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Sample records for bk virus nephropathy

  1. BK Virus Nephropathy in Heart Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alin; Pilichowska, Monika; Boucher, Helen; Kiernan, Michael; DeNofrio, David; Inker, Lesley A

    2015-06-01

    Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) has become an important cause of kidney failure in kidney transplant recipients. PVAN is reported to affect 1% to 7% of kidney transplant recipients, leading to premature transplant loss in approximately 30% to 50% of diagnosed cases. PVAN occurring in the native kidneys of solid-organ transplant recipients other than kidney only recently has been noted. We report 2 cases of PVAN in heart transplant recipients, which brings the total of reported cases to 7. We briefly review the literature on the hypothesized causes of PVAN in kidney transplant recipients and comment on whether these same mechanisms also may cause PVAN in other solid-organ transplant recipients. PVAN should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating worsening kidney function. BK viremia surveillance studies of nonkidney solid-organ recipients should be conducted to provide data to assist the transplantation community in deciding whether regular monitoring of nonkidney transplant recipients for BK viremia is indicated.

  2. [BK virus nephropathy after renal transplantation. Diagnosis and prognosis by real time PCR].

    PubMed

    Echavarría, Marcela; Basilotta, Natalia; Aguiar, Ana; Davalos, Mario; Ricarte, Carmen; Iotti, Alejandro; Carballal, Guadalupe

    2007-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy may lead to kidney transplant failure. BK infection and acute rejection are clinically undistinguishable, therefore diagnosis of these entities is critical to establish the correct treatment. The new molecular methods using PCR and real time PCR have significantly contributed to the rapid and sensitive diagnosis of BK virus. Furthermore, viral load determination in-plasma has significantly been associated with BK virus nephropathy. Definite diagnosis of nephropathy requires renal biopsy, although due to the multifocal nature of the disease sensitivity may be less than 100%. BK detection in blood and urine by PCR has contributed to the diagnosis of nephropathy in a more standardized and less invasive way. Recently, quantification of BK virus in plasma has been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease. In the present study, we describe the validation of a real time PCR method for BK virus detection in plasma and urine and its application for diagnosis and monitoring in a renal transplant patient with nephropathy.

  3. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  4. BIOPSY-PROVEN BK VIRUS NEPHROPATHY WITHOUT DETECTABLE BK VIREMIA IN A ONE-YEAR POST-KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT.

    PubMed

    Ruangkanchanasetr, Prajej; Pumchandh, Norawee; Satirapoj, Bancha; Termmathurapoj, Sumeth; Pongthanapisith, Viroj

    2015-07-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) is an important clinical problem in kidney transplant (KT) recipients. The sequence of disease is usually viruria, viremia and then nephropathy. Diagnosis of BK virus (BKV) infection includes checking BKV DNA in the urine, in the plasma and histology on renal biopsy. This last method is used to diagnose BKVN. We describe a KT patient with BKVN without detectable BK viremia. A 62-year-old female with hypertensive nephropathy underwent renal transplant from a living relative donor in December 2011. Fourteen months after transplantation, her serum creatinine(SCr) rose up from 1.2 to 1.6 mg/dl with biopsy-proven acute antibody-mediated and cellular rejection. After pulse methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin, her SCr decreased to baseline but she subsequently developed cytomegalovirus infection with pancytopenia and transaminitis. The SCr rose to 1.9 mg/dl despite ganciclovir treatment. Renal ultrasound and antegrade pyelogram showed partial obstruction of the proximal ureter with moderate hydronephrosis. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for BKV DNA was negative (less than 10 copies/ml). A renal biopsy was performed and the pathology revealed viral cytopathic changes in the tubular epithelium with interstitial inflammation. The renal biopsy also showed BKV nucleic acid sequences by in-situ hybridization confirming BKVN. Immunosuppression regimen was changed to cyclosporine, low-dose prednisolone and leflunomide. A temporary percutaneous nephrostomy was performed. Her renal function improved within one week. The diagnosis of BKVN should be considered in a KT recipient with a rising SCr with or without BK viremia and should be made by renal biopsy.

  5. A simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipient with IgA nephropathy limited to native kidneys and BK virus nephropathy limited to the transplant kidney.

    PubMed

    Ujire, Manasa P; Curry, Michael P; Stillman, Isaac E; Hanto, Douglas W; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition in the native kidneys of patients with liver disease is well described. Secondary IgA nephropathy usually is thought to be benign, but hematuria, proteinuria, and loss of kidney function have been reported in this context. BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney transplant loss; however, BK virus nephropathy is rare in the native kidneys of patients who underwent transplantation of other organs. We report the case of a patient with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease and chronic kidney disease with hematuria who underwent simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. His kidney function decreased over the course of several weeks posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplant kidney showed BK virus nephropathy, but no IgA deposits. In contrast, biopsy of the native kidneys showed IgA deposits, but no BK virus nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation wherein both the native and transplant kidneys were biopsied posttransplantation and showed exclusively different pathologies. These findings confirm the predilection of BK virus nephropathy for transplant rather than native kidneys.

  6. A Preliminary Study Into the Significance of Intrarenal Reflux in BK Virus Nephropathy After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Kunio; Honda, Kazuho; Koike, Junki; Hattori, Motoshi; Fuchinoue, Shouhei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Oda, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Background The BK virus typically colonizes the lower urinary tract and is the causative agent in BK virus nephropathy (BKVN), which can progress to allograft dysfunction and graft loss. Urinary reflux in kidney allografts is induced by vesicoureteral reflux or disturbances in intrarenal reflux (IRR), believed to be associated with BKVN. This study was designed to elucidate the relationship between BKVN and IRR. Methods We examined 30 renal transplant recipients histologically diagnosed with BKVN using anti-Simian virus 40 immunohistochemistry and 60 clinically matched control recipients. The BKVN patients were divided into stable (n = 12) and progressive (n = 18) groups according to allograft kidney function 1 year after diagnosis. Histological rejection scores according to the pathological classification of rejection in renal allografts (Banff classification), histological BKVN stages, and histological polyomavirus load levels (pvl) proposed by the Banff working group were evaluated. The IRR was quantified by histological reflux scores defined with retention and reflux of immunostained Tamm-Horsfall protein in renal tubules and glomeruli. Results Higher reflux scores were observed in the BKVN group compared with that in the control group. No differences in clinical parameters were observed between the BKVN and control groups. Reflux scores and pvl were significantly higher in the progressive group than in the stable BKVN group with no significant difference in BK stage observed between groups. Reflux scores were found to be significantly correlated with pvl. Conclusions Our preliminary study suggested that IRR might be a predisposing and prognostic factor in BKVN. PMID:27500256

  7. BK virus-specific immunity kinetics: a predictor of recovery from polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, T; Müller, K; Stein, M; Diezemann, C; Sefrin, A; Babel, N; Reinke, P

    2011-11-01

    Impaired BKV-specific immunity is associated with development of BKV-associated nephropathy. Suitable immunological parameters to identify patients at risk, however, are still debated. We monitored 18 kidney-transplant recipients through the course of self-limited BKV-reactivation (n = 11) and BKV-associated nephropathy (n = 7). BKV-specific cellular immunity directed to nonstructural small and Large T-antigen, and structural VP1-3 was analyzed in an interferon-γ Elispot assay. BKV-specific IgM and IgG were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay simultaneously. BKV-specific cellular immunity directed to five BKV-proteins increased significantly from diagnosis to resolution of BKV-reactivation (p < 0.001). Patients with self-limited BKV-reactivation developed BKV-specific T cells without therapeutic interventions, and cleared BKV-reactivation within a median period of 1 month. Patients with BKV-associated nephropathy, however, showed BKV-specific T cells after a median period of 5 months after therapeutic interventions only, and cleared BKV-reactivation after a median period of 8 months. Anti-structural T cells were detected earlier than anti-nonstructural T cells, which coincided with BKV-clearance. Patients with BKV-associated nephropathy showed the highest frequencies of BKV-specific T cells at recovery, the highest increase in BKV-specific IgG and persistence of increased IgM levels (p < 0.05). Our results suggest prognostic values of BKV-specific immune monitoring to identify those patients at risk of BKV-associated nephropathy and to aid in the management of therapeutic interventions.

  8. BK Virus Nephropathy in Kidney Transplantation: An Approach Proposal and Update on Risk Factors, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, S; Escobar-Serna, D P; Suarez, O; Benavides, X; Escobar-Serna, J F; Lozano, E

    2015-01-01

    BK virus belongs to Polyomaviridae family; it causes 95% of nephropathy cases related to polyomavirus, with the other 5% caused by JC virus. Nephropathy jeopardizes graft function, causing a premature failure of the graft in 1%-10% of patients with kidney transplants. Nowadays, antiviral effective treatment is unknown, which is why blood and urine screening of renal transplantation patients has become the most important recommendation to guide the decrease of immunosuppression, and the only proven method to decrease poor outcomes. Different interventions, such as cidofovir, leflunomide, fluoroquinolones, and intravenous immunoglobulin, have been attempted with no improvement at all. This review aims to summarize the most relevant features of BK virus, historical issues, transmission mechanisms, risk factors, and therapeutic interventions.

  9. Serum antibodies to papova viruses (BK and SV 40) in subjects from the area with Balkan endemic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Iosipenco, M; Nastac, E; Melencu, M

    1983-01-01

    The presence of antibodies to BK virus and SV40 was investigated in 63 patients with Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and in 83 apparently healthy subjects from the endemic area. Serum antibodies to BK virus were detected in 95.2% of the former and in 74.7% of the latter, high antibody levels being prevalent in the age groups 41-60 years. Antibodies to SV40 were absent in the BEN patients and their frequency in the healthy subjects (27.7%) was much lower than that previously recorded in healthy persons from other zones of Romania (40%). The results obtained plead for a prevalence of BK virus infection in the endemic area with BEN.

  10. Clearance of BK Virus Nephropathy by Combination Antiviral Therapy With Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Kable, Kathy; Davies, Carmen D.; O'connell, Philip J.; Chapman, Jeremy R.; Nankivell, Brian John

    2017-01-01

    Background Reactivation of BK polyoma virus causes a destructive virus allograft nephropathy (BKVAN) with graft loss in 46%. Treatment options are limited to reduced immunosuppression and largely ineffective antiviral agents. Some studies suggest benefit from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Methods We evaluated effectiveness of adjuvant IVIG to eliminate virus from blood and tissue, in a retrospective, single-center cohort study, against standard-of-care controls. Both groups underwent reduced immunosuppression; conversion of tacrolimus to cyclosporine; and mycophenolate to leflunomide, oral ciprofloxacin, and intravenous cidofovir. Results Biopsy-proven BKVAN occurred in 50 kidneys at 7 (median interquartile range, 3-12) months after transplantation, predominantly as histological stage B (92%), diagnosed following by dysfunction in 46%, screening viremia in 20%, and protocol biopsy in 34%. After treatment, mean viral loads fell from 1581 ± 4220 × 103 copies at diagnosis to 1434 ± 70 639 midtreatment, and 0.138 ± 0.331 after 3 months (P < 0.001). IVIG at 1.01 ± 0.18 g/kg was given to 22 (44%) patients. The IVIG group more effectively cleared viremia (hazard ratio, 3.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-8.68; P = 0.003) and BK immunohistochemistry from repeated tissue sampling (hazard ratio, 2.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.58; P = 0.028), and resulted in faster (11.3 ± 10.4 months vs 29.1 ± 31.8 months, P = 0.015) and more complete resolution of viremia (33.3% vs 77.3%, P = 0.044). Numerically, fewer graft losses occurred with IVIG (27.3% vs 53.6% for control, P = 0.06), although graft and patient survivals were not statistically different. Acute renal dysfunction requiring pulse corticosteroid was common (59.1% vs 78.6%, P = 0.09), respectively, after immunosuppression reduction. Conclusions Combination treatment incorporating adjuvant IVIG was more effective eliminating virus from BKVAN, compared with conventional therapy. Validation by multicenter

  11. Impact of combined acute rejection on BK virus-associated nephropathy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jung; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Koo, Tai Yeon; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Han, Miyeun; Jeon, Hee Jung; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-12-01

    BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN) is one of the major causes of allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant (KT) patients. We compared BKVAN combined with acute rejection (BKVAN/AR) with BKVAN alone in KT patients. We retrospectively analyzed biopsy-proven BKVAN in KT patients from 2000 to 2011 at Seoul National University Hospital. Among 414 biopsies from 951 patients, biopsy-proven BKVAN was found in 14 patients. Nine patients had BKVAN alone, while 5 patients had both BKVAN and acute cellular rejection. BKVAN in the BKVAN alone group was detected later than in BKVAN/AR group (21.77 vs 6.39 months after transplantation, P=0.03). Serum creatinine at diagnosis was similar (2.09 vs 2.00 mg/dL). Histological grade was more advanced in the BKVAN/AR group (P=0.034). Serum load of BKV, dose of immunosuppressants, and tacrolimus level showed a higher tendency in the BKVAN alone group; however it was not statistically significant. After anti-rejection therapy, immunosuppression was reduced in the BKVAN/AR group. Renal functional deterioration over 1 yr after BKVAN diagnosis was similar between the two groups (P=0.665). These findings suggest that the prognosis of BKVAN/AR after anti-rejection therapy followed by anti-BKV therapy might be similar to that of BKVAN alone after anti-BKV therapy.

  12. Combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus for treatment of BK virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jaw, Juli; Hill, Prue; Goodman, David

    2017-04-01

    BK nephropathy (BKN) is a common cause of graft dysfunction following kidney transplantation. Minimization of immunosuppressive therapy remains the first line of therapy, but this may lead to rejection and graft loss. In some cases, despite lowering immunosuppression, BK infection can persist, leading to chronic damage and kidney failure. Currently, there is no specific anti-BK viral therapy. Recent in vitro experiments have demonstrated a reduction in BK viral replication when infected cells are treated with the combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus. This study aims to explore the effect of this drugs combination on viral clearance and graft function in patients with persistent disease despite reduction in immunosuppression. We treated three patients with combination Leflunomide and Everolimus. Data on medical history, biochemical parameters and viral loads were collected. Significant improvement in viral loads was observed in two cases with resolution of viremia in another (Table 1). Two recipients had preserved allograft function. The remaining graft was lost because of combination of obstruction and BKN. No adverse reactions such as bone marrow toxicity were observed. Combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus is safe and should be considered as a rescue therapy in treatment of BKN, especially in those who fail to clear this infection despite reduction of immunosuppressive therapy.

  13. Severe antibody-mediated rejection following IVIG infusion in a kidney transplant recipient with BK-virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mainra, R; Xu, Q; Chibbar, R; Hassan, A; Shoker, A

    2013-06-01

    Intravenous immune-globulin (IVIG) use in renal transplantation has increased, with common uses including desensitization, treatment of antibody mediated rejection and adjunctive therapy for BK virus nephropathy. Although considered generally safe, potential side effects can occur in up to 23% of patients including acute kidney injury. We present a case of an unexpected cause of acute kidney injury in a renal transplant recipient following IVIG infusion. A 48-year-old nonsensitized female with end stage renal disease secondary to polycystic kidney disease received a deceased donor kidney transplant. The initial post-transplant period was unremarkable however at three years post-transplant the patient develops BK virus nephropathy. Despite a reduction in immunosuppression, graft function worsened and IVIG infusion was commenced. Immediately following the IVIG infusion, the patient develops anuric acute kidney injury necessitating hemodialysis. Renal transplant biopsy performed before and after the IVIG infusion revealed the de novo development of acute antibody mediated rejection and donor specific antibodies in the serum. Anti-HLA and donor-specific antibodies were also confirmed in a diluted sample of the IVIG preparation. We argue that the anti-HLA antibodies present in the IVIG caused an acute antibody mediated rejection in this previously nonsensitized female.

  14. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation with concurrent allograft nephrectomy for recipients with prior renal transplants lost to BK virus nephropathy: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kubal, S; Powelson, J A; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2010-01-01

    Candidacy for retransplantation after allograft loss due to BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVN) with or without allograft nephrectomy is controversial. This report describes 2 renal transplant recipients who lost their grafts to BKVN and subsequently underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation with allograft nephrectomy.

  15. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN.

  16. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  17. Clinical validation study of quantitative real-time PCR assay for detection and monitoring of BK virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kudose, Satoru; Dong, Jianli

    2014-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) causes nephropathy (BKVN) in renal transplant patients, but monitoring of BKV loads provides an opportunity to prevent BKVN. However, because viral load measurement is not standardized, each laboratory must validate their methodology. We performed a retrospective analysis of 1371 plasma and 600 urine BKV loads measured by the laboratory developed real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of BKV DNA and 346 biopsies from 284 patients in our renal transplant program. We assessed the ability of plasma and urine viral loads to predict the presence of BKVN in biopsy using the receiver-operator characteristic curve. We determined that the cut-offs 3.7 and 7.2 log copies/ml have the best sensitivity (100% and 100%) and specificity (97.6% and 97.5%) for the detection of concurrent biopsy with BKVN by plasma and urine viral load, respectively. Also, we determined that the presence of at least two viral loads greater than 2.8 log copies/ml for plasma and 6.4 log copies/ml for urine within 30 days of biopsy can detect BKVN with similar operating characteristics. Lastly, among pairs of urine and plasma viral loads from the same day, we found that 375 of 376 urine viral loads <4 log copies/ml were accompanied by plasma viral loads <2.6 log copies/ml, a finding which can alleviate the need for plasma viral load for most patients. In summary, our RT-PCR of BKV DNA has good operating characteristics, and our findings above can help in development of a better strategy to monitor BKV.

  18. Screening for BK virus nephropathy in kidney transplant recipients: comparison of diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Gabriel Godinho; Poloni, Jose Antonio T; Rotta, Liane N; Razonable, Raymund R; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C

    2016-01-01

    Urine cytology and qPCR in blood and urine are commonly used to screen renal transplant recipients for polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN). Few studies, however, have directly compared these two diagnostic tests, in terms of their performance to predict PVAN. This was a systematic review in which adult (≥ 18 years old) renal transplant recipients were studied. A structured Pubmed search was used to identify studies comparing urine cytology and/or qPCR in urine and plasma samples for detecting PVAN with renal biopsy as the gold standard for diagnosis. From 707 potential papers, there were only twelve articles that matched the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in detail. Among 1694 renal transplant recipients that were included in the review, there were 115 (6.8%) patients with presumptive PVAN and 57 (3.4%) PVAN confirmed. In this systematic review, the qPCR in plasma had better performance for PVAN compared to urine cytopathology. Resumo A citologia urinária e a reação da cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (qPCR) em amostras de sangue e/ou urina são comumente utilizados para rastrear nefropatia associada ao polyomavirus (PVAN), em pacientes transplantados renais. Entretanto, poucos estudos comparam diretamente esses testes diagnósticos quanto ao desempenho para predizer esta complicação. Aqui realizamos uma revisão sistemática na qual foram estudados pacientes transplantados renais adultos (≥ 18 anos). Uma pesquisa estruturada Pubmed foi utilizada para identificar estudos comparando citologia urinária e/ou qPCR em amostras de urina e plasma para detectar PVAN, utilizando a biópsia renal como padrão-ouro para o diagnóstico. Dentre os 707 artigos em potencial, apenas 12 atendiam aos critérios de inclusão e foram analisados em maior detalhe. Foram incluídos 1694 pacientes transplantados renais, entre os quais 115 (6,8%) classificados com PVAN presuntivo e 57 (3,4%) PVAN confirmado. Nessa revisão sistemática, o qPCR no plasma tive melhor

  19. Progression from Sustained BK Viruria to Sustained BK Viremia with Immunosuppression Reduction Is Not Associated with Changes in the Noncoding Control Region of the BK Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Imran A.; Parikh, Bijal A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Skelton, Rebecca; Storch, Gregory A.; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the BK virus archetypal noncoding control region (NCCR) have been associated with BK-virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN). Whether sustained viremia, a surrogate for BKVAN, is associated with significant changes in the BK-NCCR is unknown. We performed PCR amplification and sequencing of (1) stored urine and (2) plasma samples from the time of peak viremia from 11 patients with sustained viremia who participated in a 200-patient clinical trial. The antimetabolite was withdrawn for BK viremia and reduction of the calcineurin inhibitor for sustained BK viremia. DNA sequencing from the 11 patients with sustained viremia revealed 8 insertions, 16 transversions, 3 deletions, and 17 transitions. None were deemed significant. No patient developed clinically evident BKVAN. Our data support, at a genomic level, the effectiveness of reduction of immunosuppression for prevention of progression from viremia to BKVAN. PMID:22701777

  20. The prevalence and implications of BK virus replication in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Viswesh, Velliyur; Yost, Sarah E; Kaplan, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    The significance of BK viruria and viremia in non-renal solid organ transplants is poorly understood. A systematic review was performed reviewing the incidence and implications of BK virus replication in non-renal solid organ transplants. Ninety-seven studies were identified, of which 18 including lung, heart, liver and pancreas transplants were included. The overall incidence of BK viruria and viremia was 20% and 3% respectively and 17 cases of BK nephropathy were identified. Heart transplant recipients had a higher overall incidence of BK viremia than other non-renal organ types, and the majority of cases of BK virus-associated nephropathy were in heart transplant recipients. The incidence of BK viremia was significantly lower in non-renal solid organ transplants than that of renal transplant recipients and BK virus-associated nephropathy was rare. BK virus-associated nephropathy may be considered in heart transplant recipients who have unexplained and persistent renal dysfunction not attributable to other causes.

  1. Inhibitory Interactions between BK and JC Virus among Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingxing S.; Bohl, Daniel L.; Storch, Gregory A.; Ryschkewitsch, Caroline; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Major, Eugene O.; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hardinger, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    BK and JC polyomaviruses can reactivate after transplantation, causing renal dysfunction and graft loss. The incidence of JC reactivation after renal transplant is not well understood. Here, we characterized JC reactivation using samples collected during the first year after transplantation from 200 kidney recipients. We detected BK and JC viruses in the urine of 35 and 16% of transplant recipients, respectively. The median viral load in the urine was 400 times higher for BK virus than JC virus. The presence of BK viruria made concurrent JC viruria less likely: JC viruria was detected in 22% of non-BK viruric recipients compared with 4% of BK viruric recipients (P = 0.001). The co-detection rate was 1.5%, which is less than the expected 5.6% if reactivation of each virus was independent (P = 0.001). We did not observe JC viremia, JC nephropathy, or progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The onset of JC viruria was associated with donor, but not recipient, JC-specific antibody in a titer-dependent fashion and inversely associated with donor and recipient BK-specific antibody. Donor and recipient JC seropositivity did not predict BK viruria or viremia. In conclusion, among renal transplant recipients, infection with one polyomavirus inversely associates with infection with the other. PMID:21511831

  2. BK Virus in Recipients of Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Kelly M

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1971, the BK virus, a human polyomavirus, has emerged as a significant cause of renal dysfunction and transplant graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Improved screening methods have been effective in assisting in the early identification of the virus, and thus, prompt intervention to prevent the progression of the disease. Treatment options for the virus are limited; therefore, lowering immunosuppressive medications should be considered the first line of treatment. Current adjunctive therapies are not guaranteed to control the viral activity and may have limited therapeutic value.

  3. BK Virus Load Associated with Serum Levels of sCD30 in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Salma N.; Al-Saffer, Jinan M.; Jawad, Rana S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rejection is the main drawback facing the renal transplant operations. Complicated and overlapping factors, mainly related to the immune system, are responsible for this rejection. Elevated serum levels of sCD30 were frequently recorded as an indicator for renal allograft rejection, while BV virus is considered as one of the most serious consequences for immunosuppressive treatment of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Aims. This study aimed to determine the association of BK virus load with serum levels of sCD30 in RTRs suffering from nephropathy. Patients and Methods. A total of 50 RTRs with nephropathy and 30 age-matched apparently healthy individuals were recruited for this study. Serum samples were obtained from each participant. Real-time PCR was used to quantify BK virus load in RTRs serum, while ELISA technique was employed to estimate serum levels of sCD30. Results. Twenty-two percent of RTRs had detectable BKV with mean viral load of 1.094E + 06 ± 2.291E + 06. RTRs showed higher mean serum level of sCD30 (20.669 ± 18.713 U/mL) than that of controls (5.517 ± 5.304 U/mL) with significant difference. BK virus load had significant positive correlation with the serum levels of sCD30 in RTRs group. Conclusion. These results suggest that serum levels of sCD30 could be used as an indicator of BK viremia, and accordingly the immunosuppressive regime should be adjusted. PMID:27051424

  4. The influence of immunosuppressive agents on BK virus risk following kidney transplantation, and implications for choice of regimen.

    PubMed

    Suwelack, Barbara; Malyar, Viola; Koch, Martina; Sester, Martina; Sommerer, Claudia

    2012-07-01

    The increasing incidence of BK-associated nephropathy following kidney transplantation has prompted an examination of strategies for risk reduction and management through immunosuppression manipulation. Evidence from retrospective and prospective studies suggests that BK viruria and viremia, and the need for BK virus treatment, are higher with tacrolimus than cyclosporine. Combined therapy with tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid may be associated with a particularly higher risk of BK infection, but data are conflicting as to whether mycophenolic acid per se is an independent risk factor. The incidence of BK-related events may be reduced in patients receiving mTOR inhibitors (everolimus or sirolimus) with cyclosporine vs a calcineurin inhibitor with mycophenolic acid. De novo immunosuppression regimens that avoid rabbit antithymocyte globulin and tacrolimus, particularly tacrolimus with mycophenolic acid, may be advantageous, whereas low-exposure cyclosporine with an mTOR inhibitor appears a favorable option. Routine screening for BK infection during the first 2 years posttransplant is recommended to allow preemptive modification of the immunosuppressive regimen. In patients at high risk of BK virus infection, appropriate de novo immunosuppression or very early conversion to an mTOR inhibitor to facilitate reduction or discontinuation of calcineurin inhibitors or antimetabolites should be considered. Extensive further research into optimal avoidance, screening, and treatment strategies is required.

  5. BK virus replication following kidney transplant: does the choice of immunosuppressive regimen influence outcomes?

    PubMed

    Acott, Phillip; Babel, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of BK virus nephropathy (BKVN) observed in recent years, with its consequent impact on kidney allograft survival rates, has focused attention on the relationship between immunosuppression regimens and risk of BK virus reactivation. The adoption of more potent immunosuppressive regimens over the last two decades, notably tacrolimus with mycophenolic acid and corticosteroids, appears to be associated with higher rates of BK activation. There is also evidence of a specific increase in risk for tacrolimus-based immunosuppression vs. cyclosporine, which in vitro data suggest may be at least partly due to differences in antiviral activity. Early concerns that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor use was associated with development of BKVN do not appear to have been borne out. Protocol-driven BK virus screening is recommended to facilitate early diagnosis and intervention, which primarily comprises the controlled reduction or discontinuation of immunosuppressive drugs. Although a consensus on the optimal strategy for immunosuppression modification is still lacking, early diagnosis of BK reactivation and pre-emptive modification of immunosuppression has resulted in a marked improvement in graft outcomes. Typically, intervention consists of reducing calcineurin inhibitor exposure before or after antimetabolite dose reduction, withdrawal of one agent from a triple therapy regimen, or switching between agents within a therapeutic class. A benefit for antiviral therapy is not yet confirmed. While more data are required, the current evidence base is adequate to justify routine screening with early modification of the intensity and nature of the immunosuppression regimen to reduce the toll of BKVN in the kidney transplant population.

  6. BK virus in solid organ transplant recipients: an emerging syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mylonakis, E; Goes, N; Rubin, R H; Cosimi, A B; Colvin, R B; Fishman, J A

    2001-11-27

    BK virus is a human polyomavirus associated with a range of clinical presentations from asymptomatic viruria with pyuria to ureteral ulceration with ureteral stenosis in renal transplant patients or hemorrhagic cystitis in bone marrow transplant recipients. Infection of renal allografts has been associated with diminished graft function in some individuals. Fortunately, however, the majority of patients with BK virus infections are asymptomatic. The type, duration, and intensity of immunosuppression are major contributors to susceptibility to the activation of BK virus infection. Histopathology is required for the demonstration of renal parenchymal involvement; urine cytology and viral polymerase chain reaction methods are useful adjunctive diagnostic tools. Current, treatment of immunosuppressed patients with polyomavirus viruria is largely supportive and directed toward minimizing immunosuppression. Improved diagnostic tools and antiviral therapies are needed for polyomavirus infections.

  7. The impact of surveillance and rapid reduction in immunosuppression to control BK virus-related graft injury in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Flechner, Stuart M; Liu, Xiaobo; Schold, Jesse; Tian, Devin; Srinivas, Titte R; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B

    2013-08-01

    We prospectively screened 609 consecutive kidney (538) and kidney-pancreas (71) transplant recipients for BK viremia over a 4-year interval using polymerase chain reaction viral load detection and protocol kidney biopsies. We found that BK viremia is common at our center: total cases 26.7%, cases during first year 21.3% (mean 4 months), and recipients with ≥ 10 000 copies/ml 12.3%. We found few predictive clinical or demographic risk factors for any BK viremia or viral loads ≥ 10,000 copies/ml, other than prior treatment of biopsy confirmed acute rejection and/or higher immunosuppressive blood levels of tacrolimus (P = 0.001) or mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.007). Viral loads at diagnosis (<10 000 copies/ml) demonstrated little impact on graft function or survival. However, rising copy numbers demand early reductions in immunosuppressive drug doses of at least 30-50%. Viral loads >185 000 copies/ml at diagnosis were predictive of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN; OR: 113.25, 95% CI: 17.22-744.6, P < 0.001). Surveillance for BK viremia and rapid reduction of immunosuppression limited the incidence of BKVAN to 1.3%. The addition of leflunomide or ciprofloxacin to immunosuppressive dose reduction did not result in greater rates of viral clearance. These data support the role of early surveillance for BK viremia to limit the impact on transplant outcome, although the most effective schedule for screening awaits further investigation.

  8. Simultaneous BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis after living donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Hirsch, Hans H; Wernli, Marion; Ortiz, Fernanda; Lempinen, Marko; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Auvinen, Eeva; Mannonen, Laura; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) commonly reactivates after kidney transplantation, and can cause polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN), whereas after allogeneic stem cell transplantation the most frequent manifestation of BKPyV is polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC). Despite high-level BKPyV replication in both, the pathogenesis and manifestation of both BKPyV entities appears to differ substantially. We describe an unusual case of simultaneous PyVAN and PyVHC presenting with acute symptoms in a BKPyV-IgG positive recipient eight months after kidney transplantation from a haploidentical living donor, who was BKPyV-IgG negative. Symptoms of cystitis and viremia subsided rapidly after reduction of immunosuppression.

  9. JC polyoma virus interacts with APOL1 in African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Divers, Jasmin; Núñez, Marina; High, Kevin P; Murea, Mariana; Rocco, Michael V; Ma, Lijun; Bowden, Donald W; Hicks, Pamela J; Spainhour, Mitzie; Ornelles, David A; Kleiboeker, Steven B; Duncan, Kara; Langefeld, Carl D; Turner, Jolyn; Freedman, Barry I

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with HIV infection and two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) risk variants frequently develop nephropathy. Here we tested whether non-HIV viral infections influence nephropathy risk via interactions with APOL1 by assessing APOL1 genotypes and presence of urine JC and BK polyoma virus and plasma HHV6 and CMV by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed 300 samples from unrelated and related first-degree relatives of African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy using linear and nonlinear mixed models to account for familial relationships. The four groups evaluated were APOL1 zero/one versus two risk alleles, with or without nephropathy. Urine JCV and BKV were detected in 90 and 29 patients, respectively, whereas HHV6 and CMV were rare. Adjusting for family age at nephropathy, gender, and ancestry, presence of JCV genomic DNA in urine and APOL1 risk alleles were significantly negatively associated with elevated serum cystatin C, albuminuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio over 30 mg/g), and kidney disease defined as an eGFR under 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and/or albuminuria in an additive (APOL1 plus JCV) model. BK viruria was not associated with kidney disease. Thus, African Americans at increased risk for APOL1-associated nephropathy (two APOL1 risk variants) with JC viruria had a lower prevalence of kidney disease, suggesting that JCV interaction with APOL1 genotype may influence kidney disease risk.

  10. BK virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, J; Muñoz, P; Garcia de Viedma, D; Cabrero, I; Loeches, B; Montilla, P; Gijon, P; Rodriguez-Sanchez, B; Bouza, E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of BK virus (BKV) infection in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in our hospital. The presence of BKV was analysed in urine and plasma samples from 78 non-selected HIV-infected patients. Clinical data were recorded using a pre-established protocol. We used a nested PCR to amplify a specific region of the BKV T-large antigen. Positive samples were quantified using real-time PCR. Mean CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 472 cells/mm3 and median HIV viral load was <50 copies/mL. BKV viraemia was detected in only 1 HIV-positive patient, but 57.7% (45 out of 78) had BKV viruria, which was more common in patients with CD4 counts>500 cells/mm3 (74.3% vs 25.7%; p=0.007). Viruria was present in 21.7% of healthy controls (5 out of 23 samples, p=0.02). All viral loads were low (<100 copies/mL), and we could not find any association between BKV infection and renal or neurological manifestations. We provide an update on the prevalence of BKV in HIV-infected patients treated with HAART. BKV viruria was more common in HIV-infected patients; however, no role for BKV has been demonstrated in this population.

  11. Immunity to Polyomavirus BK Infection: Immune Monitoring to Regulate the Balance between Risk of BKV Nephropathy and Induction of Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, Michela; Basso, Sabrina; Gagliardone, Chiara; Potenza, Leonardo; Verrina, Enrico; Luppi, Mario; Zecca, Marco; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ginevri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) is the main infectious cause of allograft damage after kidney transplantation. A number of studies revealed an association between the presence of BKV-specific cellular immunity and BK viral clearance, with patients failing to recover specific T cells progressing to PyVAN. Evolution to allograft dysfunction can be prevented by restoration of BKV-specific immunity through a stepwise reduction of maintenance immunosuppressive drugs. Prospective monitoring of BK viral load and specific immunity, together with B-cell alloimmune surveillance, may allow a targeted modification/reduction of immunosuppression, with the aim of obtaining viral clearance while preventing graft injury due to deposition of de novo donor-specific HLA antibodies and late/chronic antibody-mediated allograft injury. Innovative, immune-based therapies may further contribute to BKV infection prevention and control. PMID:24000288

  12. Replication of Oral BK Virus in Human Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Madden, Victoria; Hallett, Ryan A.; Gingerich, Aaron D.; Nickeleit, Volker

    2014-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is the most common viral pathogen among allograft patients. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to the human oral compartment and to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). To date, few studies have analyzed orally derived BKPyV. This study aimed to characterize BKPyV isolated from throat wash (TW) samples from HIVSGD patients. The replication potential of HIVSGD-derived clinical isolates HIVSGD-1 and HIVSGD-2, both containing the noncoding control region (NCCR) architecture OPQPQQS, were assessed and compared to urine-derived virus. The BKPyV isolates displayed significant variation in replication potential. Whole-genome alignment of the two isolates revealed three nucleotide differences that were analyzed for a potential effect on the viral life cycle. Analysis revealed a negligible difference in NCCR promoter activity despite sequence variation and emphasized the importance of functional T antigen (Tag) for efficient replication. HIVSGD-1 encoded full-length Tag, underwent productive infection in both human salivary gland cells and kidney cells, and expressed viral DNA and Tag protein. Additionally, HIVSGD-1 generated DNase-resistant particles and by far surpassed the replication potential of the kidney-derived isolate in HSG cells. HIVSGD-2 encoded a truncated form of Tag and replicated much less efficiently. Quantitation of infectious virus, via the fluorescent forming unit assay, suggested that HIVSGD BKPyV had preferential tropism for salivary gland cells over kidney cells. Similarly, the results suggested that kidney-derived virus had preferential tropism for kidney cells over salivary gland cells. Evidence of HIVSGD-derived BKPyV oral tropism and adept viral replication in human salivary gland cells corroborated the potential link between HIVSGD pathogenesis and BKPyV. PMID:24173219

  13. Potential relationship between BK virus and renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yasemin; Ozdemir, Enver; Ozercan, Halil Ibrahim; Etem, Ebru Onalan; Aker, Fugen; Toraman, Zulal Asci; Seyrek, Adnan; Firdolas, Fatih

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential association between the presence of BK virus (BKV) DNA and mRNA and renal cell carcinoma and bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples were obtained from 50 cancer patients with renal cell carcinoma, 40 cancer patients with bladder transitional cell carcinoma, 45 control patients with the benign renal pathology, and from another 25 control patients with benign bladder pathology. The samples were subjected to nested PCR for detection of BKV DNA and real-time reverse transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) for determining mRNA levels of BKV. The results of the nested PCR indicated that 23 (14.3%) of 160 samples were positive for BKV DNA. The relationship between the cancer and the presence of BKV DNA was significant (P < 0.05). The BKV DNA positivity was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma (P = 0.03), but not with that of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The results of real-time RT-PCR showed that the mRNA of BKV VP1 was present in 69.5% of the BKV DNA positive samples. The levels of BKV mRNA were significantly higher in the renal cell cancer samples than in the control samples (P < 0.05). The results of the present study confirm the association between BKV and renal cell cancer. The findings also indicated that the presence of BKV DNA resulted in a fivefold increase in the risk of development of renal cell carcinoma.

  14. Outcomes of renal transplant recipients with BK virus infection and BK virus surveillance in the Auckland region from 2006 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Yuan; Pilmore, Helen L; Zhou, Lifeng; de Zoysa, Janak R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate incidence, risk factors and treatment outcome of BK polyomavirus nephropathy (BKVN) in a cohort of renal transplant recipients in the Auckland region without a formal BK polyomavirus (BKV) surveillance programme. METHODS A cohort of 226 patients who received their renal transplants from 2006 to 2012 was retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS Seventy-six recipients (33.6%) had a BK viral load (BKVL) test and 9 patients (3.9%) developed BKVN. Cold ischaemia time (HR = 1.18, 95%CI: 1.04-1.35) was found to be a risk factor for BKVN. Four recipients with BKVN had complete resolution of their BKV infection; 1 recipient had BKVL less than 625 copies/mL; 3 recipients had BKVL more than 1000 copies/mL and 1 had graft failure from BKVN. BKVN has a negative impact on graft function [median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 22.5 (IQR 18.5-53.0) mL/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.015), but no statistically significant difference (P = 0.374) in renal allograft function was found among negative BK viraemia group [median eGFR 60.0 (IQR 48.5-74.2) mL/min per 1.73 m2), positive BK viraemia without BKVN group [median eGFR 55.0 (IQR 47.0-76.0) mL/min per 1.73 m2] and unknown BKV status group [median eGFR 54.0 (IQR 43.8-71.0) mL/min per 1.73 m2]. The incidence and treatment outcomes of BKVN were similar to some centres with BKV surveillance programmes. CONCLUSION Recipients with BVKN have poorer graft function. Although active surveillance for BKV has been shown to be effective in reducing incidence of BKVN, it should be tailored specifically to that transplant centre based on its epidemiology and outcomes of BKVN, particularly in centres with limited resources. PMID:27872831

  15. Detection and quantitation of BK virus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the LT-ag gene in adult renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Si-Mohamed, Ali; Goff, Jérôme Le; Désiré, Nathalie; Maylin, Sarah; Glotz, Denis; Bélec, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Determination of polyomavirus BK (BKV) load in urine and plasma has been advocated for monitoring adult renal transplant recipients suffering from BKV-related nephropathy. An "in-house" real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed using the BKV-1/BKV-3 primers set in the large tumor antigen (LT-ag) region to quantitate BK virus loads in plasma and urine in renal transplant patients. This assay was adapted to routine virology laboratory by evaluating two extraction procedures of nucleic acids from urine and plasma, one manual and the other using an automatic extractor, and by evaluating the Light Cycler versus Taqman apparatus. Both the manual and automatic extraction procedures and real-time PCR apparatus were equivalent. The Light Cycler and Taqman instruments allow similarly rapid, accurate, reproducible and specific quantitative detection of the three major BKV subtypes, with a detection limit of 10 BKV DNA copies/ml, and a range from 10(0) to 10(7) copies/ml. Of 855 renal transplant patients, 128 (15%) had BKV DNA in both plasma and urine samples with a mean viral load of 5.1 log/ml in plasma and 6.8 log/ml in urine and in 5 (4%) BKV-associated tubulo-interstitial nephropathy; 332 (39%) BKV DNA was found only in the urine, not in the plasma, without further development of nephropathy and 395 patients had no BKV in plasma and urine. These observations emphasize the usefulness of real-time PCR to assess the BKV load by routine testing, and confirm the need to combine both plasma and urine determinations of the BKV DNA load in order to identify renal transplant patient at high risk for BKV-associated nephropathy.

  16. BK virus encephalitis with thrombotic microangiopathy in an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, R; Ferreira, I; Teixeira, G; Cordeiro, D; Mafra, M; Costa, I; Bravo Marques, J M; Abecasis, M

    2011-04-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection occurs most often in immunocompromised hosts, in the setting of renal or bone marrow transplantation. Hemorrhagic cystitis is the commonest manifestation but in recent years infections in other organ systems have been reported. We report an unusual case of biopsy-proven BKV encephalitis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient who subsequently developed thrombotic microangiopathy. As far as we know, this is the first report of such an association in a transplant patient.

  17. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  18. [Possible relation between viruses and oromaxillofacial tumors. V. Demonstration of hemagglutination-inhibiting anti-BK virus antibodies in patients with tumors of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Zaharia, O; Suru, M; Constantinescu, E; Goldstein, I; Nastac, E

    1987-01-01

    Anti-BK-virus hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies were revealed in 81.8% of the patients with parotid gland tumors. Results of the investigations conducted on oromaxillofacial tumors including the parotid gland ones are discussed from the point of view of the presence of viral antigens (herpes-, SV40 and BK-viruses) and of specific antibodies. Possible implication of the papova viruses in the etiopathogenesis of the parotid gland tumors in humans are also discussed.

  19. HLA type-independent method to monitor polyoma BK virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M H; Brestrich, G; Andree, H; Engelmann, E; Rosenberger, C; Tillmann, H; Zwinger, S; Babel, N; Nickel, P; Volk, H-D; Reinke, P

    2006-03-01

    (Re)activation of quiescent viral diseases is a major problem in immunosuppressed transplant patients. Polyoma BK virus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) caused by active polyoma BK virus (BKV) infection became a main reason for graft loss in kidney transplantation. After diagnosis, most transplant centers react by reducing immunosuppression (IS) to allow the immune system to control the infection. However, the impact of reduced IS on BKV immunity is not well researched. Here we present an HLA type-independent method to monitor BKV-specific T-cell immunity. Applying our method, viral protein 1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in patients with serum BKV-DNA levels >250 000 copies/mL. In addition, specific T-cell responses were also found in allograft-infiltrating cells. The method can be used to assess the impact of decreased immunosuppression on BKV immunity and to clarify the role of specific T cells in the pathogenesis of PVAN. We strongly recommend its implementation in future clinical studies.

  20. BK virus has tropism for human salivary gland cells in vitro: Implications for transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, Liesl K.; Madden, Vicki; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2009-11-25

    Background: In this study, it was determined that BKV is shed in saliva and an in vitro model system was developed whereby BKV can productively infect both submandibular (HSG) and parotid (HSY) salivary gland cell lines. Results: BKV was detected in oral fluids using quantitative real-time PCR (QRTPCR). BKV infection was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. The infectivity of BKV was inhibited by pre-incubation of the virus with gangliosides that saturated the major capsid protein, VP1, halting receptor mediated BKV entry into salivary gland cells. Examination of infected cultures by transmission electron microscopy revealed 45-50 nm BK virions clearly visible within the cells. Subsequent to infection, encapsidated BK virus was detected in the supernatant. Conclusion: We thus demonstrated that BKV was detected in oral fluids and that BK infection and replication occur in vitro in salivary gland cells. These data collectively suggest the potential for BKV oral route of transmission and oral pathogenesis.

  1. Simian agent 12 is a BK virus-like papovavirus which replicates in monkey cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, T P; Pipas, J M

    1985-01-01

    We have begun to characterize the genomic structure and replication of the baboon papovavirus simian agent 12 (SA12). We have defined a wild-type clone of SA12 (SA12 wt100) by plaque purification from a heterogeneous stock. The functional map of SA12 wt100 can be aligned with those of the other primate papovaviruses by assigning one of the two EcoRI sites as 0/1.0 map units. The origin of bidirectional viral DNA replication maps near 0.67 map units, consistent with the limits of sequences homologous to origin sequences in the other papovaviruses. DNA sequence analysis shows that the organization of the SA12 genome is similar to that of the other primate papovaviruses studied. The arrangement and sequence of functional elements in the origin of replication region, as well as the sequences of the N-terminal regions of early protein products, indicate that SA12 is most closely related to the human virus BK, next most closely related to JC virus, and less closely related to simian virus 40. Unlike BK virus, SA12 is capable of productive infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Images PMID:2985810

  2. Successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipient with previous known polyomavirus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Midtvedt, Karsten; Bjorang, Ola; Letting, Anne-Sofie

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy after renal transplantation has become increasingly common. Studies in non-immunocompromised patients have shown that pregnant women have increased susceptibility to infection or reactivation of latent virus such as BK virus. To what extent a renal transplant recipient is at risk for reactivation of polyoma virus during pregnancy remains unknown. We hereby report successful pregnancy outcome in a renal transplant recipient with a known history of BK virus nephropathy treated with cidofovir i.v. To our knowledge, this is the first published experience with a successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipients with known history of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy.

  3. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

    PubMed

    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  4. BK virus-hemorrhagic cystitis following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: Clinical characteristics and utility of leflunomide treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Hoon; Lim, Joo Han; Yi, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul Soo

    2016-04-18

    BK virus-hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC) is a potential cause of morbidity and mortality in patients having undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT). We analyzed the clinical features of BKV-HC following Allo-SCT and reported the utility of leflunomide therapy for BKV-HC.

  5. BK virus associated meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient treated with HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, José E; Fink, Maria C; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale; Dauar, Rafi F; Filho, Francisco Bonasser; Nogueira, Roberta Schiavon; Calore, Eduardo E; Pannuti, Claudio S; Trujillo, J Roberto; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva

    2007-01-01

    A severely immune-suppressed AIDS patient was suspected of suffering from BK virus (BKV) meningoencephalitis, after being studied for common causes of neurological complications of co-infectious origin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and brain samples, confirmed the presence of BKV. His clinical condition improved along with the regression of brain lesions, after modifications on his antiretroviral regime. Five months after discharge, the patient was readmitted because of frequent headaches, and a marked inflammatory reaction was evidenced by a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The symptoms paralleled a rising CD4+ lymphocyte count, and immune reconstitution syndrome was suspected. This is the first non-postmortem report of BKV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient, showing clinical and radiographic improvement solely under HAART. PMID:17559655

  6. Intracellular trafficking pathway of BK virus in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Takahito; Sorokin, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of BK Virus (BKV) in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) is critical for BKV nephritis. However, the major trafficking components utilized by BKV remain unknown. Co-incubation of HRPTEC with BKV and microtubule disrupting agents prevented BKV infection as detected by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis with antibodies which recognize BKV large T antigen. However, inhibition of a dynein, cellular motor protein, did not interfere with BKV infection in HRPTEC. A colocalization study of BKV with the markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus (GA), indicated that BKV reached the ER from 6 to 10 hours, while bypassing the GA or passing through the GA too transiently to be detected. This study contributes to the understanding of mechanisms of intracellular trafficking used by BKV in the infection of HRPTEC. PMID:17976677

  7. BK Polyomavirus and the Transplanted Kidney: Immunopathology and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, Caroline; Orio, Julie; Collette, Suzon; Senécal, Lynne; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Renoult, Édith; Tibbles, Lee Anne; Delisle, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BK polyomavirus is ubiquitous, with a seropositivity rate of over 75% in the adult population. Primary infection is thought to occur in the respiratory tract, but asymptomatic BK virus latency is established in the urothelium. In immunocompromised host, the virus can reactivate but rarely compromises kidney function except in renal grafts, where it causes a tubulointerstitial inflammatory response similar to acute rejection. Restoring host immunity against the virus is the cornerstone of treatment. This review covers the virus-intrinsic features, the posttransplant microenvironment as well as the host immune factors that underlie the pathophysiology of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy. Current and promising therapeutic approaches to treat or prevent this complication are discussed in relation to the complex immunopathology of this condition. PMID:27391196

  8. Persistence of DNA sequences of BK virus and JC virus in normal human tissues and in diseased tissues.

    PubMed

    Chesters, P M; Heritage, J; McCance, D J

    1983-04-01

    Available evidence suggests that BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) persist in the kidneys of healthy individuals after primary infection and may reactivate when the host's immune response is impaired. Data supporting this hypothesis are presented. A previous study had shown BKV to be present in the kidneys of eight (57%) of 14 subjects. In the present study, which extended the investigation to a total of 30 subjects, BKV DNA was found in the renal tissues of 10 (33%) subjects, and JCV DNA was found in the renal tissues of three (10%) subjects. The viral DNA detected appeared not to be integrated with host DNA and to be isolated in foci. Investigation of normal and diseased brain tissue, including tissue from six subjects with multiple sclerosis, failed to reveal the presence of either JCV DNA or BKV DNA.

  9. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  10. BK virus disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Rorije, Nienke M G; Shea, Margaret M; Satyanarayana, Gowri; Hammond, Sarah P; Ho, Vincent T; Baden, Lindsey R; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Marty, Francisco M

    2014-04-01

    The clinical epidemiology of BK virus (BKV) disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is not well defined. We evaluated 491 patients transplanted from January 2010 to December 2011 at a single transplant center to assess incidence, severity, and risk factors for BKV disease after HSCT. BKV disease was defined as BKV detection in urine by PCR testing in association with genitourinary symptoms without other concurrent genitourinary conditions. BKV disease occurred in 78 patients (15.9%), for an incidence rate of .47/1000 patient-days (95% confidence interval [CI], .37 to .59); BKV disease was considered severe in 27 patients (5.5%). In multivariate Cox modeling, time-dependent acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) grades II to IV (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 4.25; 95% CI, 2.51 to 7.21), cord blood HSCT (aHR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.01 to 5.15), post-transplant mycophenolate use (aHR 3.31; 95% CI, 1.83 to 5.99), and high-dose cyclophosphamide conditioning (aHR 2.34, 95% CI 1.45 to 3.77) were significant predictors of BKV disease. Time-dependent aGVHD grades III to IV (aHR 10.5; 95% CI, 4.44 to 25.0) and cord blood HSCT (aHR 5.40; 95% CI, 1.94 to 15.0) were independent risk factors for severe BKV disease. BKV disease is common and is associated with significant and prolonged morbidity after HSCT. Prospective studies are needed to better define the morbidity of post-HSCT BKV disease and inform the design of prophylaxis and treatment trials.

  11. Human endothelial cells allow passage of an archetypal BK virus (BKV) strain--a tool for cultivation and functional studies of natural BKV strains.

    PubMed

    Hanssen Rinaldo, C; Hansen, H; Traavik, T

    2005-07-01

    The ubiquitous human polyomavirus BK (BKV) causes the serious condition BKV-nephropathy in an increasing number of renal-transplant patients. The lack of authentic cell cultures for multiplication of naturally occurring strains has hampered cultivation and functional studies of BKV. Here we demonstrate that the most common urine shed BKV strain, the archetype, multiplies in the human endothelial cell line HUV-EC-C. Additional variants with deletions in the non-coding control region (NCCR) appear upon prolonged propagation. Although the titer produced was low, at the present HUV-EC-C is the only cell line shown to allow propagation of archetypal BKV. HUV-EC-C may therefore be a useful tool for BKV cultivation as well as functional studies.

  12. Specific IgG Antibodies React to Mimotopes of BK Polyomavirus, a Small DNA Tumor Virus, in Healthy Adult Sera

    PubMed Central

    Pietrobon, Silvia; Bononi, Ilaria; Mazzoni, Elisa; Lotito, Francesca; Manfrini, Marco; Puozzo, Andrea; Destro, Federica; Guerra, Giovanni; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro G.

    2017-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) was isolated in 1971 from the urine of a kidney transplant patient. Soon after its identification, BKPyV was characterized as a kidney-tropic virus, which is responsible of a significant fraction of the rejection of transplant kidney in the host. Moreover, in experimental conditions, BKPyV is able to transform different types of animal and human cells and to induce tumors of different histotypes in experimental animals. BKPyV DNA sequences have been detected in healthy individuals and cancer patients using polymerase chain reaction/Shouthern blot hybridization methods. Serum antibodies against this polyomavirus were revealed using immunological techniques, which, however, cross-react with other polyomaviruses such as JC (JCPyV) and Simian Virus 40. These non-specific data indicate the need of novel immunological methods and new investigations to check in a specific manner, BKPyV spread in humans. To this aim, mimotopes from BKPyV structural capsid protein 1 (VP1) were employed for specific immunological reactions to IgG antibodies of human serum samples. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic peptides mimicking immunogenic epitopes of BKPyV VP1 was set up and employed to test sera of healthy adult subjects. Data from this innovative immunological assay indicate that serum antibodies against BKPyV VP1 mimotopes are detectable in healthy subjects ranging from 18 to 90 years old. The overall prevalence of serum samples that reacted to BKPyV VP1 mimotopes was 72%. The strong points from this investigation are the novelty of the immunological method, its simplicity of the approach, and the specificity of BKPyV antibody reaction to VP1 mimotopes. PMID:28321224

  13. Conformational changes in the NS3 protease from hepatitis C virus strain Bk monitored by limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Orrù, S.; Dal Piaz, F.; Casbarra, A.; Biasiol, G.; De Francesco, R.; Steinkühler, C.; Pucci, P.

    1999-01-01

    Conformational changes occurring within the NS3 protease domain from the hepatitis C virus Bk strain (NS3(1-180)) under different physico-chemical conditions either in the absence or in the presence of its cofactor Pep4A were investigated by limited proteolysis experiments. Because the surface accessibility of the protein is affected by conformational changes, when comparative experiments were carried out on NS3(1-180) either at different glycerol concentrations or in the presence of Pep4A, differential peptide maps were obtained from which protein regions involved in the structural changes could be inferred. The surface topology of isolated NS3(1-180) in solution was essentially consistent with the crystal structure of the protein with the N-terminal segment showing a high conformational flexibility. At higher glycerol concentration, the protease assumed a more compact structure showing a decrease in the accessibility of the N-terminal segment that either was forced to interact with the protein or originate intermolecular interactions with neighboring molecules. Binding of the cofactor Pep4A caused the displacement of the N-terminal arm from the protein moiety, leading this segment to again adopt an open and flexible conformation, thus suggesting that the N-terminus of the protease contributes only marginally to the stability of the complex. The observed conformational changes might be directly correlated with the activation mechanism of the protease by either the cosolvent or the cofactor peptide because they lead to tighter packing of the substrate binding site. PMID:10422832

  14. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring of Leflunomide in Renal Transplant Recipients with BK Virus Reactivation: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ng, Joan C Y; Leung, Marianna; Wright, Alissa J; Ensom, Mary H H

    2017-02-28

    Leflunomide is an immunosuppressive drug with in vitro and initial observational evidence of antiviral activity against BK virus (BKV), a pathogen that causes opportunistic infection upon reactivation in renal transplant recipients. Leflunomide is considered an ancillary option to immunosuppression reduction in the management of BKV reactivation. Plasma or blood concentrations of teriflunomide, the active metabolite of leflunomide, are commonly monitored because of high leflunomide doses being used, known inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity risk. However, the utility of clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring for leflunomide is as yet unclear. A literature search of MEDLINE (1946-December 2016), EMBASE (1974-December 2016), the CENTRAL database, and Google Scholar was performed to identify relevant English-language articles. Further articles were identified from references in relevant literature. A previously published 9-step decision-making algorithm was used to assess the available literature and determine the utility of clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring for leflunomide. Teriflunomide is readily measurable in the plasma or blood, but a clear relationship between concentration and efficacy or toxicity is lacking, and its therapeutic range is not well-established. Efficacy and toxicity endpoints such as renal function and BKV clearance can be readily assessed without measuring teriflunomide concentrations. Pharmacokinetic parameters are affected by genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 CYP2C19 and ABCG2 genes. Therefore, routine clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring of leflunomide cannot be recommended based on current available evidence. However, it may provide clinical benefit in difficult situations when patients demonstrate a lack of therapeutic response or exhibit signs of drug toxicity.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 associated nephropathy (HIVAN): epidemiology, pathogenesis, histology, diagnosis, and medical management.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Michelle L; Wolf, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is a very distinct, unique, clinico-pathological syndrome, and a structural type of renal failure that is the most common cause of chronic renal failure in patients who are HIV-seropositive. Early referral and a long-term, primary care approach can improve patient outcomes. Careful adjustments of prescription doses with regularly scheduled, and at times frequent, laboratory testing will yield, optimal health, improve the quality of life, and most importantly, will decrease the incidence of morbidity and mortality in those individuals afflicted with both HIV and HIVAN.

  16. BK Polyomavirus: Clinical Aspects, Immune Regulation, and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Ambalathingal, George R; Francis, Ross S; Smyth, Mark J; Smith, Corey; Khanna, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) causes frequent infections during childhood and establishes persistent infections within renal tubular cells and the uroepithelium, with minimal clinical implications. However, reactivation of BKV in immunocompromised individuals following renal or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may cause serious complications, including BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN), ureteric stenosis, or hemorrhagic cystitis. Implementation of more potent immunosuppression and increased posttransplant surveillance has resulted in a higher incidence of BKVAN. Antiviral immunity plays a crucial role in controlling BKV replication, and our increasing knowledge about host-virus interactions has led to the development of improved diagnostic tools and clinical management strategies. Currently, there are no effective antiviral agents for BKV infection, and the mainstay of managing reactivation is reduction of immunosuppression. Development of immune-based therapies to combat BKV may provide new and exciting opportunities for the successful treatment of BKV-associated complications.

  17. Investigations on the presence of antibodies to papova viruses in patients with different forms of cancer and in other categories of patients or apparently healthy subjects. Note II. Hemagglutination-inhibiting serum antibodies to BK virus.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Nastac, E; Pucă, D; Hozoc, M; Bolocan, J; Serban, A

    1981-01-01

    Hemagglutination-inhibiting serum antibodies to BK virus (BKV were detected in patients with different forms of cancer and in blood donors (positivity percentages: 67.04 and 57.78, respectively). No such antibodies were found in a group of children 1 to 14 years of age. The data point to the presence of a latent human infection with BKV in the population of Romania.

  18. Evaluation and utilization of preassembled frozen commercial fast real-time qPCR master mixes for detection of cytomegalovirus and BK virus.

    PubMed

    Glover, William A; Atienza, Ederlyn E; Nesbitt, Shannon; Kim, Woo J; Castor, Jared; Cook, Linda; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative DNA detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and BK virus (BKV) is critical in the management of transplant patients. Quantitative laboratory-developed procedures for CMV and BKV have been described in which much of the processing is automated, resulting in rapid, reproducible, and high-throughput testing of transplant patients. To increase the efficiency of such assays, the performance and stability of four commercial preassembled frozen fast qPCR master mixes (Roche FastStart Universal Probe Master Mix with Rox, Bio-Rad SsoFast Probes Supermix with Rox, Life Technologies TaqMan FastAdvanced Master Mix, and Life Technologies Fast Universal PCR Master Mix), in combination with in-house designed primers and probes, was evaluated using controls and standards from standard CMV and BK assays. A subsequent parallel evaluation using patient samples was performed comparing the performance of freshly prepared assay mixes versus aliquoted frozen master mixes made with two of the fast qPCR mixes (Life Technologies TaqMan FastAdvanced Master Mix, and Bio-Rad SsoFast Probes Supermix with Rox), chosen based on their performance and compatibility with existing PCR cycling conditions. The data demonstrate that the frozen master mixes retain excellent performance over a period of at least 10 weeks. During the parallel testing using clinical specimens, no difference in quantitative results was observed between the preassembled frozen master mixes and freshly prepared master mixes. Preassembled fast real-time qPCR frozen master mixes perform well and represent an additional strategy laboratories can implement to reduce assay preparation times, and to minimize technical errors and effort necessary to perform clinical PCR.

  19. High prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in patients with primary and secondary glomerular nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Martinez-Ara, Jorge; Olea, Teresa; Bartolomé, Javier; Madero, Rosario; Hernández, Eduardo; Bernis, Carmen; Aguilar, Ana; Quiroga, Juan A; Carreño, Vicente; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-09-01

    The association of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and glomerulonephritis is well known. However, the relationship between immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and occult HCV, characterized by the presence of HCV-RNA in liver or in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the absence of serological markers, is unknown. We tested this in 113 anti-HCV-negative patients; 87 with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and 26 controls with hereditary glomerular nephropathies. All patients were serum HCV-RNA negative by conventional real-time PCR. Significantly, occult HCV-RNA (detectable viral RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or in serum after ultracentrifugation) was found in 34 of 87 patients with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis versus 1 of 26 control patients. The serum creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis with than in those without occult HCV (1.5 versus 1.1 mg/dl, respectively). A multivariate analysis adjusted for gender showed a significantly increased risk of occult HCV in patients with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis versus the controls (odds ratio of 13.29). Progression to end-stage renal disease tended to be faster in patients with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and occult HCV than in the negative cases. Thus, occult HCV is strongly associated with immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and may have a role in the progression of the disease.

  20. p53 gene mutational rate, Gleason score, and BK virus infection in prostate adenocarcinoma: Is there a correlation?

    PubMed

    Russo, Giuseppe; Anzivino, Elena; Fioriti, Daniela; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Giordano, Antonio; Autran-Gomez, Anamaria; Di Monaco, Franco; Di Silverio, Franco; Sale, Patrizio; Di Prospero, Laura; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2008-12-01

    Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. Viral infections could play a role in prostate carcinogenesis. Human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a possible candidate because of its transforming properties. In this study, BKV sequences in urine, blood, fresh, and paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples from 26 patients were searched using Q-PCR analysis. T antigen (TAg) and p53 localization in neoplastic cells were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. Also, the presence of mutations in 5-9 exons of p53 gene was analyzed. Results showed that BKV-DNA was found in urine (54%), plasma (31%), and in fresh prostate cancer specimens (85%). The analysis of p53 gene evidenced several mutations in high Gleason patients, according to tumor advanced stage. Immunohistochemical analysis results evidenced the localization of p53 and TAg into cytoplasm, whereas in TAg-negative tumors, p53 was nuclear. This study suggests that BKV acts as cofactor in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. These observations emphasize previous studies regarding the cellular pathways that may be deregulated by BKV.

  1. No evidence for a role of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus and BK virus in prostate cancer of German patients.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Baki; Pfister, David; Knüchel, Ruth; Heidenreich, Axel; Wieland, Ulrike; Pfister, Herbert

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in men. Controversial data exist concerning the role of BKPyV and the xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related gammaretrovirus (XMRV) in prostate cancer development. We therefore assessed the association between prostate cancer and viral infections. We could detect BKPyV in only 1 out of 85 prostate cancer samples, whereas none of the tissue samples showed evidence for XMRV positivity. Lack of detection of BKPyV and XMRV in prostate cancer tissues suggests that these viruses do not play a role in the pathogenesis of this type of cancer.

  2. Neutralization Serotyping of BK Polyomavirus Infection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Brennan, Daniel C.; Çuburu, Nicolas; Storch, Gregory A.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Randhawa, Parmjeet S.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV or BKPyV) associated nephropathy affects up to 10% of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). BKV isolates are categorized into four genotypes. It is currently unclear whether the four genotypes are also serotypes. To address this issue, we developed high-throughput serological assays based on antibody-mediated neutralization of BKV genotype I and IV reporter vectors (pseudoviruses). Neutralization-based testing of sera from mice immunized with BKV-I or BKV-IV virus-like particles (VLPs) or sera from naturally infected human subjects revealed that BKV-I specific serum antibodies are poorly neutralizing against BKV-IV and vice versa. The fact that BKV-I and BKV-IV are distinct serotypes was less evident in traditional VLP-based ELISAs. BKV-I and BKV-IV neutralization assays were used to examine BKV type-specific neutralizing antibody responses in KTRs at various time points after transplantation. At study entry, sera from 5% and 49% of KTRs showed no detectable neutralizing activity for BKV-I or BKV-IV neutralization, respectively. By one year after transplantation, all KTRs were neutralization seropositive for BKV-I, and 43% of the initially BKV-IV seronegative subjects showed evidence of acute seroconversion for BKV-IV neutralization. The results suggest a model in which BKV-IV-specific seroconversion reflects a de novo BKV-IV infection in KTRs who initially lack protective antibody responses capable of neutralizing genotype IV BKVs. If this model is correct, it suggests that pre-vaccinating prospective KTRs with a multivalent VLP-based vaccine against all BKV serotypes, or administration of BKV-neutralizing antibodies, might offer protection against graft loss or dysfunction due to BKV associated nephropathy. PMID:22511874

  3. Transient versus Persistent BK Viremia and Long-Term Outcomes after Kidney and Kidney–Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Elfadawy, Nissreen; Schold, Jesse D.; Srinivas, Titte R.; Poggio, Emilio; Fatica, Richard; Avery, Robin; Mossad, Sherif B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The objective was to study the long-term impact of transient versus persistent BK viremia on kidney transplant outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In total, 609 recipients who underwent kidney transplant from 2007 to 2011 were screened at months 1–12 for the occurrence of polyomavirus BK viremia; 130 patients (21.7%) developed BK viremia during the first year post-transplant. BK viremia patients were classified according to duration of infection (more or less than 3 months), and BK viral loads (more or less than 10,000 copies/ml) were classified as transient low viremia (n=42), transient high viremia (n=18), persistent low viremia (n=23), and persistent high viremia (n=47). All patients were followed a median of 36 (3–66) months. The rates of BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy, acute rejection, and 1-year graft function were compared with the polyomavirus BK–negative control group. Results Patient and graft survival were not significantly different among the groups. Graft function (creatinine; milligrams per deciliter) at 1 year was significantly worse in the persistent high viremia (1.75±0.6) and transient high viremia (1.85±0.7) groups compared with aviremic controls (1.47±0.4; P=0.01 and P=0.01, respectively). The incidence of BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy was limited to the persistent high viremia group (1.3%, P<0.001). The transient high viremia (50%) and persistent high viremia (34%) groups showed significantly (P=0.01) increased incidence of acute rejection versus aviremic controls (21.5%), transient low viremia (19%), or persistent low viremia (17.3%) groups. Conclusion Low viral load BK viremia, either transient or persistent, was not associated with long-term transplant outcomes. Persistent high viremia was associated with a greater risk for BK polyomavirus–associated nephropathy and subsequent graft dysfunction. Although transient high viremia was not associated with BK

  4. Frequency of CD4+CXCR5+ TFH cells in patients with hepatitis b virus-associated membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhao, Pingwei; Qu, Zhihui; Ayana, Desalegn Admassu; Jiang, Yanfang

    2014-09-01

    The frequency of different subsets of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells and serum cytokine levels were analyzed in a total of 14 patients with newly diagnosed hepatitis B virus-associated membranous nephropathy (HBV-MN), 12 individuals with immune-tolerant HBV infection (HBV-IT) and 12 healthy controls (HC). Serum cytokine levels were measured before and 10-12 weeks after treatment. Significantly higher frequency of CD4(+)CXCR5(+), CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) and CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells, and higher serum levels of IL-17A, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-21 were detected in HBV-MN patients compared to the HC. The percentage of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells and serum IL-21 level in HBV-MN patients were also higher than the HBV-IT. The percentage of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cell was negatively correlated with the value of eGFR, and the percentage of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) TFH cells was positively correlated with the 24-h urinary protein concentration. Notably, the percentage of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells was positively correlated with serum IL-21 level and 24-h urinary protein concentration. Treatment with prednisone or/and immunosuppressive drugs significantly reduced the frequency of CD4(+)CXCR5(+), CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells and serum IL-21 level, but increased IL-4 and IL-10 levels in the patients. CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells, especially CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells may participate in the pathogenesis of HBV-MN.

  5. Reflux nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, or other nervous system (neurological) conditions Reflux nephropathy can also occur from swelling of the ureters after a kidney transplant or from injury to the ureter. Risk factors ...

  6. EC decay of 244Bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodaye, Suparna; Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.; Palit, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    Berkelium isotopes have been produced in 11B-induced reaction on 238U. The EC decay of 244Bk → 244Cm has been studied by carrying out the single and coincidence measurements of the γ-rays emitted during the de-excitation of the 244Cm levels. Radiochemical separations have been carried out to minimize the contribution from the fission products and target. The new half-life of 244Bk is obtained as 5.02 ± 0.03 h, which is close to the theoretically calculated value. The relative intensities of the decay γ-rays have been re-evaluated. Based on the coincidence measurements, a tentative partial level scheme for 244Bk → 244Cm decay has been proposed.

  7. BK Polyomavirus Genomic Integration and Large T Antigen Expression: Evolving Paradigms in Human Oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kenan, D J; Mieczkowski, P A; Latulippe, E; Côté, I; Singh, H K; Nickeleit, V

    2016-12-31

    Human polyomaviruses are ubiquitous, with primary infections that typically occur during childhood and subsequent latency that may last a lifetime. Polyomavirus-mediated disease has been described in immunocompromised patients; its relationship to oncogenesis is poorly understood. We present deep sequencing data from a high-grade BK virus-associated tumor expressing large T antigen. The carcinoma arose in a kidney allograft 6 years after transplantation. We identified a novel genotype 1a BK polyomavirus, called Chapel Hill BK polyomavirus 2 (CH-2), that was integrated into the BRE gene in chromosome 2 of tumor cells. At the chromosomal integration site, viral break points were found, disrupting late BK gene sequences encoding capsid proteins VP1 and VP2/3. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated that the integrated BK virus was replication incompetent. We propose that the BK virus CH-2 was integrated into the human genome as a concatemer, resulting in alterations of feedback loops and overexpression of large T antigen. Collectively, these findings support the emerging understanding that viral integration is a nearly ubiquitous feature in polyomavirus-associated malignancy and that unregulated large T antigen expression drives a proliferative state that is conducive to oncogenesis. Based on the current observations, we present an updated model of polyomavirus-mediated oncogenesis.

  8. The oncogenic potential of BK-polyomavirus is linked to viral integration into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Daniel J; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Singh, Harsharan K; Nickeleit, Volker

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that BK-polyomavirus is linked to oncogenesis via high expression levels of large T-antigen in some urothelial neoplasms arising following kidney transplantation. However, a causal association between BK-polyomavirus, large T-antigen expression and oncogenesis has never been demonstrated in humans. Here we describe an investigation using high-throughput sequencing of tumour DNA obtained from an urothelial carcinoma arising in a renal allograft. We show that a novel BK-polyomavirus strain, named CH-1, is integrated into exon 26 of the myosin-binding protein C1 gene (MYBPC1) on chromosome 12 in tumour cells but not in normal renal cells. Integration of the BK-polyomavirus results in a number of discrete alterations in viral gene expression, including: (a) disruption of VP1 protein expression and robust expression of large T-antigen; (b) preclusion of viral replication; and (c) deletions in the non-coding control region (NCCR), with presumed alterations in promoter feedback loops. Viral integration disrupts one MYBPC1 gene copy and likely alters its expression. Circular episomal BK-polyomavirus gene sequences are not found, and the renal allograft shows no productive polyomavirus infection or polyomavirus nephropathy. These findings support the hypothesis that integration of polyomaviruses is essential to tumourigenesis. It is likely that dysregulation of large T-antigen, with persistent over-expression in non-lytic cells, promotes cell growth, genetic instability and neoplastic transformation.

  9. Genome Sequence of a Central Chimpanzee-Associated Polyomavirus Related to BK and JC Polyomaviruses, Pan troglodytes troglodytes Polyomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Madinda, Nadège F; Robbins, Martha M; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H; Ehlers, Bernhard; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-09-03

    We amplified and sequenced the genome of a polyomavirus infecting a central chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes). This virus, which is closely related to BK and JC polyomaviruses, may help shed a new light on these human pathogens' evolutionary history.

  10. BK polyomavirus association with colorectal cancer development.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, M N; Nedjadi, T; Gari, M A; Al-Maghrabi, J A; Atta, H M; Basuni, A A; Elderwi, D A

    2016-05-06

    The development of human neoplasms can be provoked by exposure to one of several viruses. Burkitt lymphoma, cervical carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma are associated with Epstein-Barr, human papilloma, and hepatitis B virus infections, respectively. Over the past three decades, many studies have attempted to establish an association between colorectal cancer and viruses, with debatable results. The aim of the present research was to assess the presence of BK polyomavirus (BKV) DNA and protein in colorectal cancer samples from patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia. DNA extracted from archival samples of colorectal cancer tissues was analyzed for BKV sequences using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. In addition, expression of a BKV protein was assessed using immunohistochemical staining. None of the tumor and control samples examined tested positive for BKV DNA in PCR assays. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining failed to detect viral proteins in both cancer and control specimens. These results may indicate that BKV is not associated with the development of colorectal adenocarcinoma in patients in the Western Province of Saudi Arabia.

  11. Irbesartan, an FDA approved drug for hypertension and diabetic nephropathy, is a potent inhibitor for hepatitis B virus entry by disturbing Na(+)-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jun; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-yu; Mao, Ying-ying; Liu, Nan-nan; Wang, Sheng-qi

    2015-08-01

    The liver-specific Na(+)-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) was recently identified as an entry receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) hepatotropic infection. In this study, an NTCP-overexpressing HepG2 cell line named HepG2.N9 susceptible to HBV infection was established using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technology. Using this cell line, irbesartan, the new NTCP-interfering molecule reported recently, was demonstrated here to effectively inhibit HBV infection with an IC50 of 3.3μM for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression and exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity up to 1000μM. Irbesartan suppressed HBV uptake weakly but inhibited HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) formation efficiently at physiological temperature. These results suggested that irbesartan targeted HBV infection at a post-uptake prior to cccDNA formation step such as the cell membrane fusion. Based on these findings, irbesartan, an FDA approved drug for hypertension and diabetic nephropathy, could be a potential candidate for treatment of HBV infection although further in vivo experiments are required.

  12. BK channel activators and their therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bentzen, Bo H.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rønn, Lars C. B.; Grunnet, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K+ channel (KCa1.1, BK, MaxiK) is ubiquitously expressed in the body, and holds the ability to integrate changes in intracellular calcium and membrane potential. This makes the BK channel an important negative feedback system linking increases in intracellular calcium to outward hyperpolarizing potassium currents. Consequently, the channel has many important physiological roles including regulation of smooth muscle tone, neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Additionally, cardioprotective roles have been revealed in recent years. After a short introduction to the structure, function and regulation of BK channels, we review the small organic molecules activating BK channels and how these tool compounds have helped delineate the roles of BK channels in health and disease. PMID:25346695

  13. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  14. Application of fibrin glue to damaged bladder mucosa in a case of BK viral hemorrhagic cystitis.

    PubMed

    Purves, J Todd; Graham, Michael L; Ramakumar, Sanjay

    2005-09-01

    BK virus is a common cause of severe hemorrhagic cystitis refractory to standard treatment. We describe a technique to achieve hemostasis after failed conservative therapy using fibrin glue applied suprapubically while visualizing and insufflating the bladder through a cystoscope. Long-term hemostasis was achieved using this novel procedure.

  15. BK polyomavirus in kidney transplant recipients: screening, monitoring and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Varella, Rafael Brandão; Almeida, Jorge Reis; Lopes, Patrícia de Fátima; Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff de; Menezes, Paulo; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2014-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a causal agent of nephropathy, ureteral stenosis and hemorrhagic cystitis in kidney transplant recipients, and is considered an important emerging disease in transplantation. Regular screening for BKPyV reactivation mainly during the first 2 years posttransplant, with subsequent pre-emptive reduction of immunosuppression is considered the best option to avoid disease progression, since successful clearance or reduction of viremia is achieved in the vast majority of patients within 6 months. The use of drugs with antiviral properties for patients with persistent viremia has been attempted despite unclear benefits. Clinical manifestations of BKPyV nephropathy, current strategies for diagnosis and monitoring of BKPyV infection, management of immunosuppressive regimen after detection of BKPyV reactivation and the use of antiviral drugs are discussed in this review.

  16. [Lithium nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Ireneusz; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are the first-line drug therapy in the treatment of uni- and bipolar disorder since the sixties of the twentieth century. In the mid-70s, the first information about their nephrotoxicity appeared. Lithium salts have a narrow therapeutic index. Side effects during treatment are polyuria, polydipsia and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Accidental intoxication can cause acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy while receiving long-term lithium salt can lead to the development of chronic kidney disease. The renal biopsy changes revealed a type of chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy. The imaging studies revealed the presence of numerous symmetric microcysts. Care of the patient receiving lithium should include regular determination of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and monitoring of urine volume. In case of deterioration of renal function reducing the dose should be considered.

  17. BK and JC polyomavirus infections in Tunisian renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Boukoum, Hanen; Nahdi, Imen; Sahtout, Wissal; Skiri, Habib; Aloui, Sabra; Achour, Abdelatif; Segondy, Michel; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the rate of BK (BKPyV) and JC (JCPyV) polyomavirus infections and their influence on allograft function in Tunisian renal transplant recipients. A total of 72 renal transplant recipients were studied. BKPyV and JCPyV were detected and quantified by real-time PCR in urine and plasma. Demographic and laboratory characteristics were collected for each patient. Polyomavirus DNAuria was detected in 54 (75%) of renal transplant recipients: 26 (36%) had BKPyV DNAuria, 20 (28%) had JCPyV DNAuria, and 8 (11%) had a dual BKPyV/JCPyV DNAuria. BKPyV DNAemia was detected in four (5.5%) patients, whereas no patient had JCPyV viremia. More than 70% of BKPyV and JCPyV infections started within the first 3 months post-transplant. The risk for positive DNAemia was observed in patients with DNAuria level >10(7) copies/ml. BK Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (BKPyVAN) was observed in two patients. This study highlights the high frequency of BKPyV and JCPyV viruria during the first year post-transplant with the highest incidence observed in the third month. We identified several risk factors that were associated with BKV DNAuria including age, sex of patients, and the use of tacrolimus instead of cyclosporine A at month 3. The use of cyclosporine A instead of tacrolimus was identified as risk factor for JCV viruria in month 3. No statistical difference in the allograft function was found between BKPyV and/or JCPyV infected and uninfected patients.

  18. Efficacy of Levofloxacin in the Treatment of BK Viremia: A Multicenter, Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Belinda T.; Gabardi, Steven; Grafals, Monica; Hofmann, R. Michael; Akalin, Enver; Aljanabi, Aws; Mandelbrot, Didier A.; Adey, Deborah B.; Heher, Eliot; Fan, Pang-Yen; Conte, Sarah; Dyer-Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives BK virus reactivation in kidney transplant recipients can lead to progressive allograft injury. Reduction of immunosuppression remains the cornerstone of treatment for active BK infection. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are known to have in vitro antiviral properties, but the evidence for their use in patients with BK viremia is inconclusive. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of levofloxacin in the treatment of BK viremia. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Enrollment in this prospective, multicenter, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial occurred from July 2009 to March 2012. Thirty-nine kidney transplant recipients with BK viremia were randomly assigned to receive levofloxacin, 500 mg daily, or placebo for 30 days. Immunosuppression in all patients was adjusted on the basis of standard clinical practices at each institution. Plasma BK viral load and serum creatinine were measured monthly for 3 months and at 6 months. Results At the 3-month follow-up, the percentage reductions in BK viral load were 70.3% and 69.1% in the levofloxacin group and the placebo group, respectively (P=0.93). The percentage reductions in BK viral load were also equivalent at 1 month (58% versus and 67.1%; P=0.47) and 6 months (82.1% versus 90.5%; P=0.38). Linear regression analysis of serum creatinine versus time showed no difference in allograft function between the two study groups during the follow-up period. Conclusions A 30-day course of levofloxacin does not significantly improve BK viral load reduction or allograft function when used in addition to overall reduction of immunosuppression. PMID:24482066

  19. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  20. Nationwide survey of BK polyomavirus associated hemorrhagic cystitis in adult allogeneic stem cell transplantation among haematologists and urologists.

    PubMed

    Schneidewind, Laila; Neumann, Thomas; Kranz, Jennifer; Knoll, Florian; Pelzer, Alexandre Egon; Schmidt, Christian; Krüger, William

    2017-02-03

    There are no epidemiological data on BK virus associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BKHC) in adult allogeneic stem cell transplantation in Germany available and associations with clinical conditions like GvHD are controversially discussed. Therefore, we conducted a nationwide survey among haematologists and urologists about this disease. We developed two questionnaires, one for haematologists (26 items) and one for urologists (20 items) concerning BKHC in adult allogeneic stem cell transplantation with epidemiological data and clinical implications. The survey was sent out at least three times to EBMT registered centres performing at least five transplantations a year, leading to 39 centres. The recruiting time was between January and June 2016. Total response rates were 76.9% among haematologists and 74.4% among urologists. BKHC seems to appear less frequent in this survey than it is described in the literature. Six deaths in the last 5 years due to this disease have been reported. Interestingly, haematologists as well as urologists mostly think that local therapy is most effective while 50.0% stated that there is no real effective oral or intravenous medication. Associations with other clinical conditions mentioned were heterogeneous, e.g. transplantation type, CMV reactivation, acute GvHD, nephropathy and worse clinical outcome. There was a significant discrepancy between haematologists and urologist concerning the association with acute GvHD (p = 0.004). We need prospective, multicentric clinical studies to evaluate local therapy and for developing a risk stratification model since this disease can be severe with morbidity and rarely mortality. In our opinion, this should be an interdisciplinary approach.

  1. Blocking the BK Channel Impedes Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Elizabeth A.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Big-K[superscript +] conductance (BK)-channel mediated fast afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) following action potentials are reduced after eyeblink conditioning. Blocking BK channels with paxilline increases evoked firing frequency in vitro and spontaneous pyramidal activity in vivo. To examine how increased excitability after BK-channel blockade…

  2. Evaluating the BK 21 Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seong, Somi; Popper, Steven W.; Goldman, Charles A.; Evans, David K.; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brain Korea 21 program (BK21), an effort to improve Korean universities and research, has attracted a great deal of attention in Korea, producing the need to understand how well the program is meeting its goals. RAND developed a logic model for identifying program goals and dynamics, suggested quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods,…

  3. Molecular mechanism of pharmacological activation of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Guido; Cui, Yong-Mei; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Soom, Malle; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (Slo1 BK) channels serve numerous cellular functions, and their dysregulation is implicated in various diseases. Drugs activating BK channels therefore bear substantial therapeutic potential, but their deployment has been hindered in part because the mode of action remains obscure. Here we provide mechanistic insight into how the dehydroabietic acid derivative Cym04 activates BK channels. As a representative of NS1619-like BK openers, Cym04 reversibly left-shifts the half-activation voltage of Slo1 BK channels. Using an established allosteric BK gating model, the Cym04 effect can be simulated by a shift of the voltage sensor and the ion conduction gate equilibria toward the activated and open state, respectively. BK activation by Cym04 occurs in a splice variant-specific manner; it does not occur in such Slo1 BK channels using an alternative neuronal exon 9, which codes for the linker connecting the transmembrane segment S6 and the cytosolic RCK1 domain—the S6/RCK linker. In addition, Cym04 does not affect Slo1 BK channels with a two-residue deletion within this linker. Mutagenesis and model-based gating analysis revealed that BK openers, such as Cym04 and NS1619 but not mallotoxin, activate BK channels by functionally interacting with the S6/RCK linker, mimicking site-specific shortening of this purported passive spring, which transmits force from the cytosolic gating ring structure to open the channel's gate. PMID:22331907

  4. Early identification of renal transplant recipients with high risk of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Teutsch, K; Schweitzer, F; Knops, E; Kaiser, R; Pfister, H; Verheyen, J; Göbel, H; Cingöz, T; Di Cristanziano, V

    2015-12-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKPyV) is ubiquitous among humans. Following primary infection, the virus remains latent predominantly in the hosts' uroepithelial cells. Up to 10 % of renal transplant recipients show a viral reactivation that can lead to polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN). In the absence of early treatments, the risk of graft loss is up to 80 %. Monitoring viral load in urine and plasma by real-time PCR after transplantation is the most common diagnostic tool to detect viral reactivation. In the present retrospective study, BKPyV-DNA loads in urine and plasma by quantitative real-time PCR were associated with clinical data, including HLA haplotype, blood parameters and viral genotype, of 40 renal transplant recipients at the University Clinics of Cologne. Seventeen out of 329 patients screened for BKPyV from January 2009 to October 2013 were detected BKPyV positive in urine only, whereas in 23 patients the virus became additionally detectable in plasma. Among these, ten patients progressed to PyVAN. Overall, the present study showed that the detection from the third month onwards after transplantation of a first viruric episode with a median viral load of 1 × 10(8) copies/mL, followed after few days by a first viremic episode with a median viral load of >1 × 10(4) copies/mL, was strongly associated with the development of PyVAN. In conclusion, the viral load and the temporal profile of the first viruric and viremic episode post-transplantation, in combination with specific features of the host immune response, should be considered as relevant clinical determinants of the risk of renal transplant recipients to progress to PyVAN.

  5. Diabetic nephropathy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common etiology for end-stage renal disease, complicates approximately 5% of insulin-dependent diabetic pregnancies. Assessment for vasculopathy is important before pregnancy because nephropathy can increase perinatal risks including potential for preeclampsia and preterm birth. Counseling women receiving renoprotective medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has recently become complicated in light of new information suggesting a teratogenic risk for these agents. Most reproductive age women with overt diabetic nephropathy have preserved renal function and do not seem to have the progression of their disease affected by pregnancy. Perinatal outcomes are excellent for these women who have received care in tertiary institutions. However, there are relatively few women with significant renal impairment included in case series of pregnancies complicated by diabetic nephropathy. For these women, adverse perinatal outcomes are more common, and the effect of pregnancy on the course of their disease is less certain.

  6. Acute phosphate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Habibzadeh, Seyed Mahmoud; Mesbah, Seyed Alireza

    2014-05-01

    We present acute phosphate nephropathy in a 28-year-old man, which was developed after a car accident due to rhabdomyolysis. Treatment of acute kidney injury was done with administration of sodium bicarbonate.

  7. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  8. Graphs for Isotopes of 97-Bk (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 97-Bk (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97).

  9. [Absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Zalikin, G A; Nisimov, P G

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with albino mongrel female rats a study was made of the absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract after a single per os administration. The bulk of 249Bk (96 per cent) administered either intravenously or per os was mainly deposited in the skeleton and liver. The value of 249Bk absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by days 4 and 8 following administration was 0.05 per cent.

  10. Peptide toxins and small-molecule blockers of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mu; Liu, San-ling; Sun, Pei-bei; Pan, Hao; Tian, Chang-lin; Zhang, Long-hua

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels play important roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability and the control of smooth muscle contractions. BK channels can be activated by changes in both the membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Here, we provide an overview of the structural and pharmacological properties of BK channel blockers. First, the properties of different venom peptide toxins from scorpions and snakes are described, with a focus on their characteristic structural motifs, including their disulfide bond formation pattern, the binding interface between the toxin and BK channel, and the functional consequence of the blockage of BK channels by these toxins. Then, some representative non-peptide blockers of BK channels are also described, including their molecular formula and pharmacological effects on BK channels. The detailed categorization and descriptions of these BK channel blockers will provide mechanistic insights into the blockade of BK channels. The structures of peptide toxins and non-peptide compounds could provide templates for the design of new channel blockers, and facilitate the optimization of lead compounds for further therapeutic applications in neurological disorders or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26725735

  11. Mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Elling, F.; Møller, T.

    1973-01-01

    In Denmark a nephropathy in pigs characterized by tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis has been identified frequently during the last 5 decades in the course of meat inspection in slaughterhouses. The disease was first described by Larsen, who recognized the connexion between feeding mouldy rye to pigs and the development of the nephropathy. In this study kidneys were examined from 19 pigs coming from a farm with an outbreak of nephropathy. The barley fed to the pigs was contaminated with the mycotoxin ochratoxin A. Histological examination revealed different degrees of change ranging from slight regressive changes in the tubular epithelium and periglomerular and interstitial fibrosis to tubular atrophy, thickened basement membranes, glomerular sclerosis, and marked fibrosis. These differences were considered to be due to differences in the length of time of exposure to the mouldy barley and differences in the amount of mycotoxin consumed by the individual pig. However, it will be necessary to carry out experiments using crystalline ochratoxin A in order to prove such a relationship. Mycotoxins have also been suggested as etiological factors in Balkan nephropathy in man, which in the initial stages is characterized by tubular lesions similar to those seen in mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4546872

  12. Arrangement of the genome of the human papovavirus RF virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pater, A; Pater, M M; di Mayorca, G

    1980-01-01

    DNA from plaque-purified RF virus, a variant of BK virus, was found to contain two species of molecules. Hybridization of each DNA species to the fragments of BK virus DNA revealed that one species had a deletion corresponding to at least 50% of the late region and the other had a deletion corresponding to at least 40% of the early region of BK virus DNA. Analysis by cleavage of each RF virus DNA species with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, HindIII, AvaII, and PvuII, when compared with BK virus DNA, revealed that the size and number of fragments were different. These results suggest the loss of some restriction sites and the appearance of new sites, probably as a result of base changes in each RF virus DNA species. Furthermore, analysis of the restriction map of each DNA molecule revealed in insertion(s) in both DNA species. Images PMID:6253672

  13. [The blastomogenic effect of 249Bk in rats].

    PubMed

    Moskalev, Iu I; Zalikin, G A; Zhorova, E S; Nisimov, P G

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that 249Bk nitrate injected intraperitoneally in a wide range of doses to albino mongrel female rats is preferentially accumulated in the bony tissue (39.8%) and liver (18.4%). Incorporation of 249Bk to rats results in development of osteosarcomas, neoplasms of hemopoietic and lymphoid tissues, mammary tumours, thyroid and pituitary glands.

  14. Introducing the Big Knowledge to Use (BK2U) challenge.

    PubMed

    Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Zheng, Ling; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the Big Data to Knowledge initiative is to develop methods for discovering new knowledge from large amounts of data. However, if the resulting knowledge is so large that it resists comprehension, referred to here as Big Knowledge (BK), how can it be used properly and creatively? We call this secondary challenge, Big Knowledge to Use. Without a high-level mental representation of the kinds of knowledge in a BK knowledgebase, effective or innovative use of the knowledge may be limited. We describe summarization and visualization techniques that capture the big picture of a BK knowledgebase, possibly created from Big Data. In this research, we distinguish between assertion BK and rule-based BK (rule BK) and demonstrate the usefulness of summarization and visualization techniques of assertion BK for clinical phenotyping. As an example, we illustrate how a summary of many intracranial bleeding concepts can improve phenotyping, compared to the traditional approach. We also demonstrate the usefulness of summarization and visualization techniques of rule BK for drug-drug interaction discovery.

  15. Developmental expression of BK channels in chick cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cochlear hair cells are high-frequency sensory receptors. At the onset of hearing, hair cells acquire fast, calcium-activated potassium (BK) currents, turning immature spiking cells into functional receptors. In non-mammalian vertebrates, the number and kinetics of BK channels are varied systematically along the frequency-axis of the cochlea giving rise to an intrinsic electrical tuning mechanism. The processes that control the appearance and heterogeneity of hair cell BK currents remain unclear. Results Quantitative PCR results showed a non-monotonic increase in BK α subunit expression throughout embryonic development of the chick auditory organ (i.e. basilar papilla). Expression peaked near embryonic day (E) 19 with six times the transcript level of E11 sensory epithelia. The steady increase in gene expression from E11 to E19 could not explain the sudden acquisition of currents at E18-19, implicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. Protein expression also preceded function but progressed in a sequence from diffuse cytoplasmic staining at early ages to punctate membrane-bound clusters at E18. Electrophysiology data confirmed a continued refinement of BK trafficking from E18 to E20, indicating a translocation of BK clusters from supranuclear to subnuclear domains over this critical developmental age. Conclusions Gene products encoding BK α subunits are detected up to 8 days before the acquisition of anti-BK clusters and functional BK currents. Therefore, post-transcriptional mechanisms seem to play a key role in the delayed emergence of calcium-sensitive currents. We suggest that regulation of translation and trafficking of functional α subunits, near voltage-gated calcium channels, leads to functional BK currents at the onset of hearing. PMID:20003519

  16. AN ECHO OF SUPERNOVA 2008bk

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2013-08-01

    I have discovered a prominent light echo around the low-luminosity Type II-plateau supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, seen in archival images obtained with the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The echo is a partial ring, brighter to the north and east than to the south and west. The analysis of the echo I present suggests that it is due to the SN light pulse scattered by a sheet, or sheets, of dust located Almost-Equal-To 15 pc from the SN. The composition of the dust is assumed to be of standard Galactic diffuse interstellar grains. The visual extinction of the dust responsible for the echo is A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.05 mag in addition to the extinction due to the Galactic foreground toward the host galaxy. That the SN experienced much less overall extinction implies that it is seen through a less dense portion of the interstellar medium in its environment. The late-time HST photometry of SN 2008bk also clearly demonstrates that the progenitor star has vanished.

  17. Determination of real oxidation potentials of the Bk /SUP IV/ -Bk /SUP III/ pair in phosphoric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, S.A.; Kulyako, Y.M.; Lebedev, I.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    The authors measure the oxidation potential of the Bk(IV)-Bk(III) pair in H3PO4 solutions by a direct spectroelectrchemical method. When the phosphoric acid concentration is increased from 3 to 10 M, its value decreases from 1.123 to 1.065 V (with respect to a normal hydrogen electrode).

  18. Evolution of the BK polyomavirus: epidemiological, anthropological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Yoshiaki; Sugimoto, Chie; Zhong, Shan; Homma, Yukio

    2009-07-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is essentially ubiquitous in all human populations worldwide. Asymptomatic infection with this virus occurs during early childhood, leading to life-long persistence in the kidney. BKV has four subtypes that can be identified using serological and genotyping methods. The evolutionary aspects of BKV have remained poorly understood due to the limited availability of BKV genomes, since urinary excretion of BKV DNA is detected primarily in immunocompromised individuals. However, we have found that BKV DNA sequences can often be amplified from non-immunocompromised elderly individuals, using a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with highly concentrated urinary DNA as the source of viral DNA. Using this approach, we have PCR-amplified and sequenced a large number of partial and complete BKV genomes from various human populations worldwide and conducted a series of evolutionary studies using these sequences. We have shown that subtypes I and IV evolved into four and six subgroups, respectively, with each having a close relationship with a particular human population. In addition, we have provided evidence supporting the hypothesis that BKV strains with the archetypal transcriptional control region (TCR) circulate in the human population. In this review, we describe these findings and discuss their epidemiological, anthropological and clinical implications.

  19. [IgA nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanović, Gordana

    2004-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is glomerular disease first described in 1968 by Berger, named after him Morbus Berger. The disease is characterized by the presence of IgA dominant or codominant immunoglobulin deposits in glomerular mesangium which can be demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Clinical manifestations of IgA nephropathy in the majority of cases is hematuria which can be macro or microscopic, isolated or combined with proteinuria which can be of nephrotic range. In some cases nephrotic syndrome can be the first clinical presentation. In 10% renal insufficiency can be present at the onset of the disease. By light microscopy IgA can manifest any of the histologic phenotypes of immune complex mediated proliferative glomerulonephritis. According to light microscopy findings a classification system have been used to categorize the histologic patterns of IgA nephropathy. Glomerular changes in IgA nephropathy are proliferative and can be focal or diffuse accompanied by crescentic formation in many cases. Immune deposits seen by electron microscopy appear as electron dense deposits most numerous in mesangium.

  20. Diabetic nephropathy: preventing progression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to one third of people with type 1 or 2 diabetes will develop microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria after 20 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and late nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and late nephropathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, glycaemic control, protein restriction, and tight control of blood pressure. PMID:21418671

  1. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. Causes IgA is a protein, called an antibody , that helps the body fight infections. IgA nephropathy occurs when too much of this protein is deposited in the kidneys. IgA builds up inside the small blood vessels of the kidney. Structures in the kidney called glomeruli become inflamed and ...

  2. A detached binary system BK Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircan, Osman; Kaya, Yalcin; Tufekcioglu, Zeki

    1994-12-01

    The UBV photometry of the detached F-type eclipsing binary BK Pegasi is presented. The light curve solution by a simple spherical model assumption suggests that a slightly hotter, larger and more luminous primary was eclipsed during the primary minimum. Combined with the radial velocity curves in Popper (1983), it was used to determine anew the system's parameters. The age and the metal abundance of the system were estimated as (3.3 +/- 0.2) x 109 yr and z = 0.028 +/- 0.003 from a comparison with the new grids of stellar models and the isochrones by Schaller et al. (1993). The distance of the system was estimated as 290 pc.

  3. Pirfenidone for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ix, Joachim H.; Mathew, Anna V.; Cho, Monique; Pflueger, Axel; Dunn, Stephen R.; Francos, Barbara; Sharma, Shoba; Falkner, Bonita; McGowan, Tracy A.; Donohue, Michael; RamachandraRao, Satish; Xu, Ronghui; Fervenza, Fernando C.; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Pirfenidone is an oral antifibrotic agent that benefits diabetic nephropathy in animal models, but whether it is effective for human diabetic nephropathy is unknown. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 77 subjects with diabetic nephropathy who had elevated albuminuria and reduced estimated GFR (eGFR) (20 to 75 ml/min per 1.73 m2). The prespecified primary outcome was a change in eGFR after 1 year of therapy. We randomly assigned 26 subjects to placebo, 26 to pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d, and 25 to pirfenidone at 2400 mg/d. Among the 52 subjects who completed the study, the mean eGFR increased in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group (+3.3 ± 8.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2) whereas the mean eGFR decreased in the placebo group (−2.2 ± 4.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P = 0.026 versus pirfenidone at 1200 mg/d). The dropout rate was high (11 of 25) in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and the change in eGFR was not significantly different from placebo (−1.9 ± 6.7 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Of the 77 subjects, 4 initiated hemodialysis in the placebo group, 1 in the pirfenidone 2400-mg/d group, and none in the pirfenidone 1200-mg/d group during the study (P = 0.25). Baseline levels of plasma biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis significantly correlated with baseline eGFR but did not predict response to therapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that pirfenidone is a promising agent for individuals with overt diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21511828

  4. [Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aurélie

    2012-04-01

    Familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy is a rare autosomal dominant disease. It is characterized by abnormal handling of urate responsible for hyperuricaemia often complicated of gouty arthritis. Renal failure is due to tubulointerstitial nephritis. Ultrasonography sometimes finds renal cysts of variable size and number. Renal histology, although not specific, shows interstitial fibrosis, atrophic tubules, sometimes enlarged and with irregular membrane thickening. Renal failure progresses to end stage between 30 and 60 years of age. Allopurinol treatment is recommended at the early stages of the disease, its efficacy on slowing down the progression of the disease is however not proven. There is genetic heterogeneity in familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy. Uromodulin encoding Tamm-Horsfall protein is the only gene to date identified, responsible in less than half of the families. The described mutations most often concern a cystein and are clustering in exon 4. These mutations result in abnormal retention of the protein in endoplasmic reticulum of Henle loop cells and in reduction of its urinary excretion. The pathophysiology of the disease is however still dubious. Indeed, Tamm-Horsfall protein functions are not well known (anti-infectious role, cristallisation inhibition, immunomodulating role). Knock-out mice do not develop renal phenotype but are more prone to E. coli urinary infections. Uromodulin gene mutations have also been described in medullary cystic kidney disease, an autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial nephropathy, considered at first as a distinct disorder. Genetic progress allowed us to consider familial juvenile hyperuricemic nephropathy and medullary cystic kidney disease as the two facets of a same disease, we should call uromodulin associated kidney diseases. At least two other genes have been implicated in similar clinical presentation: TCF2 and the gene encoding renin.

  5. Palmitoylation gates phosphorylation-dependent regulation of BK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lijun; Jeffries, Owen; McClafferty, Heather; Molyvdas, Adam; Rowe, Iain C M; Saleem, Fozia; Chen, Lie; Greaves, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Luke H; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Ruth, Peter; Shipston, Michael J

    2008-12-30

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels are important regulators of physiological homeostasis and their function is potently modulated by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. PKA regulates the channel through phosphorylation of residues within the intracellular C terminus of the pore-forming alpha-subunits. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit effects changes in channel activity are unknown. Inhibition of BK channels by PKA depends on phosphorylation of only a single alpha-subunit in the channel tetramer containing an alternatively spliced insert (STREX) suggesting that phosphorylation results in major conformational rearrangements of the C terminus. Here, we define the mechanism of PKA inhibition of BK channels and demonstrate that this regulation is conditional on the palmitoylation status of the channel. We show that the cytosolic C terminus of the STREX BK channel uniquely interacts with the plasma membrane via palmitoylation of evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues in the STREX insert. PKA phosphorylation of the serine residue immediately upstream of the conserved palmitoylated cysteine residues within STREX dissociates the C terminus from the plasma membrane, inhibiting STREX channel activity. Abolition of STREX palmitoylation by site-directed mutagenesis or pharmacological inhibition of palmitoyl transferases prevents PKA-mediated inhibition of BK channels. Thus, palmitoylation gates BK channel regulation by PKA phosphorylation. Palmitoylation and phosphorylation are both dynamically regulated; thus, cross-talk between these 2 major posttranslational signaling cascades provides a mechanism for conditional regulation of BK channels. Interplay of these distinct signaling cascades has important implications for the dynamic regulation of BK channels and physiological homeostasis.

  6. New Structural Insights into the Genome and Minor Capsid Proteins of BK Polyomavirus using Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hurdiss, Daniel L.; Morgan, Ethan L.; Thompson, Rebecca F.; Prescott, Emma L.; Panou, Margarita M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BK polyomavirus is the causative agent of several diseases in transplant patients and the immunosuppressed. In order to better understand the structure and life cycle of BK, we produced infectious virions and VP1-only virus-like particles in cell culture, and determined their three-dimensional structures using cryo-electron microscopy (EM) and single-particle image processing. The resulting 7.6-Å resolution structure of BK and 9.1-Å resolution of the virus-like particles are the highest-resolution cryo-EM structures of any polyomavirus. These structures confirm that the architecture of the major structural protein components of these human polyomaviruses are similar to previous structures from other hosts, but give new insight into the location and role of the enigmatic minor structural proteins, VP2 and VP3. We also observe two shells of electron density, which we attribute to a structurally ordered part of the viral genome, and discrete contacts between this density and both VP1 and the minor capsid proteins. PMID:26996963

  7. BK Polyomavirus Genotypes Represent Distinct Serotypes with Distinct Entry Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Diana V.; Ray, Upasana; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Çuburu, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) causes significant urinary tract pathogenesis in immunosuppressed individuals, including kidney and bone marrow transplant recipients. It is currently unclear whether BKV-neutralizing antibodies can moderate or prevent BKV disease. We developed reporter pseudoviruses based on seven divergent BKV isolates and performed neutralization assays on sera from healthy human subjects. The results demonstrate that BKV genotypes I, II, III, and IV are fully distinct serotypes. While nearly all healthy subjects had BKV genotype I-neutralizing antibodies, a majority of subjects did not detectably neutralize genotype III or IV. Surprisingly, BKV subgenotypes Ib1 and Ib2 can behave as fully distinct serotypes. This difference is governed by as few as two residues adjacent to the cellular glycan receptor-binding site on the virion surface. Serological analysis of mice given virus-like particle (VLP)-based BKV vaccines confirmed these findings. Mice administered a multivalent VLP vaccine showed high-titer serum antibody responses that potently cross-neutralized all tested BKV genotypes. Interestingly, each of the neutralization serotypes bound a distinct spectrum of cell surface receptors, suggesting a possible connection between escape from recognition by neutralizing antibodies and cellular attachment mechanisms. The finding implies that different BKV genotypes have different cellular tropisms and pathogenic potentials in vivo. Individuals who are infected with one BKV serotype may remain humorally vulnerable to other BKV serotypes after implementation of T cell immunosuppression. Thus, prevaccinating organ transplant recipients with a multivalent BKV VLP vaccine might reduce the risk of developing posttransplant BKV disease. PMID:23843634

  8. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  9. Pilot conversion trial from mycophenolic acid to everolimus in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with BK viruria and/or viremia.

    PubMed

    Belliere, Julie; Kamar, Nassim; Mengelle, Catherine; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Doumerc, Nicolas; Game, Xavier; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Esposito, Laure; Debiol, Benedicte; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-03-01

    Immunosuppression using everolimus (EVR) plus low-dose tacrolimus (Tac) is commonly used in organ transplantation. EVR has potential antiviral effects. Herein, the long-term outcomes and impacts of Tac-EVR on the BK virus are reported in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients. The initial immunosuppressive regimen combined steroids, Tac, and mycophenolic acid (MPA). At a median of 141 (34-529) days post-transplantation, seven stable ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients were converted from MPA to EVR because of active BK replication, and compared with a reference group of fourteen ABO-incompatible patients receiving classical Tac plus MPA. At 1 month before conversion, at 1, 3 months after, and at last follow-up, clinical and biological parameters were monitored. The median time from conversion to the last follow-up was 784 (398-866) days. Conversion to EVR caused no change to rejection episodes or immunological status (isoagglutinin titers, anti-HLA antibodies). At last follow-up, median eGFR was similar in the Tac-MPA versus Tac-EVR group (40 [range: 14-56] vs. 54.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [range: 0-128], P = 0.07). The major adverse event was dyslipidemia. Interestingly, conversion from MPA to EVR decreased BK viral load in five patients. ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with an active BK virus infection may benefit from conversion to EVR.

  10. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  11. [Chronic transplant nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Campistol Plana, J M

    2008-01-01

    In 2007 there were important scientific contributions in the field of kidney transplant and specifically in chronic transplant nephropathy (interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy). A new nomenclature and classification of chronic kidney disease was probably the most important contribution in this entity. Use of the C4d stain has allowed the concepts of glomerulopathy to be updated and to reveal the frequency of this entity and its impact in kidney transplant. Finally, two experimental studies provide new perspectives on the treatment of chronic kidney disease such as the use of statins or the use of pyridoxamine to block glycation end products.

  12. Heroin crystal nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Josef Edrik Keith; Merhi, Basma; Gregory, Oliver; Hu, Susie; Henriksen, Kammi; Gohh, Reginald

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present an interesting case of acute kidney injury and severe metabolic alkalosis in a patient with a history of heavy heroin abuse. Urine microscopy showed numerous broomstick-like crystals. These crystals are also identified in light and electron microscopy. We hypothesize that heroin crystalizes in an alkaline pH, resulting in tubular obstruction and acute kidney injury. Management is mainly supportive as there is no known specific therapy for this condition. This paper highlights the utility of urine microscopy in diagnosing the etiology of acute kidney injury and proposes a novel disease called heroin crystal nephropathy.

  13. Scorpion sting nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Chaitanya

    2011-01-01

    Scorpion envenomations are ubiquitous, but nephropathy is a rare manifestation, reported mainly from the Middle East and North Africa. Rapid venom redistribution from blood, delayed excretion from the kidneys, direct toxicity of venom enzymes, cytokine release and afferent arteriolar constriction have been seen in experimental animals. Haemoglobinuria, acute tubular necrosis, interstitial nephritis and haemolytic–uraemic syndrome have been documented in human victims of scorpion envenomation. Epidemiology, venom components and toxins, effects on the laboratory mammals especially the kidneys and reports of renal failure in humans are reviewed in this article. PMID:25984198

  14. IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jennifer C; Haas, Mark; Reich, Heather N

    2017-02-03

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of CKD and renal failure. Recent international collaborative efforts have led to important discoveries that have improved our understanding of some of the key steps involved in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN. Furthermore, establishment of multicenter networks has contributed to rigorous design and execution of clinical trials that have provided important insights regarding immunotherapy in IgAN. In this article, we review emerging developments in clinical and translational IgAN research and describe how these novel findings will influence future strategies to improve the outcome of patients with IgAN.

  15. Rapid detection of urinary polyomavirus BK by heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Chen; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chang, Ying-Feng; Chou, Chien; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2014-01-01

    In renal transplant patients, immunosuppressive therapy may result in the reactivation of polyomavirus BK (BKV), leading to polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN), which inevitably causes allograft failure. Since the treatment outcomes of PVAN remain unsatisfactory, early identification and continuous monitoring of BKV reactivation and reduction of immunosuppressants are essential to prevent PVAN development. The present study demonstrated that the developed dual-channel heterodyne-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is applicable for the rapid detection of urinary BKV. The use of a symmetrical reference channel integrated with the poly(ethylene glycol)-based low-fouling self-assembled monolayer to reduce the environmental variations and the nonspecific noise was proven to enhance the sensitivity in urinary BKV detection. Experimentally, the detection limit of the biosensor for BKV detection was estimated to be around 8500 copies/mL. In addition, urine samples from five renal transplant patients were tested to rapidly distinguish PVAN-positive and PVAN-negative renal transplant patients. By virtue of its simplicity, rapidity, and applicability, the SPR biosensor is a remarkable potential to be used for continuous clinical monitoring of BKV reactivation.

  16. BK channel inactivation gates daytime excitability in the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Joshua P; Montgomery, Jenna R; Meredith, Andrea L

    2016-03-04

    Inactivation is an intrinsic property of several voltage-dependent ion channels, closing the conduction pathway during membrane depolarization and dynamically regulating neuronal activity. BK K(+) channels undergo N-type inactivation via their β2 subunit, but the physiological significance is not clear. Here, we report that inactivating BK currents predominate during the day in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's intrinsic clock circuit, reducing steady-state current levels. At night inactivation is diminished, resulting in larger BK currents. Loss of β2 eliminates inactivation, abolishing the diurnal variation in both BK current magnitude and SCN firing, and disrupting behavioural rhythmicity. Selective restoration of inactivation via the β2 N-terminal 'ball-and-chain' domain rescues BK current levels and firing rate, unexpectedly contributing to the subthreshold membrane properties that shift SCN neurons into the daytime 'upstate'. Our study reveals the clock employs inactivation gating as a biophysical switch to set the diurnal variation in suprachiasmatic nucleus excitability that underlies circadian rhythm.

  17. BK channel inactivation gates daytime excitability in the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Joshua P.; Montgomery, Jenna R.; Meredith, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation is an intrinsic property of several voltage-dependent ion channels, closing the conduction pathway during membrane depolarization and dynamically regulating neuronal activity. BK K+ channels undergo N-type inactivation via their β2 subunit, but the physiological significance is not clear. Here, we report that inactivating BK currents predominate during the day in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the brain's intrinsic clock circuit, reducing steady-state current levels. At night inactivation is diminished, resulting in larger BK currents. Loss of β2 eliminates inactivation, abolishing the diurnal variation in both BK current magnitude and SCN firing, and disrupting behavioural rhythmicity. Selective restoration of inactivation via the β2 N-terminal ‘ball-and-chain' domain rescues BK current levels and firing rate, unexpectedly contributing to the subthreshold membrane properties that shift SCN neurons into the daytime ‘upstate'. Our study reveals the clock employs inactivation gating as a biophysical switch to set the diurnal variation in suprachiasmatic nucleus excitability that underlies circadian rhythm. PMID:26940770

  18. BK Channels Reveal Novel Phosphate Sensitivity in SNr Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Juan Juan; Chen, Lianwan; Duan, Xuezhi; Song, Xueqin; Su, Wenting; Zhang, Peng; Li, Li; Bai, Shuyun; Sun, Yingchun; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Whether large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels are present in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) is a matter of debate. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined the functional expression of BK channels in neurons of the SNr and showed that the channels were activated or inhibited by internal high-energy phosphates (IHEPs) at positive and negative membrane potentials, respectively. SNr neurons showed membrane potential hyperpolarization under glucose-deprivation conditions which was attenuated by paxilline, a specific BK channel blocker. In addition, Fluo-3 fluorescence recording detected an increase in the level of internal free calcium ([Ca2+]i) during ischemic hyperpolarization. These results confirm that BK channels are present in SNr neurons and indicate that their unique IHEP sensitivity is requisite in neuronal ischemic responses. Bearing in mind that the KATP channel blocker tolbutamide also attenuated the hyperpolarization, we suggest that BK channels may play a protective role in the basal ganglia by modulating the excitability of SNr neurons along with KATP channels under ischemic stresses. PMID:23284908

  19. A BK (Slo1) channel journey from molecule to physiology

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gustavo F; Castillo, Karen; Enrique, Nicolás; Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Milesi, Verónica; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Ferreira, Gonzalo; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels are key actors in cell physiology, both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells and tissues. Through negative feedback between intracellular Ca2+ and membrane voltage, BK channels provide a damping mechanism for excitatory signals. Molecular modulation of these channels by alternative splicing, auxiliary subunits and post-translational modifications showed that these channels are subjected to many mechanisms that add diversity to the BK channel α subunit gene. This complexity of interactions modulates BK channel gating, modifying the energetic barrier of voltage sensor domain activation and channel opening. Regions for voltage as well as Ca2+ sensitivity have been identified, and the crystal structure generated by the 2 RCK domains contained in the C-terminal of the channel has been described. The linkage of these channels to many intracellular metabolites and pathways, as well as their modulation by extracellular natural agents, has been found to be relevant in many physiological processes. This review includes the hallmarks of BK channel biophysics and its physiological impact on specific cells and tissues, highlighting its relationship with auxiliary subunit expression. PMID:24025517

  20. An Unexpected Surge in Plasma BKPyV Viral Load Heralds the Development of BKPyV-Associated Metastatic Bladder Cancer in a Lung Transplant Recipient With BKPyV Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kuppachi, S; Holanda, D; Eberlein, M; Alexiev, B; Tyler, A J; Wissel, M C; Kleiboeker, S B; Thomas, C P

    2017-03-01

    We report a lung transplant recipient who developed BK polyoma virus (BKPyV) DNAemia and BKPyV nephropathy. With careful management of his immunosuppression he achieved significant reduction in BKPyV DNAemia and stabilization of his kidney function. He later developed a high-grade bladder cancer and shortly thereafter he experienced a major upsurge in the level of BKPyV DNAemia that coincided with the discovery of hepatic metastasis. Retrospectively, the bladder cancer and the hepatic secondary tumor stained uniformly for SV40 large T antigen, and the BKPyV DNA sequences identified in plasma corresponded to BKPyV DNA within hepatic tissue, indicating that the spike in BKPyV load was likely derived from the circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA following metastases of a BKV-associated cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a surge in BKPyV load in a patient with controlled BKPyVN that heralded the appearance of a metastatic urothelial malignancy. This report discusses the literature on BKPyV-associated malignancies and the possibility that unexplained increases in BKPyV DNAemia may be a biomarker for metastatic BKPyV-related urothelial cancer.

  1. The association between polyomavirus BK strains and BKV viruria in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Robert Y. L.; Li, Yi-Jung; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Lin, Chan-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a polyomavirus that cause of allograft dysfunction among kidney transplant recipients. The role of BKV infection in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients is not well understood neither for the relationship between various BKV strains with occurrence of BKV viral viruria. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of BKV infection and identified of BKV various strains in the urine of liver transplant recipients. There was not significant difference of renal outcome between high BKV viruria and low BKV viruria in the liver transplant recipients. The WW-non-coding control region (NCCR) BKV detected in urine was associated with higher urinary BKV load, whereas the Dunlop-NCCR BKV was detected in the urine of low urinary BKV load. An in vitro cultivation system demonstrated that WW-BKV strain exhibiting the higher viral DNA replication efficiency and higher BKV load. Altogether, this is the first study to demonstrate the impact of BKV strains on the occurrence of BK viruria in the liver transplant recipients. PMID:27338010

  2. B_K in unquenched QCD using improved staggered fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongjeong

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for BK calculated using improved staggered fermions with a mixed action (HYP-smeared staggered valence quarks and AsqTad staggered sea quarks). We investigate £¡ ¢ a2¤ effect due to non- the effect of non-degenerate quarks on BK and attempt to estimate the Goldstone pions in loops. We fit the data to continuum partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. We find that the quality of fit for BK improves if we include non-degenerate quark mass combinations. We also observe, however, that the fitting curve deviates from the data points in the light quark mass region. This may indicate the need to include taste-breaking in pion loops.

  3. Molecular Determinants of BK Channel Functional Diversity and Functioning.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Ramon; Castillo, Karen; Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels play many physiological roles ranging from the maintenance of smooth muscle tone to hearing and neurosecretion. BK channels are tetramers in which the pore-forming α subunit is coded by a single gene (Slowpoke, KCNMA1). In this review, we first highlight the physiological importance of this ubiquitous channel, emphasizing the role that BK channels play in different channelopathies. We next discuss the modular nature of BK channel-forming protein, in which the different modules (the voltage sensor and the Ca(2+) binding sites) communicate with the pore gates allosterically. In this regard, we review in detail the allosteric models proposed to explain channel activation and how the models are related to channel structure. Considering their extremely large conductance and unique selectivity to K(+), we also offer an account of how these two apparently paradoxical characteristics can be understood consistently in unison, and what we have learned about the conduction system and the activation gates using ions, blockers, and toxins. Attention is paid here to the molecular nature of the voltage sensor and the Ca(2+) binding sites that are located in a gating ring of known crystal structure and constituted by four COOH termini. Despite the fact that BK channels are coded by a single gene, diversity is obtained by means of alternative splicing and modulatory β and γ subunits. We finish this review by describing how the association of the α subunit with β or with γ subunits can change the BK channel phenotype and pharmacology.

  4. Bidirectional control of BK channel open probability by CAMKII and PKC in medial vestibular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    van Welie, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Large conductance K+ (BK) channels are a key determinant of neuronal excitability. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons regulate eye movements to ensure image stabilization during head movement, and changes in their intrinsic excitability may play a critical role in plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Plasticity of intrinsic excitability in MVN neurons is mediated by kinases, and BK channels influence excitability, but whether endogenous BK channels are directly modulated by kinases is unknown. Double somatic patch-clamp recordings from MVN neurons revealed large conductance potassium channel openings during spontaneous action potential firing. These channels displayed Ca2+ and voltage dependence in excised patches, identifying them as BK channels. Recording isolated single channel currents at physiological temperature revealed a novel kinase-mediated bidirectional control in the range of voltages over which BK channels are activated. Application of activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) increased BK channel open probability by shifting the voltage activation range towards more hyperpolarized potentials. An opposite shift in BK channel open probability was revealed by inhibition of phosphatases and was occluded by blockade of protein kinase C (PKC), suggesting that active PKC associated with BK channel complexes in patches was responsible for this effect. Accordingly, direct activation of endogenous PKC by PMA induced a decrease in BK open probability. BK channel activity affects excitability in MVN neurons and bidirectional control of BK channels by CAMKII, and PKC suggests that cellular signaling cascades engaged during plasticity may dynamically control excitability by regulating BK channel open probability. PMID:21307321

  5. Treatment of Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Howard A.

    2012-01-01

    Exciting progress recently has been made in our understanding of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, as well as treatment of this disease. Here, we review important advances regarding the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. We will also review the current approach to treatment and its limitations and will highlight new therapies that are currently being explored for this disease including Rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, with an emphasis on results of the most recent clinical trials. PMID:22859855

  6. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification.

  7. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  8. α decay of 97249Bk and levels in 95245Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Boll, R. A.; Ezold, J. G.; Van Cleve, S. M.; Browne, E.

    2013-05-01

    α decay of 249Bk has been investigated by measuring its α and γ-ray spectra, both in singles and in coincidence modes. The α spectrum of a freshly purified 249Bk sample was measured with a high-resolution, double-focusing magnetic spectrometer. γ singles, γ-γ coincidence, and γ-α coincidence spectra were also recorded. The absolute intensity of the 327.45-keV γ ray has been determined to be (1.44±0.08)×10-5% per 249Bk decay. Assignments of previously known single-particle states were confirmed. A new rotational band was identified in the α singles spectrum and Am K x rays have been observed in its decay. This single-particle state, with an energy of 154 keV, has been assigned to the 3/2-[521] Nilsson state. This is the lowest excitation energy for this orbital in any Am nucleus. More precise energies and intensities of the 249Bk α groups and γ-ray transitions are provided.

  9. Mechanism of β4 Subunit Modulation of BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Rothberg, Brad S.; Brenner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Large-conductance (BK-type) Ca2+-activated potassium channels are activated by membrane depolarization and cytoplasmic Ca2+. BK channels are expressed in a broad variety of cells and have a corresponding diversity in properties. Underlying much of the functional diversity is a family of four tissue-specific accessory subunits (β1–β4). Biophysical characterization has shown that the β4 subunit confers properties of the so-called “type II” BK channel isotypes seen in brain. These properties include slow gating kinetics and resistance to iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin blockade. In addition, the β4 subunit reduces the apparent voltage sensitivity of channel activation and has complex effects on apparent Ca2+ sensitivity. Specifically, channel activity at low Ca2+ is inhibited, while at high Ca2+, activity is enhanced. The goal of this study is to understand the mechanism underlying β4 subunit action in the context of a dual allosteric model for BK channel gating. We observed that β4's most profound effect is a decrease in Po (at least 11-fold) in the absence of calcium binding and voltage sensor activation. However, β4 promotes channel opening by increasing voltage dependence of Po-V relations at negative membrane potentials. In the context of the dual allosteric model for BK channels, we find these properties are explained by distinct and opposing actions of β4 on BK channels. β4 reduces channel opening by decreasing the intrinsic gating equilibrium (L0), and decreasing the allosteric coupling between calcium binding and voltage sensor activation (E). However, β4 has a compensatory effect on channel opening following depolarization by shifting open channel voltage sensor activation (Vho) to more negative membrane potentials. The consequence is that β4 causes a net positive shift of the G-V relationship (relative to α subunit alone) at low calcium. At higher calcium, the contribution by Vho and an increase in allosteric coupling to Ca2+ binding (C

  10. Investigations on the presence of antibodies to papova viruses in patients with different forms of cancer and in other categories of patients or apparently healthy subjects. Note III. Hemagglutination-inhibiting serum antibodies to polyoma virus.

    PubMed

    Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Pucă, D; Serban, A; Bolocan, J; Nastac, E

    1981-01-01

    Hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies to polyoma virus could be detected in sera from apparently healthy subjects, patients with nonmalignant respiratory diseases and patients with different forms of cancer. The positivity percentages (12.97, 12.92 and 16.36, respectively) and the titers recorded were lower than in the case of BK virus. The results obtained suggest a slight antigenic relationship between polyoma and BK virus.

  11. Viral DNA Replication-Dependent DNA Damage Response Activation during BK Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR

  12. IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kar Neng; Tang, Sydney C W; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Novak, Jan; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Fogo, Agnes B; Glassock, Richard J

    2016-02-11

    Globally, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis that can progress to renal failure. The exact pathogenesis of IgAN is not well defined, but current biochemical and genetic data implicate overproduction of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1. These aberrant immunoglobulins are characterized by galactose deficiency of some hinge-region O-linked glycans. However, aberrant glycosylation alone is insufficient to induce renal injury: the participation of glycan-specific IgA and IgG autoantibodies that recognize the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecule is required. Glomerular deposits of immune complexes containing undergalactosylated IgA1 activate mesangial cells, leading to the local overproduction of cytokines, chemokines and complement. Emerging data indicate that mesangial-derived mediators that are released following mesangial deposition of IgA1 lead to podocyte and tubulointerstitial injury via humoral crosstalk. Patients can present with a range of signs and symptoms, from asymptomatic microscopic haematuria to macroscopic haematuria. The clinical progression varies, with 30-40% of patients reaching end-stage renal disease 20-30 years after the first clinical presentation. Currently, no IgAN-specific therapies are available and patients are managed with the aim of controlling blood pressure and maintaining renal function. However, new therapeutic approaches are being developed, building upon our ever-improving understanding of disease pathogenesis.

  13. Chinese herb nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    In 1994, a 44-year-old woman progressed from normal renal function to advanced renal failure and end-stage renal disease within 8 months. Biopsy revealed extensive interstitial fibrosis with focal lymphocytic infiltration. She received a cadaveric renal transplant in January 1996 and had an uneventful posttransplant course. As a result of a minor motor vehicle accident, the patient had received acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine for pain relief approximately 5 months before the onset of renal symptoms. After the transplant, analysis of the herbal remedies clearly indicated the presence of aristolochic acid in 2 of the 6 Chinese herbs ingested. Ingestion of aristolochic acid has been linked to a newly defined entity, Chinese herb nephropathy (CHN). This article discusses the history of CHN and its implication in the current case and in other recent similar cases and makes recommendations to avoid future problems caused by unregulated use of herbal medicines. This is the first reported case of CHN in the USA. PMID:16389336

  14. [Selected work-related nephropathies].

    PubMed

    Wołyniec, Wojciech; Renke, Marcin; Wójcik-Stasiak, Małgorzata; Renke, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Infections, high temperature and many of the toxic substances can cause kidney damage. Acute kidney injury is a well known complication of some work-related diseases, e.g., lead intoxication. Chronic kidney disease can also be caused by some occupational factors. Three work-related nephropathies, in which causal connection with work has been proved, are discussed in this article. There are different risk factors of nephrolithiasis, lead nephropathy and silica nephropathy, but each of them can cause chronic kidney disease. Prevention of these nephropaties seems to be relatively simple. The principles of protection from the toxic effects of heavy metals and silica dust are very specific. The most important prevention of kidney stones is correct fluid intake. In addition to providing adequate quantities of drinking water, it is also important to educate exposed workers and assure enough rest breaks at work.

  15. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  16. SHAPING OF ACTION POTENTIALS BY TYPE I AND TYPE II BK CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, David B.; Wang, Bin; Brenner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The BK channel is a Ca2+ and voltage-gated conductance responsible for shaping action potential waveforms in many types of neurons. Type II BK channels are differentiated from type I channels by their pharmacology and slow gating kinetics. The β4 accessory subunit confers type II properties on BK α subunits. Empirically derived properties of BK channels, with and without the β4 accessory subunit, were obtained using a heterologous expression system under physiological ionic conditions. These data were then used to study how BK channels alone (type I) and with the accessory β4 subunit (type II) modulate action potential properties in biophysical neuron models. Overall, the models support the hypothesis that it is the slower kinetics provided by the β4 subunit that endows the BK channel with type II properties, which leads to broadening of action potentials and, secondarily, to greater recruitment of SK channels reducing neuronal excitability. Two regions of parameter space distinguished type II and type I effects; one where the range of BK-activating Ca2+ was high (>20 µM) and the other where BK-activating Ca2+ was low (~0.4–1.2 µM). The latter required an elevated BK channel density, possibly beyond a likely physiological range. BK-mediated sharpening of the spike waveform associated with the lack of the β4 subunit was sensitive to the properties of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels due to electrogenic effects on spike duration. We also found that depending on Ca2+ dynamics, type II BK channels may have the ability to contribute to the medium AHP, a property not generally ascribed to BK channels, influencing the frequency-current relationship. Finally, we show how the broadening of action potentials conferred by type II BK channels can also indirectly increase the recruitment of SK-type channels decreasing the excitability of the neuron. PMID:21723921

  17. Anticoagulation-related nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D S; Giugliano, R P; Rangaswami, J

    2016-03-01

    Anticoagulation-related nephropathy (ARN) is a significant but underdiagnosed complication of anticoagulation that is associated with increased renal morbidity and all-cause mortality. Originally described in patients receiving supratherapeutic doses of warfarin who had a distinct pattern of glomerular hemorrhage on kidney biopsy, ARN is currently defined as acute kidney injury (AKI) without obvious etiology in the setting of an International Normalized Ratio (INR) of > 3.0. The underlying molecular mechanism is thought to be warfarin-induced thrombin depletion; however, newer studies have hinted at an alternative mechanism involving reductions in activated protein C and endothelial protein C receptor signaling. Prompt recognition of ARN is critical, as it is associated with accelerated progression of chronic kidney disease, and significant increases in short-term and long-term all-cause mortality. Prior investigations into ARN have almost universally focused on anticoagulation with warfarin; however, recent case reports and animal studies suggest that it can also occur in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants. Differences in the incidence and severity of ARN between patients taking warfarin and those taking novel oral anticoagulants are unknown; a post hoc analysis of routinely reported adverse renal outcomes in clinical trials comparing warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants found no significant difference in the rates of AKI, a prerequisite for ARN. Given the significant impact of ARN on renal function and all-cause mortality, a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms, clinical spectrum and therapeutic interventions for ARN is crucial to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulation and optimize treatment.

  18. Modulation by the BK accessory β4 subunit of phosphorylation-dependent changes in excitability of dentate gyrus granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, David; Wang, Bin; Brenner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BK channels are large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels critical for neuronal excitability. Some neurons express so called fast-gated, type I BK channels. Other neurons express BK channels assembled with the accessory β4 subunit conferring slow-gating of type II BK channels. However, it is not clear how protein phosphorylation modulates these two distinct BK channel types. Using β4 knockout mice, we compared fast- or slow-gated BK channels in response to changes in phosphorylation status of hippocampus dentate gyrus granule neurons. We utilized the selective PP2A/PP4 phosphatase inhibitor, Fostriecin, to study changes in action potential shape and firing properties of the neurons. In β4 knockout neurons, Fostriecin increases BK current, speeds BK channel activation, and reduces action potential amplitudes. Fostriecin increases spiking during early components of an action potential train. In contrast, inhibition of BK channels through β4 in wild type neurons or by BK channel inhibitor Paxilline opposes Fostriecin effects. Voltage clamp recordings of neurons reveal that Fostriecin increases both calcium and BK currents. However, Fostriecin does not activate BK α alone channels in transfected HEK293 cells lacking calcium channels. In summary, these results suggest that the fast-gating, type I BK channels lacking β4 can increase neuronal excitability in response to reduced phosphatase activity and activation of calcium channels. By opposing BK channel activation; the β4 subunit plays an important role in moderating firing frequency regardless of changes in phosphorylation status. PMID:21848922

  19. Modulation of BK Channel Function by Auxiliary Beta and Gamma Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Yan, J.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and displays diverse biophysical or pharmacological characteristics. This diversity is in part conferred by channel modulation with different regulatory auxiliary subunits. To date, two distinct classes of BK channel auxiliary subunits have been identified: β subunits and γ subunits. Modulation of BK channels by the four auxiliary β (β1–β4) subunits has been well established and intensively investigated over the past two decades. The auxiliary γ subunits, however, were identified only very recently, which adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. This chapter will review the current understanding of BK channel modulation by auxiliary β and γ subunits, especially the latest findings. PMID:27238261

  20. Energy levels of neutral and singly ionized berkelium, /sup 249/Bk I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, E.F.; Conway, J.G.; Blaise, J.

    1987-09-01

    Energy-level analyses of the observed emission spectrum of berkelium have yielded 179 odd and 186 even levels of neutral berkelium Bk I, and 42 odd and 117 even levels of singly ionized berkelium Bk II. The levels are tabulated with the J value, the g value, the configuration and hyperfine constants A and B, and the width given for many of the levels. The ground states of Bk I and Bk II are (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s/sup 2/ /sup 6/H/sup 0//sub 15/2/ and (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s /sup 7/H/sup 0//sub 8/, respectively. A table lists the lowest level of each identified electronic configuration of Bk I and Bk II.

  1. Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk studied by decay scheme and transfer reaction spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Koenig, Z. M.; McHarris, Wm. C.; Yates, S. W.

    2008-05-15

    Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk were investigated with decay scheme studies and the single-neutron transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk. Mass-separated sources of {sup 254}Es were used for {alpha} singles and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurements. These studies, plus previous studies of {sup 254}Es{sup m} {alpha} decay and the {sup 249}Bk(n,{gamma}) reaction, provide spins and parities of the observed levels. The transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk was used to deduce neutron single-particle components of the observed bands. Six pairs of singlet and triplet states, formed by the coupling of proton and neutron one-quasiparticle states, were identified. The splitting energies between the triplet and singlet states were found to be in agreement with previous calculations.

  2. Gallic acid-based small-molecule inhibitors of JC and BK polyomaviral infection.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Bethany A; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Yatawara, Achani; Gaidos, Gabriel; Mierke, Dale F; Atwood, Walter J

    2014-08-30

    JCPyV and BKPyV are common human polyomaviruses that cause lifelong asymptomatic persistent infections in their hosts. In immunosuppressed individuals, increased replication of JCPyV and BKPyV cause significant disease. JCPyV causes a fatal and rapidly progressing demyelinating disease known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. BKPyV causes hemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus associated nephropathy in bone marrow transplant recipients and in renal transplant recipients respectively. There are no specific anti-viral therapies to treat polyomavirus induced diseases. Based on detailed studies of the structures of these viruses bound to their receptors we screened several compounds that possessed similar chemical space as sialic acid for their ability to bind the virus. Positive hits in the assay were restricted to gallic acid based compounds that mimic the viruses known cellular glycan receptors. Pre-treatment of virions with these inhibitors reduced virus infection in cell culture and as such may form the basis for the development of virion specific antagonists to treat these infections.

  3. An Exploratory Study of BK from NF = 2 Dynamical Clover-Improved Wilson Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. M.; Mescia, F.; Tariq, A. S. B.

    2005-04-01

    We report calculations of BK using two flavours of dynamical clover-improved Wilson lattice fermions and look for dependence on the dynamical quark mass at fixed lattice spacing. We see some evidence for dynamical quark effects. In particular BK decreases as the sea quark masses are reduced towards the up/down quark mass. Our meson masses are quite heavy and a firm prediction of the BK value is a task for future simulations.

  4. A novel BK channel-targeted peptide suppresses sound evoked activity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, L. L.; Brecht, E. J.; Philpo, A.; Iyer, S.; Wu, N. S.; Mihic, S. J.; Aldrich, R. W.; Pierce, J.; Walton, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated (BK) channels are broadly expressed in neurons and muscle where they modulate cellular activity. Decades of research support an interest in pharmaceutical applications for modulating BK channel function. Here we report a novel BK channel-targeted peptide with functional activity in vitro and in vivo. This 9-amino acid peptide, LS3, has a unique action, suppressing channel gating rather than blocking the pore of heterologously expressed human BK channels. With an IC50 in the high picomolar range, the apparent affinity is higher than known high affinity BK channel toxins. LS3 suppresses locomotor activity via a BK channel-specific mechanism in wild-type or BK channel-humanized Caenorhabditis elegans. Topical application on the dural surface of the auditory midbrain in mouse suppresses sound evoked neural activity, similar to a well-characterized pore blocker of the BK channel. Moreover, this novel ion channel-targeted peptide rapidly crosses the BBB after systemic delivery to modulate auditory processing. Thus, a potent BK channel peptide modulator is open to neurological applications, such as preventing audiogenic seizures that originate in the auditory midbrain. PMID:28195225

  5. Diabetic nephropathy – complications and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Andy KH

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal failure globally. Much research has been conducted in both basic science and clinical therapeutics, which has enhanced understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and expanded the potential therapies available. This review will examine the current concepts of diabetic nephropathy management in the context of some of the basic science and pathophysiology aspects relevant to the approaches taken in novel, investigative treatment strategies. PMID:25342915

  6. BK channels regulate sinoatrial node firing rate and cardiac pacing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Michael H.; Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Anderson, Mark E.; Dalziel, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels play prominent roles in shaping muscle and neuronal excitability. In the cardiovascular system, BK channels promote vascular relaxation and protect against ischemic injury. Recently, inhibition of BK channels has been shown to lower heart rate in intact rodents and isolated hearts, suggesting a novel role in heart function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we recorded ECGs from mice injected with paxilline (PAX), a membrane-permeable BK channel antagonist, and examined changes in cardiac conduction. ECGs revealed a 19 ± 4% PAX-induced reduction in heart rate in wild-type but not BK channel knockout (Kcnma1−/−) mice. The heart rate decrease was associated with slowed cardiac pacing due to elongation of the sinus interval. Action potential firing recorded from isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) was reduced by 55 ± 15% and 28 ± 9% by application of PAX (3 μM) and iberiotoxin (230 nM), respectively. Furthermore, baseline firing rates from Kcnma1−/− SANCs were 33% lower than wild-type SANCs. The slowed firing upon BK current inhibition or genetic deletion was due to lengthening of the diastolic depolarization phase of the SANC action potential. Finally, BK channel immunoreactivity and PAX-sensitive currents were identified in SANCs with HCN4 expression and pacemaker current, respectively, and BK channels cloned from SANCs recapitulated similar activation as the PAX-sensitive current. Together, these data localize BK channels to SANCs and demonstrate that loss of BK current decreases SANC automaticity, consistent with slowed sinus pacing after PAX injection in vivo. Furthermore, these findings suggest BK channels are potential therapeutic targets for disorders of heart rate. PMID:25172903

  7. Epigenetic Regulations in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a chronic complication of diabetes and the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease. It has been reported that multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of DN, while the molecular mechanisms that lead to DN are still not fully understood. Numerous risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy have been proposed, including ethnicity and inherited genetic differences. Recently, with the development of high-throughput technologies, there is emerging evidence that suggests the important role of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of DN. Epigenetic regulations, including DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, and histone modifications, play a pivotal role in DN pathogenesis by a second layer of gene regulation. All these findings can contribute to developing novel therapies for DN.

  8. Diabetic nephropathy: a national dialogue.

    PubMed

    Breyer, Matthew D; Coffman, Thomas M; Flessner, Michael F; Fried, Linda F; Harris, Raymond C; Ketchum, Christian J; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G; Sedor, John R; Susztak, Katalin

    2013-09-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue (KRND) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease. Several high-priority objectives for diabetic nephropathy were identified in data and sample collection, hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing, and translation promotion. The lack of readily available human samples linked to comprehensive phenotypic, clinical, and demographic data remains a significant obstacle. With data and biological samples in place, several possibilities exist for using new technologies to develop hypotheses. Testing novel disease mechanisms with state-of-the-art tools should continue to be the foundation of the investigative community. Research must be translated to improve diagnosis and treatment of people. The objectives identified by the KRND provide the research community with future opportunities for improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  9. HIV-Associated Nephropathy: Clinical Presentation, Pathology, and Epidemiology in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Christina M.; Klotman, Paul E.; D’Agati, Vivette D.

    2008-01-01

    The classic kidney disease of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, HIV-associated nephropathy, is characterized by progressive acute renal failure, often accompanied by proteinuria and ultrasound findings of enlarged, echogenic kidneys. Definitive diagnosis requires kidney biopsy, which demonstrates collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with associated microcystic tubular dilatation and interstitial inflammation. Podocyte proliferation is a hallmark of HIV-associated nephropathy, although this classic pathology is observed less frequently in antiretroviral-treated patients. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy involves direct HIV infection of renal epithelial cells, and the widespread introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy has had a significant impact on the natural history and epidemiology of this unique disease. These observations have established antiretroviral therapy as the cornerstone of treatment for HIV-associated nephropathy, in the absence of prospective clinical trials. Adjunctive therapy for HIV-associated nephropathy includes ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, as well as corticosteroids in selected patients with significant interstitial inflammation or rapid progression. PMID:19013322

  10. Experimental Models of Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, J. Ashley; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is one of the commonest glomerular diseases, typically presenting in older males with nephrotic syndrome. The development and characterization of animal models of MN, in particular, the passive Heymann nephritis model (PHN), has greatly advanced our understanding of this disease. In this review we discuss the different animal models of human MN that are available, with an emphasis on the PHN model, including technical issues, the typical disease course and its application to human disease. PMID:21359154

  11. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N.; Haruna, Y.; Kondeti, V.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Its morphologic characteristics include glomerular hypertrophy, basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolar thickening. All of these are part and parcel of microvascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress is the common denominator link for the major pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- as well as macrovascular complications of diabetes. There are a number of macromolecules that have been implicated for increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as, NAD(P)H oxidase, advanced glycation end products (AGE), defects in polyol pathway, uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and mitochondrial respiratory chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Excess amounts of ROS modulate activation of protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and various cytokines and transcription factors which eventually cause increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes with progression to fibrosis and end stage renal disease. Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) further worsens the renal injury induced by ROS in diabetic nephropathy. Buffering the generation of ROS may sound a promising therapeutic to ameliorate renal damage from diabetic nephropathy, however, various studies have demonstrated minimal reno-protection by these agents. Interruption in the RAS has yielded much better results in terms of reno-protection and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review various aspects of oxidative stress coupled with the damage induced by RAS are discussed with the anticipation to yield an impetus for designing new generation of specific antioxidants that are potentially more effective to reduce reno-vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:20939814

  12. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-282 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-282 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 282).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-272 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-272 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 272).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-297 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-297 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 297).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-324 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-324 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 324).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-247 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-247 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 247).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-310 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-310 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 310).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-260 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-260 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 260).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-320 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-320 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 320).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-301 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-301 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 301).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-304 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-304 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 304).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-309 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-309 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 309).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-275 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-275 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 275).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-298 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-298 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 298).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-251 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-251 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 251).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-318 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-318 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 318).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-252 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-252 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 252).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-261 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-261 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 261).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-300 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-300 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 300).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-323 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-323 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 323).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-321 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-321 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 321).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-257 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-257 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 257).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-280 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-280 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 280).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-266 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-266 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 266).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-248 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-248 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 248).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-241 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-241 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 241).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-315 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-315 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 315).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-307 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-307 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 307).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-276 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-276 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 276).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-239 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-239 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 239).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-254 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-254 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 254).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-295 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-295 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 295).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-243 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-243 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 243).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-311 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-311 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 311).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-240 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-240 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 240).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-281 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-281 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 281).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-302 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-302 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 302).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-263 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-263 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 263).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-292 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-292 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 292).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-244 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-244 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 244).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-284 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-284 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 284).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-322 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-322 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 322).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-325 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-325 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 325).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-270 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-270 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 270).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-316 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-316 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 316).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-286 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-286 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 286).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-288 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-288 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 288).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-326 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-326 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 326).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-328 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-328 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 328).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-305 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-305 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 305).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-273 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-273 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 273).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-294 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-294 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 294).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-256 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-256 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 256).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-303 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-303 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 303).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-246 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-246 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 246).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-271 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-271 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 271).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-274 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-274 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 274).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-283 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-283 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 283).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-265 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-265 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 265).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-290 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-290 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 290).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-269 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-269 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 269).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-267 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-267 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 267).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-287 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-287 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 287).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-293 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-293 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 293).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-249 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-249 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 249).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-312 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-312 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 312).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-264 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-264 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 264).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-253 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-253 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 253).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-259 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-259 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 259).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-250 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-250 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 250).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-291 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-291 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 291).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-285 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-285 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 285).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-262 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-262 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 262).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-306 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-306 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 306).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-296 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-296 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 296).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-314 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-314 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 314).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-279 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-279 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 279).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-277 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-277 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 277).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-242 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-242 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 242).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-317 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-317 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 317).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-258 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-258 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 258).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-319 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-319 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 319).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-313 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-313 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 313).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-255 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-255 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 255).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-327 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-327 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 327).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-299 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-299 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 299).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-245 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-245 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 245).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-289 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-289 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 289).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-278 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-278 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 278).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-268 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-268 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 268).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Bk-308 (Berkelium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Bk-308 (Berkelium, atomic number Z = 97, mass number A = 308).

  3. Assessing genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobue; Babazono, Tetsuya

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Studies indicate both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In particular, epidemiological evidence shows a familial clustering of nephropathy in siblings with diabetes, supporting an important role of genetic susceptibility in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. A common approach in genetic research is assessment of candidate gene polymorphisms using case-control analysis; a number of studies have evaluated predictable candidate genes for diabetic nephropathy. In contrast, only a few studies have used a whole genome approach, such as scanning of micro-satellite markers, in the assessment of genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. A whole genome linkage analysis using families of Pima Indians showed susceptibility loci for diabetic nephropathy on chromosome 3, 7, and 20. Another linkage analysis using discordant sib-pairs of Caucasian families with type 1 diabetes identified a critical area on chromosome 3q. However, these results have been inconclusive and further investigation is required. Recently, a genome-wide, case-control analysis identifying susceptibility genes for diabetic nephropathy was performed. As a result, a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 23 of the solute carrier family 12 (sodium-chloride cotransporter) member 3 gene was found to be strongly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Although further assessment of this polymorphism is needed, this strategy offers great promise in the identification of genetic factors predisposing patients to diabetic nephropathy. Identification of genetic susceptibility markers may offer new hope in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. BK channel agonist represents a potential therapeutic approach for lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xi Zoë; Sun, Xue; Cao, Qi; Dong, Gaofeng; Schiffmann, Raphael; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysosomal Ca2+ release plays an essential role in lysosomal trafficking. We have recently shown that lysosomal big conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channel forms a physical and functional coupling with the lysosomal Ca2+ release channel Transient Receptor Potential Mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). BK and TRPML1 forms a positive feedback loop to facilitate lysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent lysosome membrane trafficking. However, it is unclear whether the positive feedback mechanism is common for other lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) and whether BK channel agonists rescue abnormal lysosomal storage in LSDs. In this study, we assessed the effect of BK agonist, NS1619 and NS11021 in a number of LSDs including NPC1, mild cases of mucolipidosis type IV (ML4) (TRPML1-F408∆), Niemann-Pick type A (NPA) and Fabry disease. We found that TRPML1-mediated Ca2+ release was compromised in these LSDs. BK activation corrected the impaired Ca2+ release in these LSDs and successfully rescued the abnormal lysosomal storage of these diseases by promoting TRPML1-mediated lysosomal exocytosis. Our study suggests that BK channel activation stimulates the TRPML1-BK positive reinforcing loop to correct abnormal lysosomal storage in LSDs. Drugs targeting BK channel represent a potential therapeutic approach for LSDs. PMID:27670435

  5. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Downregulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F.; Hernandez, Eder F.; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; rancisco, Sebastian F; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.

    2008-01-01

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), western immunoblotting and RT-PCR to investigate the expression pattern of the alpha-pore forming subunit of BK channels in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats obtained by the pilocarpine model of MTLE. All epileptic rats experiencing recurrent spontaneous seizures exhibited a significant down-regulation of BK channel immunostaining in the mossy fibers at the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. Quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence signals by LSCM revealed a significant 47% reduction in BK channel in epileptic rats when compared to age-matched non-epileptic control rats. These data correlate with a similar reduction in BK channel protein levels and transcripts in the cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate a seizure-related down-regulation of BK channels in chronically epileptic rats. Further functional assays are necessary to determine whether altered BK channel expression is an acquired channelopathy or a compensatory mechanism affecting the network excitability in MTLE. Moreover, seizure-mediated BK down-regulation may disturb neuronal excitability and presynaptic control at glutamatergic terminals triggering exaggerated glutamate release and seizures. PMID:18295190

  7. Down-regulation of BK channel expression in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pacheco Otalora, Luis F; Hernandez, Eder F; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Francisco, Sebastian; Willis, Michael; Ermolinsky, Boris; Zarei, Masoud; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R

    2008-03-20

    In the hippocampus, BK channels are preferentially localized in presynaptic glutamatergic terminals including mossy fibers where they are thought to play an important role regulating excessive glutamate release during hyperactive states. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK, MaxiK, Slo) have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic epilepsy. However, the role of BK channels in acquired mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) remains unknown. Here we used immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), Western immunoblotting and RT-PCR to investigate the expression pattern of the alpha-pore-forming subunit of BK channels in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats obtained by the pilocarpine model of MTLE. All epileptic rats experiencing recurrent spontaneous seizures exhibited a significant down-regulation of BK channel immunostaining in the mossy fibers at the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 area. Quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence signals by LSCM revealed a significant 47% reduction in BK channel immunofluorescent signals in epileptic rats when compared to age-matched non-epileptic control rats. These data correlate with a similar reduction in BK channel protein levels and transcripts in the cortex and hippocampus. Our data indicate a seizure-related down-regulation of BK channels in chronically epileptic rats. Further functional assays are necessary to determine whether altered BK channel expression is an acquired channelopathy or a compensatory mechanism affecting the network excitability in MTLE. Moreover, seizure-mediated BK down-regulation may disturb neuronal excitability and presynaptic control at glutamatergic terminals triggering exaggerated glutamate release and seizures.

  8. Genetic activation of BK currents in vivo generates bidirectional effects on neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Jenna R.; Meredith, Andrea L.

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are potent negative regulators of excitability in neurons and muscle, and increasing BK current is a novel therapeutic strategy for neuro- and cardioprotection, disorders of smooth muscle hyperactivity, and several psychiatric diseases. However, in some neurons, enhanced BK current is linked with seizures and paradoxical increases in excitability, potentially complicating the clinical use of agonists. The mechanisms that switch BK influence from inhibitory to excitatory are not well defined. Here we investigate this dichotomy using a gain-of-function subunit (BKR207Q) to enhance BK currents. Heterologous expression of BKR207Q generated currents that activated at physiologically relevant voltages in lower intracellular Ca2+, activated faster, and deactivated slower than wild-type currents. We then used BKR207Q expression to broadly augment endogenous BK currents in vivo, generating a transgenic mouse from a circadian clock-controlled Period1 gene fragment (Tg-BKR207Q). The specific impact on excitability was assessed in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, a cell type where BK currents regulate spontaneous firing under distinct day and night conditions that are defined by different complements of ionic currents. In the SCN, Tg-BKR207Q expression converted the endogenous BK current to fast-activating, while maintaining similar current-voltage properties between day and night. Alteration of BK currents in Tg-BKR207Q SCN neurons increased firing at night but decreased firing during the day, demonstrating that BK currents generate bidirectional effects on neuronal firing under distinct conditions. PMID:23112153

  9. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  10. Genetic association studies in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Harvest F; Brismar, Kerstin

    2012-09-01

    Clinical observations and epidemiological studies have shown that there is familial aggregation of diabetic nephropathy in many ethnic groups, indicating the strong contribution of inherited factors in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Identification of the genes involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy may provide better knowledge of its pathophysiology and future therapies. To search for the genes involved in susceptibility, resistance or progression to diabetic nephropathy, candidate gene population association, family-based association and genome wide association studies have been widely used. This article reviews genetic polymorphisms, summarizes the data from genetic association studies of diabetic nephropathy in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and discusses about the future genetic analyses in the complex diseases.

  11. Decay Properties of New Isotopes 234Bk and 230Am, and Even-Even Nuclides 234Cm and 230Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ideguchi, Eiji; Koura, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    A neutron-deficient berkelium isotope of 234Bk produced via 197Au(40Ar,3n) reaction and the daughter product of 230Am were newly identified. Alpha-decay energies of eleven 234Bk were found at 7.62-7.96 MeV, and six fission events that correlated with the α-decay of 234Bk were observed. The half-lives of 234Bk and 230Am were determined to be 19 - 4 + 6 s and 32 - 9 + 22 s, respectively. The 234Cm followed by the β-decay of 234Bk was also identified.

  12. Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages, viruses which infect and lyse bacterial cells, can provide a natural method to reduce bacterial pathogens on produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails is most likely to be effective against bacterial pathogens on produce commodities, and minimize the development of...

  13. HNF1 AND HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Renata I.; Hinojos, Cruz A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braun, Michael C.; Fornage, Myriam; Doris, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension in SHR is associated with renal redox stress and we hypothesized that nephropathy arises in SHR-A3 from altered capacity to mitigate redox stress compared with nephropathy-resistant SHR lines. We measured renal expression of redox genes in distinct lines of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-A3, SHR-B2, SHR-C) and the normotensive WKY strain. The SHR lines differ in either resisting (SHR-B2, SHR-C) or experiencing hypertensive nephropathy (SHR-A3). Immediately prior to the emergence of hypertensive renal injury expression of redox genes in SHR-A3 was profoundly altered compared with the injury-resistant SHR lines and WKY. This change appeared to arise in anti-oxidant genes where 16 of 28 were expressed at 34.3% of the level in the reference strain (WKY). No such change was observed in the injury-resistant SHR lines. We analyzed occurrence of transcription factor matrices (TFM) in the promoters of the down-regulated antioxidant genes. In these genes, the HNF1 TFM was found to be nearly twice as likely to be present and the overall frequency of HNF1 sites was nearly 5 times higher, compared with HNF1 TFMs in anti-oxidant genes that were not down-regulated. We identified 35 other (non-redox) renal genes regulated by HNF1. These were also significantly down-regulated in SHR-A3, but not in SHR-B2 or SHR-C. Finally, expression of genes that comprise HNF1 (Tcf1, Tcf2 and Dcoh) was also down-regulated in SHR-A3. The present experiments uncover a major change in transcriptional control by HNF1 that affects redox and other genes and precedes emergence of hypertensive renal injury. PMID:18443232

  14. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  15. SUPERNOVA 2008bk AND ITS RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; and others

    2012-01-15

    We have obtained limited photometric and spectroscopic data for supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, primarily at {approx}> 150 days after explosion. We find that it is a Type II-Plateau (II-P) SN that most closely resembles the low-luminosity SN 1999br in NGC 4900. Given the overall similarity between the observed light curves and colors of SNe 2008bk and 1999br, we infer that the total visual extinction to SN 2008bk (A{sub V} = 0.065 mag) must be almost entirely due to the Galactic foreground, similar to what has been assumed for SN 1999br. We confirm the identification of the putative red supergiant (RSG) progenitor star of the SN in high-quality g'r'i' images we had obtained in 2007 at the Gemini-South 8 m telescope. Little ambiguity exists in this progenitor identification, qualifying it as the best example to date, next to the identification of the star Sk -69 Degree-Sign 202 as the progenitor of SN 1987A. From a combination of photometry of the Gemini images with that of archival, pre-SN, Very Large Telescope JHK{sub s} images, we derive an accurate observed spectral energy distribution (SED) for the progenitor. We find from nebular strong-intensity emission-line indices for several H II regions near the SN that the metallicity in the environment is likely subsolar (Z Almost-Equal-To 0.6 Z{sub Sun }). The observed SED of the star agrees quite well with synthetic SEDs obtained from model RSG atmospheres with effective temperature T{sub eff} = 3600 {+-} 50 K. We find, therefore, that the star had a bolometric luminosity with respect to the Sun of log (L{sub bol}/L{sub Sun} ) = 4.57 {+-} 0.06 and radius R{sub *} = 496 {+-} 34 R{sub Sun} at {approx}6 months prior to explosion. Comparing the progenitor's properties with theoretical massive-star evolutionary models, we conclude that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass in the range of 8-8.5 M{sub Sun }. This mass is consistent with, albeit at the low end of, the inferred range of initial masses for SN II

  16. The Impact of BK Channels on Cellular Excitability Depends on their Subcellular Location

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (or BK channels) fulfil a multitude of roles in the central nervous system. At the soma of many neuronal cell types they control the speed of action potential (AP) repolarization and therefore they can have an impact on neuronal excitability. Due to their presence in nerve terminals they also regulate transmitter release. BK channels have also been shown to be present in the dendrites of some neurons where they can regulate the magnitude and duration of dendritic spikes. Here, we investigate the impact of modulating the activation of BK channels at different locations on the cellular excitability of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We find that while somatic BK channels help to repolarize APs at the soma and mediate the fast after-hyperpolarization, dendritic BK channels are responsible for repolarization of dendritic calcium spikes and thereby regulate somatic AP burst firing. We found no evidence for a role of dendritic BK channels in the regulation of backpropagating AP amplitude or duration. These experiments highlight the diverse roles of BK channels in regulating neuronal excitability and indicate that their functional impact depends on their subcellular location. PMID:27630543

  17. Big Potassium (BK) ion channels in biology, disease and possible targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil T; Wilson, Zechariah; Arismendi-Morillo, Gabriel; Kong, Xiao-Tang; Tajhya, Rajeev B; Beeton, Christine; Jadus, Martin R

    2014-10-01

    The Big Potassium (BK) ion channel is commonly known by a variety of names (Maxi-K, KCNMA1, slo, stretch-activated potassium channel, KCa1.1). Each name reflects a different physical property displayed by this single ion channel. This transmembrane channel is found on nearly every cell type of the body and has its own distinctive roles for that tissue type. The BKα channel contains the pore that releases potassium ions from intracellular stores. This ion channel is found on the cell membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and mitochondria. Complex splicing pathways produce different isoforms. The BKα channels can be phosphorylated, palmitoylated and myristylated. BK is composed of a homo-tetramer that interacts with β and γ chains. These accessory proteins provide a further modulating effect on the functions of BKα channels. BK channels play important roles in cell division and migration. In this review, we will focus on the biology of the BK channel, especially its role, and its immune response towards cancer. Recent proteomic studies have linked BK channels with various proteins. Some of these interactions offer further insight into the role that BK channels have with cancers, especially with brain tumors. This review shows that BK channels have a complex interplay with intracellular components of cancer cells and still have plenty of secrets to be discovered.

  18. Modulation of BK channel voltage gating by different auxiliary β subunits

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Gustavo F.; Neely, Alan; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK) are regulated by a multiplicity of signals. The prevailing view is that different BK gating mechanisms converge to determine channel opening and that these gating mechanisms are allosterically coupled. In most instances the pore forming α subunit of BK is associated with one of four alternative β subunits that appear to target specific gating mechanisms to regulate the channel activity. In particular, β1 stabilizes the active configuration of the BK voltage sensor having a large effect on BK Ca2+ sensitivity. To determine the extent to which β subunits regulate the BK voltage sensor, we measured gating currents induced by the pore-forming BK α subunit alone and with the different β subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes (β1, β2IR, β3b, and β4). We found that β1, β2, and β4 stabilize the BK voltage sensor in the active conformation. β3 has no effect on voltage sensor equilibrium. In addition, β4 decreases the apparent number of charges per voltage sensor. The decrease in the charge associated with the voltage sensor in α β4 channels explains most of their biophysical properties. For channels composed of the α subunit alone, gating charge increases slowly with pulse duration as expected if a significant fraction of this charge develops with a time course comparable to that of K+ current activation. In the presence of β1, β2, and β4 this slow component develops in advance of and much more rapidly than ion current activation, suggesting that BK channel opening proceeds in two steps. PMID:23112204

  19. Current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Jaffe, David B.; Brenner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    While most large-conductance, calcium-, and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK or Maxi-K type) are blocked by the scorpion venom iberiotoxin, the so-called “type II” subtype has the property of toxin resistance. This property is uniquely mediated by channel assembly with one member of the BK accessory β subunit family, the neuron-enriched β4 subunit. This review will focus on current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant, β4-containing BK channel properties and their function in the CNS. Studies have shown that β4 dramatically promotes BK channel opening by shifting voltage sensor activation to more negative voltage ranges, but also slows activation to timescales that theoretically preclude BK ability to shape action potentials (APs). In addition, β4 membrane trafficking is regulated through an endoplasmic retention signal and palmitoylation. More recently, the challenge has been to understand the functional role of the iberiotoxin-resistant BK subtype utilizing computational modeling of neurons and neurophysiological approaches. Utilizing iberiotoxin-resistance as a footprint for these channels, they have been identified in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In these neurons, the role of these channels is largely consistent with slow-gated channels that reduce excitability either through an interspike conductance, such as in purkinje neurons, or by replacing fast-gating BK channels that otherwise facilitate high frequency AP firing, such as in dentate gyrus neurons. They are also observed in presynaptic mossy fiber terminals of the dentate gyrus and posterior pituitary terminals. More recent studies suggest that β4 subunits may also be expressed in some neurons lacking iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels, such as in CA3 hippocampus neurons. Ongoing research using novel, specific blockers and agonists of BK/β4, and β4 knockout mice, will continue to move the field forward in understanding the function of these

  20. Current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jaffe, David B; Brenner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    While most large-conductance, calcium-, and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK or Maxi-K type) are blocked by the scorpion venom iberiotoxin, the so-called "type II" subtype has the property of toxin resistance. This property is uniquely mediated by channel assembly with one member of the BK accessory β subunit family, the neuron-enriched β4 subunit. This review will focus on current understanding of iberiotoxin-resistant, β4-containing BK channel properties and their function in the CNS. Studies have shown that β4 dramatically promotes BK channel opening by shifting voltage sensor activation to more negative voltage ranges, but also slows activation to timescales that theoretically preclude BK ability to shape action potentials (APs). In addition, β4 membrane trafficking is regulated through an endoplasmic retention signal and palmitoylation. More recently, the challenge has been to understand the functional role of the iberiotoxin-resistant BK subtype utilizing computational modeling of neurons and neurophysiological approaches. Utilizing iberiotoxin-resistance as a footprint for these channels, they have been identified in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In these neurons, the role of these channels is largely consistent with slow-gated channels that reduce excitability either through an interspike conductance, such as in purkinje neurons, or by replacing fast-gating BK channels that otherwise facilitate high frequency AP firing, such as in dentate gyrus neurons. They are also observed in presynaptic mossy fiber terminals of the dentate gyrus and posterior pituitary terminals. More recent studies suggest that β4 subunits may also be expressed in some neurons lacking iberiotoxin-resistant BK channels, such as in CA3 hippocampus neurons. Ongoing research using novel, specific blockers and agonists of BK/β4, and β4 knockout mice, will continue to move the field forward in understanding the function of these

  1. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  2. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  3. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F; Weiger, Thomas M

    2015-08-17

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences.

  4. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  5. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  6. Knockout of the BK β2 subunit abolishes inactivation of BK currents in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells and results in slow-wave burst activity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L.; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Rat and mouse adrenal medullary chromaffin cells (CCs) express an inactivating BK current. This inactivation is thought to arise from the assembly of up to four β2 auxiliary subunits (encoded by the kcnmb2 gene) with a tetramer of pore-forming Slo1 α subunits. Although the physiological consequences of inactivation remain unclear, differences in depolarization-evoked firing among CCs have been proposed to arise from the ability of β2 subunits to shift the range of BK channel activation. To investigate the role of BK channels containing β2 subunits, we generated mice in which the gene encoding β2 was deleted (β2 knockout [KO]). Comparison of proteins from wild-type (WT) and β2 KO mice allowed unambiguous demonstration of the presence of β2 subunit in various tissues and its coassembly with the Slo1 α subunit. We compared current properties and cell firing properties of WT and β2 KO CCs in slices and found that β2 KO abolished inactivation, slowed action potential (AP) repolarization, and, during constant current injection, decreased AP firing. These results support the idea that the β2-mediated shift of the BK channel activation range affects repetitive firing and AP properties. Unexpectedly, CCs from β2 KO mice show an increased tendency toward spontaneous burst firing, suggesting that the particular properties of BK channels in the absence of β2 subunits may predispose to burst firing. PMID:25267913

  7. Knockout of the BK β2 subunit abolishes inactivation of BK currents in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells and results in slow-wave burst activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2014-10-01

    Rat and mouse adrenal medullary chromaffin cells (CCs) express an inactivating BK current. This inactivation is thought to arise from the assembly of up to four β2 auxiliary subunits (encoded by the kcnmb2 gene) with a tetramer of pore-forming Slo1 α subunits. Although the physiological consequences of inactivation remain unclear, differences in depolarization-evoked firing among CCs have been proposed to arise from the ability of β2 subunits to shift the range of BK channel activation. To investigate the role of BK channels containing β2 subunits, we generated mice in which the gene encoding β2 was deleted (β2 knockout [KO]). Comparison of proteins from wild-type (WT) and β2 KO mice allowed unambiguous demonstration of the presence of β2 subunit in various tissues and its coassembly with the Slo1 α subunit. We compared current properties and cell firing properties of WT and β2 KO CCs in slices and found that β2 KO abolished inactivation, slowed action potential (AP) repolarization, and, during constant current injection, decreased AP firing. These results support the idea that the β2-mediated shift of the BK channel activation range affects repetitive firing and AP properties. Unexpectedly, CCs from β2 KO mice show an increased tendency toward spontaneous burst firing, suggesting that the particular properties of BK channels in the absence of β2 subunits may predispose to burst firing.

  8. Clinical polyomavirus BK variants with agnogene deletion are non-functional but rescued by trans-complementation

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, Marit Renee; Olsen, Gunn-Hege; Gosert, Rainer; Hirsch, Hans H.; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen

    2010-03-01

    High-level replication of polyomavirus BK (BKV) in kidney transplant recipients is associated with the emergence of BKV variants with rearranged (rr) non-coding control region (NCCR) increasing viral early gene expression and cytopathology. Cloning and sequencing revealed the presence of a BKV quasispecies which included non-functional variants when assayed in a recombinant virus assay. Here we report that the rr-NCCR of BKV variants RH-3 and RH-12, both bearing a NCCR deletion including the 5' end of the agnoprotein coding sequence, mediated early and late viral reporter gene expression in kidney cells. However, in a recombinant virus they failed to produce infectious progeny despite large T-antigen and VP1 expression and the formation of nuclear virus-like particles. Infectious progeny was generated when the agnogene was reconstructed in cis or agnoprotein provided in trans from a co-existing BKV rr-NCCR variant. We conclude that complementation can rescue non-functional BKV variants in vitro and possibly in vivo.

  9. Polyomavirus BK Replication in De Novo Kidney Transplant Patients Receiving Tacrolimus or Cyclosporine: A Prospective, Randomized, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, H H; Vincenti, F; Friman, S; Tuncer, M; Citterio, F; Wiecek, A; Scheuermann, E H; Klinger, M; Russ, G; Pescovitz, M D; Prestele, H

    2013-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-associated nephropathy causes premature kidney transplant (KT) failure. BKV viruria and viremia are biomarkers of disease progression, but associated risk factors are controversial. A total of 682 KT patients receiving basiliximab, mycophenolic acid (MPA), corticosteroids were randomized 1:1 to cyclosporine (CsA) or tacrolimus (Tac). Risk factors were analyzed in 629 (92.2%) patients having at least 2 BKV measurements until month 12 posttransplant. Univariate analysis associated CsA-MPA with lower rates of viremia than Tac-MPA at month 6 (10.6% vs. 16.3%, p = 0.048) and 12 (4.8% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.004) and lower plasma BKV loads at month 12 (3.9 vs. 5.1 log10 copies/mL; p = 0.028). In multivariate models, CsA-MPA remained associated with less viremia than Tac-MPA at month 6 (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36–0.99) and month 12 (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.16–0.68). Viremia at month 6 was also independently associated with higher steroid exposure until month 3 (OR 1.19 per 1 g), and with male gender (OR 2.49) and recipient age (OR 1.14 per 10 years) at month 12. The data suggest a dynamic risk factor evolution of BKV viremia consisting of higher corticosteroids until month 3, Tac-MPA compared to CsA-MPA at month 6 and Tac-MPA, older age, male gender at month 12 posttransplant. PMID:23137180

  10. Clinical impact of albuminuria in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Toyama, Tadashi; Hara, Akinori; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2012-02-01

    Patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, resulting in end-stage renal failure, are increasing in number. The pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy remains to be fully investigated. In the clinical setting, the presence of albuminuria/overt proteinuria and a low glomerular filtration rate may predict poor renal prognosis, but the prognosis of the normoalbuminuric renally insufficient diabetic patient remains controversial. In addition to the measurement of urinary albumin excretion, biomarker studies to detect diabetic nephropathy more specifically at the early stage have been performed worldwide. There is a growing body of evidence for remission and/or regression of diabetic nephropathy, which may be an indicator for cardiovascular and renal risk reduction. Deeper insights into the pathological characteristics as well as the clinical impact of albuminuria on renal and cardiovascular outcome are required.

  11. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Presynaptic CaMKII and BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and the BK channel are enriched at the presynaptic nerve terminal, where CaMKII associates with synaptic vesicles whereas the BK channel colocalizes with voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs) in the plasma membrane. Mounting evidence suggests that these two proteins play important roles in controlling neurotransmitter release. Presynaptic BK channels primarily serve as a negative regulator of neurotransmitter release. In contrast, presynaptic CaMKII either enhances or inhibits neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity depending on experimental/physiological conditions and properties of specific synapses. The different functions of presynaptic CaMKII appear to be mediated by distinct downstream proteins, including the BK channel. PMID:18759010

  12. BK channels in microglia are required for morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Zhang, Jing; Satoh, Yasushi; Meredith, Andrea L.; Nakata, Takahiro; Wu, Zhou; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Although morphine is a gold standard medication, long-term opioid use is associated with serious side effects, such as morphine-induced hyperalgesia (MIH) and anti-nociceptive tolerance. Microglia-to-neuron signalling is critically involved in pain hypersensitivity. However, molecules that control microglial cellular state under chronic morphine treatment remain unknown. Here we show that the microglia-specific subtype of Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is responsible for generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. We find that, after chronic morphine administration, an increase in arachidonic acid levels through the μ-opioid receptors leads to the sole activation of microglial BK channels in the spinal cord. Silencing BK channel auxiliary β3 subunit significantly attenuates the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance, and increases neurotransmission after chronic morphine administration. Therefore, microglia-specific BK channels contribute to the generation of MIH and anti-nociceptive tolerance. PMID:27241733

  13. Nephropathy in Chronic Lead Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lilis, Ruth; Gavrilescu, N.; Nestorescu, B.; Dumitriu, C.; Roventa, Ana

    1968-01-01

    This paper presents a study of renal function in 102 patients with lead poisoning admitted to the Occupational Diseases Clinic in Bucharest during the past 10 years; nearly half the patients had no history of lead colic. Every possible cause of renal damage, other than lead, was excluded by a careful differential diagnosis. Renal function was investigated by repeated determinations of blood urea, creatinine and uric acid, urea clearance, and endogenous creatinine clearance tests. Significant decreases of the clearance values (less than 50 ml./min. urea clearance and less than 80 ml./min. creatinine clearance), persistent high blood urea (more than 50 mg./100 ml.), and high blood creatinine (more than 1·2 mg./100 ml.) were found in a significant number of cases. These signs of impaired renal function were more frequent in the group of patients with chronic lead poisoning who had had several episodes of colic and an occupational exposure of more than 10 years. A high blood pressure was also found more frequently in this group of patients. Undercompensated and decompensated renal failure was found in 17 patients, most of whom had been exposed to lead for more than 10 years and had a history of several attacks of colic. Arterial hypertension accompanied the chronic renal failure in 13 patients, the renal impairment generally preceding the rise in blood pressure by several years. The duration of occupational lead exposure, the high absorption in the past, and the long period of observation of these patients, most of whom were repeatedly hospitalized, may explain the relatively high incidence (17 cases) of nephropathy with chronic renal failure in the present group. Impairment of urea clearance seems to be the earliest sign, at a time when the creatinine clearance is still normal. As the duration of exposure lengthens and the patient is subjected to active episodes of poisoning the creatinine clearance also deteriorates. Persistent urea retention and high creatininaemia

  14. Time-dependent effects of ethanol on BK channel expression and trafficking in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Stephanie; Velázquez-Marrero, Cristina; Marrero, Héctor G.; Seale, Garrett E.; Yudowski, Guillermo A.; Treistman, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The large conductance Ca+2 – and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) is an important player in molecular and behavioral alcohol tolerance. Trafficking and surface expression of ion channels contribute to the development of addictive behaviors. We have previously reported that internalization of the BK channel is a component of molecular tolerance to EtOH. Methods Using primary cultures of hippocampal neurons, we combine total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, electrophysiology and biochemical techniques to explore how exposure to EtOH affects the expression and subcellular localization of endogenous BK channels over time. Results Exposure to EtOH changed the expression of endogenous BK channels in a time-dependent manner at the perimembrane area (plasma membrane and/or the area adjacent to it), while total protein levels of BK remain unchanged. These results suggest a redistribution of the channel within the neurons rather than changes in synthesis or degradation rates. Our results showed a temporally nonlinear effect of EtOH on perimembrane expression of BK. First, there was an increase in BK perimembrane expression after 10-min of EtOH exposure that remained evident after 3-hrs, though not correlated to increases in functional channel expression. In contrast, after 6-hrs of EtOH exposure we observed a significant decrease in both BK perimembrane expression and functional channel expression. Furthermore, after 24-hrs EtOH exposure, perimembrane levels of BK had returned to baseline. Conclusion We report a complex time-dependent pattern in the effect of EtOH on BK channel trafficking, including successive increases and decreases in perimembrane expression and a reduction in active BK channels after 3 and 6-hrs of EtOH exposure. Possible mechanisms underlying this multiphasic trafficking are discussed. Since molecular tolerance necessarily underlies behavioral tolerance, the time-dependent alterations we see at the level of the channel

  15. Closed state-coupled C-type inactivation in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiusheng; Li, Qin; Aldrich, Richard W

    2016-06-21

    Ion channels regulate ion flow by opening and closing their pore gates. K(+) channels commonly possess two pore gates, one at the intracellular end for fast channel activation/deactivation and the other at the selectivity filter for slow C-type inactivation/recovery. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel lacks a classic intracellular bundle-crossing activation gate and normally show no C-type inactivation. We hypothesized that the BK channel's activation gate may spatially overlap or coexist with the C-type inactivation gate at or near the selectivity filter. We induced C-type inactivation in BK channels and studied the relationship between activation/deactivation and C-type inactivation/recovery. We observed prominent slow C-type inactivation/recovery in BK channels by an extreme low concentration of extracellular K(+) together with a Y294E/K/Q/S or Y279F mutation whose equivalent in Shaker channels (T449E/K/D/Q/S or W434F) caused a greatly accelerated rate of C-type inactivation or constitutive C-inactivation. C-type inactivation in most K(+) channels occurs upon sustained membrane depolarization or channel opening and then recovers during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or channel closure. However, we found that the BK channel C-type inactivation occurred during hyperpolarized membrane potentials or with decreased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and recovered with depolarized membrane potentials or elevated [Ca(2+)]i Constitutively open mutation prevented BK channels from C-type inactivation. We concluded that BK channel C-type inactivation is closed state-dependent and that its extents and rates inversely correlate with channel-open probability. Because C-type inactivation can involve multiple conformational changes at the selectivity filter, we propose that the BK channel's normal closing may represent an early conformational stage of C-type inactivation.

  16. Low Na, High K Diet and the Role of Aldosterone in BK-Mediated K Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Ryan J.; Wen, Donghai; Li, Huaqing; Yuan, Yang; Wang-France, Jun; Warner, Paige C.; Sansom, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    A low Na, high K diet (LNaHK) is associated with a low rate of cardiovascular (CV) disease in many societies. Part of the benefit of LNaHK relies on its diuretic effects; however, the role of aldosterone (aldo) in the diuresis is not understood. LNaHK mice exhibit an increase in renal K secretion that is dependent on the large, Ca-activated K channel, (BK-α with accessory BK-β4; BK-α/β4). We hypothesized that aldo causes an osmotic diuresis by increasing BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion in LNaHK mice. We found that the plasma aldo concentration (P[aldo]) was elevated by 10-fold in LNaHK mice compared with control diet (Con) mice. We subjected LNaHK mice to either sham surgery (sham), adrenalectomy (ADX) with low aldo replacement (ADX-LA), or ADX with high aldo replacement (ADX-HA). Compared to sham, the urinary flow, K excretion rate, transtubular K gradient (TTKG), and BK-α and BK-β4 expressions, were decreased in ADX-LA, but not different in ADX-HA. BK-β4 knockout (β4KO) and WT mice exhibited similar K clearance and TTKG in the ADX-LA groups; however, in sham and ADX-HA, the K clearance and TTKG of β4KO were less than WT. In response to amiloride treatment, the osmolar clearance was increased in WT Con, decreased in WT LNaHK, and unchanged in β4KO LNaHK. These data show that the high P[aldo] of LNaHK mice is necessary to generate a high rate of BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion, which creates an osmotic diuresis that may contribute to a reduction in CV disease. PMID:25607984

  17. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  18. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of the new isotope [sup 238]Bk

    SciTech Connect

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Gregorich, K.E.; Henderson, R.A.; Leyba, J.D.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Neu, M.P.; Kacher, C.D.; Hamilton, T.M.; Lane, M.R.; Sylwester, E.R.; Tuerler, A.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. )

    1994-04-01

    Electron-capture delayed fission ECDF was studied in the new isotope [sup 238]Bk produced via the [sup 241]Am(75-MeV [alpha], 7[ital n])[sup 238]Bk reaction. The half-life of the fission activity was measured to be 144[plus minus]5 seconds. The mass-yield distribution is predominantly asymmetric and the most probable preneutron emission total kinetic energy of fission is 179[plus minus]7 MeV. The ECDF mode in [sup 238]Bk was verified by an x-ray-fission coincidence experiment which indicated that the [sup 238]Cm fission lifetime is between about 10[sup [minus]15] and 10[sup [minus]9] seconds. The isotope was assigned to [sup 238]Bk through chemical separation and observation of the known 2.4-h [sup 238]Cm daughter activity. No alpha branch was observed in the decay of [sup 238]Bk. The production cross section for [sup 238]Bk is 150[plus minus]20 nb and the delayed fission probability is (4.8[plus minus]2)[times]10[sup [minus]4].

  19. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  20. Cadmium-cysteine coordination in the BK inner pore region and its structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2015-04-21

    To probe structure and gating-associated conformational changes in BK-type potassium (BK) channels, we examined consequences of Cd(2+) coordination with cysteines introduced at two positions in the BK inner pore. At V319C, the equivalent of valine in the conserved Kv proline-valine-proline (PVP) motif, Cd(2+) forms intrasubunit coordination with a native glutamate E321, which would place the side chains of V319C and E321 much closer together than observed in voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel structures, requiring that the proline between V319C and E321 introduces a kink in the BK S6 inner helix sharper than that observed in Kv channel structures. At inner pore position A316C, Cd(2+) binds with modest state dependence, suggesting the absence of an ion permeation gate at the cytosolic side of BK channel. These results highlight fundamental structural differences between BK and Kv channels in their inner pore region, which likely underlie differences in voltage-dependent gating between these channels.

  1. The Large Conductance, Calcium-activated K+ (BK) Channel is regulated by Cysteine String Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Large-conductance, calcium-activated-K+ (BK) channels are widely distributed throughout the nervous system, where they regulate action potential duration and firing frequency, along with presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Our recent efforts to identify chaperones that target neuronal ion channels have revealed cysteine string protein (CSPα) as a key regulator of BK channel expression and current density. CSPα is a vesicle-associated protein and mutations in CSPα cause the hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, adult-onset autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL). CSPα null mice show 2.5 fold higher BK channel expression compared to wild type mice, which is not seen with other neuronal channels (i.e. Cav2.2, Kv1.1 and Kv1.2). Furthermore, mutations in either CSPα's J domain or cysteine string region markedly increase BK expression and current amplitude. We conclude that CSPα acts to regulate BK channel expression, and consequently CSPα-associated changes in BK activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as ANCL. PMID:23945775

  2. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  3. BK Polyomavirus Replication in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Is Inhibited by Sirolimus, but Activated by Tacrolimus Through a Pathway Involving FKBP-12.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H H; Yakhontova, K; Lu, M; Manzetti, J

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication causes nephropathy and premature kidney transplant failure. Insufficient BKPyV-specific T cell control is regarded as a key mechanism, but direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on BKPyV replication might play an additional role. We compared the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)- and calcineurin-inhibitors on BKPyV replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells. Sirolimus impaired BKPyV replication with a 90% inhibitory concentration of 4 ng/mL by interfering with mTOR-SP6-kinase activation. Sirolimus inhibition was rapid and effective up to 24 h postinfection during viral early gene expression, but not thereafter, during viral late gene expression. The mTORC-1 kinase inhibitor torin-1 showed a similar inhibition profile, supporting the notion that early steps of BKPyV replication depend on mTOR activity. Cyclosporine A also inhibited BKPyV replication, while tacrolimus activated BKPyV replication and reversed sirolimus inhibition. FK binding protein 12kda (FKBP-12) siRNA knockdown abrogated sirolimus inhibition and increased BKPyV replication similar to adding tacrolimus. Thus, sirolimus and tacrolimus exert opposite effects on BKPyV replication in renal tubular epithelial cells by a mechanism involving FKBP-12 as common target. Immunosuppressive drugs may therefore contribute directly to the risk of BKPyV replication and nephropathy besides suppressing T cell functions. The data provide rationales for clinical trials aiming at reducing the risk of BKPyV replication and disease in kidney transplantation.

  4. BK Polyomavirus Replication in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Is Inhibited by Sirolimus, but Activated by Tacrolimus Through a Pathway Involving FKBP‐12

    PubMed Central

    Yakhontova, K.; Lu, M.; Manzetti, J.

    2015-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication causes nephropathy and premature kidney transplant failure. Insufficient BKPyV‐specific T cell control is regarded as a key mechanism, but direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on BKPyV replication might play an additional role. We compared the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)‐ and calcineurin‐inhibitors on BKPyV replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells. Sirolimus impaired BKPyV replication with a 90% inhibitory concentration of 4 ng/mL by interfering with mTOR–SP6‐kinase activation. Sirolimus inhibition was rapid and effective up to 24 h postinfection during viral early gene expression, but not thereafter, during viral late gene expression. The mTORC‐1 kinase inhibitor torin‐1 showed a similar inhibition profile, supporting the notion that early steps of BKPyV replication depend on mTOR activity. Cyclosporine A also inhibited BKPyV replication, while tacrolimus activated BKPyV replication and reversed sirolimus inhibition. FK binding protein 12kda (FKBP‐12) siRNA knockdown abrogated sirolimus inhibition and increased BKPyV replication similar to adding tacrolimus. Thus, sirolimus and tacrolimus exert opposite effects on BKPyV replication in renal tubular epithelial cells by a mechanism involving FKBP‐12 as common target. Immunosuppressive drugs may therefore contribute directly to the risk of BKPyV replication and nephropathy besides suppressing T cell functions. The data provide rationales for clinical trials aiming at reducing the risk of BKPyV replication and disease in kidney transplantation. PMID:26639422

  5. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy: a long road of discovery.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Amy Jayne; Duffy, Seamus; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2015-07-01

    The global prevalence of diabetic nephropathy is rising in parallel with the increasing incidence of diabetes in most countries. Unfortunately, up to 40 % of persons diagnosed with diabetes may develop kidney complications. Diabetic nephropathy is associated with substantially increased risks of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. An inherited susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy exists, and progress is being made unravelling the genetic basis for nephropathy thanks to international research collaborations, shared biological resources and new analytical approaches. Multiple epidemiological studies have highlighted the clinical heterogeneity of nephropathy and the need for better phenotyping to help define important subgroups for analysis and increase the power of genetic studies. Collaborative genome-wide association studies for nephropathy have reported unique genes, highlighted novel biological pathways and suggested new disease mechanisms, but progress towards clinically relevant risk prediction models for diabetic nephropathy has been slow. This review summarises the current status, recent developments and ongoing challenges elucidating the genetics of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. 1343+61 Supernova 1996bk in NGC 5308

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Janet A.

    1996-10-01

    We have been informed by Stefano Pesci, Milan, Italy, the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (IAU Circular 6491), and Guy Hurst (The Astronomer Electronic Circular 1133) of the visual discovery by Pesci and Piero Mazza, Milan, Italy, of a supernova in NGC 5308 at magnitude 14.5-15.0 on October 12.79 UT; Pesci reports that it is "quite separated from the nucleus." No object was seen at this location by Pesci on August 15. The supernova was confirmed visually by M. Schwartz, Cascade Mountains, OR, by CCD on Oct 13.3 UT. P. Garnavich and R. Kirshner, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, report that spectra obtained on Oct 15.1 UT by J. Huchra and L. Macri with the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope confirm the supernova in NGC 5308 as a type-Ia supernova about a week past maximum. They also report that, according to CCD images taken with the Whipple Observatory 1.2-m telescope, the supernova is 10.5" south and 17.9" west of the galaxy center, and at the time of exposure was magnitude V = 15 (IAU Circular 6491). Observations should be reported to the AAVSO International Database as SN 1996BK.

  7. The polyomavirus BK agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Unterstab, Gunhild; Gosert, Rainer; Leuenberger, David; Lorentz, Pascal; Rinaldo, Christine H.; Hirsch, Hans H.

    2010-04-10

    Agnoprotein encoded by human polyomavirus BK (BKV) is a late cytoplasmic protein of 66 amino acids (aa) of unknown function. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a fine granular and a vesicular distribution in donut-like structures. Using BKV(Dunlop)-infected or agnoprotein-transfected cells, we investigated agnoprotein co-localization with subcellular structures. We found that agnoprotein co-localizes with lipid droplets (LD) in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells as well as in other cells supporting BKV replication in vitro (UTA, Vero cells). Using agnoprotein-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion constructs, we demonstrate that agnoprotein aa 20-42 are required for targeting LD, whereas aa 1-20 or aa 42-66 were not. Agnoprotein aa 22-40 are predicted to form an amphipathic helix, and mutations A25D and F39E, disrupting its hydrophobic domain, prevented LD targeting. However, changing the phosphorylation site serine-11 to alanine or aspartic acid did not alter LD co-localization. Our findings provide new clues to unravel agnoprotein function.

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Enriched Nuclear Fractions from BK Polyomavirus-infected Primary Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Joshua L.; Verhalen, Brandy; Kumar, Ranjit; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Imperiale, Michael J.; Jiang, Mengxi

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small DNA viruses that are associated with a number of severe human diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The detailed virus-host interactions during lytic polyomavirus infection are not fully understood. Here we report the first nuclear proteomic study with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in a primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cell culture system using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomic profiling coupled with LC-MS/MS. We demonstrated the feasibility of SILAC labeling in these primary cells and subsequently performed reciprocal labeling-infection experiments to identify proteins that are altered by BKPyV infection. Our analyses revealed specific proteins that are significantly up- or down-regulated in the infected nuclear proteome. The genes encoding many of these proteins were not identified in a previous microarray study, suggesting that differential regulation of these proteins may be independent of transcriptional control. Western blotting experiments verified the SILAC proteomic findings. Finally, pathway and network analyses indicated that the host cell DNA damage response signaling and DNA repair pathways are among the cellular processes most affected at the protein level during polyomavirus infection. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the host nuclear proteomic changes during polyomavirus lytic infection and suggests potential novel host factors required for a productive polyomavirus infection. PMID:26354146

  9. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  10. Nitroblue tetrazolium blocks BK channels in cerebrovascular smooth muscle cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, D; Pospisilik, J A; Mathers, D A

    2000-01-01

    The effects of p-nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) on large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) in enzymatically dispersed rat cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) were examined. Patch clamp methods were employed to record single BK channel currents from inside-out patches of CVMC membrane maintained at 21–23°C. When applied to the cytoplasmic face of inside-out membrane patches (internally applied NBT), micromolar concentrations of NBT reversible reduced the mean open time of BK channels, without changing channel conductance. NBT altered the frequency distribution of BK channel open times from a two exponential to a single exponential form. In the absence of NBT, mean channel open time increased on membrane depolarization. In the presence of internally applied NBT, mean channel open became essentially independent of membrane potential. Internally applied NBT also reduced the mean closed time of BK channels when measured at membrane potentials in the range −80 mV to +20 mV. The combined effects of internal NBT on mean open and closed times resulted in the suppression of BK channel open probability when measured at positive membrane potentials. When applied to the external membrane face, micromolar concentrations of NBT reduced mean channel open time progressively as the membrane was hyperpolarized, and also reduced open probability at negative membrane potentials. A model is proposed in which NBT alters channel gating by binding to a site at or near to the cytoplasmic membrane face. Externally applied NBT suppressed BK channel open probability at concentrations which also inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Therefore, the potential role of potassium channel block in NBT actions previously attributed to NOS inhibition is discussed. PMID:10696106

  11. Central role of the BK channel in urinary bladder smooth muscle physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-09-15

    The physiological functions of the urinary bladder are to store and periodically expel urine. These tasks are facilitated by the contraction and relaxation of the urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), also known as detrusor smooth muscle, which comprises the bladder wall. The large-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK, BKCa, MaxiK, Slo1, or KCa1.1) channel is highly expressed in UBSM and is arguably the most important physiologically relevant K(+) channel that regulates UBSM function. Its significance arises from the fact that the BK channel is the only K(+) channel that is activated by increases in both voltage and intracellular Ca(2+). The BK channels control UBSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the repolarization phase of the spontaneous action potentials that determine UBSM spontaneous rhythmic contractility. In UBSM, these channels have complex regulatory mechanisms involving integrated intracellular Ca(2+) signals, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and close functional interactions with muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors. BK channel dysfunction is implicated in some forms of bladder pathologies, such as detrusor overactivity, and related overactive bladder. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the functional role of UBSM BK channels under normal and pathophysiological conditions and provides new insight toward the BK channels as targets for pharmacological or genetic control of UBSM function. Modulation of UBSM BK channels can occur by directly or indirectly targeting their regulatory mechanisms, which has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches for bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder and detrusor underactivity.

  12. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  13. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Yolima P.; Granados, Sara T.; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above. PMID:25346693

  14. BK potassium channels control transmitter release at CA3-CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Raffaelli, Giacomo; Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Pedarzani, Paola; Cherubini, Enrico

    2004-05-15

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK channels) activate in response to calcium influx during action potentials and contribute to the spike repolarization and fast afterhyperpolarization. BK channels targeted to active zones in presynaptic nerve terminals have been shown to limit calcium entry and transmitter release by reducing the duration of the presynaptic spike at neurosecretory nerve terminals and at the frog neuromuscular junction. However, their functional role in central synapses is still uncertain. In the hippocampus, BK channels have been proposed to act as an 'emergency brake' that would control transmitter release only under conditions of excessive depolarization and accumulation of intracellular calcium. Here we demonstrate that in the CA3 region of hippocampal slice cultures, under basal experimental conditions, the selective BK channel blockers paxilline (10 microM) and iberiotoxin (100 nM) increase the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneously occurring action potential-dependent EPSCs. These drugs did not affect miniature currents recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin, suggesting that their action was dependent on action potential firing. Moreover, in double patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically interconnected CA3 pyramidal neurones, blockade of BK channels enhanced the probability of transmitter release, as revealed by the increase in success rate, EPSC amplitude and the concomitant decrease in paired-pulse ratio in response to pairs of presynaptic action potentials delivered at a frequency of 0.05 Hz. BK channel blockers also enhanced the appearance of delayed responses, particularly following the second action potential in the paired-pulse protocol. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BK channels are powerful modulators of transmitter release and synaptic efficacy in central neurones.

  15. A new classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014: a report from Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Haneda, Masakazu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Koya, Daisuke; Babazono, Tetsuya; Moriya, Tatsumi; Makino, Hirofumi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Yoshiki; Wada, Takashi; Ogawa, Susumu; Inaba, Masaaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tsuchiya, Ken; Honda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Kazuko; Shide, Kenichiro

    2015-02-01

    The Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy has revised its Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy (Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014) in line with the widespread use of key concepts such as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease. In revising the Classification, the Committee carefully evaluated, as relevant to current revision, the report of a study conducted by the Research Group of Diabetic Nephropathy, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. Major revisions to the Classification are summarized as follows: (1) eGFR is substituted for GFR in the Classification; (2) the subdivisions A and B in stage 3 (overt nephropathy) have been reintegrated; (3) stage 4 (kidney failure) has been redefined as a GFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), regardless of the extent of albuminuria; and (4) stress has been placed on the differential diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy versus non-diabetic kidney disease as being crucial in all stages of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. A new Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014: a report from Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Haneda, Masakazu; Utsunomiya, Kazunori; Koya, Daisuke; Babazono, Tetsuya; Moriya, Tatsumi; Makino, Hirofumi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Yoshiki; Wada, Takashi; Ogawa, Susumu; Inaba, Masaaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Takashi; Masakane, Ikuto; Tsuchiya, Ken; Honda, Keiko; Ichikawa, Kazuko; Shide, Kenichiro

    2015-03-01

    The Joint Committee on Diabetic Nephropathy has revised its Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy (Classification of Diabetic Nephropathy 2014) in line with the widespread use of key concepts, such as the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In revising the Classification, the Committee carefully evaluated, as relevant to current revision, the report of a study conducted by the Research Group of Diabetic Nephropathy, Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan. Major revisions to the Classification are summarized as follows: (i) eGFR is substituted for GFR in the Classification; (ii) the subdivisions A and B in stage 3 (overt nephropathy) have been reintegrated; (iii) stage 4 (kidney failure) has been redefined as a GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), regardless of the extent of albuminuria; and (iv) stress has been placed on the differential diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy versus non-diabetic kidney disease as being crucial in all stages of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Low-protein diet for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Otoda, Toshiki; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of progressive kidney disease, leading to end-stage renal disease and renal replacement therapy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers have been considered effective at slowing the progression of kidney function deterioration. However, these drugs cannot sufficiently halt the progression of nephropathy to the extent that is required. A low-protein diet (LPD) is believed to be a nutritional intervention that may slow kidney disease progression. In fact, preclinical animal experiments have demonstrated excellent renoprotective effects of an LPD. However, in human clinical trials, analyses of the effects of protein restriction on diabetic nephropathy have not yet revealed consistently positive outcomes of this nutritional intervention. In this review, we analyze the potential renoprotective effects of an LPD on diabetic nephropathy and summarize the outcomes of clinical trials that have systematically investigated the efficacy of an LPD in diabetic nephropathy. In addition, we discuss some potential approaches associated with nutritional interventions to combat progressive kidney disease.

  18. Diabetic nephropathy among Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Subrata; Thameem, Farook; Alves, Tahira; Nolen, Jacqueline; Al-Shahrouri, Hania; Bansal, Shweta; Abboud, Hanna E.; Fanti, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is growing rapidly worldwide as a consequence of the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Among U.S. ethnic groups, Mexican Americans have a disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of DN and associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In communities bordering Mexico, as many as 90% of Mexican American patients with ESRD also suffer from T2DM compared to only 50% of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Both socio-economic factors and genetic predisposition appear to have a strong influence on this association. In addition, certain pathogenetic and clinical features of T2DM and DN are different in Mexican Americans compared to NHW, raising questions as to whether the diagnostic and treatment strategies that are standard practice in the NHW patient population may not be applicable in Mexican Americans. This article reviews the epidemiology of DN in Mexican Americans, describes the pathophysiology and associated risk factors, and identifies gaps in our knowledge and understanding that needs to be addressed by future investigations. PMID:22445478

  19. IgA nephropathy enigma.

    PubMed

    Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Raska, Milan

    2016-11-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis in the world. The disease is characterized by the presence of IgA-containing immune complexes in the circulation and in mesangial deposits with ensuing glomerular injury. Although in humans there are two IgA subclasses, only IgA1 molecules are involved. The exclusivity of participation of IgA1 in IgAN prompted extensive structural and immunological studies of the unique hinge region (HR) of IgA1, which is absent in otherwise highly homologous IgA2. HR of IgA1 with altered O-glycans serves as an antigen recognized by autoantibodies specific for aberrant HR glycans leading to the generation of nephritogenic immune complexes. However, there are several unresolved questions concerning the phylogenetic origin of human IgA1 HR, the structural basis of its antigenicity, the origin of antibodies specific for HR with altered glycan moieties, the regulatory defects in IgA1 glycosylation pathways, and the potential approaches applicable to the disease-specific interventions in the formation of nephritogenic immune complexes. This review focuses on the gaps in our knowledge of molecular and cellular events that are involved in the immunopathogenesis of IgAN.

  20. Bisphenol A activates BK channels through effects on α and β1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Rottgen, Trey S; Fancher, Ibra S; Asano, Shinichi; Widlanski, Theodore S; Dick, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that BK (KCa1.1) channel activity (NPo) increases in response to bisphenol A (BPA). Moreover, BK channels containing regulatory β1 subunits were more sensitive to the stimulatory effect of BPA. How BPA increases BK channel NPo remains mostly unknown. Estradiol activates BK channels by binding to an extracellular site, but neither the existence nor location of a BPA binding site has been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that an extracellular binding site is responsible for activation of BK channels by BPA. We synthesized membrane-impermeant BPA-monosulfate (BPA-MS) and used patch clamp electrophysiology to study channels composed of α or α + β1 subunits in cell-attached (C-A), whole-cell (W-C), and inside-out (I-O) patches. In C-A patches, bath application of BPA-MS (100 μM) had no effect on the NPo of BK channels, regardless of their subunit composition. Importantly, however, subsequent addition of membrane-permeant BPA (100 μM) increased the NPo of both α and α + β1 channels in C-A patches. The C-A data indicate that in order to alter BK channel NPo, BPA must interact with the channel itself (or some closely associated partner) and diffusible messengers are not involved. In W-C patches, 100 μM BPA-MS activated current in cells expressing α subunits, whereas cells expressing α + β1 subunits responded similarly to a log-order lower concentration (10 μM). The W-C data suggest that an extracellular activation site exists, but do not eliminate the possibility that an intracellular site may also be present. In I-O patches, where the cytoplasmic face was exposed to the bath, BPA-MS had no effect on the NPo of BK α subunits, but BPA increased it. BPA-MS increased the NPo of α + β1 channels in I-O patches, but not as much as BPA. We conclude that BPA activates BK α via an extracellular site and that BPA-sensitivity is increased by the β1 subunit, which may also constitute part of an intracellular binding site. PMID

  1. The regulation of BK channel activity by pre- and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Barry D; Braun, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels represent an important pathway for the outward flux of K(+) ions from the intracellular compartment in response to membrane depolarization, and/or an elevation in cytosolic free [Ca(2+)]. They are functionally expressed in a range of mammalian tissues (e.g., nerve and smooth muscles), where they can either enhance or dampen membrane excitability. The diversity of BK channel activity results from the considerable alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational modification (e.g., phosphorylation) of key domains within the pore-forming α subunit of the channel complex. Most of these modifications are regulated by distinct upstream cell signaling pathways that influence the structure and/or gating properties of the holo-channel and ultimately, cellular function. The channel complex may also contain auxiliary subunits that further affect channel gating and behavior, often in a tissue-specific manner. Recent studies in human and animal models have provided strong evidence that abnormal BK channel expression/function contributes to a range of pathologies in nerve and smooth muscle. By targeting the upstream regulatory events modulating BK channel behavior, it may be possible to therapeutically intervene and alter BK channel expression/function in a beneficial manner.

  2. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  3. Two classes of regulatory subunits coassemble in the same BK channel and independently regulate gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J.

    2015-09-01

    High resolution proteomics increasingly reveals that most native ion channels are assembled in macromolecular complexes. However, whether different partners have additive or cooperative functional effects, or whether some combinations of proteins may preclude assembly of others are largely unexplored topics. The large conductance Ca2+-and-voltage activated potassium channel (BK) is well-suited to discern nuanced differences in regulation arising from combinations of subunits. Here we examine whether assembly of two different classes of regulatory proteins, β and γ, in BK channels is exclusive or independent. Our results show that both γ1 and up to four β2-subunits can coexist in the same functional BK complex, with the gating shift caused by β2-subunits largely additive with that produced by the γ1-subunit(s). The multiplicity of β:γ combinations that can participate in a BK complex therefore allow a range of BK channels with distinct functional properties tuned by the specific stoichiometry of the contributing subunits.

  4. Nuclear BK Channels Regulate Gene Expression via the Control of Nuclear Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boxing; Jie, Wei; Huang, Lianyan; Wei, Peng; Li, Shuji; Luo, Zhengyi; Friedman, Allyson K.; Meredith, Andrea L.; Han, Ming-Hu; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the regulation of neuronal functions. The significance of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and lysosomal ion channels in the regulation of Ca2+ is well established. In contrast, surprisingly less is known about the function of ion channels on the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we demonstrate the presence of functional large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) on the NE of rodent hippocampal neurons. Functionally blockade of nuclear BK channels (nBK channels) induces NE-derived Ca2+ release, nucleoplasmic Ca2+ elevation, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. More importantly, blockade of nBK channels regulates nuclear Ca2+-sensitive gene expression and promotes dendritic arborization in a nuclear Ca2+-dependent manner. These results suggest that nBK channel functions as a molecular linker between neuronal activity and nuclear Ca2+ to convey the signals from synapse to nucleus and is a new modulator for synaptic activity-dependent neuronal functions at the NE level. PMID:24952642

  5. Manipulation of BK channel expression is sufficient to alter auditory hair cell thresholds in larval zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Tripp, Joel A.; Genova, Rachel M.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates rely on electrical resonance for frequency tuning in auditory hair cells. A key component of the resonance exhibited by these cells is an outward calcium-activated potassium current that flows through large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels. Previous work in midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) has shown that BK expression correlates with seasonal changes in hearing sensitivity and that pharmacologically blocking these channels replicates the natural decreases in sensitivity during the winter non-reproductive season. To test the hypothesis that reducing BK channel function is sufficient to change auditory thresholds in fish, morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) were used in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) to alter expression of slo1a and slo1b, duplicate genes coding for the pore-forming α-subunits of BK channels. Following MO injection, microphonic potentials were recorded from the inner ear of larvae. Quantitative real-time PCR was then used to determine the MO effect on slo1a and slo1b expression in these same fish. Knockdown of either slo1a or slo1b resulted in disrupted gene expression and increased auditory thresholds across the same range of frequencies of natural auditory plasticity observed in midshipman. We conclude that interference with the normal expression of individual slo1 genes is sufficient to increase auditory thresholds in zebrafish larvae and that changes in BK channel expression are a direct mechanism for regulation of peripheral hearing sensitivity among fishes. PMID:24803460

  6. The brain-specific Beta4 subunit downregulates BK channel cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Shruti, Sonal; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Fitzpatrick, James A; Brenner, Robert; Bruchez, Marcel P; Barth, Alison L

    2012-01-01

    The large-conductance K(+) channel (BK channel) can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca(++)- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we find that β4 expression profoundly reduces surface localization of BK channels via a C-terminal ER retention sequence. In hippocampal CA3 neurons from C57BL/6 mice with endogenously high β4 expression, whole-cell BK channel currents display none of the characteristic properties of BKα+β4 channels observed in heterologous cells. Finally, β4 knock-out animals exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in whole-cell BK channel current, indicating that β4 also regulates current magnitude in vivo. Thus, we propose that a major function of the brain-specific β4 subunit in CA3 neurons is control of surface trafficking.

  7. The Brain-Specific Beta4 Subunit Downregulates BK Channel Cell Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shruti, Sonal; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Fitzpatrick, James A.; Brenner, Robert; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Barth, Alison L.

    2012-01-01

    The large-conductance K+ channel (BK channel) can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca++- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we find that β4 expression profoundly reduces surface localization of BK channels via a C-terminal ER retention sequence. In hippocampal CA3 neurons from C57BL/6 mice with endogenously high β4 expression, whole-cell BK channel currents display none of the characteristic properties of BKα+β4 channels observed in heterologous cells. Finally, β4 knock-out animals exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in whole-cell BK channel current, indicating that β4 also regulates current magnitude in vivo. Thus, we propose that a major function of the brain-specific β4 subunit in CA3 neurons is control of surface trafficking. PMID:22438928

  8. The regulation of BK channel activity by pre- and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Barry D.; Braun, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels represent an important pathway for the outward flux of K+ ions from the intracellular compartment in response to membrane depolarization, and/or an elevation in cytosolic free [Ca2+]. They are functionally expressed in a range of mammalian tissues (e.g., nerve and smooth muscles), where they can either enhance or dampen membrane excitability. The diversity of BK channel activity results from the considerable alternative mRNA splicing and post-translational modification (e.g., phosphorylation) of key domains within the pore-forming α subunit of the channel complex. Most of these modifications are regulated by distinct upstream cell signaling pathways that influence the structure and/or gating properties of the holo-channel and ultimately, cellular function. The channel complex may also contain auxiliary subunits that further affect channel gating and behavior, often in a tissue-specific manner. Recent studies in human and animal models have provided strong evidence that abnormal BK channel expression/function contributes to a range of pathologies in nerve and smooth muscle. By targeting the upstream regulatory events modulating BK channel behavior, it may be possible to therapeutically intervene and alter BK channel expression/function in a beneficial manner. PMID:25202279

  9. Coexistence of Fabry Disease and Membranous Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xie, Hua; Lin, Hongli; Chen, Shuni; Wang, Weidong; Zhao, Guangben; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with no family history or characteristic symptoms of Fabry disease presented with proteinuria. Histological and immunofluorescent analysis of kidney tissue collected revealed stage 1 membranous nephropathy. Electron microscopy of the same tissue revealed a large number of myeloid bodies (zebra bodies) in the glomerular epithelial cytoplasm and a mild irregular thickening of basement membrane. A diagnosis of Fabry disease was supported by the low α-galactosidase A activity detected in the patient's plasma, and confirmed by the detection of a pathogenic homozygous mutation in the α-galactosidase A gene. Therefore, the final diagnosis was of coexistent Fabry disease and stage 1 membranous nephropathy. This is the first case study reporting the coexistence of Fabry disease and membranous nephropathy. Our results emphasize the importance of electron microscopy in Fabry disease diagnosis.

  10. Presynaptic BK Channels Modulate Ethanol-Induced Enhancement of GABAergic Transmission in the Rat Central Amygdala Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Madison, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium BK channels are widely expressed in the brain and are involved in the regulation of neuronal functions such as neurotransmitter release. However, their possible role in mediating ethanol-induced GABA release is still unknown. We assessed the role of BK channels in modulating the action of ethanol on inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated via GABAA receptors in the rat central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) mediated by GABAA receptors were isolated from CeA neurons under whole-cell voltage clamp, and their response to selective BK channel antagonists, channel activators, or ethanol was analyzed. Blocking BK channels with the specific BK channel antagonist paxilline significantly increased the mean amplitude of eIPSCs, whereas the activation of BK channels with the channel opener NS1619 reversibly attenuated the mean amplitude of eIPSCs. Ethanol (50 mm) alone enhanced the amplitude of eIPSCs but failed to further enhance eIPSCs in the slices pretreated with paxilline. Bath application of either BK channel blockers significantly increased the frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). Similarly, 50 mm ethanol alone also enhanced mIPSC frequency. Increases in mIPSC frequency by either selective BK channel antagonists or ethanol were not accompanied with changes in the amplitude of mIPSCs. Furthermore, following bath application of BK channel blockers for 10 min, ethanol failed to further increase mIPSC frequency. Together, these results suggest that blocking BK channels mimics the effects of ethanol on GABA release and that presynaptic BK channels could serve as a target for ethanol effects in CeA. PMID:25297098

  11. Soybeans Ameliolate Diabetic Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Eun; Ahn, Soo Kyung; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun; Park, Seung Hwa; Yoon, Bang Bu

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most frequent and serious complications of diabetes mellitus. Soybeans have been shown to reduce urinary albumin excretion and total cholesterol in non-diabetic patients with nephrotic syndrome. However, reports focusing specifically on diabetic nephropathy are scarce and the available results are inconsistent. It was reported that soybean consumption reduced urinary protein excretion in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy, whereas it was found to elicit an increase in urinary protein excretion when soybeans were consumed by type 2 diabetic patients. This study aims to investigate the effects of soybean in diabetic nephropathy, particularly the effects of consuming soybeans on the histopathology of diabetic nephropathy, using aquaporin (AQP) and osteopontin (OPN) expression as diagnostic markers. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three groups: control, diabetic with red chow diet and diabetic with soybean diet. For histological examination, the expression of OPN and AQP, renal function and hemoglobin A1c were evaluated at the end of the study. Improvements in glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were demonstrated in the diabetic rat group given a soybean diet. OPN and AQP expression were suppressed in the kidney specimens of diabetic rats with the soybean diet. In conclusion, soybeans may prevent the weight loss and morphological disruption of the kidney associated with diabetes mellitus. Soybeans also may improve glycemic control. It seems likely that long-term control of blood glucose levels using a soybean diet could prevent the progression of diabetes mellitus, and therefore, nephropathy could be prevented. PMID:18955330

  12. Cellular Cholesterol Transport Proteins in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Joseph G. S.; Yung, Susan; Chau, Mel K. M.; Shiu, Sammy W. M.; Chan, Tak Mao; Tan, Kathryn C. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid accumulation has been shown to accelerate renal injury, and the intracellular accumulation of lipids may be caused by alterations in synthesis as well as lipid uptake and efflux. We have investigated the role of cellular cholesterol transport proteins including adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), G1 (ABCG1) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in diabetic nephropathy. Methods Protein expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI was determined in human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells cultured under normal or high glucose conditions. Renal expression of these cholesterol transporters was examined in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes. Results ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI were expressed in both human renal mesangial cells and proximal tubular epithelial cells, and mediated cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI and HDL. In vitro, hyperglycemia reduced the expression and the ability to mediate cholesterol efflux of all three cholesterol transporters (p<0.05). In vivo studies showed that intra-renal accumulation of lipids was increased in diabetic mice, particularly in mice with nephropathy. This was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI in the kidneys. These changes were already seen in diabetic mice without nephropathy and preceded the development of nephropathy. Diabetic mice with nephropathy had the lowest level of these cholesterol transporters. Conclusion Inducing diabetes with streptozotocin significantly reduced renal expression of ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI. Defects in cholesterol export pathway in renal cells could therefore promote cholesterol accumulation and might contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25181357

  13. [Physiopathology of nephropathy studied with contrast media].

    PubMed

    Morales Buenrostro, L E; Tellez Zenteno, J F; Torre Delgadillo, A

    2000-01-01

    For the technological advances in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, the use of intravenous contrast media in the hospital is more and more frequent. It can produce acute renal failure secondary to its nephrotoxicity known as contrast media nephropathy. This review describes the pathophysiologic mechanisms of contrast media injury, including cytotoxicity caused by hyperosmoloarity of contrast media, the hemodynamic factors and the role of the renin-angiotensin system, prostaglandins, oxygen free radicals, endothelin-1, adenosine, nitric oxide and others. The understanding of this information is of vital importance for the development of prophylactic strategies for contrast media nephropathy.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mandeep Kumar; Singh, Umesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to trigger retinopathy, neuropathy and nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy, a long-term major microvascular complication of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, affects a large population worldwide. Recent findings suggest that numerous pathways are activated during the course of diabetes mellitus and that these pathways individually or collectively play a role in the induction and progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, clinical strategies targeting these pathways to manage diabetic nephropathy remain unsatisfactory, as the number of diabetic patients with nephropathy is increasing yearly. To develop ground-breaking therapeutic options to prevent the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of the disease is mandatory. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the underlying mechanisms and downstream pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Fast activating voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK) conductance promotes bursting in pituitary cells: a dynamic clamp study

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Joël; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Gonzalez-Iglesias, Arturo E.; Milescu, Lorin S.; Bertram, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The electrical activity pattern of endocrine pituitary cells regulates their basal secretion level. Rat somatotrophs and lactotrophs exhibit spontaneous bursting and have high basal levels of hormone secretion, while gonadotrophs exhibit spontaneous spiking and have low basal hormone secretion. It has been proposed that the difference in electrical activity between bursting somatotrophs and spiking gonadotrophs is due to the presence of large conductance potassium (BK) channels on somatotrophs but not on gonadotrophs. This is one example where the role of an ion channel type may be clearly established. We demonstrate here that BK channels indeed promote bursting activity in pituitary cells. Blocking BK channels in bursting lacto-somatotroph GH4C1 cells changes their firing activity to spiking, while further adding an artificial BK conductance via dynamic clamp restores bursting. Importantly, this burst-promoting effect requires a relatively fast BK activation/deactivation, as predicted by computational models. We also show that adding a fast activating BK conductance to spiking gonadotrophs converts the activity of these cells to bursting. Together, our results suggest that differences in BK channel expression may underlie the differences in electrical activity and basal hormone secretion levels among pituitary cell types and that the rapid rate of BK channel activation is key to its role in burst promotion. PMID:22090511

  16. BK Knockout by TALEN-Mediated Gene Targeting in Osteoblasts: KCNMA1 Determines the Proliferation and Differentiation of Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Hongya; Gao, Jianjun; Dong, Jibin; Tao, Jie; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels participate in many important physiological functions in excitable tissues such as neurons, cardiac and smooth muscles, whereas the knowledge of BK channels in bone tissues and osteoblasts remains elusive. To investigate the role of BK channels in osteoblasts, we used transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to establish a BK knockout cell line on rat ROS17/2.8 osteoblast, and detected the proliferation and mineralization of the BK-knockout cells. Our study found that the BK-knockout cells significantly decreased the ability of proliferation and mineralization as osteoblasts, compared to the wild type cells. The overall expression of osteoblast differentiation marker genes in the BK-knockout cells was significantly lower than that in wild type osteoblast cells. The BK-knockout osteoblast cell line in our study displays a phenotype decrease in osteoblast function which can mimic the pathological state of osteoblast and thus provide a working cell line as a tool for study of osteoblast function and bone related diseases. PMID:27329042

  17. Effect of aldosterone on BK channel expression in mammalian cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Estilo, Genevieve; Liu, Wen; Pastor-Soler, Nuria; Mitchell, Phillip; Carattino, Marcelo D; Kleyman, Thomas R; Satlin, Lisa M

    2008-09-01

    Apical large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) mediate flow-stimulated K(+) secretion. Dietary K(+) loading for 10-14 days leads to an increase in BK channel mRNA abundance, enhanced flow-stimulated K(+) secretion in microperfused CCDs, and a redistribution of immunodetectable channels from an intracellular pool to the apical membrane (Najjar F, Zhou H, Morimoto T, Bruns JB, Li HS, Liu W, Kleyman TR, Satlin LM. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 289: F922-F932, 2005). To test whether this adaptation was mediated by a K(+)-induced increase in aldosterone, New Zealand White rabbits were fed a low-Na(+) (LS) or high-Na(+) (HS) diet for 7-10 days to alter circulating levels of aldosterone but not serum K(+) concentration. Single CCDs were isolated for quantitation of BK channel subunit (total, alpha-splice variants, beta-isoforms) mRNA abundance by real-time PCR and measurement of net transepithelial Na(+) (J(Na)) and K(+) (J(K)) transport by microperfusion; kidneys were processed for immunolocalization of BK alpha-subunit by immunofluorescence microscopy. At the time of death, LS rabbits excreted no urinary Na(+) and had higher circulating levels of aldosterone than HS animals. The relative abundance of BK alpha-, beta(2)-, and beta(4)-subunit mRNA and localization of immunodetectable alpha-subunit were similar in CCDs from LS and HS animals. In response to an increase in tubular flow rate from approximately 1 to 5 nl.min(-1).mm(-1), the increase in J(Na) was greater in LS vs. HS rabbits, yet the flow-stimulated increase in J(K) was similar in both groups. These data suggest that aldosterone does not contribute to the regulation of BK channel expression/activity in response to dietary K(+) loading.

  18. Relationship between auxiliary gamma subunits and mallotoxin on BK channel modulation

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin; Li, Qin; Yan, Jiusheng

    2017-01-01

    The large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated K+(BK) channel consists of the pore-forming α subunits (BKα) and auxiliary subunits. The auxiliary γ1-3 subunits potently modulate the BK channel by shifting its voltage-dependence of channel activation toward the hyperpolarizing direction by approximately 145 mV (γ1), 100 mV (γ2), and 50 mV (γ3). Mallotoxin is a potent small-molecule BK channel activator. We analyzed the relationship between mallotoxin and the γ subunits in their BK channel-activating effects in membrane patches excised from HEK-293 cells. We found that mallotoxin, when applied extracellularly, shifted the half-activation voltage (V1/2) of BKα channels by −72 mV. The channel-activating effect of mallotoxin was greatly attenuated in the presence of the γ1, γ2, or γ3 subunit, with resultant ΔV1/2 (+/− mallotoxin) values of −9, −28, or −15 mV, respectively. Most examined γ1 mutant subunits antagonized mallotoxin’s channel-activating effect in a manner that was largely dependent on its own modulatory function. However, mallotoxin caused an irreversible functional and structural disengagement of the γ1-F273S mutant from BK channels. We infer that the auxiliary γ subunit effectively interferes with mallotoxin on BK channel modulation via either a direct steric competition or an indirect allosteric influence on mallotoxin’s binding and action on BKα. PMID:28165042

  19. Comparison of Topas cyclic olefin copolymers to BK7 glass in night vision goggle objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, James S.

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of Topas cyclic olefin copolymers (COC) as an optical plastic for use in military-grade night vision goggle (NVG) lens objectives. Test objective lenses that could include either a Topas COC window element or BK7 glass window element were manufactured. The test objectives were evaluated for low light resolution, MTF, off-axis veiling glare, and on-axis stray light. Additionally, the spectral transmittance of the individual windows elements was measured. This paper compares the evaluation results of test objectives containing Topas COC with test objectives containing BK7 glass.

  20. Direct Inoculation of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus from Sooty Mangabeys in Black Mangabeys (Lophocebus aterrimus): First Evidence of AIDS in a Heterologous African Species and Different Pathologic Outcomes of Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Apetrei, Cristian; Gormus, Bobby; Pandrea, Ivona; Metzger, Michael; ten Haaft, Peter; Martin, Louis N.; Bohm, Rudolf; Alvarez, Xavier; Koopman, Gerrit; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Baskin, Gary; Heeney, Jonathan; Marx, Preston A.

    2004-01-01

    A unique opportunity for the study of the role of serial passage and cross-species transmission was offered by a series of experiments carried out at the Tulane National Primate Research Center in 1990. To develop an animal model for leprosy, three black mangabeys (BkMs) (Lophocebus aterrimus) were inoculated with lepromatous tissue that had been serially passaged in four sooty mangabeys (SMs) (Cercocebus atys). All three BkMs became infected with simian immunodeficiency virus from SMs (SIVsm) by day 30 postinoculation (p.i.) with lepromatous tissue. One (BkMG140) died 2 years p.i. from causes unrelated to SIV, one (BkMG139) survived for 10 years, whereas the third (BkMG138) was euthanized with AIDS after 5 years. Histopathology revealed a high number of giant cells in tissues from BkMG138, but no SIV-related lesions were found in the remaining two BkMs. Four-color immunofluorescence revealed high levels of SIVsm associated with both giant cells and T lymphocytes in BkMG138 and no detectable SIV in the remaining two. Serum viral load (VL) showed a significant increase (>1 log) during the late stage of the disease in BkMG138, as opposed to a continuous decline in VL in the remaining two BkMs. With the progression to AIDS, neopterin levels increased in BkMG138. This study took on new significance when phylogenetic analysis unexpectedly showed that all four serially inoculated SMs were infected with different SIVsm lineages prior to the beginning of the experiment. Furthermore, the strain infecting the BkMs originated from the last SM in the series. Therefore, the virus infecting BkMs has not been serially passaged. In conclusion, we present the first compelling evidence that direct cross-species transmission of SIV may induce AIDS in heterologous African nonhuman primate (NHP) species. The results showed that cross-species-transmitted SIVsm was well controlled in two of three BkMs for 2 and 10 years, respectively. Finally, this case of AIDS in an African monkey

  1. IgA nephropathy complicating diabetic glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orfila, C; Lepert, J C; Modesto, A; Pipy, B; Suc, J M

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on 66 diabetic patients who had renal biopsies performed during 1979-1994. This review shows 10 patients who presented IgA nephropathy associated with diabetic nephropathy. Six patients had insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 4 patients non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. All patients presented with proteinuria and 7 had hematuria. Four patients presented with renal impairment. Histologic evaluation disclosed the presence of thickened glomerular basement membranes and increased mesangial matrix in all cases, associated with nodular sclerosis in 8 cases. By immunofluorescence, diffuse mesangial IgA deposits were observed in all cases. The high incidence of the coexistence of IgA nephropathy and diabetes seems not merely coincidental. Structural and/or functional abnormalities of the glomerular basement membranes might facilitate the development of immune complex glomerular diseases. In patients with diabetes, the appearance of urinary abnormalities and/or deterioration in renal function altered the clinical history of diabetic nephropathy. The disorders are clinically suggestive of the presence of nondiabetic renal disease and raised the possibility of another pathogenetic mechanism.

  2. Long-term hypoxia increases calcium affinity of BK channels in ovine fetal and adult cerebral artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Mike T; Thorington, Glyne U; Wilson, Sean M; Longo, Lawrence D; Hessinger, David A

    2015-04-01

    Acclimatization to high-altitude, long-term hypoxia (LTH) reportedly alters cerebral artery contraction-relaxation responses associated with changes in K(+) channel activity. We hypothesized that to maintain oxygenation during LTH, basilar arteries (BA) in the ovine adult and near-term fetus would show increased large-conductance Ca(2+) activated potassium (BK) channel activity. We measured BK channel activity, expression, and cell surface distribution by use of patch-clamp electrophysiology, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy, respectively, in myocytes from normoxic control and LTH adult and near-term fetus BA. Electrophysiological data showed that BK channels in LTH myocytes exhibited 1) lowered Ca(2+) set points, 2) left-shifted activation voltages, and 3) longer dwell times. BK channels in LTH myocytes also appeared to be more dephosphorylated. These differences collectively make LTH BK channels more sensitive to activation. Studies using flow cytometry showed that the LTH fetus exhibited increased BK β1 subunit surface expression. In addition, in both fetal groups confocal microscopy revealed increased BK channel clustering and colocalization to myocyte lipid rafts. We conclude that increased BK channel activity in LTH BA occurred in association with increased channel affinity for Ca(2+) and left-shifted voltage activation. Increased cerebrovascular BK channel activity may be a mechanism by which LTH adult and near-term fetal sheep can acclimatize to long-term high altitude hypoxia. Our findings suggest that increasing BK channel activity in cerebral myocytes may be a therapeutic target to ameliorate the adverse effects of high altitude in adults or of intrauterine hypoxia in the fetus.

  3. Transient IgA nephropathy with acute kidney injury in a patient with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, Bala Krishna; Sharma, Alok; Khaira, Ambar; Dinda, Amit K; Agarwal, Sanjay K; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2010-05-01

    Dengue virus infection can clinically manifest as dengue fever, dengue shock syndrome and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Acute kidney injury as a result of dengue virus infection can occur due to various reasons including hypotension, rhabdomyolysis, sepsis and rarely immune complex mediated glomerular injury. However, glomerulonephritis associated with IgA Nephropathy in dengue virus infection has not been reported previously. We report a case of 15-year-old boy who was admitted with dengue fever and dialysis dependant acute kidney injury. Urine examination showed microscopic glomerular hematuria and proteinuria. Kidney biopsy showed mesangial proliferation with mesangial IgA dominant immune complex deposits and acute tubular necrosis. A repeated kidney biopsy 6 weeks after clinical recovery showed reversal of glomerular changes as well as resolution of mesangial IgA deposits.

  4. Fusion and quasifission dynamics in the reactions 48Ca+249Bk and 50Ti+249Bk using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Synthesis of superheavy elements (SHEs) with fusion-evaporation reactions is strongly hindered by the quasifission (QF) mechanism which prevents the formation of an equilibrated compound nucleus and which depends on the structure of the reactants. New SHEs have been recently produced with doubly-magic 48Ca beams. However, SHE synthesis experiments with single-magic 50Ti beams have so far been unsuccessful. Purpose: In connection with experimental searches for Z =117 ,119 superheavy elements, we perform a theoretical study of fusion and quasifission mechanisms in 48Ca,50Ti+249Bk reactions in order to investigate possible differences in reaction mechanisms induced by these two projectiles. Methods: The collision dynamics and the outcome of the reactions are studied using unrestricted time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations as well as the density-constrained TDHF method to extract the nucleus-nucleus potentials and the excitation energy in each fragment. Results: Nucleus-nucleus potentials, nuclear contact times, masses and charges of the fragments, as well as their kinetic and excitation energies strongly depend on the orientation of the prolate 249Bk nucleus. Long contact times associated with fusion are observed in collisions of both projectiles with the side of the 249Bk nucleus, but not on collisions with its tip. The energy and impact parameter dependencies of the fragment properties, as well as their mass-angle and mass-total kinetic energy correlations are investigated. Conclusions: Entrance channel reaction dynamics are similar with both 48Ca and 50Ti projectiles. Both are expected to lead to the formation of a compound nucleus by fusion if they have enough energy to get in contact with the side of the 249Bk target.

  5. Efficient propagation of archetype BK and JC polyomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Nicole M; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-01-20

    BKPyV and JCPyV are closely related, ubiquitous human pathogens that cause disease in immunocompromised patients. The DNA sequence of the regulatory regions distinguishes two forms of these viruses, designated archetype and rearranged. Although cell culture systems exist for rearranged BKPyV and JCPyV, currently there is no robust cell culture system to study the archetype viruses. Large T antigen (TAg) is a virally encoded protein required to initiate viral DNA synthesis. Because archetype virus produces undetectable levels of TAg, we hypothesized that TAg overexpression would stimulate archetype virus replication. Efficient propagation of the archetype forms of BKPyV and JCPyV was observed in 293TT cells, human embryonic kidney cells overexpressing SV40 TAg. Importantly, the archetypal structure of the regulatory region was maintained during viral growth. Significant replication was not observed for Merkel cell, KI, or WU polyomaviruses. 293TT cells provide a means of propagating archetype BKPyV and JCPyV for detailed study.

  6. Activation of EphA1-Epha receptor axis attenuates diabetic nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihui; Yan, Hongdan; Wang, Feng; Huang, Shanying; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Zhihao; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-06

    The Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases serves as key modulators of various cellular functions, including inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Recent analyses have revealed that a member of the Eph family, EphA1, plays a pivotal role in regulating insulin metabolism and kidney injury. However, the importance of EphA1 in diabetic nephropathy has not been recognized. We established a diabetic nephropathy mouse model using a high-fat diet and streptozotocin (STZ) injection. Then, the recombinant adeno-associated virus type 9 (AAV9) overexpressing EphA1 or a negative control was injected locally into the kidney. Metabolite testing and histopathological analyses of kidney fibrosis, pancreatic islet function and signaling pathways were evaluated. Our study showed that hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and renal fibrosis accompanied the deterioration of kidney function in diabetic mice. The overexpression of EphA1 in the kidney attenuated renal fibrosis and improved kidney function but did not affect systemic glucose metabolism and pancreatic islet function. Furthermore, the overexpression of EphA1 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and MYPT1 (a substrate of Rho kinase). The overexpression of EphA1 can be therapeutically targeted to inhibit diabetic renal fibrosis, which suggests that the EphA1-Epha receptor axis may be a novel therapy target for diabetic nephropathy. Mechanistically, the overexpression of EphA1 could inhibit MAPK and the Rho pathway in diabetic kidneys.

  7. BK channel opening involves side-chain reorientation of multiple deep-pore residues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xixi; Yan, Jiusheng; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Three deep-pore locations, L312, A313, and A316, were identified in a scanning mutagenesis study of the BK (Ca2+-activated, large-conductance K+) channel S6 pore, where single aspartate substitutions led to constitutively open mutant channels (L312D, A313D, and A316D). To understand the mechanisms of the constitutive openness of these mutant channels, we individually mutated these three sites into the other 18 amino acids. We found that charged or polar side-chain substitutions at each of the sites resulted in constitutively open mutant BK channels, with high open probability at negative voltages, as well as a loss of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. Given the fact that multiple pore residues in BK displayed side-chain hydrophilicity-dependent constitutive openness, we propose that BK channel opening involves structural rearrangement of the deep-pore region, where multiple residues undergo conformational changes that may increase the exposure of their side chains to the polar environment of the pore. PMID:24367115

  8. Study of the decay of /sup 254/Es and /sup 250/Bk

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Yu.S.; Kovantsev, V.N.; Elesin, A.A.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1988-09-01

    The emission spectra of /sup 254/Es and /sup 250/Bk have been studied by the methods of semiconductor alpha, gamma, and x-ray spectrometry. The results of the determination of the intensities of the gamma rays of /sup 254/Es at 63, 85, 290, and 385 keV have been presented: 1.6 /plus minus/ 0.4, 0.16 /plus minus/ 0.7, 0.3 /plus minus/ 0.1, and 0.4 /plus minus/ 0.1%, respectively. The ratio of the intensities of the gamma rays of /sup 250/Bk at 988.96 keV and at 1028.58 and 1031.76 keV has been calculated and found to be equal to 1.113 /plus minus/ 0.0037. The intensities of the x-rays of /sup 250/Bk of the L/sub 3/, L/sub /alpha//, L/sub /beta//, and L/sub /gamma// series form a 6:87:100:21 ratio. The half periods have been determined: /sup 254/Es, 266 /plus minus/ 4 days; /sup 250/Bk, 186.2 /plus minus/ 1.1 min.

  9. Broadening roles for FMRP: big news for big potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Anis

    2013-02-20

    FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that negatively regulates translation and which is lost in fragile X syndrome. In this issue of Neuron, Deng et al. (2013) demonstrate a novel translation-independent function for FMRP as a regulator of presynaptic BK channels that modulate the dynamics of neurotransmitter release.

  10. CRL4A(CRBN) E3 ubiquitin ligase restricts BK channel activity and prevents epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiye; Ye, Jia; Zou, Xiaolong; Xu, Zhenghao; Feng, Yan; Zou, Xianxian; Chen, Zhong; Li, Yuezhou; Cang, Yong

    2014-05-21

    Ion channels regulate membrane excitation, and mutations of ion channels often cause serious neurological disorders including epilepsy. Compared with extensive analyses of channel protein structure and function, much less is known about the fine tuning of channel activity by post-translational modification. Here we report that the large conductance, Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are targeted by the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4A(CRBN) for polyubiquitination and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inactivation of CRL4A(CRBN) releases deubiquitinated BK channels from the ER to the plasma membrane, leading to markedly enhanced channel activity. Mice with CRL4A(CRBN) mutation in the brain or treated with a CRL4A(CRBN) inhibitor are very sensitive to seizure induction, which can be attenuated by blocking BK channels. Finally, the mutant mice develop spontaneous epilepsy when aged. Therefore, ubiquitination of BK channels before their cell surface expression is an important step to prevent systemic neuronal excitability and epileptogenesis.

  11. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  12. New properties of BK-spaces defined by using regular matrix of Fibonacci numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, Sinan; Bektaş, ćiǧdem A.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we studied the new properties of BK-spaces which were defined using regular matrix of Fibonacci numbers in [1]. We computed alpha-, beta-, gamma- duals of these spaces and obtained Schauder basis. We also derived some topological properties of these spaces.

  13. NQRS Data for C24H20BK (Subst. No. 1576)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BK (Subst. No. 1576)

  14. Habituation of reflexive and motivated behavior in mice with deficient BK channel function

    PubMed Central

    Typlt, Marei; Mirkowski, Magdalena; Azzopardi, Erin; Ruth, Peter; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Habituation is considered the most basic form of learning. It describes the decrease of a behavioral response to a repeated non-threatening sensory stimulus and therefore provides an important sensory filtering mechanism. While some neuronal pathways mediating habituation are well described, underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In general, there is an agreement that short-term and long-term habituation are based on different mechanisms. Historically, a distinction has also been made between habituation of motivated versus reflexive behavior. In recent studies in invertebrates the large conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel has been implicated to be a key player in habituation by regulating synaptic transmission. Here, we tested mice deficient for the pore forming α-subunit of the BK channel for short-term and long-term habituation of the acoustic startle reflex (reflexive behavior) and of the exploratory locomotor behavior in the open field box (motivated behavior). Short-term habituation of startle was completely abolished in the BK knock-out mice, whereas neither long-term habituation of startle nor habituation of motivated behavior was affected by the BK deficiency. Our results support a highly preserved mechanism for short-term habituation of startle across species that is distinct from long-term habituation mechanisms. It also supports the notion that there are different mechanisms underlying habituation of motivated behavior versus reflexive behavior. PMID:24312024

  15. Broadening roles for FMRP; Big news for Big Potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Contractor, Anis

    2013-01-01

    FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that negatively regulates translation,which is lostin Fragile X syndrome. In this issue, Deng et al demonstrate a novel translation-independent function for FMRP as a regulator of presynaptic BK channels that modulate the dynamics of neurotransmitter release. PMID:23439114

  16. Role of NKCC in BK channel-mediated net K+ secretion in the CCD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Schreck, Carlos; Coleman, Richard A.; Wade, James B.; Hernandez, Yubelka; Zavilowitz, Beth; Warth, Richard; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Apical SK/ROMK and BK channels mediate baseline and flow-induced K secretion (FIKS), respectively, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). BK channels are detected in acid-base transporting intercalated (IC) and Na-absorbing principal (PC) cells. Although the density of BK channels is greater in IC than PC, Na-K-ATPase activity in IC is considered inadequate to sustain high rates of urinary K secretion. To test the hypothesis that basolateral NKCC in the CCD contributes to BK channel-mediated FIKS, we measured net K secretion (JK) and Na absorption (JNa) at slow (∼1) and fast (∼5 nl·min−1·mm−1) flow rates in rabbit CCDs microperfused in vitro in the absence and presence of bumetanide, an inhibitor of NKCC, added to the bath. Bumetanide inhibited FIKS but not basal JK, JNa, or the flow-induced [Ca2+]i transient necessary for BK channel activation. Addition of luminal iberiotoxin, a BK channel inhibitor, to bumetanide-treated CCDs did not further reduce JK. Basolateral Cl removal reversibly inhibited FIKS but not basal JK or JNa. Quantitative PCR performed on single CCD samples using NKCC1- and 18S-specific primers and probes and the TaqMan assay confirmed the presence of the transcript in this nephron segment. To identify the specific cell type to which basolateral NKCC is localized, we exploited the ability of NKCC to accept NH4+ at its K-binding site to monitor the rate of bumetanide-sensitive cytosolic acidification after NH4+ addition to the bath in CCDs loaded with the pH indicator dye BCECF. Both IC and PC were found to have a basolateral bumetanide-sensitive NH4+ entry step and NKCC1-specific antibodies labeled the basolateral surfaces of both cell types in CCDs. These results suggest that BK channel-mediated FIKS is dependent on a basolateral bumetanide-sensitive, Cl-dependent transport pathway, proposed to be NKCC1, in both IC and PC in the CCD. PMID:21816753

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Human Neutrophils and Eosinophils Requires Proton Channels but Not BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Femling, Jon K.; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Morgan, Deri; Rada, Balázs; Davis, A. Paige; Czirják, Gabor; Enyedi, Peter; England, Sarah K.; Moreland, Jessica G.; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Nauseef, William M.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Electrophysiological events are of central importance during the phagocyte respiratory burst, because NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and voltage sensitive. We investigated the recent suggestion that large-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, rather than proton channels, play an essential role in innate immunity (Ahluwalia, J., A. Tinker, L.H. Clapp, M.R. Duchen, A.Y. Abramov, S. Page, M. Nobles, and A.W. Segal. 2004. Nature. 427:853–858). In PMA-stimulated human neutrophils or eosinophils, we did not detect BK currents, and neither of the BK channel inhibitors iberiotoxin or paxilline nor DPI inhibited any component of outward current. BK inhibitors did not inhibit the killing of bacteria, nor did they affect NADPH oxidase-dependent degradation of bacterial phospholipids by extracellular gIIA-PLA2 or the production of superoxide anion (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Moreover, an antibody against the BK channel did not detect immunoreactive protein in human neutrophils. A required role for voltage-gated proton channels is demonstrated by Zn2+ inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity assessed by H2O2 production, thus validating previous studies showing that Zn2+ inhibited \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production when assessed by cytochrome c reduction. In conclusion, BK channels were not detected in human neutrophils or eosinophils, and

  18. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system.

  19. TRPV1 Channels Are Functionally Coupled with BK(mSlo1) Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca2+). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the “pain” signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  20. B{sub s0} meson and the B{sub s0}BK coupling from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Nielsen, M.

    2010-08-01

    We evaluate the mass of the B{sub s0} scalar meson and the coupling constant in the B{sub s0}BK vertex in the framework of QCD sum rules. We consider the B{sub s0} as a tetraquark state to evaluate its mass. We get m{sub B{sub s0}}=(5.85{+-}0.13) GeV, which is in agreement, considering the uncertainties, with predictions supposing it as a bs state or a BK bound state with J{sup P}=0{sup +}. To evaluate the g{sub B{sub s0}BK} coupling, we use the three-point correlation functions of the vertex, considering B{sub s0} as a normal bs state. The obtained coupling constant is: g{sub B{sub s0}BK}=(16.3{+-}3.2) GeV. This number is in agreement with light-cone QCD sum rules calculation. We have also compared the decay width of the B{sub s0}{yields}BK process considering the B{sub s0} to be a bs state and a BK molecular state. The width obtained for the BK molecular state is twice as big as the width obtained for the bs state. Therefore, we conclude that with the knowledge of the mass and the decay width of the B{sub s0} meson, one can discriminate between the different theoretical proposals for its structure.

  1. [Berger's disease or primary IgA nephropathy in children].

    PubMed

    Renoult, E; Cochat, P; Jonon, B; Kessler, M

    1989-01-01

    Primary IgA mesangial nephropathy was first described in adults by Berger, and has been increasingly recognized in children. IgA nephropathy is a frequent type of glomerulonephritis in 3 to 15 year-old children in France. Clinical features and outcome have been defined and the progression to renal failure is possible. The pathogeny of IgA nephropathy remains unclear and is under multifactorial control and, at present, no satisfactory specific treatment is available.

  2. Osteopenia Due to Enhanced Cathepsin K Release by BK Channel Ablation in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Kabagema, Clement; Flockerzie, Katarina; Kuscher, Gerd Marten; Stuehmer, Walter; Neuhuber, Winfried; Ruth, Peter; Alves, Frauke; Sausbier, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Background The process of bone resorption by osteoclasts is regulated by Cathepsin K, the lysosomal collagenase responsible for the degradation of the organic bone matrix during bone remodeling. Recently, Cathepsin K was regarded as a potential target for therapeutic intervention of osteoporosis. However, mechanisms leading to osteopenia, which is much more common in young female population and often appears to be the clinical pre-stage of idiopathic osteoporosis, still remain to be elucidated, and molecular targets need to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings We found, that in juvenile bone the large conductance, voltage and Ca2+-activated (BK) K+ channel, which links membrane depolarization and local increases in cytosolic calcium to hyperpolarizing K+ outward currents, is exclusively expressed in osteoclasts. In juvenile BK-deficient (BK−/−) female mice, plasma Cathepsin K levels were elevated two-fold when compared to wild-type littermates. This increase was linked to an osteopenic phenotype with reduced bone mineral density in long bones and enhanced porosity of trabecular meshwork in BK−/− vertebrae as demonstrated by high-resolution flat-panel volume computed tomography and micro-CT. However, plasma levels of sRANKL, osteoprotegerin, estrogene, Ca2+ and triiodthyronine as well as osteoclastogenesis were not altered in BK−/− females. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that the BK channel controls resorptive osteoclast activity by regulating Cathepsin K release. Targeted deletion of BK channel in mice resulted in an osteoclast-autonomous osteopenia, becoming apparent in juvenile females. Thus, the BK−/− mouse-line represents a new model for juvenile osteopenia, and revealed the BK channel as putative new target for therapeutic controlling of osteoclast activity. PMID:21695131

  3. Ethanol modulation of mammalian BK channels in excitable tissues: molecular targets and their possible contribution to alcohol-induced altered behavior.

    PubMed

    Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N; Martin, Gilles E

    2014-01-01

    In most tissues, the function of Ca(2+)- and voltage-gated K(+) (BK) channels is modified in response to ethanol concentrations reached in human blood during alcohol intoxication. In general, modification of BK current from ethanol-naïve preparations in response to brief ethanol exposure results from changes in channel open probability without modification of unitary conductance or change in BK protein levels in the membrane. Protracted and/or repeated ethanol exposure, however, may evoke changes in BK expression. The final ethanol effect on BK open probability leading to either BK current potentiation or BK current reduction is determined by an orchestration of molecular factors, including levels of activating ligand (Ca(2+) i), BK subunit composition and post-translational modifications, and the channel's lipid microenvironment. These factors seem to allosterically regulate a direct interaction between ethanol and a recognition pocket of discrete dimensions recently mapped to the channel-forming (slo1) subunit. Type of ethanol exposure also plays a role in the final BK response to the drug: in several central nervous system regions (e.g., striatum, primary sensory neurons, and supraoptic nucleus), acute exposure to ethanol reduces neuronal excitability by enhancing BK activity. In contrast, protracted or repetitive ethanol administration may alter BK subunit composition and membrane expression, rendering the BK complex insensitive to further ethanol exposure. In neurohypophyseal axon terminals, ethanol potentiation of BK channel activity leads to a reduction in neuropeptide release. In vascular smooth muscle, however, ethanol inhibition of BK current leads to cell contraction and vascular constriction.

  4. Ethanol modulation of mammalian BK channels in excitable tissues: molecular targets and their possible contribution to alcohol-induced altered behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alex M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Martin, Gilles E.

    2014-01-01

    In most tissues, the function of Ca2+- and voltage-gated K+ (BK) channels is modified in response to ethanol concentrations reached in human blood during alcohol intoxication. In general, modification of BK current from ethanol-naïve preparations in response to brief ethanol exposure results from changes in channel open probability without modification of unitary conductance or change in BK protein levels in the membrane. Protracted and/or repeated ethanol exposure, however, may evoke changes in BK expression. The final ethanol effect on BK open probability leading to either BK current potentiation or BK current reduction is determined by an orchestration of molecular factors, including levels of activating ligand (Ca2+i), BK subunit composition and post-translational modifications, and the channel's lipid microenvironment. These factors seem to allosterically regulate a direct interaction between ethanol and a recognition pocket of discrete dimensions recently mapped to the channel-forming (slo1) subunit. Type of ethanol exposure also plays a role in the final BK response to the drug: in several central nervous system regions (e.g., striatum, primary sensory neurons, and supraoptic nucleus), acute exposure to ethanol reduces neuronal excitability by enhancing BK activity. In contrast, protracted or repetitive ethanol administration may alter BK subunit composition and membrane expression, rendering the BK complex insensitive to further ethanol exposure. In neurohypophyseal axon terminals, ethanol potentiation of BK channel activity leads to a reduction in neuropeptide release. In vascular smooth muscle, however, ethanol inhibition of BK current leads to cell contraction and vascular constriction. PMID:25538625

  5. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  6. Complex networks analysis of obstructive nephropathy data.

    PubMed

    Zanin, M; Boccaletti, S

    2011-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (ON) is one of the most frequent nephropathy observed among newborns and children, and the first cause of end-stage renal diseases treated by dialysis or transplantation. This pathology is characterized by the presence of an obstacle in the urinary tract, e.g., stenosis or abnormal implantation of the urethra in the kidney. In spite of important advances, pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this contribution, the topology of complex networks created upon vectors of features for control and ON subjects is related with the severity of the pathology. Nodes in these networks represent genetic and metabolic profiles, while connections between them indicate an abnormal relation between their expressions. Resulting topologies allow discriminating ON subjects and detecting which genetic or metabolic elements are responsible for the malfunction.

  7. Classification and Differential Diagnosis of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world in both developed and developing countries. This review briefly introduces the characteristic pathological changes of DN and Tervaert pathological classification, which divides DN into four classifications according to glomerular lesions, along with a separate scoring system for tubular, interstitial, and vascular lesions. Given the heterogeneity of the renal lesions and the complex mechanism underlying diabetic nephropathy, Tervaert classification has both significance and controversies in the guidance of diagnosis and prognosis. Applications and evaluations using Tervaert classification and indications for renal biopsy are summarized in this review according to recent studies. Meanwhile, differential diagnosis with another nodular glomerulopathy and the situation that a typical DN superimposed with a nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) are discussed and concluded in this review. PMID:28316995

  8. Enzyme replacement therapy and Fabry nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Warnock, David G; Daina, Erica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; West, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Involvement of the kidneys in Fabry disease ("nephropathy") occurs in male and female individuals. The majority of patients with progressive nephropathy will have significant proteinuria and develop progressive loss of kidney function, leading to ESRD. All too often, treating physicians may ignore "normal" serum creatinine levels or "minimal" proteinuria and fail to assess properly the severity of kidney involvement and institute appropriate management. Fabry nephropathy is treatable, even in patients with fairly advanced disease. Although the cornerstone of therapy remains enzyme replacement therapy with agalsidase, this treatment alone does not reduce urine protein excretion. Treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors must be added to enzyme replacement therapy to reduce urine protein excretion with the hope that this will stabilize kidney function. Kidney function, with at least estimated GFR based on serum creatinine and measurements of urinary protein, should be measured at every clinic visit, and the rate of change of the estimated GFR should be followed over time. Antiproteinuric therapy can be dosed to a prespecified urine protein target rather than a specific BP goal, with the proviso that successful therapy will usually lower the BP below the goal of 130/80 mmHg that is used for other forms of kidney disease. The overall goal for treating Fabry nephropathy is to reduce the rate of loss of GFR to -1 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)/yr, which is that seen in the normal adult population. A systematic approach is presented for reaching this goal in the individual patient.

  9. Pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kar Neng

    2012-03-20

    Since its first description in 1968, IgA nephropathy has remained the most common form of idiopathic glomerulonephritis leading to chronic kidney disease in developed countries. The exact pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy is still not well defined. Current data implicate an important genetic factor, especially in promoting the overproduction of an aberrant form of IgA1. The immunochemical aberrancy of IgA nephropathy is characterized by the undergalactosylation of O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1. However, such aberrant glycosylation alone does not cause renal injury. The next stage of disease development requires the formation of glycan-specific IgG and IgA antibodies that recognize the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecule. These antibodies often have reactivity against antigens from extrinsic microorganisms and might arise from recurrent mucosal infection. B cells that respond to mucosal infections, particularly tonsillitis, might produce the nephritogenic IgA1 molecule. With increased immune-complex formation and decreased clearance owing to reduced uptake by the liver, IgA1 binds to the glomerular mesangium via an as yet unidentified receptor. Glomerular IgA1 deposits trigger the local production of cytokines and growth factors, leading to the activation of mesangial cells and the complement system. Emerging data suggest that mesangial-derived mediators following glomerular deposition of IgA1 lead to podocyte and tubulointerstitial injury via mesangio-podocytic-tubular crosstalk. This Review summarizes the latest findings in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

  10. Pathology of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ian S D

    2014-08-01

    IgA nephropathy is defined by the presence of IgA-dominant or co-dominant immune deposits within glomeruli. Biopsy specimens meeting these diagnostic criteria have a range of histological changes that are reflected in the variable clinical course of IgA nephropathy. The impact of histology on outcomes in IgA nephropathy has been clarified in a number of large retrospective clinicopathological studies. These studies have consistently demonstrated that the stage of disease at presentation, as indicated by the extent of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy in the biopsy, is the strongest histological predictor of renal survival. The effect of active proliferative lesions on the disease course is less clear cut, owing in part to considerable treatment bias in most published retrospective studies. There is evidence that endocapillary hypercellularity and cellular crescents are responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, but this observation requires confirmation in prospective randomized controlled trials. Future challenges include improving the reproducibility of histological scoring, particularly for the presence and extent of endocapillary lesions, and to improve prognostic modelling by combining histological data with clinical variables and biomarker data.

  11. BASP1 Promotes Apoptosis in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Lorz, Corina; Gnirke, Andrea; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Nair, Viji; Egido, Jesus; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the mechanisms that lead to diabetes-induced cell death are not fully understood. Here, we combined a functional genomics screen for cDNAs that induce apoptosis in vitro with transcriptional profiling of renal biopsies from patients with DN. Twelve of the 138 full-length cDNAs that induced cell death in human embryonic kidney cells matched upregulated mRNA transcripts in tissue from human DN. Confirmatory screens identified induction of BASP1 in tubular cross sections of human DN tissue. In vitro, apoptosis-inducing conditions such as serum deprivation, high concentrations of glucose, and proinflammatory cytokines increased BASP1 mRNA and protein in human tubular epithelial cells. In normal cells, BASP1 localized to the cytoplasm, but in apoptotic cells, it colocalized with actin in the periphery. Overexpression of BASP1 induced cell death with features of apoptosis; conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of BASP1 protected tubular cells from apoptosis. Supporting possible involvement of BASP1 in renal disease other than DN, we also observed significant upregulation of renal BASP1 in spontaneously hypertensive rats and a trend toward increased tubulointerstitial BASP1 mRNA in human hypertensive nephropathy. In summary, a combined functional genomics approach identified BASP1 as a proapoptotic factor in DN and possibly also in hypertensive nephropathy. PMID:20110383

  12. Histological changes of kidney in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pourghasem, Mohsen; Shafi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of chronic renal disorders and end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. It is the major cause of dialysis and transplantation. Failure in renal function causes wide disorders in the body. Diabetes results in wide range of alterations in the renal tissue. It is believed that early histological changes in diabetic nephropathy are detectable 2 years after diabetes is diagnosed. The glomerular alterations are the most important lesions in the diabetic nephropathy (DN). The Renal Pathology Society provides a new pathological classification for the detection of histopathology of DN. It divides diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions. Alloxan or streptozotocin induced diabetic rat is the one most widely used specie to study DN. Histological changes in the rat DN closely resemble the human disease and the most information of this review was obtained through the study of rat DN. All cell types of the kidney such as mesangial cells, podocytes and tubulointerstitial cells are liable to be affected in the event of DN. Severity of renal lesions is associated to the clinical aspect of renal outcome, but the aim of this article was only to review the histological changes of kidney in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644877

  13. Anticoagulant-related nephropathy in a patient with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Góis, Mário; Azevedo, Ariana; Carvalho, Fernanda; Nolasco, Fernando

    2017-02-20

    Anticoagulant-related nephropathy is a type of acute kidney injury caused by overcoagulation. We describe a case of an 84-year-old man with arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation treated with acenocoumarol, who presented with haematoproteinuria and acute kidney injury during a phase of excessive anticoagulation. In addition to IgA nephropathy, renal biopsy also revealed acute tubular necrosis, red blood cell casts and positive iron staining in tubular cells. After this acute episode, renal function improved and proteinuria decreased below the nephrotic range.

  14. BK Virus Encephalitis in HIV-Infected Patients: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniolli, Luciana; Borges, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Encephalitis and meningitis due to BKPyV are unusual and emerging condition. Only a few cases of BKPyV encephalitis have been reported in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, with the majority of cases presenting with concurrent hemorrhagic cystitis and HIV-infected patients. The authors report two HIV-infected patients with the diagnosis of BKPyV encephalitis and discuss the main clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this infection in patients with AIDS. Physicians should be aware to recognize the main clinical features and diagnose BKPyV central nervous infection in the setting of AIDS. PMID:28326104

  15. Prevalence of and Factors Associated with Nephropathy in Diabetic Patients Attending an Outpatient Clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Machingura, Pasipanodya Ian; Chikwasha, Vasco; Okwanga, Parmenas Nelson; Gomo, Exnevia

    2017-01-01

    There is limited information on the burden of diabetic nephropathy in developing countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with nephropathy among diabetic patients attending an outpatient clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. In an analytical cross-sectional study, diabetic patients were consecutively enrolled and a questionnaire administered, clinical assessment conducted, and blood samples collected for human immunodeficiency virus testing and measurement of lipids, creatinine, fructosamine, and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Urine samples were collected for determination of albumin and creatinine levels, which were used to categorize albuminuria. A total of 344 diabetic patients were enrolled. Overall, just over a third (35.8%) of patients had moderately increased albuminuria and 9.0% had severely increased albuminuria giving an overall prevalence of nephropathy of 44.8%. Prevalence of moderately increased albuminuria was slightly higher (36.5% versus 33.3%) and severely increased albuminuria slightly lower (8.8% versus 9.5%) in type 2 than type 1 diabetes patients, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.866). Higher fructosamine and retinopathy were associated with nephropathy in both univariate and multivariate analysis {higher fructosamine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.00, confidence interval [CI] = 1.00–1.01), and retinopathy (OR = 2.80, CI = 1.64–4.97)}. We report a higher prevalence of moderately increased albuminuria and a lower prevalence of severely increased albuminuria compared with findings reported a decade ago among type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients attending the same clinic. High fructosamine and retinopathy were independent predictors of nephropathy. PMID:27994108

  16. Bicarbonate promotes BK-α/β4-mediated K excretion in the renal distal nephron.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Ryan J; Wen, Donghai; Hatcher, Lori I; Sansom, Steven C

    2012-12-01

    Ca-activated K channels (BK), which are stimulated by high distal nephron flow, are utilized during high-K conditions to remove excess K. Because BK predominantly reside with BK-β4 in acid/base-transporting intercalated cells (IC), we determined whether BK-β4 knockout mice (β4KO) exhibit deficient K excretion when consuming a high-K alkaline diet (HK-alk) vs. high-K chloride diet (HK-Cl). When wild type (WT) were placed on HK-alk, but not HK-Cl, renal BK-β4 expression increased (Western blot). When WT and β4KO were placed on HK-Cl, plasma K concentration ([K]) was elevated compared with control K diets; however, K excretion was not different between WT and β4KO. When HK-alk was consumed, the plasma [K] was lower and K clearance was greater in WT compared with β4KO. The urine was alkaline in mice on HK-alk; however, urinary pH was not different between WT and β4KO. Immunohistochemical analysis of pendrin and V-ATPase revealed the same increases in β-IC, comparing WT and β4KO on HK-alk. We found an amiloride-sensitive reduction in Na excretion in β4KO, compared with WT, on HK-alk, indicating enhanced Na reabsorption as a compensatory mechanism to secrete K. Treating mice with an alkaline, Na-deficient, high-K diet (LNaHK) to minimize Na reabsorption exaggerated the defective K handling of β4KO. When WT on LNaHK were given NH(4)Cl in the drinking water, K excretion was reduced to the magnitude of β4KO on LNaHK. These results show that WT, but not β4KO, efficiently excretes K on HK-alk but not on HK-Cl and suggest that BK-α/β4-mediated K secretion is promoted by bicarbonaturia.

  17. Mefloquine improved progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with immunoglobulin A nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Byun, Jung-Ick; Park, Kyung-Il; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient with immunoglobulin A nephropathy who was diagnosed with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and successfully treated with mefloquine, an antimalarial medication. A 67-year-old man with immunoglobulin A nephropathy presented to the hospital emergency room with fever and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive for John Cunningham virus and brain MRI displayed high signal intensity in the white matter in the right parietal lobe without gadolinium enhancement. Tapering of prednisone did not arrest the disease progression and a new lesion was detected on the cerebellum. Administration of mefloquine stopped lesion progression and resulted in dramatic clinical improvement. The CSF nested PCR for the John Cunningham virus also became negative. In reviewing the literature, mefloquine has had a heterogeneous effect in PML patients, and P-glycoprotein polymorphism and proper dosage could contribute to the various effects seen. Mefloquine may be a favorable treatment option in some patients with PML, and P-glycoprotein polymorphism may play an important role in its efficacy. More large studies in other ethnic groups including polymorphism studies for the gene encoding P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/MDR1) and taking into account various underlying conditions with secondary immunosuppression should be carried out to investigate whether mefloquine is effective for treating PML.

  18. BK channels in rat and human pulmonary smooth muscle cells are BKα-β1 functional complexes lacking the oxygen-sensitive stress axis regulated exon insert

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Neil D.; Song, Li; McClenahan, Samantha J.; Versluis, Rachel J.; Kharade, Sujay V.; Kurten, Richard C.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A loss of K+ efflux in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) contributes to abnormal vasoconstriction and PASMC proliferation during pulmonary hypertension (PH). Activation of high-conductance Ca2+-activated (BK) channels represents a therapeutic strategy to restore K+ efflux to the affected PASMCs. However, the properties of BK channels in PASMCs—including sensitivity to BK channel openers (BKCOs)—are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to compare the properties of BK channels between PASMCs of normoxic (N) and chronic hypoxic (CH) rats and then explore key findings in human PASMCs. Polymerase chain reaction results revealed that 94.3% of transcripts encoding BKα pore proteins in PASMCs from N rats represent splice variants lacking the stress axis regulated exon insert, which confers oxygen sensitivity. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings from inside-out (I-O) patches confirmed a dense population of BK channels insensitive to hypoxia. The BK channels were highly activated by intracellular Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate; these responses require BKα-β1 subunit coupling. PASMCs of CH rats with established PH exhibited a profound overabundance of the dominant oxygen-insensitive BKα variant. Importantly, human BK (hBK) channels in PASMCs from human donor lungs also represented the oxygen-insensitive BKα variant activated by BKCOs. The hBK channels showed significantly enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity compared with rat BK channels. We conclude that rat BK and hBK channels in PASMCs are oxygen-insensitive BKα-β1 complexes highly sensitive to Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate. BK channels are overexpressed in PASMCs of a rat model of PH and may provide an abundant target for BKCOs designed to restore K+ efflux. PMID:28090300

  19. NS19504: A Novel BK Channel Activator with Relaxing Effect on Bladder Smooth Muscle Spontaneous Phasic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Bernhard; Rode, Frederik; Jørgensen, Susanne; Nardi, Antonio; Korsgaard, Mads P. G.; Hougaard, Charlotte; Bonev, Adrian D.; Brown, William D.; Dyhring, Tino; Strøbæk, Dorte; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Christophersen, Palle; Grunnet, Morten; Nelson, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK, KCa1.1, MaxiK) are important regulators of urinary bladder function and may be an attractive therapeutic target in bladder disorders. In this study, we established a high-throughput fluorometric imaging plate reader–based screening assay for BK channel activators and identified a small-molecule positive modulator, NS19504 (5-[(4-bromophenyl)methyl]-1,3-thiazol-2-amine), which activated the BK channel with an EC50 value of 11.0 ± 1.4 µM. Hit validation was performed using high-throughput electrophysiology (QPatch), and further characterization was achieved in manual whole-cell and inside-out patch-clamp studies in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing hBK channels: NS19504 caused distinct activation from a concentration of 0.3 and 10 µM NS19504 left-shifted the voltage activation curve by 60 mV. Furthermore, whole-cell recording showed that NS19504 activated BK channels in native smooth muscle cells from guinea pig urinary bladder. In guinea pig urinary bladder strips, NS19504 (1 µM) reduced spontaneous phasic contractions, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin. In contrast, NS19504 (1 µM) only modestly inhibited nerve-evoked contractions and had no effect on contractions induced by a high K+ concentration consistent with a K+ channel–mediated action. Collectively, these results show that NS19504 is a positive modulator of BK channels and provide support for the role of BK channels in urinary bladder function. The pharmacologic profile of NS19504 indicates that this compound may have the potential to reduce nonvoiding contractions associated with spontaneous bladder overactivity while having a minimal effect on normal voiding. PMID:24951278

  20. Risk factor control is key in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged duration of diabetes, poor glycaemic control and hypertension are major risk factors for both diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Optimising blood sugar control together with excellent control of blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy should be considered in any patient with diabetes when persistent albuminuria develops. Microalbuminuria is the earliest clinically detectable indicator of diabetic nephropathy risk. The majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy are appropriately diagnosed based on elevated urinary albumin excretion and/or reduced 0032-6518 renal function. Patients with type 2 diabetes should have annual urinary ACR measurements from the time of diabetes diagnosis while those with type 1 diabetes should commence five years after diagnosis. Blood pressure lowering to 130/80mmHg and reduction of proteinuria to <1 g/day retards progression of diabetic nephropathy and reduces the number of cardiovascular events. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are effective in reducing proteinuria, managing hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk. Unless there are clear contraindications or intolerance all patients with diabetic nephropathy should be prescribed an ACEI or ARB. Stopping an ACEI or ARB during intercurrent illness or times of volume depletion is critically important. Patients with diabetic nephropathy should have at least yearly measurements of blood pressure, renal function and urinary ACR.

  1. Splitting the task: Ubp8 and Ubp10 deubiquitinate different cellular pools of H2BK123

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Julia M.; Hentrich, Thomas; Nakanishi, Shima; Gupta, Arvind; Emberly, Eldon; Shilatifard, Ali; Kobor, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Monoubiquitination of H2BK123 (H2BK123ub), catalyzed by Rad6/Bre1, is a transient histone modification with roles in transcription and is essential for establishing H3K4 and H3K79 trimethylations (H3K4me3 and H3K79me3). Here, we investigated the chromatin network around H2BK123ub by examining its localization and co-occurrence with its dependent marks as well as the transcription elongation mark H3K36me3 across the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, H2BK123ub is removed by the deubiquitinases Ubp8 and Ubp10, but their genomic target regions remain to be determined. Genome-wide maps of H2BK123ub in the absence of Ubp8 and Ubp10 revealed their distinct target loci, which were genomic sites enriched for H3K4me3 and H3K79me3, respectively. We propose an extended model of the H2BK123ub cross-talk by integrating existing relationships with the substrate specificities of Ubp8 and Ubp10 reported here. PMID:22056669

  2. Mg2+ mediates interaction between the voltage sensor and cytosolic domain to activate BK channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Hu, Lei; Shi, Jingyi; Delaloye, Kelli; Horrigan, Frank T; Cui, Jianmin

    2007-11-13

    The voltage-sensor domain (VSD) of voltage-dependent ion channels and enzymes is critical for cellular responses to membrane potential. The VSD can also be regulated by interaction with intracellular proteins and ligands, but how this occurs is poorly understood. Here, we show that the VSD of the BK-type K(+) channel is regulated by a state-dependent interaction with its own tethered cytosolic domain that depends on both intracellular Mg(2+) and the open state of the channel pore. Mg(2+) bound to the cytosolic RCK1 domain enhances VSD activation by electrostatic interaction with Arg-213 in transmembrane segment S4. Our results demonstrate that a cytosolic domain can come close enough to the VSD to regulate its activity electrostatically, thereby elucidating a mechanism of Mg(2+)-dependent activation in BK channels and suggesting a general pathway by which intracellular factors can modulate the function of voltage-dependent proteins.

  3. Rubidium efflux as a tool for the pharmacological characterisation of compounds with BK channel opening properties.

    PubMed

    McKay, Neil G; Kirby, Robert W; Lawson, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes a method of assaying rubidium (Rb(+)) efflux as a measure of potassium channel activity. In this assay, rubidium acts as a tracer for potassium movement across the cell membrane. HEK 293 cells expressing the alpha subunit of the human brain large-conductance, voltage-activated, calcium-sensitive potassium channel (BK channel) are loaded with Rb(+), washed, and then incubated under experimental conditions. The cell supernatant is removed, and the remaining cell monolayer lysed. These two samples contain Rb(+) that has moved out of the cell and Rb(+) that remains in the cell, respectively. Measurement of the Rb(+) content of these samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry allows calculation of the percentage Rb(+) efflux and, depending on the experimental design, provides pharmacological data about the control and test compounds used. In this chapter, we describe the protocol and steps for optimisation and illustrate this with data obtained using NS1619, a well-characterised BK channel opener.

  4. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  5. BK channels modulate pre- and postsynaptic signaling at reciprocal synapses in retina

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, William N.; Li, Wei; Chávez, Andrés E.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    In the mammalian retina, A17 amacrine cells provide reciprocal inhibitory feedback to rod bipolar cells, thereby shaping the time course of visual signaling in vivo. Previous results indicate that A17 feedback can be triggered by Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ permeable AMPARs and can occur independently of voltage-gated Ca2+ (Cav) channels, whose presence and functional role in A17 dendrites have not been explored. Here, we combine electrophysiology, calcium imaging and immunohistochemistry to show that L-type Cav channels in rat A17 amacrine cells are located at the sites of reciprocal synaptic feedback, but their contribution to GABA release is diminished by large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels, which suppress postsynaptic depolarization in A17s and limit Cav channel activation. We also show that BK channels, by limiting GABA release from A17s, regulate the flow of excitatory synaptic transmission through the rod pathway. PMID:19363492

  6. Mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy--old buddies and newcomers part 2.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, P P; Isermann, B

    2010-11-01

    The clinical translation of established pathomechanisms of diabetic nephropathy improved the outcome in patients with diabetic nephropathy. However, they fail to halt or even reverse diabetic nephropathy, even though the feasibility of disease reversal has been established. The second part of this review summarizes recent novel insights into the mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy focusing on novel candidate mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy. These studies emphasize a crucial role of endothelial dependent mechanisms, which, however, can not be viewed as independent determinants of diabetic nephropathy. Rather, the endothelial dependent mechanisms act in concert with other cellular systems, establishing an intra-glomerular cross-talk which determines the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Noise measurements on the helicopter BK 117 design. Weighted noise levels and influence of airspeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Anders, Klaus P.; Spiegel, Karl-Heinz

    1986-11-01

    Noise measurements on the prototype helicopter BK 117 were performed in strict compliance with the proposed international Civil Aviation Organization regulations for noise certification of helicopters. Measurement procedure, noise data acquisition, analysis and reduction as well as applied correction procedures are described. Effective perceived noise levels (EPNL) and other noise descriptors were evaluated and related to the proposed noise limits. Additional level flyover tests with variable airspeed were conducted to investigate the resulting effect on the EPNL and other noise measures.

  8. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  9. B_K on 2+1 flavor Iwasaki DWF lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Saul

    2006-12-01

    We present current results from an ongoing calculation of BK on 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion lattices with β 2¢ 13 generated with the Iwasaki gauge action (inverse lattice spacing a 1 £ ¤ ¡ 1¢ 6 GeV). Nonperturbative renormalization and chiral fits to the partially quenched 2+1 flavor form are discussed. A new kind of source for large lattice volumes is introduced.

  10. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  11. Rodent models of diabetic nephropathy: their utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Munehiro; Ogura, Yoshio; Koya, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease. Therefore, novel therapies for the suppression of diabetic nephropathy must be developed. Rodent models are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of diseases and testing novel therapies, and many type 1 and type 2 diabetic rodent models have been established for the study of diabetes and diabetic complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animals are widely used as a model of type 1 diabetes. Akita diabetic mice that have an Ins2+/C96Y mutation and OVE26 mice that overexpress calmodulin in pancreatic β-cells serve as a genetic model of type 1 diabetes. In addition, db/db mice, KK-Ay mice, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, Wistar fatty rats, Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats and Goto-Kakizaki rats serve as rodent models of type 2 diabetes. An animal model of diabetic nephropathy should exhibit progressive albuminuria and a decrease in renal function, as well as the characteristic histological changes in the glomeruli and the tubulointerstitial lesions that are observed in cases of human diabetic nephropathy. A rodent model that strongly exhibits all these features of human diabetic nephropathy has not yet been developed. However, the currently available rodent models of diabetes can be useful in the study of diabetic nephropathy by increasing our understanding of the features of each diabetic rodent model. Furthermore, the genetic background and strain of each mouse model result in differences in susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria and the development of glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Therefore, the validation of an animal model reproducing human diabetic nephropathy will significantly facilitate our understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms that contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we focus on rodent models of diabetes and discuss the utility and limitations of these models for the study of diabetic

  12. BK/TD models for analyzing in vitro impedance data on cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Teng, S; Barcellini-Couget, S; Beaudouin, R; Brochot, C; Desousa, G; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2015-06-01

    The ban of animal testing has enhanced the development of new in vitro technologies for cosmetics safety assessment. Impedance metrics is one such technology which enables monitoring of cell viability in real time. However, analyzing real time data requires moving from static to dynamic toxicity assessment. In the present study, we built mechanistic biokinetic/toxicodynamic (BK/TD) models to analyze the time course of cell viability in cytotoxicity assay using impedance. These models account for the fate of the tested compounds during the assay. BK/TD models were applied to analyze HepaRG cell viability, after single (48 h) and repeated (4 weeks) exposures to three hepatotoxic compounds (coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2). The BK/TD models properly fit the data used for their calibration that was obtained for single or repeated exposure. Only for one out of the three compounds, the models calibrated with a single exposure were able to predict repeated exposure data. We therefore recommend the use of long-term exposure in vitro data in order to adequately account for chronic hepatotoxic effects. The models we propose here are capable of being coupled with human biokinetic models in order to relate dose exposure and human hepatotoxicity.

  13. Solution structure of the HsapBK K+ channel voltage-sensor paddle sequence.

    PubMed

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Lind, Jesper; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Mäler, Lena

    2009-06-30

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open and close in response to changes in the membrane potential. In this study, we have determined the NMR solution structure of the putative S3b-S4 voltage-sensor paddle fragment, the part that moves to mediate voltage gating, of the HsapBK potassium channel in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. This paper presents the first structure of the S3b-S4 fragment from a BK channel. Diffusion coefficients as determined from PFG NMR experiments showed that a well-defined complex between the peptide and DPC molecules was formed. The structure reveals a helix-turn-helix motif, which is in agreement with crystal structures of other voltage-gated potassium channels, thus indicating that it is feasible to study the isolated fragment. The paddle motifs generally contain several basic residues, implicated in the gating. The critical Arg residues in this structure all reside on the surface, which is in agreement with crystal structures of K(v) channels. Similarities in the structure of the S3b-S4 fragment in BK and K(v) channels as well as important differences are seen, which may be important for explaining the details in paddle movement within a bilayer.

  14. Deletion of cytosolic gating ring decreases gate and voltage sensor coupling in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Geng, Yanyan; Jin, Yakang; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Magleby, Karl L; Salkoff, Lawrence; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-03-06

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK channels) gate open in response to both membrane voltage and intracellular Ca(2+) The channel is formed by a central pore-gate domain (PGD), which spans the membrane, plus transmembrane voltage sensors and a cytoplasmic gating ring that acts as a Ca(2+) sensor. How these voltage and Ca(2+) sensors influence the common activation gate, and interact with each other, is unclear. A previous study showed that a BK channel core lacking the entire cytoplasmic gating ring (Core-MT) was devoid of Ca(2+) activation but retained voltage sensitivity (Budelli et al. 2013. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1313433110). In this study, we measure voltage sensor activation and pore opening in this Core-MT channel over a wide range of voltages. We record gating currents and find that voltage sensor activation in this truncated channel is similar to WT but that the coupling between voltage sensor activation and gating of the pore is reduced. These results suggest that the gating ring, in addition to being the Ca(2+) sensor, enhances the effective coupling between voltage sensors and the PGD. We also find that removal of the gating ring alters modulation of the channels by the BK channel's β1 and β2 subunits.

  15. A seizure-induced gain-of-function in BK channels is associated with elevated firing activity in neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shruti, Sonal; Clem, Roger L.; Barth, Alison L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A heritable gain-of-function in BK channel activity has been associated with spontaneous seizures in both rodents and humans. We find that chemoconvulsant-induced seizures induce a gain-of-function in BK channel current that is associated with abnormal, elevated network excitability. Action potential half-width, evoked firing rate, and spontaneous network activity in vitro were all altered 24 hrs following picrotoxin-induced seizures in layer 2/3 pyramidal cells in the neocortex of young mice (P13-P16). Action potential half-width and firing output could be normalized to control values by application of BK channel antagonists in vitro. Thus, both inherited and acquired BK channel gain-of-functions are linked to abnormal excitability. Because BK channel antagonists can reduce elevated firing activity in neocortical neurons, BK channels might serve as a new target for anticonvulsant therapy. PMID:18387812

  16. Diabetic nephropathy in Africa: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Naidoo, Jashira; Kengne, Andre P

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and incidence of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. METHODS: We performed a systematic narrative review of published literature following the MOOSE Guidelines for Meta-Analysis and Systematic Reviews of Observational Studies. We searched PubMed-MEDLINE for all articles published in English and French languages between January 1994 and July 2014 using a predefined strategy based on the combination of relevant terms and the names of each of the 54 African countries and African sub-regions to capture the largest number of studies, and hand-searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. Included studies reported on the prevalence, incidence or determinants of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes within African countries. RESULTS: Overall, we included 32 studies from 16 countries; two being population-based studies and the remaining being clinic-based surveys. Most of the studies (90.6%) were conducted in urban settings. Methods for assessing and classifying CKD varied widely. Measurement of urine protein was the most common method of assessing kidney damage (62.5% of studies). The overall prevalence of CKD varied from 11% to 83.7%. Incident event rates were 94.9% for proteinuria at 10 years of follow-up, 34.7% for end-stage renal disease at 5 years of follow-up and 18.4% for mortality from nephropathy at 20 years of follow-up. Duration of diabetes, blood pressure, advancing age, obesity and glucose control were the common determinants of kidney disease. CONCLUSION: The burden of CKD is important among people with diabetes in Africa. High quality data from large population-based studies with validated measures of kidney function are still needed to better capture the magnitude and characteristics of diabetic nephropathy in Africa. PMID:26069725

  17. Membranous nephropathy that first presented in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Yumie; Iyoda, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Ai; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Kuroki, Aki; Shibata, Takanori; Akizawa, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman at 17 weeks of gestation who was first noted to have proteinuria and microscopic hematuria at 13 weeks of gestation was admitted to our hospital with proteinuria that progressed to nephrotic syndrome (NS). Despite the treatment with prednisolone, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy, the NS worsened. The patient underwent an elective abortion at 21 weeks of gestation, and the NS then went into partial remission. A renal biopsy revealed membranous nephropathy (MN). There was no evidence of secondary MN. This is the first reported case of subclinical idiopathic MN that first developed in pregnancy.

  18. [Pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Meza Letelier, Carlos Eduardo; San Martín Ojeda, Camilo Alfredo; Ruiz Provoste, José Javier; Frugone Zaror, Cristobal Jesus

    2017-01-12

    Chronic kidney disease is a common complication of diabetes. Its importance lies in its high prevalence and future projection. It is associated with high health costs and global cardiovascular deterioration as well. The development of this disease pathophysiology is being studied and it is known that a series of complex molecular pathways determining a microvascular disease are involved. This review addresses the known pathways in the development of diabetic nephropathy aiming to improve the understanding of potential therapeutic targets that could be developed in the future.

  19. [Contrast-induced nephropathy: An update].

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, V; Azzalini, L; Tadros, V X; Picard, F; Ly, H Q

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is common in hospitalized patients. Its occurrence is associated with an increased hospitalization stay and cost, morbidity and mortality. Thus, preventives strategies remain a major issue. Patients that are referred for cardiac catheterization are among the most vulnerable to develop CIN due to their comorbidities. Moreover, in some cases, such preventives measures cannot be introduced due to emergent clinical settings. After a summary regarding the properties of iodinated contrast medium, the aim of this work was to review the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and preventive strategies related to CIN.

  20. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  1. Beethoven's nephropathy and death: discussion paper.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P J

    1993-01-01

    The autopsy description of Beethoven's nephropathy is so typical of renal papillary necrosis, that the diagnosis is as near to certain as is possible, in the absence of a histological examination. A review of the symptoms and clinical course of Beethoven's final illness is consistent with this diagnosis. It is proposed that the cause was an acute onset diabetes mellitus, complicating chronic pancreatitis. Beethoven's case appears to be the first report in the literature of an autopsy proven case of renal papillary necrosis. PMID:8459382

  2. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  3. BK channel activity determines the extent of cell degeneration after oxygen and glucose deprivation: a study in organotypical hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Rundén-Pran, E; Haug, F M; Storm, J F; Ottersen, O P

    2002-01-01

    BK channels are voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium channels whose activation tends to reduce cellular excitability. In hippocampal pyramidal cells, BK channels repolarize somatic action potentials, and recent immunogold and electrophysiological analyses have revealed a presynaptic pool of BK channels that can regulate glutamate release. Agents that modulate BK channel activity would therefore be expected to affect cell excitability and neurotransmitter release also under pathological conditions. We have investigated the role of BK potassium channels in a model of ischemia-induced nerve cell degeneration. Organotypical slice cultures of rat hippocampus were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was assessed by the fluorescent dye propidium iodide. OGD induced cell death in the CA1 region and to a lesser extent in CA3. Treatment with the BK channel blockers, paxilline and iberiotoxin, during and after OGD induced increased cell death in CA1 and CA3. Both BK channel blockers also sensitized the relatively resistant granule cells in fascia dentata to OGD. The effect of paxilline and iberiotoxin was evident from 3 h after OGD, indicating a role of BK channels early in the post-ischemic phase or during OGD itself. The BK channel opener, NS1619, turned out to be gliotoxic, and this effect was not counteracted by paxilline and iberiotoxin. Our data show that blockade of BK channels aggravates OGD-induced cell damage and suggest that BK channels act as a kind of 'emergency brake' during and/or after ischemia. Accordingly, the BK channel is a potential molecular target for neuroprotective therapy in stroke.

  4. Intrinsic Electrostatic Potential in the BK Channel Pore: Role in Determining Single Channel Conductance and Block

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Wendy; Torres, Yolima P.; Brauchi, Sebastian; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Latorre, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    The internal vestibule of large-conductance Ca2+ voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels contains a ring of eight negative charges not present in K+ channels of lower conductance (Glu386 and Glu389 in hSlo) that modulates channel conductance through an electrostatic mechanism (Brelidze, T.I., X. Niu, and K.L. Magleby. 2003. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 100:9017–9022). In BK channels there are also two acidic amino acid residues in an extracellular loop (Asp326 and Glu329 in hSlo). To determine the electrostatic influence of these charges on channel conductance, we expressed wild-type BK channels and mutants E386N/E389N, D326N, E329Q, and D326N/E329Q channels on Xenopus laevis oocytes, and measured the expressed currents under patch clamp. Contribution of E329 to the conductance is negligible and single channel conductance of D326N/E329Q channels measured at 0 mV in symmetrical 110 mM K+ was 18% lower than the control. Current–voltage curves displayed weak outward rectification for D326N and the double mutant. The conductance differences between the mutants and wild-type BK were caused by an electrostatic effect since they were enhanced at low K+ (30 mM) and vanished at high K+ (1 M K+). We determine the electrostatic potential change, Δφ, caused by the charge neutralization using TEA+ block for the extracellular charges and Ba2+ for intracellular charges. We measured 13 ± 2 mV for Δφ at the TEA+ site when turning off the extracellular charges, and 17 ± 2 mV for the Δφ at the Ba2+ site when the intracellular charges were turned off. To understand the electrostatic effect of charge neutralizations, we determined Δφ using a BK channel molecular model embedded in a lipid bilayer and solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The model explains the experimental results adequately and, in particular, gives an economical explanation to the differential effect on the conductance of the neutralization of charges D326 and E329. PMID:18227273

  5. Reactive oxygen species signaling facilitates FOXO-3a/FBXO-dependent vascular BK channel β1 subunit degradation in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tong; Chai, Qiang; Yu, Ling; d'Uscio, Livius V; Katusic, Zvonimir S; He, Tongrong; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2012-07-01

    Activity of the vascular large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel is tightly regulated by its accessory β(1) subunit (BK-β(1)). Downregulation of BK-β(1) expression in diabetic vessels is associated with upregulation of the forkhead box O subfamily transcription factor-3a (FOXO-3a)-dependent F-box-only protein (FBXO) expression. However, the upstream signaling regulating this process is unclear. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common finding in diabetic vasculopathy. We hypothesized that ROS signaling cascade facilitates the FOXO-3a/FBXO-mediated BK-β(1) degradation and leads to diabetic BK channel dysfunction. Using cellular biology, patch clamp, and videomicroscopy techniques, we found that reduced BK-β(1) expression in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mouse arteries and in human coronary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured with high glucose was attributable to an increase in protein kinase C (PKC)-β and NADPH oxidase expressions and accompanied by attenuation of Akt phosphorylation and augmentation of atrogin-1 expression. Treatment with ruboxistaurin (a PKCβ inhibitor) or with GW501516 (a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ activator) reduced atrogin-1 expression and restored BK channel-mediated coronary vasodilation in diabetic mice. Our results suggested that oxidative stress inhibited Akt signaling and facilitated the FOXO-3a/FBXO-dependent BK-β(1) degradation in diabetic vessels. Suppression of the FOXO-3a/FBXO pathway prevented vascular BK-β(1) degradation and protected coronary function in diabetes.

  6. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0-S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg(2+) coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44-113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg(2+). Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  7. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes. PMID:28042580

  8. BMP-7 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IS DOWNREGULATED IN HUMAN DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ivanac-Janković, Renata; Ćorić, Marijana; Furić-Čunko, Vesna; Lovičić, Vesna; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar

    2015-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is expressed in all parts of the normal kidney parenchyma, being highest in the epithelium of proximal tubules. It protects kidney against acute and chronic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease, and is characterized by decreased expression of BMP-7. The aim of our study was to analyze whether the expression of BMP-7 is significantly changed in advanced stages of human diabetic nephropathy. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of BMP-7 was performed on archival material of 30 patients that underwent renal biopsy and had confirmed diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that BMP-7 was differently expressed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of proximal tubules and podocytes among all stages of diabetic nephropathy. At early stages of diabetic nephropathy, BMP-7 was strongly positive in proximal tubules and podocytes, while low expression was recorded in the majority of samples at advanced stages. In conclusion, increased expression of BMP-7 at initial stages of diabetic nephropathy with subsequent decrease at advanced stage highlights the role of BMP-7 in the protection of kidney structure and function. Further investigations should be focused on disturbances of BMP-7 receptors and signaling pathways in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes.

  10. Diabetic Nephropathy: New Risk Factors and Improvements in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with diabetic nephropathy have a high cardiovascular risk, comparable to patients with coronary heart disease. Accordingly, identification and management of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy as well as timely diagnosis and prompt management of the condition are of paramount importance for effective treatment. A variety of risk factors promotes the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including elevated glucose levels, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Most of these risk factors are modifiable by antidiabetic, antihypertensive, or lipid-lowering treatment and lifestyle changes. Others such as genetic factors or advanced age cannot be modified. Therefore, the rigorous management of the modifiable risk factors is essential for preventing and delaying the decline in renal function. Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is another essential component in the management of diabetes and its complications such as nephropathy. New markers may allow earlier diagnosis of this common and serious complication, but further studies are needed to clarify their additive predictive value, and to define their cost-benefit ratio. This article reviews the most important risk factors in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis of this disease.

  11. BK Channels Localize to the Paranodal Junction and Regulate Action Potentials in Myelinated Axons of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirono, Moritoshi; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Misono, Kaori; Zollinger, Daniel R.; Trimmer, James S.

    2015-01-01

    In myelinated axons, K+ channels are clustered in distinct membrane domains to regulate action potentials (APs). At nodes of Ranvier, Kv7 channels are expressed with Na+ channels, whereas Kv1 channels flank nodes at juxtaparanodes. Regulation of axonal APs by K+ channels would be particularly important in fast-spiking projection neurons such as cerebellar Purkinje cells. Here, we show that BK/Slo1 channels are clustered at the paranodal junctions of myelinated Purkinje cell axons of rat and mouse. The paranodal junction is formed by a set of cell-adhesion molecules, including Caspr, between the node and juxtaparanodes in which it separates nodal from internodal membrane domains. Remarkably, only Purkinje cell axons have detectable paranodal BK channels, whose clustering requires the formation of the paranodal junction via Caspr. Thus, BK channels occupy this unique domain in Purkinje cell axons along with the other K+ channel complexes at nodes and juxtaparanodes. To investigate the physiological role of novel paranodal BK channels, we examined the effect of BK channel blockers on antidromic AP conduction. We found that local application of blockers to the axon resulted in a significant increase in antidromic AP failure at frequencies above 100 Hz. We also found that Ni2+ elicited a similar effect on APs, indicating the involvement of Ni2+-sensitive Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, axonal application of BK channel blockers decreased the inhibitory synaptic response in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Thus, paranodal BK channels uniquely support high-fidelity firing of APs in myelinated Purkinje cell axons, thereby underpinning the output of the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25948259

  12. BK potassium channels control transmitter release at CA3−CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Raffaelli, Giacomo; Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Pedarzani, Paola; Cherubini, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels (BK channels) activate in response to calcium influx during action potentials and contribute to the spike repolarization and fast afterhyperpolarization. BK channels targeted to active zones in presynaptic nerve terminals have been shown to limit calcium entry and transmitter release by reducing the duration of the presynaptic spike at neurosecretory nerve terminals and at the frog neuromuscular junction. However, their functional role in central synapses is still uncertain. In the hippocampus, BK channels have been proposed to act as an ‘emergency brake’ that would control transmitter release only under conditions of excessive depolarization and accumulation of intracellular calcium. Here we demonstrate that in the CA3 region of hippocampal slice cultures, under basal experimental conditions, the selective BK channel blockers paxilline (10 μm) and iberiotoxin (100 nm) increase the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneously occurring action potential-dependent EPSCs. These drugs did not affect miniature currents recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin, suggesting that their action was dependent on action potential firing. Moreover, in double patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically interconnected CA3 pyramidal neurones, blockade of BK channels enhanced the probability of transmitter release, as revealed by the increase in success rate, EPSC amplitude and the concomitant decrease in paired-pulse ratio in response to pairs of presynaptic action potentials delivered at a frequency of 0.05 Hz. BK channel blockers also enhanced the appearance of delayed responses, particularly following the second action potential in the paired-pulse protocol. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that BK channels are powerful modulators of transmitter release and synaptic efficacy in central neurones. PMID:15034127

  13. Antecedent hydrogen sulfide elicits an anti-inflammatory phenotype in postischemic murine small intestine: role of BK channels.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, Mozow Y; Yang, Yan; Wang, Meifang; Kalogeris, Theodore; Liu, Yajun; Meininger, Cynthia J; Hill, Michael A; Davis, Michael J; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the role of calcium-activated, small (SK), intermediate (IK), and large (BK) conductance potassium channels in initiating the development of an anti-inflammatory phenotype elicited by preconditioning with an exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Intravital microscopy was used to visualize rolling and firmly adherent leukocytes in vessels of the small intestine of mice preconditioned with NaHS (in the absence and presence of SK, IK, and BK channel inhibitors, apamin, TRAM-34, and paxilline, respectively) or SK/IK (NS-309) or BK channel activators (NS-1619) 24 h before ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). I/R induced marked increases in leukocyte rolling and adhesion, effects that were largely abolished by preconditioning with NaHS, NS-309, or NS-1619. The postischemic anti-inflammatory effects of NaHS-induced preconditioning were mitigated by BKB channel inhibitor treatment coincident with NaHS, but not by apamin or TRAM-34, 24 h before I/R. Confocal imaging and immunohistochemistry were used to demonstrate the presence of BKα subunit staining in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of isolated, pressurized mesenteric venules. Using patch-clamp techniques, we found that BK channels in cultured endothelial cells were activated after exposure to NaHS. Bath application of the same concentration of NaHS used in preconditioning protocols led to a rapid increase in a whole cell K(+) current; specifically, the component of K(+) current blocked by the selective BK channel antagonist iberiotoxin. The activation of BK current by NaHS could also be demonstrated in single channel recording mode where it was independent of a change in intracellular Ca(+) concentration. Our data are consistent with the concept that H(2)S induces the development of an anti-adhesive state in I/R in part mediated by a BK channel-dependent mechanism.

  14. Smoking in diabetic nephropathy: sparks in the fuel tank?

    PubMed

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2012-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality and the prevalence of this disease is continuously increasing worldwide. Long-term diabetes increases the likelihood of developing secondary complications like nephropathy, the most common cause of end stage renal disease. Usually, other factors like hypertension, alcoholism and smoking also partly contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Among this, cigarette smoking in diabetes has been repeatedly confirmed as an independent risk factor for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various studies suggest that smoking is a major fuel in the development of high oxidative stress and subsequently hyperlipidemia, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, activation of the renin angiotensin system and Rho-kinase, which are observed to play a pathogenic role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, cigarette smoking in diabetic patients with vascular complications produces a variety of pathological changes in the kidney, such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial expansion with progression in glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, which ultimately results in end stage renal failure. Strong associations are consistently found between chronic cigarette smoking and diabetic microvascular complications. A diverse group of studies unveil potential mechanisms that may explain the role of cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tremendous efforts are being made to control smoking mediated progression of diabetic nephropathy, but no promising therapy is yet available. The present review critically discusses the possible detrimental role of chronic cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and various possible pharmacological interventions to attenuate the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Smoking in diabetic nephropathy: sparks in the fuel tank?

    PubMed Central

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality and the prevalence of this disease is continuously increasing worldwide. Long-term diabetes increases the likelihood of developing secondary complications like nephropathy, the most common cause of end stage renal disease. Usually, other factors like hypertension, alcoholism and smoking also partly contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Among this, cigarette smoking in diabetes has been repeatedly confirmed as an independent risk factor for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various studies suggest that smoking is a major fuel in the development of high oxidative stress and subsequently hyperlipidemia, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, activation of the renin angiotensin system and Rho-kinase, which are observed to play a pathogenic role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, cigarette smoking in diabetic patients with vascular complications produces a variety of pathological changes in the kidney, such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial expansion with progression in glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, which ultimately results in end stage renal failure. Strong associations are consistently found between chronic cigarette smoking and diabetic microvascular complications. A diverse group of studies unveil potential mechanisms that may explain the role of cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tremendous efforts are being made to control smoking mediated progression of diabetic nephropathy, but no promising therapy is yet available. The present review critically discusses the possible detrimental role of chronic cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and various possible pharmacological interventions to attenuate the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23301120

  16. AGE, RAGE, and ROS in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adeline L Y; Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2007-03-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Two key mechanisms implicated in the development of diabetic nephropathy include advanced glycation and oxidative stress. Advanced glycation is the irreversible attachment of reducing sugars onto amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE modification of proteins may lead to alterations in normal function by inducing cross-linking of extracellular matrices. Intracellular formation of AGEs also can cause generalized cellular dysfunction. Furthermore, AGEs can mediate their effects via specific receptors, such as the receptor for AGE (RAGE), activating diverse signal transduction cascades and downstream pathways, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress occurs as a result of the imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant defenses. Sources of ROS include the mitochondria, auto-oxidation of glucose, and enzymatic pathways including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NAD[P]H) oxidase. Beyond the current treatments to treat diabetic complications such as the optimization of blood pressure and glycemic control, it is predicted that new therapies designed to target AGEs, including AGE formation inhibitors and cross-link breakers, as well as targeting ROS using novel highly specific antioxidants, will become part of the treatment regimen for diabetic renal disease.

  17. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  18. β1-subunit–induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Juan P.; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E.; Hyde, H. Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A.; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Luk, Louis Y. P.; Kent, Stephen B. H.; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit–induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex. PMID:27217576

  19. β1-subunit-induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan P; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Hyde, H Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Luk, Louis Y P; Kent, Stephen B H; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-06-07

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit-induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex.

  20. Nutritional intervention for a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing every year, and also the acute and chronic complications accompanying this disease are increasing. Diabetic nephropathy is one of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, and food intake which is burden to kidney function should be limited. At the same time, diet restriction could deteriorate quality of life of patient with diabetic nephropathy. According to the results of previous studies, the aggressive management is important for delaying of the progression to diabetic nephropathy. Also, the implementation of a personalized diet customized to individuals is an effective tool for preservation of kidney function. This is a case report of a patient with diabetic nephropathy who was introduced to a proper diet through nutrition education to prevent malnutrition, uremia and to maintain blood glucose levels.

  1. Nutritional Intervention for a Patient with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have reported that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing every year, and also the acute and chronic complications accompanying this disease are increasing. Diabetic nephropathy is one of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus, and food intake which is burden to kidney function should be limited. At the same time, diet restriction could deteriorate quality of life of patient with diabetic nephropathy. According to the results of previous studies, the aggressive management is important for delaying of the progression to diabetic nephropathy. Also, the implementation of a personalized diet customized to individuals is an effective tool for preservation of kidney function. This is a case report of a patient with diabetic nephropathy who was introduced to a proper diet through nutrition education to prevent malnutrition, uremia and to maintain blood glucose levels. PMID:24527422

  2. Canine IgA nephropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akira; Shimokawa Miyama, Takako; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy is a rare form of canine glomerular disease. This report describes a case of canine IgA nephropathy showing characteristics typical of human IgA nephropathy. An 8-year-old, spayed female Miniature Dachshund showed persistent severe proteinuria without azotemia. She was receiving long-term glucocorticoid therapy due to chronic gastritis and an intra-abdominal suture granuloma. A renal biopsy demonstrated mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with predominantly mesangial IgA deposition and electron-dense deposits in the paramesangium. These findings closely resembled those of human IgA nephropathy. Glucocorticoid treatment was discontinued, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril was administrated as an antiproteinuric agent. The proteinuria subsequently went into remission, and the patient has maintained good condition without recurrence.

  3. Silicosis and renal disease: insights from a case of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    RICCÒ, Matteo; THAI, Elena; CELLA, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 68-yr-old male, smoker, is admitted for proteinuria (2,800 mg/24 h) and reduced renal function (serum creatinine 2 mg/dl, GFR 35 ml/min). Renter, he started working 20-yr-old as a sandstone cave miner. Despite the high levels of silica dusts, he reported no mandatory use of airways protection devices during the first 25 yr of activity. No clinical or radiological signs of silicosis or pneumoconiosis where reported until the year of retirement (1997). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (91 mm/h) and C reactive protein (35 mg/l) suggested a pro-inflammatory status. High serum IgA was found (465 mg/dl). A renal biopsy identified glomerular sclerosis with IgA deposition, signs of diffuse vasculitis and tubular atrophia suggesting a diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Chest X-Rays showed emphysema and diffuse nodularity suggesting diagnosis of silicosis. Chest tomography was also positive for mild signs of silicosis with silicotic nodules and without honeycombing. IgA nephropathy is the most common type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. Several clues suggest a genetic or acquired abnormality of immune system as a trigger of the increased production of IgA. In our case report, simultaneous kidney and pulmonary disease could suggest same triggers (e.g. exposure to virus, bacteria or environmental agents) inducing IgA synthesis and pulmonary immune system activation. PMID:26423329

  4. A study of the low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernova 2008bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, S. M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2017-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 2008bk is a well-observed low-luminosity Type II event visually associated with a low-mass red-supergiant progenitor. To model SN 2008bk, we evolve a 12 M⊙ star from the main sequence until core collapse, when it has a total mass of 9.88 M⊙, a He-core mass of 3.22 M⊙ and a radius of 502 R⊙. We then artificially trigger an explosion that produces 8.29 M⊙ of ejecta with a total energy of 2.5 × 1050 erg and ∼0.009 M⊙ of 56Ni. We model the subsequent evolution of the ejecta with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer. Although somewhat too luminous and energetic, this model reproduces satisfactorily the multiband light curves and multi-epoch spectra of SN 2008bk, confirming the suitability of a low-mass massive star progenitor. As in other low-luminosity SNe II, the structured Hα profile at the end of the plateau phase is probably caused by Ba II 6496.9 Å rather than asphericity. We discuss the sensitivity of our results to changes in progenitor radius and mass, as well as chemical mixing. A 15 per cent increase in progenitor radius causes a 15 per cent increase in luminosity and a 0.2 mag V-band brightening of the plateau but leaves its length unaffected. An increase in ejecta mass by 10 per cent lengthens the plateau by ∼10 d. Chemical mixing introduces slight changes to the bolometric light curve, limited to the end of the plateau, but has a large impact on colours and spectra at nebular times.

  5. Paxilline inhibits BK channels by an almost exclusively closed-channel block mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Lingle, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Paxilline, a tremorogenic fungal alkaloid, potently inhibits large conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK)-type channels, but little is known about the mechanism underlying this inhibition. Here we show that inhibition is inversely dependent on BK channel open probability (Po), and is fully relieved by conditions that increase Po, even in the constant presence of paxilline. Manipulations that shift BK gating to more negative potentials reduce inhibition by paxilline in accordance with the increase in channel Po. Measurements of Po times the number of channels at negative potentials support the idea that paxilline increases occupancy of closed states, effectively reducing the closed-open equilibrium constant, L(0). Gating current measurements exclude an effect of paxilline on voltage sensors. Steady-state inhibition by multiple paxilline concentrations was determined for four distinct equilibration conditions, each with a distinct Po. The IC50 for paxilline shifted from around 10 nM when channels were largely closed to near 10 µM as maximal Po was approached. Model-dependent analysis suggests a mechanism of inhibition in which binding of a single paxilline molecule allosterically alters the intrinsic L(0) favoring occupancy of closed states, with affinity for the closed conformation being >500-fold greater than affinity for the open conformation. The rate of inhibition of closed channels was linear up through 2 µM paxilline, with a slope of 2 × 10(6) M(-1)s(-1). Paxilline inhibition was hindered by either the bulky cytosolic blocker, bbTBA, or by concentrations of cytosolic sucrose that hinder ion permeation. However, paxilline does not hinder MTSET modification of the inner cavity residue, A313C. We conclude that paxilline binds more tightly to the closed conformation, favoring occupancy of closed-channel conformations, and propose that it binds to a superficial position near the entrance to the central cavity, but does not hinder access of smaller

  6. Paxilline inhibits BK channels by an almost exclusively closed-channel block mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Paxilline, a tremorogenic fungal alkaloid, potently inhibits large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK)-type channels, but little is known about the mechanism underlying this inhibition. Here we show that inhibition is inversely dependent on BK channel open probability (Po), and is fully relieved by conditions that increase Po, even in the constant presence of paxilline. Manipulations that shift BK gating to more negative potentials reduce inhibition by paxilline in accordance with the increase in channel Po. Measurements of Po times the number of channels at negative potentials support the idea that paxilline increases occupancy of closed states, effectively reducing the closed–open equilibrium constant, L(0). Gating current measurements exclude an effect of paxilline on voltage sensors. Steady-state inhibition by multiple paxilline concentrations was determined for four distinct equilibration conditions, each with a distinct Po. The IC50 for paxilline shifted from around 10 nM when channels were largely closed to near 10 µM as maximal Po was approached. Model-dependent analysis suggests a mechanism of inhibition in which binding of a single paxilline molecule allosterically alters the intrinsic L(0) favoring occupancy of closed states, with affinity for the closed conformation being >500-fold greater than affinity for the open conformation. The rate of inhibition of closed channels was linear up through 2 µM paxilline, with a slope of 2 × 106 M−1s−1. Paxilline inhibition was hindered by either the bulky cytosolic blocker, bbTBA, or by concentrations of cytosolic sucrose that hinder ion permeation. However, paxilline does not hinder MTSET modification of the inner cavity residue, A313C. We conclude that paxilline binds more tightly to the closed conformation, favoring occupancy of closed-channel conformations, and propose that it binds to a superficial position near the entrance to the central cavity, but does not hinder access of smaller

  7. Telmisartan in the management of diabetic nephropathy: a contemporary view.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Bishnoi, Harish K; Mahadevan, Nanjaian

    2012-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, a complex disorder with heterogeneous etiologies, remains one of the most threatening diseases worldwide. There were around 177 million people with diabetes mellitus worldwide, and it has been estimated to be increased to 360 million by 2030. Given that about 20-30% of these people develop diabetic nephropathy, the present treatment protocols primarily aim for an efficient glucose and blood pressure control to arrest the initiation and progression of diabetic nephropathy. The treatment of diabetic nephropathy near the beginning at microalbuminuria stage with angiotensin-II-AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) improves blood pressure control and halts disease progression of diabetic nephropathy. In fact, ARBs exert renoprotective effects independently of their blood pressure lowering effect, as they have direct defensive action on the diabetic kidney. Indubitably, it would be better if an ARB has both glucose-lowering and blood pressure controlling potentials efficiently. Intriguingly, telmisartan has such possessions considering its dual role of AT1 receptor blocking action and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) partial agonistic property. The additional PPARγ agonistic potential of telmisartan could make it a distinctive intervention in the ARB class to prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy through activation of PPARγ-mediated insulin sensitization, and renal anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. Indeed, telmisartan reduced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, and halted the progressive renal dysfunction associated with diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the incidence of albuminuria, and preventing the progression of glomerulosclerosis, renal interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. This review will discuss the current status of therapeutic potentials of telmisartan in treating diabetic nephropathy.

  8. Susceptibility to ethanol withdrawal seizures is produced by BK channel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R; Atkinson, Nigel S

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal seizures are part of the symptomatology of severe alcohol dependence and are believed to originate from long-term neural adaptations that counter the central nervous system depressant effects of alcohol. Upon alcohol withdrawal, however, the increased neural excitability that was adaptive in the presence of alcohol becomes counter-adaptive and produces an imbalanced hyperactive nervous system. For some individuals, the uncovering of this imbalance by alcohol abstention can be sufficient to generate a seizure. Using the Drosophila model organism, we demonstrate a central role for the BK-type Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channel gene slo in the production of alcohol withdrawal seizures.

  9. Towards saturation of the electron-capture delayed fission probability: The new isotopes 240Es and 236Bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konki, J.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Block, M.; Briselet, R.; Cox, D. M.; Dasgupta, M.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Grahn, T.; Hauschild, K.; Herzán, A.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Hinde, D. J.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Leino, M.; Lommel, B.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Luong, D. H.; Mallaburn, M.; Nishio, K.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Rezynkina, K.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.; Sulignano, B.; Theisen, Ch.; Ward, A.; Yakushev, A.; Yakusheva, V.

    2017-01-01

    The new neutron-deficient nuclei 240Es and 236Bk were synthesised at the gas-filled recoil separator RITU. They were identified by their radioactive decay chains starting from 240Es produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction 209Bi(34S,3n)240Es. Half-lives of 6 (2)s and 22-6+13s were obtained for 240Es and 236Bk, respectively. Two groups of α particles with energies Eα = 8.19 (3)MeV and 8.09 (3)MeV were unambiguously assigned to 240Es. Electron-capture delayed fission branches with probabilities of 0.16 (6) and 0.04 (2) were measured for 240Es and 236Bk, respectively. These new data show a continuation of the exponential increase of ECDF probabilities in more neutron-deficient isotopes.

  10. Essential hypertension and risk of nephropathy: a reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Murea, Mariana; Freedman, Barry I.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the controversial relationship between hypertension and initiation of kidney disease. We focus on ethnic differences in renal histopathology and associated gene variants comprising the spectrum of MYH9-nephropathy. Purpose of review Treating mild to moderate essential hypertension in non-diabetic African Americans fails to halt nephropathy progression; while hypertension control slows nephropathy progression in European Americans. The pathogenesis of these disparate renal syndromes is reviewed. Recent findings The non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) is associated with a spectrum of kidney diseases in African Americans, including idiopathic focal global glomerulosclerosis historically attributed to hypertension, idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and the collapsing variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (HIV-associated nephropathy). Risk variants in MYH9 likely contribute to the failure of hypertension control to slow progressive kidney disease in non-diabetic African Americans. Summary Early and intensive hypertension control fails to halt progression of “hypertensive nephropathy” in African Americans. Genetic analyses in patients with essential hypertension and nephropathy attributed to hypertension, FSGS and HIVAN reveal that MYH9 gene polymorphisms are associated with a spectrum of kidney diseases in this ethnic group. Mild to moderate hypertension may cause nephropathy in European Americans with intra-renal vascular disease improved by the treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking cessation. PMID:20051853

  11. Predictors of prognosis in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2012-10-01

    IgA nephropathy (nephropathy with mesangial IgA and IgG deposits, so-called Berger's disease) is the most common primary chronic glomerulonephritis worldwide, and was first described in 1968. Histopathologically, IgA nephropathy is characterized by expansion of the glomerular mesangial matrix with mesangial cell proliferation and/or mononuclear cell infiltration. Glomeruli typically contain generalized-diffuse granular mesangial deposits of IgA (mainly IgA1), IgG and C3. This disease, therefore, is considered to be an immune-complex-mediated glomerulonephritis although the antigenic agents are still obscure. Clinically, patients with IgA nephropathy show microscopic and macroscopic hematuria and/or proteinuria. Although the clinical course is generally gradual in patients with IgA nephropathy, progression to renal hypertension, renal anemia, and end-stage kidney disease is not as rare as originally thought. Since pathogenesis and radical treatment for IgA nephropathy are still not established, it is necessary to study them using various clinical findings.

  12. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hirofumi; Sanford, Ryan B.; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the major cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Although the renin-angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a beneficial effect on diabetic nephropathy independently of their effects on blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II levels. This suggests that the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is also involved in the disease. To study the role of the KKS in diabetic nephropathy, mice lacking either the bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) or the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) have been commonly used. However, because absence of either receptor causes enhanced expression of the other, it is difficult to determine the precise functions of each receptor. This difficulty has recently been overcome by comparing mice lacking both receptors with mice lacking each receptor. Deletion of both B1R and B2R reduces nitric oxide (NO) production and aggravates renal diabetic phenotypes, relevant to either lack of B1R or B2R, demonstrating that both B1R and B2R exert protective effects on diabetic nephropathy presumably via NO. Here, we review previous epidemiological and experimental studies, and discuss novel insights regarding the therapeutic implications of the importance of the KKS in averting diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22318421

  13. Role of Toll-like receptors in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Harshini; Pollock, Carol; Panchapakesan, Usha

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of kidney failure and its increasing prevalence and incidence has imposed global socio-economic stress on healthcare systems worldwide. Although historically considered a metabolic disorder, recent studies have established that inflammatory responses are central to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. TLRs (Toll-like receptors) are a family of pattern recognition receptors responsible for the initiation of inflammatory and immune responses. The regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various kidney diseases, and emerging evidence shows their involvement in the perpetuation of inflammation in the diabetic kidney. The present review focuses on the relative contributions of TLR2 and TLR4 in recognizing endogenous ligands relevant to diabetic nephropathy and their subsequent activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), which results in the synthesis and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, we discuss the pro-inflammatory signalling pathways of TLR2 and TLR4, in which their interruption or blockade may prove to be important therapeutic targets, potentially translated into clinical treatments for diabetic nephropathy. Currently, inhibitors to TLR2 and TLR4 are undergoing clinical trials in various inflammatory models of disease, but none in patients with diabetic nephropathy. Given the existing literature, there is a fundamental necessity to undertake trials in patients with diabetic nephropathy with a focus on renal end points.

  14. Inherited forms of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Simplex and multiplex families with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) have been reported from several ethnic backgrounds, providing the strongest evidence of a role for genetic factors in pathogenesis of IgAN. From a phenotypic point of view, familial and sporadic IgAN cannot be differentiated, and the main clinical and histological features are similar. Traditionally, the case-control study design was employed to identify associations between particular candidate genes, for example, HLA antigens the uteroglobin gene and IgAN, giving conflicting results. Recently, a different approach, using linkage analysis, was undertaken by geneticists at Yale University. A 10-cM genome-wide screen was performed in 30 multiplex IgAN pedigrees, and one locus was mapped (IGAN-1) on chromosome 6q22-23. Future study will be focused on the identification of the gene underlying IGAN-1. This will enable us to understand the molecular pathogenetic basis of IgAN.

  15. Fructose and uric acid in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Kosugi, Tomoki; Kume, Shinji; Jalal, Diana; Maahs, David M.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported associations between serum uric acid levels and the development of diabetic nephropathy, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There is evidence from animal studies that blocking uric acid production protects the kidney from tubulointerstitial injury, which may suggest a causal role for uric acid in the development of diabetic tubular injury. In turn, when fructose, which is endogenously produced in diabetes via the polyol pathway, is metabolised, uric acid is generated from a side-chain reaction driven by ATP depletion and purine nucleotide turnover. For this reason, uric acid derived from endogenous fructose could cause tubulointerstitial injury in diabetes. Accordingly, our research group recently demonstrated that blocking fructose metabolism in a diabetic mouse model mitigated the development of tubulointerstitial injury by lowering tubular uric acid production. In this review we discuss the relationship between uric acid and fructose as a novel mechanism for the development of diabetic tubular injury. PMID:26049401

  16. Treatment of membranous nephropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Makker, Sudesh P

    2003-07-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is not a common pediatric glomerular disease and not a common cause of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS) in children. Because of the rarity of the disease, there is only a limited amount of uncontrolled data and no controlled data available in children regarding the treatment of MN. Older uncontrolled data indicate that nearly a quarter of children with NS, whether untreated or treated with various immunosuppressive agents, develop chronic renal failure. Current recommendations for treatment both for children presenting with or without NS therefore are based on controlled data obtained in adults with MN. All children should receive angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs). Children with NS may be treated initially with corticosteroids. If a satisfactory response is not obtained with corticosteroids, then treatment with cyclosporine or chlorambucil can be tried. The protocols of treatment with these drugs are described in this article.

  17. Complex networks analysis of obstructive nephropathy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, M.; Boccaletti, S.

    2011-09-01

    Congenital obstructive nephropathy (ON) is one of the most frequent and complex diseases affecting children, characterized by an abnormal flux of the urine, due to a partial or complete obstruction of the urinary tract; as a consequence, urine may accumulate in the kidney and disturb the normal operation of the organ. Despite important advances, pathological mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this contribution, the topology of complex networks, based on vectors of features of control and ON subjects, is related with the severity of the pathology. Nodes in these networks represent genetic and metabolic profiles, while connections between them indicate an abnormal relation between their expressions. Resulting topologies allow discriminating ON subjects and detecting which genetic or metabolic elements are responsible for the malfunction.

  18. Structure-activity relationships of a novel group of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel modulators: the GoSlo-SR family.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhrangsu; Morayo Akande, Adebola; Large, Roddy J; Webb, Tim I; Camarasu, Costin; Sergeant, Gerard P; McHale, Noel G; Thornbury, Keith D; Hollywood, Mark A

    2012-10-01

    Opening up ion channels: We synthesised a series of anthraquinone analogues, called the GoSlo-SR family. Their effects on bladder smooth muscle BK channels were examined and, as shown, shifted voltage dependent activation >-100 mV (at 10 μM). They were more efficacious than NS11021 and could provide a new scaffold for the design of efficacious BK openers.

  19. Large Conductance Voltage- and Ca2+-gated Potassium (BK) Channel β4 Subunit Influences Sensitivity and Tolerance to Alcohol by Altering Its Response to Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Marrero, Cristina; Seale, Garrett E.; Treistman, Steven N.; Martin, Gilles E.

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance is a well described component of alcohol abuse and addiction. The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-gated potassium channel (BK) has been very useful for studying molecular tolerance. The influence of association with the β4 subunit can be observed at the level of individual channels, action potentials in brain slices, and finally, drinking behavior in the mouse. Previously, we showed that 50 mm alcohol increases both α and αβ4 BK channel open probability, but only α BK develops acute tolerance to this effect. Currently, we explore the possibility that the influence of the β4 subunit on tolerance may result from a striking effect of β4 on kinase modulation of the BK channel. We examine the influence of the β4 subunit on PKA, CaMKII, and phosphatase modulation of channel activity, and on molecular tolerance to alcohol. We record from human BK channels heterologously expressed in HEK 293 cells composed of its core subunit, α alone (Insertless), or co-expressed with the β4 BK auxiliary subunit, as well as, acutely dissociated nucleus accumbens neurons using the cell-attached patch clamp configuration. Our results indicate that BK channels are strongly modulated by activation of specific kinases (PKA and CaMKII) and phosphatases. The presence of the β4 subunit greatly influences this modulation, allowing a variety of outcomes for BK channel activity in response to acute alcohol. PMID:25190810

  20. Association of Diabetic Nephropathy and Liver Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Malawadi, BN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver disorder is known to be a risk factor for Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and diabetic patients are at risk of developing liver disorders. Association of liver and renal disease is less explored in the field of research; hence, we conducted a retrospective study on this. Aim To compare the renal and liver profiles of type II DM patients compared to healthy controls and find the association between the two profiles in diabetics. Materials and Methods The renal and liver profiles of 68 type II DM patients and 58 controls were compared. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) (eGFR) was calculated using Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula and was taken as a tool to grade different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Comparison of liver profiles between different stages of diabetic nephropathy was done. Correlations and associations were studied between eGFR and liver enzymes and Bilirubin. Results A significant elevation in Total Bilirubin (TB) (p< 0.15), Direct Bilirubin (DB) (p< 0.0035), Aspartate Amino Transferase (AST) and Alanine Amino Transferase (ALT) (p<0.0001) levels in diabetics was noted. An elevated eGFR and a significant correlation between eGFR and liver enzymes were observed. A significant association between liver and renal disease has been obtained in diabetics (p=0.0136). Conclusion Significantly, high liver function tests and low eGFR were observed in type II diabetics. A significant positive correlation between liver enzymes (AST and ALT) and eGFR suggest a possible association between liver and kidney functions in DM. PMID:27891331

  1. Exogenous kallikrein protects against diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Yemei; Lu, Xiaolan; Guo, Shizhe; Wu, Meng; Wang, Meng; Yan, Linling; Wang, Qinghua; Zhao, Xiaolong; Tong, Xian; Hu, Ji; Li, Yiming; Hu, Renming; Stanton, Robert C; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-11-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system has been shown to be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, but specific mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we determined the renal-protective role of exogenous pancreatic kallikrein in diabetic mice and studied potential mechanisms in db/db type 2 diabetic and streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. After the onset of diabetes, mice were treated with either pancreatic kallikrein (db/db+kallikrein, streptozotocin+kallikrein) or saline (db/db+saline, streptozotocin+saline) for 16 weeks, while another group of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice received the same treatment after onset of albuminuria (streptozotocin'+kallikrein, streptozotocin'+saline). Db/m littermates or wild type mice were used as non-diabetic controls. Pancreatic kallikrein had no effects on body weight, blood glucose and blood pressure, but significantly reduced albuminuria among all three groups. Pathological analysis showed that exogenous kallikrein decreased the thickness of the glomerular basement membrane, protected against the effacement of foot process, the loss of endothelial fenestrae, and prevented the loss of podocytes in diabetic mice. Renal fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress were reduced in kallikrein-treated mice compared to diabetic controls. The expression of kininogen1, tissue kallikrein, kinin B1 and B2 receptors were all increased in the kallikrein-treated compared to saline-treated mice. Thus, exogenous pancreatic kallikrein both prevented and ameliorated diabetic nephropathy, which may be mediated by activating the kallikrein-kinin system.

  2. Differential effects of low-dose fenofibrate treatment in diabetic rats with early onset nephropathy and established nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kadian, Supriya; Mahadevan, Nanjaian; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2013-01-05

    We have previously shown that low-dose fenofibrate treatment has an ability to prevent diabetes-induced nephropathy in rats. We investigated here the comparative pre- and post-treatment effects of low-dose fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o.) in diabetes-induced onset of nephropathy. Rats were made diabetics by single administration of streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg i.p.). The development of diabetic nephropathy was assessed biochemically and histologically. Moreover, lipid profile and renal oxidative stress were assessed. Diabetic rats after 8 weeks of STZ-administration developed apparent nephropathy by elevating serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and microproteinuria, and inducing glomerular-capsular wall distortion, mesangial expansion and tubular damage and renal oxidative stress. Fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) pretreatment (4 weeks after STZ-administration) markedly prevented diabetes-induced onset of diabetic nephropathy, while the fenofibrate (30 mg/kg/day p.o., 4 weeks) post-treatment (8 weeks after STZ-administration) was less-effective. However, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments were effective in preventing diabetes-induced renal oxidative stress and lipid alteration in diabetic rats though the pretreatment was slightly more effective. Conversely, both pre-and post fenofibrate treatments did not alter elevated glucose levels in diabetic rats. It may be concluded that diabetes-induced oxidative stress and lipid alteration, in addition to a marked glucose elevation, play a detrimental role in the onset of nephropathy in diabetic rats. The pretreatment with low-dose fenofibrate might be a potential therapeutic approach in preventing the onset of nephropathy in diabetic subjects under the risk of renal disease induction. However, low-dose fenofibrate treatment might not be effective in treating the established nephropathy in diabetic subjects.

  3. Activation of galanin receptor 2 stimulates large conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channels through the IP3 pathway in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Na Clara; Bai, Yun-Fei; Yang, Yutao; Hökfelt, Tomas; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2014-03-28

    The large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are widely distributed in the brain, and act as intracellular calcium sensors in neurons. They play an important feedback role in controlling Ca(2+) flux and Ca(2+)-dependent processes, including neurotransmitter release and cellular excitability. In this study, the effects of the neuropeptide galanin on BK channels were examined by determining the whole-cell currents and single-channel activities in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells co-expressing GalR2 and the BK alpha subunit. Galanin enhanced the currents of BK channels, in a concentration-dependent and PTX-independent manner, with an ED50 value of 71.8±16.9 nM. This activation was mediated by GalR2, since its agonist AR-M1896 mimicked the effect of galanin, and since galanin did not facilitate BK currents in cells co-expressing cDNAs of BK and GalR1 or GalR3. The galanin-induced BK current persisted after replacement with Ca(2+)-free solution, suggesting that extracellular Ca(2+) is not essential. Chelating intracellular Ca(2+) by either the slow Ca(2+) buffer EGTA or the fast Ca(2+) buffer BAPTA abolished galanin-mediated activation of BK channels, indicating the important role of intracellular Ca(2+). The role of Ca(2+) efflux from the sarcoplasmic reticulum/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) was confirmed by application of thapsigargin, an irreversible inhibitor that depletes Ca(2+) from SR/ER. Moreover, the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP3R) was identified as the mediator responsible for increased intracellular Ca(2+) activating BK channels. Taken together, activation of GalR2 leads to elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) is due to Ca(2+) efflux from ER through IP3R sequentially opening BK channels.

  4. BK channels modulate pre- and postsynaptic signaling at reciprocal synapses in retina.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Li, Wei; Chávez, Andrés E; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2009-05-01

    In the mammalian retina, A17 amacrine cells provide reciprocal inhibitory feedback to rod bipolar cells, thereby shaping the time course of visual signaling in vivo. Previous results have indicated that A17 feedback can be triggered by Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors and can occur independently of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(v)) channels, whose presence and functional role in A17 dendrites have not yet been explored. We combined electrophysiology, calcium imaging and immunohistochemistry and found that L-type Ca(v) channels in rat A17 amacrine cells were located at the sites of reciprocal synaptic feedback and that their contribution to GABA release was diminished by large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels, which suppress postsynaptic depolarization in A17s and limit Ca(v) channel activation. We also found that BK channels, by limiting GABA release from A17s, regulate the flow of excitatory synaptic transmission through the rod pathway.

  5. BK Lyncis: The Oldest Old Nova? or: Archaeo-Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Jonathan; Patterson, Joe; de Miguel, Enrique; Roberts, George; Campbell, Tut; Hambsch, Franz-J.; Krajci, Tom; Dvorak, Shawn; Koff, Robert A.; Morell, Etienne; Potter, Michael; Cejudo, David; Ulowetz, Joe; Boyd, David; Sabo, Richard; Rock, John; Oksanen, Arto

    2012-05-01

    We summarize the results of a 20-year campaign to study the light curves of BK Lyncis, a nova-like star strangely located below the 2-3 hour orbital period gap in the family of cataclysmic variables. Two "superhumps" dominate the nightly light curves - with periods 4.6% longer, and 3.0% shorter, than Porb. The first appears to be associated with the star's brighter states (V~14), while the second appears to be present throughout and becomes very dominant in the low state (V~15.7). It's plausible that these arise, respectively, from a prograde apsidal precession and a retrograde nodal precession of the star's accretion disk. In 2011-2, the star's light curve became indistinguishable from that of a dwarf nova - in particular, that of the ER UMa subclass. No such transition has ever been observed in a cataclysmic variable. Reviewing all the star's oddities, we speculate: (a) BK Lyn is the remnant of the probable nova on 30 December 101, and (b) it has been fading ever since, but has taken ~2000 years for the accretion rate to drop sufficiently to permit dwarf-nova eruptions. If such behavior is common, it can explain two other puzzles of CV evolution. One: why the ER UMa class even exists (because all can be remnants of recent novae). And two: the relative space densities of short- and long-period CVs, and of known nova remnants (set by the durations of these transient phases).

  6. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  7. Dystrobrevin controls neurotransmitter release and muscle Ca2+ transients by localizing BK channels in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bojun; Liu, Ping; Zhan, Haiying; Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Dystrobrevin is a major component of a dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC). It is widely expressed in mammalian tissues including the nervous system, where it is localized to the presynaptic nerve terminal with unknown function. In a genetic screen for suppressors of a lethargic phenotype caused by a gain-of-function (gf) isoform of SLO-1 in C. elegans, we isolated multiple loss-of-function (lf) mutants of the dystrobrevin gene dyb-1. dyb-1(lf) phenocopied slo-1(lf), causing increased neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction, increased frequency of Ca2+ transients in body-wall muscle, and abnormal locomotion behavior. Neuron- and muscle-specific rescue experiments suggest that DYB-1 is required for SLO-1 function in both neurons and muscle cells. DYB-1 colocalized with SLO-1 at presynaptic sites in neurons and dense body regions in muscle cells, and dyb-1(lf) caused SLO-1 mislocalization in both types of cells without altering SLO-1 protein level. The neuronal phenotypes of dyb-1(lf) were partially rescued by mouse α-dystrobrevin-1 (αDB1). These observations revealed novel functions of the BK channel in regulating muscle Ca2+ transients, and of dystrobrevin in controlling neurotransmitter release and muscle Ca2+ transients by localizing the BK channel. PMID:22131396

  8. Biomarkers in IgA nephropathy: relationship to pathogenetic hits

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Margaret Colleen; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Berthoux, Francois; Julian, Bruce A; Sanders, John T; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan; Wyatt, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction IgA nephropathy, the most prevalent glomerular disease in the world, requires a renal biopsy for diagnosis. Reliable biomarkers are needed for the non-invasive diagnosis of this disease and to more fully delineate its natural history and risk for progression. Areas covered In this review, the authors examine serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) and glycan-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies that are integral to pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. They also explore biomarkers related to alternative and lectin pathways of complement activation and serum and urinary peptide biomarkers detected by mass spectrometric methods. The literature search included review of all publications having IgA nephropathy in the title that were cited in PubMed and Scopus over the past 10 years and a non-systematic review of abstracts published for the annual meetings of the American Society of Nephrology and the International Symposia on IgA Nephropathy. Expert opinion Serum Gd-IgA1 level and glycan-specific autoantibody levels are prime candidates to become diagnostic biomarkers for IgA nephropathy because of their central role in the earliest stages of disease pathogenesis. Assays for serum levels of complement proteins C3 and factor H are readily available in clinical practice and deserve continued study, either alone or in tandem with total serum IgA or serum Gd-IgA1 levels, as prognostic biomarkers for patients with IgA nephropathy. Urinary peptidomic data are also reviewed because this approach can successfully differentiate patients with IgA nephropathy from healthy controls and from patients with other forms of renal disease. PMID:24175678

  9. Mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy--old buddies and newcomers part 1.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, P P; Isermann, B

    2010-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of terminal kidney failure in industrialized countries. In addition, the manifestation of diabetic nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis for affected patients. Current therapies are based on established pathophysiological models. However, despite reflecting significant progress in our understanding of diabetic nephropathy, the translational efforts fell short their expectations. The current review summarizes recent studies which provided new insights into established mechanisms (part 1) and studies identifying new candidate mechanisms (part 2) underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  10. ERG-28 controls BK channel trafficking in the ER to regulate synaptic function and alcohol response in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kelly H; Haney, James J; Wang, Xiaohong; Chuang, Chiou-Fen; Richmond, Janet E; Kim, Hongkyun

    2017-01-01

    Voltage- and calcium-dependent BK channels regulate calcium-dependent cellular events such as neurotransmitter release by limiting calcium influx. Their plasma membrane abundance is an important factor in determining BK current and thus regulation of calcium-dependent events. In C. elegans, we show that ERG-28, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, promotes the trafficking of SLO-1 BK channels from the ER to the plasma membrane by shielding them from premature degradation. In the absence of ERG-28, SLO-1 channels undergo aspartic protease DDI-1-dependent degradation, resulting in markedly reduced expression at presynaptic terminals. Loss of erg-28 suppressed phenotypic defects of slo-1 gain-of-function mutants in locomotion, neurotransmitter release, and calcium-mediated asymmetric differentiation of the AWC olfactory neuron pair, and conferred significant ethanol-resistant locomotory behavior, resembling slo-1 loss-of-function mutants, albeit to a lesser extent. Our study thus indicates that the control of BK channel trafficking is a critical regulatory mechanism for synaptic transmission and neural function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24733.001 PMID:28168949

  11. The total neutron cross sections of /sup 249/Bk and /sup 249/Cf below 100 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.W.; Carlton, R.F.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Pandey, M.S.

    1983-11-01

    The neutron total cross sections of /sup 249/Bk and /sup 249/Cf have been measured from 0.03 to 100 eV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator as a source of pulsed neutrons. The 1.6-mm-diam cylindrical transmission samples initially contained up to 5.3 mg of 98% /sup 249/Bk and 2% /sup 249/Cf; 4.5 yr later, when the final measurements were made, the composition of the samples had become 2.5% /sup 249/Bk, 96.9% /sup 249/Cf, and 0.6% /sup 245/Cm. Samples were cooled with liquid nitrogen to reduce Doppler broadening. Thirty-nine resonances were identified in /sup 249/Bk and analyzed using a single-level Breit-Wigner formalism. Fifty-five resonances were identified in /sup 249/Cf and analyzed using an R-matrix multilevel formalism. The resonance parameters obtained have been used to determine the average level spacings and the s-wave neutron and fission strength functions. Where possible, bound-level parameters were derived to fit the thermal neutron total cross-section data.

  12. Intensity of 253 keV {gamma}-rays ({sup 245}Am) from {alpha}-decay of {sup 249}Bk

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Yu.S.; Srurov, D.Kh.; Baranov, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    The intensity of 253 keV {gamma}-rays ({sup 245}Am) from {alpha}-decay of {sup 249}Bk is 3.09(9)% at the P = 0.95 confidence level. Precision semi-conducting {gamma}-spectrometry and coulometry are used.

  13. [Enhanced BK(Ca) single-channel activities in cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells of simulated microgravity rats.].

    PubMed

    Xie, Man-Jiang; Zhang, Li-Fan; Ma, Jin; Cheng, Hong-Wei

    2005-08-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes in single-channel currents of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca) channels) in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of rats after 1-week simulated microgravity. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to tail-suspension (SUS) to simulate cardiovascular deconditioning due to microgravity. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) was examined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy with calcium-sensitive-dye Fluo-3/AM as fluorescent probe. Single-channel currents of BK(Ca) channels were measured with cell-attached membrane patches bathed in symmetrical high potassium solution. The [Ca(2+)](i)i level was significantly higher in cerebrovascular myocytes of SUS than that of control (CON) rats. The probability of open (Po) and the mean open time (To) of BK(Ca) channels in cerebral VSMCs significantly increased in SUS as compared with CON. However, there were no significant differences in the unitary conductance and mean close time (Tc) between the two groups. The results obtained suggest that both the elevated [Ca(2+)](i) and enhanced single-channel activities of BK(Ca) channels in cerebral VSMCs might be among the electrophysiological mechanisms that mediate the increased vasoreactivity and hypertrophic change in cerebral arteries during adaptation to simulated microgravity in rats.

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of BK channel splice variant stability by miR-9 underlies neuroadaptation to alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzykowski, Andrzej Z.; Friesen, Ryan M.; Martin, Gilles E.; Puig, Sylvie I.; Nowak, Cheryl L.; Wynne, Patricia M.; Siegelmann, Hava T.; Treistman, Steven N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Tolerance represents a critical component of addiction. The large conductance calcium-and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK) is a well-established alcohol target, and an important element in behavioral and molecular alcohol tolerance. We tested whether microRNA, a newly-discovered class of gene expression regulators, plays a role in the development of tolerance. We show that in adult mammalian brain alcohol upregulates microRNA (miR-9) and mediates post-transcriptional reorganization in BK mRNA splice variants by miR-9-dependent destabilization of BK mRNAs containing 3’UTRs with a miR-9 Recognition Element (MRE). Different splice variants encode BK isoforms with different alcohol sensitivities. Computational modeling indicates that this miR-9 dependent mechanism contributes to alcohol tolerance. Moreover, this mechanism can be extended to regulation of additional miR-9 targets relevant to alcohol abuse. Our results describe a novel mechanism of multiplex regulation of stability of alternatively spliced mRNA by miRNA in drug adaptation and neuronal plasticity. PMID:18667155

  15. Membranous nephropathy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fareha A; Larsen, Christopher P; Troxell, Megan L

    2013-11-01

    Membranous nephropathy presents clinically as nephrotic syndrome, with subepithelial immune complex deposits seen on biopsy. Historically, in about three-quarters of membranous cases, no obvious etiologic agent or condition can be identified. More recently, serum antibodies to the phospholipase A2 receptor have been discovered in many patients with primary/idiopathic membranous nephropathy. About one-quarter of patients have membranous nephropathy as a manifestation of another systemic disorder, such as autoimmune conditions, infection, malignancy, toxin exposure, or drugs (classically gold or penicillamine). In this report, we present a case of recurrent nephrotic syndrome with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy closely associated with use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen and piroxicam. Characterization of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass profile of the deposits showed abundant IgG1, weak IgG4, and positive staining for phospholipase A2 receptor. This case serves to highlight membranous nephropathy as an under-recognized renal complication of NSAID use. Other kidney effects of NSAIDs, such as hemodynamic compromise, interstitial nephritis, and minimal change disease, are more broadly recognized.

  16. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kume, Shinji; Koya, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Network-centric Analysis of Genetic Predisposition in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ntemka, A; Iliadis, F; Papanikolaou, NA; Grekas, D

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious, long-term complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease throughout the world. Although this disease is progressively imposing a heavier burden on the health care system, in many aspects it remains poorly understood. In addition to environmental influences, there is abundant evidence in support of genetic susceptibility to microvascular complications of nephropathy in diabetic patients. Familial clustering of phenotypes such as end-stage renal disease, albuminuria and kidney disease have been reported in large scale population studies throughout the world demonstrating strong contribution of inherited factors. Recent genome-wide linkage scans identified several chromosomal regions that are likely to contain diabetic nephropathy susceptibility genes, and association analyses have evaluated positional candidate genes under linkage peaks. In this review we have extracted from the literature the most promising candidate genes thought to confer susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy and mapped them to affected pathways by using network-centric analysis. Several of the top susceptibility genes have been identified as network hubs and bottlenecks suggesting that they might be important agents in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22435020

  18. Renal involvement in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)-APS nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tektonidou, Maria G

    2009-06-01

    Although the kidney represents a major target organ in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), renal involvement in APS was poorly recognized until recently. The most well-recognized renal manifestations of APS are the renal artery thrombosis/stenosis, renal infarction, hypertension, renal vein thrombosis, end-stage renal disease, increased allograft vascular thrombosis, some types of glomerular disease, and a small-vessel vaso-occlusive nephropathy, recently defined as APS nephropathy. APS nephropathy was first described in primary APS patients, characterized by acute thrombotic lesions in glomeruli and/or arterioles (thrombotic microangiopathy) and chronic vascular lesions such as fibrous intimal hyperplasia of arterioles and interlobular arteries, organized thrombi with or without recanalization, and fibrous arterial and arteriolar occlusions or focal cortical atrophy. APS nephropathy was also detected in further studies including patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related APS and SLE/non-APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies, independently of lupus nephritis. The same histologic lesions, especially thrombotic mictroangiopathy, were also observed in patients with catastrophic APS. The most frequent clinical and laboratory characteristics of APS nephropathy in all the above groups of patients are hypertension (often severe), proteinuria (ranging from mild to nephrotic range), hematuria, and acute or chronic renal insufficiency.

  19. Treatment of acute kidney injury with cast nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Walther, Carl; Podoll, Amber S; Finkel, Kevin W

    2014-07-01

    Nearly 50% of patients with multiple myeloma develop renal disease; acute kidney injury (AKI) from cast nephropathy, or "myeloma kidney" is the most common type. Development of AKI is associated with worse 1-year survival and reduces the therapeutic options available to patients. Therefore, there is a great need to develop more effective therapies. Cast nephropathy is due to the interaction and aggregation of filtered free light chains (FLCs) and Tamm- Horsfall protein (THP) causing intratubular obstruction and damage. The key to treating cast nephropathy is rapid lowering of FLCs as this correlates with renal recovery. Newer chemotherapy agents lower FLCs and have been referred to as "renoprotective". However there remains great interest in using various extracorporeal therapies to remove serum FLCs. Initially, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was thought to improve renal outcomes in cast nephropathy based on small trials. The largest randomized trial of TPE, however, failed to show any benefit. A newer technique is extended high cut-off hemodialysis (HCO-HD). This modality uses a high molecular weight cut-off filter to remove FLCs. To date, trials with HCO-HD in patients with cast nephropathy have been encouraging. However, there are no randomized trials demonstrating the benefit of HCOHD when used in addition to newer chemotherapeutic regimens. Until these studies are available, HCO-HD cannot be recommended as standard of care.

  20. The role of sulodexide in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Niecestro, Robert; Raz, Itamar

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis and natural history of diabetic nephropathy, characterised by a progressive decline in glomerular function, were initially described in patients with type 1 diabetes. Reports that describe the glomerulopathy and progression of renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes suggest that the disease process is similar to that observed in patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy. An emerging body of evidence supports the notion that glomerular capillary wall and mesangial alterations in diabetic nephropathy involve pathobiochemical alterations of glycoproteins in these structures. Evidence in experimental animals rendered diabetic, reveal that the administration of heparin and other anionic glycoproteins can effectively prevent the biochemical alterations that promote albuminuria. Clinical reports of the use of sulodexide, a preparation of low molecular weight glycosaminoglycan polysaccharides, have shown that proteinuria is significantly diminished in patients with diabetic nephropathy, even when these patients are receiving either an ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor antagonist.

  1. Phosphorylation of BK channels modulates the sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide (H2S)

    PubMed Central

    Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Fuchs, Roman; Kainz, Verena; Weiger, Thomas M.; Hermann, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gases, such as nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), termed gasotransmitters, play an increasingly important role in understanding of how electrical signaling of cells is modulated. H2S is well-known to act on various ion channels and receptors. In a previous study we reported that H2S increased calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel activity. Aims: The goal of the present study is to investigate the modulatory effect of BK channel phosphorylation on the action of H2S on the channel as well as to recalculate and determine the H2S concentrations in aqueous sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS) solutions. Methods: Single channel recordings of GH3, GH4, and GH4 STREX cells were used to analyze channel open probability, amplitude, and open dwell times. H2S was measured with an anion selective electrode. Results: The concentration of H2S produced from NaHS was recalculated taking pH, temperature salinity of the perfusate, and evaporation of H2S into account. The results indicate that from a concentration of 300 μM NaHS, only 11–13%, i.e., 34–41 μM is effective as H2S in solution. GH3, GH4, and GH4 STREX cells respond differently to phosphorylation. BK channel open probability (Po) of all cells lines used was increased by H2S in ATP-containing solutions. PKA prevented the action of H2S on channel Po in GH4 and GH4 STREX, but not in GH3 cells. H2S, high significantly increased Po of all PKG pretreated cells. In the presence of PKC, which lowers channel activity, H2S increased channel Po of GH4 and GH4 STREX, but not those of GH3 cells. H2S increased open dwell times of GH3 cells in the absence of ATP significantly. A significant increase of dwell times with H2S was also observed in the presence of okadaic acid. Conclusions: Our results suggest that phosphorylation by PKG primes the channels for H2S activation and indicate that channel phosphorylation plays an important role in the response to H2S. PMID:25429270

  2. A new precise mass for the progenitor of the Type IIP SN 2008bk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maund, Justyn R.; Mattila, Seppo; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Eldridge, John J.

    2014-02-01

    The progenitor of the Type IIP supernova (SN) 2008bk was discovered in pre-explosion g'r'i'IYJHKs images, acquired with European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph, High Acuity Wide field K-band Imager and Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera instruments and the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph-South instrument. The wealth of pre-explosion observations makes the progenitor of this SN one of the best studied, since the detection of the progenitor of SN 1987A. Previous analyses of the properties of the progenitor were hampered by the limited quality of the photometric calibration of the pre-explosion images and the crowded nature of the field containing the SN. We present new late-time observations of the site of SN 2008bk acquired with identical instrument and filter configurations as the pre-explosion observations, and confirm that the previously identified red supergiant (RSG) star was the progenitor of this SN and has now disappeared. Image subtraction techniques were used to conduct precise photometry of the now missing progenitor, independently of blending from any nearby stars. The nature of the surrounding stellar population and their contribution to the flux attributed to the progenitor in the pre-explosion images are probed using Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Ultraviolet-Visible/Infrared observations. In comparison with MARCS synthetic spectra, we find the progenitor was a highly reddened RSG with luminosity log (L/{L}_{{⊙}})=4.84^{+0.10}_{-0.12}, corresponding to an initial mass of M_init=12.9^{+1.6}_{-1.8} M_{{⊙}}. The temperature of the progenitor was hotter than previously expected for RSGs (T ˜ 4330 K), but consistent with new temperatures derived for RSGs using spectral energy distribution fitting techniques. We show that there is evidence for significant extinction of the progenitor, possibly arising in the circumstellar medium, but that this dust yields a similar reddening law

  3. Modulation of BK channels contributes to activity-dependent increase of excitability through MTORC1 activity in CA1 pyramidal cells of mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Steven J.; Burkett, Brian J.; Schrader, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory acquisition and synaptic plasticity are accompanied by changes in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These activity-dependent changes in excitability are mediated by modulation of intrinsic currents which alters the responsiveness of the cell to synaptic inputs. The afterhyperpolarization (AHP), a major contributor to the regulation of neuronal excitability, is reduced in animals that have acquired several types of hippocampus-dependent memory tasks and also following synaptic potentiation by high frequency stimulation. BK channels underlie the fast AHP and contribute to spike repolarization, and this AHP is reduced in animals that successfully acquired trace-eyeblink conditioning. This suggests that BK channel function is activity-dependent, but the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we found that blockade of BK channels with paxilline (10 μM) decreased IAHP amplitude and increased spike half-width and instantaneous frequency in response to a +100 pA depolarization. In addition, induction of long term potentiation (LTP) by theta burst stimulation (TBS) in CA1 pyramidal neurons reduced BK channel’s contribution to IAHP, spike repolarization, and instantaneous frequency. This result indicates that BK channel activity is decreased following synaptic potentiation. Interestingly, blockade of mammalian target of rapamycin (MTORC1) with rapamycin (400 nM) following synaptic potentiation restored BK channel function, suggesting a role for protein translation in signaling events which decreased postsynaptic BK channel activity following synaptic potentiation. PMID:25628536

  4. Relation between BK-α/β4-mediated potassium secretion and ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Wen, Donghai; Cornelius, Ryan J; Rivero-Hernandez, Dianelys; Yuan, Yang; Li, Huaqing; Weinstein, Alan M; Sansom, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    The large-conductance, calcium-activated BK-α/β4 potassium channel, localized to the intercalated cells of the distal nephron, mediates potassium secretion during high-potassium, alkaline diets. Here we determine whether BK-α/β4-mediated potassium transport is dependent on epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption. We maximized sodium-potassium exchange in the distal nephron by feeding mice a low-sodium, high-potassium diet. Wild-type and BK-β4 knockout mice were maintained on a low-sodium, high-potassium, alkaline diet or a low-sodium, high-potassium, acidic diet for 7-10 days. Wild-type mice maintained potassium homeostasis on the alkaline, but not acid, diet. BK-β4 knockout mice could not maintain potassium homeostasis on either diet. During the last 12 h of diet, wild-type mice on either a regular, alkaline, or an acid diet, or knockout mice on an alkaline diet, were administered amiloride (an ENaC inhibitor). Amiloride enhanced sodium excretion in all wild-type and knockout groups to similar values; however, amiloride diminished potassium excretion by 59% in wild-type but only by 33% in knockout mice on an alkaline diet. Similarly, amiloride decreased the trans-tubular potassium gradient by 68% in wild-type but only by 42% in knockout mice on an alkaline diet. Amiloride treatment equally enhanced sodium excretion and diminished potassium secretion in knockout mice on an alkaline diet and wild-type mice on an acid diet. Thus, the enhanced effect of amiloride on potassium secretion in wild-type compared to knockout mice on the alkaline diet clarify a BK- α/β4-mediated potassium secretory pathway in intercalated cells driven by ENaC-mediated sodium reabsorption linked to bicarbonate secretion.

  5. Standardization of Nucleic Acid Tests for Clinical Measurements of Bacteria and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pavšič, Jernej; Parkes, Helen; Schimmel, Heinz; Foy, Carole A.; Karczmarczyk, Maria; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Honeyborne, Isobella; Huggett, Jim F.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Milavec, Mojca; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Žel, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based tests for infectious diseases currently used in the clinical laboratory and in point-of-care devices are diverse. Measurement challenges associated with standardization of quantitative viral load testing are discussed in relation to human cytomegalovirus, BK virus, and Epstein-Barr virus, while the importance of defining the performance of qualitative methods is illustrated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and influenza virus. The development of certified reference materials whose values are traceable to higher-order standards and reference measurement procedures, using, for instance, digital PCR, will further contribute to the understanding of analytical performance characteristics and promote clinical data comparability. PMID:25392365

  6. Standardization of Nucleic Acid Tests for Clinical Measurements of Bacteria and Viruses.

    PubMed

    Pavšič, Jernej; Devonshire, Alison S; Parkes, Helen; Schimmel, Heinz; Foy, Carole A; Karczmarczyk, Maria; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Honeyborne, Isobella; Huggett, Jim F; McHugh, Timothy D; Milavec, Mojca; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Žel, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Nucleic acid-based tests for infectious diseases currently used in the clinical laboratory and in point-of-care devices are diverse. Measurement challenges associated with standardization of quantitative viral load testing are discussed in relation to human cytomegalovirus, BK virus, and Epstein-Barr virus, while the importance of defining the performance of qualitative methods is illustrated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and influenza virus. The development of certified reference materials whose values are traceable to higher-order standards and reference measurement procedures, using, for instance, digital PCR, will further contribute to the understanding of analytical performance characteristics and promote clinical data comparability.

  7. [IgA nephropathy in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Marinaki, M; Benini, D; Fasoli, E; Fanos, V

    2003-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a primitive cronic idiopatic glomerulonephritis, characterized by diffuse depositis of IgA in the glomeruler mesangium. Familial cases are also descripted. IgA nephropaty is more frequent in males and in white rase. In Italy it's the most frequently recognized glomerulonephritis in renal biopsia (20%), especially in patients with dismorfic micro or macroematuria and nephrotic proteinuria. Clinical presentation is often in association with respiratory tract or gastrointestinal disorders. The most relevant pathogenetic hypothesis suggest an IgA abnormal glycosilation, with mesangial IgA aggregation, increased mesangial reactivity and release of inflammatory mediators and fibrotic agents. Treatment is considered in rapidly progressing forms. At the present, there is no treatment of proven value in all patients, althoug interesting results have been published with prednison, ACE-inhibitors or fish-oil in decresing renal deterioration rate. Natural history varies in different series. Renal survival at 10 years is 85% in Italy, 94% in France, 97% in the USA. Poor prognostic factor are heavy proteinuria and hypertension. However a wide inter-individual variability is observed.

  8. Resveratrol Attenuates Diabetic Nephropathy via Modulating Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Liying; Chen, Jing; Gu, Yong; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of resveratrol, a polyphenol with antiangiogenic activity in DN. In a type 1 diabetic rat model, resveratrol treatment blunted the increases of urine albumin excretion, kidney weight and creatinine clearance rate. The increases of glomerular diameter, mesangium accumulation, glomerular basement membrane thickness and renal fibrosis in diabetic rats were also reduced by resveratrol treatment. In the diabetic kidney, increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flk-1 and angiopoietin 2, and reduced expression of Tie-2 were observed. These changes in angiogenic hormones and associated receptors were attenuated by resveratrol treatment. No changes in angiopoietin 1 expression were detected among each group of rats. Resveratrol also significantly downregulated high glucose-induced VEGF and Flk-1 expressions in cultured mouse glomerular podocytes and endothelial cells, respectively. These effects were attenuated by knocking-down silent information regulator 1 (Sirt1) expression. In contrast, upregulation of Sirt1 in cultured endothelial cells reduced Flk-1 expression. Increased permeability and cellular junction disruption of cultured endothelial cells caused by VEGF were also inhibited by resveratrol pretreatment. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that resveratrol may attenuate DN via modulating angiogenesis. PMID:24312656

  9. Oxidative stress in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Coppo, R; Camilla, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L

    2010-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial deposits of IgA1, likely due to accumulation of IgA immune complexes. The activation of intracellular signaling mostly results in oxidative stress, as detected in mesangial cells cultured with aberrantly glycosylated IgA or IgA aggregates and in renal biopsies of patients with IgAN. Signs of altered oxidation/antioxidation balance have been detected in sera and/or in erythrocytes of patients with IgAN, including increased levels of lipoperoxide or malondialdehyde and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Moreover, increased levels of a marker of oxidative stress, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), have been reported to be significantly associated with proteinuria and disease progression in patients with IgAN. AOPPs are often carried by albumin and can in turn enhance the oxidative stress in the circulation. Recent research suggests that the nephrotoxicity of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN is enhanced in the presence of systemic signs of oxidative stress, and it is tempting to hypothesize that the level of the oxidative milieu conditions the different expression and progression of IgAN.

  10. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  11. New therapeutic agents in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaeni; Park, Cheol Whee

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating diabetic nephropathy (DN) have mostly focused on interpreting the pathologic molecular mechanisms of DN, which may provide valuable tools for early diagnosis and prevention of disease onset and progression. Currently, there are few therapeutic drugs for DN, which mainly consist of antihypertensive and antiproteinuric measures that arise from strict renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inactivation. However, these traditional therapies are suboptimal and there is a clear, unmet need for treatments that offer effective schemes beyond glucose control. The complexity and heterogeneity of the DN entity, along with ambiguous renal endpoints that may deter accurate appraisal of new drug potency, contribute to a worsening of the situation. To address these issues, current research into original therapies to treat DN is focusing on the intrinsic renal pathways that intervene with intracellular signaling of anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and metabolic pathways. Mounting evidence in support of the favorable metabolic effects of these novel agents with respect to the renal aspects of DN supports the likelihood of systemic beneficial effects as well. Thus, when translated into clinical use, these novel agents would also address the comorbid factors associated with diabetes, such as obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review will provide a discussion of the promising and effective therapeutic agents for the management of DN. PMID:28049280

  12. The Death Ligand TRAIL in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lorz, Corina; Benito-Martín, Alberto; Boucherot, Anissa; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Henger, Anna; Armelloni, Silvia; Santamaría, Beatriz; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death contributes to diabetic nephropathy (DN), but its role is not well understood. The tubulointerstitium from DN biopsy specimens was microdissected, and expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis were analyzed. A total of 112 (25%) of 455 cell death–related genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated. Among those that showed the greatest changes in regulation were two death receptors, OPG (the gene encoding osteoprotegerin) and Fas, and the death ligand TRAIL. Glomerular and proximal tubular TRAIL expression, assessed by immunohistochemistry, was higher in DN kidneys than controls and was associated with clinical and histologic severity of disease. In vitro, proinflammatory cytokines but not glucose alone regulated TRAIL expression in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2. TRAIL induced tubular cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependant manner, an effect that was more marked in the presence of high levels of glucose and proinflammatory cytokines. TRAIL also activated NF-κB, and inhibition of NF-κB sensitized cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. It is proposed that TRAIL-induced cell death could play an important role in the progression of human DN. PMID:18287563

  13. [Case of MMF monotherapy for membranous nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mioko; Kojima, Chiari; Sugiura, Hidekazu; Aoki, Asuka; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Tsukada, Misao; Takei, Takashi; Uchida, Keiko; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old male patient who visited our hospital for the management of edema and proteinuria. He was diagnosed as having nephrotic syndrome, with serum total protein and albumin levels of 4.6 g/dL and 2.1 g/dL, respectively, and a urinary protein excretion level of 6.0 g/day. A percutaneous renal biopsy showed features of membranous glomerulonephritis, with capillary-wall granular deposits of IgG and C3 on immunofluorescence and subepithelial immune complex deposits on electron microscopy. No other secondary cause of membranous glomerulopathy was found even after extensive investigations. The patient was started on mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) monotherapy (1,500 mg/day), and 18 months after the start of this therapy, the proteinuria decreased to 0.5 g/day, with return to a normal serum albumin level. No digestive symptoms, kidney function worsening or increase in blood pressure were noted during treatment. These findings suggest that MMF monotherapy is effective and safe for the treatment of membranous nephropathy.

  14. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guang-dong; Cui, Wen-peng; Guo, Qiao-yan; Miao, Li-ning

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN. PMID:25215303

  15. BK and Kv3.1 potassium channels control different aspects of deep cerebellar nuclear neurons action potentials and spiking activity.

    PubMed

    Pedroarena, Christine M

    2011-12-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclear neurons (DCNs) display characteristic electrical properties, including spontaneous spiking and the ability to discharge narrow spikes at high frequency. These properties are thought to be relevant to processing inhibitory Purkinje cell input and transferring well-timed signals to cerebellar targets. Yet, the underlying ionic mechanisms are not completely understood. BK and Kv3.1 potassium channels subserve similar functions in spike repolarization and fast firing in many neurons and are both highly expressed in DCNs. Here, their role in the abovementioned spiking characteristics was addressed using whole-cell recordings of large and small putative-glutamatergic DCNs. Selective BK channel block depolarized DCNs of both groups and increased spontaneous firing rate but scarcely affected evoked activity. After adjusting the membrane potential to control levels, the spike waveforms under BK channel block were indistinguishable from control ones, indicating no significant BK channel involvement in spike repolarization. The increased firing rate suggests that lack of DCN-BK channels may have contributed to the ataxic phenotype previously found in BK channel-deficient mice. On the other hand, block of Kv3.1 channels with low doses of 4-aminopyridine (20 μM) hindered spike repolarization and severely depressed evoked fast firing. Therefore, I propose that despite similar characteristics of BK and Kv3.1 channels, they play different roles in DCNs: BK channels control almost exclusively spontaneous firing rate, whereas DCN-Kv3.1 channels dominate the spike repolarization and enable fast firing. Interestingly, after Kv3.1 channel block, BK channels gained a role in spike repolarization, demonstrating how the different function of each of the two channels is determined in part by their co-expression and interplay.

  16. Herbs and hazards: risk of aristolochic acid nephropathy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Khodaie, Laleh; Nasri, Hamid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Herbs are usually considered as inherently harmless products. Nonetheless, various renal injuries have been reported in association with several herbs. The best-known herb-induced chronic kidney disease is aristolochic acid nephropathy. Aristolochic acid is found in Chinese slim herbs. Balkan endemic nephropathy is nowadays considered as an aristolochic acid nephropathy. Plants of Aristolochiaceae (also known as birthwort, dutchman's pipe, and somersworth) is named zaravand or chopoghak in Persian and it grows in different mountainous and rural areas of Iran. The fruit and the steam of the Aristolochiacae are named zaravand gerd (nokhod alvand) and zaravand dearaz, respectively, and have different usage in Iranian teadirional such as treatment of headache, back pain, and anxiety. Some patients with end-stage renal disease and bilateral small kidneys have a history of exposure to some herbal remedies. We need to consider the possibility of environmental toxins and even Aristolochia nephrotoxicity as a potential danger in Iran.

  17. Membranous nephropathy with acquired factor V inhibitor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membranous nephropathy is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome in adults. In contrast, acquired factor V inhibitor is a rare bleeding disorder. Case presentation A 62-year-old Asian man with a history of cerebral hemorrhage, purpura, eosinophilia and hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome developed proteinuria. The bleeding disorder was diagnosed with acquired factor V inhibitors. A renal biopsy revealed that he suffered from membranous nephropathy with glomerular endothelial damage which is reported to be involved in another factor disorder. After the steroid administration, the coagulation test and proteinuria were improved. Conclusions The presence of factor V inhibitors may have been involved in the development of membranous nephropathy. PMID:24360027

  18. Treatment and impact of dyslipidemia in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Tadashi; Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Recent epidemiological research revealed that dyslipidemia is a risk factor for development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Results from interventional studies revealed the possibility that anti-hyperlipidemic agents have a better effect on diabetic nephropathy through improvement of albuminuria and loss of renal function. In addition, dyslipidemia may be a consequence of albuminuria and renal dysfunction, thereby perpetuating kidney damage. Today, the proportion of diabetic patients receiving statins is increasing due to their beneficial effect on cardiovascular mortality. However, treatment for patients should be determined based on consideration of the risk and benefit of the treatment. More insight into the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and the effects of life-style changes is required.

  19. Mathematical modeling of surface roughness in magnetic abrasive finishing of BK7 optical glass.

    PubMed

    Pashmforoush, Farzad; Rahimi, Abdolreza; Kazemi, Mehdi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic abrasive finishing (MAF) is one of the advanced machining processes efficiently used to finish hard-to-machine materials. Simulation and modeling of the process is of particular importance to understand the mechanics of material removal and consequently achieve a high-quality surface with a minimum of surface defects. Hence, in this paper, we performed a numerical-experimental study to mathematically model the surface roughness during the MAF of BK7 optical glass. For this purpose, the initial roughness profile was estimated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a Gaussian filter. We obtained the final surface profile based on the material removal mechanisms and the corresponding chipping depth values evaluated by finite element analysis. We then validated experimentally the simulation results in terms of the arithmetic average surface roughness (R(a ). The comparison between the obtained results demonstrates that the theoretical and experimental findings are in good agreement when predicting the parameters' effect on surface roughness behavior.

  20. Resummation of double collinear logs in BK evolution versus HERA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a global fit to HERA data on the reduced cross section measured in electron-proton collisions in the region of small Bjorken-x: x ≤x0 =10-2 and moderate to high values of the virtuality Q2 BK equations for the description of the small-x evolution of the dipole scattering amplitude [1,2]. These two new equations provide an all-order resummation of double collinear logarithms that arise beyond leading logarithmic accuracy. We show that a very good description of data is possible in both cases, provided the parent dipole or smallest dipole prescriptions are employed for the running of the coupling.

  1. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the BK channel in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, A G

    1997-01-01

    The activity of the BK channel of bovine chromaffin cells was studied at high hydrostatic pressure, using inside-out patches in symmetrical KCl solution, Ca2+-free and at V(H) = -60 to -40 mV. Pressure increased the probability of channels being open (900 atm increasing the probability 30-fold), and it increased the minimum number of channels apparent in the patches. The pressure activation of the channel was reversed on decompression. Channel conductance was unaffected. It was shown that pressure did not act by raising the temperature, or by affecting [Ca] or pH, or the order of the membrane bilayer, and it was concluded that pressure most likely acted directly on the channel proteins and/or their modulating reactions. PMID:9336182

  2. Study of delayed fission of the isotopes of Bk, Es, and Md

    SciTech Connect

    Gangrskii, Y.P.; Miller, M.B.; Mikhailov, L.V.; Kharisov, I.F.

    1980-02-01

    We have measured the probabilities of delayed fission in electron capture for the nuclei /sup 240,242/Bk, /sup 244,246,248/Es, and /sup 248,250/Md. The data are analyzed by means of analytical expressions obtained in the work which explicitly relate the probability of delayed fission (in electron capture or ..beta../sup -/ decay) to the parameters of a two-humped fission barrier. As a result of the analysis the fission barriers are evaluated for the corresponding daughter nuclei: the isotopes of Cm, Cf, and Fm. According to the estimates the height of the fission barrier for the group of nuclei investigated is close to the value 6 MeV and does not decrease appreciably with increase of the Z of the nucleus or with removal from the ..beta..-stability band.

  3. WNK4 inhibits Ca2+-activated big-conductance potassium channels (BK) via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Peng; Zhang, Chengbiao; Lin, Dao-Hong; Sun, Peng; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    We used the perforated whole-cell recording technique to examine the effect of With-No-Lysine Kinase 4 (WNK4) on the Ca2+ activated big-conductance K channels (BK) in HEK293T cells transfected with BK–α subunit (BK-α). Expression of WNK4 inhibited BK channels and decreased the outward K currents. Coexpression of SGK1 abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels and restored the outward K currents. Expression of WNK4S1169D//1196D, in which both SGK1-phosphorylation sites (serine 1169 and 1196) were mutated to aspartate, had no effect on BK channels. Moreover, coexpression of SGK1 had no additional effect on K currents in the cells transfected with BKα + WNK4 S1169D//1196D, suggesting that SGK1 reversed WNK4-induced inhibition of BK channels by stimulating WNK4 phosphorylation. Expression of WNK4 but not WNK4 S1169D//1196D increased the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); an effect was abolished by coexpression of SGK1. The role of ERK and p38 MAPK in mediating the effect of WNK4 on BK channels was further suggested by the finding that inhibition of ERK and P38 MAPK completely abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels. In contrast, inhibition of MAPK failed to abolish the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK channels in both HEK cells and Xenopus oocytes. Expression of dominant negative dynaminK44A (DynK44A) or treatment of the cells with dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, not only increased K currents but also largely abolished the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on BK channels. However, inhibition of MAPK still increased the outward K currents in the cells transfected with BKα+WNK4 and treated with dynasore. Similar results were obtained in experiments performed in the native tissue in which inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK increased BK channel activity in the cortical collecting duct (CCD) treated with dynasore. We concluded that WNK4 inhibited BK channels by stimulating ERK and p38 MAPK and that activation of MAPK

  4. Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial redox status in diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Putt, David A.; Zhong, Qing; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-15

    Nephropathy is a serious and common complication of diabetes. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes, nephropathy does not typically develop until 30 to 45 days post-injection, although hyperglycemia occurs within 24 h. We tested the hypothesis that chronic hyperglycemia results in a modest degree of oxidative stress that is accompanied by compensatory changes in certain antioxidants and mitochondrial redox status. We propose that as kidneys progress to a state of diabetic nephropathy, further adaptations occur in mitochondrial redox status. Basic parameters of renal function in vivo and several parameters of mitochondrial function and glutathione (GSH) and redox status in isolated renal cortical mitochondria from STZ-treated and age-matched control rats were examined at 30 days and 90 days post-injection. While there was no effect of diabetes on blood urea nitrogen, measurement of other, more sensitive parameters, such as urinary albumin and protein, and histopathology showed significant and progressive worsening in diabetic rats. Thus, renal function is compromised even prior to the onset of frank nephropathy. Changes in mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities indicated existence of a hypermetabolic state. Higher mitochondrial GSH content and rates of GSH transport into mitochondria in kidneys from diabetic rats were only partially due to changes in expression of mitochondrial GSH carriers and were mostly due to higher substrate supply. Although there are few clear indicators of oxidative stress, there are several redox changes that occur early and change further as nephropathy progresses, highlighting the complexity of the disease. Highlights: ►Adaptive changes in renal mitochondrial and redox status in diabetic rats. ►Modest renal dysfunction even prior to onset of nephropathy. ►Elevated concentrations of mitochondrial GSH in diabetic kidneys. ►Change in GSH due partly to increased protein expression of transporter.

  5. Towards microRNA-based therapeutics for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M L; DiStefano, J K

    2013-03-01

    There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy and the molecular mechanisms underlying disease aetiology remain poorly understood. While current paradigms for clinical management of diabetic nephropathy are useful in delaying disease onset and preventing its progression, they do not do so for a significant proportion of diabetic individuals, who eventually end up developing renal failure. Thus, novel therapeutic targets are needed for the treatment and prevention of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, have recently been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. It is widely recognised that dysregulation of miRNA expression or action contributes to the development of a number of different human diseases, and evidence of a role for miRNAs in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is emerging. The discovery that modulation of miRNA expression in vivo is feasible, combined with recent results from successful clinical trials using this technology, opens the way for future novel therapeutic applications. For instance, inhibition of miRNAs that are commonly upregulated in diabetic nephropathy decreases albuminuria and mesangial matrix accumulation in animal models, suggesting that a therapeutic agent against these molecules may help to prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy. Certain challenges, including the development of safe and reliable delivery systems, remain to be overcome before miRNA-based therapeutics become a reality. However, the findings accumulated to date, in conjunction with newly emerging results, are expected to yield novel insights into the complex pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, and may eventually lead to the identification of improved therapeutic targets for treatment of this disease.

  6. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy associated with Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kie, Jeong Hae; Park, Yoonseon; Chang, Tae Ik; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Seung Jun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2012-04-01

    Glomerulonephritis occurs as a rare form of renal manifestation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Herein, we report a case of falciparum malaria-associated IgA nephropathy for the first time. A 49-yr old male who had been to East Africa was diagnosed with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Microhematuria and proteinuria along with acute kidney injury developed during the course of the disease. Kidney biopsy showed mesangial proliferation and IgA deposits with tubulointerstitial inflammation. Laboratory tests after recovery from malaria showed disappearance of urinary abnormalities and normalization of kidney function. Our findings suggest that malaria infection might be associated with IgA nephropathy.

  7. Heartland Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) NCEZID Share Compartir Heartland virus On this Page What is Heartland virus? How ... Do I Need to Know? What is Heartland virus? Heartland virus belongs to a family of viruses ...

  8. Metadherin facilitates podocyte apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Ting; Peng, Fen-Fen; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Wen; Gong, Wang-Qiu; Chen, Wen-Jing; Chen, Yi-Hua; Li, Pei-Lin; Li, Shu-Ting; Xu, Zhao-Zhong; Long, Hai-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis, one of the major causes of podocyte loss, has been reported to have a vital role in diabetic nephropathy (DN) pathogenesis, and understanding the mechanisms underlying the regulation of podocyte apoptosis is crucial. Metadherin (MTDH) is an important oncogene, which is overexpressed in most cancers and responsible for apoptosis, metastasis, and poor patient survival. Here we show that the expression levels of Mtdh and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) are significantly increased, whereas those of the microRNA-30 family members (miR-30s) are considerably reduced in the glomeruli of DN rat model and in high glucose (HG)-induced conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes (MPC5). These levels are positively correlated with podocyte apoptosis rate. The inhibition of Mtdh expression, using small interfering RNA, but not Mtdh overexpression, was shown to inhibit HG-induced MPC5 apoptosis and p38 MAPK pathway, and Bax and cleaved caspase 3 expression. This was shown to be similar to the effects of p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580). Furthermore, luciferase assay results demonstrated that Mtdh represents the target of miR-30s. Transient transfection experiments, using miR-30 microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors, led to the increase in Mtdh expression and induced the apoptosis of MPC5, whereas the treatment with miR-30 miRNA mimics led to the reduction in Mtdh expression and apoptosis of HG-induced MPC5 cells in comparison with their respective controls. Our results demonstrate that Mtdh is a potent modulator of podocyte apoptosis, and that it represents the target of miR-30 miRNAs, facilitating podocyte apoptosis through the activation of HG-induced p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. PMID:27882943

  9. [Genetics of mesangial IgA nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Delbarba, Elisa; Pedroni, Bruno; Dallera, Nadia; Izzi, Claudia; Scolari, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis, with a variable prevalence depending on the geographic area of examination. Marked differences in disease prevalence has suggested that genetics could play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, indicating the existence of susceptibility genes detected with different frequencies in geographically separated populations. Moreover, familial forms of IgAN have been reported worldwide, in sibling pairs, families and extended pedigrees belonging to geographically isolated populations. In this article we describe recent discoveries in genetic studies on IgAN. If candidate-gene association studies require first survey on the pathogenesis of the disease, since the candidate loci are selected on the basis of information gathered from traditional biology, the linkage analysis consist in an alternative approach. Several susceptibility loci have been identified in pedigrees segregating for IgAN, but not the causative mutations of the disease. Further progress in the field of knowledge about the genetics of IgAN has recently been obtained by the application of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in large cohorts of cases and controls of IgAN. GWAS have identified multiple susceptibility loci coding for genes involved in critical mechanisms for the development of IgAN and, accordingly, have shed new light on the biology of the disease, revealing unknown pathogenic pathways. The close connection between IgAN and many autoimmune diseases has been demonstrated. Moreover, these studies have made the correlation of genetic risk score of developing IgAN with the geo-epidemiological aspect of the disease possible. The goal of the integrated genomic approach will be to discover new potential therapeutic targets.

  10. The Nephropathy of Experimental Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Tito; Galvanek, Eleonora G.; Ward, Peter A.; von Lichtenberg, Franz

    1974-01-01

    The glomerular lesions induced in 10 chimpanzees infected with variable numbers of Schistosoma japonicum cercariae were studied by means of light and electron microscopy and fluorescent antibody technic. Ten animals served as controls; 5 were uninfected and 5 were only lightly infected. The animals were observed for periods ranging from 3 to 17 months, and by the time of sacrifice, all had developed advanced liver fibrosis. In general, the degree of glomerular injury was related to infection intensity and degree and duration of portal liver fibrosis. Some animals had terminal BUN elevation and slight proteinuria. By light and electron microscopy, in the initial stages, only part of the glomeruli were involved and exhibited mesangial matrix expansion and mesangial cell proliferation with intracellular hyaline droplets. At later stages, a larger number of glomeruli were affected and exhibited diffuse hypercellularity, glomerular basement thickening, mesangial sclerosis and less often, focal necrosis, crescent formation, synechiae and global hyalinization. In addition, there were discrete electron-dense deposits localized in the mesangial area in some glomeruli. Immunofluorescent studies utilizing antisera to chimpanzee γ-globulin and complement (C3) and to human properdin disclosed only faint deposits of C3, apparently in mesangial areas. The association of hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and nephropathy, the possible role of schistosomal antigen and the mechanism(s) of such glomerular injuries are reviewed and compared with the disease in humans and other host species infected with Schistosoma. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Figs 5-8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:4137991

  11. Treatment with rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Marco; Tondolo, Francesco; Bruno, Francesca; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab represents a valid therapeutic option to induce remission in patients with primary glomerulonephritis. Despite several studies proving its efficacy in improving outcomes in patients with membranous nephropathy (MN), its role in therapeutic protocols is not yet defined. Methods We studied 38 patients with idiopathic MN treated with rituximab (in 13 patients as first-line therapy, in the remaining 25 after conventional immunosuppressive therapy). The patients were analyzed for a 15-month median (interquartile range 7.7–30.2) follow-up, with serial monitoring of 24-h proteinuria, renal function and circulating CD19+ B cells. Results The percentages of patients who achieved complete remission, partial remission and the composite endpoint (complete or partial remission) were 39.5% (15 patients), 36.8% (14 patients) and 76.3% (29 patients), respectively. The 24-h proteinuria was reduced significantly during the entire period of follow-up (from a baseline value of 6.1 to 0.9 g/day in the last visit; P < 0.01), while albuminemia increased constantly (from a baseline value of 2.6 to 3.5 g/dL in the last observation; P < 0.01). Renal function did not significantly change during the observation period. Circulating CD19+ B cells were reduced significantly from the baseline value to the 24-month value (P < 0.01); data about anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies were available in 14 patients, 10 of which experienced a decreasing trend after treatment. No significant adverse events were described during and after infusions. Conclusions The present study confirmed that treatment with rituximab was remarkably safe and allowed for a large percentage of complete or partial remissions in patients with MN. PMID:27994855

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Daugas, Eric; Nochy, Dominique; Huong, Du Le Thi; Duhaut, Pierre; Beaufils, Hélène; Caudwell, Valérie; Bariety, Jean; Piette, Jean-Charles; Hill, Gary

    2002-01-01

    In the course of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the existence of vaso-occlusive lesions capable of affecting numerous organs is now well established. The renal involvement attributable to primary APS, APS nephropathy (APSN), corresponds to vaso-occlusive lesions of the intrarenal vessels, associating side-by-side, acute thromboses with chronic arterial and arteriolar lesions, leading to zones of cortical ischemic atrophy. A retrospective study of 114 lupus patients undergoing renal biopsy was undertaken to determine the following: (1) if APSN can be found in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); (2) if certain clinical and biologic factors can permit the prediction of the presence of APSN; and (3) if APSN is a superadded renal morbidity factor in lupus patients. This study shows the following: (1) APSN occurs in SLE (32% of patients with renal biopsies) in addition to, and independently of, lupus nephritis; (2) APSN is statistically associated with lupus anticoagulant but not with anticardiolipin antibodies; (3) APSN is associated with extrarenal APS, mainly arterial thromboses and obstetrical fetal loss, but not with the venous thromboses of APS; (4) APSN is an independent risk factor, over and above lupus nephritis, that contributes to an elevated prevalence of hypertension, elevated serum creatinine, and increased interstitial fibrosis. Thus, it seems likely that, because of its associations with hypertension, elevated serum creatinine, and increased interstitial fibrosis, APSN may worsen the prognosis in these patients. APSN may also have therapeutic significance in that its recognition should permit a better balance between immunosuppressor and antithrombotic and/or vasoprotective therapy. Finally, this study suggests that APSN should be considered as an element to be included in the classification criteria of APS.

  13. Inflammation in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen

    2017-03-14

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is the most frequently occurring primary glomerulonephritis in Caucasian and Asian populations. Nonetheless, therapeutic recommendations are based on weak evidence, large controlled trials are scarce and, in particular, the additional value of immunosuppression beyond comprehensive supportive measures is not well-established. The use of immunosuppressants is supported by experimental insights into IgAN pathogenesis that suggest an autoimmune component in disease development. The so-called "multi-hit" theory comprises multiple steps, starting with defective glycosylation of IgA subclass IgA1 that results in overproduction of galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1), occurrence of anti-Gd-IgA1 autoantibodies, and mesangial deposition of nephritogenic immune complexes. This eventually results in an increased mesangial cell proliferation, inflammatory responses, and complement activation. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several susceptibility genes, many of which support the "multi-hit" concept. In light of these discoveries, it is astonishing that the vast majority of adult IgAN patients obviously do not need and/or benefit from immunosuppressive therapies in the first place. In fact, a number of supportive measures are highly effective in reducing the risk for disease progression in many patients. These measures need to be optimized before immunosuppression should be considered at all. In this review we focus on the underlying pathogenetic cornerstones and the central question of whether systemic inflammation in adult IgAN patients should be treated. Treatment options in children with IgAN are also discussed.

  14. Genetics and Epigenetics of Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Lee, Kyung; He, John Cijiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the USA and worldwide, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. A genetic factor for the development of DN is strongly implicated, as only one third of diabetic patients eventually develop kidney disease. Growing evidence also supports an important role of epigenetic modifications in DN. Summary Multiple studies have been performed to identify risk genes and loci associated with DN. So far, only several genes and loci have been identified, none of which showed a strong association with DN. Therefore, a better study design with a larger sample size to identify rare variants and a clinically defined patient population to identify genes and loci associated with progressive DN are still needed. In addition to genetic factors, epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs, also play a major role in the pathogenesis of DN through a second layer of gene regulation. Although a major progress has been made in this field, epigenetic studies in DN are still in the early phase and have been limited mostly due to the heterogeneity of kidney tissue samples with multiple cells. However, rapid development of high-throughput genome-wide techniques will help us to better identify genetic variants and epigenetic changes in DN. Key Message Understanding of genetic and epigenetic changes in DN is needed for the development of new biomarkers and better drug targets against DN. Summarized in this review are important recent findings on genetic and epigenetic studies in the field of DN. PMID:27536664

  15. Pyridorin in Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Tom; Spitalewiz, Samuel; Blumenthal, Samuel; Berl, Tomas; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Pohl, Marc A.; Rohde, Richard D.; Raz, Itamar; Yerushalmy, Yair; Yagil, Yoram; Herskovits, Tommy; Atkins, Robert C.; Reutens, Anne T.; Packham, David K.; Lewis, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride (Pyridorin, NephroGenex) inhibits formation of advanced glycation end products and scavenges reactive oxygen species and toxic carbonyls, but whether these actions translate into renoprotective effects is unknown. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 317 patients with proteinuric type 2 diabetic nephropathy to twice-daily placebo; Pyridorin, 150 mg twice daily; or Pyridorin, 300 mg twice daily, for 52 weeks. At baseline, the mean age ± SD was 63.9±9.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 17.6±8.5 years; the mean serum creatinine level was 2.2±0.6 mg/dl, and the mean protein-to-creatinine ratio was 2973±1932 mg/g. Regarding the primary end point, a statistically significant change in serum creatinine from baseline to 52 weeks was not evident in either Pyridorin group compared with placebo. However, analysis of covariance suggested that the magnitude of the treatment effect differed by baseline renal function. Among patients in the lowest tertile of baseline serum creatinine concentration, treatment with Pyridorin associated with a lower average change in serum creatinine concentration at 52 weeks (0.28, 0.07, and 0.14 mg/dl for placebo, Pyridorin 150 mg, and Pyridorin 300 mg, respectively; P=0.05 for either Pyridorin dose versus placebo); there was no evidence of a significant treatment effect in the middle or upper tertiles. In conclusion, this trial failed to detect an effect of Pyridorin on the progression of serum creatinine at 1 year, although it suggests that patients with less renal impairment might benefit. PMID:22034637

  16. Apelin retards the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Day, Robert T; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Feliers, Denis

    2013-03-15

    Apelin and its receptor APJ have pleiotropic effects in mice and humans and play a protective role in cardiovascular diseases at least partially by inhibiting oxidative stress. Our objective was to study the effect of apelin on the progression of kidney disease in mice with established type 1 diabetes. Ove26 mice with type 1 diabetes received daily subcutaneous injections of apelin for 2 or 14 wk. APJ localizes in the glomeruli and blood vessels of kidneys. Renal APJ expression was reduced in diabetic mice but increased after treatment with apelin. Apelin treatment did not affect glycemia, body weight, or blood pressure in diabetic mice. Whole kidney and glomerular hypertrophy, as well as renal inflammation, including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression, NF-κB activation, and monocyte infiltration, was inhibited after short and long treatment with apelin. Apelin administration significantly reduced albuminuria at 6 mo. Short treatment with apelin was sufficient to reverse the downregulation of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Expression of angiotensin II and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1) in kidneys from diabetic mice treated was not affected by apelin. These findings show for the first time that apelin exerts a protective effect on the diabetic kidney. Short administration is sufficient to reduce kidney and glomerular hypertrophy as well as renal inflammation, but prolonged treatment is required to improve albuminuria. This effect was independent of the activation of the renin angiotensin system but correlated with upregulation of the antioxidant catalase. Apelin may represent a novel tool to treat diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the voltage-dependent potassium currents underlying spike repolarization in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Studying mouse substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons both in brain slice and after acute dissociation, we found that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 channels both make major contributions to the depolarization-activated potassium current. Inhibiting Kv2 or BK channels had very different effects on spike shape and evoked firing. Inhibiting Kv2 channels increased spike width and decreased the afterhyperpolarization, as expected for loss of an action potential-activated potassium conductance. BK inhibition also increased spike width but paradoxically increased the afterhyperpolarization. Kv2 channel inhibition steeply increased the slope of the frequency–current (f–I) relationship, whereas BK channel inhibition had little effect on the f–I slope or decreased it, sometimes resulting in slowed firing. Action potential clamp experiments showed that both BK and Kv2 current flow during spike repolarization but with very different kinetics, with Kv2 current activating later and deactivating more slowly. Further experiments revealed that inhibiting either BK or Kv2 alone leads to recruitment of additional current through the other channel type during the action potential as a consequence of changes in spike shape. Enhancement of slowly deactivating Kv2 current can account for the increased afterhyperpolarization produced by BK inhibition and likely underlies the very different effects on the f–I relationship. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This work shows that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 voltage-activated potassium channels both regulate action potentials in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra

  18. Effects of the novel BK (KCa1.1) channel opener GoSlo-SR-5-130 are dependent on the presence of BKβ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Large, R J; Kshatri, A; Webb, T I; Roy, S; Akande, A; Bradley, E; Sergeant, G P; Thornbury, K D; McHale, N G; Hollywood, M A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose GoSlo-SR compounds are efficacious BK (KCa1.1) channel openers, but little is known about their mechanism of action or effect on bladder contractility. We examined the effects of two closely related compounds on BK currents and bladder contractions. Experimental Approach A combination of electrophysiology, molecular biology and synthetic chemistry was used to examine the effects of two novel channel agonists on BK channels from bladder smooth muscle cells and in HEK cells expressing BKα alone or in combination with either β1 or β4 subunits. Key Results GoSlo-SR-5-6 shifted the voltage required for half maximal activation (V1/2) of BK channels approximately −100 mV, irrespective of the presence of regulatory β subunits. The deaminated derivative, GoSlo-SR-5-130, also shifted the activation V1/2 in smooth muscle cells by approximately −100 mV; however, this was reduced by ∼80% in HEK cells expressing only BKα subunits. When β1 or β4 subunits were co-expressed with BKα, efficacy was restored. GoSlo-SR-5-130 caused a concentration-dependent reduction in spontaneous bladder contraction amplitude and this was abolished by iberiotoxin, consistent with an effect on BK channels. Conclusions and Implications GoSlo-SR-5-130 required β1 or β4 subunits to mediate its full effects, whereas GoSlo-SR-5-6 worked equally well in the absence or presence of β subunits. GoSlo-SR-5-130 inhibited spontaneous bladder contractions by activating BK channels. The novel BK channel opener, GoSlo-SR-5-130, is approximately fivefold more efficacious on BK channels with regulatory β subunits and may be a useful scaffold in the development of drugs to treat diseases such as overactive bladder. PMID:25598230

  19. The role of BK-type Ca2+-dependent K+ channels in spike broadening during repetitive firing in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Li-Rong; Halvorsrud, Ragnhild; Borg-Graham, Lyle; Storm, Johan F

    1999-01-01

    The role of large-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channels (BK-channels; also known as maxi-K- or slo-channels) in spike broadening during repetitive firing was studied in CA1 pyramidal cells, using sharp electrode intracellular recordings in rat hippocampal slices, and computer modelling. Trains of action potentials elicited by depolarizing current pulses showed a progressive, frequency-dependent spike broadening, reflecting a reduced rate of repolarization. During a 50 ms long 5 spike train, the spike duration increased by 63·6 ± 3·4% from the 1st to the 3rd spike. The amplitude of the fast after-hyperpolarization (fAHP) also rapidly declined during each train. Suppression of BK-channel activity with (a) the selective BK-channel blocker iberiotoxin (IbTX, 60 nM), (b) the non-peptidergic BK-channel blocker paxilline (2–10 μM), or (c) calcium-free medium, broadened the 1st spike to a similar degree (≈60%). BK-channel suppression also caused a similar change in spike waveform as observed during repetitive firing, and eliminated (occluded) most of the spike broadening during repetitive firing. Computer simulations using a reduced compartmental model with transient BK-channel current and 10 other active ionic currents, produced an activity-dependent spike broadening that was strongly reduced when the BK-channel inactivation mechanism was removed. These results, which are supported by recent voltage-clamp data, strongly suggest that in CA1 pyramidal cells, fast inactivation of a transient BK-channel current (ICT), substantially contributes to frequency-dependent spike broadening during repetitive firing. PMID:10562340

  20. Direct measurement of the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient gamma at 355 nm in fused silica and in BK-10 glass.

    PubMed

    Iii, W T; Smith, W L; Milam, D

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient gamma interferometrically at 355 nm in fused silica and in BK-10, a borosilicate crown glass. These measurements are the first reported direct ultraviolet measurements of the nonlinear index of refraction in any transparent glass. Our results are gamma = (2.5 +/- 1.2) x 10(-16) cm(2)/W and gamma = (1.7 +/- 0.8) x 10(-16) cm(2)/W, respectively, for fused silica and BK-10.

  1. Acute oxalate nephropathy after ingestion of star fruit.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Fang, H C; Chou, K J; Wang, J S; Chung, H M

    2001-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of star fruit (carambola) has not been reported before. We report the first two cases. These patients developed nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and backache within hours of ingesting large quantities of sour carambola juice; then acute renal failure followed. Both patients needed hemodialysis for oliguric acute renal failure, and pathologic examinations showed typical changes of acute oxalate nephropathy. The renal function recovered 4 weeks later without specific treatment. Sour carambola juice is a popular beverage in Taiwan. The popularity of star fruit juice is not compatible with the rare discovery of star fruit-associated acute oxalate nephropathy. Commercial carambola juice usually is prepared by pickling and dilution processes that reduce oxalate content markedly, whereas pure fresh juice or mild diluted postpickled juice for traditional remedies, as used in our cases, contain high quantities of oxalate. An empty stomach and dehydrated state may pose an additional risk for development of renal injury. To avoid acute oxalate nephropathy, pure sour carambola juice or mild diluted postpickled juice should not be consumed in large amounts, especially on an empty stomach or in a dehydrated state.

  2. Tacrolimus monotherapy in membranous nephropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Praga, M; Barrio, V; Juárez, G Fernández; Luño, J

    2007-05-01

    Membranous nephropathy is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Although some patients with membranous nephropathy achieve a spontaneous remission, renal function continues to deteriorate in others. We conducted a prospective randomized trial evaluating monotherapy with tacrolimus to achieve complete or partial remission in patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Twenty-five patients received tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) over 12 months with a 6-month taper, whereas 23 patients were in the control group. The probability of remission in the treatment group was 58, 82, and 94% after 6, 12, and 18 months but only 10, 24, and 35%, respectively in the control group. The decrease in proteinuria was significantly greater in the treatment group. Notably, six patients in the control group and only one in the treatment group reached the secondary end point of a 50% increase in their serum creatinine. No patient in the tacrolimus group showed a relapse during the taper period. Nephrotic syndrome reappeared in almost half of the patients who were in remission by the 18th month after tacrolimus withdrawal. We conclude that tacrolimus is a very useful therapeutic option for patients with membranous nephropathy and preserved renal function. The majority of patients experienced remission with a significant reduction in the risk for deteriorating renal function.

  3. [The role of ramipril in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Dézsi, Csaba András

    2014-02-16

    In the past two decades the number of diabetic patients has increased dramatically. According to the data of the International Diabetes Federation published in 2012, more than 371 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus, which is responsible for the death of 4.8 million people yearly. Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of terminal renal failure. The first stage of its development is microalbuminuria. Without an efficient treatment 20-40% of the patients with microalbuminuria suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus develop chronic renal failure, but only 20% of them become uremic because most of them die beforehand mainly due to cardiovascular disease. The renin-angiotensin-system, which is one of the most important elements of the regulation of blood pressure and water-salt metabolism, plays an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Drugs affecting the function of this system are of great significance in the treatment of hypertension. The author rewiews the results of several important studies and animal experiments to demonstrate the role of ramipril in the therapy of diabetic nephropathy. The author concludes that ramipril is one of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors with the highest number of evidence based beneficial results. Apart from its blood pressure decreasing effect, ramipril protects target organs and it proved to be effective in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy according to most international multicenter clinical trials. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(7), 263-269.

  4. Calorie restriction mimicking effects of roflumilast prevents diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Lodea, Saritha; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-08-08

    Little is known about role of PDE4 in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we investigated the effect of roflumilast, a selective PDE 4 inhibitor in type 1 diabetic nephropathy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats using streptozotocin (55 mg/kg). Diabetic rats showed elevated plasma glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and decrease in plasma albumin confirming signs of nephropathy. Roflumilast at 2 and 3mg/kg normalized these alterations. Roflumilast also suppressed oxidative stress and deposition of an extracellular matrix protein such as fibronectin and collagen in kidney of diabetic rats. TUNEL assay revealed apoptosis in diabetic kidney than control and that roflumilast prevents this effect. We show that kidney of diabetic rats displayed a state of p-AMPK and SIRT1 deficiency and that roflumilast, interestingly, was able to restore their levels. Further, roflumilast prevented an increase in HO-1 and loss in the FoxO1 expression in diabetes. However, it did not improve the reduced NRF2 levels in diabetes. This is the first report to show that, like resveratrol and other SIRT1 activators, roflumilast also mimics calorie restriction effects through activation of AMPK/SIRT1 and protects against diabetic nephropathy. This study unveils the unexplored potential of roflumilast which can be used in treatment of metabolic disorders.

  5. Predicting Diabetic Nephropathy Using a Multifactorial Genetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Blech, Ilana; Wainstein, Julio; Rubinstein, Ardon; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Cohen, Joseph; Pollin, Toni I.; Glaser, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Aims The tendency to develop diabetic nephropathy is, in part, genetically determined, however this genetic risk is largely undefined. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the hypothesis that combined analysis of multiple genetic variants can improve prediction. Methods Based on previous reports, we selected 27 SNPs in 15 genes from metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and genotyped them in 1274 Ashkenazi or Sephardic Jewish patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes of >10 years duration. A logistic regression model was built using a backward selection algorithm and SNPs nominally associated with nephropathy in our population. The model was validated by using random “training” (75%) and “test” (25%) subgroups of the original population and by applying the model to an independent dataset of 848 Ashkenazi patients. Results The logistic model based on 5 SNPs in 5 genes (HSPG2, NOS3, ADIPOR2, AGER, and CCL5) and 5 conventional variables (age, sex, ethnicity, diabetes type and duration), and allowing for all possible two-way interactions, predicted nephropathy in our initial population (C-statistic = 0.672) better than a model based on conventional variables only (C = 0.569). In the independent replication dataset, although the C-statistic of the genetic model decreased (0.576), it remained highly associated with diabetic nephropathy (χ2 = 17.79, p<0.0001). In the replication dataset, the model based on conventional variables only was not associated with nephropathy (χ2 = 3.2673, p = 0.07). Conclusion In this proof-of-concept study, we developed and validated a genetic model in the Ashkenazi/Sephardic population predicting nephropathy more effectively than a similarly constructed non-genetic model. Further testing is required to determine if this modeling approach, using an optimally selected panel of genetic markers, can provide clinically useful prediction and if generic models can be developed for

  6. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction.

  7. Properties of optical breakdown in BK7 glass induced by an extended-cavity femtosecond laser oscillator.

    PubMed

    Do, Binh T; Phillips, Mark C; Miller, Paul A; Kimmel, Mark W; Britsch, Justin; Cho, Seong-Ho

    2009-02-16

    Using an extended-cavity femtosecond oscillator, we investigated optical breakdown in BK7 glass caused by the accumulated action of many laser pulses. By using a pump-probe experiment and collecting the transmitted pump along with the reflected pump and the broadband light generated by the optical breakdown, we measured the build-up time to optical breakdown as a function of the pulse energy, and we also observed the instability of the plasma due to the effect of defocusing and shielding created by the electron gas. The spectrum of the broadband light emitted by the optical breakdown and the origin of the material modification in BK7 glass was studied. We developed a simple model of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma that is consistent with the observed behavior of the reflection, absorption, and transmission of the laser light.

  8. Risk prediction models for contrast induced nephropathy: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Samuel A; Shah, Prakesh M; Chertow, Glenn M; Wald, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To look at the available literature on validated prediction models for contrast induced nephropathy and describe their characteristics. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature) databases. Review methods Databases searched from inception to 2015, and the retrieved reference lists hand searched. Dual reviews were conducted to identify studies published in the English language of prediction models tested with patients that included derivation and validation cohorts. Data were extracted on baseline patient characteristics, procedural characteristics, modelling methods, metrics of model performance, risk of bias, and clinical usefulness. Eligible studies evaluated characteristics of predictive models that identified patients at risk of contrast induced nephropathy among adults undergoing a diagnostic or interventional procedure using conventional radiocontrast media (media used for computed tomography or angiography, and not gadolinium based contrast). Results 16 studies were identified, describing 12 prediction models. Substantial interstudy heterogeneity was identified, as a result of different clinical settings, cointerventions, and the timing of creatinine measurement to define contrast induced nephropathy. Ten models were validated internally and six were validated externally. Discrimination varied in studies that were validated internally (C statistic 0.61-0.95) and externally (0.57-0.86). Only one study presented reclassification indices. The majority of higher performing models included measures of pre-existing chronic kidney disease, age, diabetes, heart failure or impaired ejection fraction, and hypotension or shock. No prediction model evaluated its effect on clinical decision making or patient outcomes. Conclusions Most predictive models for contrast induced nephropathy in clinical use have modest ability, and are only relevant to patients receiving contrast for

  9. Immunoglobulin M Nephropathy in a Patient with Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Sajjad, Zoya; Haroon Khan, Asna; Mamoon, Nadira; Bilal, Muhammad; Mujtaba Quadri, Khaja Hameeduddin

    2016-12-13

    Immunoglobulin M nephropathy (IgMN) is characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulin M in a dominant distribution in the renal glomeruli. Primary immunoglobulin M nephropathy is diagnosed after consistent light microscopy (LM), immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy (EM) results, and exclusion of known systemic disorders causing immunoglobulin M deposition in the glomeruli. The secondary disease has been reported with a few conditions though it has never been reported with any primary disease of the liver. We report the case of an adolescent male patient who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and worsening anasarca. He was found to have nephrotic-range proteinuria that did not respond to conventional corticosteroid treatment. He was subjected to a renal biopsy which revealed a diagnosis of immunoglobulin M nephropathy. His liver function tests were deranged and an ultrasound scan of the abdomen revealed a coarse irregular liver. Workup revealed elevated urine copper excretion and a low ceruloplasmin level. He was diagnosed as a case of Wilson's disease and started on penicillamine and pyridoxine. He was also started on intravenous cyclophosphamide for the corticosteroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome to which he responded remarkably well. His edema settled, proteinuria resolved, and liver functions normalized. Currently, he is in remission and enjoying good health. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first known association between IgM nephropathy and Wilson's disease. It is presently not clear if causation can necessarily be established. This may be the result of defective IgM clearance by the liver or an altered metabolism of the antibody or immune complexes, as with hepatic-associated immunoglobulin M (IgM) nephropathy. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of this disease.

  10. Current concepts in the management of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Waanders, F; Visser, F W; Gans, R O B

    2013-11-01

    Although much progress has been made in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy, renal dysfunction and development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain major concerns in diabetes. In addition, diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have an increased cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, new treatment modalities or strategies are needed to prevent or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy and prevent cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this review we describe current concepts in pathophysiology, treatment goals and we discuss future developments in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Common risk factors for diabetic nephropathy and its progression are longer duration, poor glycaemic control, hypertension and the presence of albuminuria. Available treatment options, especially renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, but also better blood pressure and blood glucose control, decrease the incidence of cardiovascular disease and renal disease in diabetes. It is important that treatment goals are tailored to the individual patient with individual treatment goals of glycaemic control and blood pressure, depending on age, type of diabetes and diabetes duration. Aggressive treatment of glucose control and blood pressure might not always be best practice for every patient. Since the proportion of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy remains high, optimisation of RAAS blockade is advocated and can be achieved by adequate sodium restriction and/or diuretic treatment. Moreover, aldosterone blockade might be a valuable strategy, which has potency to slow the progression of diabetic renal disease. Other possible future interventions are under investigation, but large clinical trials have to be awaited to confirm the safety and efficacy of these drugs.

  11. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hovind, Peter; Hansen, Tine W; Rossing, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them with previous data, obtained using identical criteria at our hospital. The glomerular filtration rate, measured yearly by 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance, was a mean of 71 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline. The mean glomerular filtration rate decline was significantly reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 5-34) from previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal function has improved along with better control of modifiable risk factors.

  12. The coupling of acetylcholine-induced BK channel and calcium channel in guinea pig saccular type II vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jia; Guo, Chang-Kai; Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Song; Li, Guan-Qiao; Li, Zhi-Wang; Van Cauwenberge, Paul

    2007-01-19

    Molecular biological studies and electrophysiological data have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) is the principal cochlear and vestibular efferent neurotransmitter among mammalians. However, the functional roles of ACh in type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) among mammalians are still unclear, with the exception of the well-known alpha9-containing nicotinic ACh receptor (alpha9-containing nAChR)-activated small conductance, calcium-dependent potassium current (SK) in cochlear hair cells and frog saccular hair cells. The activation of SK current was necessary for the calcium influx through the alpha9-containing nAChR. Recently, we have demonstrated that ACh-induced big conductance, calcium-dependent potassium current (BK) was present in VHCs II of the vestibular end-organ of guinea pig. In this study, the nature of calcium influx for the activation of ACh-induced BK current in saccular VHCs II of guinea pig was investigated. Following extracellular perfusion of ACh, saccular VHCs II displayed a sustained outward current, which was sensitive to iberiotoxin (IBTX). High concentration of apamin failed to inhibit the current amplitude of ACh-induced outward current. Intracellular application of Cs(+) completely abolished the current evoked by ACh. ACh-induced current was potently inhibited by nifedipine, nimodipine, Cd(2+) and Ni(2+), respectively. The inhibition potency of these four calcium channel antagonists was nimodipine>nifedipine>cadmium>nickel. The L-type Ca(2+) channels agonist, (-)-Bay-K 8644 mimicked the effect of ACh and activated an IBTX-sensitive current. In addition, partial VHCs II displayed a biphasic waveform. In conclusion, the present data showed that in the guinea pig saccular VHCs II, ACh-induced BK channel was coupled with the calcium channel, but not the receptor. The perfusion of ACh will drive the opening of calcium channels; the influx of calcium ions will then activate the BK current.

  13. Single-channel properties of BK-type calcium-activated potassium channels at a cholinergic presynaptic nerve terminal

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Ping; Schlichter, Lyanne C; Stanley, Elis F

    1999-01-01

    A high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK KCa) was characterized at a cholinergic presynaptic nerve terminal using the calyx synapse isolated from the chick ciliary ganglion.The channel had a conductance of 210 pS in a 150 mM:150 mM K+ gradient, was highly selective for K+ over Na+, and was sensitive to block by external charybdotoxin or tetraethylammonium (TEA) and by internal Ba2+. At +60 mV it was activated by cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i with a Kd of ≈0.5 μM and a Hill coefficient of ≈2.0. At 10 μM [Ca2+]i the channel was 50 % activated (V½) at -8.0 mV with a voltage dependence (Boltzmann slope-factor) of 32.7 mV. The V½ values hyperpolarized with an increase in [Ca2+]i while the slope factors decreased. There were no overt differences in conductance or [Ca2+]i sensitivity between BK channels from the transmitter release face and the non-release face.Open and closed times were fitted by two and three exponentials, respectively. The slow time constants were strongly affected by both [Ca2+]i and membrane potential changes.In cell-attached patch recordings BK channel opening was enhanced by a prepulse permissive for calcium influx through the patch, suggesting that the channel can be activated by calcium ion influx through neighbouring calcium channels.The properties of the presynaptic BK channel are well suited for rapid activation during the presynaptic depolarization and Ca2+ influx that are associated with transmitter release. This channel may play an important role in terminating release by rapid repolarization of the action potential. PMID:10420003

  14. Treatment of experimental asthma using a single small molecule with anti-inflammatory and BK channel-activating properties

    PubMed Central

    Goldklang, Monica P.; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Trischler, Jordis; Nkyimbeng, Takwi; Zakharov, Sergey I.; Shiomi, Takayuki; Zelonina, Tina; Marks, Andrew R.; D'Armiento, Jeanine M.; Marx, Steven O.

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are highly expressed in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Utilizing the ovalbumin (OVA) and house dust mite (HDM) models of asthma in C57BL/6 mice, we demonstrate that systemic administration of the BK channel agonist rottlerin (5 μg/g) during the challenge period reduced methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) in OVA- and HDM-sensitized mice (47% decrease in peak airway resistance in OVA-asthma animals, P<0.01; 54% decrease in HDM-asthma animals, P<0.01) with a 35–40% reduction in inflammatory cells and 20–35% reduction in Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Intravenous rottlerin (5 μg/g) reduced AHR within 5 min in the OVA-asthma mice by 45% (P<0.01). With the use of an ex vivo lung slice technique, rottlerin relaxed acetylcholine-stimulated murine airway lumen area to 87 ± 4% of the precontracted area (P<0.01 vs. DMSO control). Rottlerin increased BK channel activity in human ASM cells (V50 shifted by 73.5±13.5 and 71.8±14.6 mV in control and asthmatic cells, respectively, both P<0.05 as compared with pretreatment) and reduced the frequency of acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in murine ex vivo lung slices. These findings suggest that rottlerin, with both anti-inflammatory and ASM relaxation properties, may have benefit in treating asthma.—Goldklang, M. P., Perez-Zoghbi, J. F., Trischler, J., Nkyimbeng, T., Zakharov, S. I., Shiomi, T., Zelonina, T., Marks, A. R., D'Armiento, J. M., Marx, S. O. Treatment of experimental asthma using a single small molecule with anti-inflammatory and BK channel-activating properties. PMID:23995289

  15. Mice with Deficient BK Channel Function Show Impaired Prepulse Inhibition and Spatial Learning, but Normal Working and Spatial Reference Memory

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Erin; Ruettiger, Lukas; Ruth, Peter; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels) have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection. PMID:24303038

  16. [Clinical studies on chronic diabetic nephropathy and recent data concerning prevention of risks of nephropathy and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Esnault, Vincent

    2006-05-01

    Considering the increasing incidence of diabetic nephropathy and its serious complications, the prevention of nephropathy evolution risk in diabetic patients is the subject of several recently initiated studies. In diabetic patients with advanced nephropathy, the lowering of proteinuria by renin angiotensin system blockers induces an evolution risk reduction, which can be further improved by increasing the dose of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARA II). Such a synergy can be also obtained with the association of an ARA II and an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, provided that the diuretic dose given to the patient is increased. In terms of cardiovascular risk, diabetic patients benefit from this type of treatment, as cardiovascular events increase with the level of proteinuria. In micro-albuminuria patients, sufficient doses of ARA II or ACE inhibitors are needed to avoid relapse after treatment discontinuation. In normo-albuminuria patients also, the treatment with a renin angiotensin system blocker significantly decreases the risk of development of microalbuminuria. Thus, the reduction of proteinuria or the prevention of its appearance with renin angiotensin system blockers is the main therapeutic strategy to prevent the evolution of nephropathy in diabetic patients.

  17. BK Lyncis: the oldest old nova and a Bellwether for cataclysmic variable evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Uthas, Helena; Kemp, Jonathan; de Miguel, Enrique; Krajci, Thomas; Foote, Jerry; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Campbell, Tut; Roberts, George; Cejudo, David; Dvorak, Shawn; Vanmunster, Tonny; Koff, Robert; Skillman, David; Harvey, David; Martin, Brian; Rock, John; Boyd, David; Oksanen, Arto; Morelle, Etienne; Ulowetz, Joseph; Kroes, Anthony; Sabo, Richard; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-09-01

    We summarize the results of a 20-yr campaign to study the light curves of BK Lyn, a nova-like star strangely located below the 2 to 3 h orbital-period gap in the family of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Two apparent superhumps dominate the nightly light curves, with periods 4.6 per cent longer, and 3.0 per cent shorter, than the orbital period. The first appears to be associated with the star's brighter states (V ˜ 14), while the second appears to be present throughout and becomes very dominant in the low state (V ˜ 15.7). It is plausible that these arise, respectively, from a prograde apsidal precession and a retrograde nodal precession of the star's accretion disc. Starting in the year 2005, the star's light curve became indistinguishable from that of a dwarf nova - in particular, that of the ER UMa subclass. No such clear transition has ever been observed in a CV before. Reviewing all the star's oddities, we speculate: (a) BK Lyn is the remnant of the probable nova on 101 December 30, and (b) it has been fading ever since, but it has taken ˜2000 yr for the accretion rate to drop sufficiently to permit dwarf-nova eruptions. If such behaviour is common, it can explain other puzzles of CV evolution. One: why the ER UMa class even exists (because all members can be remnants of recent novae). Two: why ER UMa stars and short-period nova-likes are rare (because their lifetimes, which are essentially cooling times, are short). Three: why short-period novae all decline to luminosity states far above their true quiescence (because they are just getting started in their post-nova cooling). Four: why the orbital periods, accretion rates and white dwarf temperatures of short-period CVs are somewhat too large to arise purely from the effects of gravitational radiation (because the unexpectedly long interval of enhanced post-nova brightness boosts the mean mass-transfer rate). And maybe even five: why very old, post-period-bounce CVs are hard to find (because the higher mass

  18. A charged residue in S4 regulates coupling among the activation gate, voltage, and Ca2+ sensors in BK channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guohui; Yang, Huanghe; Liang, Hongwu; Yang, Junqiu; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Chen, Yihan; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-09-10

    Coupling between the activation gate and sensors of physiological stimuli during ion channel activation is an important, but not well-understood, molecular process. One difficulty in studying sensor-gate coupling is to distinguish whether a structural perturbation alters the function of the sensor, the gate, or their coupling. BK channels are activated by membrane voltage and intracellular Ca(2+) via allosteric mechanisms with coupling among the activation gate and sensors quantitatively defined, providing an excellent model system for studying sensor-gate coupling. By studying BK channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, here we show that mutation E219R in S4 alters channel function by two independent mechanisms: one is to change voltage sensor activation, shifting voltage dependence, and increase valence of gating charge movements; the other is to regulate coupling among the activation gate, voltage sensor, and Ca(2+) binding via electrostatic interactions with E321/E324 located in the cytosolic side of S6 in a neighboring subunit, resulting in a shift of the voltage dependence of channel opening and increased Ca(2+) sensitivity. These results suggest a structural arrangement of the inner pore of BK channels differing from that in other voltage gated channels.

  19. Study of the properties of the superheavy nuclei Z = 117 produced in the 249Bk + 48Ca reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Alexander, C.; Binder, J.; Boll, R. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Ezold, J.; Felker, K.; Gostic, J. M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Henderson, R. A.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Miller, D.; Moody, K. J.; Polyakov, A. N.; Ramayya, A. V.; Roberto, J. B.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Stoyer, M. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Voinov, A. A.; Vostokin, G. K.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction of 249Bk with 48Ca have been reinvestigated to provide new evidence for the discovery of element 117 on a larger number of events. The experiments were performed at five projectile energies and with a total beam dose of 48Ca of about 4.6×1019. Two isotopes 293,294117 were synthesized in the 249Bk+48Ca reaction, providing excitation functions and α-decay spectra of the produced isotopes that establishes these nuclei to be the products of the 4n- and 3n-evaporation channels, respectively. Decay properties of 293,294117 and of all the daughter products agree with the data of the experiment in which these nuclei were synthesized for the first time in 2010. The new 289115 events, populated by α decay of 293117, demonstrate the same decay properties as those observed for 289115 produced in the 243Am(48Ca,2n) reaction thus providing crossbombardment evidence. In addition, a single decay of 294118 was observed from the reaction with 249Cf - a result of the in-growth of 249Cf in the 249Bk target.

  20. Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel inactivation contributes to spike broadening during repetitive firing in the rat lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Faber, E S Louise; Sah, Pankaj

    2003-10-15

    In many neurons, trains of action potentials show frequency-dependent broadening. This broadening results from the voltage-dependent inactivation of K+ currents that contribute to action potential repolarisation. In different neuronal cell types these K+ currents have been shown to be either slowly inactivating delayed rectifier type currents or rapidly inactivating A-type voltage-gated K+ currents. Recent findings show that inactivation of a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, mediated by large conductance BK-type channels, also contributes to spike broadening. Here, using whole-cell recordings in acute slices, we examine spike broadening in lateral amygdala projection neurons. Spike broadening is frequency dependent and is reversed by brief hyperpolarisations. This broadening is reduced by blockade of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and BK channels. In contrast, broadening is not blocked by high concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or alpha-dendrotoxin. We conclude that while inactivation of BK-type Ca2+-activated K+ channels contributes to spike broadening in lateral amygdala neurons, inactivation of another as yet unidentified outward current also plays a role.