-26 years of age who are prior qHPV vaccine recipients is highly immunogenic with respect to HPV types 31/33/45/52/58 and generally well tolerated. Copyright

  1. A bivalent vaccine to protect against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Fan; Sayeed, Sabina; Thompson, Claudette M; Szu, Shousun; Anderson, Porter W; Malley, Richard

    2012-05-14

    Pneumococcal and Salmonella typhi infections are two major diseases for children in developing countries. For typhoid fever, licensed Vi polysaccharide vaccines are ineffective in children <2-year old. While investigational Vi conjugate vaccines have been shown effective in clinical trials, they are currently only available to restricted areas. Pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are highly effective in children, but suffer from some limitations including cost and limited serotype coverage. We have previously shown that a fusion conjugate vaccine, consisting of pneumococcal fusion protein PsaA and pneumolysoid (PdT) conjugated to a polysaccharide, results in enhanced antibody and CD4+ Th17 cell responses as well as protection against pneumococcal colonization and disease in mice. Here we applied this approach to develop a bivalent vaccine against pneumococcus and S. typhi. Two species-conserved pneumococcal antigens (SP1572 or SP2070) were fused to the nonhemolytic pneumolysoid PdT. SP1572-PdT was then conjugated to Vi polysaccharide and SP2070-PdT was conjugated to the pneumococcal cell wall polysaccharide (CWPS; also conserved). Mice immunized with this bivalent conjugate were protected against pneumococcal colonization and sepsis challenges, and made anti-Vi antibody concentrations higher by 40-fold compared to mice that received equimolar mixtures of the antigens. An enhanced killing of Vi-bearing Salmonellae in vitro was demonstrated from plasma of mice that received the fusion conjugate but not the mixture of antigens. Our results support further evaluation of this bivalent immunogen for the prevention of pneumococcal colonization and disease, and of typhoid fever.

  2. Influence of evidence type and narrative type on HPV risk perception and intention to obtain the HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaoli; Dahlstrom, Michael F; Richards, Adam; Rangarajan, Sarani

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of evidence type (statistical, narrative, or hybrid) and narrative type (first-person or third-person) on risk perception about human papillomavirus (HPV) and behavioral intention to get the HPV vaccine. In total, 174 college students who had not received the HPV vaccine participated in a controlled experiment. Results show that the hybrid message containing both statistical and narrative descriptions of HPV resulted in greater perceived risk of getting HPV than either of the messages containing just one type of evidence--statistical or narrative. Moreover, the first-person narrative message led to greater risk perception about HPV than the third-person narrative message. Both evidence type and narrative type had an indirect effect on intention to get the HPV vaccine free of cost through HPV risk perception. Implications of the findings for vaccine risk communication are discussed.

  3. HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal carcinoma: What can be learned from anogenital vaccination programs?

    PubMed

    Takes, Robert P; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Jackowska, Joanna; Silver, Carl E; Rodrigo, Juan P; Dikkers, Frederik G; Olsen, Kerry D; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Brakenhoff, Ruud H; Ferlito, Alfio

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are well known causes of anogenital cancers. Recent studies show that HPV also plays a role in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). A review on the role of HPV vaccination in the prevention of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with special emphasis on OPC was conducted and available vaccines and vaccination strategies in HNSCC and OPC are discussed. Prophylactic vaccination is known to be effective for prevention of anogenital HPV infection and precursor lesions in the cervix and anus. While the value of vaccination for prevention of OPC and possibly as an adjuvant treatment is still an open question, evidence to date supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may prove to be effective in reducing the incidence of this malignancy.

  4. Are state laws granting pharmacists authority to vaccinate associated with HPV vaccination rates among adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Trogdon, Justin G.; Shafer, Paul R.; Shah, Parth D.; Calo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We explored whether state laws allowing pharmacists to administer human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations to adolescents are associated with a higher likelihood of HPV vaccine uptake. Methods We examined provider-reported HPV vaccination among 13 to 17 year olds in the National Immunization Survey-Teen: 2008–2014 for girls (N=48,754) and 2010–2014 for boys (N=31,802). Outcome variables were HPV vaccine initiation (≥ 1 dose) and completion (≥ 3 doses). The explanatory variable of interest was a categorical variable for the type of pharmacist authority regarding HPV vaccination for adolescents (< 18 years) in the state: not permitted (reference), by prescription, by collaborative practice protocol, or independent authority. We ran separate difference-in-difference regression models by sex. Results During 2008–2014, 15 states passed laws allowing pharmacists to administer HPV vaccine to adolescents. Pharmacist authority laws were not statistically significantly associated with increased HPV vaccine initiation or completion. Conclusions As currently implemented, state laws allowing pharmacists to administer HPV vaccine to adolescents were not associated with uptake. Possible explanations that need further research include restrictions on pharmacists’ third-party billing ability and the lack of promotion of pharmacy vaccination services to age-eligible adolescents. PMID:27496275

  5. Fusion of flagellin 2 with bivalent white spot syndrome virus vaccine increases survival in freshwater shrimp.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hansam; Park, Na Hye; Jang, Yuyeon; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Park, Ki-Hoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Tae Jin; Kim, Young Bong

    2017-03-01

    Despite large economic losses attributable to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), an infectious pathogen of penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans worldwide, no efficient vaccines or antiviral agents to control the virus are available at present. Here, we designed and constructed baculovirus-based vaccines delivering genes encoding the WSSV envelope proteins, VP28 and VP19. To enhance the immunogenicity of the baculovirus-based vaccine, we fused a Salmonella typhimurium flagellin 2 (FL2) gene with VP28 or VP19 gene. Both vaccine constructs elicited similar high titlers of anti-WSSV IgG after oral immunization in mice. The protective effect of oral vaccines upon WSSV challenge was observed in Macrobrachium nipponense. Bivalent vaccine displaying WSSV envelope proteins, VP19 and VP28, led to enhanced more than 10% survival protection against WSSV infection, compared to monovalent vaccine containing WSSV envelope protein, VP19 or VP28. Furthermore, a baculovirus-based WSSV vaccine fused with FL2 gene, Ac-VP28-ie1VP19FL2, efficiently protected mice against WSSV challenge (89.5% survival rate). In support of the efficacy of FL2 in our vaccine, we verified FL2 enhanced survival rate and induced the NF-κB gene in Palaemon paucidens. The collective results strongly suggest that our recombinant baculoviral system displaying WSSV envelope protein and delivering FL2-fused WSSV envelope gene effectively induced protective responses, supporting the utility of a potential new oral DNA vaccine against WSSV.

  6. Human Papillomavirus and the HPV Vaccine: Where Are We Today?

    PubMed

    Khan, Leah

    2017-01-01

    Vaccine discussions are an important part of the general pediatrician's day. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, in particular, has been slow to gain acceptance by the general public. It has recently gained momentum (both positive and negative) on social media, which has led to an increase in questions and concerns from families. It is important that providers are equipped to address these concerns, answer questions, and provide quality information for families to help guide them in their vaccination decisions. Not only is it crucial to be knowledgeable about the vaccines themselves, but providers should also be informed about HPV and its potential disease burden. The HPV vaccine recommendations are also evolving, so it is important to stay abreast with current data to provide the best care for all patients. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(1):e2-e5.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Immunogenicity of next-generation HPV vaccines in non-human primates: Measles-vectored HPV vaccine versus Pichia pastoris recombinant protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Giannino, Viviana; Rishi, Narayan; Glueck, Reinhard

    2016-09-07

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide. HPVs are oncogenic small double-stranded DNA viruses that are the primary causal agent of cervical cancer and other types of cancers, including in the anus, oropharynx, vagina, vulva, and penis. Prophylactic vaccination against HPV is an attractive strategy for preventing cervical cancer and some other types of cancers. However, there are few safe and effective vaccines against HPV infections. Current first-generation commercial HPV vaccines are expensive to produce and deliver. The goal of this study was to develop an alternate potent HPV recombinant L1-based vaccines by producing HPV virus-like particles into a vaccine that is currently used worldwide. Live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccines have a well-established safety and efficacy record, and recombinant MV (rMV) produced by reverse genetics may be useful for generating candidate HPV vaccines to meet the needs of the developing world. We studied in non-human primate rMV-vectored HPV vaccine in parallel with a classical alum adjuvant recombinant HPV16L1 and 18L1 protein vaccine produced in Pichia pastoris. A combined prime-boost approach using both vaccines was evaluated, as well as immune interference due to pre-existing immunity against the MV. The humoral immune response induced by the MV, Pichia-expressed vaccine, and their combination as priming and boosting approaches was found to elicit HPV16L1 and 18L1 specific total IgG and neutralizing antibody titres. Pre-existing antibodies against measles did not prevent the immune response against HPV16L1 and 18L1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity of the Bivalent Oral Cholera Vaccine Shanchol in Haitian Adults With HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Charles, Richelle C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M; Teng, Jessica E; Jerome, J Gregory; Rychert, Jenna; LaRocque, Regina C; Xu, Peng; Kovácˇ, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Almazor, Charles P; Franke, Molly F; Harris, Jason B

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated immune responses following bivalent oral cholera vaccination (Shanchol [Shantha Biotechnics]; BivWC) in a cohort of 25 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in Haiti. Compared with adults without HIV infection, vaccination in HIV-infected individuals resulted in lower vibriocidal responses against Vibrio cholerae O1, and there was a positive relationship between the CD4(+) T-cell count and vibriocidal responses following vaccination. Nevertheless, seroconversion occurred at a rate of 65% against the Ogawa serotype and 74% against the Inaba serotype in adults with HIV infection. These results suggest that the vaccine retains substantial immunogenicity in adults with HIV infection and may benefit this population by protecting against cholera.

  9. HPV awareness and willingness to HPV vaccination among high-risk men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Colón-López, Vivian; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth M; Ortiz, Ana P; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Palefsky, Joel M

    2012-12-01

    An HPV vaccine has been approved for men aged 9 to 26 in the US for the prevention of genital warts and anal cancer. The purpose of this study is to describe 1) HPV vaccine awareness, 2) willingness to get the HPV vaccine and 3) perceived susceptibility to HPV-related cancers and genital warts among men 18-26 years old who attend an STI clinic in San Juan, Puerto Rico (PR). A cross-sectional pilot study consisting of 206 HIV+/HIV- men. For purpose of this analysis, only those participants aged vaccinated against HPV. Fewer than a third knew about the HPV vaccine (28.3%). However, more than half (76.9%) were willing to be vaccinated against HPV. Information sources about the HPV vaccine included their female sexual partners (13.0%), a female sexual partner who received the vaccine (8.7%) and a male sexual partner (2.2%). Most participants'reported that the main reason that would increase their willingness to get vaccinated was if a physician recommend the vaccine (95.7%). Perceived susceptibility was low, particularly for anal and oral cancer. This pilot study shows poor awareness of the HPV vaccine, although willingness to getting the HPV vaccine was high among those who knew about the vaccine. Future studies should try to evaluate this paradox and study in depth willingness and barriers to vaccination among male sub-groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM). These studies should also evaluate predictors of uptake of the HPV vaccine among men in this and other STI clinics in PR, in order to develop interventions to increase male vaccination.

  10. HPV Awareness and Willingness to HPV Vaccination among High-Risk Men attending an STI Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth M.; Ortiz, Ana P.; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective An HPV vaccine has been approved for men aged 9 to 26 in the US for the prevention of genital warts and anal cancer. The purpose of this study is to describe 1) HPV vaccine awareness, 2) willingness to get the HPV vaccine and 3) perceived susceptibility to HPV-related cancers and genital warts among men 18–26 years old who attend an STI clinic in San Juan, Puerto Rico (PR). Methods A cross-sectional pilot study consisting of 206 HIV+/HIV− men. For purpose of this analysis, only those participants aged ≤26 years old were included in this analysis (n=46). Results None of the study participants had been vaccinated against HPV. Fewer than a third knew about the HPV vaccine (28.3%). However, more than half (76.9%) were willing to be vaccinated against HPV. Information sources about the HPV vaccine included their female sexual partners (13.0%), a female sexual partner who received the vaccine (8.7%) and a male sexual partner (2.2%). Most participants reported that the main reason that would increase their willingness to get vaccinated was if a physician recommend the vaccine (95.7%). Perceived susceptibility was low, particularly for anal and oral cancer. Conclusion This pilot study shows poor awareness of the HPV vaccine, although willingness to getting the HPV vaccine was high among those who knew about the vaccine. Future studies should try to evaluate this paradox and study in depth willingness and barriers to vaccination among male sub-groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM). These studies should also evaluate predictors of uptake of the HPV vaccine among men in this and other STI clinics in PR, in order to develop interventions to increase male vaccination. PMID:23844472

  11. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali.

    PubMed

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S; Koita, Ousmane A

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali.

  12. Prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 and attitudes toward HPV vaccination trials in patients with cervical cancer in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Téguété, Ibrahima; Dolo, Amadou; Sangare, Kotou; Sissoko, Abdoulaye; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Tounkara, Karamoko; Yekta, Shahla; De Groot, Anne S.; Koita, Ousmane A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the most common and lethal cancers in West Africa. Even though vaccines that protect against the most common Human papillomavirus (HPV) strains, 16 and 18, are currently in use in developed countries, the implementation of these vaccines in developing countries has been painfully slow, considering the pre-eminence of HPV-associated cervical cancer among women in those countries. Aim We performed serological and PCR-based assessment of blood and tissue specimens obtained from women undergoing cervical cancer-related surgery at a major urban hospital in Bamako. Since several therapeutic HPV vaccines are currently in clinical trials, we also assessed willingness to participate in HPV cancer vaccine trials. Methods Blood and biopsy samples of 240 women were evaluated for HPV types 16 and 18 by serology and PCR. Knowledge regarding the HPV vaccine and autonomy to decide to vaccinate their own child was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results HPV 16 and 18 were identified in 137/166 (82.5%) cervical cancer biopsy samples by PCR. Co-infection with both HPV 16 and 18 was significantly more frequent in women over 50 years of age than in younger women (63.0% vs. 37.0%). 44% of study participants said they would be willing to vaccinate their child with HPV vaccine. Only 39% of women participating in this study reported that they would be able to make an autonomous decision to receive HPV vaccination. Permission from a male spouse or head of household was identified as important for participation by 59% of the women. Conclusion This study provides strong support for the introduction of currently available HPV vaccines in Mali, and also provides key information about conditions for obtaining informed consent for HPV vaccine trials and HPV vaccination in Mali. PMID:28231334

  13. Lack of allele-specific efficacy of a bivalent AMA1 malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Mu, Jianbing; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Saye, Renion; Sagara, Issaka; Dicko, Alassane; Niangaly, Amadou; Duan, Junhui; Ellis, Ruth D; Miller, Louis H; Su, Xin-zhuan; Plowe, Christopher V; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2010-06-21

    Extensive genetic diversity in vaccine antigens may contribute to the lack of efficacy of blood stage malaria vaccines. Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) is a leading blood stage malaria vaccine candidate with extreme diversity, potentially limiting its efficacy against infection and disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites with diverse forms of AMA1. Three hundred Malian children participated in a Phase 2 clinical trial of a bivalent malaria vaccine that found no protective efficacy. The vaccine consists of recombinant AMA1 based on the 3D7 and FVO strains of P. falciparum adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide (AMA1-C1). The gene encoding AMA1 was sequenced from P. falciparum infections experienced before and after immunization with the study vaccine or a control vaccine. Sequences of ama1 from infections in the malaria vaccine and control groups were compared with regard to similarity to the vaccine antigens using several measures of genetic diversity. Time to infection with parasites carrying AMA1 haplotypes similar to the vaccine strains with respect to immunologically important polymorphisms and the risk of infection with vaccine strain haplotypes were compared. Based on 62 polymorphic AMA1 residues, 186 unique ama1 haplotypes were identified among 315 ama1 sequences that were included in the analysis. Eight infections had ama1 sequences identical to 3D7 while none were identical to FVO. Several measures of genetic diversity showed that ama1 sequences in the malaria vaccine and control groups were comparable both at baseline and during follow up period. Pre- and post-immunization ama1 sequences in both groups all had a similar degree of genetic distance from FVO and 3D7 ama1. No differences were found in the time of first clinical episode or risk of infection with an AMA1 haplotype similar to 3D7 or FVO with respect to a limited set of immunologically important polymorphisms found in the cluster 1 loop of domain I of AMA1. This Phase 2 trial of a bivalent

  14. [Ethics and reproductive health: the issue of HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Matejić, Bojana; Kesić, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    The ethics of reproductive health covers a wide field of different issues, from the ethical dimensions of assisted reproduction, life of newborns with disabilities to the never-ending debate on the ethical aspects of abortion. Furthermore, increasing attention is paid to the ethical dimensions of using stem cells taken from human embryos, the creation of cloned embryos of patients for possible self-healing, and the increasingly present issue of reproductive cloning. Development of vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) has introduced new ethical aspects related to reproductive health and the need for a consensus of clinical and public-healthcare population. Today immunization with HPV vaccine is a measure for the primary prevention of cervical cancer and it provides effective protection against certain types of viruses included in the vaccine. The most often mentioned issues of discussions on ethical concerns about HPV vaccination are the recommended age of girls who should be informed and vaccinated (12-14 years), attitudes and fears of parents concerning discussion with their preadolescent daughters on issues important for their future sexual behavior, dilemma on the vaccination of boys and the role of the chosen pediatrician in providing information on the vaccination. In Serbia, two HPV vaccines have been registered but the vaccination is not compulsory. Up-till-now there has been no researches on the attitudes of physicians and parents about HPV vaccination. Nevertheless, it is very important to initiate education of general and medical public about the fact that the availability of vaccine, even if we disregard all aforementioned dilemmas, does not lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer, primarily screening. The National Program for Cervical Cancer Prevention involves organized screening, i.e. regular cytological examinations of the cervical smear of all women aged 25-69 years, every three years, regardless of the

  15. Vaccine-Relevant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infections and Future Acquisition of High-Risk HPV Types in Men

    PubMed Central

    Rositch, Anne F.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Backes, Danielle M.; Moses, Stephen; Agot, Kawango; Nyagaya, Edith; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Bailey, Robert C.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background.Little is known about type-specific associations between prevalent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and risk of acquiring other HPV types in men. Data on natural clustering of HPV types are needed as a prevaccine distribution to which postvaccine data can be compared. Methods.Using data from a randomized controlled trial of male circumcision in Kisumu, Kenya, adjusted mean survival ratios were estimated for acquisition of any-HPV, high-risk (HR) HPV, and individual HR-HPV types among men uninfected as compared to those infected with vaccine-relevant HPV types 16, 18, 31, 45, 6, or 11 at baseline. Results.Among 1097 human immunodeficiency virus–negative, uncircumcised men, 2303 incident HPV infections were detected over 2534 person-years of follow-up. Although acquisition of individual HR-HPV types varied by baseline HPV type, there was no clear evidence of shorter times to acquisition among men without vaccine-relevant HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, -6, or -11 infections at baseline, as compared to men who did have these infections at baseline. Conclusions.These prospective data on combinations of HPV infections over time do not suggest the potential for postvaccination HPV type replacement. Future surveillance studies are needed to definitely determine whether elimination of HPV types by vaccination will alter the HPV type distribution in the population. PMID:22711906

  16. Safety of an Escherichia coli-expressed bivalent human papillomavirus (types 16 and 18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine: an open-label phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Mei; Huang, Shou-Jie; Chu, Kai; Wu, Ting; Wang, Zhong-Ze; Yang, Chang-Lin; Cai, Jia-Ping; Jiang, Han-Min; Wang, Yi-Jun; Guo, Meng; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Hong-Jiang; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2014-01-01

    An Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant bivalent human papillomavirus (types 16 and 18) vaccine candidate has been shown to be safe and immunogenic in preclinical trials. The safety of this vaccine was analyzed in an open-label phase I clinical trial in Jiangsu province, China. Thirty-eight healthy women from 18 to 55 y of age were enrolled and vaccinated at 0, 1, and 6 mo. Adverse events that occurred within 30 d after each injection and serious adverse events that occurred throughout the study were recorded. In addition, blood parameters were tested before and after each injection. All but one woman received all 3 doses. Thirty-two (84.2%) of the participants reported adverse events, all adverse events of which were mild, of short duration and resolved spontaneously. No serious adverse events occurred during the study. Changes in blood parameters after each injection were random, mild, and not clinically significant. These preliminary results show that a new Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant HPV 16/18 bivalent vaccine is well tolerated in healthy women and support further immunogenicity and efficacy studies for this HPV vaccine candidate.

  17. The safety and immunogenicity of Quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Dhar, J Patricia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Dhar, Renee; Magee, Ardella; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J

    2017-05-09

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of qHPV vaccine in SLE. Subjects: 34 women ages 19-50years (yrs.) with mild to moderate SLE & minimally active or inactive SLE received qHPV vaccine at the standard dosing schedule. active SLE disease (SELENA-SLEDAI>2), history of severe SLE disease, deep venous thrombosis, on >400mg/day of hydroxychloroquine, on >15mg/day of prednisone, or active infections. Patients were monitored for adverse events (AE), SLE flare, generation of thrombogenic antibodies and thrombosis. Antibody (Ab) levels to HPV 6, 11, 16 & 18 were measured by HPV competitive Luminex Immunoassay and Geometric Mean Titers (GMTs) were calculated for each HPV type. Seroconversion was assessed for those seronegative at baseline. The women in the study: African-American (79%), mean age=38.1years, mean age at diagnosis of SLE=28.6years, 35.3% had a history of smoking, 91% had 4 or more sexual partners, 50% had a history of sexually transmitted diseases, and 27.3% used condoms on a regular basis. Vaccine site reactions (VSRs) occurred in 62%, all mild. Ninety-seven percent experienced at least 1 non vaccine adverse event (nvAE) with a total of 493 nvAEs in 33 patients, of which 90% were mild and none were related to vaccine or SLE. There were 9 serious AEs, none were related to vaccine or SLE, all resolved. No patient experienced an SLE flare, thrombosis, or generation of thrombogenic antibodies. Seroconversion rate was 100% with mean GMTs comparable to Gardasil® package insert data. In this SLE vaccine study, qHPV vaccine was generally safe, well tolerated, and highly immunogenic. This clinical trial is registered on Clinical Trials.gov under number, NCT01741012 and was conducted under the FDA IND BB14113. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Potential Impact of Prophylactic HPV Vaccination on Oropharynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Theresa; Eisele, David W.; Fakhry, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is significantly increasing in incidence in the United States. Given that these epidemiologic trends are driven by HPV, the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines on the prevention of OPC is of interest. To date, the primary evidence supporting the approval of current prophylactic HPV vaccines are large phase III clinical trials focused on prevention of genital disease (cervical and anal cancer, as well as genital warts). These trials reported 89-98% vaccine efficacy for prevention of both premalignant lesions and persistent genital infection. However, these trials were designed before the etiologic relationship between HPV and oropharyngeal cancer was established. There are differences in the epidemiology of oral and genital HPV infection, such as differences in age and gender distributions, which suggest that the vaccine efficacy shown in genital cancers may not be directly translatable to the oropharynx. Evaluation of vaccine efficacy is challenging in the oropharynx because no premalignant lesions analogous to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in cervical cancer has been identified. In order to truly investigate the efficacy of these vaccines in the oropharynx, additional clinical trials with feasible endpoints are needed. PMID:27152637

  19. Ethics and the HPV Vaccine: Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Mary P.

    2008-01-01

    School nurses are at the forefront of health care providers for many families of junior high and high school students and are used as primary sources of information and guidance about recommended student vaccinations. In the case of the relatively new vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), school nurses must be both knowledgeable about the…

  20. Ethics and the HPV Vaccine: Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Mary P.

    2008-01-01

    School nurses are at the forefront of health care providers for many families of junior high and high school students and are used as primary sources of information and guidance about recommended student vaccinations. In the case of the relatively new vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), school nurses must be both knowledgeable about the…

  1. Parental acceptance of HPV vaccine in Peru: a decision framework.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Rosario M; Winkler, Jennifer L; Penny, Mary E; LaMontagne, D Scott

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer affecting women worldwide and it is an important cause of death, especially in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) and can be prevented by HPV vaccine. The challenge is to expand vaccine availability to countries where it is most needed. In 2008 Peru's Ministry of Health implemented a demonstration project involving 5(th) grade girls in primary schools in the Piura region. We designed and conducted a qualitative study of the decision-making process among parents of girls, and developed a conceptual model describing the process of HPV vaccine acceptance. We found a nonlinear HPV decision-making process that evolved over time. Initially, the vaccine's newness, the requirement of written consent, and provision of information were important. If information was sufficient and provided by credible sources, many parents accepted the vaccine. Later, after obtaining additional information from teachers, health personnel, and other trusted sources, more parents accepted vaccination. An understanding of the issues surrounding the vaccine developed, parents overcome fears and rumors, and engaged in family negotiations-including hearing the girl's voice in the decision-making process. The concept of prevention (cancer as danger, future health, and trust in vaccines) combined with pragmatic factors (no cost, available at school) and the credibility of the offer (information in the media, recommendation of respected authority figure) were central to motivations that led parents to decide to vaccinate their daughters. A lack of confidence in the health system was the primary inhibitor of vaccine acceptance. Health personnel and teachers are credible sources of information and can provide important support to HPV vaccination campaigns.

  2. Effectiveness of a BHV-1/BEFV bivalent vaccine against bovine herpesvirus type 1 infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yao-Chi; Shen, Hsiu-Yen; Cheng, Li-Ting; Liu, Shyh-Shyan; Chu, Chun-Yen

    2016-12-01

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) causes acute febrile respiratory diseases (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, IBR), decreased milk production, weight loss and abortion. Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) causes acute febrile respiratory disease, with pulmonary emphysema and pulmonary edema as the main signs. These viruses infect domesticated herds and lead to significant economic losses. In our previous study, an inactivated BHV-1 and BEFV bivalent vaccine was formulated with water-in-oil-in-water adjuvant, and vaccine efficacy was evaluated in guinea pigs. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the bivalent vaccine in cattle. Results showed that immunized cattle had a significantly higher level of total anti-BHV-1 antibody response (S/P ratio of 12.7) than the control group (S/P ratio of 0.07) 32weeks post-vaccination. The immunized group also showed higher neutralizing antibody levels against BHV-1 (SN=2(3.8)) and BEFV (SN=2(4.6)) than the control group (SN<2) 4 to 32weeks post-vaccination (p<0.05). In a BHV-1 challenge experiment, immunized cattle showed low virus shedding (10(1.2)TCID50/mL) and a significant reduction in pathological lesion scores (p<0.01). In conclusion, the BHV-1+BEFV+w/o/w vaccine not only improved long-term antibody immune response but also significantly reduced clinical signs in a BHV-1 challenge experiment. Our approach may be feasible for developing an effective vaccine against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and bovine ephemeral fever virus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Knowledge and Awareness of HPV Vaccine and Acceptability to Vaccinate in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Stacey; Wamai, Richard G.; Bain, Paul A.; Welty, Thomas; Welty, Edith; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We assessed the knowledge and awareness of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccine, and willingness and acceptability to vaccinate in sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. We further identified countries that fulfill the two GAVI Alliance eligibility criteria to support nationwide HPV vaccination. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies on the knowledge and awareness of cervical cancer, HPV and HPV vaccine, and willingness and acceptability to vaccinate. Trends in Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP3) vaccine coverage in SSA countries from 1990–2011 were extracted from the World Health Organization database. Findings The review revealed high levels of willingness and acceptability of HPV vaccine but low levels of knowledge and awareness of cervical cancer, HPV or HPV vaccine. We identified only six countries to have met the two GAVI Alliance requirements for supporting introduction of HPV vaccine: 1) the ability to deliver multi-dose vaccines for no less than 50% of the target vaccination cohort in an average size district, and 2) achieving over 70% coverage of DTP3 vaccine nationally. From 2008 through 2011 all SSA countries, with the exception of Mauritania and Nigeria, have reached or maintained DTP3 coverage at 70% or above. Conclusion There is an urgent need for more education to inform the public about HPV, HPV vaccine, and cervical cancer, particularly to key demographics, (adolescents, parents and healthcare professionals), to leverage high levels of willingness and acceptability of HPV vaccine towards successful implementation of HPV vaccination programs. There is unpreparedness in most SSA countries to roll out national HPV vaccination as per the GAVI Alliance eligibility criteria for supporting introduction of the vaccine. In countries that have met 70% DTP3 coverage, pilot programs need to be rolled out to identify the best practice and strategies for delivering HPV vaccines to adolescents and also to qualify for GAVI

  4. Parents who refuse or delay HPV vaccine: Differences in vaccination behavior, beliefs, and clinical communication preferences.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Melissa B; Calo, William A; Marciniak, Macary W; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-03-04

    We sought to estimate the national prevalence of HPV vaccine refusal and delay in a nationally-representative sample of parents of adolescents. We also compared parents who refused versus delayed HPV vaccine in terms of their vaccination beliefs and clinical communication preferences. In 2014 to 2015, we conducted an online survey of 1,484 US parents who reported on an 11- to 17-year-old child in their household. We used weighted multinomial logistic regression to assess correlates of HPV vaccine refusal and delay. Overall, 28% of parents reported that they had ever "refused or decided not to get" HPV vaccine for their child, and an additional 8% of parents reported that they had "delayed or put off getting" HPV vaccine. Compared to no refusal/delay, refusal was associated with lower confidence in adolescent vaccination (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-0.91), lower perceived HPV vaccine effectiveness (RRR = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.50-0.91), and higher perceived harms (RRR = 3.49, 95% CI, 2.65-4.60). In contrast, delay was associated with needing more information (RRR = 1.76, 95% CI, 1.08-2.85). Most parents rated physicians and information sheets as helpful for making decisions about HPV vaccination, although parents who reported refusal endorsed these resources less often. Our findings suggest that HPV vaccine refusal is common among parents of adolescents and may have increased relative to previous estimates. Because the vaccination beliefs and communication preferences of parents who refuse appear to differ from those who delay, targeted communication strategies may be needed to effectively address HPV vaccine hesitancy.

  5. Got the HPV Vaccine Before You Knew You Were Pregnant? Don't Worry

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164345.html Got the HPV Vaccine Before You Knew You Were Pregnant? Don't ... 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The cancer-preventing HPV vaccine does not appear to have any ill effect ...

  6. Influences on parental acceptance of HPV vaccination in demonstration projects in Uganda and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Galagan, Sean R; Paul, Proma; Menezes, Lysander; LaMontagne, D Scott

    2013-06-26

    This study investigates the effect of communication strategies on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake in HPV vaccine demonstration projects in Uganda and Vietnam. Secondary analysis was conducted on data from surveys of a representative sample of parents and guardians of girls eligible for HPV vaccine, measuring three-dose coverage achieved in demonstration projects in 2008-2010. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis calculated the unadjusted and adjusted odds of receiving at least one dose of HPV vaccine depending on exposure to community influencers; information, education, and communication (IEC) channels; and demographic factors. This study found that exposure to community influencers was associated with HPV vaccine uptake in a multivariate model controlling for other factors. Exposure to non-interactive IEC channels was only marginally associated with HPV vaccine uptake. These results underscore the need of HPV vaccine programs in low- and middle-income countries to involve and utilize key community influencers and stakeholders to maximize HPV vaccine uptake.

  7. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  8. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in cervical cancer 2003-2008 in Stockholm, Sweden, before public HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Näsman, Anders; Carlson, Joseph W; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2011-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major cause of cervical cancer, but the prevalence of different HPV types varies depending on geographical location and may change dramatically after introduction of HPV vaccination. Here, we aimed to gain some information regarding the recent prevalence of different HPV types, in cancer of the uterine cervix in the Stockholm region, before the introduction of public HPV vaccination in Sweden. From 215 diagnosed cervical cancer patients 2003-2008 at the Karolinska University Hospital, 160 pretreatment cervical cancer samples, including both squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and adenocarcinomas (ADC) could be obtained. DNA was extracted from 154/160 of the SCC and ADC samples and assayed by Luminex Multiplex for 24 different HPV types, including 15 high-risk (HR), three putative HR and six low-risk types (LR). We successfully analysed 154/215 (71.6%) of the locally diagnosed cases and found a high prevalence of HPV with 92.9% in all uterine cervix cancer cases, and 93.3% and 91.4 % in SCC and ADC, respectively. All HPV positive cases harboured HR types, either alone or as multiple infections. In SCC HPV16 dominated and together with HPV18 accounted for 69.7% of the cases, followed in prevalence by HPV33, 31 and 45. In ADC, HPV18 was more common than HPV16, and they were observed in all except one of the HPV positive samples. The prevalence of HPV16 and 18, followed by HPV33, 31 and 45 is high in SCC and ADC in the Stockholm region. Public HPV vaccination could potentially inhibit a large proportion of such tumours underlining the urgency to initiate HPV vaccination.

  10. Assessment of bivalent and tetravalent dengue vaccine formulations in flavivirus-naïve adults in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Gustavo H; Galán-Herrera, Juan-Francisco; Forrat, Remi; Zambrano, Betzana; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Harenberg, Anke; Guy, Bruno; Lang, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Several ChimeriVax-Dengue (CYD)-based vaccination strategies were investigated as potential alternatives to vaccination with tetravalent CYD vaccine (CYD-TDV) in this phase IIa trial conducted in 2008-9 in 150 healthy adults. Participants were randomized and vaccinated on D0 and D105 (± 15 days). One group received bivalent CYD vaccine against serotypes 1 and 3 (CYD-1;3) on day 0 and CYD-2;4 on day 105 (± 15 days). Two groups received an injection at each timepoint of a tetravalent blend of CYD-1;3;4 and a VERO cell derived, live attenuated vaccine against serotype 2 (VDV-2), or the reference CYD-TDV. A fourth group received Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine on days -14, -7 and 0, followed by CYD-TDV on day 105. Viraemia was infrequent in all groups. CYD-4 viraemia was most frequent after tetravalent vaccination, while CYD-3 viraemia was most frequent after the first bivalent vaccination. Immunogenicity as assessed by 50% plaque reduction neutralisation test on D28 was comparable after the first injection of either tetravalent vaccine, and increased after the second injection, particularly with the blended CYD-1;3;4/ VDV-2 vaccine. In the bivalent vaccine group, immune response against serotype 3 was highest and the second injection elicited a low immune response against CYD 2 and 4. Immune responses after the first injection of CYD-TDV in the JE-primed group were in general higher than after the first injection in the other groups. All tested regimens were well tolerated without marked differences between groups. Bivalent vaccination showed no advantage in terms of immunogenicity. NCT00740155.

  11. Changing HPV vaccination rates in bisexual and lesbian women.

    PubMed

    Polek, Carolee; Hardie, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates continue to be below national targets for women and lower in some sexual minorities. HPV is a primary causal agent in cervical cancer, from which members of the lesbian and bisexual community mistakenly believe they are at low risk. This study characterized rates of HPV vaccination in women based on their sexual orientation. Data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Interview Survey 2013-2014. This survey evaluated 5695 women-113 (2%) lesbian, 135 (2.4%) bisexual, and 5446 (95.6%) heterosexual women ages 18-26 in 2006-using logistic regression. A dependent variable of having had HPV vaccination and independent variable of sexual orientation was used. Significant differences were found in vaccine uptake based on sexual orientation. Bisexual women were most likely to be vaccinated, and differed significantly from heterosexual and lesbians which did not differ significantly from each other. The results suggest improvement in sexual minority rates but this finding is tempered by the low rates of vaccination in adult women. The low vaccination rates in adult women and sexual minorities merit further study. The low rates may be a function of the transition from pediatric to adult care and/or practice barriers perceived by sexual minorities. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Central European Vaccination Advisory Group (CEVAG) guidance statement on recommendations for the introduction of HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Prymula, Roman; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Bakir, Mustafa; Czajka, Hanna; Lutsar, Irja; Mészner, Zsófia; Salman, Nuran; Simurka, Pavol; Usonis, Vytautas

    2009-09-01

    Vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV), the primary causative agent in cervical cancer, are licensed. This paper contains the Central European Vaccination Advisory Group (CEVAG) guidance statement on the introduction of HPV vaccines in central Europe. Eight countries currently have medical representatives on CEVAG: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Turkey. By raising awareness and disseminating information, CEVAG aims to promote the efficient and safe use of vaccines to prevent, control and if possible eliminate infectious diseases. In January 2008, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control published a report entitled Guidance for the Introduction of HPV Vaccines in EU Countries. Members of CEVAG have taken the information relevant to their countries from this report and, with consideration of local issues, produced these guidance recommendations for the introduction of HPV vaccines in the CEVAG region, which may be adapted for use in individual countries.

  13. A replication-incompetent influenza virus bearing the HN glycoprotein of human parainfluenza virus as a bivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Kiso, Maki; Uraki, Ryuta; Ichiko, Yurie; Takimoto, Toru; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-12-16

    Influenza virus and human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) are major etiologic agents of acute respiratory illness in young children. Inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccines are approved in several countries, yet no vaccine is licensed for HPIV. We previously showed that a replication-incompetent PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) virus that possesses a reporter gene in the coding region of the PB2 segment can serve as a platform for a bivalent vaccine. To develop a bivalent vaccine against influenza and parainfluenza virus, here, we generated a PB2-KO virus possessing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of HPIV type 3 (HPIV3), a major surface antigen of HPIV, in its PB2 segment. We confirmed that this virus replicated only in PB2-expressing cells and expressed HN. We then examined the efficacy of this virus as a bivalent vaccine in a hamster model. High levels of virus-specific IgG antibodies in sera and IgA, IgG, and IgM antibodies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids against both influenza virus and HPIV3 were detected from hamsters immunized with this virus. The neutralizing capability of these serum antibodies was also confirmed. Moreover, the immunized hamsters were completely protected from virus challenge with influenza virus or HPIV3. These results indicate that PB2-KO virus expressing the HN of HPIV3 has the potential to be a novel bivalent vaccine against influenza and human parainfluenza viruses.

  14. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix(®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months.: Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months.: In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men.

  15. Identifying Health Beliefs Influencing Hispanic College Men's Willingness to Vaccinate against HPV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Thomas, Tami L.; Eaton, Asia

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies health beliefs influencing Hispanic college men's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake decision making processes. Hispanic college men were interviewed about their HPV vaccine knowledge, and information seeking behaviors. Overall, participants did not view HPV infection or vaccination as an immediate concern or priority;…

  16. School Nurses' Professional Practice in the HPV Vaccine Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany L.; Ashwood, Daniel; Richardson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Because U.S. human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain low, we evaluated school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, self-efficacy, intention, and professional practice regarding the HPV vaccine and determined if these variables influenced their professional practice concerning the HPV vaccine. We…

  17. Identifying Health Beliefs Influencing Hispanic College Men's Willingness to Vaccinate against HPV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Thomas, Tami L.; Eaton, Asia

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies health beliefs influencing Hispanic college men's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake decision making processes. Hispanic college men were interviewed about their HPV vaccine knowledge, and information seeking behaviors. Overall, participants did not view HPV infection or vaccination as an immediate concern or priority;…

  18. School Nurses' Professional Practice in the HPV Vaccine Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Brittany L.; Ashwood, Daniel; Richardson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Because U.S. human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain low, we evaluated school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, self-efficacy, intention, and professional practice regarding the HPV vaccine and determined if these variables influenced their professional practice concerning the HPV vaccine. We…

  19. The role of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma on HPV vaccine decision-making among college males.

    PubMed

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18-26 from 3 Canadian universities were recruited from September 2013 to April 2014. Participants completed a self-report survey assessing HPV-related stigma, psychosocial predictors of HPV-related stigma, and HPV vaccine decision-making. The results were analyzed using variance analyses and linear regressions. Ethnicity, province of residence, and perceived severity of HPV were found to significantly influence HPV-related stigma. In addition, HPV-related stigma was higher in those unaware of the availability of the HPV vaccine for males. Promotion efforts should concentrate on Asian minorities and should avoid HPV severity messaging, as these may lead to higher HPV-related stigma, which in turn may act as a barrier to vaccination.

  20. The Role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Stigma on HPV Vaccine Decision-Making among College Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Participants: Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18--26 from 3…

  1. The Role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Stigma on HPV Vaccine Decision-Making among College Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Participants: Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18--26 from 3…

  2. Social media microblogs as an HPV vaccination forum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chupei; Gotsis, Marientina; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice

    2013-01-01

    The 2006 US FDA approval of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine brought new hope for cancer prevention. Gardasil and Cervarix are widely available vaccines that can deter HPV infection, which causes 70% of cervical cancer. Acceptance of vaccination varies due to a lack of HPV awareness and HPV vaccine knowledge. Recent observations of the Chinese microblog “SinaWeibo” suggest a new approach to engage health professionals and consumer website bloggers. Websites that present the latest fashion, fitness or beauty news and ways to obtain “deals” have created informative blogs or online communities that appeal to female users. Some users raise health questions of their peers. Health professionals, as website bloggers, can introduce vaccine news or respond to conversations between bloggers and their followers. By transforming medical vocabulary into ordinary chat, microblogs may promote efficiency in vaccine education and communication. A web-based, interactive social media-microblog could offer an ideal platform to speed up information dissemination and increase targeted communication. PMID:23842072

  3. Identifying knowledge-attitude-practice gaps to enhance HPV vaccine diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elisia L; Head, Katharine J

    2013-01-01

    To examine differences in knowledge, attitudes, and related practices among adopters and nonadopters of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, the researchers conducted 83 in-depth interviews with 18- to 26-year-old women. The study identified knowledge-attitude-practice gaps in the context of the HPV vaccine to explain why diffusion of a preventive innovation (such as the HPV vaccine) requires targeted risk communication strategies in order to increase demand. Salient findings included similarities between vaccinated and unvaccinated women's lack of knowledge and uncertainties about HPV and cervical cancer. Vaccinated women who had no knowledge of HPV or no-risk/low-risk perceptions of HPV reported receiving vaccination, indicating HPV risk protection behavior could precede knowledge acquisition for vaccinated women. These vaccinated women identified an interpersonal network supportive of vaccination and reported supportive social influences. Among unvaccinated women, unsupportive vaccination attitudes included low perceived personal risk of HPV. In contrast, unvaccinated women often cited erroneous beliefs that HPV could be avoided by abstinence, monogamy, and knowledge of their partners' sexual history as reasons that the vaccine was not personally relevant. Unvaccinated women cited interpersonal influences that activated short- and long-term vaccination safety and efficacy concerns. Different levels of fear regarding the HPV vaccine may underlie (a) attitudinal differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in perceived vaccination value and (b) attitude-practice gaps.

  4. Barriers to Prevention: Knowledge of HPV, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccinations among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    STROHL, Anna E; MENDOZA, Gricelda; GHANT, Marissa S; CAMERON, Kenzie A; SIMON, Melissa A; SCHINK, Julian C; MARSH, Erica E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess knowledge of the human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer, and HPV vaccination in African American women (AAW). STUDY DESIGN This study was a quantitative cross-sectional survey of English speaking, AAW, ages 18-70 recruited from a community fair in Chicago, IL. Surveys were distributed to a convenience sample to assess knowledge of HPV, cervical cancer, and the HPV vaccine. Cumulative knowledge scores were calculated for each participant and analysis was performed to identify factors associated with adequate knowledge scores. RESULTS 322 surveys were distributed, 242 surveys were collected, and 215 met inclusion criteria. Mean knowledge score was 12.3 ± 4.2 (mean ± SD) out of a maximum score of 28 (range 3-23); 73% of participants scored <65% on the knowledge portion of the survey. Education level (P=0.007), household income (P=0.010), and having a child that had been offered the HPV vaccine (P=0.041) were associated with adequate (≥65% accuracy) knowledge scores. CONCLUSION Knowledge of HPV, cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was low in this urban African American adult female population. Targeted educational health programs are needed in order to increase awareness among these women who have the highest rate of cervical cancer mortality in the United States. Such patient educational programs need to be developed by physicians and should address the cultural and literacy needs of this particular group of women. In addition, AAW exert influence on the health of their communities and are integral in health-related decision making, thus educating them through their healthcare providers will have far ranging impact. PMID:24983684

  5. HPV vaccination among lesbian and bisexual women: Findings from a national survey of young adults

    PubMed Central

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Katz, Mira L.; Paskett, Electra D.; Reiter, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and associated cervical disease are common among all women, regardless of sexual identity, yet limited research has examined HPV vaccination among lesbian and bisexual women. Methods A national sample of lesbian and bisexual women ages 18-26 (n=543) completed our online survey during Fall 2013. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify correlates of HPV vaccine initiation (receipt of at least 1 dose) and completion (receipt of all 3 recommended doses among initiators). Results Overall, 45% of respondents had initiated HPV vaccine, and 70% of initiators reported completing the series. HPV vaccine initiation was higher among respondents who: were students, had received a healthcare provider's recommendation, perceived greater positive social vaccination norms, or anticipated greater regret if they did not get vaccinated and later got HPV. Initiation was lower among those who perceived greater HPV vaccine harms or greater barriers to getting the vaccine (all p<.05). HPV vaccine completion was higher among initiators who had a college degree while it was lower among those who perceived a greater likelihood of acquiring HPV or who anticipated greater regret if they got the vaccine and fainted (all p<.05). Among HPV vaccine initiators who had not yet completed the series, about half (47%) intended to get the remaining doses. Conclusions Many lesbian and bisexual women are not getting vaccinated against HPV. Healthcare provider recommendations and women's health beliefs may be important leverage points for increasing vaccination among this population. PMID:25038312

  6. Declining Genital Warts in Young Women in England Associated With HPV 16/18 Vaccination: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Soldan, Kate; Wetten, Sally; Mesher, David; Williams, Tim; Gill, O. Noel; Hughes, Gwenda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Diagnoses of genital warts (GW) in genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics have been increasing in England for many years. In 2008, an HPV immunization program began with a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix). This was expected to markedly reduce infections and disease due to human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 but not HPV 6/11 infections or disease. However, from 2009 to 2011 there were decreases in reported diagnoses of GW in young females at GUM clinics. Methods. Using data from GUM clinics and a sample of general practices (GPs) throughout England, we analyzed rates of GW diagnoses by age, year of diagnosis, and estimated immunization coverage. Results. The overall reduction in GW diagnoses at GUM clinics between 2008 and 2011 was 13.3% among 16- to 19-year-old females, with the greatest decline of 20.8% in 17-year-olds. Declines were positively associated with estimated immunization coverage. A similar pattern was seen in GP diagnoses, but not among older women, and for other GUM consultations. Conclusions. Several factors might contribute to declines in GW. However, the size and pattern of the declines strongly suggest that we are observing an unexpected, moderately protective effect of HPV 16/18 vaccination against GW. PMID:24092908

  7. Pap testing, awareness, and acceptability of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among Chinese American women.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang T; Chen, Bei; Chan, Melvin

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the knowledge and opinions of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among Chinese immigrants, nor the impact of framing HPV as a sexually transmitted infection in this population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted focusing on knowledge and experience with HPV, HPV vaccine, cervical cancer and Pap testing, and attitudes toward HPV vaccine in response to different message frames. Chinese American women were recruited in a community setting (n = 162). Only 19 % had heard of HPV and 38 % had had a Pap test in the last 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression showed that English proficiency was associated with vaccination acceptance and insurance status was associated with HPV awareness; there was no observed correlation with message framing. Chinese American women with limited English proficiency have low HPV awareness. Community-based, culturally appropriate education about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine should be directed toward limited-English proficient Chinese American women.

  8. Use of HPV testing for cervical screening in vaccinated women--Insights from the SHEVa (Scottish HPV Prevalence in Vaccinated Women) study.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ramya; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Cubie, Heather Ann; Serrano, Itziar; Wennington, Holli; Hopkins, Mark; Pan, Jiafeng; Pollock, Kevin G; Palmer, Tim J; Cuschieri, Kate

    2016-06-15

    The management of cervical disease is changing worldwide as a result of HPV vaccination and the increasing use of HPV testing for cervical screening. However, the impact of vaccination on the performance of HPV based screening strategies is unknown. The SHEVa (Scottish HPV Prevalence in Vaccinated women) projects are designed to gain insight into the impact of vaccination on the performance of clinically validated HPV assays. Samples collated from women attending for first cervical smear who had been vaccinated as part of a national "catch-up" programme were tested with three clinically validated HPV assays (2 DNA and 1 RNA). Overall HR-HPV and type specific positivity was assessed in total population and according to underlying cytology and compared to a demographically equivalent group of unvaccinated women. HPV prevalence was significantly lower in vaccinated women and was influenced by assay-type, reducing by 23-25% for the DNA based assays and 32% for the RNA assay (p = 0.0008). All assays showed over 75% reduction of HPV16 and/or 18 (p < 0.0001) whereas the prevalence of non 16/18 HR-HPV was not significantly different in vaccinated vs unvaccinated women. In women with low grade abnormalities, the proportion associated with non 16/18 HR-HPV was significantly higher in vaccinated women (p < 0.0001). Clinically validated HPV assays are affected differentially when applied to vaccinated women, dependent on assay chemistry. The increased proportion of non HPV16/18 infections may have implications for clinical performance, consequently, longitudinal studies linking HPV status to disease outcomes in vaccinated women are warranted.

  9. HPV infection awareness and self-reported HPV vaccination coverage in female adolescent students in two German cities.

    PubMed

    Samkange-Zeeb, F; Spallek, L; Klug, S J; Zeeb, H

    2012-12-01

    Low levels of human papillomavirus (HPV) awareness and knowledge have been observed in the few studies conducted among school-going adolescents. Such data are lacking in Germany. To assess awareness of HPV and of vaccination status among girls attending grades 8-13 in Bremen and Bremerhaven, two German cities. Participants completed a questionnaire in school including questions on demographic characteristics, about HPV awareness and on vaccination status. We analysed the relationship between awareness of HPV, of vaccination status and vaccine uptake and several variables including age and migrant background using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Six hundred and thirty-two girls aged 12-20 years completed the questionnaire. 50 % had no awareness of HPV, 12 % reported being vaccinated against HPV and 57 % did not know whether or not they were vaccinated against HPV. In multivariate analyses, ever had sex was associated with awareness of HPV, and ever been to a gynaecologist with awareness of vaccination status. Our results may be an indication that female adolescents in Germany are not adequately informed and counselled about HPV and associated issues.

  10. Motivational and contextual determinants of HPV-vaccination uptake: A longitudinal study among mothers of girls invited for the HPV-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pot, Mirjam; van Keulen, Hilde M; Ruiter, Robert A C; Eekhout, Iris; Mollema, Liesbeth; Paulussen, Theo W G M

    2017-07-01

    In the Netherlands, HPV-vaccination uptake among 12-year-old girls remains to be lower (61% in 2016) than expected. The present study is about 1) replicating the extent to which social-psychological determinants found in earlier cross-sectional studies explain HPV-vaccination intention, and 2) testing whether HPV-vaccination intention, as well as other social-psychological determinants, are good predictors of future HPV-vaccination uptake in a longitudinal design. A random sample of mothers of girls invited for the vaccination in 2015 was drawn from the Dutch vaccination register (Praeventis) (N=36,000) and from three online panels (N=2483). Two months prior to the vaccination of girls, their mothers were requested to complete a web-based questionnaire by letter (Praeventis sample) or by e-mail (panel samples). HPV-vaccination uptake was derived from Praeventis. Backward linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine most dominant predictors of HPV-vaccination intention and uptake, respectively. The total sample used for data analyses consisted of 8062 mothers. Response rates were 18% for the Praeventis sample and 47% for the panel samples. HPV-vaccination intention was best explained by attitude, beliefs, subjective norms, habit, and perceived relative effectiveness of the vaccination; they explained 83% of the variance in HPV-vaccination intention. Intention appeared to be the only stable predictor of HPV-vaccination uptake and explained 43% of the variance in HPV-vaccination uptake. These results confirm what was found by earlier cross-sectional studies, and provide strong leads for selecting relevant targets in the planning of future communication strategies aiming to improve HPV-vaccination uptake. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Health Care Providers' Knowledge of HPV Vaccination, Barriers, and Strategies in a State With Low HPV Vaccine Receipt: Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Warner, Echo L; Ding, Qian; Pappas, Lisa; Bodson, Julia; Fowler, Brynn; Mooney, Ryan; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Kepka, Deanna

    2017-08-11

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is below national goals in the United States. Health care providers are at the forefront of improving vaccination in the United States, given their close interactions with patients and parents. The objective of this study was to assess the associations between demographic and practice characteristics of the health care providers with the knowledge of HPV vaccination and HPV vaccine guidelines. Furthermore, our aim was to contextualize the providers' perceptions of barriers to HPV vaccination and strategies for improving vaccination in a state with low HPV vaccine receipt. In this mixed-methods study, participating providers (N=254) were recruited from statewide pediatric, family medicine, and nursing organizations in Utah. Participants completed a Web-based survey of demographics, practice characteristics, HPV vaccine knowledge (≤10 correct vs 11-12 correct answers), and knowledge of HPV vaccine guidelines (correct vs incorrect). Demographic and practice characteristics were compared using chi-square and Fisher exact tests for HPV knowledge outcomes. Four open-ended questions pertaining to the barriers and strategies for improving HPV vaccination were content analyzed. Family practice providers (52.2%, 71/136; P=.001), institutional or university clinics (54.0%, 20/37; P=.001), and busier clinics seeing 20 to 29 patients per day (50.0%, 28/56; P=.04) had the highest proportion of respondents with high HPV vaccination knowledge. Older providers aged 40 to 49 years (85.1%, 57/67; P=.04) and those who were a Vaccines for Children provider (78.7%, 133/169; P=.03) had the highest proportion of respondents with high knowledge of HPV vaccine recommendations. Providers perceived the lack of parental education to be the main barrier to HPV vaccination. They endorsed stronger, consistent, and more direct provider recommendations for HPV vaccination delivered to parents through printed materials available in clinical settings and

  12. Individual- and regional-level determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine refusal: the Ontario Grade 8 HPV vaccine cohort study.

    PubMed

    Remes, Olivia; Smith, Leah M; Alvarado-Llano, Beatriz E; Colley, Lindsey; Lévesque, Linda E

    2014-10-08

    Studies on the determinants of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use have generally focused on individual-level characteristics, despite the potentially important influence of regional-level characteristics. Therefore, we undertook a population-based, retrospective cohort study to identify individual- and regional-level determinants of HPV vaccine refusal (non-receipt) in Ontario's (Canada) Grade 8 HPV Immunization Program. Ontario's administrative health and immunization databases were used to identify girls eligible for free HPV vaccination in 2007-2011 and to ascertain individual-level characteristics of cohort members (socio-demographics, vaccination history, health care utilization, medical history). The social and material characteristics of the girl's region (health unit) were derived from the 2006 Canadian Census. Generalized estimating equations (binomial distribution, logit link) were used to estimate the population-average effects of individual- and regional-level characteristics on HPV vaccine refusal. Our cohort consisted of 144,047 girls, 49.3% of whom refused HPV vaccination. Factors associated with refusal included a previous diagnosis of Down's syndrome (OR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.16-1.63) or autism (OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.34-1.90), few physician visits (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.35-1.55), and previous refusal of mandatory (OR = 2.23, 95% CI 2.07-2.40) and optional (OR = 3.96, 95% CI 3.87-4.05) vaccines. Refusal was highest among the lowest and highest income levels. Finally, a previous diagnosis of obesity and living in an area of high deprivation were associated with lower refusal (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.83-0.92 and OR = 0.82 95%, CI 0.79-0.86, respectively). Studies on HPV vaccine determinants should consider regional-level factors. Efforts to increase HPV vaccine acceptance should include vulnerable populations (such as girls of low income) and girls with limited contact with the healthcare system.

  13. Dendritic cell targeting vaccine for HPV-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Duluc, Dorothée; Joo, HyeMee; Oh, SangKon

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime and activate cellular immune responses. Delivering antigens to in vivo DCs has thus been considered as a promising strategy that could allow us to mount T cell-mediated therapeutic immunity against cancers in patients. Successful development of such types of cancer vaccines that can target in vivo DCs, however, requires a series of outstanding questions that need to be addressed. These include the proper selection of which DC surface receptors, specific DC subsets and DC activators that can further enhance the efficacy of vaccines by promoting effector T cell infiltration and retention in tumors and their actions against tumors. Supplementing these areas of research with additional strategies that can counteract tumor immune evasion mechanisms is also expected to enhance the efficacy of such therapeutic vaccines against cancers. After more than a decade of study, we have concluded that antigen targeting to DCs via CD40 to evoke cellular responses is more efficient than targeting antigens to the same types of DCs via eleven other DC surface receptors tested. In recent work, we have further demonstrated that a prototype vaccine (anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7, a recombinant fusion protein of anti-human CD40 and HPV16.E6/7 protein) for HPV16-associated cancers can efficiently activate HPV16.E6/7-specific T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, from the blood of HPV16+ head-and-neck cancer patients. Moreover, anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7 plus poly(I:C) can mount potent therapeutic immunity against TC-1 tumor expressing HPV16.E6/7 protein in human CD40 transgenic mice. In this manuscript, we thus highlight our recent findings for the development of novel CD40 targeting immunotherapeutic vaccines for HPV16-associated malignancies. In addition, we further discuss several of key questions that still remain to be addressed for enhancing therapeutic immunity elicited by our prototype vaccine against HPV16

  14. Genotype considerations for virus-like particle-based bivalent norovirus vaccine composition.

    PubMed

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Lappalainen, Suvi; Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2015-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) genogroup I (GI) and GII are responsible for most human infections with NoV. Because of the high genetic variability of NoV, natural infection does not induce sufficient protective immunity to different genotypes or to variants of the same genotype and there is little or no cross-protection against different genogroups. NoV-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates that induce high levels of NoV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. It is believed that a bivalent NoV vaccine consisting of a representative VLP from GI and GII is a minimum requirement for an effective vaccine. Here, we compared the abilities of monovalent immunizations with NoV GI.1-2001, GI.3-2002, GII.4-1999, and GII.4-2010 New Orleans VLPs to induce NoV type-specific and cross-reactive immune responses and protective blocking antibody responses in BALB/c mice. All of the VLPs induced comparable levels of type-specific serum IgG antibodies, as well as blocking antibodies to the VLPs used for immunization. However, the abilities of different VLP genotypes to induce cross-reactive IgG and cross-blocking antibodies varied remarkably. Our results confirm previous findings of a lack of cross-protective immune responses between GI and GII NoVs. These data support the rationale for including NoV GI.3 and GII.4-1999 VLPs in the bivalent vaccine formulation, which could be sufficient to induce protective immune responses across NoV genotypes in the two common genogroups in humans. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. The sexual ethics of HPV vaccination for boys.

    PubMed

    Luyten, Jeroen; Engelen, Bart; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. It is a leading cause of cervical cancer in women but the virus is increasingly being linked to several other cancers in men and women alike. Since the introduction of safe and effective but also expensive vaccines, many developed countries have implemented selective vaccination programs for girls. Some however argue that these programs should be expanded to include boys, since (1) HPV constitutes non-negligible health risks for boys as well and (2) protected boys will indirectly also protect girls. In this paper we approach this discussion from an ethical perspective. First, on which moral grounds can one justify not reimbursing vaccination for the male sex? We develop an ethical framework to evaluate selective vaccination programs and conclude that, in the case of HPV, efficiency needs to be balanced against non-stigmatization, non-discrimination and justice. Second, if vaccination programs were to be expanded to boys as well, do the latter then also have a moral duty to become immunized? Two arguments in favor of such a moral duty are well known in vaccination ethics: the duty not to harm others and to contribute to the public good of public health. However, we argue that these are not particularly convincing in the context of HPV. In contrast, we believe a third, more powerful but also more controversial argument is possible. In our view, the sexual mode of transmission of HPV constitutes an additional reason to believe that boys in fact may have a moral obligation to accept vaccination.

  16. The feminization of HPV: How science, politics, economics and gender norms shaped U.S. HPV vaccine implementation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Ellen M; Vamos, Cheryl A; Thompson, Erika L; Zimet, Gregory D; Rosberger, Zeev; Merrell, Laura; Kline, Nolan S

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause a number of anogenital cancers (i.e., cervical, penile, anal, vaginal, vulvar) and genital warts. A decade ago, the HPV vaccine was approved, and has been shown to be a public health achievement that can reduce the morbidity and mortality for HPV-associated diseases. Yet, the mistaken over-identification of HPV as a female-specific disease has resulted in the feminization of HPV and HPV vaccines. In this critical review, we trace the evolution of the intersection of science, politics, economics and gender norms during the original HPV vaccine approval, marketing era, and implementation. Given the focus on cervical cancer screening, women were identified as bearing the burden of HPV infection and its related illnesses, and the group responsible for prevention. We also describe the consequences of the feminization of HPV, which has resulted primarily in reduced protection from HPV-related illnesses for males. We propose a multilevel approach to normalizing HPV vaccines as an important aspect of overall health for both genders. This process must engage multiple stakeholders, including providers, parents, patients, professional organizations, public health agencies, policymakers, researchers, and community-based organizations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vaccinating Girls and Boys with Different Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: Can It Optimise Population-Level Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Mélanie; Boily, Marie-Claude; Van de Velde, Nicolas; Franco, Eduardo L.; Brisson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Decision-makers may consider vaccinating girls and boys with different HPV vaccines to benefit from their respective strengths; the quadrivalent (HPV4) prevents anogenital warts (AGW) whilst the bivalent (HPV2) may confer greater cross-protection. We compared, to a girls-only vaccination program with HPV4, the impact of vaccinating: 1) both genders with HPV4, and 2) boys with HPV4 and girls with HPV2. Methods We used an individual-based transmission-dynamic model of heterosexual HPV infection and diseases. Our base-case scenario assumed lifelong efficacy of 100% against vaccine types, and 46,29,8,18,6% and 77,43,79,8,0% efficacy against HPV-31,-33,-45,-52,-58 for HPV4 and HPV2, respectively. Results Assuming 70% vaccination coverage and lifelong cross-protection, vaccinating boys has little additional benefit on AGW prevention, irrespective of the vaccine used for girls. Furthermore, using HPV4 for boys and HPV2 for girls produces greater incremental reductions in SCC incidence than using HPV4 for both genders (12 vs 7 percentage points). At 50% vaccination coverage, vaccinating boys produces incremental reductions in AGW of 17 percentage points if both genders are vaccinated with HPV4, but increases female incidence by 16 percentage points if girls are switched to HPV2 (heterosexual male incidence is incrementally reduced by 24 percentage points in both scenarios). Higher incremental reductions in SCC incidence are predicted when vaccinating boys with HPV4 and girls with HPV2 versus vaccinating both genders with HPV4 (16 vs 12 percentage points). Results are sensitive to vaccination coverage and the relative duration of protection of the vaccines. Conclusion Vaccinating girls with HPV2 and boys with HPV4 can optimize SCC prevention if HPV2 has higher/longer cross-protection, but can increase AGW incidence if vaccination coverage is low among boys. PMID:23840589

  18. Acceptability of HPV Vaccine for Males and Preferences for Future Education Programs Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Oldach, Benjamin R.; Randle, Katherine E.; Katz, Mira L.

    2014-01-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with several disparities related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, yet little is known about acceptability of HPV vaccine for males among Appalachian residents. HPV vaccine acceptability and preferences for future HPV vaccine education programs were examined among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with Appalachian Ohio residents between July and October 2011. Participants (n = 102 from 24 focus groups and 5 in-depth interviews) included four key stakeholder groups: health care providers, community leaders, parents with adolescent sons, and young adult men ages 18 to 26 years. Support for vaccinating males against HPV was high among participants, despite low awareness and knowledge about HPV vaccine for males. Participants reported three categories of potential barriers to vaccinating males against HPV: concerns about vaccine safety and side effects, access to care and vaccination logistics, and gender and cultural issues. Participants reported that HPV vaccine was viewed as being only for females in their communities and that receiving the vaccine may be emasculating or embarrassing to males. Participants suggested that future HPV vaccine education programs mainly target parents, include basic information about HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccine (e.g., number of doses, cost), and present the vaccine as having the potential to prevent cancer (as opposed to preventing genital warts). Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males was high among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Future HPV vaccine education programs in Appalachia should address common potential barriers to vaccination and help destigmatize vaccination among males. PMID:24085197

  19. Recombinant canine distemper virus serves as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Feng, Na; Ge, Jinying; Shuai, Lei; Peng, Liyan; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2012-07-20

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Attenuated live vaccine has been widely used to protect carnivores from canine distemper. In this study, we generated a recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine strain, rCDV-RVG, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) by using reverse genetics. The recombinant virus rCDV-RVG retained growth properties similar to those of vector CDV in Vero cell culture. Animal studies demonstrated that rCDV-RVG was safe in mice and dogs. Mice inoculated intracerebrally or intramuscularly with rCDV-RVG showed no apparent signs of disease and developed a strong rabies virus (RABV) neutralizing antibody response, which completely protected mice from challenge with a lethal dose of street virus. Canine studies showed that vaccination with rCDV-RVG induced strong and long-lasting virus neutralizing antibody responses to RABV and CDV. This is the first study demonstrating that recombinant CDV has the potential to serve as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper in animals.

  20. HPV Vaccination of College Males: Strategizing against HPV Infection in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham-Erves, Jennifer; Talbott, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The disease burden of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among females and its associated sequelae have been widely studied by social and behavioral science researchers and medical professionals. Approved for administration to males as young as nine years old, the vaccination of males continues to spark much debate when older age groups are brought…

  1. HPV Vaccination of College Males: Strategizing against HPV Infection in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham-Erves, Jennifer; Talbott, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The disease burden of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among females and its associated sequelae have been widely studied by social and behavioral science researchers and medical professionals. Approved for administration to males as young as nine years old, the vaccination of males continues to spark much debate when older age groups are brought…

  2. Does framing HPV vaccine as preventing cancer in men increase vaccine acceptability?

    PubMed Central

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Reiter, Paul L.; Chantala, Kim; Brewer, Noel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is now approved for use in males in the United States to prevent genital warts. We conducted an experiment to see whether framing HPV vaccination as also preventing cancer in men would increase men’s vaccination willingness. Methods We conducted an online survey in January 2009 with a national sample of men aged 18–59 who self-identified as gay/bisexual (n=312) or heterosexual (n=296). In the within-subjects experiment, men read 4 randomly ordered vignettes that described hypothetical vaccines that prevented either genital warts alone, or genital warts and either anal cancer, oral cancer, or penile cancer. We analyzed data using repeated-measures analysis of variance and tested whether perceived severity or perceived likelihood mediated the effect of disease outcome framing on men’s HPV vaccination willingness Results While only 42% of men were willing to receive HPV vaccine when it was framed as preventing genital warts alone, 60% were willing to get it when it was framed as preventing cancer in addition to genital warts (p<.001). The effect of outcome framing was the same for heterosexual and gay/bisexual men and for the three cancer types examined. Perceived severity of disease partially mediated the association between disease outcome and HPV vaccination willingness. Conclusions Men may be more accepting of HPV vaccine when it is framed as preventing cancer, regardless which of the three most common HPV-related cancers in men is described. Impact Study findings may be useful in developing health communication messages that maximize HPV vaccine acceptability among young men. PMID:20647398

  3. Implementing HPV vaccines: public knowledge, attitudes, and the need for education.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amrita

    This article reviews qualitative research on public knowledge and attitudes to HPV vaccines, focusing on socio-economically challenged populations. Keyword searches were conducted on MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science for relevant peer-reviewed literature in English. A high acceptance of HPV vaccines was found despite low knowledge about HPV (types, prevalence, transmission, health risks, and cervical screening). Facilitators of HPV vaccine uptake included fear of cancer and desire to protect children's health. Barriers included low knowledge levels, perception of HPV vaccines as potential causes of sexual disinhibition, concerns about vaccine costs, social stigma, adverse effects, and parental unwillingness to permit vaccination of pre-adolescent children. Despite acceptance of HPV vaccines, implementation in low-resource settings faces social and economic difficulties. To pursue and strengthen cervical screening in these settings, public education about HPV is key.

  4. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  5. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  6. Discussions of Adolescent Sexuality in News Media Coverage of the HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Tsui, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Given the sexually transmitted nature of human papillomavirus (HPV), some worry the HPV vaccine will create a false sense of security and promote adolescent sexual activity. Media coverage of vaccines can influence social norms, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance; in this paper we examine U.S. news media messages related to sexuality and HPV vaccination. Drawing on a structured analysis of 447 articles published during 2005-2009, we qualitatively analyzed a purposive sample of 49 articles discussing adolescent health behaviors related to HPV vaccination. Commonly, articles discussed vaccination in the context of abstinence-only versus comprehensive sexual health education; cited research findings to support vaccination or sex education; argued against connecting vaccination to promiscuous behavior; but included fear-inducing messages. Media messages concerning health behaviors related to HPV vaccination tended to support government and parental involvement in sex education, and dismiss concerns linking vaccination to sexual activity, while also presenting the vaccine as lifesaving. PMID:24439619

  7. Discussions of adolescent sexuality in news media coverage of the HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Dana M; Smith, Katherine C; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C

    2014-02-01

    Given the sexually transmitted nature of human papillomavirus (HPV), some worry the HPV vaccine will create a false sense of security and promote adolescent sexual activity. Media coverage of vaccines can influence social norms, parental attitudes, and vaccine acceptance; in this paper we examine U.S. news media messages related to sexuality and HPV vaccination. Drawing on a structured analysis of 447 articles published during 2005-2009, we qualitatively analyzed a purposive sample of 49 articles discussing adolescent health behaviors related to HPV vaccination. Commonly, articles discussed vaccination in the context of abstinence-only versus comprehensive sexual health education; cited research findings to support vaccination or sex education; argued against connecting vaccination to promiscuous behavior; but included fear-inducing messages. Media messages concerning health behaviors related to HPV vaccination tended to support government and parental involvement in sex education, and dismiss concerns linking vaccination to sexual activity, while also presenting the vaccine as lifesaving.

  8. Vaccine-related internet search activity predicts H1N1 and HPV vaccine coverage: implications for vaccine acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is a primary source for health-related information, and Internet search activity is associated with infectious disease outbreaks. The authors hypothesized that Internet search activity for vaccine-related information would predict vaccination coverage. They examined Internet search activity for H1N1 and human papilloma virus (HPV) disease and vaccine information in relation to H1N1 and HPV vaccine uptake. Google Insight for Search was used to assess the volume of Internet search queries for H1N1- and vaccine-related terms in the United States in 2009, the year of the H1N1 pandemic. Vaccine coverage data were also obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at the state level for H1N1 vaccinations in 2009. These same measures were collected at the state level for HPV- and vaccine-related search terms in 2010 as well as HPV vaccine uptake in that year. Analyses showed that the search terms H1N1 and vaccine were correlated with H1N1 vaccine uptake; ordinal regression found the H1N1 search term was independently associated with H1N1 vaccine coverage. Similarly, the correlation between vaccine search volume and HPV coverage was significant; ordinal regression showed the search term vaccine independently predicted HPV vaccination coverage. This is among the first studies to show that Internet search activity is associated with vaccination coverage. The Internet should be exploited as an opportunity to dispel vaccine misinformation by providing accurate information to support vaccine decision making.

  9. Knowledge, Awareness and Attitude on HPV, HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer among the College Students in India.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Shazia; Labani, Satyanarayana; Das, Bhudev C

    2016-01-01

    Infection of specific high risk Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is known to cause cervical cancer and two prophylactic vaccines have been developed against two major high risk HPV types 16 and 18 for prevention of cervical cancer. Because of societal, religious and ethical issues associated with the vaccination of adolescent girls in India together with lack of awareness about HPV and HPV vaccines, no successful HPV immunization program has been employed in India. To determine knowledge, awareness and attitude of college students on HPV, HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted in a total of 1580 undergraduate students between the age group 16-26 years comprising 684 girls and 876 boys. Out of a total of 1580 students, girls had more knowledge about cervical cancer (82.45%, p<0.001), HPV (45.61%, p<0.001) and HPV vaccines (44%, p<0.001) when compared to those in boys. However, knowledge about the types of HPV and vaccines was poor. Interestingly, students from biology-major had more knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer (81.89%, p<0.001) and HPV (46.58%, <0.001) when compared to non-biology students. Girls from both biology and non-biology group had higher awareness compared to boys. Analysis of odds ratio (ORs) along with 95% CI showed older girls with 1.2 to 3 fold (p<0.05) higher knowledge than boys. All students agreed that girls should get vaccinated against HPV (p<0.001). It is suggested that there is a need for educational intervention and awareness campaigns to augment HPV immunization program for control of cervical cancer in India.

  10. Knowledge, Awareness and Attitude on HPV, HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer among the College Students in India

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shazia; Labani, Satyanarayana; Das, Bhudev C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection of specific high risk Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is known to cause cervical cancer and two prophylactic vaccines have been developed against two major high risk HPV types 16 and 18 for prevention of cervical cancer. Because of societal, religious and ethical issues associated with the vaccination of adolescent girls in India together with lack of awareness about HPV and HPV vaccines, no successful HPV immunization program has been employed in India. Objective To determine knowledge, awareness and attitude of college students on HPV, HPV vaccine and cervical cancer. Method A questionnaire-based survey was conducted in a total of 1580 undergraduate students between the age group 16–26 years comprising 684 girls and 876 boys. Results Out of a total of 1580 students, girls had more knowledge about cervical cancer (82.45%, p<0.001), HPV (45.61%, p<0.001) and HPV vaccines (44%, p<0.001) when compared to those in boys. However, knowledge about the types of HPV and vaccines was poor. Interestingly, students from biology-major had more knowledge and awareness about cervical cancer (81.89%, p<0.001) and HPV (46.58%, <0.001) when compared to non-biology students. Girls from both biology and non-biology group had higher awareness compared to boys. Analysis of odds ratio (ORs) along with 95% CI showed older girls with 1.2 to 3 fold (p<0.05) higher knowledge than boys. All students agreed that girls should get vaccinated against HPV (p<0.001). Conclusion It is suggested that there is a need for educational intervention and awareness campaigns to augment HPV immunization program for control of cervical cancer in India. PMID:27861611

  11. A qualitative study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV vaccine among parents of immunosuppressed children.

    PubMed

    Seale, Holly; Trung, Linda; Mackie, Fiona E; Kennedy, Sean E; Boros, Christina; Marshall, Helen; Tidswell, Jane; Shaw, Peter J; Montgomery, Kay; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2012-11-19

    Barriers influencing the willingness of parents to vaccinate immunocompetent children include a lack of knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV) and low perception of risk regarding their child's acquisition of HPV infection. However, it cannot be assumed that the facilitators and barriers of HPV vaccination are the same for parents/guardians of children who are immunocompromised, or who have chronic medical conditions. This study aimed to document the knowledge and attitudes of parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children and adolescents towards HPV infection and the vaccine. A study using qualitative methods which incorporated 27 semi-structured interviews was undertaken with parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children vaccinated against HPV at three hospitals in two states of Australia. Thematic analysis revealed that while participants acknowledged that they had heard of HPV, they did not have a strong sense of what it actually was. The level of concern held about their child acquiring an HPV infection (prior to vaccination) ranged from 'not at all' to 'extremely'. Some believed that their child was at increased risk of developing a severe HPV-related illness because of their underlying condition. The participants supported their child receiving the HPV vaccine, as they did not want to take a risk with a disease that may cause their child to return to hospital for treatment. The majority had little apprehension about the use of the HPV vaccine but expressed some concern that potential adverse effects would be more severe for immunosuppressed children. However, they stressed their belief in the safety of the vaccine and their trust in the child's health team. Our study results show that parents of children with impaired immunity would benefit from further information about the safety of the vaccine and about the important role of the vaccine for boys as well as girls.

  12. [HPV-related cancer: should young men be vaccinated?].

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Assma; Mach, Nicolas

    2012-05-23

    HPV infection, a sexually transmissible disease, causes squamous cell carcinoma in a small fraction of infected individuals, years after exposure. Several cancers both in female and male, such as cervical cancer, anal carcinoma and up to 50% of oropharyngeal tumors are related to serotypes 16 and 18 of HPV. Several studies evaluating vaccination of young women before HPV exposure showed very good protection against cervical dysplasia and carcinoma in situ. Health authorities' guidelines now widely recommend vaccination of female between 11 and 14 years old. Results of recent trials also reveal good protective effect in men, raising the question of immunizing both young women and men. Important medical and socio-economic issues will need to be addressed before implementing such program.

  13. HPV vaccine acceptance among African-American mothers and their daughters: an inquiry grounded in culture.

    PubMed

    Galbraith-Gyan, Kayoll V; Lechuga, Julia; Jenerette, Coretta M; Palmer, Mary H; Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B

    2017-05-29

    Much of the research on African-Americans' HPV vaccine acceptance has largely focused on racial/ethnic differences related to cognitive, socio-economical, and structural factors that contribute to differences in HPV vaccine acceptance and completion. A growing body of literature suggest that cultural factors, such as mistrust of healthcare providers (HCPs) and the healthcare system, religion, and social norms related to appropriate sexual behaviors, also plays a prominent role in their HPV vaccine acceptance. However, these studies were limited in their use of theoretical approaches necessary to conceptualize and operationalize culture. To explore the influence of culture on African-American mothers' and daughters' HPV vaccine acceptance using the PEN-3, a culturally-centered conceptual framework. Grounded theory techniques were used to explore cultural factors that influenced the acceptance of the HPV vaccine among African-American mothers (n = 28) and their daughters (n = 34). Positive attitudes towards vaccination stemmed from beliefs that the HPV vaccine has cancer prevention benefits and that vaccinations in general protected against infectious diseases. Negative attitudes stemmed from beliefs that the HPV vaccine was too new, not effective, daughters were too young, and that vaccines were not a one-size-fits-all intervention. Majority of mothers and daughters indicated that their religious doctrine did not impede their HPV vaccination decisions. For a few mothers, religious beliefs could not be separated from their HPV vaccination decisions and ultimately deterred HPV vaccine acceptance. HCP recommendations were valued however mothers were often dissatisfied with the detail of information communicated. Support networks provided both positive and negative types of social support to mothers and daughters. The media highlighted the cancer prevention benefits of the HPV vaccine and unintentionally communicated negative information of the HPV vaccine

  14. Different population-level vaccination effectiveness for HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Marc; Van de Velde, Nicolas; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2011-02-01

    Given that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine types have different durations of infectiousness and infectivity, the population-level vaccine effectiveness of these types may differ even if vaccine efficacy is identical. To compare the type-specific effectiveness of vaccination against HPV types 16, 18, 6 and 11. An individual-based stochastic model of HPV transmission (18 HPV-types) in a population stratified by age, gender and sexual activity was developed. Multiple parameter sets were identified by fitting the model to sexual behaviour data and age- and type-specific HPV prevalence. Under base case assumptions (70% coverage, 99% vaccine efficacy per act and 20 years' duration of protection), vaccinating 12-year-old girls is predicted to reduce HPV-16, HPV-18 and HPV-6/11 prevalence by 61% (80% uncertainty interval (UI) 53-77), 92% (80% UI 65-100) and 100% (80% UI 97-100), respectively, 50 years after the start of the vaccination programme. Differences in type-specific vaccine effectiveness increased over time, and decreased with improved vaccine efficacy characteristics. For the same vaccine efficacy, the population-level impact of HPV vaccination will most likely be different, with HPV-16, the most oncogenic type, having the lowest effectiveness. These results should be taken into account when designing and interpreting post-vaccination surveillance studies.

  15. SUS users’ knowledge of and attitude to HPV virus and vaccines available in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Osis, Maria José Duarte; Duarte, Graciana Alves; de Sousa, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccines in men and women, users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, and the intention to get themselves and their teenage children vaccinated. METHODS A descriptive, cross-sectional study with 286 women (18-49 years old) and 252 men (18-60 years old), users of five primary health units and two polyclinics in Campinas, SP, Southeastern Brazil, was carried out. Participants were interviewed in 2011 using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and Poisson regression analysis were performed to identify variables associated with knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccines, and participants vaccination intentions. RESULTS Almost 40.0% of the participants reported having heard of HPV and 28.9% mentioned adequate information. The main information source was the media (41.7%). Only 8.6% of the participants had heard of the HPV vaccines. Once the participants were informed of the existence of HPV vaccines about 94% of them said they would get vaccinated and/or vaccinate their teenage children, if the vaccines were available in the public health system. Schooling of over 8 years and being female were the variables independently associated with having heard of HPV, the vaccines and having adequate knowledge of the virus. Advanced age was associated with having heard of HPV vaccines. There were no variables associated with the vaccination intentions. CONCLUSIONS These results reinforce the need for educational activities that provide the population with adequate information on HPV and preventive measures. PMID:24789645

  16. HPV Knowledge and Vaccine Acceptability among Hispanic Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornfeld, Julie; Byrne, Margaret M.; Vanderpool, Robin; Shin, Sarah; Kobetz, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and vaccine acceptability in a convenience sample of immigrant Hispanic men, many of whom are parents of adolescents. Data on 189 male callers were collected from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service Spanish-language call center. Most participants…

  17. HPV Knowledge and Vaccine Acceptability among Hispanic Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornfeld, Julie; Byrne, Margaret M.; Vanderpool, Robin; Shin, Sarah; Kobetz, Erin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and vaccine acceptability in a convenience sample of immigrant Hispanic men, many of whom are parents of adolescents. Data on 189 male callers were collected from the National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service Spanish-language call center. Most participants…

  18. Evaluation of a Radionovela to Promote HPV Vaccine Awareness and Knowledge Among Hispanic Parents

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Rodriguez, Hector P.; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic women have more than a 1.5-fold increased cervical cancer incidence and mortality compared to non-Hispanic white women in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control recommends the HPV vaccine for females at ages 11 and 12 years, though it is approved for females aged 9–26 to protect against the primary types of high-risk HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) that cause approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases. Few culturally-tailored Spanish HPV vaccine awareness programs have been developed. This study evaluates the efficacy of a Spanish radionovela as an educational tool. Rural Hispanic parents of daughters aged 9–17 (n = 88; 78 mothers and 10 fathers) were randomized to listen to the HPV vaccine radionovela or to another public service announcement. Participants completed a 30 min pretest posttest questionnaire. Parents who listened to the HPV radionovela (intervention group) scored higher on six knowledge and belief items. They were more likely to confirm that HPV is a common infection (70% vs. 48%, P = .002), to deny that women are able to detect HPV (53% vs. 31%, P = .003), to know vaccine age recommendations (87% vs. 68%, P = .003), and to confirm multiple doses (48% vs. 26%, P = .03) than control group parents. The HPV vaccine radionovela improved HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge and attitudes. Radionovela health education may be an efficacious strategy to increase HPV vaccine awareness among Hispanic parents. PMID:21452030

  19. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www.cdc. ...

  20. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www. cdc. ...

  1. HPV vaccine awareness and the association of trust in cancer information from physicians among males.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dexter L; Hernandez, Natalie D; Rollins, Latrice; Akintobi, Tabia Henry; McAllister, Calvin

    2017-05-09

    Black and Hispanic men are diagnosed with more HPV-related cancers and at later stages compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Physician communication with men about HPV vaccination may be beneficial to increasing HPV vaccinations and decreasing HPV transmission. The purpose of this study was to examine HPV and HPV vaccine awareness among men by race, and the association between trust in cancer information from physicians and ever hearing about HPV and the HPV vaccine. U.S. adult males (age 18+) were identified from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) (n=1203). Binomial logistic regression models assessed the influences of race/ethnicity and trust of cancer information from physicians on men having heard of HPV and the HPV vaccination. Approximately 50% of the sample had never heard of HPV and 53% had never heard of the vaccine. Black men were less likely to know that HPV is sexually transmitted compared to White and Hispanic men (p<0.001). Hispanic and Black men were less likely to have heard about the HPV vaccine when compared to White men (p<0.001). Additionally, Hispanic men were less likely to trust a doctor about cancer information compared to White and Black men (p<0.001). Findings highlight the lack of awareness about HPV among men. Furthermore, statistically significant racial/ethnic differences were found in HPV vaccine knowledge and trust in receiving cancer information from physicians. Future interventions should include community-based approaches and improved physicians' HPV-related communication to increase knowledge and uptake of the HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Vaccination: Awareness and Knowledge of HPV and Acceptability of HPV Vaccine among Mothers of Teenage Daughters in Weihai, Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xu, Minglei; Sun, Jiandong; Li, Ruiying; Li, Meilan; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Xu, Aiqiang

    2016-01-01

    In preparation for the introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, we investigated awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccine and potential acceptability to HPV vaccine among mothers with a teenage daughter in Weihai, Shandong, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2013 with a sample of 1850 mothers who had a daughter (aged 9-17 years) attending primary, junior and senior high schools. In the final sample (N = 1578, response rate 85.30%), awareness of HPV was reported by 305 (19.32%) mothers. Awareness varied significantly by daughter's age (P<0.01), mother's education level (P<0.01), mother's occupation (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and residence type (P<0.01). Knowledge about HPV/HPV vaccine was poor with a mean total score of 3.56 (SD = 2.40) out of a possible score of 13. Mothers with a higher education level reported higher levels of knowledge (P = 0.02). Slightly more than one-fourth (26.49%) of mothers expressed their potential acceptability of HPV vaccine for their daughters. Acceptability increased along with increased daughters' age (P<0.01), household income (P<0.01) and knowledge level (P<0.01). House wives and unemployed mothers had the highest acceptability (P<0.01). The most common reasons for not accepting HPV vaccination were "My daughter is too young to have risk of cervical cancer (30.95%)", "The vaccine has not been widely used, and the decision will be made after it is widely used (24.91%)", "Worry about the safety of the vaccine (22.85%)". Awareness and knowledge of HPV/HPV vaccines are poor and HPV vaccine acceptability is low among these Chinese mothers. These results may help inform appropriate health education programs in this population.

  3. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines (HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck & Co., Inc.) differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo post-vaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed (HPV-010 [NCT00423046]). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0-16.7%) versus the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0-5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA. HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio [GMR] =2.0; p=0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR=2.6; p=0.0092]), as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p=0.0009; HPV-45, p=0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection.

  4. Sexual healthcare professionals' views on HPV vaccination for men in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Nadarzynski, Tom; Smith, Helen E; Richardson, Daniel; Ford, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Carrie D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for men could prevent anal cancers amongst men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: An e-survey of attitudes towards vaccination for men in the UK was conducted in July–August 2014. Results: Among 325 sexual health professionals, 14% were already vaccinating men against HPV, 83% recommended gender-neutral HPV vaccination and 65% recommended targeting MSM. Over 50% reported having poor knowledge about the use of HPV vaccine for MSM and the skills to identify MSM likely to benefit from HPV vaccination. Conclusions: Clear advice and guidelines on HPV vaccine use for men at sexual health clinics are required to ensure equitable opportunities for vaccination. PMID:26575602

  5. Biopower, Normalization, and HPV: A Foucauldian Analysis of the HPV Vaccine Controversy.

    PubMed

    Engels, Kimberly S

    2016-09-01

    This article utilizes the Foucauldian concepts of biopower and normalization to give an analysis of the debate surrounding the controversial administration of the HPV vaccine to adolescents. My intention is not to solve the problem, rather to utilize a Foucauldian framework to bring various facets of the issue to light, specifically the way the vaccine contributes to strategies of power in reference to how young adults develop within relationships of power. To begin, the article provides an overview of the Foucauldian concepts of biopower and normalization, including how these two strategies of power were present in the administration of the smallpox vaccine in the 19th century. Next, information about HPV and the history of the current controversy in the United States is presented. Lastly, the article presents an analysis of the strategies of biopower and normalization present in the debate on HPV, including an emphasis on how the vaccination is similar to, and different from, 19th century smallpox vaccination. It also explores the way that mechanisms of disease control affect and are affected by individual subjects, in this case, adolescents.

  6. Efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine of porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Fostera™ PCV MH) under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Jeong, Jiwoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-04

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine (Fostera™ PCV MH, Zoetis) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in growing pigs under experimental conditions. A total of 80 pigs were randomly divided into 8 groups (10 pigs per group). The pigs were administered the bivalent vaccine intramuscularly as a 2.0 mL dose at 21 days of age based on the manufacturer's instructions. Three weeks after vaccination, the pigs were inoculated with either PCV2 (intranasal route) or M. hyopneumoniae (intratracheal route) or both. Regardless of the type of inoculation, vaccinated pigs after challenge exhibited effective reduction of clinical signs, PCV2 viremia levels and mycoplasma nasal shedding, and lung and lymphoid lesion when compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Vaccinated challenged pigs had significantly higher (P<0.05) levels of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies, and numbers of PCV2-and M. hyopneumoniae-specific interferon-γ secreting cells compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. This study demonstrates that the bivalent vaccine is able to protect pigs against either PCV2 or M. hyopneumoniae infection or both based on clinical, microbiological, immunological, and pathological evaluation.

  7. HPV Vaccine Acceptance in a Clinic-Based Sample of Women in the Rural South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Heather M.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; McCree, Donna H.; Wright, Marcie S.; Davis, Jennifer; Hutto, Brent E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common sexually transmitted infection linked to cervical disease. Vaccines for some types of HPV were in development at the time of the study. Purpose: The study examined HPV vaccine acceptability among underserved women in a rural region of the southeastern U.S. with high rates of cervical cancer…

  8. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ross L; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Pan, Jiafeng; Love, John; Cuschieri, Kate; Robertson, Chris; Ahmed, Syed; Palmer, Timothy; Pollock, Kevin G J

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program using a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18 was implemented in Scotland along with a national surveillance program designed to determine the longitudinal effects of vaccination on HPV infection at the population level. Each year during 2009-2013, the surveillance program conducted HPV testing on a proportion of liquid-based cytology samples from women undergoing their first cervical screening test for precancerous cervical disease. By linking vaccination, cervical screening, and HPV testing data, over the study period we found a decline in HPV types 16 and 18, significant decreases in HPV types 31, 33, and 45 (suggesting cross-protection), and a nonsignificant increase in HPV 51. In addition, among nonvaccinated women, HPV types 16 and 18 infections were significantly lower in 2013 than in 2009. Our results preliminarily indicate herd immunity and sustained effectiveness of the bivalent vaccine on virologic outcomes at the population level.

  9. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kimberley; Pan, Jiafeng; Love, John; Cuschieri, Kate; Robertson, Chris; Ahmed, Syed; Palmer, Timothy; Pollock, Kevin G.J.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program using a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18 was implemented in Scotland along with a national surveillance program designed to determine the longitudinal effects of vaccination on HPV infection at the population level. Each year during 2009–2013, the surveillance program conducted HPV testing on a proportion of liquid-based cytology samples from women undergoing their first cervical screening test for precancerous cervical disease. By linking vaccination, cervical screening, and HPV testing data, over the study period we found a decline in HPV types 16 and 18, significant decreases in HPV types 31, 33, and 45 (suggesting cross-protection), and a nonsignificant increase in HPV 51. In addition, among nonvaccinated women, HPV types 16 and 18 infections were significantly lower in 2013 than in 2009. Our results preliminarily indicate herd immunity and sustained effectiveness of the bivalent vaccine on virologic outcomes at the population level. PMID:26692336

  10. Adolescents' intention and self-efficacy to follow Pap testing recommendations after receiving the HPV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Lisa M; Dirksing, Kelsie N; Ding, Lili; Morrow, Charlene D; Widdice, Lea A; Kahn, Jessica A

    2016-06-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are recommended in the US for girls and women 11-26 y of age. Because these vaccines do not prevent all cervical cancers, Papanicolaou (Pap) screening is still recommended after vaccination. Young women who have been vaccinated may perceive themselves at lower risk for HPV infection and cervical cancer, which could lead to lower intention and self-efficacy to follow cervical cancer screening guidelines, and subsequent nonadherence to Pap testing. The aim of this study was to examine whether perceived risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) after vaccination and other factors are associated with adolescents' intention and self-efficacy to get Pap testing after HPV vaccination. Women 13-21 y of age (N = 339) receiving their first HPV vaccine dose completed a survey. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations between perceived risk of HPV and intention/self-efficacy to get a Pap test while adjusting for other factors. Approximately half of participants reported high intention and half reported high self-efficacy to get a Pap test. Factors significantly associated with high intention were Pap testing history and knowledge about HPV/HPV vaccines; factors significantly associated with high self-efficacy included insurance plan, Pap testing history, communication with clinician about needing a Pap test after vaccination, lifetime number of male sexual partners, and recent smoking. In conclusion, educating adolescents about HPV/HPV vaccines and the need for Pap testing may increase self-efficacy/intention to get a Pap test after vaccination.

  11. Women have a preference for their male partner to be HPV vaccinated.

    PubMed

    Harper, Diane Medved; Alexander, Natalie Marya; Ahern, Debra Ann; Comes, Johanna Claire; Smith, Melissa Smith; Heutinck, Melinda Ann; Handley, Sandra Martin

    2014-01-01

    Peer influence and social networking can change female adolescent and young adult behavior. Peer influence on preferences for male human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has not been documented. The primary aim of this study was to determine if women had preferences about male sexual partner HPV vaccination receipt. A prospective survey of women 18-26 years of age was conducted at an urban university student health clinic. Education about the two HPV vaccines, cervical cancer and genital warts was provided. Women self-reported their demographic and medical history data, as well as their own preferences for HPV vaccine and their preferences for their male partner HPV vaccine using a 5 point Likert scale. 601 women, mean age of 21.5 years (SD 2.4), participated between 2011 and 2012. Nearly 95% of respondents were heterosexual; condoms and contraceptives were used in over half of the population. Regardless of the woman's vaccination status, women had significantly higher (strongly agree/agree) preferences for the male partner being vaccinated with HPV4 than not caring if he was vaccinated (63.6% vs. 13.1%, p<0.001). This preference was repeated for sexual risk factors and past reproductive medical history. Women who received HPV4 compared to those choosing HPV2 had a significantly lower proportion of preferences for not caring if the male partner was vaccinated (13% vs. 22%, p = 0.015). Women preferred a HPV vaccinated male partner. Peer messaging might change the male HPV vaccination uptake.

  12. Beliefs, behaviors and HPV vaccine: correcting the myths and the misinformation.

    PubMed

    Zimet, Gregory D; Rosberger, Zeev; Fisher, William A; Perez, Samara; Stupiansky, Nathan W

    2013-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake in many countries has been sub-optimal. We examine several issues associated with non-vaccination that have received particular attention, including fears about sexual risk compensation, concerns about vaccine safety, inadequate vaccination recommendations by health care providers (HCPs), and distrust due to the perceived "newness" of HPV vaccines. Selective review of behavioral and social science literature on HPV vaccine attitudes and uptake. There is no evidence of post-vaccination sexual risk compensation, HPV vaccines are quite safe, and they can no longer be considered "new". Nonetheless, research findings point to these issues and, most importantly, to the failure of HCPs to adequately recommend HPV vaccine as major drivers of non-vaccination. Most fears related to HPV vaccine are more related to myth than reality. In the absence of major health policy initiatives, such as those implemented in Canada, the U.K., and Australia, a multi-level, multi-faceted approach will be required to achieve high rates of HPV vaccination. It will be essential to focus on the education of HCPs regarding indications for HPV vaccination and approaches to communicating most effectively with parents and patients about the safety and benefits of vaccination and the risks associated with non-vaccination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes, practices and willingness to vaccinate in preparation for the introduction of HPV vaccines in Bamako, Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tounkara, Karamoko; Rochas, Mali; Beseme, Sarah; Yekta, Shahla; Diallo, Fanta Siby; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Teguete, Ibrahima; Koita, Ousmane A.

    2017-01-01

    Although screening for pre-cancerous cervical lesions and human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination are accepted and effective means to prevent cervical cancer, women in Mali have limited access to these interventions. In addition, cervical cancer prevention by HPV vaccination has been controversial in some settings. To reduce cervical cancer prevalence and increase HPV vaccine uptake, it is important to understand the level of knowledge about cervical cancer screening and practices related to vaccination in at-risk populations. In this study, the level of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer and attitudes towards vaccination were assessed among 301 participants (male and female, adults and adolescents) in a house-to-house survey in two urban neighborhoods in Bamako, Mali. The survey was combined with a brief educational session on HPV. Prior to the education session, overall knowledge of HPV infection and cervical cancer was very low: only 8% knew that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Less than 20% of women had ever consulted a gynecologist and less than 3% had ever had cervical cancer screening. After hearing a description of HPV vaccine, more than 80% would accept HPV vaccination; fathers and husbands were identified as primary decisions makers and local clinics or the home as preferred sites for vaccination. This study provides information on STI knowledge and vaccine acceptance in Bamako, Mali in 2012, prior to the introduction of HPV vaccination. PMID:28192460

  14. Giving Boys a Shot: The HPV Vaccine's Portrayal in Canadian Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Samara; Fedoruk, Claire; Shapiro, Gilla K; Rosberger, Zeev

    2016-12-01

    In January 2012, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) of Canada recommended that males aged 9-26 years receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to protect against genital warts and HPV-associated cancers. Estimated HPV vaccine uptake rates for Canadian males are extremely low. Using a content analysis of Canadian newspaper articles, this study investigated what information about the HPV vaccine was relayed to the public, and how this content was portrayed following the 2012 male HPV vaccine recommendation. A search was conducted using Proquest Canadian Newsstand Complete for newspaper articles published between January 1, 2012, and September 1, 2014. Researchers coded 232 articles on several relevant dimensions: article information; epidemiological information; public policy information; article topic; article and title tone; and informant testimony. The majority of articles (93%) mentioned that girls are eligible for the HPV vaccine, whereas only half (49%) mentioned male eligibility. While most articles associated HPV with cervical cancer (85%), fewer indicated its relation to other HPV-associated cancers (59%) or genital warts (52%). Most articles (60%) were positive or neutral (22%) in tone toward the HPV vaccine, while few had mixed messages (11%) or were negative (6%). Less than 5% of articles reported on issues of morality, suggesting that fears that the HPV vaccine causes promiscuity have largely subsided. Notably, article tone toward male vaccination became progressively more positive over time. However, half of the articles did not mention the vaccine's approval for males, and articles tended to report HPV's relation to cervical cancer over other HPV-associated cancers. The Canadian public may thus be unaware of male eligibility and the importance of HPV vaccine for males. The collaboration of researchers, health care providers, and policymakers with journalists is critical in order to disseminate complete and accurate HPV and HPV

  15. Substantial Decline in Vaccine-Type Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Among Vaccinated Young Women During the First 8 Years After HPV Vaccine Introduction in a Community.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jessica A; Widdice, Lea E; Ding, Lili; Huang, Bin; Brown, Darron R; Franco, Eduardo L; Bernstein, David I

    2016-11-15

     Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine effectiveness and herd protection are not well established in community settings. Our objective was to determine trends in vaccine-type HPV in young women during the 8 years after vaccine introduction, to assess changes in HPV prevalence and characterize herd protection in a community.  We recruited 3 samples of sexually experienced, 13-26-year-old adolescent girls and young women (hereafter women; N = 1180) from 2006-2014: before widespread vaccine introduction (wave 1) and 3 (wave 2) and 7 (wave 3) years after vaccine introduction. We determined the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV (HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18) among all, vaccinated, and unvaccinated women at waves 1, 2, and 3, adjusted for differences in participant characteristics, then examined whether changes in HPV prevalence were significant using inverse propensity score-weighted logistic regression.  Vaccination rates increased from 0% to 71.3% across the 3 waves. Adjusted vaccine-type HPV prevalence changed from 34.8% to 8.7% (75.0% decline) in all women, from 34.9% to 3.2% (90.8% decline) in vaccinated women, and from 32.5% to 22.0% (32.3% decline) in unvaccinated women. Among vaccinated participants, vaccine-type HPV prevalence decreased significantly from wave 1 to wave 2 (adjusted odds ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .13-.34) and from wave 1 to wave 3 (0.06; .03-.13). The same decreases were also significant among unvaccinated participants (adjusted odds ratios, 0.44; [95% confidence interval, .27-.71] and 0.59; [.35-.98], respectively).  The prevalence of vaccine-type HPV decreased >90% in vaccinated women, demonstrating high effectiveness in a community setting, and >30% in unvaccinated women, providing evidence of herd protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18–45 years

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines [HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck and Co., Inc.,] differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo postvaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed [HPV-010 (NCT00423046)]. Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA ) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0–16.7%) vs. the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0–5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA . HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine {HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio (GMR) = 2.0; p = 0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR = 2.6; p = 0.0092]}, as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p = 0.0009; HPV-45, p = 0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection. PMID:22048172

  17. Nationwide Survey of Knowledge and Health Beliefs regarding Human Papillomavirus among HPV-Vaccinated Female Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Li Ping; Raja Muhammad Yusoff, Raja Nur Amalina; Edib, Zobaida; Sam, I-Ching; Zimet, Gregory D

    The National HPV Immunization Programme, which offers free human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines to teenaged female students, was launched in Malaysia in 2010. HPV vaccination paired with adequate knowledge about HPV infection provides the best protection against cervical cancer. To identify the level of knowledge and the health beliefs towards HPV and the HPV vaccine among HPV-vaccinated female students in Malaysia. A nationwide cross-sectional survey among 14 years old female students who had received three doses of the HPV vaccine was conducted in 32 randomly selected schools from 13 states and 3 federal territories in Malaysia between February 2013 and April 2013. Among 2482 respondents, knowledge about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine was extremely poor. The mean total knowledge score was only 3.56 (SD ± 1.76), out of a possible score of 10. The majority of respondents were unaware that vaccinating boys with HPV can help protect girls against HPV infection (91.6%), HPV cannot be cured (81.6%) and that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection (70.3%). Most of the respondents had the misconception that only females get HPV (95.1%), and that the HPV vaccine eliminates the need for Pap smear tests (68.3%). Most respondents (91.6%) believed that they would not get an HPV infection. Almost half of the respondents (42.9%) held the misconception that HPV infection could not lead to serious illness. Findings revealed poor knowledge about both HPV and the HPV vaccine, low perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and misinformation about HPV infection among HPV-vaccinated girls. Therefore, it is essential to increase the knowledge and awareness of health risks regarding HPV infection among teenaged girls who have received the HPV vaccine.

  18. Nationwide Survey of Knowledge and Health Beliefs regarding Human Papillomavirus among HPV-Vaccinated Female Students in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Li Ping; Raja Muhammad Yusoff, Raja Nur Amalina; Edib, Zobaida; Sam, I-Ching; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The National HPV Immunization Programme, which offers free human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines to teenaged female students, was launched in Malaysia in 2010. HPV vaccination paired with adequate knowledge about HPV infection provides the best protection against cervical cancer. To identify the level of knowledge and the health beliefs towards HPV and the HPV vaccine among HPV-vaccinated female students in Malaysia. A nationwide cross-sectional survey among 14 years old female students who had received three doses of the HPV vaccine was conducted in 32 randomly selected schools from 13 states and 3 federal territories in Malaysia between February 2013 and April 2013. Among 2482 respondents, knowledge about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine was extremely poor. The mean total knowledge score was only 3.56 (SD ± 1.76), out of a possible score of 10. The majority of respondents were unaware that vaccinating boys with HPV can help protect girls against HPV infection (91.6%), HPV cannot be cured (81.6%) and that HPV is a sexually transmitted infection (70.3%). Most of the respondents had the misconception that only females get HPV (95.1%), and that the HPV vaccine eliminates the need for Pap smear tests (68.3%). Most respondents (91.6%) believed that they would not get an HPV infection. Almost half of the respondents (42.9%) held the misconception that HPV infection could not lead to serious illness. Findings revealed poor knowledge about both HPV and the HPV vaccine, low perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and misinformation about HPV infection among HPV-vaccinated girls. Therefore, it is essential to increase the knowledge and awareness of health risks regarding HPV infection among teenaged girls who have received the HPV vaccine. PMID:27656876

  19. The school nurse, the school and HPV vaccination: a qualitative study of factors affecting HPV vaccine uptake.

    PubMed

    Brabin, Loretta; Stretch, Rebecca; Roberts, Stephen A; Elton, Peter; Baxter, David; McCann, Rosemary

    2011-04-12

    School nurses in the United Kingdom are largely responsible for delivering the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to 12-13 year old girls. In order to assess the impact of HPV vaccination on school nurses' roles, we gave a questionnaire to all 33 school nurses who offered Cervarix ™ in two Primary Care Trusts one year ahead of the national vaccine programme. Key organisational issues raised by the school nurses were the size of the team and its skill mix. A few found their schools uncooperative and were dissatisfied with mechanisms for problem resolution. On average, nurses spent an additional 69 h (0.80 h per child) on vaccine-related activities. In semi-qualitative interviews (n=17), school nurses complained of work overload and described the difficulties of establishing good relationships with some of their schools. Nurses expected schools to take some responsibility for ensuring good uptake and were frustrated when help was not forthcoming. We conclude that variation in uptake between schools in part reflects a difficult relationship with the school nurse which may be attributed to characteristics of the school, schools' attitudes towards health interventions, organisational problems, multiple school nurse roles and/or personal ability. Some of these issues will need to be addressed to ensure continued high vaccine coverage as HPV vaccination becomes a less prioritised, routine activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. "Is It Like One of Those Infectious Kind of Things?" The Importance of Educating Young People about HPV and HPV Vaccination at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Cristyn; Skinner, Susan Rachel; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen Siobhan; Collins, Joanne; Jones, Jane; Hutton, Heidi; Parrella, Adria