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Sample records for black hills domain

  1. Black Hills

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Drought in the Black Hills     View ... and western South Dakota remain in the midst of a severe drought. This set of images and maps from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging ... the 2000 and 2004 dates. As the vegetation faded with the drought, the  albedo  at the surface increased. Albedo measures the ...

  2. Black Hills hydrology study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, D.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Black Hills area of western South Dakota is a valuable resource center. The area has attracted numerous residents and industries because of the availability of mineral, timber, agricultural, recreational, and water resources. The water resources of the area have been stressed locally by increasing population, periodic drought, and development of other resources. In response to residents' concerns about these stresses on the water resources, the Black Hills Hydrology Study was initiated in 1990 as a cooperative effort among the U.S. Geological Survey, the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District. West Dakota represents the various local and county cooperators. This report describes the purpose, scope, approach, and status of the study and presents highlights from the first project data report produced for the study.

  3. Black Hills Region, SD, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-81-157 (22 June 1973) --- This view of the Black Hills Region, SD (44.0N, 104.0W) shows the scenic Black Hills where Mt. Rushmore and other monuments are located. Cities and towns in this view include: Rapid City, Deadwood, and Belle Fourche with the nearby Belle Fourche Reservoir. Notable in this scene are the recovering burn scars (seen as irregular shaped light toned patches) from a 1959 forest fire in the Black Hills National Forest near the edge of the photo. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Drought in the Black Hills

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-18

    Despite good rainfall and record-setting snowstorms in the spring of 2005, most of northeastern Wyoming, the Black Hills, and western South Dakota remained in the midst of a severe drought. These images are from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  5. Report on the Black Hills Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joe

    1979-01-01

    A rally to save the Black Hills from coal- and uranium-greedy energy companies was held on July 6 and over 2,000 joined in a 15-mile walk on July 7 in Rapid City, South Dakota. The Black Hills Alliance, an Indian coalition concerned about energy development proposals in the Great Plains, sponsored the gathering. (NQ)

  6. Report on the Black Hills Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joe

    1979-01-01

    A rally to save the Black Hills from coal- and uranium-greedy energy companies was held on July 6 and over 2,000 joined in a 15-mile walk on July 7 in Rapid City, South Dakota. The Black Hills Alliance, an Indian coalition concerned about energy development proposals in the Great Plains, sponsored the gathering. (NQ)

  7. Drought in the Black Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Color-Coded Map

    Despite good rainfall and record-setting snowstorms in the spring of 2005, most of northeastern Wyoming, the Black Hills, and western South Dakota remain in the midst of a severe drought. This set of images and maps from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) contrast the appearance of the Black Hills region of northwestern South Dakota on July 12, 2000 (left column), with views acquired four years later, on July 14, 2004 (right column). The natural-color images along the top are from MISR's nadir (downward-looking) camera. The browning that appears in 2004 compared with 2000 indicates that the vigor of green vegetation was significantly diminished in 2004.

    The color-coded maps (along the bottom) provide a quantitative measurement of the sunlight reflected from these surfaces, and the loss of sunlight-absorbing vegetation between the 2000 and 2004 dates. As the vegetation faded with the drought, the albedo at the surface increased. Albedo measures the fraction of incident sunlight that is reflected by a surface, and can vary between zero (if all the incident sunlight is absorbed and none is reflected) and one (if all sunlight is reflected and none is absorbed). Dense forest has a low albedo; bright desert, snow and clouds, have a high albedo. Here, albedo is provided for the wavelengths of sunlight that plants use for photosynthesis (400 - 700 nanometers). This measurement is known as the albedo for Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR). Surfaces with greater absorption of PAR appear here in blue hues, whereas surfaces with lower absorption appear as green, yellow, orange or red. Black pixels indicate areas where albedo could not be derived, usually due to the presence of clouds. In July 2004, low albedo areas (blue pixels) are notably reduced in extent, and higher albedo areas (yellow, orange and red pixels) have increased.

    Because incoming sunlight is

  8. Drought in the Black Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Color-Coded Map

    Despite good rainfall and record-setting snowstorms in the spring of 2005, most of northeastern Wyoming, the Black Hills, and western South Dakota remain in the midst of a severe drought. This set of images and maps from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) contrast the appearance of the Black Hills region of northwestern South Dakota on July 12, 2000 (left column), with views acquired four years later, on July 14, 2004 (right column). The natural-color images along the top are from MISR's nadir (downward-looking) camera. The browning that appears in 2004 compared with 2000 indicates that the vigor of green vegetation was significantly diminished in 2004.

    The color-coded maps (along the bottom) provide a quantitative measurement of the sunlight reflected from these surfaces, and the loss of sunlight-absorbing vegetation between the 2000 and 2004 dates. As the vegetation faded with the drought, the albedo at the surface increased. Albedo measures the fraction of incident sunlight that is reflected by a surface, and can vary between zero (if all the incident sunlight is absorbed and none is reflected) and one (if all sunlight is reflected and none is absorbed). Dense forest has a low albedo; bright desert, snow and clouds, have a high albedo. Here, albedo is provided for the wavelengths of sunlight that plants use for photosynthesis (400 - 700 nanometers). This measurement is known as the albedo for Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR). Surfaces with greater absorption of PAR appear here in blue hues, whereas surfaces with lower absorption appear as green, yellow, orange or red. Black pixels indicate areas where albedo could not be derived, usually due to the presence of clouds. In July 2004, low albedo areas (blue pixels) are notably reduced in extent, and higher albedo areas (yellow, orange and red pixels) have increased.

    Because incoming sunlight is

  9. Reflections on the Black Hills Claim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deloria, Vine, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses Sioux claim to the Black Hills of South Dakota from the Sioux perspective. Land claim discussed not as legal or political issue, but as a problem deeper than simple land transaction. Examines history and federal land acquisition as violation of Indian culture. Discusses possible future strategies in dealing with government. (TES)

  10. Interior ponderosa pine in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Boldt; Robert R. Alexander; Milo J. Larson

    1983-01-01

    The gross area of the Black Hills of South Dakota and associated Bear Lodge Mountains of eastern Wyoming is about 3.5 million acres (1.4 million ha). Roughly half the area supports forest or woodland cover. Essentially pure stands of climax Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum Engelm.) predominate on about...

  11. 77 FR 22755 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board AGENCY: USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of meetings of the Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Black Hills National Forest was required...

  12. Black Hills State University Underground Campus.

    PubMed

    Mount, Brianna J; Thomas, Keenan J; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey C; Lesko, Kevin T; Schnee, Richard W; Henning, Reyco; MacLellan, Ryan F; Guerra, Marcelo B B; Busch, Matthew; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann D; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, Wenqin; Mei, Dongming

    2017-08-01

    The Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC) houses a low background counting facility on the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. There are currently four ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detectors installed in the BHUC and it is anticipated four more detectors will be installed within a year. In total, the BHUC will be able to accommodate up to twelve detectors with space inside a class 1000 cleanroom, an automated liquid nitrogen fill system, on-site personnel assistance and other required utilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. AmeriFlux US-Blk Black Hills

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Tilden

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Blk Black Hills. Site Description - The Black Hills tower was established by the Institute for Atmospheric Studies of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology.

  14. Ecology, siliviculture, and management of Black Hills ponderosa pine

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd; Michael A. Battaglia

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a broad-based synthesis of the general ecology of the ponderosa pine ecosystem in the Black Hills. This synthesis contains information and results of research on ponderosa pine from numerous sources within the Black Hills ecosystem. We discuss the silvical characteristics of ponderosa pine, natural disturbances that govern ecosystem processes,...

  15. The Black Hills Case: On the Cusp of History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommersheim, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the legal history of ownership claim to Black Hills land in South Dakota by Lakota Sioux Indians and federal government. Examines progress of the Sioux Nation Black Hills Act (1987) as a way to establish a Sioux National Council, a vibrant legal panel linking the Lakota with their past. (TES)

  16. Microhabitats of Merriam's turkeys in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Stanley H. Anderson

    1996-01-01

    Merriam’s Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) are associated with ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in the western United States, but are not native to the ponderosa pine forest of the Black Hills, South Dakota. The Black Hills population was established by transplanting birds from New Mexico and Colorado between 1948 and...

  17. Motivations of female Black Hills deer hunters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Covelli Metcalf, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    State fish and wildlife agencies are particularly interested in attracting female participation because of the potential to offset declining participation in hunting. Understanding female hunters’ motivations will be critical for designing effective recruitment and retention programs for women hunters. Although female participation in hunting is increasing, males still outnumber females by about tenfold. Gender differences in deer hunters were explored by comparing ratings of eight motivations (social, nature, excitement, meat, challenge, trophy, extra hunting opportunity, and solitude). Hunter types were defined by hunters’ selection of the most important motivation for why they like Black Hills deer hunting. Overall, females and males were relatively similar in their ratings of the eight motivations, and we found 85% gender similarity in the selection of the most important motivation. Women were slightly more motivated by the food aspect of the hunt while men placed slightly more value on the hunt as a sporting activity.

  18. Hydrology of the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet; Williamson, Joyce; Putnam, Larry

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills Hydrology Study was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota. This report summarizes the hydrology of the Black Hills area and the results of this long-term study.The Black Hills area of South Dakota and Wyoming is an important recharge area for several regional, bedrock aquifer systems and various local aquifers; thus, the study focused on describing the hydrologic significance of selected bedrock aquifers. The major aquifers in the Black Hills area are the Deadwood, Madison, Minnelusa, Minnekahta, and Inyan Kara aquifers. The highest priority was placed on the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers, which are used extensively and heavily influence the surface-water resources of the area.Within this report, the hydrogeologic framework of the area, including climate, geology, ground water, and surface water, is discussed. Hydrologic processes and characteristics for ground water and surface water are presented. For ground water, water-level trends and comparisons and water-quality characteristics are presented. For surface water, streamflow characteristics, responses to precipitation, annual yields and yield efficiencies, and water-quality characteristics are presented. Hydrologic budgets are presented for ground water, surface water, and the combined ground-water/surface-water system. A summary of study findings regarding the complex flow systems within the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers also is presented.

  19. GHG PSD Permit: Cheyenne Light, Fuel & Power / Black Hills Power, Inc. – Cheyenne Prairie Generating Station

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the final PSD permit for the Cheyenne Light, Fuel & Power / Black Hills Power, Inc. Cheyenne Prairie Generating Station, located in Laramie, Wyoming, and operated by Black Hills Service Company.

  20. Ancient granite gneiss in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Norton, J.J.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Granite gneiss, with an age of approximately 2.5 billion years, in the Black Hills, South Dakota , provides a link betweeen ancient rocks in western Wyoming and Montana and in eastern North and South Dakota and Minnesota. The discovery suggests that early Precambrian rocks covered an extensive area in northcentral United States and were not restricted to several small nuclei.

  1. Forests of the Black Hills National Forest 2011

    Treesearch

    Brian F. Walters; Christopher W. Woodall; Ronald J. Piva; Mark A. Hatfield; Grant M. Domke; David E. Haugen

    2013-01-01

    This inventory of the Black Hills National Forest (BHNF) covers the years 2007-2011 on the South Dakota portion of the forest and 2005 on the Wyoming portion. It reports more than 1.16 million acres of forest land dominated by ponderosa pine. Forest features reported on include volume, biomass, growth, removals, mortality, carbon, snags, and down woody material, along...

  2. Elk resource selection at parturition sites, Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Chadwick P. Lehman; Mark A. Rumble; Christopher T. Rota; Benjamin J. Bird; Dillon T. Fogarty; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2015-01-01

    We studied elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) parturition sites at coarse (314-km2 and 7-km2) and fine (0.2-ha) scales in the Black Hills, South Dakota, 2011-2013, following a period of population decline and poor calf recruitment. Our objective was to test whether female elk selected parturition sites across spatial scales in association with forage, terrain...

  3. Forest resources of the Black Hills National Forest

    Treesearch

    Larry T. DeBlander

    2002-01-01

    The Interior West Forest Inventory and Analysis (IWFIA) Program of the USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, as part of our National Forest System cooperative inventories, conducted a forest resource inventory on the Black Hills National Forest using a nationally standardized mapped-plot design (for more details see section "How was the inventory...

  4. Merriam's turkey poult survival in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Chad P. Lehman; Lester D. Flake; Mark A. Rumble; Daniel J. Thompson

    2008-01-01

    We investigated poult survival from hatching to 4 wks of age for Merriam's wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) poults in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. We estimated survival from 841 poults reared by 57 radio-marked wild turkeys (n = 52 adult females, n = 5 yearling females). Survival of poults to 4 wks posthatch averaged 33...

  5. 40 CFR 81.214 - Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.214 Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Dakota) has been renamed the Black Hills-Rapid...

  6. 40 CFR 81.214 - Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.214 Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Dakota) has been renamed the Black Hills-Rapid...

  7. 40 CFR 81.214 - Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.214 Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Dakota) has been renamed the Black Hills-Rapid...

  8. 40 CFR 81.214 - Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.214 Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Dakota) has been renamed the Black Hills-Rapid...

  9. 40 CFR 81.214 - Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.214 Black Hills-Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Rapid City Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Dakota) has been renamed the Black Hills-Rapid...

  10. 77 FR 9889 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board Public Meeting Dates Announced

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board Public Meeting Dates Announced AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board (NFAB... lands, among others. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Committee Management Officer, Black Hills National...

  11. 75 FR 78209 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board Public Meeting Dates Announced

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board Public Meeting Dates Announced AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board (NFAB... Officer, Black Hills National Forest, 1019 N. 5th Street, Custer, SD, 57730, (605) 673-9200. Dated...

  12. Multi-scale habitat use of male ruffed grouse in the Black Hills National Forest

    Treesearch

    Cassandra L. Mehls; Kent C. Jensen; Mark A. Rumble; Michael C. Wimberly

    2014-01-01

    Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are native upland game birds and a management indicator species (MIS) for aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest (Black Hills). Our objective was to assess resource selection of male ruffed grouse to identify the most appropriate scale to manage for aspen and ruffed grouse in the Black Hills. During spring 2007...

  13. Water professionals and water policy in the Black Hills region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, T.A.; Driscoll, D.G.; Erickson, J.W.; Kenner, S.J.; Sawyer, J.F.; Kendy, Eloise

    1999-01-01

    A case study approach based on examples from the Black Hills region is used to evaluate the role of water professionals in developing feasible and fair public policy involving water resources. Examples presented include a long-term hydrologic investigation in the Black Hills, a local wellhead protection program, issues being addressed by a local flood management commission, coordination of definitions of beneficial stream uses by two state agencies, water-quality problems related to rapid population increase in a rural area, and impacts of potential climate change on water resources. In some of these examples, the hydrologic work was separated from policy making to ensure neutrality. In other examples, involvement of the hydrologists and water resource engineers directly benefited policy development. Opportunities for increased effectiveness were observed in most of the examples.

  14. Old Black Hills ponderosa pines tell a story

    Treesearch

    Matthew J. Bunkers; L. Ronald Johnson; James R. Miller; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1999-01-01

    A single ponderosa pine tree found in the central Black Hills of SouthDakota revealed its age of more than 700 years by its tree rings taken from coring in 1992. The purpose of this study was to examine historic climatic patterns from the 13th century through most of the 20th century as inferred from ring widths of this and other nearby trees. The steep, rocky site...

  15. Selected Hydrologic Data, Through Water Year 1998, Black Hills Hydrology Study, South Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Selected Hydrologic Data, Through Water Year 1998, Black Hills Hydrology Study, South Dakota...SUBTITLE Selected Hydrologic Data, Through Water Year 1998, Black Hills Hydrology Study, South Dakota 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...275 ILLUSTRATIONS 1. Map showing area of investigation for the Black Hills Hydrology Study

  16. Stream piracy in the Black Hills: A geomorphology lab exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaprowski, B.J.; Evenson, E.B.; Epstein, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota exhibits many fine examples of stream piracy that are very suitable for teaching geomorphology lab exercises. This lab goes beyond standard topographic map interpretation by using geologic maps, well logs, gravel provenance and other types of data to teach students about stream piracy. Using a step-by-step method in which the lab exercises ramp up in difficulty, students hone their skills in deductive reasoning and data assimilation. The first exercises deal with the identification of stream piracy at a variety of spatial scales and the lab culminates with an exercise on landscape evolution and drainage rearrangement.

  17. Conservation assessment for the autumn willow in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    J. Hope Hornbeck; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Deanna J. Reyher

    2003-01-01

    Autumn willow, Salix serissima (Bailey) Fern., is an obligate wetland shrub that occurs in fens and bogs in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada. Disjunct populations of autumn willow occur in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Only two populations occur on Black Hills National Forest lands: a large population at McIntosh Fen and a small...

  18. Conservation assessment for bloodroot in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    J. Hope Hornbeck; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Deanna J. Reyher

    2003-01-01

    Bloodroot, Sanguinaria canadensis L. (Papaveraceae), is a common spring flowering herb in the deciduous forests of eastern North America. It is disjunctly distributed in the northeastern Black Hills of South Dakota. There are 22 known occurrences of bloodroot on Black Hills National Forest in hardwood forests, shrub thickets, and floodplain habitats of limited...

  19. Characteristics of successful puma kill sites of elk in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Chadwick P. Lehman; Christopher T. Rota; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2017-01-01

    Elk Cervus canadensis nelsoni in the Black Hills, South Dakota, have been declining since 2006 and there is concern by resource managers and hunters that puma Puma concolor predation may be contributing to declining herds. We evaluated characteristics at sites where puma successfully killed elk in the Black Hills of South Dakota. We evaluated characteristics at coarse...

  20. Identifying changes in tree form for harvested ponderosa pine in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Michael S. Williams; Raymond L. Czaplewski; Don L. Martinez

    1996-01-01

    Recent underestimates of total volume for timber sales in the Black Hills National Forest prompted analysis of two felled ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) data sets that were collected approximately 10 years apart. Though neither data set collected was a representative sample of the Black Hills, both were similar in terms of diameter at breast height and total...

  1. Historian's View of S. 705 - The Sioux Nation Black Hills Bill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the Sioux Nation Black Hills Act (1987) as a proposed settlement of the Black Hills claim by the Sioux. Examines bill in terms of American legal history. Suggests the legislation would create legal confusion, conflict, and racial tension. Criticizes bill as harming regional resource management efforts. (TES)

  2. Silviculture of ponderosa pine in the Black Hills: The status of our knowledge

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Boldt; James L. Van Deusen

    1974-01-01

    This Paper, intended as a guide for professional foresters, describes major silvicultural conditions likely to be encountered in the Black Hills, reasonable treatment options, and probable results and implications of these treatments. It also describes silvical characteristics and behavior of Black Hills ponderosa pine, and a variety of proven silvicultural tools....

  3. Species-area relations of song birds in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Brian L. Dykstra; Lester D. Flake

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effects of stand size resulting from current logging practices on occurrence and species richness of song birds in the Black Hills. Richness of forest interior and forest interior/edge songbirds was not related to stand area (P > 0.40) in stands of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) in the Black Hills. Brown creepers (...

  4. Nest success of Black-backed Woodpeckers in forests with mountain pine beetle outbreaks in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Thomas W. Bonnot; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2008-01-01

    Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are burned-forest specialists that rely on beetles (Coleoptera) for food. In the Black Hills, South Dakota, standing dead forests resulting from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks offer food resources for Black-backed Woodpeckers, in addition to providing habitat...

  5. A Radiogenic Analysis of the Northern Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. W.; Gosnold, W. D., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    The Northern Black Hills underwent large-scale tectonism and hydrothermal metamorphism during the Paleoproterozoic era which left an vast supply of REE and ore deposits deep beneath the surface. These events, as well as volcanic intrusions in the Cenozoic era, also left larger accumulations of U, Th and K. To date, limited research has been conducted in the region to determine the distribution and variation of radioactivity. Recently, SURF has been chosen as the location to host a new geoneutrino detector for the DUNE. Radioactive decay also produces geoneutrinos, which needs to be taken into consideration for calibration purposes. A radiogenic analysis was conducted of the Northern Black Hills in 2015-2016, to determine the distribution and variability of U, Th, K. This analysis used gamma-ray spectrometry, using a Ge-Li GRS, due to the high detection accuracy and the inexpensive use. Approximately 300 samples were gathered within a 15-km radius of SURF, consisting of 109 igneous, 73 metamorphic and 117 sedimentary rocks. Each sample was prepared and stored for two months prior to analysis, allowing samples to reach equilibrium. The eU and eTh were measured in ppm and the K in pct. This data was then used to calculate and map the heat production and neutrino luminosity. The initial analysis used a handheld GRS which concluded an average of 6.00 ± 6.46 ppm U, 14.54 ± 17.71 ppm Th, and 2.61 ± 2.24 pct K, with an average heat production of 3.34 ± 3.39 μW m-3. Further analyses used a stationary GRS for individual samples, averaging 2.39 ± 4.57 ppm U, 6.62 ± 11.45 ppm Th, and 1.27 ± 1.54 pct K, with an average heat production of 1.42 ± 2.28 μW m-3. The largest contributor of the radioactivity was towards the NW and SW hemisphere of the area. The average Th:U ratio was calculated to be between 2.42 and 2.77. The ratio is largely influenced by the rock type. The highest contributors were volcanic-igneous rocks.

  6. Neutrinos and dark matter in the Black Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan Norris, Margaret; Sayler, Bentley

    2010-02-01

    Where in the U.S. could you walk into a hardware store and be asked about neutrinos? It happens regularly in the Black Hills of South Dakota, where preliminary design is in progress for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), a planned NSF Major Research Experimental Facility Construction (MREFC) initiative to be located at the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, SD. DUSEL has physicists buzzing too, as the particle, astro-, and nuclear physics communities have all identified the need for a new laboratory deep beneath the Earth's surface to address some of the most compelling, transformational science at the frontiers of their disciplines. Elusive particles such as neutrinos and WIMPS (a possible candidate for dark matter) -- though they spark the imagination - are equally elusive when trying to explain to students and the public. That will be the task of the Sanford Center for Science Education, planned to be the education arm of DUSEL. Early prototypes of future programs at the education center are now under development, ranging from professional development for teachers to classroom tours to working with American Indian educators. These programs, which are building capacity for the future education center, will be discussed. )

  7. Altitude of the Top of the Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Redden, Jack A.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  8. Altitude of the Top of the Madison Limestone in the Black Hills area, South Dakota, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Redden, Jack A.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and groundwater in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study arca arc Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  9. Altitude of the Top of the Minnelusa Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Redden, Jack A.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  10. Altitude of the Top of the Minnekahta Limestone in the Black Hills area, South Dakota, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Redden, Jack A.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and groundwater in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoli, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara. Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  11. Altitude of the top of the Inyan Kara Group in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Redden, Jack A.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  12. Streamflow losses in the Black Hills of western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hortness, Jon E.; Driscoll, Daniel G.

    1998-01-01

    Losses occur in numerous streams that cross outcrops of various sedimentary rocks that are exposed around the periphery of the Black Hills of South Dakota. These streamflow losses are recognized as an important source of local recharge to regional bedrock aquifers. Most streams lose all of their flow up to some threshold rate. Streamflow is maintained through a loss zone when the threshold is exceeded. Streamflow records for 86 measurement sites are used to determine bedrock loss thresholds for 24 area streams, which have individual loss thresholds that range from negligible (no loss) to as much as 50 cubic feet per second. In addition, insights are provided regarding springflow that occurs in the immediate vicinity of selected loss zones. Most losses occur to outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation. Losses to the Deadwood Formation probably are minimal. Losses to the Minnekahta Limestone generally are small; however, they are difficult to quantify because of potential losses to extensive alluvial deposits that commonly are located near Minnekahta outcrops. Loss thresholds for each stream are shown to be relatively constant, without measurable effects from streamflow rates or duration of flow through the loss zones. Calculated losses for measurements made during high-flow conditions generally have larger variability than calculated losses for low-flow conditions; however, consistent relations between losses and streamflow have not been identified. Some of this variability results from the inability to account for tributary inflows and changes in storage. Calculated losses are shown to decrease, in some cases, during periods of extended flow through loss zones. Decreased 'net' losses, however, generally can be attributed to springflow (ground-water discharge) within a loss zone, which may occur during prolonged periods of wet climatic conditions. Losses to unsaturated alluvial deposits located adjacent to the stream channels are found to have

  13. Black holes escaping from domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Flachi, Antonino; Sasaki, Misao; Pujolas, Oriol; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2006-06-15

    Previous studies concerning the interaction of branes and black holes suggested that a small black hole intersecting a brane may escape via a mechanism of reconnection. Here we consider this problem by studying the interaction of a small black hole and a domain wall composed of a scalar field and simulate the evolution of this system when the black hole acquires an initial recoil velocity. We test and confirm previous results, however, unlike the cases previously studied, in the more general set-up considered here, we are able to follow the evolution of the system also during the separation, and completely illustrate how the escape of the black hole takes place.

  14. Water quality impacts from mining in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, P.H.; Davis, A.D.; Webb, C.J.; Nichols, A.D.

    1996-02-01

    The focus of this research was to determine if abandoned mines constitute a major environmental hazard in the Black Hills. Many abandoned gold mines in the Black Hills contribute acid and heavy metals to streams. In some areas of sulfide mineralization local impacts are severe, but in most areas the impacts are small because most ore deposits consist of small quartz veins with few sulfides. Pegmatite mines appear to have negligible effects on water due to the insoluble nature of pegmatite minerals. Uranium mines in the southern Black Hills contribute some radioactivity to surface water, but he impact is limited because of the dry climate and lack of runoff in that area. 26 refs.

  15. Potentiometric surface of the Inyan Kara Aquifer in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  16. Potentiometric surface of the Madison Aquifer in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory L.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  17. Potentiometric surface of the Deadwood Aquifer in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  18. Distribution of hydrogeologic units in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Jarrell, Gregory J.; Sawyer, J. Foster; Schleicher, John R.; Fahrenbach, Mark D.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. The map in this report is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps that are being produced for the study. Other maps include structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally

  19. Potentiometric surface of the Minnekahta Aquifer in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  20. Potentiometric surface of the Minnelusa Aquifer in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    This map is a product of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, which was initiated in 1990 to assess the quantity, quality, and distribution of surface water and ground water in the Black Hills area of South Dakota (Driscoll, 1992). This long-term study is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District, which represents various local and county cooperators. This map is part of a series of 1:100,000-scale maps for the study. The maps include a hydrogeologic map, structure-contour maps (altitudes of the tops of formations) for five formations that contain major aquifers in the study area, and potentiometric maps for these five major aquifers (the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers).The study area consists of the topographically defined Black Hills and adjacent areas located in western South Dakota. The Black Hills area is an elongated, dome-shaped feature, about 125 miles long and 60 miles wide, which was uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich, 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are exposed in the central core of the Black Hills. Surrounding the Precambrian core is a layered series of sedimentary rocks including limestones, sandstones, and shales that are exposed in roughly concentric rings around the uplifted flanks of the Black Hills. The bedrock sedimentary units typically dip away from the uplifted Black Hills at angles that approach or exceed 10 degrees near the outcrops, and decrease with distance from the uplift. Many of the sedimentary units contain aquifers, both within and beyond the study area. Recharge to these aquifers occurs from infiltration of precipitation upon the outcrops and, in some cases, from infiltration of streamflow (Hortness and Driscoll, 1998). Artesian conditions generally exist within these

  1. 78 FR 65962 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Hills National Forest Advisory Board (Board), due to the Federal Government furlough which began on... Federal Register, Volume 78, Number 187, Thursday, September 26, 2013, pages 59337-59338. ] FOR...

  2. Traps and attractants for wood-boring insects in ponderosa pine stands in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Sheryl L. Costello; Jose F. Negron; William R. Jacobi

    2008-01-01

    Recent large-scale wildfires have increased populations of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Because little is known about possible impacts of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills, land managers are interested in developing monitoring techniques such as flight trapping with semiochemical baits. Two trap designs and four semiochemical attractants...

  3. 76 FR 5580 - Black Hills Colorado IPP, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Black Hills Colorado IPP, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding Black Hills Colorado IPP, LLC's application for market...

  4. Multiple-scale roost habitat comparisons of female Merriam's wild turkeys in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Thompson; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake; Chad P. Lehman

    2009-01-01

    Because quantity and quality of roosting habitat can affect Merriam's Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) distribution, we described habitat characteristics of Merriam's turkey roost sites in the southern Black Hills of South Dakota. Varying proportions of Merriam's turkeys in the southern Black Hills depended on supplemental feed from livestock...

  5. Feeding ecology of Merriam's turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Stanley H. Anderson

    1996-01-01

    W e studied the feeding ecology of Merriam’s turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) in the Black Hills, South Dakota, between 1986 and 1989. Adult birds consumed 78 kinds of food, of which four food categories constituted >79% of winter diets and six food categories constituted >75% of summer diets. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seeds were...

  6. Survival and cause-specific mortality of Merriam's turkeys in the southern Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Chad P. Lehman; Lester D. Flake; Mark A. Rumble

    2007-01-01

    Merriam's turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) in the Black Hills feed in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest habitats during winter, but some birds centralize winter activities within or near farmsteads that provide waste grain as supplemental food. The objective of our research was to determine if female Merriam's...

  7. Resource selection by elk at two spatial scales in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; R. Scott. Gamo

    2011-01-01

    Understanding resource selection by elk (Cervus elaphus) at multiple spatial scales may provide information that will help resolve the increasing number of resource conflicts involving elk. We quantified vegetation at 412 sites where the precise location of elk was known by direct observation and 509 random sites in the Black Hills of South Dakota during 1998-2001. We...

  8. Characteristics of white-tailed deer fawn beds, Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Ted A. Benzon; Kieth E. Severson; Lakhdar Benkobi

    1999-01-01

    Forty-two white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus dakotensis) were captured and fitted with radio transmitters and observed from June through September 1991 and 1992 to determine diurnal bed site use in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Fawns were monitored biweekly during daylight hours and 259 bed sites were located. In addition, 301 random...

  9. Trembling aspen response to a mixed-severity wildfire in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Treesearch

    Tara L. Keyser; Frederick W. Smith; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2005-01-01

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) regeneration dynamics including sprout production, growth, and clone size were measured to determine the effects of fire on small aspen clone persistence following a mixedseverity wildfire in the Black Hills, South Dakota. Four years postfire, 10 small, isolated aspen clones per low and high fire severity...

  10. Monitoring with a modified Robel pole on meadows in the central Black Hills of South Dakaota

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Ted A. Benzon

    2007-01-01

    This study using a modified Robel pole was conducted in the central Black Hills, South Dakota. The objectives were to test the relationship between visual obstruction readings and standing herbage, develop guidelines for monitoring, and estimate sample size. The relationship between visual obstruction and standing herbage was linear with 2 segments in a piecewise model...

  11. 76 FR 48120 - Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD-Mountain Pine Beetle Response Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD--Mountain Pine Beetle Response Project AGENCY...: This project proposes to treat areas newly infested by mountain pine beetles on approximately 325,000... on all four Ranger Districts. Treatments would be carried out within the scope of direction provided...

  12. 77 FR 10717 - Black Hills National Forest, Custer, South Dakota-Mountain Pine Beetle Response Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... scope of direction provided in the Revised Land and Resource Management Plan for the Black Hills... Beetle Response Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Corrected notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: This project proposes to treat areas newly infested by mountain pine...

  13. Occupancy modeling of ruffed grouse in the Black Hills National Forest

    Treesearch

    Christopher Paul Hansen

    2009-01-01

    Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are important game birds and the management indicator species for quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest (BHNF). As a result, a robust monitoring protocol which reflects the status, trends, and habitat associations of ruffed grouse in the BHNF is necessary. To evaluate...

  14. Watershed management in the Black Hills: The status of our knowledge

    Treesearch

    Howard K. Orr

    1975-01-01

    Climate, geology, soils, vegetation, and water yields are briefly described, followed by a review and discussion of watershed management research and problems unique to the Black Hills. Research needs with respect to water quality, data collection, and model development are highlighted.

  15. Large-scale thinning, ponderosa pine, and mountain pine beetle in the Black Hills, USA

    Treesearch

    Jose F. Negron; Kurt K. Allen; Angie Ambourn; Blaine Cook; Kenneth Marchand

    2017-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) (MPB), can cause extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) mortality in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA. Lower tree densities have been associated with reduced MPB-caused tree mortality, but few studies have reported on large-scale thinning and most data come from small plots that...

  16. Mountain pine beetles: A century of knowledge, control attempts, and impacts central to the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Lance A. Asherin; Michael A. Battaglia; Terrie Jain; Stephen A. Mata

    2016-01-01

    This publication chronicles the understanding, controlling, and impacts of mountain pine beetles (MPB) central to the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming from the time they were described by Hopkins in 1902, through the presentation of data from work started by Schmid and Mata in 1985. The plots established by these two men from 1985 through 1994 were subjected to...

  17. Black Hills State University Research and Scholarly Work Symposium Proceedings (Spearfish, South Dakota, May 2, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnopoulos, Cheryl, Ed.; Ochse, Roger, Ed.; Wolff, Roger, Ed.

    This proceedings contains papers from a symposium conducted to promote the professional sharing of scholarly accomplishments of Black Hills State University (South Dakota) faculty and students. The symposium also provided a forum for discussion of current issues related to the presentations. The papers, representing a variety of disciplines, are…

  18. Macrohabitat associations of Merriam's turkeys in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Stanley H. Anderson

    1993-01-01

    Merriam's turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) were introduced into South Dakota in the late 1940's and have since expanded to occupy the entire Black Hills. Because little is known of their habitat requirements and the effects of forest management practices on this important game species, macrohabitat selections patterns of Merriam'...

  19. Northern goshawk and its prey in the Black Hills: Habitat assessment

    Treesearch

    Russell T. Graham; Shelley Bayard de Volo; Richard T. Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    The northern goshawk is classified as a Sensitive Species in all USDA Forest Service regions, including on the Black Hills National Forest in western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming. An assessment was conducted of the quality of northern goshawk nesting and foraging habitat, along with the habitat quality of 22 of the goshawk’s prey species. A Delphi (expert...

  20. Monitoring ruffed grouse in the Black Hills: Protocol and user's manual for the occupancy spreadsheet program

    Treesearch

    Christopher P. Hansen; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) in the Black Hills National Forest is a priority for forest managers due to the bird's status as the management indicator species for quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and its value to hunters and other recreational groups. We conducted drumming surveys, estimated occupancy, and assessed the influence of sampling and...

  1. Occupancy modeling of ruffed grouse in the Black Hills National Forest

    Treesearch

    Christopher P. Hansen; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Mark A. Rumble

    2011-01-01

    Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are a popular game bird and the management indicator species for quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Black Hills National Forest (BHNF), which requires development of a robust monitoring protocol to evaluate trends in ruffed grouse populations. We used roadside drumming surveys in spring 2007 and 2008 to estimate ruffed grouse...

  2. Ten-year results of a ponderosa pine progeny test in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Wayne D. Shepperd; Sue E. McElderry

    1986-01-01

    Ten-year survival and growth of seedlings from 77 parent trees from throughout the Black Hills were compared, using a cluster-analysis technique. Five clusters were identified that account for most of the variability in survival and growth of the open-pollinated families. One cluster, containing 6 families, exhibited exceptional survival and growth. Another, containing...

  3. Hybrid poplar cultivars for maximizing phytomass production on gold mine tailings in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Ardell J. Bjugstad

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-six hybrid poplar clones were planted as cuttings on a gold mine tailings in the Black Hills. Four exhibited very good survival and growth. Other clones had relatively high (exceeding 50 percent) survival but slow growth (below 60 cm) over a 5-year period.

  4. Fire history in interior ponderosa pine communities of the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Treesearch

    Peter M. Brown; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    1996-01-01

    Chronologies of fire events were reconstructed from crossdated fire-scarred ponderosa pine trees for four sites in the south-central Black Hills. Compared to other ponderosa pine forests in the southwest US or southern Rocky Mountains, these communities burned less frequently. For all sites combined, and using all fires detected, the mean fire interval (MFI), or number...

  5. Predicting mortality of ponderosa pine regeneration after prescribed fire in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Treesearch

    Mike Battaglia; Frederick W. Smith; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2009-01-01

    Reduction of crown fire hazard in Pinus ponderosa forests in the Black Hills, SD, often focuses on the removal of overstorey trees to reduce crown bulk density. Dense ponderosa pine regeneration establishes several years after treatment and eventually increases crown fire risk if allowed to grow. Using prescribed fire to control this regeneration is...

  6. Influence of ponderosa pine overstory on forage quality in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Kieth E. Severson; Daniel W. Uresk

    1988-01-01

    Forage quality was assessed in pole and sapling ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands growing at five stocking levels - 0, 5. 14, 23, and unthinned (which approximated 40 m2/ha basal area)-in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Crude protein, acid detergent fiber, acid detergent lignin, ash, calcium, and phosphorus were...

  7. Mountain pine beetle-killed trees as snags in Black Hills ponderosa pine stands

    Treesearch

    J. M. Schmid; S. A. Mata; W. C. Schaupp

    2009-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle-killed ponderosa pine trees in three stands of different stocking levels near Bear Mountain in the Black Hills National Forest were surveyed over a 5-year period to determine how long they persisted as unbroken snags. Rate of breakage varied during the first 5 years after MPB infestation: only one tree broke during the first 2 years in the three...

  8. Roosting habitat of Merriam's turkeys in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble

    1992-01-01

    Lack of roost habitat (trees >40 cm diameter breast height [dbh] and >18 m2/ha basal area) can limit populations of Merriam’s turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami). The Black Hills region has relatively large populations of Merriam’s turkeys, yet trees >40 cm dbh are uncommon. Consequently, I studied...

  9. Black Hills State University Research and Scholarly Work Symposium Proceedings (Spearfish, South Dakota, April 11, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnopoulos, Cheryl L., Ed.; Ochse, Roger, Ed.; Wolff, Roger, Ed.

    This proceedings contains papers from a symposium conducted to promote the professional sharing of scholarly accomplishments of Black Hills State University faculty and students. The symposium also provided a forum for discussion of current issues related to the presentations. The papers, representing a variety of disciplines, are as follows:…

  10. Nesting ecology of Merriam's turkeys in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble; Robert A. Hodorff

    1993-01-01

    Merriam’s wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) were introduced to the Black Hills approximately 40 years ago, and recent population estimates show a large and stable population. Until now, few studies have evaluated nesting ecology of Merriam’s turkeys, and none occurred in predominantly pure ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa...

  11. Five-year results of a ponderosa pine provenance study in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    James L. Van Deusen

    1974-01-01

    Survival and height growth data were collected after five field growing seasons from ponderosa pine progeny representing 75 provenances of natural stands in the Great Plains and Northern Rockies. Results showed that trees from no other provenance survived significantly better or grew significantly taller than trees from the Black Hills. Trees from southern Colorado,...

  12. Evaluation of a habitat capability model for nongame birds in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Todd R. Mills; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake

    1996-01-01

    Habitat models, used to predict consequences of land management decisions on wildlife, can have considerable economic effect on management decisions. The Black Hills National Forest uses such a habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy is largely unknown. We tested this model’s predictive accuracy for nongame birds in 13 vegetative structural stages of...

  13. Ruffed grouse selection of drumming sites in the Black Hills National Forest

    Treesearch

    Christopher P. Hansen; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2011-01-01

    Ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) are important game birds that depend on multiple forest age-classes of aspen (Populus spp.) for food and cover, which makes them an appropriate management indicator species for the condition of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) communities in the Black Hills National Forest of western South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming (BHNF)....

  14. Service life of treated and untreated Black Hills ponderosa pine fenceposts

    Treesearch

    Donald C. Markstrom; Lee R. Gjovik

    1992-01-01

    Service-life tests indicate that ponderosa pine fenceposts treated with preservatives performed well after field exposure of 30 years. Treating plants in the Black Hills area used commercial methods to treat the posts with creosote, pentachlorophenol, and waterborne arsenicals. Test sites were in the northern Great Plains-one in the semiarid western portion near Scenic...

  15. Landscape scale attributes of elk centers of activity in the central Black Hills of South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Cynthia H. Stubblefield; Kerri T. Vierling; Mark A. Rumble

    2006-01-01

    We researched the environmental attributes (n = 28) associated with elk (n = 50) summer range (1 May ­30 Sep) in the central Black Hills of South Dakota, USA, during 1998-­2001. We defined high-use areas or centers of activity as landscapes underlying large concentrations of elk locations resulting from the shared fidelity of...

  16. Water-quality characteristics in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Joyce E.; Carter, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the water-quality characteristics of ground-water and surface-water in the Black Hills area. Differences in groundwater quality by aquifer and differences in surfacewater quality by water source are presented. Ground-water characteristics are discussed individually for each of the major aquifers in the Black Hills area, referred to herein as the Precambrian, Deadwood, Madison, Minnelusa, Minnekahta, and Inyan Kara aquifers. Characteristics for minor aquifers also are discussed briefly. Surface-water characteristics are discussed for hydrogeologic settings including headwater springs, crystalline core sites, artesian springs, and exterior sites. To characterize the water quality of aquifers and streams in the Black Hills area, data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System water-quality database were examined. This included samples collected as part of the Black Hills Hydrology Study as well as for other studies within the time frame of October 1, 1930, to September 30, 1998. Tables of individual results are not presented in this report, only summaries. Constituents summarized and discussed include physical properties, common ions, nutrients, trace elements, and radionuclides. Comparisons of concentration levels are made to drinking-water standards as well as beneficial-use and aquatic-life criteria. Ground water within the Black Hills and surrounding area generally is fresh and hard to very hard. Concentrations exceeding various Secondary and Maximum Contaminant Levels may affect the use of the water in some areas for many aquifers within the study area. Concentrations that exceed Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels (SMCL's) generally affect the water only aesthetically. Radionuclide concentrations may be especially high in some of the major aquifers used within the study area and preclude the use of water in some areas. The sodiumadsorption ratio and specific conductance may affect irrigation use for some wells. High

  17. Conservation assessment for groundcedar and stiff clubmoss in the Black Hills National Forest South Dakota and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    J.Hope Hornbeck; Deanna J. Reyher; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Reed W. Crook

    2002-01-01

    Stiff clubmoss (Lycopodium annotinum L.) and groundcedar (Lycopodium complanatum L.; synonym = Diphasiastrum complanatum [L.] Holub.) (Lycopodiaceae) are circumboreal clubmoss species that are widely distributed in North American boreal habitats. In the northern Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming,...

  18. Effects of timber harvesting on birds in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming, USA

    Treesearch

    Brian L. Dykstra; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake

    1997-01-01

    Timber harvest alters structural characteristics in ponderosa pine forests. In the Black Hills, harvested stands with 40-70% overstory canopy cover are managed as sapling/pole (3.0 - 22.9 cm dbh) or mature (> 22.9 cm dbh) stands. Changing the forest structure to two size classes has unknown effects on bird communities in this region. We counted birds in 20 harvested...

  19. The Black Hills (South Dakota) flood of June 1972: Impacts and implications

    Treesearch

    Howard K. Orr

    1973-01-01

    Rains of 12 inches or more in 6 hours fell on the east slopes of the Black Hills the night of June 9, 1972. Resulting flash floods exacted a disastrous toll in human life and property. Rainfall and discharge so greatly exceeded previous records that recurrence intervals have been presented in terms of multiples of the estimated 50- or 100- year event. Quick runoff was...

  20. Understory-overstory relationships in ponderosa pine forests, Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Daniel W. Uresk; Kieth E. Severson

    1989-01-01

    Under-story-overstory relationships were examined over 7 different growing stock levels(GSLs) of 2 size classes(saplings,8-10 cm d.b.h. and poles, 15-18 cm d.b.h.) of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) in the Black Hills, South Dakota. Generally, production of graminoids, forbs, and shrubs was similar between sapling and pole stands. Trends among GSLs were also similar...

  1. Early Tertiary Age of Pitchstone in the Northern Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redden, Jack A.; Obradovich, John D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Zartman, Robert E.; Norton, James J.

    1983-06-01

    A block of pitchstone in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, is Paleocene in age, according to potassium-argon dating of biotite and fission-track dating of zircon in the sample. These data invalidate published suggestions that the age is much younger. The pitchstone is not extrusive in its present position but instead is in a volcanic pipe with other fragments that came downward from as much as 1100 meters above the modern surface.

  2. Selected hydrologic data, through water year 1998, Black Hills Hydrology Study, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bradford, Wendell L.; Moran, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents water-level and water-quality data that have been collected or compiled, through water year 1998, for the Black Hills Hydrology Study. This study is a long-term coop-erative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District (which represents various local and county cooperators). This report is the third in a series of project data reports produced for the study. Daily water-level data are presented for 71 observation wells and 2 cave sites in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. The wells include a network of observation wells that are maintained in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are completed in various bedrock formations that are utilized as aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. Both cave sites are located within outcrops of the Madison Limestone. Data presented include site descriptions, hydrographs, and tables of daily water levels. Annual measurements of water levels collected during water years 1995-98 from a net-work of 18 additional, miscellaneous wells are presented. These wells are part of a statewide network of wells completed in bedrock aquifers that was operated from 1959 through 1989 in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Site descriptions and hydrographs for the entire period of record for each site also are presented. Water-quality data are presented for 9 surface-water sites, 19 ground-water sites, and 30 sites that have been classified as areas of surface- and ground-water interaction in the Black Hills area. The surface- and ground-water interaction sites are further divided into three categories that include 11 loss zone sites, 8 headwater spring sites, and 11 downgradient spring sites.

  3. Results of paleoflood investigations for Spring, Rapid, Boxedler, and Elk Creeks, Black Hills, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; O'Connor, James E.; Harden, Tessa M.

    2012-01-01

    Flood-frequency analyses for the Black Hills area are especially important because of severe flooding of June 9–10, 1972, that was caused by a large mesoscale convective system and resulted in at least 238 deaths. This paper summarizes results of paleoflood investigations for six study reaches in the central Black Hills. Stratigraphic records and resulting long-term flood chronologies, locally extending more than 2,000 years, were combined with observed and historical flood information to derive flood-frequency estimates. Results indicate that floods as large as and even substantially larger than 1972 have affected most of the study reaches. Results of the paleoflood investigations provide better physically based information on low-probability floods than has been previously available, substantially improving estimates of the magnitude and frequency of large floods in the central Black Hills and reducing associated uncertainties. Collectively, the results provide insights regarding regional flood-generation processes and their spatial controls, enable approaches for extrapolation of results for hazard assessment beyond specific study reaches, and provide a millennial-scale perspective on the 1972 flooding.

  4. Compilation of selected hydrologic data, through water year 1992, Black Hills Hydrology Study, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bradford, Wendell

    1994-01-01

    This report presents water-level, water-quailty, and springflow data that have been collected or compiled, through water year 1992, for the Black Hills Hydrology Study. This study is a long-term cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the South Dakota Department of Environmental and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District (which represents various local and county cooperators). Water-level data are presented for 32 observation wells and 2 cave sites in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. The wells are part of a network of observation wells maintained by the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are completed in various bedrock formations that are utilized as aquifers in the Black Hills area. Both cave sites are located within outcrops of the Madison Limestone. Data presented include site descriptions, hydrographs, and tabular data. Water- quality data are presented for 12 surface-water sites and 5 ground-water sites. Data presented include field parameters, bacteria counts, and concentrations of common ions, solids, nutrients, trace elements, radiometrics, cyanide, phenols, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended sediment. Spring data are presented for 83 springs and 21 stream reaches with significant springflow components. Data presented include site information, discharge, and field water-quality parameters including temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH.

  5. Spatial analysis of Northern Goshawk Territories in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klaver, Robert W.; Backlund, Douglas; Bartelt, Paul E.; Erickson, Michael G.; Knowles, Craig J.; Knowles, Pamela R.; Wimberly, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) is the largest of the three North American species ofAccipiter and is more closely associated with older forests than are the other species. Its reliance on older forests has resulted in concerns about its status, extensive research into its habitat relationships, and litigation. Our objective was to model the spatial patterns of goshawk territories in the Black Hills, South Dakota, to make inferences about the underlying processes. We used a modification of Ripley's K function that accounts for inhomogeneous intensity to determine whether territoriality or habitat determined the spacing of goshawks in the Black Hills, finding that habitat conditions rather than territoriality were the determining factor. A spatial model incorporating basal area of trees in a stand of forest, canopy cover, age of trees >23 cm in diameter, number of trees per hectare, and geographic coordinates provided good fit to the spatial patterns of territories. There was no indication of repulsion at close distances that would imply spacing was determined by territoriality. These findings contrast with those for the Kaibab Plateau, Arizona, where territoriality is an important limiting factor. Forest stands where the goshawk nested historically are now younger and have trees of smaller diameter, probably having been modified by logging, fire, and insects. These results have important implications for the goshawk's ecology in the Black Hills with respect to mortality, competition, forest fragmentation, and nest-territory protection.

  6. Paleomagnetism of Eocene Intrusive Rocks, Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.; Fawcett, T. C.; Gregiore, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming are a large Precambrian-cored Laramide uplift. Intruding the Black Hills are a diverse suite of igneous rocks, which include phonolites, trachytes, latites, garnet-bearing rhyolites, and pyroxenites. These intrusive bodies range in size from several meter outcrop-scale bodies, to several 10s of km wide intrusive complexes. New geochronology (40Ar-39Ar) data indicate many of these intrusive rocks are between 58 and 45 Ma in age (Duke at al, 2002). As part of a larger paleomagnetic study aimed at Jurassic strata surrounding the Black Hills, a collection of 20 sites and 145 samples of the Eocene intrusive rocks was made. A combination of alternating field, thermal, and liquid nitrogen step-wise demagnetization revealed that, with a few exceptions, these rocks have two well-defined magnetization components. The first-removed component is interpreted to be a present (dipole) field magnetization, and is removed by 10 to 30 mT a.f., or 200 C thermal demagnetization steps. The second-removed components have either positive or negative inclinations, and are defined by demagnetization steps between 30 and 200 mT a.f., or 300 to 630 C thermal demagnetization steps. These components are interpreted to be ancient, presumably Eocene, magnetizations. A preliminary mean of the normal-polarity sites is D=352, I=59.3, k=26.7, a95=18.2, N=4, and of the reverse-polarity sites is D=154.9, I=-61.3, k=23.1, a95=18.2, N=4. The combined mean direction is D=344.9, I=60.3, k=28.8, a95=10.5, N=8. Two sites of rhyolites at Mt. Theodore Roosevelt have well-defined magnetization components, but either mixed polarity (Site 99Trr1), or reverse-polarity with what might be a transitional-field direction (D=27.7, I=-37.4, k=18.0, a95=18.6, n=5), and are not included in the calculation of means. The magnetizations recorded by these Eocene rocks are essentially identical to the expected direction for the Black Hills calculated from the Diehl et al., 1983

  7. Ground-Water Resources in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Sawyer, J. Foster

    2003-01-01

    The availability of ground-water resources in the Black Hills area is influenced by many factors including location, local recharge and ground-water flow conditions, and structural features. Thus, the availability of ground water can be extremely variable throughout the Black Hills area, and even when water is available, it may not be suitable for various uses depending on the water quality. The major bedrock aquifers in the Black Hills area are the Deadwood, Madison, Minnelusa, Minnekahta, and Inyan Kara aquifers. Minor bedrock aquifers occur in other hydrogeologic units, including confining units, due to fracturing and interbedded permeable layers. Various information and maps are presented in this report that describe availability and quality of ground-water resources in the Black Hills area. However, there is no guarantee of obtaining usable water at any location due to the extreme potential variability in conditions that can affect the availability and quality of ground water in the area. Maps presented in this report include the distribution of hydrogeologic units; depth to the top of the five formations that contain major aquifers; thickness of the five formations that contain major aquifers; potentiometric maps for the five major aquifers; saturated thickness of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers; water temperature in the Madison aquifer; specific conductance in the Madison, Minnelusa, and Inyan Kara aquifers; hardness in the Inyan Kara aquifer; sulfate concentrations in the Minnelusa aquifer; and radon concentrations in the Deadwood aquifer. Water quality of the major aquifers generally is very good in and near outcrop areas but deteriorates progressively with distance from the outcrops. In the Minnelusa aquifer, an abrupt increase in concentrations of dissolved sulfate occurs downgradient from outcrop areas, where a zone of active anhydrite dissolution occurs. Most limitations for the use of ground water are related to aesthetic qualities associated with

  8. Hydrologic response for a high-elevation storm in the South Dakota Black Hills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunkers, Matthew J.; Smith, Melissa; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Hoogestraat, Galen K.

    2015-01-01

    A group of thunderstorms produced >4 in of rain during four periods of progressively more intense rainfall across a small part of a relatively high-elevation area of the northern Black Hills on 5 August 2014. The resulting hydrologic response was noteworthy in two very small headwater drainage basins, where the measured peak flows are by far the largest—relative to drainage area—ever documented for the high-elevation Limestone Plateau area. However, peak flows attenuated quickly in a downstream direction owing to the storms tracking perpendicular to the drainage direction, moderately dry antecedent conditions, and progressive widening of the valley bottoms.

  9. 2480 Ma mafic magmatism in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota: A new link connecting the Wyoming and Superior cratons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahl, P.S.; Hamilton, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Foland, K.A.; Frei, R.; McCombs, J.A.; Holm, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Laramide Black Hills uplift of southwest South Dakota exposes a Precambrian crystalline core of ???2560-2600 Ma basement granitoids nonconformably overlain by two Paleoproterozoic intracratonic rift successions. In the northern Black Hills, a 1 km thick, layered sill (the Blue Draw metagabbro) that intrudes the older rift succession provides a key constraint on the timing of mafic magmatism and of older rift-basin sedimentation. Ion microprobe spot analyses of megacrysts of magmatic titanite from a horizon of dioritic pegmatite in the uppermost sill portion yield a 207Pb/206Pb upper-intercept age of 2480 ?? 6 Ma (all age errors ??2??), comparable to two-point 207Pb/206Pb errorchron ages obtained by Pb stepwise leaching of the same titanites. Nearly concordant domains in coexisting magmatic zircon yield apparent spot ages ranging from 2458 ?? 16 to 2284 ?? 20 Ma (i.e., differentially reset along U-Pb concordia), and hornblende from an associated metadiorite yields a partially reset date with oldest apparent-age increments ranging between 2076 ?? 16 and 2010 ?? 8 Ma. We interpret these data as indicating that an episode of gabbroic magmatism occurred at 2480 Ma, in response to earlier rifting of the eastern edge of the Wyoming craton. Layered mafic intrusions of similar thickness and identical age occur along a rifted belt in the southern Superior craton (Sudbury region, Ontario). Moreover, these mafic intrusions are spatially aligned using previous supercontinent restorations of the Wyoming and Superior cratons (Kenorland-Superia configurations). This new "piercing point" augments one previously inferred by spatial-temporal correlation of the Paleoproterozoic Huronian (southern Ontario) and Snowy Pass (southeastern Wyoming) supergroups. We propose that layered mafic intrusions extending from Nemo, South Dakota, to Sudbury, Ontario, delineate an axial rift zone along which Wyoming began to separate from Superior during initial fragmentation of the Neoarchean

  10. Element partitioning and thermal-compositional patterns in coexisting muscovites and biotites, Black Hills, SD

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, P.S.; Feldman, S.G.; Wehn, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-two elements in 50 coexisting muscovites and biotites from pelitic schists of the southern Black Hills have been analyzed by ICP spectrometry. Most elements exhibit highly systematic partitioning between the micas over a wide range of composition. Sillimanite-zone micas are typically enriched in K, Ti, and Li but depleted in Na relative to those from the staurolite zone. Also, sillimanite-zone biotites are relatively depleted in Mg/(Fe+Mg), but enriched in Mn, relative to those of the staurolite zone. Preliminary verification of the muscovite-biotite thermometer (calibration of Hoish (1989)) is indicated from a regional thermal pattern that is strikingly similar to that obtained by Friberg et al. (in prep.) using garnet (rim) - biotite thermometry. The lowest K/(Na+K)[sup mus], X[sub Li] (bio), mica temperatures, and highest X[sub Mg](bio) in the region are observed in staurolite-zone schists between the Grand Junction and Hill City Faults. These regional patterns correlate with: (1) mapped gravity lows (subsurface granitic plutons ), (2) mapped pegmatite density, and (3) proximity to the main mass of Harney Peak Granite. As such, pelitic micas appear to record the T-X signatures of vertically( )-flowing alkali metasomatic fluids that variably overprinted low- to medium-grade regional-metamorphic assemblages during emplacement of the Harney Peak granite-pegmatite complex. The area between the Grand Junction and Hill City faults appears least affected by the metasomatic activity associated with this magmatic event.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the 9-10 June 1972 Black Hills Storm Using CSU RAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nair, U. S.; Hjelmfelt, Mark R.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.

    1997-01-01

    Strong easterly flow of low-level moist air over the eastern slopes of the Black Hills on 9-10 June 1972 generated a storm system that produced a flash flood, devastating the area. Based on observations from this storm event, and also from the similar Big Thompson 1976 storm event, conceptual models have been developed to explain the unusually high precipitation efficiency. In this study, the Black Hills storm is simulated using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. Simulations with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initializations and different grid structures are presented. The conceptual models of storm structure proposed by previous studies are examined in light of the present simulations. Both homogeneous and inhomogeneous initialization results capture the intense nature of the storm, but the inhomogeneous simulation produced a precipitation pattern closer to the observed pattern. The simulations point to stationary tilted updrafts, with precipitation falling out to the rear as the preferred storm structure. Experiments with different grid structures point to the importance of removing the lateral boundaries far from the region of activity. Overall, simulation performance in capturing the observed behavior of the storm system was enhanced by use of inhomogeneous initialization.

  12. Associations between iron concentration and productivity in montane streams of the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayer, Cari Ann; Holcomb, Benjamin M.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient found in aquatic systems that can influence nutrient availability (e.g., phosphorus) and primary productivity. In streams, high iron concentrations often are associated with low pH as a result of acid mine drainage, which is known to affect fish and invertebrate communities. Streams in the Black Hills of South Dakota are generally circumneutral in pH, yet select streams exhibit high iron concentrations associated with natural iron deposits. In this study, we examined relationships among iron concentration, priphyton biomass, macroinvertebrate abundance, and fish assemblages in four Black Hills streams. The stream with the highest iron concentration (~5 mg Fe/L) had reduced periphyton biomass, invertebrate abundance, and fish biomass compared to the three streams with lower iron levels (0.1 to 0.6 mg Fe/L). Reduced stream productivity was attributed to indirect effects of ferric iron Fe+++), owing to iron-hydroxide precipitation that influenced habitat quality (i.e., substrate and turbidity) and food availability (periphyton and invertebrates) for higher trophic levels (e.g., fish). Additionally, reduced primary and secondary production was associated with reduced standing stocks of salmonid fishes. Our findings suggested that naturally occurring iron deposits may constrain macroinvertebrate and fish production.

  13. Mordenite and montmorillonite alteration of glass structures in a rhyolite pipe, northern Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.G. )

    1991-10-01

    Green structures, 0.5 to 1.5 in. across, occur in a Tertiary rhyolite pipe in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota. The structures are of two types: angular to ellipsoidal masses and stretched or smeared structures. Thin section analysis revealed that those of the first type are massive, with no internal structure, and those of the second type are cellular and have classic flame structure characteristics. XRD indicated the composition to be a mixture of secondary mordenite (a zeolite) and montmorillonite. The first type is interpreted to be deuterically altered vitrophyre clasts and the second type to be altered vesicular structures produced by degassing of the magma in the pipe. Chemical analysis of the alteration material indicates a loss of alkalies and silica, with an increase in water, CaO, MgO and ferric iron when compared to the composition of fresh vitrophyre from the same pipe. The changes are in agreement with experimental work on the alteration of rhyolitic glass by a number of researchers. This is the first occurrence of mordenite reported for the Black Hills.

  14. Thick domain walls in AdS black hole spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Moderski, Rafal; Rogatko, Marek

    2006-08-15

    Equations of motion for a real self-gravitating scalar field in the background of a black hole with negative cosmological constant were solved numerically. We obtain a sequence of static axisymmetric solutions representing thick domain wall cosmological black hole systems, depending on the mass of black hole, cosmological parameter and the parameter binding black hole mass with the width of the domain wall. For the case of extremal cosmological black hole the expulsion of scalar field from the black hole strongly depends on it.

  15. Gold in the Black Hills, South Dakota, and how new deposits might be found

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, James Jennings

    1974-01-01

    Of the recorded production of 34,694,552 troy ounces of gold mined in South Dakota through 1971, about 90 percent has come from Precambrian ore bodies in the Homestake mine at Lead in the northern Black Hills. Most of the rest has come from ore deposited in the Deadwood Formation (Cambrian) by hydrothermal replacement during early Tertiary igneous activity. About 99 percent of the total production has been within a radius of 5 miles (8 km) of Lead. Elsewhere, prospecting has been intense, both in the Precambrian rocks, which are exposed over an area 61 by 26 miles (98 by 42 km), and in nearby Paleozoic rocks. All the known ore bodies have been found either at the surface or in subsurface workings of operating mines. Efforts to find totally new deposits have been modest and sporadic; no comprehensive and systematic program has ever been attempted. Obviously, any exploration program should be aimed at finding a new deposit resembling the Homestake in the Precambrian, but discovery in the Deadwood of a new group of ore bodies containing several hundred thousand ounces of gold would certainly be worthwhile. Evidence has long been available that the Deadwood deposits and the Homestake deposit are somehow related. Current opinion is that (1) the Homestake ore is mainly Precambrian, (2) a trivial amount of Homestake ore is Tertiary, (3)gold in Deadwood basal conglomerate is largely of placer origin, and (4) the gold of replacement deposits in the Deadwood and in other rock units came originally from sources similar to the Homestake deposit or its parent materials. Homestake ore is virtually entirely contained in a unit of iron-formation locally known as the Homestake Formation, which seemingly had more gold in the original sediments than similar rocks exposed elsewhere in the Black Hills. Gold, sulfur, and other constituents were subsequently concentrated in ore shoots in zones of dilation caused by cross folds that deformed earlier major folds. These ore shoots are in

  16. The Black Hills: a Keystone of North American Continental Evolution for over 2.6 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. S.; Dahl, P. S.; Duke, G.; Duke, E. F.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2006-12-01

    The Black Hills region provides an excellent field laboratory to study numerous aspects of the continental evolution of North America from the Neoarchean to the Recent. The Neoarchean basement consists of 2.60- 2.56 Ga gneissic granitoids that formed during an early episode of convergent thermotectonism. In the Paleoproterozoic the region experienced rifting at 2.48-1.98 Ga and renewed convergence at 1.75-1.71 Ga associated with early breakup and final reassembly of the Wyoming and Superior cratons, respectively. The product of this cratonic reconfiguration was a broad deformation zone known as the Trans-Hudson Orogen. Thermotectonic activity within the Dakota segment of this zone occurred at ~1820-1680 Ma compared to ~1860-1790 Ma in the Canadian segment. South of the Black Hills region the Yavapai (Central Plains) province was also accreted during the Precambrian. An extensive sequence of Cambrian through Cretaceous marine and continental sediments were laid down before the Black Hills were uplifted during the Laramide orogeny, which exposed the Precambrian crystalline core and its structures that record evidence for the major episodes of compressional deformation and intervening rifting events noted above. Laramide deformation may have actually localized along the Precambrian structures. Alkalic extrusive and intrusive activity occurred during late Laramide stages (~58 Ma) and continued up until ~46 Ma. Aeromagnetic evidence indicates that these mantle-derived magmas intruded along a N70°W trending fault with 50 km of left-lateral offset on the Precambrian surface. The Black Hills also sits astride the transition from the Rocky Mountain region to the northern Great Plains. South of the Black Hills there is evidence from fission track and stream deposition /erosion that the transition has been uplifting during the past 5 Ma. Other geophysical anomalies exist in the region including the North American Central Plains conductivity anomaly within the Trans Hudson

  17. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Harmark, Troels

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensio0008.

  18. Selected hydrologic data, through water year 1994, Black Hills Hydrology Study, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, D.G.; Bradford, W.L.; Neitzert, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents water-level, water-quality, and spring data that have been collected or compiled, through water year 1994, for the Black Hills Hydrology Study. This study is a long-term cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and the West Dakota Water Development District (which represents various local and county cooperators). This report is the second in a series of biennial project data reports produced for the study. Daily water-level data are presented for 39 observation wells and 2 cave sites in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. The wells are part of a network of observation wells maintained by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and are completed in various bedrock formations that are utilized as aquifers in the Black Hills area. Both cave sites are located within outcrops of the Madison Limestone. Data presented include site descriptions, hydrographs, and tables of daily water levels. Annual measurements of water levels collected during water years 1993-94 from a network of 20 additional, miscellaneous wells are presented. These wells are part of a Statewide network of wells completed in bedrock aquifers that was operated from 1959 through 1989 in cooperation with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Site descriptions and hydrographs for the entire period of record for each site also are presented. Drawdown and recovery data are presented for five wells that were pumped (or flowed) for collection of water-quality samples. These wells are part of the network of observation wells for which daily water-level records are compiled. Water-quality data are presented for 20 surface-water sites and 22 ground-water sites. Data presented include field parameters, bacteria counts, and concentrations of common ions, solids, nutrients, trace elements, radiometrics and isotopes, cyanide, phenols, and suspended sediment. Spring data are

  19. A comprehensive guide to fuels treatment practices for ponderosa pine in the Black Hills, Colorado Front Range, and Southwest

    Treesearch

    M.E. Hunter; W.D. Shepperd; J.E. Lentile; J.E. Lundquist; M.G. Andreu; J.L. Butler; F.W. Smith

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present recommendations for fuels treatments in ponderosa pine forests in the Southwest, Colorado Front Range, and Black Hills of South Dakota. We have synthesized existing knowledge from the peer-reviewed literature and administrative studies and acquired local knowledge through a series of discussions with fuels treatment...

  20. 76 FR 53400 - Black Hills National Forest, SD; Thunder Basin National Grassland, WY; Teckla-Osage-Rapid City...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Forest Service Black Hills National Forest, SD; Thunder Basin National Grassland, WY; Teckla-Osage-Rapid... Basin National Grasslands, private lands, BLM lands, and state lands in Wyoming. The line would be... Geri Proctor, Thunder Basin National Grasslands, 2250 East Richards Street, Douglas, WY 82633-8922...

  1. An Evaluation of the Industrial Arts Teacher Education Program at Black Hills State College by the Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Leonard D.

    The major purpose of this study was to evaluate the importance of the basic elements of the courses taught in the industrial arts teacher education program at Black Hills State College. Another purpose was to obtain data relative to the status and geographic location of the graduates. A list of 86 graduates who majored in industrial arts from 1960…

  2. Selected Hydrogeologic Data For the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood Aquifers in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    uplifted during the Laramide orogeny (Feldman and Heimlich , 1980). The oldest geologic units in the study area are Precambrian metamorphic and igneous...Geological Survey Open-File Report 92-84, 10 p. Feldman, R.M., and Heimlich , R.A., 1980, The Black Hills: K/H Geology Field Guide Series, Kendall

  3. Conservation assessment for great-spurred violet in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    J. Hope Hornbeck; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Deanna J. Reyher

    2003-01-01

    Great-spurred violet (Viola selkirkii Pursh ex Goldie; Violaceae) is an early spring flowering herb that occurs in the boreal and Rocky Mountain regions of North America, and cool temperate regions of Eurasia, eastern China and Japan. In the Black Hills, the species is restricted to spruce-dominated forests in cold, shady ravines from 5,400 to 7,000...

  4. Habitat of birds in ponderosa pine and aspen/birch forest in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Todd R. Mills; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake

    2000-01-01

    Birds with both eastern and western distributions occur in the Black Hills of western South Dakota. This forest is mostly ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and is managed for timber. Logging alters forest characteristics and the bird community. We studied habitat relations of breeding songbirds at the stand- and site-level scales in ponderosa pine and...

  5. Selected hydrogeologic data for the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected hydrogeologic data on wells and springs in the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. The data were used to create potentiometric maps for these five aquifers.

  6. Resource selection for foraging by female Merriam's wild turkeys with poults in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Chad P. Lehman; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake; Daniel J. Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of Merriam's wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) resource selection in the context of landscape attributes is an important asset for managing resources on multiple-use public lands. We investigated resource selection for foraging by Merriam's wild turkey broods in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. We collected macro- and microhabitat...

  7. Spatial distribution of ponderosa pine seedlings along environmental gradients within burned areas in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    V. H. Bonnet; A. W. Schoettle; W. D. Shepperd

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, the Jasper fire in the Black Hills, SD, created a mosaic of burned and unburned patches of different sizes within the contiguous ponderosa pine forest. To study the spatial regeneration of ponderosa pine seedlings and the ecological gradients existing between burned and unburned areas two years after fire, we used a transect approach. We demonstrated that...

  8. Forest vegetation of the Black Hills National Forest of South Dakota and Wyoming: A habitat type classification

    Treesearch

    George R. Hoffman; Robert R. Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A vegetation classification based on concepts and methods developed by Daubenmire was used to identify 12 forest habitat types and one shrub habitat type in the Black Hills. Included were two habitat types in the Quercus macrocarpa series, seven in the Pinus ponderosa series, one in the Populus tremuloides series, two in the Picea glaucci series, and one in the...

  9. Maps Showing Geology, Structure, and Geophysics of the Central Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redden, Jack A.; DeWitt, Ed

    2008-01-01

    This 1:100,000-scale digital geologic map details the complex Early Proterozoic granitic rocks, Early Proterozoic supracrustal metamorphic rocks, and Archean crystalline basement of the Black Hills. The granitic rocks host pegmatite deposits renowned for their feldspar, mica, spodumene, and beryl. The supracrustal rocks host the Homestake gold mine, which produced more than 40 million ounces of gold over a 125-year lifetime. The map documents the Laramide deformation of Paleozoic and Mesozoic cover rocks; and shows the distribution of Laramide plutonic rocks associated with precious-metals deposits. Four 1:300,000-scale maps summarize Laramide structures; Early Proterozoic structures; aeromagnetic anomalies; and gravity anomalies. Three 1:500,000-scale maps show geophysical interpretations of buried Early Proterozoic to Archean rocks in western South Dakota and eastern Wyoming.

  10. Climate effects on fire regimes and tree recruitment in Black Hills ponderosa pine forests.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter M

    2006-10-01

    Climate influences forest structure through effects on both species demography (recruitment and mortality) and disturbance regimes. Here, I compare multi-century chronologies of regional fire years and tree recruitment from ponderosa pine forests in the Black Hills of southwestern South Dakota and northeastern Wyoming to reconstructions of precipitation and global circulation indices. Regional fire years were affected by droughts and variations in both Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures. Fires were synchronous with La Niñas, cool phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and warm phases of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). These quasi-periodic circulation features are associated with drought conditions over much of the western United States. The opposite pattern (El Niño, warm PDO, cool AMO) was associated with fewer fires than expected. Regional tree recruitment largely occurred during wet periods in precipitation reconstructions, with the most abundant recruitment coeval with an extended pluvial from the late 1700s to early 1800s. Widespread even-aged cohorts likely were not the result of large crown fires causing overstory mortality, but rather were caused by optimal climate conditions that contributed to synchronous regional recruitment and longer intervals between surface fires. Synchronous recruitment driven by climate is an example of the Moran effect. The presence of abundant fire-scarred trees in multi-aged stands supports a prevailing historical model for ponderosa pine forests in which recurrent surface fires affected heterogenous forest structure, although the Black Hills apparently had a greater range of fire behavior and resulting forest structure over multi-decadal time scales than ponderosa pine forests of the Southwest that burned more often.

  11. Geology and water resources of the northern portion of the Black Hills and adjoining regions in South Dakota and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darton, N.H.

    1909-01-01

    This paper, which supplements the report on the geology and water resources of the southern half of the Black Hills, published in 1901, is the result of studies made at intervals during the years 1899 to 1907. It relates to an area of about 7,500 square miles, situated about half in South Dakota and half in the northeast corner of Wyoming (Pl. II), and covering the northern half of the Black Hills uplift and a wide area of adjacent plains. The report describes the geology of the sedimentary rocks - their stratigraphy, structure, and history - and discusses their mineral resources, including underground water, coal, gypsum, etc. It also contains information respecting surface waters available for irrigation and stock raising, timber, climate, and the history of the topographic development of the region. The crystalline rocks of the central portion of the Black Hills area and the various igneous rocks of later age are shown on some of the accompanying maps but without differentiation, as the study of their geology was not within the scope of the investigation; neither are their mineral resources considered here, for these are treated in other publications.In the field work I have been assisted mainly by Prof. C. C. O'Harra, of the School of Mines at Rapid, who has mapped the geology of large areas about Aladdin, the Devils Tower, Belle Fourche, and Rapid. Dr. W. S. Tangier Smith has mapped portions of the Bear Lodge and Nigger Hill uplifts, and Mr. C. A. Fisher has assisted in portions of the work. The geology of the region from Sturgis to a point beyond Spearfish Canyon was mapped by Prof. T. A. Jaggar, jr., with the assistance of Mr. J. M. Boutwell, in 1898 and 1899.It is desirable to repeat here the statement made in my previous report that all who study the geology of the Black Hills must feel impressed by the remarkably clear general conceptions of the geologic relations of this region afforded by the survey made by Mr. Henry Newton over a quarter of a century

  12. Abundance of Black-backed woodpeckers and other birds in relation to disturbance and forest structure in the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains of South Dakota and Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth A. Matseur

    2017-01-01

    Natural disturbances, such as wildfire and mountain pine beetle (Dentroctonus ponderosae, hereafter MPB) infestations, are two sources of large-scale disturbance that can significantly alter forest structure in the Black Hills. The Black Hills has recently experienced one of the largest MPB outbreaks in the last 100 years, along with varying levels of wildfires...

  13. Hydrologic conditions and budgets for the Black Hills of South Dakota, through water year 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    The Black Hills are an important recharge area for aquifers in the northern Great Plains. The surface-water hydrology of the area is highly influenced by interactions with the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers, including large springs and streamflow loss zones. Defining responses of ground water and streamflow to a variety of hydrogeologic influences is critical to development of hydrologic budgets for ground- and surface-water systems. Hydrographs for 52 observation wells and 1 cave site are used to show ground-water response to cumulative precipitation departures. Aquifers considered include the Precambrian, Deadwood, Madison, Minnelusa, Minnekahta, and Inyan Kara aquifers, with wells completed in the Inyan Kara aquifer generally showing small response to precipitation patterns. Many wells completed in the other aquifers have large short- and long-term fluctuations in water levels. Madison and Minnelusa wells in the southern Black Hills show a general tendency for smaller water-level fluctuations than in other areas. Streamflow characteristics and relations with precipitation are examined for 33 gaging stations representative of five different hydrogeologic settings that are identified. The ?limestone headwater? setting occurs within outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation along the ?Limestone Plateau,? where direct runoff is uncommon and streamflow consists almost entirely of base flow originating as ground-water discharge from headwater springs. Thus, variability in daily, monthly, and annual flow is small. Annual streamflow correlates poorly with precipitation; however, consideration of ?moving averages? (involving up to 11 years of annual precipitation data for some stations) improves relations substantially. The ?crystalline core? area is encircled by the outcrop band of the Madison and Minnelusa Formations and is dominated by igneous and metamorphic rocks. Base flow ranges from about 41 to 73 percent for representative streams; however

  14. The Black Hills-Rapid City flood of June 9-10, 1972: A description of the storm and flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, Francis K.; Hughes, L.A.; Hansen, E.M.; Petersen, M.S.; Kelly, Donovan B.

    1975-01-01

    Almost all the flood peaks occurred between 2230 MDT on June 9 and 0100 MDT on June 10, 1972, in a flood belt about 40 miles long and 20 miles wide along the eastern slopes of the Black Hills. This belt extended from Sturgis, S. Dak., on the north to Hermosa, S. Dak., on the south, with Rapid City near the center. To document the flood, peak discharge determinations were made at 49 sites. Records show that about 13,000 acre-feet of water flowed through Rapid City during the 2 days of flooding. At one point during the night of June 9, the floodwaters rose about 3.5 feet in 15 minutes. Coming off the slopes of the Black Hills, the flood peak traveled the 22 miles between Deer Creek and Rapid City in about 3.5 hours.

  15. Summary of precipitation data for the Black Hills area of South Dakota, water years 1931-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Kenner, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Long-term precipitation records are sum-marized for the Black Hills area of South Dakota. Precipitation data are available for numerous gaging locations; however, few gages have continuous, long-term records, and periods of missing record are common. Thus, a geographic information system (GIS) utilizing an inverse-distance weighting method was developed to generate spatial precipitation distributions from point precipitation data for the Black Hills area, based on available monthly records. The spatial distributions were used to estimate periods of missing record for all 94 gages considered. The resulting monthly records of measured and estimated precipitation are tabulated for water years 1931-98. Average values for water years 1961-90, which is the period used for calculation of climatic normals, were used to develop an isohyetal map of normal annual precipitation for the Black Hills area. Temporal trends in precipitation for the Black Hills area also were examined. Sustained periods of deficit precipitation occurred during 1931-40 and 1948-61. Sustained periods of surplus precipitation occurred during 1941-47, 1962-68, and 1991-98, with the late 1990's identified as the wettest period since 1931. The driest 30-year period was 1931-60, when annual precipitation averaged 17.17 inches for the study area. The wettest 30-year period was 1969-98, when annual precipitation averaged 19.61 inches. Normal annual precipitation (1961-90) for the study area is 19.06 inches, compared with the long-term (1931-98) annual average of 18.61 inches. Annual extremes for the study area have ranged from 10.22 inches in water year 1936 to 27.39 inches in water year 1995.

  16. Growth Response of Pinus ponderosa following a Mixed-Severity Wildfire in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Tara keyser; Fredrick Smith; Wayne Sheppard

    2010-01-01

    In late summer 2000 the Jasper Fire burned ~34,000 ha of ponderosa pine forest in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Although regarded as a catastrophic event, the Jasper Fire left a mosaic of fire severity across the landscape, with live trees present in areas burned under low and moderate fire severity. In October 2005, we cored 96 trees from unburned, low-severity,...

  17. Flood-frequency analyses from paleoflood investigations for Spring, Rapid, Boxelder, and Elk Creeks, Black Hills, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Tessa M.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Stamm, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Flood-frequency analyses for the Black Hills area are important because of severe flooding of June 9-10, 1972, that was caused by a large mesoscale convective system and caused at least 238 deaths. Many 1972 peak flows are high outliers (by factors of 10 or more) in observed records that date to the early 1900s. An efficient means of reducing uncertainties for flood recurrence is to augment gaged records by using paleohydrologic techniques to determine ages and magnitudes of prior large floods (paleofloods). This report summarizes results of paleoflood investigations for Spring Creek, Rapid Creek (two reaches), Boxelder Creek (two subreaches), and Elk Creek. Stratigraphic records and resulting long-term flood chronologies, locally extending more than 2,000 years, were combined with observed and adjusted peak-flow values (gaged records) and historical flood information to derive flood-frequency estimates for the six study reaches. Results indicate that (1) floods as large as and even substantially larger than 1972 have affected most of the study reaches, and (2) incorporation of the paleohydrologic information substantially reduced uncertainties in estimating flood recurrence. Canyons within outcrops of Paleozoic rocks along the eastern flanks of the Black Hills provided excellent environments for (1) deposition and preservation of stratigraphic sequences of late-Holocene flood deposits, primarily in protected slack-water settings flanking the streams; and (2) hydraulic analyses for determination of associated flow magnitudes. The bedrock canyons ensure long-term stability of channel and valley geometry, thereby increasing confidence in hydraulic computations of ancient floods from modern channel geometry. Stratigraphic records of flood sequences, in combination with deposit dating by radiocarbon, optically stimulated luminescence, and cesium-137, provided paleoflood chronologies for 29 individual study sites. Flow magnitudes were estimated from elevations of flood

  18. Chemistry of potassium feldspars from three zoned pegmatites, Black Hills, South Dakota: Implications concerning pegmatite evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.

    1985-03-01

    An initial phase of an extensive geochemical study of pegmatites from the Black Hills, South Dakota, indicates potassium feldspar composition is useful in interpreting petrogenetic relationships among pegmatites and among pegmatite zones within a single pegmatite. The K/Rb and Rb/Sr ratios and Li and Cs contents of the feldspars within each zoned pegmatite, to a first approximation, are consistent with the simple fractional crystallization of the potassium feldspar from a silicate melt from the wall zone to the core of the pegmatites. Some trace element characteristics ( i.e. Cs) have been modified by subsolidus reequilibration of the feldspars with late-stage residual fluid. K/Rb ratios of the potassium feldspar appear to be diagnostic of the pegmatite mineral assemblage. The relationship between K/Rb and mineralogy is as follows: Harney Peak Granite (barren pegmatites) > 180; Li-Fe-Mn phosphate-bearing pegmatites = 90-50; spodumene-bearing pegmatites = 60-40; pollucitebearing pegmatites < 30. Although the K/Rb ratios suggest that the pegmatites studied are genetically related by fractional crystallization to each other and the Harney Peak Granite, overlapping Rb/Sr ratios and the general increase in Sr and Ba with decreasing K/Rb indicate the genetic relationship is much more complex and may also be dependent upon slight variations in source (chemistry and mineralogy) material composition and degrees of partial melting.

  19. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.

  20. Lakota Formation, southern Black Hills, South Dakota: an Early Cretaceous evolving fluvial system

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom D.J.; Fox, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    The fluvial, Early Cretaceous Lakota Formation consists of four spatially and temporally distinct sandstone units in the southern Black Hills and southeastern Powder River basin. Three of these units crop out in proximity to an area of uranium roll-front development (Edgemont mining district) where approximately 2300 wells were drilled and logged. Comparison of the resistivity logs of several of these wells with continuous cores of the Lakota Formation confirms their lithologic sensitivity. These logs (utilized to assist in subsurface facies interpretations where cores were not available), cores, and outcrops are the basis for the following facies interpretations. The discharge, sediment load, and resulting sinuosity of this fluvial system varied substantially throughout the time of Lakota deposition. The oldest unit consists of tabular deposits with complex internal architecture comprised of cross-cutting lateral accretion deposits. Upward-fining grain size, upward-decreasing scale of sedimentary structures, and the angular relationship between lateral accretion surfaces and overlying crevasse-splay deposits support this conclusion. The intermediate unit of ephemeral stream sediments is characterized by abundant pebble- and cobble-strewn erosional surfaces with up to 1.5 m relief, very poor clast sorting, and trough and planar cross-bedding with concave-upward foresets. The youngest unit has a predominance of tabular cross-bedding with back flow climbing ripples and low dispersion of paleocurrent directions, suggesting a relatively straight, bed-load-type channel dominated by trains of sand waves.

  1. Evaluating detection probabilities for American marten in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Joshua B.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Klaver, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring techniques designed to determine presence of forest carnivores, such as American marten (Martes americana), is crucial for validation of survey results. Although comparisons between techniques have been made, little attention has been paid to the issue of detection probabilities (p). Thus, the underlying assumption has been that detection probabilities equal 1.0. We used presence-absence data obtained from a track-plate survey in conjunction with results from a saturation-trapping study to derive detection probabilities when marten occurred at high (>2 marten/10.2 km2) and low (???1 marten/10.2 km2) densities within 8 10.2-km2 quadrats. Estimated probability of detecting marten in high-density quadrats was p = 0.952 (SE = 0.047), whereas the detection probability for low-density quadrats was considerably lower (p = 0.333, SE = 0.136). Our results indicated that failure to account for imperfect detection could lead to an underestimation of marten presence in 15-52% of low-density quadrats in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA. We recommend that repeated site-survey data be analyzed to assess detection probabilities when documenting carnivore survey results.

  2. The influence of light, stream gradient, and iron on Didymosphenia geminata bloom development in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Daniel A.; Mosel, Kyle; Chipps, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    The aquatic nuisance species Didymosphenia geminata was first documented in Rapid Creek of South Dakota’s Black Hills during 2002. Since then, blooms have occurred primarily in a 39-km section of Rapid Creek while blooms were rarely observed in other Black Hills streams. In this study, we evaluated factors related to the presence and development of visible colonies of D. geminata in four streams of the Black Hills. At the watershed scale, stream gradient was negatively associated with the occurrence of D. geminata whereas stream width was positively related to D. geminata presence. At the stream scale, D. geminata coverage was inversely related to canopy coverage and iron concentration. At the local scale, shading by bridges virtually eliminated growth of D. geminata colonies under bridges. At all three scales, proxy measures of light such as stream width, canopy coverage, and bridge shading revealed that light availability was an important factor influencing the presence and coverage of D. geminata colonies. In general, streams that had relatively wide stream reaches (mean = 9.9 m), shallow gradients (mean = 0.22%), and little canopy cover (mean = 13%) were associated with D. geminata blooms. In addition, iron concentrations in streams with D. geminata colonies were lower than in streams without blooms.

  3. Traps and attractants for wood-boring insects in ponderosa pine stands in the Black Hills, South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Costello, Sheryl L; Negrón, José F; Jacobi, William R

    2008-04-01

    Recent large-scale wildfires have increased populations of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Because little is known about possible impacts of wood-boring insects in the Black Hills, land managers are interested in developing monitoring techniques such as flight trapping with semiochemical baits. Two trap designs and four semiochemical attractants were tested in a recently burned ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., forest in the Black Hills. Modified panel and funnel traps were tested in combination with the attractants, which included a woodborer standard (ethanol and alpha-pinene), standard plus 3-carene, standard plus ipsenol, and standard plus ipsdienol. We found that funnel traps were equally efficient or more efficient in capturing wood-boring insects than modified panel traps. Trap catches of cerambycids increased when we added the Ips spp. pheromone components (ipsenol or ipsdienol) or the host monoterpene (3-carene) to the woodborer standard. During the summers of 2003 and 2004, 18 cerambycid, 14 buprestid, and five siricid species were collected. One species of cerambycid, Monochamus clamator (LeConte), composed 49 and 40% of the 2003 and 2004 trap catches, respectively. Two other cerambycids, Acanthocinus obliquus (LeConte) and Acmaeops proteus (Kirby), also were frequently collected. Flight trap data indicated that some species were present throughout the summer, whereas others were caught only at the beginning or end of the summer.

  4. Episodic sediment-discharge events in Cascade Springs, southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Timothy Scott

    1999-01-01

    Cascade Springs is a group of artesian springs in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, with collective flow of about 19.6 cubic feet per second. Beginning on February 28, 1992, a large discharge of red suspended sediment was observed from two of the six known discharge points. Similar events during 1906-07 and 1969 were documented by local residents and newspaper accounts. Mineralogic and grain-size analyses were performed to identify probable subsurface sources of the sediment. Geochemical modeling was performed to evaluate the geochemical evolution of water discharged from Cascade Springs. Interpretations of results provide a perspective on the role of artesian springs in the regional geohydrologic framework. X-ray diffraction mineralogic analyses of the clay fraction of the suspended sediment were compared to analyses of clay-fraction samples taken from nine geologic units at and stratigraphically below the spring-discharge points. Ongoing development of a subsurface breccia pipe(s) in the upper Minnelusa Formation and/or Opeche Shale was identified as a likely source of the suspended sediment; thus, exposed breccia pipes in lower Hell Canyon were examined. Upper Minnelusa Formation breccia pipes in lower Hell Canyon occur in clusters similar to the discrete discharge points of Cascade Springs. Grain-size analyses showed that breccia masses lack clay fractions and have coarser distributions than the wall rocks, which indicates that the red, fine-grained fractions have been carried out as suspended sediment. These findings support the hypothesis that many breccia pipes were formed as throats of abandoned artesian springs. Geochemical modeling was used to test whether geochemical evolution of ground water is consistent with this hypothesis. The evolution of water at Cascade Springs could not be suitably simulated using only upgradient water from the Minnelusa aquifer. A suitable model involved dissolution of anhydrite accompanied by dedolomitization in the

  5. Geochemistry of the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naus, Cheryl A.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    The Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are two of the most important aquifers in the Black Hills area because of utilization for water supplies and important influences on surface-water resources resulting from large springs and streamflow- loss zones. Examination of geochemical information provides a better understanding of the complex flow systems within these aquifers and interactions between the aquifers. Major-ion chemistry in both aquifers is dominated by calcium and bicarbonate near outcrop areas, with basinward evolution towards various other water types. The most notable differences in major-ion chemistry between the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are in concentrations of sulfate within the Minnelusa aquifer. Sulfate concentrations increase dramatically near a transition zone where dissolution of anhydrite is actively occurring. Water chemistry for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers is controlled by reactions among calcite, dolomite, and anhydrite. Saturation indices for gypsum, calcite, and dolomite for most samples in both the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are indicative of the occurrence of dedolomitization. Because water in the Madison aquifer remains undersaturated with respect to gypsum, even at the highest sulfate concentrations, upward leakage into the overlying Minnelusa aquifer has potential to drive increased dissolution of anhydrite in the Minnelusa Formation. Isotopic information is used to evaluate ground-water flowpaths, ages, and mixing conditions for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers. Distinctive patterns exist in the distribution of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in precipitation for the Black Hills area, with isotopically lighter precipitation generally occurring at higher elevations and latitudes. Distributions of 18O in ground water are consistent with spatial patterns in recharge areas, with isotopically lighter 18O values in the Madison aquifer resulting from generally higher elevation recharge sources, relative to the

  6. A Black Hills-Madison Aquifer origin for Dakota Aquifer groundwater in northeastern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Randy; Harvey, F Edwin; Gosselin, David C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of the Dakota Aquifer in South Dakota attributed elevated groundwater sulfate concentrations to Madison Aquifer recharge in the Black Hills with subsequent chemical evolution prior to upward migration into the Dakota Aquifer. This study examines the plausibility of a Madison Aquifer origin for groundwater in northeastern Nebraska. Dakota Aquifer water samples were collected for major ion chemistry and isotopic analysis ((18)O, (2)H, (3)H, (14)C, (13)C, (34)S, (18)O-SO(4), (87)Sr, (37)Cl). Results show that groundwater beneath the eastern, unconfined portion of the study area is distinctly different from groundwater sampled beneath the western, confined portion. In the east, groundwater is calcium-bicarbonate type, with delta(18)O values (-9.6 per thousand to -12.4 per thousand) similar to local, modern precipitation (-7.4 per thousand to -10 per thousand), and tritium values reflecting modern recharge. In the west, groundwater is calcium-sulfate type, having depleted delta(18)O values (-16 per thousand to -18 per thousand) relative to local, modern precipitation, and (14)C ages 32,000 to more than 47,000 years before present. Sulfate, delta(18)O, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O-SO(4) concentrations are similar to those found in Madison Aquifer groundwater in South Dakota. Thus, it is proposed that Madison Aquifer source water is also present within the Dakota Aquifer beneath northeastern Nebraska. A simple Darcy equation estimate of groundwater velocities and travel times using reported physical parameters from the Madison and Dakota Aquifers suggests such a migration is plausible. However, discrepancies between (14)C and Darcy age estimates indicate that (14)C ages may not accurately reflect aquifer residence time, due to mixtures of varying aged water.

  7. Lithium anomaly near Pringle, southern Black Hills, South Dakota, possibly caused by unexposed rare-mineral pegmatite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, James Jennings

    1984-01-01

    Six samples of biotite schist from a site near Pringle, South Dakota, contained from 140 to 750 parts per million lithium. These values are far greater than are found in mica schists in most of the rest of the southern Black Hills. The lithium may have emanated from concealed lithium pegmatite, and such pegmatite can be of interest as a possible source of rare minerals, especially tantalite and beryl. Whether making a full test of the anomaly will become economically judicious is much less clear.

  8. Chemical migration by contact metamorphism between pegmatite/country rocks: natural analogs for radionuclides migration. [Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Walker, R.J.; Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J.; Simon, S.B.

    1983-10-01

    Comparison of trace element signatures of country rocks as a function of distance from the contact with two pegmatites, Tin Mountain and Etta, in the Black Hills of South Dakota, suggests that some elements such as K, Li, Rb, Cs, As, Sb, Zn and Pb, have migrated to distances of 4 to 40 meters during contact metamorphism. The relative degree of migration varies depending on the element. On the other hand, there is virtually no migration of rare earth elements (REE), Al, Sc, Cr, Hf, U, and Th. Biotite and muscovite are effective trace element traps for Li, Rb and Cs. Biotite has a greater affinity for Rb, Cs and Li than muscovite.

  9. Lithium anomaly near Pringle, southern Black Hills, South Dakota, possibly caused by unexposed rare-mineral pegmatite

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Six samples of biotite schist from a site near Pringle, South Dakota, contained from 140 to 750 parts per million lithium. These values are far greater than are found in mica schists in most of the rest of the southern Black Hills. The lithium may have emanated from concealed lithium pegmatite, and such pegmatite can be of interest as a possible source of rare minerals, especially tantalite and beryl. Whether making a full test of the anomaly will become economically judicious is much less clear. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Inventory of forest and rangeland resources, including forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Black Hills, and Manitou, Colorado test sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C.; Aldrich, R. C.; Weber, F. P.; Driscoll, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Some current beetle-killed ponderosa pine can be detected on S190-B photography imaged over the Bear Lodge mountains in the Black Hills National Forest. Detections were made on SL-3 imagery (September 13, 1973) using a zoom lens microscope to view the photography. At this time correlations have not been made to all of the known infestation spots in the Bear Lodge mountains; rather, known infestations have been located on the SL-3 imagery. It was determined that the beetle-killed trees were current kills by stereo viewing of SL-3 imagery on one side and SL-2 on the other. A successful technique was developed for mapping current beetle-killed pine using MSS imagery from mission 247 flown by the C-130 over the Black Hills test site in September 1973. Color enhancement processing on the NASA/JSC, DAS system using three MSS channels produced an excellent quality detection map for current kill pine. More importantly it provides a way to inventory the dead trees by relating PCM counts to actual numbers of dead trees.

  11. Hydrologic Effects of the 1988 Galena Fire, Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet M.; Ohlen, Donald O.

    2004-01-01

    The Galena Fire burned about 16,788 acres of primarily ponderosa pine forest during July 5-8, 1988, in the Black Hills area of South Dakota. The fire burned primarily within the Grace Coolidge Creek drainage basin and almost entirely within the boundaries of Custer State Park. A U.S. Geological Survey gaging station with streamflow records dating back to 1977 was located along Grace Coolidge Creek within the burned area. About one-half of the gaging station's 26.8-square-mile drainage area was burned. The drainage basin for Bear Gulch, which is tributary to Grace Coolidge Creek, was burned particularly severely, with complete deforestation occurring in nearly the entirety of the area upstream from a gaging station that was installed in 1989. A study to evaluate effects of the Galena Fire on streamflow, geomorphology, and water quality was initiated in 1988. The geomorphologic and water-quality components of the study were completed by 1990 and are summarized in this report. A data-collection network consisting of streamflow- and precipitation-gaging stations was operated through water year 1998 for evaluation of effects on streamflow characteristics, including both annual-yield and peak-flow characteristics, which are the main focus of this report. Moderately burned areas did not experience a substantial increase in the rate of surface erosion; however, severely burned areas underwent surficial erosion nearly twice that of the unburned areas. The sediment production rate of Bear Gulch estimated 8 to 14 months after the fire was 870 ft3/acre (44 tons/acre). Substantial degradation of stream channels within the severely burned headwater areas of Bear Gulch was documented. Farther downstream, channel aggradation resulted from deposition of sediments transported from the headwater areas. The most notable water-quality effect was on concentrations of suspended sediment, which were orders of magnitude higher for Bear Gulch than for the unburned control area. Effects on

  12. Single-domain spectral method for black hole puncture data

    SciTech Connect

    Ansorg, Marcus; Bruegmann, Bernd; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2004-09-15

    We calculate puncture initial data corresponding to both single and binary black hole solutions of the constraint equations by means of a pseudospectral method applied in a single spatial domain. Introducing appropriate coordinates, these methods exhibit rapid convergence of the conformal factor and lead to highly accurate solutions. As an application we investigate small mass ratios of binary black holes and compare these with the corresponding test mass limit that we obtain through a semianalytical limiting procedure. In particular, we compare the binding energy of puncture data in this limit with that of a test particle in the Schwarzschild spacetime and find that it deviates by 50% from the Schwarzschild result at the innermost stable circular orbit of Schwarzschild, if the ADM mass at each puncture is used to define the local black hole masses.

  13. Primordial black hole and wormhole formation by domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Heling; Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    In theories with a broken discrete symmetry, Hubble sized spherical domain walls may spontaneously nucleate during inflation. These objects are subsequently stretched by the inflationary expansion, resulting in a broad distribution of sizes. The fate of the walls after inflation depends on their radius. Walls smaller than a critical radius fall within the cosmological horizon early on and collapse due to their own tension, forming ordinary black holes. But if a wall is large enough, its repulsive gravitational field becomes dominant much before the wall can fall within the cosmological horizon. In this ``supercritical'' case, a wormhole throat develops, connecting the ambient exterior FRW universe with an interior baby universe, where the exponential growth of the wall radius takes place. The wormhole pinches off in a time-scale comparable to its light-crossing time, and black holes are formed at its two mouths. As discussed in previous work, the resulting black hole population has a wide distribution of masses and can have significant astrophysical effects. The mechanism of black hole formation has been previously studied for a dust-dominated universe. Here we investigate the case of a radiation-dominated universe, which is more relevant cosmologically, by using numerical simulations in order to find the initial mass of a black hole as a function of the wall size at the end of inflation. For large supercritical domain walls, this mass nearly saturates the upper bound according to which the black hole cannot be larger than the cosmological horizon. We also find that the subsequent accretion of radiation satisfies a scaling relation, resulting in a mass increase by about a factor of 2.

  14. Domain Walls, Black Holes and Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-07-25

    Supersymmetric solutions, such as BPS domain walls or black holes, in four- and five-dimensional supergravity theories with eight supercharges can be described by effective quantum mechanics with a potential term. We show how properties of the latter theory can help us to learn about the physics of supersymmetric vacua and BPS solutions in these supergravity theories. The general approach is illustrated in a number of specific examples where scalar fields of matter multiplets take values in symmetric coset spaces.

  15. Fluid inclusion and carbon isotope studies of quartz-graphite veins, Black Hills, South Dakota, and Ruby Range, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Edward F.; Galbreath, Kevin C.; Trusty, Kane J.

    1990-03-01

    Fluid inclusions and graphite are intimately associated in quartz veins that cut high grade metamorphic rocks in the Black Hills, South Dakota, and at the Crystal Graphite Mine in the southwestern Ruby Range, Montana. Measured fluid inclusion compositions and volumetric properties were compared with calculated compositions of graphite-saturated fluids and with estimates of metamorphic P-T conditions and carbon isotope ratios of graphite were measured to evaluate possible sources of carbon in veinforming fluids. Fluid inclusions from the two areas contrast markedly in their reliability as recorders of metamorphic fluid compositions and metamorphic conditions. The δ13C of graphite associated with the veins indicates that the source of carbon was also different in the two areas. In the Black Hills veins, fluid inclusions are dominantly H 2OCO 2 mixtures with 24-96 mol% CO 2 and a maximum of ˜5 mol% N 2 and ˜ 13 mol% CH 4. Isochores for the highest density inclusions pass near estimated peak metamorphic conditions (550°-600°C, 4.5-6.5 kbar) and fluid inclusion compositions are compatible with thermodynamic predictions for fluids in equilibrium with graphite in the stated P- T range at geologically reasonable ƒ O 2.Graphite in a 12-cm wall-rock alteration zone adjacent to one of the veins has uniform δ13C of -20.8 ± 0.2%., indicating that carbon in the vein-forming fluid was derived largely from reduced organic carbon. In the Ruby Range, peak metamorphic conditions were higher - ˜750°-850°C, 5-8 kbar. In contrast to the Black Hills veins, fluid inclusions are almost all CO 2CH 4 mixtures (with unknown N 2 content). Many contain > 20 equivalent mol% CH 4 and mixed H 2OCO 2 inclusions were observed in only one sample. Inclusions in one vein have ˜ 84-97 mol% CH 4. Virtually all inclusion compositions are incompatible with computed graphite equilibria and inclusion isochores likewise do not pass through estimated metamorphic conditions. The density and

  16. Comparing the Preferences of Black, Asian, Hispanic, and White Fishermen at Moraine Hills State Park, Illinois

    Treesearch

    Dale J. Blahna

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study conducted at Moraine Hills State Park outside of Chicago, which is one of the few Illinois state parks that gets a high level of use by ethnic minorities. Personal interviews were conducted with 310 fishermen at two sites within the park: the McHenry Dam, a highly developed recreation area on the Fox River, and Wilderness Lake...

  17. Extending Black Domain Name List by Using Co-occurrence Relation between DNS Queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazumichi; Ishibashi, Keisuke; Toyono, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Haruhisa; Yoshino, Hideaki

    Botnet threats, such as server attacks or sending of spam e-mail, have been increasing. Therefore, infected hosts must be found and their malicious activities mitigated. An effective method for finding infected hosts is to use a blacklist of domain names. When a bot receives attack commands from a Command and Control (C&C) server, it attempts to resolve domain names of C&C servers. We can thus detect infected hosts by finding these that send queries on black domain names. However, we cannot find all infected hosts because of the inaccuracy of blacklists. There are many black domain names, and the lifetimes of these domain names are short; therefore a blacklist cannot cover all black domain names. We thus present a method for finding unknown black domain names by using DNS query data and an existing blacklist of known black domain names. To achieve this, we focus on DNS queries sent by infected hosts. One bot sends several queries on black domain names due to C&C server redundancy. We use the co-occurrence relation of two different domain names to find unknown black domain names and extend the blacklist. If a domain name frequently co-occurs with a known black name, we assume that the domain name is also black. A cross-validation evaluation of the proposed method showed that 91.2% of domain names that are on the validation list scored in the top 1%.

  18. Changes in forest structure after a large, mixed-severity wildfire in ponderosa pine forests of the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    Treesearch

    Tara L. Keyser; Leigh B. Lentile; Frederick W. Smith; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated changes in forest structure related to fire severity after a wildfire in ponderosa pine forests of the Black Hills, South Dakota, where 25% burned at low, 48% at moderate, and 27% at high severity. We compared tree mortality, fine (FWD) and coarse woody debris (CWD) and tree regeneration in areas burned under different severity. With low severity,...

  19. Hieracium caespitosum and Hieracium piloselloides (Asteraceae) in the Black Hills National Forest: New state records for South Dakota, U.S.A

    Treesearch

    Brian E. Dickerson; Cheryl Mayer; Justin Ramsey; Zach Mergen; Mark Gabel

    2016-01-01

    Hieracium spp. (Asteraceae) are noted for their taxonomic complexity, frequent incidence of apomixis and polyploidy, and invasive tendencies. Here we report the Eurasian taxa, Hieracium caespitosum Dumort. and Hieracium piloselloides Vill., as recent additions to the flora of South Dakota. Plants were collected at three locations in the Black Hills during 2014 and 2015...

  20. Short-term impact of post-fire salvage logging on regeneration, hazardous fuel accumulation, and understorey development in ponderosa pine forest of the Black Hills, SD, USA

    Treesearch

    Tara L Keyser; Fredrick W Smith; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2009-01-01

    We examined the impacts of post-fire salvage logging on regeneration, fuel accumulation, and understorey vegetation and assessed whether the effects of salvage logging differed between stands burned under moderate and high fire severity following the 2000 Jasper Fire in the Black Hills. In unsalvaged sites, fire-related tree mortality...

  1. Patch structure, fire-scar formation, and tree regeneration in a large mixed-severity fire in the South Dakota Black Hills, USA

    Treesearch

    Leigh B. Lentile; Frederick W. Smith; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2005-01-01

    We compared patch structure, fire-scar formation, and seedling regeneration in patches of low, moderate, and high burn severity following the large (~34 000 ha) Jasper fire of 2000 that occurred in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex P. & C. Laws.) forests of the Black Hills of South Dakota, USA. This fire created a patchy mosaic of effects...

  2. Developing management guidelines that balance cattle and timber production with ecological interests in the Black Hills of South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowanski, Kurt M.

    Forested lands contribute to the United States (US) economy by providing livestock and timber production. Livestock grazing of forested lands has been widespread throughout the western US since the settlement era, and currently occurs on 51.4 million hectares (ha) representing 16% of all US grazing land and 22% of all US forested land (Nickerson et al. 2011). While livestock grazing and timber harvest are occurring on a substantial amount of forested land, relationships between management practices, tree stocking, timber production, forage production, livestock grazing, wildlife, aesthetics, and ecological integrity are not well documented. Whether considering timber or cattle, finding a balance between production and resource conservation is a fundamental challenge to agricultural producers, and is often a tradeoff between short term gains and long term sustainability. This dissertation aims to identify livestock and timber management practices that optimize production and are ecologically conservative. Specifically, I focused on three objectives. First, I reviewed the published literature and summarized what is known about best-practices for concurrent management of livestock and timber production in pine forests in the US. I found most studies came from the southeastern and western US where timber and livestock production on the same land unit are common. The relationship between pine cover and forage seemed fairly consistent across the US, and production was optimized when cattle grazed open canopy forests with basal areas between 5 and 14 m2 ha-1 (15-35% tree canopy cover). Second, I developed forest cover maps to estimate forage production in the Black Hills, South Dakota (SD) for the period from 1999 to 2015. I developed a regression model based on Landsat and Ikonos satellite imagery and was able to detect large changes in forest cover over time. I then used these maps in combination with maps of soil type and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) to update

  3. Late Holocene flood probabilities in the Black Hills, South Dakota with emphasis on the Medieval Climate Anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Tessa M.; O'Connor, James E.; Driscoll, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    A stratigraphic record of 35 large paleofloods and four large historical floods during the last 2000 years for four basins in the Black Hills of South Dakota reveals three long-term flooding episodes, identified using probability distributions, at A.D.: 120–395, 900–1290, and 1410 to present. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~ A.D. 900–1300) the four basins collectively experienced 13 large floods compared to nine large floods in the previous 800 years, including the largest floods of the last 2000 years for two of the four basins. This high concentration of extreme floods is likely caused by one or more of the following: 1) instability of air masses caused by stronger than normal westerlies; 2) larger or more frequent hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean; and/or 3) reduced land covering vegetation or increased forest fires caused by persistent regional drought.

  4. Geologic structure and altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation, northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peter, Kathy D.; Kyllonen, David P.; Mills, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1981, a 3-yr project was conducted to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the sedimentary bedrock aquifers in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. The project was limited to three bedrock units in order of increasing age: the Cretaceous Inyan kara Group, Permian and Pennsylvanian Minnelusa Formation, and Mississippian Madison (or Pahasapa) Limestone. This map shows the altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation in the northern Black Hills, and shows the configuration of the structural features in the northern part of the Black Hills and the eastern part of the Bear Lodge Mountains. In general, the Minnelusa Formation dips away from the Black Hills uplift, either to the northeast and the Williston Basin or, south of the Bear Lodge Mountains, to the southwest and the Powder River basin, which is outside the map area. In the map area, the upper beds of the Minnelusa Formation are an aquifer and the lower beds are a confining or semi-confining unit. The upper part of the Minnelusa Formation has a greater percentage of coarse-grained sandstone beds than the lower part. Furthermore, solution and removal of anhydrite, brecciation, and solution of cement binding the sandstone grains may have increased the permeability of the upper part of the Minnelusa Formation in the Black Hills. Wells completed in the upper part of the Minnelusa have yields that exceed 100 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min. Flowing wells have been completed in the Minnelusa aquifer in most of the study area in South Dakota and in about the northern one-half of Crook County, Wyoming. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Microhabitat selection by bobcats in the badlands and Black Hills of South Dakota, USA: a comparison of Prairie and forested habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosby, Cory E.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Klaver, Robert W.; Schroeder, Greg M.; Schmitz, Lowell E.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of habitat selection is important for management of wildlife species. Although bobcat (Lynx rufus) resource selection has been addressed in many regions of the United States, little work has been conducted in the Northern Great Plains. From 2006–2008 we captured and radiocollared 20 bobcats in the Badlands (n = 10) and Black Hills (n = 10) regions of South Dakota. During the summers of 2008 and 2009 we collected habitat measurements at 349 (176 Badlands, 176 Black Hills) bobcat locations and 321 (148 Badlands, 173 Black Hills) random sites. Microhabitat characteristics at bobcat use sites varied with region (P < 0.001) and sex of bobcat (P < 0.001). Percent slope, shrub, low cover, medium cover, and total cover were greater (P ≤ 0.017) at bobcat locations in the Black Hills than in the Badlands whereas distance to drainage was greater (P < 0.001) at locations in the Badlands than in the Black Hills. In the Badlands, male bobcat locations were closer (P ≤ 0.002) to prairie dog towns and drainages and had greater (P < 0.05) percent forbs and forb height than random sites, whereas females were closer to badland formations (P < 0.001) than random sites. In the Black Hills, male locations were at greater elevation (P < 0.001) and female locations were characterized by greater (P ≤ 0.02) grass height, shrub height, low cover, and total cover than random sites. Logistic regression indicated that microhabitat selection was similar between study areas; odds ratios indicated that odds of bobcat use increased by 0.998 (95% CI = 0.997–0.999) per 1 m increase in distance to drainage, 0.986 (95% CI = 0.978–0.993) per 1.0% increase in grass cover, by 1.024 (95% CI = 1.011–1.036) per 1 cm increase in grass height, by 1.013 (95% CI = 1.003–1.024) per 1% increase in forb cover, and by 1.028 (95% CI = 1.017–1.039) per 1% increase in medium cover. Our results were similar to other bobcat microhabitat selection studies, where bobcat relocations were

  6. Influence of drought conditions on brown trout biomass and size structure in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Daniel A.; Wilhite, Jerry W.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of drought conditions on the biomass of brown trout Salmo trutta in Spearfish Creek, upper Rapid Creek, and lower Rapid Creek in the Black Hills of western South Dakota. Stream discharge, mean summer water temperature, the biomass of juvenile and adult brown trout, and brown trout size structure were compared between two time periods: early (2000–2002) and late drought (2005–2007). Mean summer water temperatures were similar between the early- and late-drought periods in Spearfish Creek (12.4°C versus 11.5°C), lower Rapid Creek (19.2°C versus 19.3°C), and upper Rapid Creek (9.8°C in both periods). In contrast, mean annual discharge differed significantly between the two time periods in Spearfish Creek (1.95 versus 1.50 m3/s), lower Rapid Creek (2.01 versus 0.94 m3/s), and upper Rapid Creek (1.41 versus 0.84 m3/s). The mean biomass of adult brown trout in all three stream sections was significantly higher in the early-drought than in the late-drought period (238 versus 69 kg/ha in Spearfish Creek, 272 versus 91 kg/ha in lower Rapid Creek, and 159 versus 32 kg/ha in upper Rapid Creek). The biomass of juvenile brown trout was similar (43 versus 23 kg/ha) in Spearfish Creek in the two periods, declined from 136 to 45 kg/ha in lower Rapid Creek, and increased from 14 to 73 kg/ha in upper Rapid Creek. Size structure did not differ between the early- and late-drought periods in lower Rapid and Spearfish creeks, but it did in upper Rapid Creek. In addition to drought conditions, factors such as angler harvest, fish movements, and the nuisance algal species Didymosphenia geminata are discussed as possible contributors to the observed changes in brown trout biomass and size structure in Black Hills streams.

  7. The role of wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations on the population dynamics of black-backed woodpeckers in the black hills, South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Rota, Christopher T; Millspaugh, Joshua J; Rumble, Mark A; Lehman, Chad P; Kesler, Dylan C

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire and mountain pine beetle infestations are naturally occurring disturbances in western North American forests. Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are emblematic of the role these disturbances play in creating wildlife habitat, since they are strongly associated with recently-killed forests. However, management practices aimed at reducing the economic impact of natural disturbances can result in habitat loss for this species. Although black-backed woodpeckers occupy habitats created by wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations, the relative value of these habitats remains unknown. We studied habitat-specific adult and juvenile survival probabilities and reproductive rates between April 2008 and August 2012 in the Black Hills, South Dakota. We estimated habitat-specific adult and juvenile survival probability with Bayesian multi-state models and habitat-specific reproductive success with Bayesian nest survival models. We calculated asymptotic population growth rates from estimated demographic rates with matrix projection models. Adult and juvenile survival and nest success were highest in habitat created by summer wildfire, intermediate in MPB infestations, and lowest in habitat created by fall prescribed fire. Mean posterior distributions of population growth rates indicated growing populations in habitat created by summer wildfire and declining populations in fall prescribed fire and mountain pine beetle infestations. Our finding that population growth rates were positive only in habitat created by summer wildfire underscores the need to maintain early post-wildfire habitat across the landscape. The lower growth rates in fall prescribed fire and MPB infestations may be attributed to differences in predator communities and food resources relative to summer wildfire.

  8. The Role of Wildfire, Prescribed Fire, and Mountain Pine Beetle Infestations on the Population Dynamics of Black-Backed Woodpeckers in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Christopher T.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Rumble, Mark A.; Lehman, Chad P.; Kesler, Dylan C.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire and mountain pine beetle infestations are naturally occurring disturbances in western North American forests. Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are emblematic of the role these disturbances play in creating wildlife habitat, since they are strongly associated with recently-killed forests. However, management practices aimed at reducing the economic impact of natural disturbances can result in habitat loss for this species. Although black-backed woodpeckers occupy habitats created by wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations, the relative value of these habitats remains unknown. We studied habitat-specific adult and juvenile survival probabilities and reproductive rates between April 2008 and August 2012 in the Black Hills, South Dakota. We estimated habitat-specific adult and juvenile survival probability with Bayesian multi-state models and habitat-specific reproductive success with Bayesian nest survival models. We calculated asymptotic population growth rates from estimated demographic rates with matrix projection models. Adult and juvenile survival and nest success were highest in habitat created by summer wildfire, intermediate in MPB infestations, and lowest in habitat created by fall prescribed fire. Mean posterior distributions of population growth rates indicated growing populations in habitat created by summer wildfire and declining populations in fall prescribed fire and mountain pine beetle infestations. Our finding that population growth rates were positive only in habitat created by summer wildfire underscores the need to maintain early post-wildfire habitat across the landscape. The lower growth rates in fall prescribed fire and MPB infestations may be attributed to differences in predator communities and food resources relative to summer wildfire. PMID:24736502

  9. Low Background Counting with the Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Alan; Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Berkeley Low Background Facility Team; Black Hills State University Underground Campus Team

    2016-09-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and 4,850 feet underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD in a dedicated cleanroom at the Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC). A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors. Experiments utilizing these needs often include those studying dark matter, neutrinos, or neutrinoless double beta decay. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. The BHUC will ultimately host several HPGe low background counting stations and other sensitive instruments from several incoming low background groups and projects that will operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC facility, status, and future plans will also be discussed.

  10. Digital data sets for map products produced as part of the Black Hills Hydrology Study, western South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Joyce E.; Jarrell, Gregory J.; Clawges, Rick M.; Galloway, Joel M.; Carter, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    This compact disk contains digital data produced as part of the 1:100,000-scale map products for the Black Hills Hydrology Study conducted in western South Dakota. The digital data include 28 individual Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets: data sets for the hydrogeologic unit map including all mapped hydrogeologic units within the study area (1 data set) and major geologic structure including anticlines and synclines (1 data set); data sets for potentiometric maps including the potentiometric contours for the Inyan Kara, Minnekahta, Minnelusa, Madison, and Deadwood aquifers (5 data sets), wells used as control points for each aquifer (5 data sets), and springs used as control points for the potentiometric contours (1 data set); and data sets for the structure-contour maps including the structure contours for the top of each formation that contains major aquifers (5 data sets), wells and tests holes used as control points for each formation (5 data sets), and surficial deposits (alluvium and terrace deposits) that directly overlie each of the major aquifer outcrops (5 data sets). These data sets were used to produce the maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  11. Nd, O and Sr isotopic constraints on the origin of Precambrian rocks, southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Hanson, G.N.; Papike, J.J.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1986-12-01

    The Nd, O and Sr isotopic characteristics of Precambrian metasedimentary, metavolcanic and granitic rocks from the Black Hills of South Dakota are examined. Two late-Archean granites (2.5-2.6 Ga) have T/sub DM/ ages of 3.05 and 3.30 Ga, suggesting that at least one of the granites was derived through the melting of significantly older crust. Early-Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks have T/sub DM/ ages that range from 2.32 to 2.45 Ga. These model ages, in conjunction with probable stratigraphic ages ranging from 1.9 to 2.2 Ga, indicate that mantle-derived material was added to the continental crust of this region during the early-Proterozoic. Previous studies of the Harney Peak Granite complex have reported U-Pb and Rb-Sr ages of about 1.71 Ga, and most granite samples examined in this study have Sr isotopic compositions consistent with that age. Two granite samples taken from the same sill, however, give two-point Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of 2.08 +/- 0.08 and 2.20 +/- 0.20 Ga, respectively. In addition, whole-rock and apatite samples of the spatially associated Tin Mountain pegmatite give a Sm-Nd isochron age of 2000 +/- 100 Ma.

  12. Relations of zoned pegmatites to other pegmatites, granite, and metamorphic rocks in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, J.J.; Redden, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The pegmatite field and the Harney Peak Granite of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, form an igneous system that progresses from slightly biotitic muscovite granite through layered pegmatitic granite, with alternating sodic and potassic rocks, to simple plagioclase-quartz-perthite pegmatites, and on to zoned pegmatites. Most of the country rocks are Lower Proterozoic mica schists. At 1700 Ga, intrusion of the Harney Peak Granite created a large dome in these rocks, a thermal aureole with a staurolite, a first sillimanite isograd, and a small area of metamorphism above the second sillimanite isograd. The zoned pegmatites have a strong tendency to occur in clusters, and the types of pegmatites are different in different clusters. A less obvious tendency is a regional zonation in which rare-mineral pegmatites become more abundant and muscovite pegmatites less abundant toward the outskirts of the region. The composition of the granite indicates that its magma originated by partial melting of metasedimentary mica schists similar to those at the present surface. The pegmatitic nature of most of the granite probably reflects exsolution of an aqueous phase. -from Authors

  13. [Optimization of shelterbelt distribution for the gully erosion control of cultivated slope land in rolling hill black soil region of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Su, Zi-Long; Cui, Ming; Fan, Hao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Shelterbelt system is one of the main components of cultivated slope land in rolling hill black soil region of Northeast China, which plays an important role in the control of gully erosion. Based on the Quickbird high-resolution remote sensing image and the digital elevation model (DEM), and combining with field survey data, this paper analyzed the effects of shelterbelt system in a small watershed of rolling hill black soil region in Heshan Farm of Heilongjiang Province on the control of gully erosion in the cultivated slope land, and put forward an optimized scheme for gully erosion control based on the features of gully erosion in the cultivated slope land and their relations with the distribution of the shelterbelt system. In the study area, the current distribution of the shelterbelt system promoted the occurrence and development of shallow gully and gully directly and indirectly. The proposed scheme for optimizing the distribution of the present shelterbelts included the adjustment of the direction of the shelterbelt perpendicular to the aspect of slope, the enhancement of the maintenance and regeneration of the shelterbelts to reduce the gaps of the shelterbelts, the increase of the shelterbelt number, and the decrease of the distances between shelterbelts. A method for calculating the shelterbelt number and the distances between the shelterbelts was also given. This study could provide scientific basis for the gully erosion control and the shelterbelts programming in the cultivated slope land of rolling hill black soil region.

  14. Diagrammatic restored section of the Inyan Kara group, Morrison formation, and Unkpapa sandstone of the western side of the Black Hills, Wyoming and South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mapel, W.J.; Gott, G.B.

    1959-01-01

    The Inyan Kara group of Early Creaceous age and the underlying Morrison formation and Unkapa sandstone of Late Jurassic age comprise about 300 to 850 feet of gently dipping predominantly nonmarine rocks that crop out along the flanks of the Black Hills in northeastern Wyoming and western South Dakota. Terailed mapping and stratigraphic studies of these rocks were made from 1952 to 1957 by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. One of the results of the studies is a correlation of formational and informational units along the western side of the Black Hills for a distance of about 140 miles. The generalized section above, which has a greatly exaggerated vertical scale, shoes the main lithologic units that have been traced and correlated, and  the stratigraphic position of uranium deposits in various parts of the Black Hills in relation to these units. Geologists who have this sheet and the areas for which each is responsible are shown on the accompanying map. The brief text below summarizes some of the broad stratigraphic relations within the Inyan Kara group and underlying formations.

  15. Knickzone propagation in the Black Hills and northern High Plains: a different perspective on the late Cenozoic exhumation of the Laramide Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaprowski, Brent J.; Evenson, Edward B.; Pazzaglia, Frank J.; Epstein, Jack B.

    2001-01-01

    Geomorphic research in the Black Hills and northern High Plains poses an intriguing hypothesis for the Cenozoic evolution of this salient of the Laramide Rockies. Most recently, geologists have appealed to late Cenozoic epeirogenic uplift or climate change to explain the post-Laramide unroofing of the Rockies. On the basis of field mapping and the interpretation of long-valley profiles, we conclude that the propagation of knickzones is the primary mechanism for exhumation in the Black Hills. Long profiles of major drainages show discrete breaks in the slope of the channel gradient that are not coincident with changes in rock type. We use the term knickzones to describe these features because their profiles are broadly convex over tens of kilometers. At and below the knickzone, the channel is incising into bedrock, abandoning a flood plain, and forming a terrace. Above the knickzone, the channel is much less incised, resulting in a broad valley bottom. Numerous examples of stream piracy are documented, and in each case, the capture is recorded in the same terrace level. These observations are consistent with migrating knickzones that have swept through Black Hills streams, rearranging drainages in their wake. We demonstrate there are two knickzone fronts associated with mapped terraces. Preliminary field evidence of soil development shows that these terraces are time transgressive in nature. Our data strongly suggest that knickzone propagation must be considered a viable mechanism driving late Cenozoic fluvial incision and exhumation of the northern High Plains and adjacent northern Rocky Mountains.

  16. Habitat selection of a declining white-tailed deer herd in the central Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperno, Christopher Shannon

    Habitat selection, survival rates, the Black Hills National Forest Habitat Capability Model (HABCAP), and the USDA Forest Service Geographic Information System (GIS) data base were evaluated for a declining white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus dacotensis) herd in the central Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. From July 1993 through July 1996, 73 adult and yearling female and 12 adult and yearling male white-tailed deer were radiocollared and visually monitored. Habitat information was collected at 4,662 white-tailed deer locations and 1,087 random locations. Natural mortality (71%) was the primary cause of female mortality, followed by harvest (22.5%) and accidental causes (6.5%). More females died in spring (53.2%) than in fall (22.6%), winter (14.5%), or summer (9.7%). Male mortality resulted from hunting in fall (66.7%) and natural causes in spring (33.3%). Survival rates for all deer by year were 62.1% in 1993, 51.1% in 1994, 56.4% in 1995, and 53.9% in 1996 and were similar (P = 0.691) across years. During winter, white-tailed deer selected ponderosa pine- (Pinus ponderosa ) deciduous and burned pine cover types. Overstory-understory habitats selected included pine/grass-forb, pine/bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi), pine/snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus), burned pine/grass-forb, and pine/shrub habitats. Structural stages selected included sapling-pole pine stands with >70% canopy cover, burned pine sapling-pole and saw-timber stands with <40% canopy cover. Bedding locations were represented by saw-timber pine structural stages with >40% canopy cover and all sapling-pole pine structural stages; sapling-pole stands with >70% canopy cover received the greatest use. White-tailed deer primarily fed in pine saw-timber structural stage with less than 40% canopy cover. Overall, selected habitats contained lower amounts of grass/forb, shrubs, and litter than random locations. Male and female deer generally bedded in areas that were characterized by greater

  17. Hydrologic budgets for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers, Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming, water years 1987-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Jarrell, Gregory J.

    2001-01-01

    The Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are two of the most important aquifers in the Black Hills area of South Dakota and Wyoming. Quantification and evaluation of various hydrologic budget components are important for managing and understanding these aquifers. Hydrologic budgets are developed for two scenarios, including an overall budget for the entire study area and more detailed budgets for subareas. Budgets generally are combined for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers because most budget components cannot be quantified individually for the aquifers. An average hydrologic budget for the entire study area is computed for water years 1987-96, for which change in storage is approximately equal to zero. Annual estimates of budget components are included in detailed budgets for nine subareas, which consider periods of decreasing storage (1987-92) and increasing storage (1993-96). Inflow components include recharge, leakage from adjacent aquifers, and ground-water inflows across the study area boundary. Outflows include springflow (headwater and artesian), well withdrawals, leakage to adjacent aquifers, and ground-water outflow across the study area boundary. Leakage, ground-water inflows, and ground-water outflows are difficult to quantify and cannot be distinguished from one another. Thus, net ground-water flow, which includes these components, is calculated as a residual, using estimates for the other budget components. For the overall budget for water years 1987-96, net ground-water outflow from the study area is computed as 100 ft3/s (cubic feet per second). Estimates of average combined budget components for the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are: 395 ft3/s for recharge, 78 ft3/s for headwater springflow, 189 ft3/s for artesian springflow, and 28 ft3/s for well withdrawals. Hydrologic budgets also are quantified for nine subareas for periods of decreasing storage (1987-92) and increasing storage (1993-96), with changes in storage assumed equal but opposite. Common

  18. Mineralogical and chemical evolution of a rare-element granite-pegmatite system: Harney Peak Granite, Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    The Harney Peak Granite (1.7 b.y.) in the Black Hills, South Dakota, is a well-exposed granite complex surrounded by a rare-element pegmatite field (barren to Nb-, Ta-, Be, Li-enriched pegmatites). It consists of a multitude of large and small sills and dikes, which exhibit great variation in texture, mineralogy and geochemistry. This granite is moderately to strongly peraluminous with the following mineralogy: plagioclase (An 0-An 21) + potassium feldspar (Or 70-96) + quartz + muscovite ± apatite ± biotite ± garnet ± tourmaline. The granitic intrusions in the interior of the complex have similar K/Rb ratios (> 190), whereas this ratio decreases and is more variable for intrusions which are structurally higher or along the perimeter of the complex. Substitutions of (Fe, Mn)Mg -1 in the ferromagnesian minerals, NaCa -1 in plagioclase and RbK -1 in muscovite and potassium feldspar increase in the perimeter granites and vary systematically with K/Rb. These more evolved intrusions are commonly enriched in incompatible elements such as Nb, Li, Cs, Be, and B and depleted in Ba, Ca, and Sr relative to the interior, primitive granites. Biotite-bearing assemblages are common in the interior granites but are replaced by tourmaline-bearing granites in the more evolved intrusions. A series of discontinuous reactions may explain this assemblage transition. Observations and trace element modeling suggest that: (1) within individual units volatile transfer mechanisms have resulted in mineral and chemical segregation; (2) 75-80% fractional crystallization of a primitive biotite-muscovite granite was the dominant mechanism in producing the more evolved tourmaline-bearing granites; and (3) extreme fractional crystallization aided by high volatile activity produced the associated rare-element pegmatites.

  19. Petrogenetic relationships between pegmatite and granite based on geochemistry of muscovite in pegmatite wall zones, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliff, B.L. ); Papike, J.J.; Shearer, C.K. )

    1992-05-01

    The compositions of large samples of granitic pegmatite wall zones have been determined for a suite of ten pegmatites of diverse geochemical character and degree of compositional evolution in the Keystone area of the Black Hills. Whole-rock compositions are strongly peraluminous, and they deviate substantially from the granite minimum composition in quartz-albite-orthoclase normalized components, showing considerably more scatter than Harney Peak Granite whole rocks. Wall-zone minerals are commonly coarsely segregated, leading to large modal variability among whole rocks. These features make whole-rock samples of wall zones unsuitable for the determination of initial pegmatite bulk compositions. Trace and minor element compositions of muscovite separates from the wall zones were thus determined to eliminate the effects of modal variability on trace element concentrations so that geochemical differences between pegmatites could be modeled. Estimates of initial pegmatite melt trace element concentrations range from 800-4,000 ppm Rb, 100-1,000 ppm Cs, 200-2,000 ppm Li, and 1-50 ppm Ba. Trace element concentrations of muscovite from a given pegmatite generally cluster together, although several show considerable intra-pegmatite scatter, and there are large overlaps among different pegmatites. The geochemical characteristics of samples from the Etta pegmatite indicate mixing with and assimilation of country rocks. Exceptionally low Rb/Cs ratios of muscovite from the Etta pegmatite and similar to those of muscovite from K-feldspar-rich assemblages of other pegmatites where the Rb concentration of melt may have been buffered by crystallizing assemblages that had bulk Rb distribution coefficients close to 1.

  20. Mass transfer during wall-rock alteration: An example from a quartz-graphite vein, Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Galbreath, K.C.; Duke, E.F.; Papike, J.J. ); Laul, J.C. )

    1988-07-01

    Mass transfer and fluid-rock interaction have been evaluated along two sample traverses in low-sillimanite grade quartz-mica schist adjacent to a synmetamorphic quartz-graphite vein in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota. In an {approximately}17 cm halo between apparently unaltered schist and the vein contact is an outer zone of cryptic alteration and three inner zones of visible alteration. The cryptic zone consists of the original prograde metamorphic mineral assemblage plus anomalously high amounts of tourmaline. The outermost visible zone contains abundant graphite. The second visible zone is defined by intensive bleaching of the schist. The innermost visible zone, immediately adjacent to the vein, is tourmaline + quartz + plagioclase + limonite + graphite. The vein is composed almost entirely of quartz, but also contains trace amounts of graphite. Mass balance calculations indicate that Al was essentially inert. The predominant chemical changes during wall-rock alteration were addition of B and C from the vein-forming fluid along with loss of K from the wall rocks, corresponding to precipitation of tourmaline and graphite, and the progressive destruction of microcline, biotite, and muscovite toward the vein. In addition, the elements V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Sb, W, and Au were introduced into the country rock, whereas Si, Rb, Ba, and Cs were removed. Fluid-rock interaction modeling suggests that between one and four equivalent masses of fluid interacted chemically with the most altered mineral assemblages. In addition, greater than one equivalent mass of reactive fluid penetrated to distances of at least 5 cm from the vein contact.

  1. Phonolites and peralkaline rhyolites from a single magma source in the mantle : A new look at some Black Hills rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, J.G. . Dept. of Geography-Geology)

    1993-03-01

    A re-evaluation of existing data from the Deer Mountain-Terry Peak-Sugarloaf Mountain area of the Black Hills, plus some new data, suggests the real possibility that both silica-undersaturated and silica-oversaturated alkaline-peralkaline rocks evolved from the same mantle-derived parent magma. Mineralogically, aegirine rhyolites, phonolites, a minette and the mantle are linked by an association of Mg-rich olivine-phlogopite structures, zenocrystic phlogopite and diopside-cored pyroxene phenocrysts. Trends of silica vs. major elements, trace elements (V,Sc,Ni) and MgO/FeOt are continuous and preclude being fortuitous. Peralkalinity also increases with silica in a well-defined trend. Increasing ferric oxide to total iron oxide indicates increasing oxygen fugacity with silica saturation. A mantle origin for the phonolites is supported by Sr-isotope data of Beintema (1986) and Beintema and Montgomery (1986). Higher Sr-isotope ratios for the aegirine rhyolites, suggesting a lower crustal origin, actually may result from magmatic processes, as shown by others for ocean island basalt-phonolite-comendite associations. Early fractionation of mafic phases drives trends away from the Ne-minimum on the residua diagram, indicating that magma evolution took place above residua temperatures, thus avoiding the thermal divide. Later fractionation of alkali feldspars accounts for variation in the aegirine rhyolites. Rising alkalies and oxygen explain variations in peralkalinity and ferric iron content. Pressure-dependent immiscibility possibly may be the cause of a silica gap in rock types, as rocks with low quartz contents are not found, except as phaneritic inclusions. A model is suggested in which either a fractionating minette or trachyte magma could yield the series of rocks under study.

  2. Alteration of sandstone as a guide to uranium deposits and their origin, northern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vickers, R.C.

    1956-01-01

    Several uranium deposits are present in the Fall River sandstone of Early Cretaceous age on the northeast flank of the Black Hills, Butte County, South Dakota. The deposits are within a fine-grained, well-sorted, persistent basal sandstone unit that ranges in thickness from 2 to 18 feet and dips about 4° NE. Detailed mapping of about 2 square miles surrounding the deposits have shown that all the uranium occurrences and most of the areas of high radioactivity are where the color changes in the basal sandstone from reddish on the up-dip side of the the occurrences to yellowish-gray or buff down-dip. Radioactivity measurements show that uranium is distributed almost continuously along the sinuous red-buff contact for more than 5 miles. Laboratory work indicates that the red color is caused by the hematite resulting from the alteration of ferrous iron minerals and hydrous ferric oxides. The close association of the red-buff contact and the uranium deposits suggest that the two were formed by the same solutions. The uranium was probably deposited originally from ground water which moved down-dip and gradually changed from an oxidizing solution near the surface to a mildly reducing solution at depth. Concentrations of uranium have resulted from the localization of reducing conditions cause perhaps by structures superimposed on the regional dip, local thinning or decrease in permeability of the sandstone, or concentrations of pyritiferous carbonaceous material. The red alteration is probably the result of pre-Oligocene weathering that has extended downward in the more permeable beds about 200 feet below the ancient erosion surface. Oxidation of the primary uranium during the present weathering cycle has resulted in the formation of carnotite and possibly other secondary uranium minerals.

  3. Nd, O and Sr isotopic constraints on the origin of Precambrian rocks, Southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.J.; Hanson, G.N.; Papike, J.J.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Nd, O and Sr isotopic characteristics of Precambrian metasedimentary, metavolcanic and granitic rocks from the Black Hills of South Dakota are examined. Two late-Archean granites (2.5-2.6 Ga) have Tdm ages of 3.05 and 3.30 Ga, suggesting that at least one of the granites was derived through the melting of significantly older crust. Early-Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks have Tdm ages that range from 2.32 to 2.45 Ga. These model ages, in conjunction with probable stratigraphic ages ranging from 1.9 to 2.2 Ga, indicate that mantle-derived material was added to the continental crust of this region during the early-Proterozoic. Previous studies of the Harney Peak Granite complex have reported U-Pb and Rb-Sr ages of about 1.71 Ga and most granite samples examined in this study have Sr isotopic compositions consistent with that age. Two granite samples taken from the same sill, however, give two-point Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of 2.08 ??0.08 and 2.20 ??0.20 Ga (???2200Nd = -15.5), respectively. In addition, whole-rock and apatite samples of the spatially associated Tin Mountain pegmatite give a Sm-Nd isochron age of 2000 ??100 Ma (???2200Nd = -5.8 ??1.8). The Sm-Nd, O and Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of these granitic rocks have been complicated to some degree by both crystallization and post-crystallization processes, and the age of the pegmatite and parts of the Harney Peak Granite complex remain uncertain. Processes that probably complicated the isotopic systematics of these rocks include derivation from heterogeneous source material, assimilation, mixing of REE between granite and country rock during crystallization via a fluid phase and post-crystallization mobility of Sr. The Nd isotopic compositions of the pegmatite and the Harney Peak Granite indicate that they were not derived primarily from the exposed metasedimentary rocks. ?? 1986.

  4. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Thune, John [R-SD

    2013-03-05

    06/27/2013 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 117. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.291, which became Public Law 113-131 on 7/25/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Thune, John [R-SD

    2013-03-05

    Senate - 06/27/2013 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 117. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.291, which became Public Law 113-131 on 7/25/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Noem, Kristi L. [R-SD-At Large

    2012-02-01

    Senate - 05/16/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Noem, Kristi L. [R-SD-At Large

    2012-02-01

    05/16/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Thune, John [R-SD

    2013-03-05

    06/27/2013 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 117. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.291, which became Public Law 113-131 on 7/25/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Black Hills Cemetery Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Noem, Kristi L. [R-SD-At Large

    2012-02-01

    05/16/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. The Black Experience: Social, Cultural and Economic Considerations. Proceedings of a Workshop on the Black Experience. (1st, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, March 14, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Audreye E., Ed.

    This publication consists of the proceedings of a workshop on the social, cultural, and economic experiences of Blacks. The workshops' goals were to intensify the interest of social workers in the Black experience; to examine the values which have an impact on services to Black people; to increase the knowledge of social workers about Blacks; and…

  11. Estimated recharge to the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers in the Black Hills area, South Dakota and Wyoming, water years 1931-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.M.; Driscoll, D.G.; Hamade, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    The Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are two of the most important aquifers in the Black Hills area. Long-term estimates of recharge to the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers are important for managing the water resources in the Black Hills area. Thus, annual recharge from streamflow losses and infiltration of precipitation on outcrop areas is estimated for water years 1931-98. All estimates are for recharge that contributes to regional ground-water flow patterns and that occurs in outcrop areas connected to the regional flow system. Estimates exclude recharge to outcrop areas that are isolated from the regional flow system, which generally results in ground-water discharge to area streams. Streamflow recharge is calculated directly for 11 streams in the Black Hills area that have continuous-record gaging stations located upstream from loss zones, using available records of daily streamflow, against which estimated loss thresholds (from previous investigations) are applied. Daily streamflow records are extrapolated, when necessary, using correlations with long-term gages, to develop annual estimates of streamflow recharge for 1950-98. Streamflow recharge is estimated for a number of smaller basins using loss thresholds for miscellaneous-record sites. Annual recharge estimates are derived from synthetic records of daily streamflow for 1992-98, which are based on drainage-area ratios applied to continuous-record gaging stations. Recharge estimates are further extrapolated for 1950-91, based on the average percentage of streamflow recharge contributed by these basins during 1992-98, relative to overall streamflow recharge.Streamflow recharge also is estimated for small drainage areas with undetermined loss thresholds that are situated between larger basins with known thresholds. Estimates for 1992-98 are based on estimates of annual streamflow derived using drainage-area ratios, with assumed losses equal to 90 percent of annual streamflow. Recharge estimates also are

  12. Petrogenetic relationships between pegmatite and granite based on geochemistry of muscovite in pegmatite wall zones, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    1992-05-01

    The compositions of large samples of granitic pegmatite wall zones have been determined for a suite of ten pegmatites of diverse geochemical character and degree of compositional evolution in the Keystone area of the Black Hills. Whole-rock compositions are strongly peraluminous, and they deviate substantially from the granite minimum composition in quartz-albite-orthoclase normalized components, showing considerably more scatter than Harney Peak Granite whole rocks. Wall-zone minerals are commonly coarsely segregated, leading to large modal variability among whole rocks. These features make whole-rock samples of wall zones unsuitable for the determination of initial pegmatite bulk compositions. Trace and minor element compositions of muscovite separates from the wall zones were thus determined to eliminate the effects of modal variability on trace element concentrations so that geochemical differences between pegmatites could be modeled. Estimates of initial pegmatite melt trace element concentrations range from 800-4000 ppm Rb, 100-1000 ppm Cs, 200-2000 ppm Li, and 1-50 ppm Ba. Trace element concentrations of muscovite from a given pegmatite generally cluster together, although several show considerable intra-pegmatite scatter, and there are large overlaps among different pegmatites. The geochemical characteristics of samples from the Etta pegmatite indicate mixing with and assimilation of country rocks. Exceptionally low Rb/Cs ratios of muscovite from the Etta pegmatite are similar to those of muscovite from K-feldspar-rich assemblages of other pegmatites where the Rb concentration of melt may have been buffered by crystallizing assemblages that had bulk Rb distribution coefficients close to 1. The large degree of scatter of geochemical parameters among these pegmatites precludes derivation of the entire suite by either single-stage crystallization or partial melting processes, nor can the pegmatites be satisfactorily related by any fractionation trajectory from

  13. Variation and fractionation of lithium isotope ratios within single tourmaline crystals in the pegmatites of the Black Hills, SD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, M.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2012-12-01

    Lithium isotopes are quickly becoming a valuable geochemical tool, providing insight into a broad range of studies. Li isotopes have been utilized in studies with subjects ranging from mantle processes to planetary accretion on stars. Yet, as an emerging technique, a number of uncertainties remain to be resolved. Two basic questions must be answered in order to apply isotope studies in a meaningful way: How do isotopes fractionate from each other and what do the isotope ratios mean? Previous studies on intra-crystal Li isotope signatures in tourmaline are extremely limited. One study showed roughly homogenous isotope profile using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis (Ludwig et al. 2011). If Li isotopes are in fact variable within individual crystals, however, it has implications for previous models of pegmatite formation reached using Li isotopes, as well as the root cause of Li isotope fractionation in tourmaline. For this study, tourmaline samples were collected from several texturally different pegmatite localities in the Black Hills, SD. Lithium concentrations and isotope ratios were measured along numerous points in a tourmaline crystal to discern how they change within a single crystal. The tourmaline was dissolved by an alkali fusion technique. Concentrations were determined at the University of Missouri using a Perkin-Elmer Optima 3300 Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES). Isotope measurements were performed at University of Maryland-College Park by a Nu Plasma Multi-collector ICP-MS. The procedure followed the three-column cation exchange chromatography method. Additionally, elemental mapping was performed on one sample using the JEOL JXA-8200 Superprobe at Washington University in St. Louis. Results of this research reveal that extreme fractionation of Li is possible within single tourmaline crystals. The δ7Li values measured are among the highest measured in rocks, though the average for each crystal falls

  14. Stable isotope evidence for the petrogenesis and fluid evolution in the Proterozoic Harney Peak leucogranite, Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, P. I.; Russ-Nabelek, C.; Haeussler, G. T.

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope systematics of the Proterozoic Harney Peak Granite, Black Hills, South Dakota, were examined in order to constrain its petrogenesis and to examine the role of fluids in a peraluminous granite-pegmatite magmatic system. The leucogranite and its satellite intrusions were emplaced as hundreds of sills and dikes which are texturally heterogeneous, ranging from aplitic to pegmatitic. The dominant ferromagnesian mineral in the core of the granite is biotite while along its perimeter and in satellite intrusions it is tourmaline. Biotite and tourmaline are for the most part mutually exclusive. Oxygen isotopes among minerals in non-pegmatitic rocks from throughout the pluton equilibrated for the most part at magmatic temperatures between >800 to 650°C. In the pegmatitic samples, quartzfeldspar oxygen isotope fractionations point to disequilibrium, probably a result of the sequential crystallization of these minerals. The isotopic composition of most pegmatites suggests local derivation by differentiation of emplaced batches of magma. The whole rock δ 18O values of the granites are heterogeneous, ranging from 10.4 to 14.3‰ However, there is a pronounced difference in the isotopic composition of the biotite-containing granites from the core of the pluton ( 11.5 ± 0.6‰) and the tourmaline-rich granites from its perimeter and the satellite intrusions ( 13.2 ± 0.8‰). The average oxygen isotopic composition of the surrounding schists is identical to that of the latter granites. Biotite-muscovite and tourmaline-muscovite ΔD values vary from -20 to - 10‰ and from 0 to +10‰, respectively. Although these values differ from theoretical values, the narrow ranges suggest that the minerals are in isotopic equilibrium and that their isotopic compositions record the composition of the magmatic fluid. The calculated δD value of the magmatic fluid is -67 to -58‰, well within the magmatic water range. However, somewhat elevated mineral δD values

  15. Susceptibility of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa (Dougl. Ex Laws.), to mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attack in uneven-aged stands in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming USA

    Treesearch

    Jose F. Negron; Kurt Allen; Blaine Cook; John R. Withrow

    2008-01-01

    Mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins can cause extensive tree mortality in ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws., forests in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. Most studies that have examined stand susceptibility to mountain pine beetle have been conducted in even-aged stands. Land managers...

  16. The generation and crystallization conditions of the Proterozoic Harney Peak Leucogranite, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA: Petrologic and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, P. I.; Russ-Nabelek, C.; Denison, J. R.

    1992-04-01

    The mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the Proterozoic Harney Peak Granite, Black Hills, South Dakota, were examined in view of experimentally determined phase equilibria applicable to granitic systems in order to place constraints on the progenesis of peraluminous leucogranites and commonly associated rare-element pegmatites. The granite was emplaced at 3 4 kbar as multiple sills and dikes into quartz-mica schists at the culmination of a regional high-temperature, low-pressure metamorphic event. Principally along the periphery of the main pluton and in satellite intrusions, the sills segregated into granite-pegmatite couplets. The major minerals include quartz, K-feldspar, sodic plagioclase and muscovite. Biotite-{Mg No. [Molar MgO/(MgO+FeO)]=0.32-0.38} is the predominant ferromagnesian mineral in the granite's core, whereas at the periphery of the main pluton and in the satellite intrusions tourmaline (Mg No.=0.18 0.48) is the dominant ferromagnesian phase. Almandine-spessartine garnet is also found in the outer intrusions. There is virtually a complete overlap in the wide concentration ranges of SiO2, CaO, MgO, FeO, Sr, Zr, W of the biotite- and tourmaline-bearing granite suites with no discernable differentiation trends on Harker diagrams, precluding the derivation of one suite from the other by differentiation following emplacement. This is consistent with the oxygen isotope compositions which are 11.5 ± 0.6‰ for the biotite granites and 13.2 ± 0.8‰ for the tourmaline granites, suggesting derivation from different sources. The concentrations of TiO2 and possibly Ba are higher and of MnO and B are lower in the biotite granites. The normative Orthoclase/Albite ratio is extremely variable ranging from 0.26 to 1.65 in the biotite granites to 0.01 1.75 in the tourmaline granites. Very few sample compositions fall near the high-pressure, watersaturated haplogranite minima-eutectic trend, indicating that the granites for the most part are not minimum

  17. Geohydrology and water quality of the Inyan Kara, Minnelusa, and Madison aquifers of the northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyllonen, D.P.; Peter, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Inyan Kara, Minnelusa, and Madison aquifers are the principal sources of ground water in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming. The aquifers are exposed in the Bear Lodge Mountains and the Black Hills and are about 3,000 to 5,000 ft below the land surface in the northeast corner of the study area. The direction of groundwater movement is from the outcrop area toward central South Dakota. Recharge is by infiltration of precipitation and streamflow is by springs and well withdrawals. All three aquifers yield water to flowing wells in some part of the area. Measured and reported well yields in each of the three aquifers exceed 100 gal/min (gpm). A well open to the Minnelusa Formation and the upper part of the Madison Limestone yielded more than 2 ,000 gpm. Water from the Inyan Kara aquifer may require treatment for gross alpha radiation, iron, manganese, sulfate, and hardness before use in public water systems. Water from the Minnelusa aquifer in the northern one-half of the study area may require treatment for sulfate and hardness before use in public water systems. Water from the Madison aquifer in the northern one-half of the study area may require treatment of fluoride, gross alpha radiation, sulfate, and hardness before use in public water systems. Water from the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers in the southern one-half of the study area, though very hard (more than 180 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate), is suitable for public water systems and irrigation. Flow between the Minnelusa and the Inyan Kara aquifers appears to be insignificant, based on the results of a digital model results. The model indicated there may be significant recharge to the Minnelusa and Madison aquifers by leakage between these two aquifers and perhaps deeper aquifers. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Space-use and habitat associations of Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) occupying recently disturbed forests in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Christopher T. Rota; Mark A. Rumble; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Chadwick P. Lehman; Dylan C. Kesler

    2014-01-01

    Black-backed Woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are a disturbance-dependent species that occupy recently burned forest and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestations. Forest management practices that reduce the amount of disturbed forest may lead to habitat loss for Black-backed Woodpeckers, which have recently been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act. We...

  19. Kronos: Mapping Black Hole Environments in the Time Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B. M.; Kronos Science Team

    2001-05-01

    Kronos is a multiwavelength (X-ray, EUV, UV, and optical) observatory designed for high time resolution, long-duration spectroscopy of faint sources from high-Earth orbit. It will be proposed to NASA as a Medium Explorer (MIDEX). The main scientific goals of the mission are the study of accretion processes and related outflow phenomena (such as disk winds and jets) in black hole systems of all masses, as well as neutron star and white dwarf interacting binary systems. Coaligned X-ray, EUV, UV/optical telescopes will provide simultaneous spectrophotometry to perform reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei and eclipse mapping of binary stars to map the structure and dynamics of these systems on microarcsecond angular scales.

  20. Perturbative evolution of particle orbits around Kerr black holes: time-domain calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Alemán, Ramón; Khanna, Gaurav; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-07-01

    We consider the problem of the gravitational waves produced by a particle of negligible mass orbiting a Kerr black hole. We treat the Teukolsky perturbation equation in the time domain numerically as a 2 + 1 partial differential equation. We model the particle by smearing the singularities in the source term by the use of narrow Gaussian distributions. We have been able to reproduce earlier results for equatorial circular orbits that were computed using the frequency-domain formalism. The time-domain approach is however geared for a more general evolution, for instance of nearly geodesic orbits under the effects of radiation reaction.

  1. Microgravity methods for characterization of groundwater-storage changes and aquifer properties in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota, 2009-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koth, Karl R.; Long, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of groundwater storage in the karstic Madison aquifer in the Black Hills of South Dakota using microgravity methods was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with West Dakota Water Development District, South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources, and Lawrence County. Microgravity measurements from 2009 to 2012 were used to investigate groundwater-storage changes and effective porosity in unconfined areas of the Madison aquifer. Time-lapse microgravity surveys that use portable high-sensitivity absolute and relative gravimeters indicated temporal-gravity changes as a result of changing groundwater mass. These extremely precise measurements of gravity required characterization and removal of internal instrumental and external environmental effects on gravity from the raw data. The corrected data allowed groundwater-storage volume to be quantified with an accuracy of about plus or minus 0.5 foot of water per unit area of aquifer. Quantification of groundwater-storage change, coupled with water-level data from observation wells located near the focus areas, also was used to calculate the effective porosity at specific altitudes directly beneath gravity stations. Gravity stations were established on bedrock outcrops in three separate focus areas for this study. The first area, the Spring Canyon focus area, is located to the south of Rapid City with one gravity station on the rim of Spring Canyon near the area where Spring Creek sinks into the Madison aquifer. The second area, the Doty focus area, is located on outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation to the northwest of Rapid City, and consists of nine gravity stations. The third area, the Limestone Plateau focus area, consists of a single gravity station in the northwestern Black Hills located on an outcrop of the Madison Limestone. An absolute-gravity station, used to tie relative-gravity survey data together, was established on a relatively impermeable

  2. Early Detection of Mountain Pine Beetle Damage in Ponderosa Pine Forests of the Black Hills Using Hyperspectral and WorldView-2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Vitaliy Alekseyevich

    A leading cause for mortality in the pine forests of western North America, the mountain pine beetle, has impacted over 400,000 acres of ponderosa pine forest in the Black Hills of South Dakota since 1996. Methods aimed at earlier detection, prior to visual manifestation of a mountain pine beetle damage in the tree crown, have not been successful because of the overlap and variability of spectral response between the initial stages of attack (green-attacked) and non-attacked tree crowns. Needle-level reflectance spectra was measured from green-attack and non-attack ponderosa pine trees in early spring following an infestation and analyzed using a multi-statistical approach to determine which spectral features best discriminate green-attack needles. Green-attack reflectance was significantly higher than non-attack from 424-717 nm and 1151-2400 nm. Bands in the shortwave-infrared had increased measures of separation between classes compared to visible and near-infrared bands. Peaks in separation related to moisture absorption features, from 1451-1540 nm and 1973-2103 nm, and pigment absorption features from 462-520 nm and 663-689 nm, were consistently observed over multiple statistical analyses. While these features show promise for operational canopy-level detection, it is unknown if they can be scaled up due to large within-class variability and spectral overlap between classes. To examine the potential for canopy-level detection, in-situ training data was collected for green-attack and non-attack trees from known locations within the Black Hills at a similar time a WorldView-2 image was acquired of the study area. Along with eight WV-2 bands, all possible normalized two-band indices were calculated to examine the suitability of WV-2 data for detecting green-attack damage. The performance of three different classifiers, logistic regression, linear discriminant analysis, Random Forest, was evaluated. Normalized two-band indices using a combination of a near

  3. Red Hill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii Administrative Order on Consent (AOC), an enforceable agreement of the Hawaii Department of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Navy -- Defense Logistics Agency.

  4. The role of wildfire, prescribed fire, and mountain pine beetle infestations on the population dynamics of black-backed woodpeckers in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    Christopher T. Rota; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Mark A. Rumble; Chad P. Lehman; Dylan C. Kesler

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire and mountain pine beetle infestations are naturally occurring disturbances in western North American forests. Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are emblematic of the role these disturbances play in creating wildlife habitat, since they are strongly associated with recently-killed forests. However, management practices aimed at reducing the economic...

  5. Selected data for wells and test holes used in structure-contour maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents selected data on wells and test holes that were used in the construction of structure-contour maps of selected formations that contain major aquifers in the Black Hills area of western South Dakota. Altitudes of the top of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation are presented for the wells and test holes presented in this report.

  6. Selected Data for Wells and Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills Area, South Dakota

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Selected Data for Wells and Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison...Test Holes Used in Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation...Structure-Contour Maps of the Inyan Kara Group, Minnekahta Limestone, Minnelusa Formation, Madison Limestone, and Deadwood Formation in the Black Hills Area

  7. Time domain analysis of superradiant instability for the charged stringy black hole-mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao; Zhao, Junkun

    2015-11-01

    It has been proved that the charged stringy black holes are stable under the perturbations of massive charged scalar fields. However, superradiant instability can be generated by adding the mirror-like boundary condition to the composed system of charged stringy black hole and scalar field. The unstable boxed quasinormal modes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical methods. In this paper, we further provide a time domain analysis by performing a long time evolution of charged scalar field configuration in the background of the charged stringy black hole with the mirror-like boundary condition imposed. We have used the ingoing Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates to derive the evolution equation, and adopted Pseudo-spectral method and the forth-order Runge-Kutta method to evolve the scalar field with the initial Gaussian wave packet. It is shown by our numerical scheme that Fourier transforming the evolution data coincides well with the unstable modes computed from frequency domain analysis. The existence of the rapid growth mode makes the charged stringy black hole a good test ground to study the nonlinear development of superradiant instability.

  8. Use of multi-temporal Landsat images to monitor forest disturbance (1987-2007) in the Black Hills of South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Xuexia; Ohlen, Donald O.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring forest disturbance is important for studying carbon pools and fluxes. The goal of this study is to observe forest disturbance of different burn severity levels using multi-temporal Landsat images. The Jasper Fire occurred in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, during August and September of 2000. The fire disturbance to ecosystem characteristics has a widespread and long-term impact. We used 18 Landsat images acquired from 1987 to 2007 to monitor the land cover changes due to the fire disturbance. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR), and Integrated Forest Index (IFI) were calculated from the Landsat at-sensor-reflectance data. Based on IFI in 2000 and Composite Burn Index data collected in May 2002, nine field plots were selected and monitored. The results showed that all four spectral indices were capable of detecting and monitoring the forest disturbance caused by thinning and fire. IFI and NBR are more suitable for long-term monitoring while NDVI and EVI are more sensitive to rapid changes within a one-year period.

  9. Influence of mining-related activities on concentrations of metals in water and sediment from streams of the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, T.W.; Wiedmeyer, Ray H.; Gober, J.; Larson, S.

    2001-01-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected from streams in Spearfish Creek, Whitewood Creek, and Bear Butte Creek watersheds in the Black Hills, SD, an area impacted by gold mining operations. Arsenic concentrations that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Concentration Limit of 50 μg/L for drinking water were found in water from Annie Creek, a tributary of Spearfish Creek, and from Whitewood Creek. Gold Run, a tributary of Whitewood Creek, and Annie Creek contained Se concentrations in water that exceeded the EPA Ecotox threshold of 5 μg/L and were classified as a high hazard for Se accumulation from water into the planktonic food chain and for resultant toxicity to fish and aquatic birds. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in sediment exceeded EPA Ecotox thresholds in one or more of the watersheds suggesting potential adverse ecological effects. Sediment from Rubicon Creek, a tributary of Spearfish Creek, contained Se concentrations high enough (4.0 μg/g) to be a moderate hazard for accumulation from sediments into the benthic food chain, with resultant dietary toxicity to fish and aquatic birds. These results are discussed in light of historical mining activities and recent clean-up and reclamation efforts. Based on the results and comparisons to Ecotox tresholds, further studies of ecological effects are warranted.

  10. Leslie Pickney Hill's "Toussaint L'Ouverture."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ako, Edward O.

    1987-01-01

    In his 1928 play, the Harlem Renaissance writer Leslie Pickney Hill portrays Toussaint L'Ouverture, the leader of the Haitian slave rebellion, with historical accuracy. Hill's presentation was aimed at rehabilitating black pride, "A worthy literature reared upon authentic records of achievement is the present spiritual need of the race."…

  11. Thermo-rheological, shear heating model for leucogranite generation, metamorphism, and deformation during the Proterozoic Trans-Hudson orogeny, Black Hills, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, Peter I.; Liu, Mian; Sirbescu, Mona-Liza

    2001-12-01

    This paper evaluates thermotectonic models for metamorphism and leucogranite generation during the Proterozoic Trans-Hudson orogeny, as recorded in rocks exposed in the Black Hills, SD. Intrusion of the Harney Peak Granite and associated pegmatites at ˜1715 Ma occurred at the waning stages of regional deformation and staurolite-grade regional metamorphism. Published Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling (COCORP) results indicate that Proterozoic sedimentary rocks were thrust over the Archean Wyoming province during the Trans-Hudson collision. Isotopic compositions of the Harney Peak Granite suggest that the exposed Proterozoic and Archean metasedimentary rocks in the Black Hills represent source rocks of the granites. Numerical simulations of the regional metamorphism and Harney Peak Granite generation, assuming crustal thickening by thrusting coupled with erosion, show the following: (1) Doubling of the crust with normal distribution of radioactive elements does not yield sufficiently high temperatures to cause anatexis anywhere in the crust or growth of garnet in the now exposed part of the crust; (2) a 35-km drop-off length for internal heat production can yield sufficient temperature for garnet growth at the current erosion level; it is, however, insufficient to produce staurolite, and melting can occur only in the deepest parts of the crust; (3) temperatures in crust with stable 70 km thickness for ˜40 Ma and 35 km drop-off length for heat production could become sufficient to produce staurolite at the current erosion level, and subsequent rapid denudation of the crust could potentially trigger decompression-melting of lower crustal rocks. Although this model could potentially explain the observed temporal relationship between regional metamorphism and leucogranite generation, it is inconsistent with melting of upper crustal Proterozoic source rocks that is indicated by isotopic compositions of the granites, with lack of evidence for rapid

  12. Excised acoustic black holes: The scattering problem in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Cherubini, C.; Federici, F.; Tosi, M.P.; Succi, S.

    2005-10-15

    The scattering process of a dynamic perturbation impinging on a draining-tub model of an acoustic black hole is numerically solved in the time domain. Analogies with real black holes of general relativity are explored by using recently developed mathematical tools involving finite elements methods, excision techniques, and constrained evolution schemes for strongly hyperbolic systems. In particular it is shown that superradiant scattering of a quasimonochromatic wave packet can produce strong amplification of the signal, offering the possibility of a significant extraction of rotational energy at suitable values of the angular frequency of the vortex and of the central frequency of the wave packet. The results show that theoretical tools recently developed for gravitational waves can be brought to fruition in the study of other problems in which strong anisotropies are present.

  13. Accuracy and effectualness of closed-form, frequency-domain waveforms for nonspinning black hole binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Nagar, Alessandro; Trias, Miquel

    2011-01-15

    The coalescences of binary black hole systems, here taken to be nonspinning, are among the most promising sources for gravitational wave (GW) ground-based detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. To detect the GW signals emitted by binary black holes and measure the parameters of the source, one needs to have in hand a bank of GW templates that are both effectual (for detection) and accurate (for measurement). We study the effectualness and the accuracy of the two types of parametrized banks of templates that are directly defined in the frequency domain by means of closed-form expressions, namely, 'post-Newtonian' (PN) and 'phenomenological' models. In the absence of knowledge of the (continuous family of) exact waveforms, our study assumes as fiducial, target waveforms the ones generated by the most accurate version of the effective-one-body formalism, calibrated upon a few high-accuracy numerical-relativity (NR) waveforms. We find that, for initial GW detectors the use, at each point of parameter space, of the best closed-form template (among PN and phenomenological models) leads to an effectualness >97% over the entire mass range and >99% in an important fraction of parameter space; however, when considering advanced detectors, both of the closed-form frequency-domain models fail to be effectual enough in significant domains of the two-dimensional [total mass and mass ratio] parameter space. Moreover, we find that, for both initial and advanced detectors, the two closed-form frequency-domain models fail to satisfy the minimal required accuracy standard in a very large domain of the two-dimensional parameter space. In addition, a side result of our study is the determination, as a function of the mass ratio, of the maximum frequency at which a frequency-domain PN waveform can be 'joined' onto a NR-calibrated effective-one-body waveform without undue loss of accuracy. In the case of mass ratios larger than 4 ratio 1 this maximum frequency occurs well before the last

  14. 40Ar/39Ar evidence for Middle Proterozoic (1300-1500 Ma) slow cooling of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, midcontinent, North America: Implications for Early Proterozoic P-T evolution and posttectonic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Daniel K.; Dahl, Peter S.; Lux, Daniel R.

    1997-08-01

    40Ar/39Ar total gas and plateau dates from moscovite and biotite in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, provide evidence for a period of Middle Proterozoic slow cooling. Early Proterozoic (1600-1650 Ma) mica dates were obtained from metasedimentary rocks located in a synformal structure between the Harney Peak and Bear Mountain domes and also south of Bear Mountain. Metamorphic rocks from the dome areas and undeformed samples of the ˜1710 Ma Harney Peak Granite (HPG) yield Middle Proterozoic mica dates (˜1270-1500 Ma). Two samples collected between the synform and Bear Mountain dome yield intermediate total gas mica dates of ˜1550 Ma. We suggest two end-member interpretations to explain the map pattern of cooling ages: (1) subhorizontal slow cooling of an area which exhibits variation in mica Ar retention intervals or (2) mild folding of a Middle Proterozoic (˜1500 Ma) ˜300°C isotherm. According to the second interpretation, the preservation of older dates between the domes may reflect reactivation of a preexisting synformal structure (and downwarping of relatively cold rocks) during a period of approximately east-west contraction and slow uplift during the Middle Proterozoic. The mica data, together with hornblende data from the Black Hills published elsewhere, indicate that the ambient country-rock temperature at the 3-4 kbar depth of emplacement of the HPG was between 350°C and 500°C, suggesting that the average upper crustal geothermal gradient was 25°-40°C/km prior to intrusion. The thermochronologic data suggest HPG emplacement was followed by a ˜200 m.y. period of stability and tectonic quiescence with little uplift. We propose that crust thickened during the Early Proterozoic was uplifted and erosionally(?) thinned prior to ˜1710 Ma and that the HPG magma was emplaced into isostatically stable crust of relatively normal thickness. We speculate that uplift and crustal thinning prior to HPG intrusion was the result of differential thinning of

  15. Ocean Hill-Brownsville, 40 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Forty years ago--on May 9, 1968--the local school board in Brooklyn's black ghetto of Ocean Hill-Brownsville sent telegrams to 19 unionized educators, informing them that their employment in the district was terminated. Eighteen were white. One black teacher was mistakenly included on the list, but reinstated almost immediately after the error was…

  16. Ocean Hill-Brownsville, 40 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlenberg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Forty years ago--on May 9, 1968--the local school board in Brooklyn's black ghetto of Ocean Hill-Brownsville sent telegrams to 19 unionized educators, informing them that their employment in the district was terminated. Eighteen were white. One black teacher was mistakenly included on the list, but reinstated almost immediately after the error was…

  17. Step-leach Pb-Pb dating of inclusion-bearing garnet and staurolite, with implications for Early Proterozoic tectonism in the Black Hills collisional orogen, South Dakota, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Peter S.; Frei, Robert

    1998-02-01

    We report 207Pb/206Pb stepwise-leaching (PbSL) ages of 1762 ± 15 Ma, 1759 ± 8 Ma, and 1760 ± 7 Ma for almandine garnet, staurolite, and garnet-staurolite (combined) in an Early Proterozoic metapelite from the Black Hills collisional orogen, South Dakota. PbSL-derived 208Pb/206Pb (Th/U) trends reveal that staurolite contains inclusions of both cogenetic monazite (ca. 1760 ± 7 Ma) and older detrital zircon (≥2040 Ma), whereas coexisting garnet contains only the zircon. These results and petrologic data indicate prograde sequential growth of garnet, monazite, and staurolite during tectonic burial at temperatures between ˜400 °C and ˜550 °C (i.e., well below Pb closure temperatures). We interpret the 1760 ± 7 Ma date as a maximum age for Wyoming-Superior continental collision in the Black Hills, which apparently postdated the 1800 1900 Ma Trans-Hudson orogeny in Canada, but was nearly synchronous with north-directed accretion of the Central Plains orogen in southeastern Wyoming.

  18. Puncture black hole initial data: A single domain Galerkin-collocation method for trumpet and wormhole data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, P. C. M.; de Oliveira, H. P.

    2017-07-01

    We present a single-domain Galerkin-collocation method to calculate puncture initial data sets for single and binary black holes, either in the trumpet or wormhole geometries. The combination of aspects belonging to the Galerkin and the collocation methods together with the adoption of spherical coordinates in all cases are shown to be very effective. We propose a unified expression for the conformal factor to describe trumpet and spinning black holes. In particular, for the spinning trumpet black holes, we exhibit the deformation of the limit surface due to the spin from a sphere to an oblate spheroid. We also revisit the energy content in the trumpet and wormhole puncture data sets. The algorithm can be extended to describe binary black holes.

  19. From blackbirds to black holes: Investigating capture-recapture methods for time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.

    2017-07-01

    In time domain astronomy, recurrent transients present a special problem: how to infer total populations from limited observations. Monitoring observations may give a biassed view of the underlying population due to limitations on observing time, visibility and instrumental sensitivity. A similar problem exists in the life sciences, where animal populations (such as migratory birds) or disease prevalence, must be estimated from sparse and incomplete data. The class of methods termed Capture-Recapture is used to reconstruct population estimates from time-series records of encounters with the study population. This paper investigates the performance of Capture-Recapture methods in astronomy via a series of numerical simulations. The Blackbirds code simulates monitoring of populations of transients, in this case accreting binary stars (neutron star or black hole accreting from a stellar companion) under a range of observing strategies. We first generate realistic light-curves for populations of binaries with contrasting orbital period distributions. These models are then randomly sampled at observing cadences typical of existing and planned monitoring surveys. The classical capture-recapture methods, Lincoln-Peterson, Schnabel estimators, related techniques, and newer methods implemented in the Rcapture package are compared. A general exponential model based on the radioactive decay law is introduced which is demonstrated to recover (at 95% confidence) the underlying population abundance and duty cycle, in a fraction of the observing visits (10-50%) required to discover all the sources in the simulation. Capture-Recapture is a promising addition to the toolbox of time domain astronomy, and methods implemented in R by the biostats community can be readily called from within python.

  20. Thunderstorms and Flooding of August 17, 2007, with a Context Provided by a History of Other Large Storm and Flood Events in the Black Hills Area of South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bunkers, Matthew J.; Carter, Janet M.; Stamm, John F.; Williamson, Joyce E.

    2010-01-01

    The Black Hills area of western South Dakota has a history of damaging flash floods that have resulted primarily from exceptionally strong rain-producing thunderstorms. The best known example is the catastrophic storm system of June 9-10, 1972, which caused severe flooding in several major drainages near Rapid City and resulted in 238 deaths. More recently, severe thunderstorms caused flash flooding near Piedmont and Hermosa on August 17, 2007. Obtaining a thorough understanding of peak-flow characteristics for low-probability floods will require a comprehensive long-term approach involving (1) documentation of scientific information for extreme events such as these; (2) long-term collection of systematic peak-flow records; and (3) regional assessments of a wide variety of peak-flow information. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with the South Dakota Department of Transportation and National Weather Service to produce this report, which provides documentation regarding the August 17, 2007, storm and associated flooding and provides a context through examination of other large storm and flood events in the Black Hills area. The area affected by the August 17, 2007, storms and associated flooding generally was within the area affected by the larger storm of June 9-10, 1972. The maximum observed 2007 precipitation totals of between 10.00 and 10.50 inches occurred within about 2-3 hours in a small area about 5 miles west of Hermosa. The maximum documented precipitation amount in 1972 was 15.0 inches, and precipitation totals of 10.0 inches or more were documented for 34 locations within an area of about 76 square miles. A peak flow of less than 1 cubic foot per second occurred upstream from the 2007 storm extent for streamflow-gaging station 06404000 (Battle Creek near Keystone); whereas, the 1972 peak flow of 26,200 cubic feet per second was large, relative to the drainage area of only 58.6 square miles. Farther downstream along Battle Creek, a 2007

  1. Water-Quality Effects and Characterization of Indicators of Onsite Wastewater Disposal Systems in the East-Central Black Hills Area, South Dakota, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putnam, Larry D.; Hoogestraat, Galen K.; Sawyer, J. Foster

    2008-01-01

    Onsite wastewater disposal systems (OWDS) are used extensively in the Black Hills of South Dakota where many of the watersheds and aquifers are characterized by fractured or solution-enhanced bedrock with thin soil cover. A study was conducted during 2006-08 to characterize water-quality effects and indicators of OWDS. Water samples were collected and analyzed for potential indicators of OWDS, including chloride, bromide, boron, nitrite plus nitrate (NO2+NO3), ammonia, major ions, nutrients, selected trace elements, isotopes of nitrate, microbiological indicators, and organic wastewater compounds (OWCs). The microbiological indicators were fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli (E. coli), enterococci, Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens), and coliphages. Sixty ground-water sampling sites were located either downgradient from areas of dense OWDS or in background areas and included 25 monitoring wells, 34 private wells, and 1 spring. Nine surface-water sampling sites were located on selected streams and tributaries either downstream or upstream from residential development within the Precambrian setting. Sampling results were grouped by their hydrogeologic setting: alluvial, Spearfish, Minnekahta, and Precambrian. Mean downgradient dissolved NO2+NO3 concentrations in ground water for the alluvial, Spearfish, Minnekahta, and Precambrian settings were 0.734, 7.90, 8.62, and 2.25 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Mean downgradient dissolved chloride concentrations in ground water for these settings were 324, 89.6, 498, and 33.2 mg/L, respectively. Mean downgradient dissolved boron concentrations in ground water for these settings were 736, 53, 64, and 43 micrograms per liter (ug/L), respectively. Mean dissolved surface-water concentrations for NO2+NO3, chloride, and boron for downstream sites were 0.222 mg/L, 32.1 mg/L, and 28 ug/L, respectively. Mean values of delta-15N and delta-18O (isotope ratios of 14N to 15N and 18O to 16O relative to standard ratios) for

  2. Phase transition of charged-AdS black holes and quasinormal modes: A time domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Moumni, H.; Iraoui, S.; Masmar, K.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the time evolution of a massless scalar perturbation around small and large RN-AdS4 black holes for the purpose of probing the thermodynamic phase transition. We show that below the critical point the scalar perturbation decays faster with increasing of the black hole size, both for small and large black hole phases. Our analysis of the time profile of quasinormal mode reveals a sharp distinction between the behaviors of both phases, providing a reliable tool to probe the black hole phase transition. However at the critical point P=Pc, as the black hole size extends, we note that the damping time increases and the perturbation decays faster, the oscillation frequencies raise either in small and large black hole phase. In this case the time evolution approach fails to track the AdS4 black hole phase.

  3. Systematic study of terahertz time-domain spectra of historically informed black inks.

    PubMed

    Bardon, Tiphaine; May, Robert K; Taday, Philip F; Strlič, Matija

    2013-09-07

    The potential of terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) as a diagnostic tool for studies of inks in historical documents is investigated in this paper. Transmission mode THz-TDS was performed on historically informed model writing and drawing inks. Carbon black, bistre and sepia inks show featureless spectra between 5 and 75 cm(-1) (0.15-2.25 THz); however, their analysis still provided useful information on the interaction of terahertz radiation with amorphous materials. On the other hand, THz-TDS can be used to distinguish different iron gall inks with respect to the amount of iron(II) sulfate contained, as sharp spectral features are observed for inks containing different ratios of iron(II) sulfate to tannic or gallic acid. Additionally, copper sulfate was found to modify the structure of iron(II) precipitate. Furthermore, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) applied to THz-TDS spectra, highlights changes in iron gall inks during thermal degradation, during which a decrease in the sharp spectral bands associated with iron(II) sulfate is observed. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with THz-TDS of dynamically heated ink samples indicate that this phenomenon is due to dehydration of iron(II) sulfate heptahydrate. While this research demonstrates the potential of THz-TDS to improve monitoring of the chemical state of historical documents, the outcomes go beyond the heritage field, as it also helps to develop the theoretical knowledge on interactions between terahertz radiation and matter, particularly in studies of long-range symmetry (polymorphism) in complex molecular structures and the role played by the surrounding matrix, and also indicates the potential of THz-TDS for the optimization of contrast in terahertz imaging.

  4. Active galactic nucleus black hole mass estimates in the era of time domain astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Pancoast, Anna; Malkan, Matthew; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-12-20

    We investigate the dependence of the normalization of the high-frequency part of the X-ray and optical power spectral densities (PSDs) on black hole mass for a sample of 39 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with black hole masses estimated from reverberation mapping or dynamical modeling. We obtained new Swift observations of PG 1426+015, which has the largest estimated black hole mass of the AGNs in our sample. We develop a novel statistical method to estimate the PSD from a light curve of photon counts with arbitrary sampling, eliminating the need to bin a light curve to achieve Gaussian statistics, and we use this technique to estimate the X-ray variability parameters for the faint AGNs in our sample. We find that the normalization of the high-frequency X-ray PSD is inversely proportional to black hole mass. We discuss how to use this scaling relationship to obtain black hole mass estimates from the short timescale X-ray variability amplitude with precision ∼0.38 dex. The amplitude of optical variability on timescales of days is also anticorrelated with black hole mass, but with larger scatter. Instead, the optical variability amplitude exhibits the strongest anticorrelation with luminosity. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our results for estimating black hole mass from the amplitude of AGN variability.

  5. Map showing locations of mines, prospects, and patented mining claims, and classification of mineral deposits in the Silver City 7 1/2-minute Quadrangle, Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Ed; Buscher, David; Wilson, A.B.; Johnson, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    This map is one in a set of 26 maps (see index map) at 1:24,000 scale of the Black Hills region of South Dakota and Wyoming om which are shown a geologic classification of mines, a bibliography of mineral deposits, and locations of active and inactive mines, prospects, and patented mining claims. Some of these maps are published as U. S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Maps (MF series) and some as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports (QF series); see index map. An earlier unpublished version of this set of maps was the data base from which plate 4 (scale 1:250,000) of DeWitt and others (1986) was compiled. Subsequent to that publication, the set has been revised and updated, and prospects and patented claims have been added. These revised and more detailed 1:24,000-scale maps should be used for the equivalent areas of plate 4 of DeWitt and others (1986).

  6. A frequency-domain approach for fast analysis of binary black hole parameter estimation capability of LISA-like instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John G.; Marsat, Sylvain N.; Graff, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Space-based gravitational-wave instruments such as LISA will provide extraordinary precise information about the central black holes in early galaxies. Fine details about merging black holes are encoded in the gravitational waveforms that these instruments will measure, and sky position information is encoded in the measured signals through the rich structure of the instrumental transfer function. Estimating of our ability to extract this information has so far been an arduous time-consuming process allowing few comprehensive studies and often requiring shortcuts which may impact the accuracy of the results. We report on an effort to speed up the generation of accurate response signals for LISA-type instruments based on Effective-One-Body (EOB) gravitational wave signal models. Our approach begins with reduced order models of the EOB waveforms directly in the Fourier domain. We then apply fast yet accurate techniques for encoding the time-dependent response of LISA-type detectors in Fourier domain and for computing the integrals required in estimating the parameter measurement capability. Our ultimate aim is to provide tools that make it easy for astrophysicists with other expertise to rapidly assess how space-based gravitational wave observations could impact their field.

  7. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data for inventory of forest and rangeland and detection of forest stress. [Atlanta, Georgia, Manitou, Colorado, and Black Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. C. (Principal Investigator); Aldrich, R. C.; Driscoll, R. S.; Francis, R. E.; Weber, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results of photointerpretation indicated that ERTS is a good classifier of forest and nonforest lands (90 to 95 percent accurate). Photointerpreters could make this separation as accurately as signature analysis of the computer compatible tapes. Further breakdowns of cover types at each site could not be accurately classified by interpreters (60 percent) or computer analysts (74 percent). Exceptions were water, wet meadow, and coniferous stands. At no time could the large bark beetle infestations (many over 300 meters in size) be detected on ERTS images. The ERTS wavebands are too broad to distinguish the yellow, yellow-red, and red colors of the dying pine foliage from healthy green-yellow foliage. Forest disturbances could be detected on ERTS color composites about 90 percent of the time when compared with six-year-old photo index mosaics. ERTS enlargements (1:125,000 scale, preferably color prints) would be useful to forest managers of large ownerships over 5,000 hectares (12,500 acres) for broad area planning. Black-and-white enlargements can be used effectively as aerial navigation aids for precision aerial photography where maps are old or not available.

  8. Frequency-domain gravitational waves from nonprecessing black-hole binaries. I. New numerical waveforms and anatomy of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husa, Sascha; Khan, Sebastian; Hannam, Mark; Pürrer, Michael; Ohme, Frank; Forteza, Xisco Jiménez; Bohé, Alejandro

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the anatomy of frequency-domain gravitational-wave signals from nonprecessing black-hole coalescences with the goal of constructing accurate phenomenological waveform models. We first present new numerical-relativity simulations for mass ratios up to 18, including spins. From a comparison of different post-Newtonian approximants with numerical-relativity data we select the uncalibrated SEOBNRv2 model as the most appropriate for the purpose of constructing hybrid post-Newtonian/numerical-relativity waveforms, and we discuss how we prepare time-domain and frequency-domain hybrid data sets. We then use our data together with results in the literature to calibrate simple explicit expressions for the final spin and radiated energy. Equipped with our prediction for the final state we then develop a simple and accurate merger-ringdown model based on modified Lorentzians in the gravitational-wave amplitude and phase, and we discuss a simple method to represent the low frequency signal augmenting the TaylorF2 post-Newtonian approximant with terms corresponding to higher orders in the post-Newtonian expansion. We finally discuss different options for modelling the small intermediate frequency regime between inspiral and merger ringdown. A complete phenomenological model based on the present work is presented in a companion paper [S. Khan et al., following paper, Phys. Rev. D 93 044007 (2016)].

  9. Styles of lode gold mineralization contributing to the placers of the Indian River and Black Hills Creek, Yukon Territory, Canada as deduced from microchemical characterization of placer gold grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Robert John; Mortensen, James Keith; Lebarge, William P.

    2011-12-01

    Between 1978 and 2009, approximately 430,000 oz of placer gold were obtained from the Indian River and Black Hills Creek, which equates to roughly 20% of the production for the entire Yukon Territory during that period. The area is unglaciated, exposure is poor, and there are few known lode gold occurrences present. The technique of microchemical characterization of placer gold grains has been applied to illuminate the style(s) of source mineralization and their relationship to placer gold from the Klondike gold district immediately to the north. A total of 2,613 placer gold grains from 22 localities were characterised in terms of the Au, Ag, Cu, and Hg content of their alloy and associated suite of opaque mineral inclusions. A combination of alloy and inclusion mineralogy was used to define gold signatures which augmented the previous classification of orogenic gold in the Klondike. Gold type 3b (8-25% Ag) is the main component of the placers in lower Dominion Creek but is augmented and eventually replaced by type 3a gold (10-40% Ag) in placers in the main Indian River valley, probably through erosion of gold-bearing veins in the valley floor. Type 4 gold exhibits highly variable Ag which may contain Hg to a maximum of 11 wt.%. This gold type also hosts a distinctive inclusion assemblage of complex polymetallic sulphides, tellurides, sulfotellurides, and sulfosalts and has previously been ascribed to local low sulfidation epithermal mineralization. Placer gold in drainages radiating from Eureka Dome exhibits various proportions of types 3 and 4 gold depending on location, but type 3 gold forms the major component in Black Hills Creek and northerly flowing tributaries of the Indian River with the exception of Eureka and Montana creeks. Type 5 gold is found only in placers in the middle and lower Indian River. It is distinguished by slightly elevated (0.05-0.17%) Cu in the gold alloy, together with low (5-9%) Ag contents. Inclusions of Bi minerals, Cr

  10. Substitution within erythropoietin receptor gene D1 domain associated with litter size in Beijing Black pig, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Li, Yong; Li, Wen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Kebin; Wang, Lixian

    2011-10-01

    Studies of uterine capacity and litter size in swine have suggested that erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) plays an important role in fetal survival through maturation of red blood cells. In this study, we screened the porcine EPOR gene for mutations and identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): two missense mutations and one synonymous mutation. We then genotyped 272 Beijing Black sows, Sus scrofa, and compared this data with litter sizes from a total of 1523 parities among the sows. The G allele of the nonsynonymous SNP, EPOR c.434A>G, was associated with greater litter size at both first parity (P < 0.05) and at later parities (P < 0.01). This SNP causes His92Arg adjacent to the fourth conserved cysteine residue in the mature protein and is in the D1 domain of the protein. Additionally, we determined the allele frequencies for this SNP among six Chinese indigenous pig breeds (Bamei, Erhualian, Laiwu Black, Mashen, Meishan and Min) and three Western commercial pig breeds (Duroc, Landrace and Large White). The c.434G allele was significantly more common among the more prolific Chinese breeds than the Western breeds, implying that EPOR c.434A>G could be a useful genetic marker to improve litter size in swine.

  11. Lost Hills Subsidence Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-06

    This frame from an animation depicts ground subsidence resulting from the extraction of oil. The oil fields are located near the community of Lost Hills, California, approximately 100 km northwest of Bakersfield.

  12. Red Hill Updates

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This and other periodic updates are intended to keep the public informed on major progress being made to protect public health and the environment at the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Hawaii.

  13. Meet Janis Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Jane

    1980-01-01

    Janis Hill, an itinerant physical education teacher in Florida, is interviewed about her job, which sometimes involves work with emotionally disturbed or learning disabled students. The importance of teaching children to work together, have fun, and play is stressed. (CJ)

  14. Dunes Streaming through Hills

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    This dramatic image observed by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows dark rippled bodies of sand, sometimes in the form of dunes, streaming through Ganges Chasma. The floor of the canyon is covered by hills and mesas.

  15. Layered Rocks in 'Columbia Hills'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This black-and-white image shows the first layered rocks scientists have seen close up in Gusev Crater, where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit landed Jan. 4, 2004. While Spirit's twin rover, Opportunity, reached the stadium-size Endurance Crater on the other side of Mars and began exploring its many layered outcrops in early May, Spirit traveled more than 3.5 kilometers (2.2 miles) to get to this layered bedrock in the 'Columbia Hills.' Scientists are planning to conduct a study of these rocks to determine if they are volcanic or sedimentary in origin, and if they have been chemically altered. Spirit's panoramic camera took this image on sol 217 (Aug. 13, 2004).

  16. 'Black sheep' that don't leave the double-stranded RNA-binding domain fold.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Michael L; Maquat, Lynne E

    2014-07-01

    The canonical double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (dsRBD) is composed of an α1-β1-β2-β3-α2 secondary structure that folds in three dimensions to recognize dsRNA. Recently, structural and functional studies of divergent dsRBDs revealed adaptations that include intra- and/or intermolecular protein interactions, sometimes in the absence of detectable dsRNA-binding ability. We describe here how discrete dsRBD components can accommodate pronounced amino-acid sequence changes while maintaining the core fold. We exemplify the growing importance of divergent dsRBDs in mRNA decay by discussing Dicer, Staufen (STAU)1 and 2, trans-activation responsive RNA-binding protein (TARBP)2, protein activator of protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) (PACT), DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR)8, DEAH box helicase proteins (DHX) 9 and 30, and dsRBD-like fold-containing proteins that have ribosome-related functions. We also elaborate on the computational limitations to discovering yet-to-be-identified divergent dsRBDs.

  17. Bacon Hill Substation. Bacon Hill, Cecil Co., MD. Sec. 1201, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bacon Hill Substation. Bacon Hill, Cecil Co., MD. Sec. 1201, MP 48.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between District of Columbia/Maryland state line & Maryland/Delaware state line, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. Nonradiative Electron--Hole Recombination Rate Is Greatly Reduced by Defects in Monolayer Black Phosphorus: Ab Initio Time Domain Study.

    PubMed

    Long, Run; Fang, Weihai; Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-02-18

    We report ab initio time-domain simulations of nonradiative electron-hole recombination and electronic dephasing in ideal and defect-containing monolayer black phosphorus (MBP). Our calculations predict that the presence of phosphorus divacancy in MBP (MBP-DV) substantially reduces the nonradiative recombination rate, with time scales on the order of 1.57 ns. The luminescence line width in ideal MBP of 150 meV is 2.5 times larger than MBP-DV at room temperature, and is in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that the electron-hole recombination in ideal MBP is driven by the 450 cm(-1) vibrational mode, whereas the recombination in the MBP-DV system is driven by a broad range of vibrational modes. The reduced electron-phonon coupling and increased bandgap in MBP-DV rationalize slower recombination in this material, suggesting that electron-phonon energy losses in MBP can be minimized by creating suitable defects in semiconductor device material.

  19. A five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon and its inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Somprasong, Nawarat; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2006-01-01

    A novel five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, SPIPm2, identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon was successfully expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system. The expressed recombinant SPIPm2 (rSPIPm2) as inclusion bodies was solubilized with a sodium carbonate buffer, pH10, and purified by gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of rSPIPm2 was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to be 29.065 kDa. The inhibitory activities of rSPIPm2 were tested against trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin and elastase. The inhibitor exhibited potent inhibitory activities against subtilisin and elastase, weak inhibitory activity against trypsin, and did not inhibit chymotrypsin. Tight-binding inhibition assay suggested that the molar ratios of SPIPm2 to subtilisin and elastase were 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. The inhibition against subtilisin and elastase was a competitive type with inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.52 and 3.27 nM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of SPIPm2 against subtilisin implies that, in shrimp, it may function as a defense component against proteinases from pathogenic bacteria but the elastase inhibitory function is not known.

  20. A Hill Divided

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-07

    This image captured by NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an elevated group of hills east of Phlegra Montes. This highland is divided by a linear channel that is most likely of tectonic origin. Orbit Number: 61195 Latitude: 31.5513 Longitude: 167.142 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-09-30 13:26 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20109

  1. Jack Hills, Australia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-02

    This image acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, shows the oldest material on Earth which has yet been dated by man is a zircon mineral of 4.4 billion years old from a sedimentary gneiss in the Jack Hills of the Narre Gneiss Terrane of Australia.

  2. Chocolate Hills Rock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-16

    This false-color image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA rover Opportunity, shows the rock Chocolate Hills, perched on the rim of the 10-meter 33-foot wide Concepcion crater. This rock has a thick, dark-colored coating resembling chocolate.

  3. Soufriere Hills Volcano Resumes Activity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A massive eruption of Montserrat’s Soufrière Hills Volcano covered large portions of the island in debris. The eruption was triggered by a collapse of Soufrière Hills’ summit lava dome on February 11, 2010. Pyroclastic flows raced down the northern flank of the volcano, leveling trees and destroying buildings in the village of Harris, which was abandoned after Soufrière Hills became active in 1995. The Montserrat Volcano Observatory reported that some flows, about 15 meters (49 feet) thick, reached the sea at Trant’s Bay. These flows extended the island’s coastline up to 650 meters (2,100 feet). These false-color satellite images show the southern half of Montserrat before and after the dome collapse. The top image shows Montserrat on February 21, 2010, just 10 days after the event. For comparison, the bottom image shows the same area on March 17, 2007. Red areas are vegetated, clouds are white, blue/black areas are ocean water, and gray areas are covered by flow deposits. Fresh deposits tend to be lighter than older deposits. On February 21, the drainages leading down from Soufrière Hills, including the White River Valley, the Tar River Valley, and the Belham River Valley, were filled with fresh debris. According to the Montserrat Volcano Observatory, pyroclastic flows reached the sea through Aymers Ghaut on January 18, 2010, and flows entered the sea near Plymouth on February 5, 2010. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Robert Simmon. To read more go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=42792 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  4. Hill and Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows exposures of north polar layered material -- perhaps composed of a mixture of dust and ice--in the form of a hill and an adjacent depression. The depression is in the lower half of the image and forms an oval shape at its lowest elevations. The hill is immediately above the depression (above the center of the image) and forms a similar pattern of arcuate bands. This scene is located near 85.7oN, 21.0oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  5. Hill In Deuteronilus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 December 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an eroded, rounded hill in the Deuteronilus Colles region of Mars, near 40.3oN, 338.8oW. The plains surrounding the hill have been pitted and modified by erosion. Similar pitting is common throughout the middle latitude regions of Mars. Some Mars science investigators have proposed that the pitted materials were ice-rich, and that sublimation of ice has created these textures. However, no similar landforms are found on Earth, thus there is no clear analog that would help scientists better understand the origin of these features. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/lower left.

  6. Nose Hill Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Vivian

    2008-01-01

    A Blackfoot woman, caught in the act of adultery, was condemned at this site to have her nose cut off as a penalty for her actions. People do not know her story. The tribe cast it on the ground. And so She, Nose Hill, was named. John Laurie Boulevard holds her mound in a circlet of asphalt, defining the map of her "terra incognita." She…

  7. Top of the hill.

    PubMed

    Lubell, Jennifer

    2009-08-24

    With healthcare reform the hottest topic in Washington (and at congressional town halls) this summer, it's no surprise President Barack Obama tops our 100 Most Powerful People in Healthcare ranking, joined by plenty of other power players on the Hill. "Clearly, the president is pushing hard on his goals to expand access to care, to reform health insurance and to control costs," says LifePoint's Bill Carpenter.

  8. Notting Hill Carnival 1988.

    PubMed

    Dalton, A M; Sharma, A; Touquet, R

    1989-06-01

    The injuries sustained at the 1988 Notting Hill Carnival were documented in order to suggest ways in which these might be reduced in future years. Sixty-four patients presented to six hospitals participating in the study over a 48-h period, most of whom were victims of accidents (63%) rather than assaults (37%). Many of the accidents were caused by motorized floats or by stepping on broken glass.

  9. Notting Hill Carnival 1988.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, A M; Sharma, A; Touquet, R

    1989-01-01

    The injuries sustained at the 1988 Notting Hill Carnival were documented in order to suggest ways in which these might be reduced in future years. Sixty-four patients presented to six hospitals participating in the study over a 48-h period, most of whom were victims of accidents (63%) rather than assaults (37%). Many of the accidents were caused by motorized floats or by stepping on broken glass. PMID:2742669

  10. A Cone Shaped Hill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-14

    There are many hills and knobs on Mars that reveal aspects of the local geologic history. Typically, the hills in the relatively-smooth region surrounding this image are flat topped erosional remnants or mesas with irregular or even polyhedral margins. These landforms suggest wide spread erosion of the soft or weakly-cemented sedimentary layers. This hill stands out because of is circular inverted-cone shape and apparent dark streaks along its flanks visible in lower resolution images. Close inspection from HiRISE reveals that the fine soils sloping down from the peak are intersected with radiating lines of rock and eroding rubble. This formation is similar to lava intrusions that form in the core of a volcano. As lava is squeezed up into a central conduit, radiating fractures fill with lava forming rock units called dikes. As the lava cools inside the ground and in the fractures, it forms into a harder rock that is more resistant to erosion. Later, as the surrounding sediments and soils erode, the resistant volcanic rock remains standing to tell a story of what happened underground long ago. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20003

  11. 'Columbia Hills' from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This view of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater was made by draping an image from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter (image E0300012 from that camera) over a digital elevation model that was derived from two Mars Orbiter Camera images (E0300012 and R0200357).

    This unique view is helpful to the rover team members as they plan the journey of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit to the base of the Columbia Hills and beyond. Spirit successfully completed a three-month primary mission, and so far remains healthy in an extended mission of bonus exploration. As of sol 135 (on May 21, 2004), Spirit sits approximately 680 meters (0.4 miles) away from its first target at the western base of the hills, a spot informally called 'West Spur.' The team estimates that Spirit will reach West Spur by sol 146 (June 1, 2004). Spirit will most likely remain there for about a week to study the outcrops and rocks associated with this location.

    When done there, Spirit will head approximately 620 meters (0.38 miles) to a higher-elevation location informally called 'Lookout Point.' Spirit might reach Lookout Point by around sol 165 (June 20, 2004). On the way, the rover will pass by and study ripple-shaped wind deposits that may reveal more information about wind processes on Mars.

    Lookout Point will provide a great vantage point for scientists to remotely study the inner basin area of the Columbia Hills. This basin contains a broad range of interesting geological targets including the informally named 'Home Plate' and other possible layered outcrops. These features suggest that the hills contain rock layers. Spirit might investigate the layers to determine whether they are water-deposited sedimentary rock.

    Once at Lookout Point, Spirit will acquire 360-degree panoramic images of the entire area to help define the rover's next steps. Assuming the rover stays healthy, Spirit will eventually drive down into the basin to get an up

  12. 'Columbia Hills' from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This view of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater was made by draping an image from the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter (image E0300012 from that camera) over a digital elevation model that was derived from two Mars Orbiter Camera images (E0300012 and R0200357).

    This unique view is helpful to the rover team members as they plan the journey of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit to the base of the Columbia Hills and beyond. Spirit successfully completed a three-month primary mission, and so far remains healthy in an extended mission of bonus exploration. As of sol 135 (on May 21, 2004), Spirit sits approximately 680 meters (0.4 miles) away from its first target at the western base of the hills, a spot informally called 'West Spur.' The team estimates that Spirit will reach West Spur by sol 146 (June 1, 2004). Spirit will most likely remain there for about a week to study the outcrops and rocks associated with this location.

    When done there, Spirit will head approximately 620 meters (0.38 miles) to a higher-elevation location informally called 'Lookout Point.' Spirit might reach Lookout Point by around sol 165 (June 20, 2004). On the way, the rover will pass by and study ripple-shaped wind deposits that may reveal more information about wind processes on Mars.

    Lookout Point will provide a great vantage point for scientists to remotely study the inner basin area of the Columbia Hills. This basin contains a broad range of interesting geological targets including the informally named 'Home Plate' and other possible layered outcrops. These features suggest that the hills contain rock layers. Spirit might investigate the layers to determine whether they are water-deposited sedimentary rock.

    Once at Lookout Point, Spirit will acquire 360-degree panoramic images of the entire area to help define the rover's next steps. Assuming the rover stays healthy, Spirit will eventually drive down into the basin to get an up

  13. a Multi-Domain Hybrid Method for Head-On Collision of Black Holes in Particle Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Debananda; Jung, Jae-Hun; Khanna, Gaurav

    A hybrid method is developed based on the spectral and finite-difference methods for solving the inhomogeneous Zerilli equation in time-domain. The developed hybrid method decomposes the domain into the spectral and finite-difference domains. The singular source term is located in the spectral domain while the solution in the region without the singular term is approximated by the higher-order finite-difference method. The spectral domain is also split into multi-domains and the finite-difference domain is placed as the boundary domain. Due to the global nature of the spectral method, a multi-domain method composed of the spectral domain only does not yield the proper power-law decay unless the range of the computational domain is large. The finite-difference domain helps reduce boundary effects due to the truncation of the computational domain. The multi-domain approach with the finite-difference boundary domain method reduces the computational cost significantly and also yields the proper power-law decay. Stable and accurate interface conditions between the finite-difference and spectral domains and the spectral and spectral domains are derived. For the singular source term, we use both the Gaussian model with various values of full width at half-maximum and a localized discrete δ-function. The discrete δ-function was generalized to adopt the Gauss-Lobatto collocation points of the spectral domain. The gravitational waveforms are measured. Numerical results show that the developed hybrid method accurately yields the quasi-normal modes and the power-law decay profile. The numerical results also show that the power-law decay profile is less sensitive to the shape of the regularized δ-function for the Gaussian model than expected. The Gaussian model also yields better results than the localized discrete δ-function.

  14. Gyroscopes orbiting black holes: A frequency-domain approach to precession and spin-curvature coupling for spinning bodies on generic Kerr orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruangsri, Uchupol; Vigeland, Sarah J.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2016-08-01

    A small body orbiting a black hole follows a trajectory that, at leading order, is a geodesic of the black hole spacetime. Much effort has gone into computing "self-force" corrections to this motion, arising from the small body's own contributions to the system's spacetime. Another correction to the motion arises from coupling of the small body's spin to the black hole's spacetime curvature. Spin-curvature coupling drives a precession of the small body, and introduces a "force" (relative to the geodesic) which shifts the small body's worldline. These effects scale with the small body's spin at leading order. In this paper, we show that the equations which govern spin-curvature coupling can be analyzed with a frequency-domain decomposition, at least to leading order in the small body's spin. We show how to compute the frequency of precession along generic orbits, and how to describe the small body's precession and motion in the frequency domain. We illustrate this approach with a number of examples. This approach is likely to be useful for understanding spin coupling effects in the extreme mass ratio limit, and may provide insight into modeling spin effects in the strong field for nonextreme mass ratios.

  15. A Capitol Hill Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Christal

    2006-04-01

    Relatively few women receive advanced degrees in the sciences, and relatively few scientists find their way into staff positions on Capitol Hill. Yet in this staffer's experience, I count more female science Ph.D.s in my circle of colleagues than I counted female classmates in physics graduate school. Why, at least anecdotally, does it seem that women with advanced degrees in science are more likely than their male peers to leave the laboratory and join the policy lobby? My observations are based on my own work in energy and environmental policy as a staffer in both the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

  16. KISATCHIE HILLS WILDERNESS, LOUISIANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haley, Boyd R.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Kisatchie Hills Wilderness, Louisiana indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There is insufficient data on oil and gas producing formations that underlie the area to evaluate the oil and gas resource potential. All the oil fields of Wilcox age are less than 40 acres in extent; therefore, closer spaced deeper wells might find additional fields in sediments of Wilcox age. Oil and natural gas have been produced from older reservoirs (Cretaceous age) to the northwest of the wilderness, and deeper wells might find oil and natural gas in sediments of Cretaceous and older age in the vicinity of the wilderness.

  17. STUDIES OF THERMALLY UNSTABLE ACCRETION DISKS AROUND BLACK HOLES WITH ADAPTIVE PSEUDOSPECTRAL DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION METHOD. II. LIMIT-CYCLE BEHAVIOR IN ACCRETION DISKS AROUND KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Li; Lu Jufu; Sadowski, Aleksander; Abramowicz, Marek A. E-mail: lujf@xmu.edu.cn

    2011-07-01

    For the first time ever, we derive equations governing the time evolution of fully relativistic slim accretion disks in the Kerr metric and numerically construct their detailed non-stationary models. We discuss applications of these general results to a possible limit-cycle behavior of thermally unstable disks. Our equations and numerical method are applicable in a wide class of possible viscosity prescriptions, but in this paper we use a diffusive form of the 'standard alpha prescription' that assumes that the viscous torque is proportional to the total pressure. In this particular case, we find that the parameters that dominate the limit-cycle properties are the mass-supply rate and the value of the alpha-viscosity parameter. Although the duration of the cycle (or the outburst) does not exhibit any clear dependence on the black hole spin, the maximal outburst luminosity (in the Eddington units) is positively correlated with the spin value. We suggest a simple method for a rough estimate of the black hole spin based on the maximal luminosity and the ratio of outburst to cycle durations. We also discuss a temperature-luminosity relation for the Kerr black hole accretion disk limit cycle. Based on these results, we discuss the limit-cycle behavior observed in microquasar GRS 1915+105. We also extend this study to several non-standard viscosity prescriptions, including a 'delayed heating' prescription recently addressed by the MHD simulations of accretion disks.

  18. Associations between Prenatal Exposure to Black Carbon and Memory Domains in Urban Children: Modification by Sex and Prenatal Stress.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Whitney J; Bellinger, David C; Coull, Brent A; Gennings, Chris; Wright, Robert O; Wright, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Whether fetal neurodevelopment is disrupted by traffic-related air pollution is uncertain. Animal studies suggest that chemical and non-chemical stressors interact to impact neurodevelopment, and that this association is further modified by sex. To examine associations between prenatal traffic-related black carbon exposure, prenatal stress, and sex with children's memory and learning. Analyses included N = 258 mother-child dyads enrolled in a Boston, Massachusetts pregnancy cohort. Black carbon exposure was estimated using a validated spatiotemporal land-use regression model. Prenatal stress was measured using the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey of negative life events. The Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML2) was administered at age 6 years; outcomes included the General Memory Index and its component indices [Verbal, Visual, and Attention Concentration]. Relationships between black carbon and WRAML2 index scores were examined using multivariable-adjusted linear regression including effect modification by stress and sex. Mothers were primarily minorities (60% Hispanic, 26% Black); 67% had ≤12 years of education. The main effect for black carbon was not significant for any WRAML2 index; however, in stratified analyses, among boys with high exposure to prenatal stress, Attention Concentration Index scores were on average 9.5 points lower for those with high compared to low prenatal black carbon exposure (P3-way interaction = 0.04). The associations between prenatal exposure to black carbon and stress with children's memory scores were stronger in boys than in girls. Studies assessing complex interactions may more fully characterize health risks and, in particular, identify vulnerable subgroups.

  19. Associations between Prenatal Exposure to Black Carbon and Memory Domains in Urban Children: Modification by Sex and Prenatal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Whitney J.; Bellinger, David C.; Coull, Brent A.; Gennings, Chris; Wright, Robert O.; Wright, Rosalind J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether fetal neurodevelopment is disrupted by traffic-related air pollution is uncertain. Animal studies suggest that chemical and non-chemical stressors interact to impact neurodevelopment, and that this association is further modified by sex. Objectives To examine associations between prenatal traffic-related black carbon exposure, prenatal stress, and sex with children’s memory and learning. Methods Analyses included N = 258 mother-child dyads enrolled in a Boston, Massachusetts pregnancy cohort. Black carbon exposure was estimated using a validated spatiotemporal land-use regression model. Prenatal stress was measured using the Crisis in Family Systems-Revised survey of negative life events. The Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML2) was administered at age 6 years; outcomes included the General Memory Index and its component indices [Verbal, Visual, and Attention Concentration]. Relationships between black carbon and WRAML2 index scores were examined using multivariable-adjusted linear regression including effect modification by stress and sex. Results Mothers were primarily minorities (60% Hispanic, 26% Black); 67% had ≤12 years of education. The main effect for black carbon was not significant for any WRAML2 index; however, in stratified analyses, among boys with high exposure to prenatal stress, Attention Concentration Index scores were on average 9.5 points lower for those with high compared to low prenatal black carbon exposure (P3-way interaction = 0.04). Conclusion The associations between prenatal exposure to black carbon and stress with children’s memory scores were stronger in boys than in girls. Studies assessing complex interactions may more fully characterize health risks and, in particular, identify vulnerable subgroups. PMID:26544967

  20. The Potential for Cubesats to Determine Black Holes Masses in Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei and Contribute to Other Time Domain Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Ardila, David R.; Barth, Aaron J.; Janson, Siegfried; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Peterson, Bradley M.; Rowen, Darren; Seager, Sara; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2016-01-01

    A 3U (30cmx10cmx10cm) CubeSat with a 9cm diameter aperture telescope can deliver unprecedented time domain coverage in the ultraviolet (UV) for the purposes of Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) reverberation mapping to determine supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses. SMBH's reside at the centers of most, if not all, massive galaxies and accretion onto those black holes generates a great deal of emission peaking in the UV. These accretion disks are also surrounded by a nearby, fast moving gas region called the Broad Line Region (BLR). As light pulses generated near the black hole spread out, they first illuminate the accretion disk, and then the BLR. For a sample of bright AGN, a dedicated cubesat can follow these changes in brightness on a daily basis for up to 100 days from low Earth orbit. With such monitoring of changes in the accretion disk and then the BLR, an accurate distance between the two regions can be determined. Combining this UV coverage with optical emission-line spectroscopy from the ground allows for a direct measurement of the mass of the central black hole. This exchange of time resolution for spatial resolution can also be used to determine the structure of the central region of the AGN. Ground-based photometric and spectroscopic measurements will complement the UV by tracing the optically emitting and hence cooler regions of the AGN to provide one of the best measurements of supermassive black hole masses.In addition to the primary science mission, the long observing campaigns and the large field of view required to get comparison stars for relative photometry allow for other competitive science. We have identified UV activity in M dwarfs as ancillary science that can be addressed with such a cubesat. This activity will have a strong impact on the habitability of any possible planet around the star.

  1. Hills in Arctic Canada with Impact Origin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-06-02

    While most hills and mountains on Earth originate from tectonic motions or volcanism, Earth also has some examples of hills that originated from impacts of large meteorites, the predominant origin for hills and mountains on the Moon.

  2. 'Columbia Hills' in Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    While en route to higher ground in the 'Columbia Hills,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree stereo panorama of its surroundings. Because the rover was parked on a steep slope, it was tilted approximately 22 degrees to the west-northwest. This would be similar to tilting your body sideways like a leaning pole and turning your body and head around to survey your surroundings without bending your neck. At one point, you would be looking slightly down. At another point, you would be looking slightly up. In between those two points, your eyes would be slanted at an angle to the horizon. To compensate for this, image processing experts 'untilted' the images, so to speak, which makes the martian horizon appear flat but also creates a vertical offset between the left and right eyes. This offset can make it difficult to view a scene like this looking through 3-D glasses because the two sides of the stereo image do not line up perfectly. Tilting your head one way or the other may help to view it more easily.

    The highest point visible in this panorama is 'Husband Hill,' named for space shuttle Columbia Commander Rick Husband. To the right are the rover's tracks through the soil, where it stopped to perform maintenance on its right front wheel in July. In the distance, below the hills, is the floor of Gusev Crater, where Spirit landed Jan. 3, 2004, before traveling more than 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) to reach this point. This vista comprises 188 images taken between Spirit's 213th day, or sol, on Mars to its 223rd sol (Aug. 9 to 19, 2004). Team members at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University spent several weeks processing images and producing geometric maps to stitch all the images together in this mosaic. The 360-degree view is presented in a

  3. The State of Black America, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bernard E.; And Others

    In this report seven scholars (Bernard Anderson, James Dumpson, Charles Hamilton, Robert Hill, Vernon Jordan, Jr., Bernard Watson and Robert Weaver) appraise the social, economic, political, and educational status of blacks and black families. Minimal gains and poor prospects for black female heads of families in the current recession job market…

  4. Toilets in the hills.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, P; Holcombe, S J

    1990-04-01

    Population and Community Development Association (PDA) in Chieng Rai province in northern Thailand implemented its Environmental Sanitation for the Hill Tribes Project in March 1988 to reduce parasite infection and generate interest in self help development projects. As of early 1990, the hill tribes population growth rate stood at 4.5% compared to 1.5% in lowland Thailand. Other problems included villagers defecating around dwellings, not drinking safe water (since none was available), and not wearing shoes all of which contributed to a high rate of parasite infection. In fact, an analysis of stool samples revealed that parasites infected a mean of almost 70% of the villagers. PDA staff informed villagers about basic environmental health information which influenced them to improve sanitation conditions. They also demonstrated how to build the 1st model latrine. After that, each villager designed and constructed his own latrine. Each villager took out a Baht 150 (US$6) loan to pay for the construction materials (squat casings and cement) provided by PDA. Over the following 10 months, the staff returned to the villages to collect payments and to provide technical assistance. Those villagers that constructed a latrine persuaded others to also construct a latrine. In fact, villagers, not always PDA staff, have even transferred the knowledge to other villages. As of early 1990, villagers and staff have built 1000 squats and 993 latrines. With the health education and latrine use, PDA hoped to see a subsequent reduction in parasite infections. With the help of volunteer contraceptive distributors, PDA has also been able to expand its family planning program to 250 villages. It has also initiated a parasite control pilot project in the area in which infection rates have steadily decreased.

  5. 15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts looking towards the chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  6. 9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with chute building on the left - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  7. 12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  8. 19. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking at door to stairwell - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  9. 14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  10. 16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up at the trusses of the second floor - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  11. 3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking lot in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  12. 2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; chute building is in background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  13. 20. View of second floor to the Cherry Hill lettuce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of second floor to the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking at floor area - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  14. 22. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking at double doors - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  15. 6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, with chute building to the right - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  16. 18. View of the second floor of the Cherry Hill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of the second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking at door - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  17. 21. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of second floor of the Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards window - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  18. Antigravity hills are visual illusions.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Paola; Garlaschelli, Luigi; Barracano, Monica

    2003-09-01

    Antigravity hills, also known as spook hills or magnetic hills, are natural places where cars put into neutral are seen to move uphill on a slightly sloping road, apparently defying the law of gravity. We show that these effects, popularly attributed to gravitational anomalies, are in fact visual illusions. We re-created all the known types of antigravity spots in our laboratory using tabletop models; the number of visible stretches of road, their slant, and the height of the visible horizon were systematically varied in four experiments. We conclude that antigravity-hill effects follow from a misperception of the eye level relative to gravity, caused by the presence of either contextual inclines or a false horizon line.

  19. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-07

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit. This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03880

  20. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is

  1. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  2. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct.

  3. Spirit's Trip to the Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead view of a portion of Gusev Crater shows the route the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has traveled since arriving on the red planet over five months ago. On sol 156 (June 11, 2004), Spirit reached the base of the 'Columbia Hills,' where it is currently investigating some unusual rocks. The rover may eventually head to the top of one of the closest hills.

    This image is a composite of images taken by the camera on the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor and the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover's lander.

  4. Clarks Hill Lake Water Quality Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC LIST CLARKS HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera Class Turbellaria Ablabesmyia parajanta unidentified Planariidae A...HILL LAKE 1981 Phylum Platyhelminthes Order Diptera (continued) Planaria sp.,’ Bezzia sp. 2 unidentified Planariidae Chaoborus punctipennis unidentified

  5. Arkansas' Ozark Mountain Blacks: An Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gordon D.; Kunkel, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Introduces research which attempted to determine if black Arkansas hill people could reasonably be referred to as hillbillies in the sense that isolated rural white mountain dwellers are so referred, finding that the few black mountaineers left are not hillbillies in the sense indicated of whites. (Author/JM)

  6. Hill & Knowlton's Two Ethical Dilemmas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Cornelius B.

    1994-01-01

    Presents arguments for and against the acceptance, in 1990, of two controversial client accounts by the public relations agency Hill & Knowlton. Examines the ethical implications of both accounts and concludes that whatever ethical infractions may have occurred reflect the agency's dominant public relations practices, not necessarily the "greedy…

  7. The z~4 Quasar Luminosity Function: Implications for supermassive black hole growth, reionization, and future time domain surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; Connolly, Andrew J.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Fan, Xiaohui; LSST Data Management

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift (z > 4) quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying objects, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We develop these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 < z < 4.5 for -27.5 < M1450 < -23.5. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) repeated imaging of the 275 sq. deg. equatorial region of the sky (50 < R.A. < +60; -1.26 < Dec. < +1.26) known as Stripe 82, we extracted 40 million new lightcurves using the LSST data management software and selected a statistical sample of z~4 quasars based on colors and variability metrics. We confirmed these using a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i < 22.5. We present the first variability-selected QLF measurement at high redshift (z > 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity M*1450 = -26.7 from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z~4.

  8. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved maps...

  9. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved maps...

  10. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved maps...

  11. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved maps...

  12. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chalk Hill. 9.52 Section 9... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.52 Chalk Hill. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chalk Hill.” (b) Approved maps...

  13. 27 CFR 9.204 - Tracy Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracy Hills. 9.204 Section... Hills. (a) Tracy Hills. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Tracy Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Tracy Hills” is a term of viticultural significance. (b...

  14. Highlighting XMM-Newton's Role in Time Domain Studies of Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray binaries in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiter, K.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Braatz, J.; Grossberger, C.; Krauß, F.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Langejahn, M.; Litzinger, E.; Markowitz, A.

    2015-09-01

    XMM-Newton's combination of large effective area, superior event timing, and wide field imaging have provided a powerful capability for time-domain studies of nearby X-ray binary populations. In its first 15 years XMM has accomplished groundbreaking monitoring surveys for X-ray binaries; complemented by RXTE, Chandra, and Nustar. Over the next decade XMM's capabilities will complement a new generation of missions including Astrosat, Hitomi, and NICER. This paper highlights the role of XMM-Newton in combination with other missions, in exploring the HMXB populations of the Small Magellanic Cloud and IC 10. Both are nearby dwarf starburst galaxies, yet their ages and evolutionary scenarios are very different, the consequences of which have led to contrasting X-ray binary populations. In the SMC the definitive sample of X-ray binary pulsars assembled by RXTE is revealing fundamental accretion physics when probed by XMM. Finding and characterizing IC 10's youthful X-ray binaries required the combination of XMM together with Chandra and Nustar. Key results include the revelatory finding of an X-ray irradiated wind masking the mass-function in the WR+BH binary X-1 and the measurement of the BH's spin. Such studies have wide relevance to stellar/galactic evolution, implications for black hole masses and formation channels for BH+BH binaries.

  15. Highlighting XMM-Newton's Role in Time Domain Studies of Neutron Star and Black Hole X-ray binaries in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, S.; Yang, J.; Cappallo, R.; Christodoulou, D.; Steiner, J.

    2016-09-01

    XMM-Newton's combination of large effective area, superior event timing, and wide field imaging have provided a powerful capability for time-domain studies of nearby X-ray binary populations. In its first 15 years XMM has accomplished groundbreaking monitoring surveys for X-ray binaries; complemented by RXTE, Chandra, and Nustar. Over the next decade XMM's capabilities will complement a new generation of missions including Astrosat, Hitomi, and NICER. This paper highlights the role of XMM-Newton in combination with other missions, in exploring the HMXB populations of the Small Magellanic Cloud and IC 10. Both are nearby dwarf starburst galaxies, yet their ages and evolutionary scenarios are very different, the consequences of which have led to contrasting X-ray binary populations. In the SMC the definitive sample of X-ray binary pulsars assembled by RXTE is revealing fundamental accretion physics when probed by XMM. Finding and characterizing IC 10's youthful X-ray binaries required the combination of XMM together with Chandra and Nustar. Key results include the revelatory finding of an X-ray irradiated wind masking the mass-function in the WR+BH binary X-1 and the measurement of the BH's spin. Such studies have wide relevance to stellar/galactic evolution, implications for black hole masses and formation channels for BH+BH binaries.

  16. On the origin of Hill's causal criteria.

    PubMed

    Morabia, A

    1991-09-01

    The rules to assess causation formulated by the eighteenth century Scottish philosopher David Hume are compared to Sir Austin Bradford Hill's causal criteria. The strength of the analogy between Hume's rules and Hill's causal criteria suggests that, irrespective of whether Hume's work was known to Hill or Hill's predecessors, Hume's thinking expresses a point of view still widely shared by contemporary epidemiologists. The lack of systematic experimental proof to causal inferences in epidemiology may explain the analogy of Hume's and Hill's, as opposed to Popper's, logic.

  17. GEOCHEMISTRY OF MAJUBA HILL, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenrich, Karen J.; Mascarenas, Joseph F.; Silberman, Miles L.

    1984-01-01

    Majuba Hill is the erosional remnant of a mineralized volcanic complex of rhyolite porphyry stocks, dikes, sills and irregular masses of breccia intruded into Triassic(? ) argillites. Majuba Hill is best known for its Cu and Sn ore; in addition, it was mineralized with other metals of possible economic significance, most notably, Mo, Ag, and U. Although this is an intrusive complex with no evidence of any extrusive phases, it was intruded sufficiently near the surface to develop a porphyritic texture. Intense sericitic and argillic alteration affected all stages of intrusion. Fresh rocks were not available for K-Ar analyses. Several samples of feldspars and sericite from altered zones yielded K-Ar ages for the alteration of 24. 7 to 25. 5 m. y. The tight clustering of ages suggests that all stages of the complex were altered within less than 1 m. y.

  18. Rolling Mill Hill, Nashville, TN

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rolling Mill Hill was the home to Nashville General Hospital from 1890 to the 1990s and encompassed several buildings and structures. These existing buildings of historical significance were re-used in the form of apartments. The original Trolley Barns on the site are now artists’ lofts and are home to several companies and non-profit offices. Nance Place, which entails additional buildings built on-site, is a Tax Credit Workforce Housing Development and is Platinum LEED certified.

  19. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.L.; Clark, B. C.; Crumpler, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Gorevan, S.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hurowitz, J.; Kusack, A.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Ruff, S.W.; Wang, A.; Yen, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Crumpler, Larry; Farrand, William H.; Gorevan, Stephen; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Hurowitz, Joel; Kusack, Alastair; McSween, Harry Y.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Ruff, Steven W.; Wang, Alian; Yen, Albert

    2006-02-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic or impact in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in Martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present.

  1. Density and abundance of black-backed woodpeckers in a Ponderosa pine ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Sean R. Mohren; Mark A. Rumble; Stanley H. Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are usually associated with forest disturbance resulting in recently killed trees. While black-backed woodpeckers are attracted to areas affected by these disturbances, in the Black Hills they exist during interim disturbance periods in largely undisturbed forests. In 2012, a petition for listing black-backed woodpeckers in...

  2. The man and the hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1962-01-01

    He was sitting on a large slab of rock. As he looked at the cloud of dust hanging hazily on the horizon, the piece of antler and the block of flint he held in his hand hung as if they were suspended from their previous rapid motion. The man gazed intently across the swaying grass which rose in wave-like billows across the distant hills. What was that dust - a herd of buffalo, a band of hunters, or were coyotes chasing the antelope again? After watching for a while he started again to chip the flint with a rapid twisting motion of the bone in his right hand. The little chips of flint fell in the grass before him. It is the same hill but the scene has changed. Seated on the same rock, holding the reins of a saddle horse, a man dressed in buckskin took the fur cap off his head and wiped his brow. He was looking intently across a brown and desolate landscape at a cloud of dust on the far horizon. Was it the hostile tribe of Indians? It could be buffalo. Nervously he kicked at the ground with the deerhide moccasin, pushing the flint chips out of the way. He wiped the dust from his long rifle. What a terrible place - no water, practically no grass, everything bare and brown. Now at sunset, slanting across the hills green with springtime, a cowman sits on a big rock, pushes his sombrero back on his head, and looks across the valley at a large but quiet herd of stock, moving slowly as each steer walks from one lush patch of grass to another, nibbling. Suddenly he stood up. Far on the horizon some dark objects were moving. Is it the sheepmen? Could it be the stage coach from Baggs to the Sweetwater Crossing?Same hill - a gray truck was grinding slowly toward the summit. It pulled up near a small fenced enclosure where there were some instruments painted a bright silver color. A man stepped out of the truck and turned to his younger companion, "You've never found an arrowhead? Maybe you have never thought about it correctly. If you want to find where an Indian camped long

  3. Keeping pace with Capitol Hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, C.

    2007-01-01

    At the Capitol Hill, the legislative branch of the United States government, the work is always at pace. Working with Congress is a tough job yet, rewarding. The Congress worked hard together to serve the public interest but many big issues are one small part of what Congress does. However, many US news media do not report what the government does instead, the media report what the government argues about. The media reports the conflicts but story is always incomplete. In order for the people know what is happening to the government, contact the congressional representative to know the complete story.

  4. 75 FR 78208 - Black Hills National Forest, Northern Hills Ranger District; South Dakota; Steamboat Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... pine beetle infestations and reduce the risk of high severity wildfire. The proposed action includes... pine beetle infestation, and to reduce the risk of high severity wildfire. All actions are intended to... wildfire by thinning stands and reducing the amount of fuel available to fires. Commercial and...

  5. Spirit Rover on 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Location of Spirit

    Two Earth years ago, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit touched down in Gusev Crater. The rover marked its first Mars-year (687 Earth days) anniversary in November 2005. Shortly before Spirit's Martian anniversary, the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor acquired an image covering approximately 3 kilometers by 3 kilometers (1.9 miles by 1.9 miles) centered on the rover's location at that time in the 'Columbia Hills.'

    'Husband Hill,' the tallest in the range, is just below the center of the image. The image has a resolution of about 50 centimeters (1.6 feet) per pixel. North is up; illumination is from the left. The location is near 14.8 degrees south latitude, 184.6 degrees west longitude.

    The image was acquired on Nov. 2, 2005. A white box (see Figure 1) indicates the location of an excerpted portion on which the location of Spirit on that date is marked. Dr. Timothy J. Parker of the Mars Exploration Rover team at the NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., confirmed the location of the rover in the image. The region toward the bottom of the image shows the area where the rover is currently headed. The large dark patch and other similar dark patches are accumulations of windblown sand and granules.

  6. Spirit Rover on 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Location of Spirit

    Two Earth years ago, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit touched down in Gusev Crater. The rover marked its first Mars-year (687 Earth days) anniversary in November 2005. Shortly before Spirit's Martian anniversary, the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor acquired an image covering approximately 3 kilometers by 3 kilometers (1.9 miles by 1.9 miles) centered on the rover's location at that time in the 'Columbia Hills.'

    'Husband Hill,' the tallest in the range, is just below the center of the image. The image has a resolution of about 50 centimeters (1.6 feet) per pixel. North is up; illumination is from the left. The location is near 14.8 degrees south latitude, 184.6 degrees west longitude.

    The image was acquired on Nov. 2, 2005. A white box (see Figure 1) indicates the location of an excerpted portion on which the location of Spirit on that date is marked. Dr. Timothy J. Parker of the Mars Exploration Rover team at the NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., confirmed the location of the rover in the image. The region toward the bottom of the image shows the area where the rover is currently headed. The large dark patch and other similar dark patches are accumulations of windblown sand and granules.

  7. The Minority Experience at a Predominantly White University--A Report of a 1972 Survey at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinbaum, David G.; Kleinbaum, Anna

    1976-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive questionnaire survey of all phases of black student life at a large predominantly white southern university, the University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill (UNC) in 1972, indicate that direct forms of discrimination as well as open discord between racial groups are essentially absent at UNC, although black students…

  8. 7. Detail of balcony rail. August 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of balcony rail. August 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from small photo taken by survey member. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 1936 FIRST ORIGINAL STORE AND POSTOFFICE, COPY OF AN EARLY PHOTOGRAPH. LENT BY EVELYN S. CRAIG - Jansonist Colony, Colony Store & Post Office, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  10. 6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of pilaster cap. Aug. 10, 1936. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from small photo taken by survey member. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  11. 3. West and south elevations. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West and south elevations. Joseph Hill, photographer, copied from photo lent by Evelyn S. Craig. August 1936. - Jansonist Colony, Steeple Building, Main & Bishop Hill Streets, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  12. Bluff Hills - Ideal For Hardwood Timber Production

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Johnson

    1958-01-01

    Meandering along the eastern edge of the Mississippi River Valley from Cairo, Illinois, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, are 4% million acres of forested uplands variously called the Loess Hills, the Thick Loess area, the Brown Loam Bluffs, the Bluff Hills, or just the Bluffs. The area (Fig. 1) is well known to foresters and lumbermen who work in the Lower Mississippi Valley...

  13. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  14. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  15. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  16. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rattlesnake Hills. 9.193... Rattlesnake Hills. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Rattlesnake Hills”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Rattlesnake Hills” is a term of viticultural significance....

  17. Management Decisions and the "Dred" Hills

    Treesearch

    Steven W. Anderson

    1992-01-01

    An area of public land called the Red Hills was being so abused by the public that it was often called the "Dred" Hills. Some staff work had been accomplished to protect sensitive areas within the 7,200-acre site, but depreciative behavior continued. Primary destructive activities included off-road vehicle use and indiscriminate shooting and dumping. This...

  18. Colleges as Shining Cities on a Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Kathleen Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that the notion of America be reintroduced as the "shining city on a hill," that abiding image from American history. The image of the shining city on a hill captures the imagination because it reflects the abiding truth that people become fully human in society, not outside of it. People need one…

  19. Colleges as Shining Cities on a Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Kathleen Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes that the notion of America be reintroduced as the "shining city on a hill," that abiding image from American history. The image of the shining city on a hill captures the imagination because it reflects the abiding truth that people become fully human in society, not outside of it. People need one…

  20. Glaciated appalachian plateau: till shadows on hills.

    PubMed

    Coates, D R

    1966-06-17

    North slopes are twice as steep as south slopes on the hills of central New York. This asymmetry is caused by unequal till thickness-3.6 meters on north slopes and 27.6 meters on south slopes. Previous workers interpreted the hills as being of bedrock sculptured by glacial erosion, with till 0.9 to 3 meters thick.

  1. 78 FR 21098 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... about White-Nose Syndrome and the Cave Management Environmental Impact Statement. DATES: The meeting... discussion of Range Management issues; and, (2) an update on White-Nose Syndrome and the Cave Management...

  2. 78 FR 64471 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... regarding Cave Management and White Nose Syndrome in Bats; and (3) discuss Motorized Travel Permit Fees... conducted: (1) Orientation to Forest Funding including appropriations and trends; (2) an update on Cave...

  3. 78 FR 59337 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Board regarding management actions resulting from completion of the Cave Management Environmental Impact... actions resulting from the White Nose Syndrome in Bats/Cave Management Environmental Impact Statement...

  4. 78 FR 73187 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... public. The purpose of the meeting is to: (1) Conduct Annual Ethics Training for all members of the... National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 U.S.C. sec. 1612), and the Federal Public Lands Recreation... broad range of forest issues such as forest plan revisions or amendments and forest health, including...

  5. 77 FR 75120 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... public. The purpose of the meeting is: (1) To accomplish the required annual Ethics Training; (2) to....) (RPA); the National Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 U.S.C. 1612) (NFMA), and the Federal Public Lands... recommendations on a broad range of forest issues such as forest plan revisions or amendments, forest health...

  6. Wishlist: Wilderness Endgame in the Black Hills National Forest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Robert Wellman

    2010-01-01

    RARE II (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation) was meant to settle the political contest that had been fought over wilderness since 1964, as the endgame to decide once and for all the winners and losers among federal lands. RARE II was a modified version of the process dictated by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, which by the time of…

  7. Biota of uranium mill tailings near the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Rumble

    1982-01-01

    Reclamation" often implies the enhancement of the land as wildlife habitat or for other productive uses. However, there are situations where revegetation to stabilize erosion is the only desired goal. Uranium mining and mill sites may fall into this later category. Data pertaining to plant and animal components on revegetated uranium mill tailings was collected....

  8. Woodpecker forage availability in habitat disturbances of the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Brian E. Dickerson; Angie K. Ambourn; Mark A. Rumble; Kurt K. Allen; Chad P. Lehman

    2015-01-01

    Habitat disturbance events are critical to ecological systems in which some bird species have become specialized. The vegetation community, reduced competition, ability to avoid predators, nest site characteristics, and forage opportunities within a disturbed ecosystem are all aspects that make it desirable for selection by particular species (Svardson 1949,...

  9. 78 FR 76100 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C. App. II), the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974... can be found by visiting the Board's Web site at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/blackhills... summary of the meeting will be posted on the Web site listed above within 45 days after the...

  10. Growth characteristics of bearberry in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Kieth E. Severson; E. Chester. Garrett

    1974-01-01

    Growth of bearberry varied widely between plants and between sites. Most annual growth (66 percent] occurred during June when moisture and temperature conditions were apparently optimum. Annual growth can readily be recognized by the presence of nodes and by color changes.

  11. Geologic history of the Black Hills caves, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, Arthur N.; Palmer, Margaret; Paces, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The caves reveal four phases of calcite deposition: eogenetic ferroan calcite (Mississippian replacement of sulfates); white scalenohedra in paleovoids deposited during deep post-Mississippian burial; palisade crusts formed during blockage of springs by Oligocene–Miocene continental sediments; and laminated crusts from late Pleistocene water-table fluctuations. The caves reveal more than 300 m.y. of geologic history and a close relationship to regional geologic events.

  12. Coyote foods in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    Treesearch

    James G. MacCracken; Daniel W. Uresk

    1984-01-01

    Coyotes (Canis latrans) are one of the most widely studied animals in North America. The primary reason that much effort has been directed toward understanding the coyote is its feeding patterns. Coyotes prey upon domestic animals (Murie 1951, Gipson 1974, MacCracken 1982) and game animals (Fichter et al. 1955, Beasom 1974, Salwasser 1974, MacCracken...

  13. 77 FR 8214 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Forest. The Board meets approximately ten times a year, with one month being a field trip, held in August... summer field tour as designated by the Designated Federal Officer (DFO). The appointment of members to...

  14. Wishlist: Wilderness Endgame in the Black Hills National Forest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Robert Wellman

    2010-01-01

    RARE II (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation) was meant to settle the political contest that had been fought over wilderness since 1964, as the endgame to decide once and for all the winners and losers among federal lands. RARE II was a modified version of the process dictated by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, which by the time of…

  15. 77 FR 17402 - Black Hills National Forest Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Secretary of Agriculture CFLR Program to encourage the collaborative, science-based ecosystem restoration of... minorities, women, and persons with disabilities. Dated: March 19, 2012. Craig Bobzien, Forest Supervisor...

  16. Optimum timeframes for detecting songbird vocalizations in the Black Hills

    Treesearch

    Todd R. Mills; Mark A. Rumble; Lester D. Flake

    2000-01-01

    Birds are indicators of vegetation structure and ecological conditions. The singing activity of birds declines during late-morning periods, which can affect estimates of abundance and conclusions regarding vegetative conditions indexed by birds. Therefore, it is important to quantify periods of bird activity so biologists can plan studies. We determined hourly...

  17. Hill Country Teacher: Oral Histories from the One-Room School and Beyond. Twayne's Oral History Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Diane

    This book presents the oral histories of one male and seven female retired teachers who began their careers during the 1920s and 1930s in one-room schools in the Texas hill country. These teachers continued to teach until after the desegregation of public schools in the 1960s. The married black couple included began teaching in rural Texas in 1931…

  18. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  19. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  20. A Symplectic Integrator for Hill's Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Thomas; Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, Derek C.; Barnes, Rory

    2010-02-01

    Hill's equations are an approximation that is useful in a number of areas of astrophysics including planetary rings and planetesimal disks. We derive a symplectic method for integrating Hill's equations based on a generalized leapfrog. This method is implemented in the parallel N-body code, PKDGRAV, and tested on some simple orbits. The method demonstrates a lack of secular changes in orbital elements, making it a very useful technique for integrating Hill's equations over many dynamical times. Furthermore, the method allows for efficient collision searching using linear extrapolation of particle positions.

  1. A SYMPLECTIC INTEGRATOR FOR HILL'S EQUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Thomas; Barnes, Rory; Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-02-15

    Hill's equations are an approximation that is useful in a number of areas of astrophysics including planetary rings and planetesimal disks. We derive a symplectic method for integrating Hill's equations based on a generalized leapfrog. This method is implemented in the parallel N-body code, PKDGRAV, and tested on some simple orbits. The method demonstrates a lack of secular changes in orbital elements, making it a very useful technique for integrating Hill's equations over many dynamical times. Furthermore, the method allows for efficient collision searching using linear extrapolation of particle positions.

  2. Hill-Climbing Attacks and Robust Online Signature Verification Algorithm against Hill-Climbing Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Daigo

    Attacks using hill-climbing methods have been reported as a vulnerability of biometric authentication systems. In this paper, we propose a robust online signature verification algorithm against such attacks. Specifically, the attack considered in this paper is a hill-climbing forged data attack. Artificial forgeries are generated offline by using the hill-climbing method, and the forgeries are input to a target system to be attacked. In this paper, we analyze the menace of hill-climbing forged data attacks using six types of hill-climbing forged data and propose a robust algorithm by incorporating the hill-climbing method into an online signature verification algorithm. Experiments to evaluate the proposed system were performed using a public online signature database. The proposed algorithm showed improved performance against this kind of attack.

  3. Stars with relativistic speeds in the Hills scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremova, G. N.; Dremov, V. V.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The dynamical capture of a binary system consisting of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) and an ordinary star in the gravitational field of a central (more massive) SMBH is considered in the three-body problem in the framework of a modified Hills scenario. The results of numerical simulations predict the existence of objects whose spatial speeds are comparable to the speed of light. The conditions for and constraints imposed on the ejection speeds realized in a classical scenario and the modified Hills scenario are analyzed. The star is modeled using an N-body approach, making it possible to treat it as a structured object, enabling estimation of the probability that the object survives when it is ejected with relativistic speed as a function of the mass of the star, the masses of both SMBHs, and the pericenter distance. It is possible that the modern kinematic classification for stars with anomalously high spatial velocities will be augmented with a new class—stars with relativistic speeds.

  4. 27 CFR 9.136 - Texas Hill Country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas Hill Country. 9.136... Texas Hill Country. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas Hill Country.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the “Texas Hill...

  5. 27 CFR 9.169 - Red Hills Lake County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Hills Lake County. 9... Red Hills Lake County. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hills Lake County”. (b) Approved Map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Red Hills...

  6. 27 CFR 9.169 - Red Hills Lake County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Hills Lake County. 9... Red Hills Lake County. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hills Lake County”. (b) Approved Map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Red Hills...

  7. 27 CFR 9.169 - Red Hills Lake County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Hills Lake County. 9... Red Hills Lake County. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hills Lake County”. (b) Approved Map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Red Hills...

  8. Exploring Hill Ciphers with Graphing Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Explains how to code and decode messages using Hill ciphers which combine matrix multiplication and modular arithmetic. Discusses how a graphing calculator can facilitate the matrix and modular arithmetic used in the coding and decoding procedures. (ASK)

  9. Confidence Hills Drill Powder in Scoop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-04

    This image from NASA Curiosity rover shows a sample of powdered rock extracted by the rover drill from the Confidence Hills target -- the first rock drilled after Curiosity reached the base of Mount Sharp in September 2014.

  10. Exploring Hill Ciphers with Graphing Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Explains how to code and decode messages using Hill ciphers which combine matrix multiplication and modular arithmetic. Discusses how a graphing calculator can facilitate the matrix and modular arithmetic used in the coding and decoding procedures. (ASK)

  11. Dark Hill on Asteroid Vesta Movie

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-06

    This still from a movie shows an image taken by NASA Dawn spacecraft layered on a digital terrain model of an unusual hill containing a dark-rayed impact crater and nearby dark deposit on asteroid Vesta.

  12. Ionospheric Climatology Over Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Holt, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    26 years of incoherent scatter observations over Millstone Hill since 1976 have been analyzed and modeled in order to study the climatological behavior in the local ionosphere-thermosphere system. A bin-fit technique is applied to process and represent the huge volume of data: measurements are binned according to local time, season, and altitude; sorted data in each bin are fitted into an empirical model where solar activity index F107 and geomagnetical activity index Ap are included as keyed inputs [Holt et al., 2002]. This paper focuses on seasonal, semiannual and annual variations and the long-term trend in electron density, electron temperature and ion temperature measurements over a 200-500 km height range of the F2 layer. A clear semiannual variation of the electron density is seen above the F2 peak during the day, as well as at the F2 peak and below during the later afternoon to evening period (16-20LT) . The semiannual variation of the electron temperature persists with minimum at equinox during the night, while the annual variation prevails by day with maximum in summer.

  13. The Igwisi Hills extrusive 'kimberlites'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Donaldson, C. H.; Dawson, J. B.; Brown, R. W.; Ridley, W. I.

    1975-01-01

    The petrography and mineral chemistry of volcanic rocks from the Igwisi Hills in Tanzania are discussed. There is considerable evidence to suggest that the Igwisi rocks are extrusive kimberlites: a two-component nature with high P-T minerals in a low P-T matrix; the presence of chrome pyrope, Al enstatite, chrome diopside, chromite and olivine; a highly oxidized, volatile-rich matrix with serpentine, calcite, magnetite, perovskite; high Sr, Zr, and Nb contents; occurrence in a narrow isolated vent within a stable shield area. The Igwisi rocks differ from kimberlite in the lack of magnesian ilmenite, the scarcity of matrix phlogopite, and the overall low alkali content. They apparently contain material from phlogopite-bearing garnet peridotites with a primary mineral assemblage indicative of equilibrium at upper mantle temperatures and pressures. This primary assemblage was brought rapidly to the surface in a gas-charged, carbonate-rich fluid. Rapid upward transport, extrusion, and rapid cooling have tended to prevent reaction between inclusions and the carbonate-rich matrix that might otherwise have yielded a more typical kimberlite.

  14. A perspective on Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Carroll Ann

    As the AGU Congressional Science Fellow for 1980-1981, I had a unique opportunity to witness the federal engine in action—a remarkable piece of machinery. The American Association for the Advancement of Science organized an excellent orientation program, introducing our class of science fellows (about 30) to the kinds of options available for a year's tenure on Capitol Hill. These include affiliation with a congressman's or senator's staff or with one of the hundred or so standing, select, or joint committees and subcommittees. I arranged to join the personal staff of Congressman Jim Santini (D, Nev.), largely because of his demonstrated interest in Department of Interior affairs in general and the minerals industry in particular. The position of fellow provides no guarantee of work in one's areas of expertise or inclination, however, and I found that my staff assignments included topics ranging from wild horses to peanut subsidies. My principal task involved evaluation of the Air Force proposal to deploy the MX missile in Nevada and the consequent impact of that incredible scheme on the physical and economic environments of the state and the nation, including effects on minerals exploration. I had not expected to become conversant with missile technology, but the exercise provided quite an education.

  15. Streamlined Hills of Maja Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 16 May 2003

    Classic catastrophic flood morphology (streamlined hills and longitudinal grooves) is captured in this image of Lunae Planum. Similar features (although much smaller in size) are seen in terrestrial catastrophic flood regions such as Channeled Scabland of Washington state and in Iceland.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.8, Longitude 301.8East (58.2). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Bunker Hill Sediment Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Neal A. Yancey; Debby F. Bruhn

    2009-12-01

    The long history of mineral extraction in the Coeur d’Alene Basin has left a legacy of heavy metal laden mine tailings that have accumulated along the Coeur d’Alene River and its tributaries (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001; Barton, 2002). Silver, lead and zinc were the primary metals of economic interest in the area, but the ores contained other elements that have become environmental hazards including zinc, cadmium, lead, arsenic, nickel, and copper. The metals have contaminated the water and sediments of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and continue to be transported downstream to Spokane Washington via the Spokane River. In 1983, the EPA listed the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex on the National Priorities List. Since that time, many of the most contaminated areas have been stabilized or isolated, however metal contaminants continue to migrate through the basin. Designation as a Superfund site causes significant problems for the economically depressed communities in the area. Identification of primary sources of contamination can help set priorities for cleanup and cleanup options, which can include source removal, water treatment or no action depending on knowledge about the mobility of contaminants relative to water flow. The mobility of contaminant mobility under natural or engineered conditions depends on multiple factors including the physical and chemical state (or speciation) of metals and the range of processes, some of which can be seasonal, that cause mobilization of metals. As a result, it is particularly important to understand metal speciation (National Research Council, 2005) and the link between speciation and the rates of metal migration and the impact of natural or engineered variations in flow, biological activity or water chemistry.

  17. Black Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Jr., Martin J.

    1969-01-01

    "A television show by blacks for blacks--coupled with a program of training for black television technicians--was the basic concept of the Black Voices" series aired over KTCA-TV and KTCI-TV in Minneapolis and St. Paul during the 1968-1969 television season. The series was designed to provide understanding among blacks of the Twin…

  18. Engaging Hill-Sachs Defects

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Shahrokhi, Shahram; Henry, Patrick; Wasserstein, David; Whyne, Cari; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Dwyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anatomic studies have demonstrated that bipolar glenoid and humeral bone loss have a cumulative impact on shoulder instability, and that these defects may engage in functional positions depending on their size, location, and orientation, potentially resulting in failure of stabilization procedures. Determining which lesions pose a risk for engagement remains a challenge, with arthroscopic assessment and Itoi’s 3DCT based glenoid track method being the accepted approaches at this time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of humeral and glenoid bone defects on shoulder engagement in a cadaveric model. Two alternative approaches to predicting engagement were evaluated; 1) CT scanning the shoulder in abduction and external rotation 2) measurement of Bankart lesion width and a novel parameter, the intact anterior articular angle (IAAA), on conventional 2D multi-plane reformats. The results of these two approaches were compared to the results obtained using Itoi’s glenoid track method for predicting engagement. Methods: Hill-Sachs and Bony Bankart defects of varying size were created in 12 cadaveric upper limbs, producing 45 bipolar defect combinations. The shoulders were assessed for engagement using cone beam CT in various positions of function, from 30 to 90 degrees of both abduction and external rotation. The humeral and glenoid defects were characterized by measurement of their size, location, and orientation. Diagnostic performance measures for predicting engagement were calculated for both the abduction external rotation scan and 2D IAAA approaches using the glenoid track method as reference standard. Results: Engagement was predicted by Itoi’s glenoid track method in 24 of 45 specimens (53%). The abduction external rotation CT scan performed at 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction (corresponding to 90 degrees of abduction relative to the trunk) and 90 degrees of external rotation predicted engagement accurately in 43 of

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation on Turbulent Flow and Plume Dispersion over A 2-Dimensional Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, H.; Nagai, H.

    2009-09-01

    The dispersion analysis of airborne contaminant including radioactive substances from industrial or nuclear facilities is the important issue for maintenance of air quality or safety assessment. Many studies on the plume dispersion behavior in the simulated atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat plain have been conducted mainly by wind tunnel experiments. However, many nuclear power plants are located at complex coastal terrains in Japan. In this case, topographical effects on the turbulent flow and plume dispersion should be investigated. Therefore, we perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) on turbulent flows and plume dispersions. As the first step of this study, we try it for a 2-dimensional hill flow and investigate the characteristics of mean and fluctuation concentrations. In order to produce a realistic turbulent boundary layer flow, we set up two computational domains. One is the driver region for generating the spatially-developing boundary layer flow and the other is the main computational region for plume dispersion over a 2-dimensional hill. Near the inlet of the driver region, roughness blocks for generating a thick turbulent boundary layer are placed. The inflow turbulence data obtained in the driver region are imposed at the inlet of the main computational domain at each time step. The sizes of driver and main computational regions are 46.25H×6.25H×25.0H and 37.5H×6.25H×25.0H (H: the height of a 2-dimensional hill) in x-, y- and z-directions, respectively. Here, x, y and z indicate streamwise, spanwise and vertical directions, respectively. The number of grid points of driver and main computational regions are 400×100×90 and 400×100×90 in x, y and z directions, respectively. A 2-dimensional hill model has 5.45H length and are placed at a distance of 10.4H downstream from the inlet of the main computational region. A release point of a tracer gas is located at a distance of 9.09H upstream from a 2-dimensional hill top and elevated with the

  20. Pesticides, Neurodevelopmental Disagreement, and Bradford Hill's Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shrader-Frechette, Kristin; ChoGlueck, Christopher

    2016-06-27

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism affect one-eighth of all U.S. newborns. Yet scientists, accessing the same data and using Bradford-Hill guidelines, draw different conclusions about the causes of these disorders. They disagree about the pesticide-harm hypothesis, that typical United States prenatal pesticide exposure can cause neurodevelopmental damage. This article aims to discover whether apparent scientific disagreement about this hypothesis might be partly attributable to questionable interpretations of the Bradford-Hill causal guidelines. Key scientists, who claim to employ Bradford-Hill causal guidelines, yet fail to accept the pesticide-harm hypothesis, fall into errors of trimming the guidelines, requiring statistically-significant data, and ignoring semi-experimental evidence. However, the main scientists who accept the hypothesis appear to commit none of these errors. Although settling disagreement over the pesticide-harm hypothesis requires extensive analysis, this article suggests that at least some conflicts may arise because of questionable interpretations of the guidelines.

  1. Elk Hills: still out in front

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, B.

    1982-07-01

    The producing history and capacity of the Elk Hills Oil and Gas Fields in California are described. Developments in the field are discussed, including waterflooding. The field presently produces ca. 160,000 bpd of oil and 350 mmcfd of natural gas. Gas liquids production totals ca. 683,000 gal/day. Waterflooding is expected to pay an increasingly important role in the production of crude oil. Steaming techniques also are viewed with favor after analysis of results of pilot projects. Exploratory develoment in Elk Hills also continues.

  2. Photovoltaics - 10 years after Cherry Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, E. L.

    The status of R&D programs connected with photovoltaic (PV) systems 10 years after the Cherry Hill workshop on 'Photovoltaic Conversion of Solar Energy for Terrestrial Applications' is assessed. The five categories of research recommended by the Cherry Hill Workshop are listed in a table together with their recommended research budget allocations. The workshop categories include: single-crystal Si cells; poly-Si cells; systems and diagnostics. Categories for thin film CdS/Cu2S and CuInSe2 cells are also included. The roles of government and private utility companies in providing adequate financial support for PV research programs is emphasized.

  3. Black holes and the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  4. 3. GENERAL VIEW DOWN EAST HILLS DRIVE, BUILDING 20 (ONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW DOWN EAST HILLS DRIVE, BUILDING 20 (ONE BEDROOM) AND BUILDING 21 (TWO/THREE BEDROOM); ACTIVITY CENTER IN REAR, FACING NORTHEAST. - Aluminum City Terrace, East Hill Drive, New Kensington, Westmoreland County, PA

  5. OVERVIEW OF GOLD HILL MILL, ROAD, AND WARM SPRINGS CAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF GOLD HILL MILL, ROAD, AND WARM SPRINGS CAMP BUILDINGS, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. THE FUNCTION OF THE FLAT AREA AT CENTER RIGHT IS UNKNOWN. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. An Unlikely Student Hits Capitol Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Todd Sollar, a laid-off autoworker from Ohio who is studying for an associate degree in engineering at Sinclair Community College, in Dayton, OH, went to Capitol Hill to help educate lawmakers about the importance of including support for community colleges in the economic-stimulus bill. Mr. Sollar came to Washington with Sinclair's president, and…

  7. Paleoecology of Kettleman Hills, Coalinga, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiss-Cortez, M.; Kelison, D.; Mooney, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    The lithofacies at Kettleman Hills in Coalinga, California contain many clues to the paleoecology of the region. Though the examination of lithofacies, invertebrate fossils, and vertebrate fossils we interpret the depositional depths, nutrient availability, salinity, and energy of the environment over the Miocene to the early Pleistocene (11 MYA to 1.8 MYA).

  8. ENHANCED REMEDIATION DEMONSTRATIONS AT HILL AFB: INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine enhanced aquifer remediation technologies were demonstrated side-by-side at a Hill Air Force Base Chemical Disposal Pit/Fire Training Area site. The demonstrations were performed inside 3 x 5 m cells isolated from the surrounding shallow aquifer by steel piling. The site w...

  9. Andoyer construction for Hill and Delaunay variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Jacques

    2017-03-01

    Andoyer variables are well known for the study of rotational dynamics. These variables were derived by Andoyer through a procedure that can be also used to obtain the Hill variables of the Kepler problem. Andoyer construction can also forecast the Delaunay variables which canonicity is then obtained without the use of a generating function.

  10. An Unlikely Student Hits Capitol Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Todd Sollar, a laid-off autoworker from Ohio who is studying for an associate degree in engineering at Sinclair Community College, in Dayton, OH, went to Capitol Hill to help educate lawmakers about the importance of including support for community colleges in the economic-stimulus bill. Mr. Sollar came to Washington with Sinclair's president, and…

  11. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  12. The House on the Hill Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author suggests a classroom challenge that will engage students in designing a house on the hill. He suggests teachers ask a local builder to come to the school to discuss the kinds of concerns that must be dealt with when building homes in cold environments. The use of dioramas and cardboard scale models would be very useful…

  13. Living the Past at Oak Hill School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Amy D.

    2000-01-01

    Oak Hill School served elementary students in the 10th district of Washington County, Tennessee, from 1886 to 1952. After extensive restoration and a move to Historic Jonesborough, the one-room school now functions as a living history museum. Fourth-grade students spend a day following the 1892 curriculum for grade 4. A teacher's resource and…

  14. 27 CFR 9.193 - Rattlesnake Hills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Rattlesnake Hills viticultural area are eight United States Geological Survey 1:24,000 scale topographic maps. They are titled: (1.... The area's boundary is defined as follows: (1) The beginning point is on the Yakima East map at...

  15. ENHANCED REMEDIATION DEMONSTRATIONS AT HILL AFB: INTRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine enhanced aquifer remediation technologies were demonstrated side-by-side at a Hill Air Force Base Chemical Disposal Pit/Fire Training Area site. The demonstrations were performed inside 3 x 5 m cells isolated from the surrounding shallow aquifer by steel piling. The site w...

  16. General Education at UNC-Chapel Hill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalin, Jay; Robinson, Jenna Ashley

    2013-01-01

    The general education program at UNC-Chapel Hill has abandoned the concept of a core curriculum. Instead, students choose their "required" classes from lists of thousands of courses that may be as narrow and idiosyncratic as Love, Sex and Marriage in Soviet Culture (RUSS 277) or The Gardens, Shrines and Temples of Japan (ASIA 586).…

  17. Chronology of polyphase extension in the Windermere Hills, northeast Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, K.J.; Cerveny, P.K.; Perkins, M.E.; Snee, L.W.

    1999-01-01

    Fission-track and 40Ar/39Ar dating and chemical correlation of volcanic strata exposed in the Windermere Hills and northern Pequop Mountains, northeast Nevada, indicate a protracted, polyphase history of Tertiary (late Eocene-late Miocene) extension along the northern margin of a major Cordilleran metamorphic core complex. Early extension is recorded by a west-tilted half graben filled with early Oligocene (34.79 ?? 0.18-39.18 ?? 0.12 Ma) sedimentary rocks in the eastern Windermere Hills above the low-angle Black Mountain detachment fault. The early Oligocene half graben conformably overlies a widespread suite of late Eocene (39.18 ?? 0.12-40.38 ?? 0.06 Ma) calc-alkaline volcanic rocks, reflecting a temporal link between early extension at a high structural level and the end of the ignimbrite flare-up. These strata are cut by east-west-striking normal faults, which are exposed along, and parallel to, the northern margin of the metamorphic complex. Available age data (e.g., between 14.93 ?? 0.08 and 34.79 ?? 0.18 Ma) permit the interpretation that the east-west-striking faults formed at the same time as, or after, large-magnitude unroofing of high-grade rocks. We interpret the east-west-striking faults to accommodate differential uplift of greenschist-grade metamorphic rocks in the upper crust, above a lateral ramp in a west-northwest-directed mylonitic shear zone. Subsequent extension in the Windermere Hills is defined by deep, rapidly filled half grabens of middle Miocene (<7.42 ?? 2.0 to 14.93 ?? 0.08 Ma) age that unconformably overlie older faults and synextensional deposits. These are the youngest half grabens in the region and are inferred to be initiated by extensional stresses imparted to the base of the lithosphere by a laterally spreading mantle plume (e.g., the Yellowstone hotspot) located in southeastern Oregon at this time.

  18. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  19. Black Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  20. Black holes.

    PubMed

    Brügmann, B; Ghez, A M; Greiner, J

    2001-09-11

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries.

  1. Black Alcoholism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  2. The timber resources of the Ohio Hill Country

    Treesearch

    Paul S. DeBald; Roger E. McCay

    1969-01-01

    This report presents 1967 forest resource statistics for the Hill Country-Ohio's portion of Appalachia. The Hill Country comprises 28 counties, which were divided into three geographic sampling units for this survey. The Hill Country of the 1952 Ohio forest survey contained 26 of these counties. The additional Appalachia counties are Brown and Clermont in the...

  3. 3. HYDE STREET HILL: View to north looking down the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. HYDE STREET HILL: View to north looking down the Hyde Street hill from Lombard Street. The steepest hill on the present cable railway system, this grade exceeds 20%. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. View of south boundary of Easter Hill project site, former ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of south boundary of Easter Hill project site, former right of way for Hoffman Boulevard. Note reconstructed Easter Hill Building No. 6 at rear. Looking east - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  5. Paleotopography of Husband Hill and the West Spur of the Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. B.; Watters, W. A.; Aron, F. A.; Squyres, S.

    2012-12-01

    From June 2004 through March 2010, Spirit conducted a detailed campaign examining the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater. The Hills are an irregular, nearly-triangular edifice of uncertain origin, spanning ~8.4 km in the northerly direction by ~4.5 km in the easterly direction, and are embayed by the basaltic plains that fill the floor of Gusev Crater. The topography is as irregular as the perimeter, cut by numerous valleys of varying lengths, widths, and directional trends. Along its traverse, Spirit examined several rock classes as defined by elemental abundances from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). Unlike the Gusev Plains, the rocks of the Columbia Hills show extensive evidence of aqueous alteration. In addition to mineralogical and chemical investigations, Spirit's stereo panoramic (Pancam) and navigation (Navcam) cameras obtained over 7,000 images of the West Spur of the Columbia Hills and Husband Hill, the highest peak. This dataset includes stereo coverage of several outcrop exposures with apparent bedding. In this analysis, we reconstruct a paleo-Digital Elevation Model (paleo-DEM) of the West Spur and Husband Hill based on stereo image data from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. We have performed detailed structural and stratigraphic measurements of the outcrops Spirit observed on its traverse across the West Spur and Husband Hill, using digital terrain models derived from Pancam and Navcam data. We compare outcrop bedding orientations to local topography as determined by the HiRISE DEM. While bedding orientations do not conform to the current topography, outcrops within local geographic regions exhibit conformable bedding orientations both within and across the rock classes defined by composition. Assuming that the bedding planes are in-place and were conformable to the local topography at the time of deposition, we reconstruct the ancient topography of the West Spur and Husband Hill.

  6. Structure, stratigraphy, and origin of Husband Hill, Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, T.J.; Sims, M.; Schmidt, M.E.; Edwards, L.; Tornabene, L.L.; Crumpler, L.S.; Cohen, B. A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Blaney, D.L.; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Rica, J.W.; Treguier, E.; d'Uston, C.; Grant, J. A.; McSween, H.Y.; Golombek, M.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; de Souza, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The strike and dip of lithologic units imaged in stereo by the Spirit rover in the Columbia Hills using three-dimensional imaging software shows that measured dips (15-32??) for bedding on the main edifice of the Columbia Hill are steeper than local topography (???8-10??). Outcrops measured on West Spur are conformable in strike with shallower dips (7-15??) than observed on Husband Hill. Dips are consistent with observed strata draping the Columbia Hills. Initial uplift was likely related either to the formation of the Gusev Crater central peak or ring or through mutual interference of overlapping crater rims. Uplift was followed by subsequent draping by a series of impact and volcaniclastic materials that experienced temporally and spatially variable aqueous infiltration, cementation, and alteration episodically during or after deposition. West Spur likely represents a spatially isolated depositional event. Erosion by a variety of processes, including mass wasting, removed tens of meters of materials and formed the Tennessee Valley primarily after deposition. This was followed by eruption of the Adirondack-class plains basalt lava flows which embayed the Columbia Hills. Minor erosion, impact, and aeolian processes have subsequently modified the Columbia Hills. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  8. Validation of Domain-Referenced Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Domain-referenced test items for objectives in clinical dietetics were administered to a national sample of students. Loevinger's index of item response homogeneity was used as an indicator of substantive construct validity. Available from: Sage Publications, Inc., 275 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, California 90212. (Author/JAC)

  9. A syntenin-like protein with postsynaptic density protein (PDZ) domains produced by black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in response to white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bangrak, Phuwadol; Graidist, Potchanapond; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Supamattaya, Kidchakan; Phongdara, Amornrat

    2002-04-24

    We report the isolation and characterization of products from a subtractive cDNA library from the haemolymph of Penaeus monodon experimentally infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). One cDNA derived from up-regulated mRNA was identified. A homology search indicated similarity to the putative protein syntenin (TE8). The nearly complete nucleotide sequence of TE8 was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA (RACE). Its putative protein product contained a tandem repeat of PDZ domains (postsynaptic density protein or PSD-95, DlgA and ZO-1). We propose that TE8 may function as an adapter that couples PDZ-binding protein(s) in a signaling pathway involved in the shrimp response to WSSV.

  10. The Strengths of High-Achieving Black High School Students in a Racially Diverse Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Kris; Chaney, Cassandra; Jones, Derrick

    2012-01-01

    Robert Hill (1972) identified strengths of Black families: strong kinship bonds, strong work orientation, adaptability of family roles, high achievement orientation, and religious orientation. Some suggest these strengths sustain the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs of Blacks. This study used narratives and survey data from a…

  11. The Strengths of High-Achieving Black High School Students in a Racially Diverse Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Kris; Chaney, Cassandra; Jones, Derrick

    2012-01-01

    Robert Hill (1972) identified strengths of Black families: strong kinship bonds, strong work orientation, adaptability of family roles, high achievement orientation, and religious orientation. Some suggest these strengths sustain the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs of Blacks. This study used narratives and survey data from a…

  12. The planar Hill problem with oblate primary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, K. E.

    2004-09-01

    The regularized equations of motion of the planar Hill problem which includes the effect of the oblateness of the larger primary body, is presented. Using the Levi-Civita coordinate transformation as well as the corresponding time transformation, we obtain a simple regularized polynomial Hamiltonian of the dynamical system that corresponds to that of two uncoupled harmonic oscillators perturbed by polynomial terms. The relations between the synodic and regularized variables are also given. The convenient numerical computations of the regularized equations of motion, allow derivation of a map of the group of families of simple-periodic orbits, free of collision cases, of both the classical and the Hill problem with oblateness. The horizontal stability of the families is calculated and we determine series of horizontally critical symmetric periodic orbits of the basic families g and g'.

  13. Uranium series dating of Allan Hills ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium-238 decay series nuclides dissolved in Antarctic ice samples were measured in areas of both high and low concentrations of volcanic glass shards. Ice from the Allan Hills site (high shard content) had high Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 activities but similarly low U-238 activities in comparison with Antarctic ice samples without shards. The Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 excesses were found to be proportional to the shard content, while the U-238 decay series results were consistent with the assumption that alpha decay products recoiled into the ice from the shards. Through this method of uranium series dating, it was learned that the Allen Hills Cul de Sac ice is approximately 325,000 years old.

  14. Morgan Hill, California Earthquake, April 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, Henry

    1987-01-01

    The Morgan Hill earthquake, a moderate-size (Mg=6.1, ML =6.2, M=6.2) event, was felt throughout central California on April 24, 1984. The epicenter of the earthquake was located near Halls Valley southwest of Mount Hamilton, and the event is presumed to have occurred on the Calaveras fault. Damage, however, was concentrated near the south end of the Anderson Reservoir and in the town of Morgan Hill. A preliminary assessment by the California Office of Emergency Services estimated damage to private property at \\$7.0 million and to local-government facilities at \\$0.5 million, for a total of \\$7.5 million in damage. 

  15. Uranium series dating of Allan Hills ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium-238 decay series nuclides dissolved in Antarctic ice samples were measured in areas of both high and low concentrations of volcanic glass shards. Ice from the Allan Hills site (high shard content) had high Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 activities but similarly low U-238 activities in comparison with Antarctic ice samples without shards. The Ra-226, Th-230 and U-234 excesses were found to be proportional to the shard content, while the U-238 decay series results were consistent with the assumption that alpha decay products recoiled into the ice from the shards. Through this method of uranium series dating, it was learned that the Allen Hills Cul de Sac ice is approximately 325,000 years old.

  16. Autonomous Legged Hill and Stairwell Ascent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    environments with little burden to a human operator. Keywords: autonomous robot, hill climbing, stair climbing, sequential composition, hexapod, self...simulation studies [11], with almost all empirical work confined to the traversal of a single flight and yaw control on the stairs (summarized in [4]). The...only prior report we have found documenting empirical work over multiple flights of stairs assumed a very specific, simple landing geometry [12]; we

  17. Hill Ciphers over Near-Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farag, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Hill ciphers are linear codes that use as input a "plaintext" vector [p-right arrow above] of size n, which is encrypted with an invertible n x n matrix E to produce a "ciphertext" vector [c-right arrow above] = E [middle dot] [p-right arrow above]. Informally, a near-field is a triple [left angle bracket]N; +, *[right angle bracket] that…

  18. An SP-Hill layered broadcast cryptosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M. E.; Tavares, S. E.

    A new type of cryptosystem with applications in broadcast communications and database systems is described. The scheme combines various elements of both SP-networks and Hill broadcast encryption systems. The theoretical basis for the encryption technique is described in a series of equations and the results of a preliminary production process complexity test are presented. The results of the test indicate that the scheme performs well cryptographically and that it represents a significant advance over conventional encryption systems.

  19. Possible Meteorites in the Martian Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    From its winter outpost at 'Low Ridge' inside Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this spectacular, color mosaic of hilly, sandy terrain and two potential iron meteorites. The two light-colored, smooth rocks about two-thirds of the way up from the bottom of the frame have been labeled 'Zhong Shan' and 'Allan Hills.'

    The two rocks' informal names are in keeping with the rover science team's campaign to nickname rocks and soils in the area after locations in Antarctica. Zhong Shang is an Antarctic base that the People's Republic of China opened on Feb. 26, 1989, at the Larsemann Hills in Prydz Bay in East Antarctica. Allan Hills is a location where researchers have found many Martian meteorites, including the controversial ALH84001, which achieved fame in 1996 when NASA scientists suggested that it might contain evidence for fossilized extraterrestrial life. Zhong Shan was the given name of Dr. Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925), known as the 'Father of Modern China.' Born to a peasant family in Guangdong, Sun moved to live with his brother in Honolulu at age 13 and later became a medical doctor. He led a series of uprisings against the Qing dynasty that began in 1894 and eventually succeeded in 1911. Sun served as the first provisional president when the Republic of China was founded in 1912.

    The Zhong Shan and Allan Hills rocks, at the left and right, respectively, have unusual morphologies and miniature thermal emission spectrometer signatures that resemble those of a rock known as 'Heat Shield' at the Meridiani site explored by Spirit's twin, Opportunity. Opportunity's analyses revealed Heat Shield to be an iron meteorite.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image on the rover's 872nd Martian day, or sol (June 16, 2006), using exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 600 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 480 nanometers.

  20. Possible Meteorites in the Martian Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    From its winter outpost at 'Low Ridge' inside Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this spectacular, color mosaic of hilly, sandy terrain and two potential iron meteorites. The two light-colored, smooth rocks about two-thirds of the way up from the bottom of the frame have been labeled 'Zhong Shan' and 'Allan Hills.'

    The two rocks' informal names are in keeping with the rover science team's campaign to nickname rocks and soils in the area after locations in Antarctica. Zhong Shang is an Antarctic base that the People's Republic of China opened on Feb. 26, 1989, at the Larsemann Hills in Prydz Bay in East Antarctica. Allan Hills is a location where researchers have found many Martian meteorites, including the controversial ALH84001, which achieved fame in 1996 when NASA scientists suggested that it might contain evidence for fossilized extraterrestrial life. Zhong Shan was the given name of Dr. Sun Yat-sen (1866-1925), known as the 'Father of Modern China.' Born to a peasant family in Guangdong, Sun moved to live with his brother in Honolulu at age 13 and later became a medical doctor. He led a series of uprisings against the Qing dynasty that began in 1894 and eventually succeeded in 1911. Sun served as the first provisional president when the Republic of China was founded in 1912.

    The Zhong Shan and Allan Hills rocks, at the left and right, respectively, have unusual morphologies and miniature thermal emission spectrometer signatures that resemble those of a rock known as 'Heat Shield' at the Meridiani site explored by Spirit's twin, Opportunity. Opportunity's analyses revealed Heat Shield to be an iron meteorite.

    Spirit acquired this approximately true-color image on the rover's 872nd Martian day, or sol (June 16, 2006), using exposures taken through three of the panoramic camera's filters, centered on wavelengths of 600 nanometers, 530 nanometers, and 480 nanometers.

  1. A double WAP domain-containing protein PmDWD from the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon is involved in the controlling of proteinase activities in lymphoid organ.

    PubMed

    Suthianthong, Pranisa; Pulsook, Naritsara; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2011-03-01

    A homolog of mammalian secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor or SLPI known as a double WAP domain (DWD) protein has been found in penaeid shrimp and believed to play an important role in innate immune system of the shrimp. The PmDWD identified from the Penaeus monodon EST database was investigated for its expression under pathogen infection. Infections by Vibrio harveyi and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) up-regulated the expression of the PmDWD, which was peaked at about 24 h post infection and, then, subsided to more or less normal level. The PmDWD was expressed in various tissues of normal, 24-h WSSV-injected and leg-amputated shrimp, predominantly in the hemocytes. The expression was dramatically increased in lymphoid organ upon WSSV infection and leg amputation. The recombinant PmDWD (rPmDWD) was not active against the commercial proteinases: trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase and subtilisin while its mutant rPmDWD_F70R was active against the subtilisin. By using agar diffusion assay, the rPmDWD inhibited the crude proteinases from lymphoid organs of leg-amputated and WSSV-infected shrimp. It inhibited the crude proteinases from Bacillus subtilis as well. Unlike the mammalian SLPIs, the rPmDWD had no antimicrobial activity against various bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Rocks of the Columbia Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, Steven W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Blaney, Diana L.; Clark, Benton C.; Crumpler, Larry; Farrand, William H.; Gorevan, Stephen; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Hurowitz, Joel; Kusack, Alastair; hide

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has identified five distinct rock types in the Columbia Hills of Gusev crater. Clovis Class rock is a poorly-sorted clastic rock that has undergone substantial aqueous alteration. We interpret it to be aqueously-altered ejecta deposits formed by impacts into basaltic materials. Wishstone Class rock is also a poorly-sorted clastic rock that has a distinctive chemical composition that is high in Ti and P and low in Cr. Wishstone Class rock may be pyroclastic in origin. Peace Class rock is a sedimentary material composed of ultramafic sand grains cemented by significant quantities of Mg- and Ca-sulfates. Peace Class rock may have formed when water briefly saturated the ultramafic sands, and evaporated to allow precipitation of the sulfates. Watchtower Class rocks are similar chemically to Wishstone Class rocks, and have undergone widely varying degrees of near-isochemical aqueous alteration. They may also be ejecta deposits, formed by impacts into Wishstone-rich materials and altered by small amounts of water. Backstay Class rocks are basalt/trachybasalt lavas that were emplaced in the Columbia Hills after the other rock classes were, either as impact ejecta or by localized volcanic activity. The geologic record preserved in the rocks of the Columbia Hills reveals a period very early in martian history in which volcanic materials were widespread, impact was a dominant process, and water was commonly present.

  3. Miocene cercopithecoidea from the Tugen Hills, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Christopher C; Goble, Emily D; Hill, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Miocene to Pleistocene fossiliferous sediments in the Tugen Hills span the time period from at least 15.5 Ma to 0.25 Ma, including time periods unknown or little known elsewhere in Africa. Consequently, the Tugen Hills deposits hold the potential to inform us about crucial phylogenetic events in African faunal evolution and about long-term environmental change. Among the specimens collected from this region are a number of discoveries already important to the understanding of primate evolution. Here, we describe additional cercopithecoid material from the Miocene deposits in the Tugen Hills sequence, including those from securely dated sites in the Muruyur Beds (16-13.4 Ma), the Mpesida Beds (7-6.2 Ma) and the Lukeino Formation (∼ 6.2-5.7 Ma). We also evaluate previously described material from the Ngorora Formation (13-8.8 Ma). Identified taxa include Victoriapithecidae gen. et sp. indet., cf. Parapapio lothagamensis, and at least two colobines. Specimens attributed to cf. Pp. lothagamensis would extend the species' geographic range beyond its type locality. In addition, we describe specimens sharing derived characters with modern African colobines (Tribe: Colobina), a finding that is congruent with previous molecular estimates of colobine divergence dates. These colobine specimens represent some of the earliest known members of the modern African colobine radiation and, in contrast to previous hypotheses, suggest that early African colobines were mainly arboreal and that semi-terrestrial Late Miocene and Plio-Pleistocene colobine taxa were secondarily derived in their locomotor adaptations.

  4. Midnight Temperature Maximum Observations Over Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Noto, J.; Kerr, R. B.; Kapali, S.; Riccobono, J.; Migliozzi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The thermospheric Midnight Temperature Maximum (MTM) is a large-scale neutral temperature anomaly usually observed at low latitudes. The magnitude of temperature enhancements during low-latitude MTM events is about 50-150 K and its occurrence is linked to poleward surges in an otherwise "quiescent" equatorward meridional flow. The MTM is also associated with the post-midnight brightness of 630 nm (redline) emission and the downward descent of the F-region plasma (midnight collapse). Recent experimental and modeling studies have indicated that MTM anomalies extend into mid-latitudes, although observational evidence of the mid-latitude MTM in the literature is limited to a single site in the Southern Hemisphere. In this paper, we present observations of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude MTM in Faby-Perot Interferometer (FPI) redline data from Millstone Hill Observatory (42.6° N, 71.49° W). The FPI at Millstone Hill has been operating since April, 2010 and providing F-region night-time neutral winds and temperatures. We present case studies of post-midnight red-line temperature enhancements and correlated poleward surges in the meridional neutral winds.; An example of Millstone Hill redline temperature and neutral wind measurements during an MTM event.

  5. Black Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baraka, Amiri

    1987-01-01

    Discusses black art as not only an expression of black life but as revolutionary art. It must be collective, functional, and committing. It must also be anti-racist, anti-capitalist, and anti-imperialist. (LHW)

  6. From Carver to Hill, and On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, Samuel P.

    The story of blacks in chemistry is one of determination, expectation, participation and contribution. Between 1910 and 1945, despite George Washington Carver's significant agricultural contributions and St. Elmo Brady's scholarship, white graduate schools and industry had little interest in accepting blacks. There was slow progress, despite these…

  7. From Carver to Hill, and On.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, Samuel P.

    The story of blacks in chemistry is one of determination, expectation, participation and contribution. Between 1910 and 1945, despite George Washington Carver's significant agricultural contributions and St. Elmo Brady's scholarship, white graduate schools and industry had little interest in accepting blacks. There was slow progress, despite these…

  8. Black Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The contents of the present volume, designed to bring together in a single place writings by the new black psychologists and other black social and behavioral scientists, are organized in seven parts, as follows: Part I, "Black Psychology: Perspectives," includes articles by Cedric Clark, Wade W. Nobles, Doris P. Mosby, Joseph White, and William…

  9. Black Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry

    The black student revolt did not start with the highly publicized activities of the black students at San Francisco State College. The roots of the revolt lie deeply imbedded within the history and structure of the overall black liberation struggle in America. The beginnings of this revolt can be found in the students of Southern Negro colleges in…

  10. Black Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L., Ed.

    The contents of the present volume, designed to bring together in a single place writings by the new black psychologists and other black social and behavioral scientists, are organized in seven parts, as follows: Part I, "Black Psychology: Perspectives," includes articles by Cedric Clark, Wade W. Nobles, Doris P. Mosby, Joseph White, and William…

  11. Confidence Hills Mineralogy and Chemin Results from Base of Mt. Sharp, Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity recently completed its fourth drill sampling of sediments on Mars. The Confidence Hills (CH) sample was drilled from a rock located in the Pahrump Hills region at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. The CheMin X-ray diffractometer completed five nights of analysis on the sample, more than previously executed for a drill sample, and the data have been analyzed using Rietveld refinement and full-pattern fitting to determine quantitative mineralogy. Confidence Hills mineralogy has several important characteristics: 1) abundant hematite and lesser magnetite; 2) a 10 angstrom phyllosilicate; 3) multiple feldspars including plagioclase and alkali feldspar; 4) mafic silicates including forsterite, orthopyroxene, and two types of clinopyroxene (Ca-rich and Ca-poor), consistent with a basaltic source; and 5) minor contributions from sulfur-bearing species including jarosite.

  12. Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    1992-09-01

    Foreword to the French edition; Foreword to the English edition; Acknowledgements; Part I. Gravitation and Light: 1. First fruits; 2. Relativity; 3. Curved space-time; Part II. Exquisite Corpses: 4. Chronicle of the twilight years; 5. Ashes and diamonds; 6. Supernovae; 7. Pulsars; 8. Gravitation triumphant; Part III. Light Assassinated: 9. The far horizon; 10. Illuminations; 11. A descent into the maelstrom; 12. Map games; 13. The black hole machine; 14. The quantum black hole; Part IV. Light Regained: 15. Primordial black holes; 16. The zoo of X-ray stars; 17. Giant black holes; 18. Gravitational light; 19. The black hole Universe; Appendices; Bibliography; Name index; Subject index.

  13. Three-dimensional potential flow over hills and oval mounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was made of the potential flow behavior for an initially uniform flow passing over a single axisymmetric hill, an oval mound, and a combination of two hills. Small perturbation theory was used, and the resulting Laplace equation for the perturbation velocity potential was solved by using either a product solution or a Green's function. The three dimensional solution is of interest in calculating the pressure distribution around obstacles, the flow of pollutants carried by the wind, and the augmentation of wind velocity for windmill siting. The augmentation in velocity at the top of a hill was found to be proportional to the hill height relative to a characteristic width dimension of the hill. An axisymmetric hill produced about 20 percent less velocity increase than a two dimensional ridge having the same cross-sectional profile.

  14. PLANS AND SECTIONS. WEIR SPILLWAY. TEXAS HILL CANAL STA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANS AND SECTIONS. WEIR SPILLWAY. TEXAS HILL CANAL - STA. 132+82.15. TEXAS HILL CANAL AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. United States Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation; Gila Project, Arizona, Wellton-Mohawk Division. Drawing No. 50-D-3200, dated February 7, 1955, Denver, Colorado - Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation System, Relift Station, Texas Hill Canal 2.5, Northern Terminus of Avenue 51 East, approximately .5 mile south of Union Pacific Railroad, Wellton, Yuma County, AZ

  15. Correlates of simulated hill climb cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Davison, R C; Swan, D; Coleman, D; Bird, S

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between several commonly used aerobic and anaerobic cycle ergometer tests and performance during a treadmill cycling hill climb. Eight competitive cyclists (age 27+/-7 years; body mass 73.2+/-5.2 kg; height 177+/-6 cm; mean +/- s) completed six tests in random order: a lactate minimum test; a Wingate anaerobic power test; and two 6-km climbs at 6% and two 1-km climbs at 12% gradient performed on a motorized treadmill. The mean times and power outputs for the 6-km and 1-km climbs were 16:30+/-1:08 min: s and 330+/-17.8 W, and 4:19+/-0:27 min: s and 411+/-24.4 W, respectively. The best individual predictor of 6-km and 1-km performance times was the time for the corresponding climb at the other distance (r = 0.97). The next strongest predictor of both hill climb performances was the average power produced during the Wingate test divided by body mass. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the two variables contributing most to the prediction equation for both climbs were the Wingate average power per unit of body mass and maximal aerobic power divided by total mass (rider + bike), which together accounted for 92 and 96% of the variability in the 6-km and 1-km climbs. In conclusion, among competitive cyclists, the Wingate average power per unit of body mass was the best single predictor of simulated cycling hill climb performance at the distance and gradient used.

  16. RYAN HILL ROADLESS AREA, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, C.H.; Ellis, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a geochemical survey, the Ryan Hill Roadless Area, now the Langmuir Research Site in New Mexico has both probable and substantiated resource potential for manganese deposits. The nature of the geologic terrane holds little likelihood for the occurrence of organic fuels. Additional geochemical studies of the manganese vein systems are desirable to better delineate the resource potential; mineralogical and metallurgical studies are needed to determine recoverability of potentially important byproducts, including tungsten and cobalt. Drilling into the vein system at depth would be required to test the continuity of the manganese deposits and evaluate the resource potential of the area for deeply buried base- and precious-metal resources.

  17. EarthScope Exhibit on Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    2004-08-01

    Politicians got a chance to see why funding the National Science Foundation is crucial to the nation's scientific enterprise during an annual exhibit and reception showcasing NSF-sponsored research, held on 22 June in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. AGU teamed with the American Geological Institute and the Geological Society of America to co-sponsor a display about EarthScope that outlined the NSF-supported multi-year investigation into the structure and evolution of the North American continent and the physical processes controlling earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  18. McGraw-Hill encyclopedia of physics

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    This Encyclopedia is thoroughly comprehensive and up to date. The 760 alphabetically arranged articles, written by the leading international authorities on each of the subjects, were selected from the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology (5th ed., 1982). The text is supplemented by more than 1000 drawings, graphs, charts, and photographs. All information is readily accessible through a detailed analytical index and by the use of cross-references. Bibliographies provide lists of references for further reading. The Appendix includes International System (SI) conversion tables, a listing of mathematical notation, a table of fundamental constants, and a periodic table of elements.

  19. Needs Analysis for the West Hills College at Lemoore, West Hills Community College District. Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report reviews the proposal by the West Hills Community College District (WHCCD) (California) to transition its off-campus center to full college status. The proposal's objectives include: (1) establishing a new comprehensive college that will serve approximately 1,700 full-time-equivalent students by 2015; and (2) providing greater access to…

  20. Supersymmetric black holes and Freudenthal duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrani, Alessio; Mandal, Taniya; Tripathy, Prasanta K.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of Freudenthal duality on supersymmetric extremal black hole attractors in 𝒩 = 2, D = 4 ungauged supergravity. Freudenthal duality acts on the dyonic black hole charges as an anti-involution which keeps the black hole entropy and the critical points of the effective black hole potential invariant. We analyze its effect on the recently discovered distinct, mutually exclusive phases of axionic supersymmetric black holes, related to the existence of nontrivial involutory constant matrices. In particular, we consider a supersymmetric D0 - D4 - D6 black hole and we explicitly Freudenthal-map it to a supersymmetric D0 - D2 - D4 - D6 black hole. We thus show that the charge representation space of a supersymmetric D0 - D2 - D4 - D6 black hole also contains mutually exclusive domains.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul

    2003-04-01

    Einstein's equations of general relativity are prime candidates for numerical solution on supercomputers. There is some urgency in being able to carry out such simulations: Large-scale gravitational wave detectors are now coming on line, and the most important expected signals cannot be predicted except numerically. Problems involving black holes are perhaps the most interesting, yet also particularly challenging computationally. One difficulty is that inside a black hole there is a physical singularity that cannot be part of the computational domain. A second difficulty is the disparity in length scales between the size of the black hole and the wavelength of the gravitational radiation emitted. A third difficulty is that all existing methods of evolving black holes in three spatial dimensions are plagued by instabilities that prohibit long-term evolution. I will describe the ideas that are being introduced in numerical relativity to deal with these problems, and discuss the results of recent calculations of black hole collisions.

  2. Spirit on 'Husband Hill,' with 2004 Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Two Earth years ago, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit touched down in Gusev Crater. The rover marked its first Mars-year (687 Earth days) anniversary in November 2005. On Nov. 2, 2005, shortly before Spirit's Martian anniversary, the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor acquired an image centered on the rover's location in the 'Columbia Hills.' The location of Spirit on that date is circled on the image on the right. On the left, for comparison, is an image from Jan. 10, 2004, when few dreamed that the Spirit would ever reach the hills from its landing site about three kilometers (two miles) away.

    The newer image has a resolution of about 50 centimeters (1.6 feet) per pixel. North is up; illumination is from the left. The location is near 14.8 degrees south latitude, 184.6 degrees west longitude. Dr. Timothy J. Parker of the Mars Exploration Rover team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., confirmed the location of the rover in the 2005 image. The scale bar is 50 meters (164 feet).

  3. Spirit's Neighborhood in 'Columbia Hills,' in Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Two Earth years ago, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit touched down in Gusev Crater. The rover marked its first Mars-year (687 Earth days) anniversary in November 2005. On Nov. 2, 2005, shortly before Spirit's Martian anniversary, the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor acquired an image covering approximately 3 kilometers by 3 kilometers (1.9 miles by 1.9 miles) centered on the rover's location in the 'Columbia Hills.'

    The tinted portion of this image gives a stereo, three-dimensional view when observed through 3-D glasses with a red left eye and blue right eye. The tallest peak is 'Husband Hill,' which was climbed by Spirit during much of 2005. The region south (toward the bottom) of these images shows the area where the rover is currently headed. The large dark patch and other similar dark patches in these images are accumulations of windblown sand and granules. North is up; illumination is from the left. The location is near 14.8 degrees south latitude, 184.6 degrees west longitude.

  4. New type of hill-top inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barvinsky, A.O.; Nesterov, D.V.; Kamenshchik, A.Yu. E-mail: Alexander.Kamenshchik@bo.infn.it

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a new type of hill-top inflation originating from the initial conditions in the form of the microcanonical density matrix for the cosmological model with a large number of quantum fields conformally coupled to gravity. Initial conditions for inflation are set up by cosmological instantons describing underbarrier oscillations in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum. These periodic oscillations of the inflaton field and cosmological scale factor are obtained within the approximation of two coupled oscillators subject to the slow roll regime in the Euclidean time. This regime is characterized by rapid oscillations of the scale factor on the background of a slowly varying inflaton, which guarantees smallness of slow roll parameters ε and η of the following inflation stage. A hill-like shape of the inflaton potential is shown to be generated by logarithmic loop corrections to the tree-level asymptotically shift-invariant potential in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and R{sup 2}-gravity. The solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale is discussed within the concept of conformal higher spin fields, which also suggests the mechanism bringing the model below the gravitational cutoff and, thus, protecting it from large graviton loop corrections.

  5. Spirit's Neighborhood in 'Columbia Hills,' in Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Two Earth years ago, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit touched down in Gusev Crater. The rover marked its first Mars-year (687 Earth days) anniversary in November 2005. On Nov. 2, 2005, shortly before Spirit's Martian anniversary, the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor acquired an image covering approximately 3 kilometers by 3 kilometers (1.9 miles by 1.9 miles) centered on the rover's location in the 'Columbia Hills.'

    The tinted portion of this image gives a stereo, three-dimensional view when observed through 3-D glasses with a red left eye and blue right eye. The tallest peak is 'Husband Hill,' which was climbed by Spirit during much of 2005. The region south (toward the bottom) of these images shows the area where the rover is currently headed. The large dark patch and other similar dark patches in these images are accumulations of windblown sand and granules. North is up; illumination is from the left. The location is near 14.8 degrees south latitude, 184.6 degrees west longitude.

  6. The Goodwin model: behind the Hill function.

    PubMed

    Gonze, Didier; Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim

    2013-01-01

    The Goodwin model is a 3-variable model demonstrating the emergence of oscillations in a delayed negative feedback-based system at the molecular level. This prototypical model and its variants have been commonly used to model circadian and other genetic oscillators in biology. The only source of non-linearity in this model is a Hill function, characterizing the repression process. It was mathematically shown that to obtain limit-cycle oscillations, the Hill coefficient must be larger than 8, a value often considered unrealistic. It is indeed difficult to explain such a high coefficient with simple cooperative dynamics. We present here molecular models of the standard Goodwin model, based on single or multisite phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes of a transcription factor, which have been previously shown to generate switch-like responses. We show that when the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes are fast enough, the limit-cycle obtained with a multisite phosphorylation-based mechanism is in very good quantitative agreement with the oscillations observed in the Goodwin model. Conditions in which the detailed mechanism is well approximated by the Goodwin model are given. A variant of the Goodwin model which displays sharp thresholds and relaxation oscillations is also explained by a double phosphorylation/dephosphorylation-based mechanism through a bistable behavior. These results not only provide rational support for the Goodwin model but also highlight the crucial role of the speed of post-translational processes, whose response curve are usually established at a steady state, in biochemical oscillators.

  7. New type of hill-top inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, A. O.; Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Nesterov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a new type of hill-top inflation originating from the initial conditions in the form of the microcanonical density matrix for the cosmological model with a large number of quantum fields conformally coupled to gravity. Initial conditions for inflation are set up by cosmological instantons describing underbarrier oscillations in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum. These periodic oscillations of the inflaton field and cosmological scale factor are obtained within the approximation of two coupled oscillators subject to the slow roll regime in the Euclidean time. This regime is characterized by rapid oscillations of the scale factor on the background of a slowly varying inflaton, which guarantees smallness of slow roll parameters epsilon and η of the following inflation stage. A hill-like shape of the inflaton potential is shown to be generated by logarithmic loop corrections to the tree-level asymptotically shift-invariant potential in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and R2-gravity. The solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale is discussed within the concept of conformal higher spin fields, which also suggests the mechanism bringing the model below the gravitational cutoff and, thus, protecting it from large graviton loop corrections.

  8. Spirit's Express Route to 'Columbia Hills'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This map illustrates the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's position as of sol 112 (April 26, 2004), near the crater called 'Missoula.' Like a train on a tight schedule, Spirit will make regular stops along the way to its ultimate destination, the 'Columbia Hills.' At each stop, or 'station,' the rover will briefly analyze the area's rocks and soils. Each tick mark on the rover's route represents one sol's worth of travel, or about 60 to 70 meters (200 to 230 feet). Rover planners estimate that Spirit will reach the hills around mid-June. Presently, the rover is stopped at a site called 'Plains Station.'

    The color thermal data show how well different surface features hold onto heat. Red indicates warmth; blue indicates coolness. Areas with higher temperatures are more likely to be rocky, as rocks absorb heat. Lower temperatures denote small particles and fewer rocks. During its traverse, Spirit will document the causes of these temperature variations.

    The map comprises data from the camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter and the thermal emission imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter.

  9. The Goodwin Model: Behind the Hill Function

    PubMed Central

    Gonze, Didier; Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim

    2013-01-01

    The Goodwin model is a 3-variable model demonstrating the emergence of oscillations in a delayed negative feedback-based system at the molecular level. This prototypical model and its variants have been commonly used to model circadian and other genetic oscillators in biology. The only source of non-linearity in this model is a Hill function, characterizing the repression process. It was mathematically shown that to obtain limit-cycle oscillations, the Hill coefficient must be larger than 8, a value often considered unrealistic. It is indeed difficult to explain such a high coefficient with simple cooperative dynamics. We present here molecular models of the standard Goodwin model, based on single or multisite phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes of a transcription factor, which have been previously shown to generate switch-like responses. We show that when the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes are fast enough, the limit-cycle obtained with a multisite phosphorylation-based mechanism is in very good quantitative agreement with the oscillations observed in the Goodwin model. Conditions in which the detailed mechanism is well approximated by the Goodwin model are given. A variant of the Goodwin model which displays sharp thresholds and relaxation oscillations is also explained by a double phosphorylation/dephosphorylation-based mechanism through a bistable behavior. These results not only provide rational support for the Goodwin model but also highlight the crucial role of the speed of post-translational processes, whose response curve are usually established at a steady state, in biochemical oscillators. PMID:23936338

  10. Spirit's Express Route to 'Columbia Hills'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This map illustrates the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's position as of sol 112 (April 26, 2004), near the crater called 'Missoula.' Like a train on a tight schedule, Spirit will make regular stops along the way to its ultimate destination, the 'Columbia Hills.' At each stop, or 'station,' the rover will briefly analyze the area's rocks and soils. Each tick mark on the rover's route represents one sol's worth of travel, or about 60 to 70 meters (200 to 230 feet). Rover planners estimate that Spirit will reach the hills around mid-June. Presently, the rover is stopped at a site called 'Plains Station.'

    The color thermal data show how well different surface features hold onto heat. Red indicates warmth; blue indicates coolness. Areas with higher temperatures are more likely to be rocky, as rocks absorb heat. Lower temperatures denote small particles and fewer rocks. During its traverse, Spirit will document the causes of these temperature variations.

    The map comprises data from the camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter and the thermal emission imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter.

  11. Spirit's Express Route to 'Columbia Hills'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This map illustrates the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's position as of sol 112 (April 26, 2004), near the crater called 'Missoula.' Like a train on a tight schedule, Spirit will make regular stops along the way to its ultimate destination, the 'Columbia Hills.' At each stop, or 'station,' the rover will briefly analyze the area's rocks and soils. Each tick mark on the rover's route represents one sol's worth of travel, or about 60 to 70 meters (200 to 230 feet). Rover planners estimate that Spirit will reach the hills around mid-June. Presently, the rover is stopped at a site called 'Plains Station.'

    The color thermal data show how well different surface features hold onto heat. Red indicates a higher thermal inertia associated with rocky terrain (cooler in the day, warmer at night); blue indicates a lower thermal inertia associated with smaller particles and fewer rocks (warmer at night, cooler in the day). During its traverse, Spirit will document the causes of these thermal variations.

    The map comprises data from the camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter and the thermal emission imaging system on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter.

  12. New type of hill-top inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Barvinsky, A.O.; Kamenshchik, A.Yu.; Nesterov, D.V.

    2016-01-20

    We suggest a new type of hill-top inflation originating from the initial conditions in the form of the microcanonical density matrix for the cosmological model with a large number of quantum fields conformally coupled to gravity. Initial conditions for inflation are set up by cosmological instantons describing underbarrier oscillations in the vicinity of the inflaton potential maximum. These periodic oscillations of the inflaton field and cosmological scale factor are obtained within the approximation of two coupled oscillators subject to the slow roll regime in the Euclidean time. This regime is characterized by rapid oscillations of the scale factor on the background of a slowly varying inflaton, which guarantees smallness of slow roll parameters ϵ and η of the following inflation stage. A hill-like shape of the inflaton potential is shown to be generated by logarithmic loop corrections to the tree-level asymptotically shift-invariant potential in the non-minimal Higgs inflation model and R{sup 2}-gravity. The solution to the problem of hierarchy between the Planckian scale and the inflation scale is discussed within the concept of conformal higher spin fields, which also suggests the mechanism bringing the model below the gravitational cutoff and, thus, protecting it from large graviton loop corrections.

  13. Structure and Origin of the Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Timothy; Sims, M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Cohen, B. A.; Blaney, D. L.; Schmidt, M. E.; Treguier, E.; d'Uston, C.; Rice, J. W.; Tornabene, L. L.; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Haldemann, A.

    2007-10-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has yielded profound insights into features at millimeter to decimeter scales. However, the origin of the Columbia Hills has remained enigmatic given the traverse across one peak [1]. We present a geologic history of the Hills consistent with their morphology, bedding attitudes, and stratigraphy. The Columbia Hills form a triangle 4.2 by 2.3 km, are bounded by linear to slightly concave margins, lie near the center of Gusev Crater, and have peaks rising to 90 m. Bedding dips away from a NNE-SSW axis cutting the Tennessee Valley. Husband Hill dips (15-32°) are steeper than local topography ( 8-10°) and those on West Spur are conformable with greater scatter in strike and shallower dips (7-15°). Husband Hill is cored by volcaniclastic rocks and impact breccias altered to various extents (Wishstone, Watchtower and Descartes classes), ringed by ultramafic volcaniclastic rocks and sulfate-cemented sands (Algonquin and Peace classes), ringed by localized impact breccias and volcaniclastic deposits (West Spur and Home Plate) [2]. The Columbia Hills likely formed by (1) Uplift of the Gusev Crater central peak, raising the Hills to 3 km above the crater floor, assuming the Hills are deeply-rooted and subsequently buried. Uplift by overlapping crater rims is inconsistent with bedding attitudes, but may have modified the margins of the Hills. (2) Draping by impact and volcaniclastic rocks and sands with localized alteration and cementation. Fragile rocks (Peace) and in situ soils (Paso Robles) would not have survived Gusev Crater formation. (3) Mass wasting of the Tennessee Valley removed tens of meters from the peak of the Hills, exposing older units in the core, (4) Plains (Adirondack) basalts surrounded and embayed the Hills, and (5) Small impacts redistributed rocks. [1] Rice J.W. (2004) Fall AGU, #P23B-03. [2] Squyres S.W. et al. (2006) JGR 111, E02S11.

  14. Multi-scale nest-site selection by black-backed woodpeckers in outbreaks of mountain pine beetles

    Treesearch

    Thomas W. Bonnot; Joshua J. Millspaugh; Mark A. Rumble

    2009-01-01

    Areas of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreaks in the Black Hills can provide habitat for black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus), a U.S. Forest Service, Region 2 Sensitive Species. These outbreaks are managed through removal of trees infested with mountain pine beetles to control mountain pine...

  15. 3D Volumetric Strain Modelling of Eruptions at Soufrière Hills Volcano Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, N. K.; Gottsmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    Volumetric strain data has captured a number of Vulcanian explosions at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, which involve the uppermost part of the magmatic system. We previously used volumetric strain data from during one of these explosions to elucidate the geometry of the shallow plumbing system and crustal mechanics at Montserrat for mechanically plausible depressurisation amplitudes. Our results from both forward and inverse 2D models found that it was necessary to incorporate a mechanically weak shallow crust and mechanically compliant halo of material around the highest part of the SHV magmatic system i.e. the conduit, in order to implement geologically realistic conditions of depressurisation and rock strength. However, this model lacks complexity that cannot be implemented in a 2D environment. Here, in the first study of its kind, we use Finite Element Analysis of volumetric strain data in a 3D domain incorporating topography and mechanical complexities as imaged by seismic and gravimetric data. Our model implements topography from a DEM covering the island and surrounding bathymetry and include the mechanically stiff extinct volcanic cores of the Silver Hills and the Centre Hills. Here we present our preliminary findings from the 3D strain modelling and the effect of the extinct volcanic cores on strain partitioning on Montserrat.

  16. View of sports field and Easter Hill at west side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of sports field and Easter Hill at west side of project site. Looking west - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  17. View of sports field and Easter Hill at west side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of sports field and Easter Hill at west side of project site. Looking southwest - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  18. View of sports field from Easter Hill looking at intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of sports field from Easter Hill looking at intersection of South Twenty-Sixth Street and Foothill Avenue at left center rear. Buildings No. 36, 35, 25, 27, and 29, from left to right. Looking northeast - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  19. 3. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CIA TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CIA TO THE SOUTHWEST. BUILDINGS NOTED IN ID-29-2 APPEAR, IN ADDITION TO DRY ORE PLANT AND BONNOT COAL PULVERIZING EQUIPMENT BUILDING ON THE RIGHT. - Bunker Hill Lead Smelter, Bradley Rail Siding, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  20. 2. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CIA TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CIA TO THE SOUTH. IN FOREGROUND, PLANT DRY, SLAG FUMING PLANT, BLAST FURNACE, SMELTER OFFICE, LEAD AND SILVER REFINERIES ARE VISIBLE, L. TO R. HIGH VELOCITY FLUE LEADS FROM LOWER PLANT TO BAG HOUSE AND STACKS AT TOP OF SMELTING FACILITY. - Bunker Hill Lead Smelter, Bradley Rail Siding, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  1. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Oregon. 9.190 Section 9.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  2. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Oregon. 9.190 Section 9.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  3. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Oregon. 9.190 Section 9.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  4. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Oregon. 9.190 Section 9.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  5. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Oregon. 9.190 Section 9.190 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  6. 83. GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTH END OF GUN HILL PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTH END OF GUN HILL PLATFORM OF 3RD AVENUE EL SHOWING THE SOUTHBOUND TRACK APPROACH INTO GUN HILL STATION. 7TH AVENUE EXPRESS EL ABOVE. - Interborough Rapid Transit Company, Third Avenue Elevated Line, Borough of the Bronx, New York County, NY

  7. Drawing entitled "Sketch of proposed site for Pine Hills Patrol ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Drawing entitled "Sketch of proposed site for Pine Hills Patrol Station, Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, California. Surveyed by Norman McClean, U.S.F.S., January, 1934. - Pine Hills Station, Barracks, West Side of Boulder Creek Road at Engineers Road, Julian, San Diego County, CA

  8. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST TOWARD QUARTERMASTER BUILDINGS GROUP AND RESERVOIR HILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO SOUTHEAST TOWARD QUARTERMASTER BUILDINGS GROUP AND RESERVOIR HILL, FROM AMMUNITION (IGLOO) HILL. (Part 2 of a 3 view panorama; see also CA-2398-J-1 and CA-2398-16.) - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  9. 1. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CENTRAL IMPOUNDMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUNKER HILL LEAD SMELTER. VIEW IS FROM CENTRAL IMPOUNDMENT AREA LOOKING SOUTH. PLANT DRY IS IN CENTER FOREGROUND, SLAG FUMING PLANT IS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, AND BAG HOUSE IS IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. VARIOUS PLANT STACKS ARE ALSO VISIBLE. - Bunker Hill Lead Smelter, Bradley Rail Siding, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  10. Abyssal hills: Influence of topography on benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanoudis, Paris V.; Bett, Brian J.; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Abyssal plains, often thought of as vast flat areas, encompass a variety of terrains including abyssal hills, features that constitute the single largest landscape type on Earth. The potential influence on deep-sea benthic faunas of mesoscale habitat complexity arising from the presence of abyssal hills is still poorly understood. To address this issue we focus on benthic foraminifera (testate protists) in the >150-μm fraction of Megacorer samples (0-1 cm layer) collected at five different sites in the area of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain Sustained Observatory (NE Atlantic, 4850 m water depth). Three sites are located on the tops of small abyssal hills (200-500 m elevation) and two on the adjacent abyssal plain. We examined benthic foraminiferal assemblage characteristics (standing stock, diversity, composition) in relation to seafloor topography (hills vs. plain). Density and rarefied diversity were not significantly different between the hills and the plain. Nevertheless, hills do support a higher species density (i.e. species per unit area), a distinct fauna, and act to increase the regional species pool. Topographically enhanced bottom-water flows that influence food availability and sediment type are suggested as the most likely mechanisms responsible for these differences. Our findings highlight the potential importance of mesoscale heterogeneity introduced by relatively modest topography in regulating abyssal foraminiferal diversity. Given the predominance of abyssal hill terrain in the global ocean, we suggest the need to include faunal data from abyssal hills in assessments of abyssal ecology.

  11. Accounting for imperfect detection in Hill numbers for biodiversity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broms, Kristin M.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Fitzpatrick, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    The occupancy-based Hill number estimators are always at their asymptotic values (i.e. as if an infinite number of samples have been taken for the study region), therefore making it easy to compare biodiversity between different assemblages. In addition, the Hill numbers are computed as derived quantities within a Bayesian hierarchical model, allowing for straightforward inference.

  12. Is "Home" Still in the Hills? Staff Paper 153.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Eldon D.

    Although there was expectation that the current recession would bring a new wave of Appalachian Kentuckians back to their homeland hills, as had previous recessions, no great "return to the hills" (or even to other areas of the state) has materialized. Unemployment insurance claims by people formerly employed in other states have not…

  13. VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING WEST TOWARD RESERVOIR HILL. THE SPRR HOTEL WAS LOCATED IN THE STRIPED AREA AT THE BOTTOM OF THE IMAGE, AND THE TRACK RAN BETWEEN THE HILL AND THE HOTEL. - Southern Pacific Railroad Water Settling Reservoir, Yuma Crossing, south bank of Colorado River at foot of Madison Avenue, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  14. View of south boundary of Easter Hill project site for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of south boundary of Easter Hill project site for right of way for Hoffman Boulevard. Buildings No. 11 and 14 at right in trees. Looking west - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  15. "This Delightfull Garden": "Rabbit Hill" and the Pastoral Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Contends that Robert Lawson's children's book "Rabbit Hill" (1944) falls within the genre of pastoral literature, in the tradition of Edmund Spenser's "Faerie Queen." Examines the history of the genre and finds reasons for classifying Lawson's book as pastoral. Cites classic elements in "Rabbit Hill." Gives five…

  16. Axillary shoulder with exaggerated rotation: the Hill-Sachs defect.

    PubMed

    Rafert, J A; Long, B W; Hernandez, E M; Kreipke, D L

    1990-01-01

    One of the most common fractures of the humeral head resulting from an anterior dislocation is the Hill-Sachs defect. Other special radiographic positions to demonstrate this injury may prove difficult for the patient to assume and maintain. An axillary shoulder projection with exaggerated external rotation is easy to position and clearly demonstrates the Hill-Sachs defect.

  17. OVERVIEW OF GOLD HILL MILL, ROAD, AND WHITE PINE TALC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF GOLD HILL MILL, ROAD, AND WHITE PINE TALC MINE LOOKING EAST. THE OPENING TO THE TALC MINE IS IN THE DARK AREA AT CENTER LEFT EDGE. WARM SPRINGS CAMP IS OUT OF FRAME TO THE RIGHT. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  18. Rotating black holes in dilatonic Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory.

    PubMed

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen

    2011-04-15

    We construct generalizations of the Kerr black holes by including higher-curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. We show that the domain of existence of these Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet-dilaton (EGBD) black holes is bounded by the Kerr black holes, the critical EGBD black holes, and the singular extremal EGBD solutions. The angular momentum of the EGBD black holes can exceed the Kerr bound. The EGBD black holes satisfy a generalized Smarr relation. We also compare their innermost stable circular orbits with those of the Kerr black holes and show the existence of differences which might be observable in astrophysical systems.

  19. Comparing the fractal basins of attraction in the Hill problem with oblateness and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2017-10-01

    The basins of convergence, associated with the roots (attractors) of a complex equation, are revealed in the Hill problem with oblateness and radiation, using a large variety of numerical methods. Three cases are investigated, regarding the values of the oblateness and radiation. In all cases, a systematic and thorough scan of the complex plane is performed in order to determine the basins of attraction of the several iterative schemes. The correlations between the attracting domains and the corresponding required number of iterations are also illustrated and discussed. Our numerical analysis strongly suggests that the basins of convergence, with the highly fractal basin boundaries, produce extraordinary and beautiful formations on the complex plane.

  20. Decay of isolated hills and saddles on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Pierre; Brendel, Lothar; Roos, Kelly R.; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Heringdorf, Frank-J. Meyer zu

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the high temperature decay of isolated hills and saddle points on Si(001). Using in situ dark-field imaging in low energy electron microscopy, we track the movement of individual steps during high temperature annealing. We find different temperature dependent decay rates for the top of the hill compared to a saddle point with low step density that is present in the vicinity of the hill. The decay rate of the hill is always higher than the decay rate at the saddle. The two rates converge with increasing temperature and become equal at temperatures above 1060 °C. We also report an alternating fast and low decay rate for the layer-by-layer decay of the hills. This surprising finding is independent of temperature and is explained by macroscopic strain in the sample.

  1. Seeing mountains in mole hills: geographical-slant perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, D. R.; Creem, S. H.; Zosh, W. D.; Kaiser, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    When observers face directly toward the incline of a hill, their awareness of the slant of the hill is greatly overestimated, but motoric estimates are much more accurate. The present study examined whether similar results would be found when observers were allowed to view the side of a hill. Observers viewed the cross-sections of hills in real (Experiment 1) and virtual (Experiment 2) environments and estimated the inclines with verbal estimates, by adjusting the cross-section of a disk, and by adjusting a board with their unseen hand to match the inclines. We found that the results for cross-section viewing replicated those found when observers directly face the incline. Even though the angles of hills are directly evident when viewed from the side, slant perceptions are still grossly overestimated.

  2. Comparisons of calculated and measured helicopter noise near instrument hill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, Henry E.; You, Chulsoo

    1993-01-01

    The polar parabolic equation (POPE) method solves for the diffraction of sound by a curved surface including a realistic sound speed profile. POPE is outlined briefly to describe diffraction which propagates the field over a hill. Experimental data are compared with POPE predictions using the measured sound speed profile and ground impedance. Two trial cases are considered for the comparisons: the helicopter located at the base of the hill and far away from the base of the hill, respectively. The physical mechanisms for sound propagation over a hill are examined with and of POPE calculations and experimental data. The shedding of rays from the hillside gives an interference effect with a wave along the flat surface beyond the base of a hill.

  3. Black Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Fred, Ed.; Cabbell, Ed, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on black Appalachians, their culture, and their history. It contains local histories, articles, and poems and short stories by Appalachian blacks. Articles include: "A Mountain Artist's Landscape," a profile of artist Rita Bradley by Pat Arnow; "A Part and Apart," a profile of…

  4. Black Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Fred, Ed.; Cabbell, Ed, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on black Appalachians, their culture, and their history. It contains local histories, articles, and poems and short stories by Appalachian blacks. Articles include: "A Mountain Artist's Landscape," a profile of artist Rita Bradley by Pat Arnow; "A Part and Apart," a profile of…

  5. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  6. Airborne remote sensing of spatiotemporal change (1955-2004) in indigenous and exotic forest cover in the Taita Hills, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellikka, Petri K. E.; Lötjönen, Milla; Siljander, Mika; Lens, Luc

    2009-08-01

    We studied changes in area and species composition of six indigenous forest fragments in the Taita Hills, Kenya using 1955 and 1995 aerial photography with 2004 airborne digital camera mosaics. The study area is part of Eastern Arc Mountains, a global biodiversity hot spot that boasts an outstanding diversity of flora and fauna and a high level of endemism. While a total of 260 ha (50%) of indigenous tropical cloud forest was lost to agriculture and bushland between 1955 and 2004, large-scale planting of exotic pines, eucalyptus, grevillea, black wattle and cypress on barren land during the same period resulted in a balanced total forest area. In the Taita Hills, like in other Afrotropical forests, indigenous forest loss may adversely affect ecosystem services.

  7. After Conquering 'Husband Hill,' Spirit Moves On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The first explorer ever to scale a summit on another planet, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has begun a long trek downward from the top of 'Husband Hill' to new destinations. As shown in this 180-degree panorama from east of the summit, Spirit's earlier tracks are no longer visible. They are off to the west (to the left in this view). Spirit's next destination is 'Haskin Ridge,' straight ahead along the edge of the steep cliff on the right side of this panorama.

    The scene is a mosaic of images that Spirit took with the navigation camera on the rover's 635th Martian day, or sol, (Oct. 16, 2005) of exploration of Gusev Crater on Mars. This view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  8. The 1984 Morgan Hill, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.; Clark, M.M.; Cockerham, R.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Lindh, A.G.; Prescott, W.H.; Shakal, A.F.; Spudich, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Morgan Hill, California, earthquake (magnitude 6.1) of 24 April 1984 ruptured a 30-kilometer-long segment of the Calaveras fault zone to the east of San Jose. Although it was recognized in 1980 that an earthquake of magnitude 6 occurred on this segment in 1911 and that a repeat of this event might reasonably be expected, no short-term precursors were noted and so the time of the 1984 earthquake was not predicted. Unilateral rupture propagation toward the south-southeast and an energetic late source of seismic radiation located near the southeast end of the rupture zone contributed to the highly focused pattern of strong motion, including an exceptionally large horizontal acceleration of 1.29g at a site on a dam abutment near the southeast end of the rupture zone.

  9. Seeing sodomy: Fanny Hill's blinding vision.

    PubMed

    Kopelson, K

    1992-01-01

    One of the oddest and most erotic moments in Cleland's Fanny Hill occurs when Fanny is knocked "senseless" by a voyeuristic vision of two young men having anal intercourse. This sodomitical passage demonstrates a dominant culture's strong phobic attraction to a socially peripheral Other against which it defines itself. The passage also represents two types of transgression. On one level, it records an inversion of sex, gender, and class paradigms that structure bourgeois subjectivity. On another level, the passage also transgresses signification itself, exploding as well as inverting those paradigms, in a movement that recalls Barthes's distinction between the coded "studium" of the pornographic and the uncoded "punctum" of the erotic. This transgressive exemption from meaning might well be read, in a Barthesian sense, as true sexual enfranchisement in that, for Barthes, the liberation of sexuality requires the release of sexuality from meaning, and from transgression as meaning.

  10. Meteorological analysis for Fenton Hill, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.; Wilson, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    Three years of meteorological data have been collected at the Fenton Hill site to establish a local climatic baseline, transport and diffusion climatology, and an initial site for an eventual Valles Caldera meteorological network. Tower-based wind and temperature data at 15 m above ground were supplemented during 1979 with precipitation, humidity and pressure measurements, and a limited program of upper winds. Preliminary analysis of the data has been made to identify major topographic and meteorological driving forces affecting the local climatic variations on diurnal and seasonal time scales. The site is quite high and exposed enough tht external influences such as gradient wind flow and thunderstorms tend to dominate over purely local driving forces in determining climate. Locally generated wind circulations are identifiable at night but tend to be weak and sporadic. The presence of topographic obstacles on the 10- to 100-km scale is observed in the winds.

  11. Operational teledermatology in Broken Hill, rural Australia.

    PubMed

    See, Adrian; Lim, Adrian C; Le, Katie; See, Jo-Ann; Shumack, Stephen P

    2005-08-01

    From January 2001 to January 2002, Broken Hill, New South Wales, served as a trial site for teledermatology as one method of access to dermatologists. Fourteen participating general practitioners referred 46 patients making up 48 teledermatology cases. The mean diagnostic agreement between general practitioners and dermatologists was 35% and 50% for primary and differential diagnoses, respectively. Teledermatology patients formed 12% of the collectively referred dermatology patients (outpatients and teledermatology). In this project, high patient and general practitioner acceptability and positive medical outcomes confirm the value of rural teledermatology. However, this project also revealed unexpected barriers and pitfalls in the effective operation of rural teledermatology. Lack of education of participants, inertia among potential users and patient inconvenience are issues that may adversely affect the effective implementation of rural teledermatology.

  12. Who's Afraid of the Hill Boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The Jacobi-Maupertuis metric allows one to reformulate Newton's equations as geodesic equations for a Riemannian metric which degenerates at the Hill boundary. We prove that a JM geodesic which comes sufficiently close to a regular point of the boundary contains pairs of conjugate points close to the boundary. We prove the conjugate locus of any point near enough to the boundary is a hypersurface tangent to the boundary. Our method of proof is to reduce analysis of geodesics near the boundary to that of solutions to Newton's equations in the simplest model case: a constant force. This model case is equivalent to the beginning physics problem of throwing balls upward from a fixed point at fixed speeds and describing the resulting arcs, see Fig. 2.

  13. AGU climate scientists visit Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2012-02-01

    On 1 February 2012, AGU teamed with 11 other scientific societies to bring 29 scientists researching various aspects of climate change to Washington, D. C., for the second annual Climate Science Day on Capitol Hill. The participants represented a wide range of expertise, from meteorology to agriculture, paleoclimatology to statistics, but all spoke to the reality of climate change as demonstrated in their scientific research. With Congress debating environmental regulations and energy policy amid tight fiscal pressures, it is critical that lawmakers have access to the best climate science to help guide policy decisions. The scientists met with legislators and their staff to discuss the importance of climate science for their districts and the nation and offered their expertise as an ongoing resource to the legislators.

  14. Ash and Steam, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Monserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. These two images provide a context view of the island (bottom) and a detailed view of the summit plume (top). When the images were taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that 'large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m.' Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image. Digital photograph numbers ISS004-E-8972 and 8973 were taken 20 March, 2002 from Space Station Alpha and were provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  15. Ash and Steam, Soufriere Hills Volcano, Monserrat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station crew members are regularly alerted to dynamic events on the Earth's surface. On request from scientists on the ground, the ISS crew observed and recorded activity from the summit of Soufriere Hills on March 20, 2002. These two images provide a context view of the island (bottom) and a detailed view of the summit plume (top). When the images were taken, the eastern side of the summit region experienced continued lava growth, and reports posted on the Smithsonian Institution's Weekly Volcanic Activity Report indicate that 'large (50-70 m high), fast-growing, spines developed on the dome's summit. These spines periodically collapsed, producing pyroclastic flows down the volcano's east flank that sometimes reached the Tar River fan. Small ash clouds produced from these events reached roughly 1 km above the volcano and drifted westward over Plymouth and Richmond Hill. Ash predominately fell into the sea. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remained high. Theodolite measurements of the dome taken on March 20 yielded a dome height of 1,039 m.' Other photographs by astronauts of Montserrat have been posted on the Earth Observatory: digital photograph number ISS002-E-9309, taken on July 9, 2001; and a recolored and reprojected version of the same image. Digital photograph numbers ISS004-E-8972 and 8973 were taken 20 March, 2002 from Space Station Alpha and were provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  16. Quantifying the role of mitigation hills in reducing tsunami runup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Suckale, J.; Lunghino, B.; Giraldo, F.; Hood, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal communities around the world are being encouraged to plant or restore vegetation along their shores for the purpose of mitigating tsunami damage. A common setup for these projects is to develop 'mitigation hills' - an ensemble of vegetated hills along the coast - instead of one continuous stretch of vegetation. The rationale behind a staggered-hill setup is to give tree roots more space to grow and deepen. From a fluid-dynamical point of view, however, staggered mitigation hills may have significant drawbacks such as diverting the flow into the low-lying areas of the park, which could entail strong currents in the narrow channels between the hills and lead to erosion of the hills from the sides. The goal of this study is to quantify how mitigation hills affect tsunami runup and to provide constraints on the design of mitigation hills that mitigate tsunami damage using numerical simulations. Our computations of tsunami runup are based on the non-linear shallow water equation solved through a fully implicit, high-order, discontinuous Galerkin method. The adaptive computational grid is fitted to the hill topography to capture geometric effects accurately. A new dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity originally designed for large eddy simulation of compressible flows is used for stabilization and to capture the obstacle-generated turbulence. We have carefully benchmarked our model in 1D and 2D against classical test cases. The included figure shows an example run of tsunami runup through coastal mitigation hills. In the interest of providing generalizable results, we perform a detailed scaling analysis of our model runs. We find that the protective value of mitigation hills depends sensitively on the non-linearity of the incoming wave and the relative height of the wave to the hills. Our simulations also suggest that the assumed initial condition is consequential and we hence consider a range of incoming waves ranging from a simple soliton to a more realistic N

  17. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters, emphasizing some colors more than others to enhance striking but subtle color differences among rocks, soils, hills, and plains.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  18. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters, emphasizing some colors more than others to enhance striking but subtle color differences among rocks, soils, hills, and plains.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  19. Black tea

    MedlinePlus

    ... But this does not seem to occur in humans.Flutamide (Eulexin)The body breaks down flutamide (Eulexin) ... much medicine the body absorbs. To avoid this interaction, avoid black tea 1 hour before and 2 ...

  20. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  1. Lake Aquilla - Habitat Survey Hill County, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    M. E., M. L. Morrison, and R. N. Wilkins. 2013. Tree species composition and food availability affect productivity of an endangered species : The...forests at Lake Aquilla. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Aquilla Lake (Tex.) Vegetation surveys Plant communities Restoration ecology Endangered species Black... endangered Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia P. L. Sclater and Salvin). Data was collected using a combination of plots and transects. All

  2. The Gas Hills uranium district and some probable controls for ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, Howard Davis

    1957-01-01

    Uranium deposits occur in the upper coarse-grained facies of the Wind River formation of Eocene age in the Gas Hills district of the southern part of the Wind River Basin. Some of the principal deposits lie below the water table in the unoxidized zone and consist of uraninite and coffinite occurring as interstitial fillings in irregular blanket-like bodies. In the near-surface deposits that lie above the water table, the common yellow uranium minerals consist of uranium phosphates, silicates, and hydrous oxides. The black unoxidized uraninite -coffinite ores show enrichment of molybdenum, arsenic, and selenium when compared to the barren sandstone. Probable geologic controls for ore deposits include: 1) permeable sediments that allowed passage of ore-bearing solutions; 2) numerous faults that acted as impermeable barriers impounding the ore -bearing solutions; 3) locally abundant pyrite, carbonaceous material, and natuial gas containing hydrogen sulfide that might provide a favorable environment for precipitation of uranium. Field and laboratory evidence indicate that the uranium deposits in the Gas Hills district are very young and related to the post-Miocene to Pleistocene regional tilting to the south associated with the collapse of the Granite Mountains fault block. This may have stopped or reversed ground water movement from a northward (basinward) direction and alkaline ground water rich in carbonate could have carried the uranium into the favorable environment that induced precipitation.

  3. 265. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF TENSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    265. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF TENSION EYE BARS AT CANTILEVER TRUSS, FACING SOUTHWEST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. 266. Dennis Hill, Photographer June 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF TENSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    266. Dennis Hill, Photographer June 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF TENSION EYE BARS AND COMPRESSION MEMBERS ABOVE UPPER DECK, FACING SOUTHEAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. 215. Dennis Hill, Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF STRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    215. Dennis Hill, Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF STRAND SHOES AND STORM CABLE EYE BARS IN YERBA BUENA ANCHORAGE, FACING EAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 STAIR RAILING, 66 WEST OAK STREET - Chicago Ironwork, 66 West Oak Street (Cast Iron Stair Railing), 66 West Oak Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. 170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    170. Credit SHS. Northern California Power Company substation, Bully Hill Mine area. Note lack of vegetation, caused by nearby copper smelting works. - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, EARLY PHOTO OF HOUSE DATE UNKNOWN. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer July 1936 COPIED FROM AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY MRS. NELLY MUNRO - Old Baptist Parsonage, Snyder & Virginia Streets, Sublette, Lee County, IL

  10. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from an old photograph loaned by Alice Snyder, Galena, Illinois. SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - Grace Episcopal Church, South Prospect Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Copied by Joseph Hill from photograph loaned by the Illinois Bell Telephone Co. SOUTH EAST ELEVATION - Grace Episcopal Church, South Prospect Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  12. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, ARSENAL ISLAND 1870 - Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, FORT ARMSTRONG 1819 FROM A MODEL IN ARSENAL MUSEUM - Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  14. 19. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer COL. DAVENPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer COL. DAVENPORT Copy of an old photograph loaned by the commandant. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, FORT ARMSTRONG ARSENAL ISLAND 1819 - Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT. DATE UNKNOWN - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 346, Davenport Drive, Arsenal Grounds, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer May 1936 COPY OF AN OLD PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY THE COMMANDANT, EARLY BRIDGE ACROSS MISSISSIPPI RIVER, DATE UNKNOWN. - Bridge Spanning Mississippi River, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer October 1936 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer October 1936 #12 EARLY RED BRICK HOUSE, Elk and Prospect Sts., Galena, Illinois - Galena Doorways, Red Brick House, Elk & Prospect Streets, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  19. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  20. 24. VIEW FORM NORTHWEST, WHERE HOUSE RECEDES INTO HILL, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW FORM NORTHWEST, WHERE HOUSE RECEDES INTO HILL, SHOWING ROOF, CHIMNEY AND OCTAGONAL SKYLIGHT TO KITCHEN IN CENTER - Isaac N. Hagan House, Kentuck Knob, U.S. Route 40 vicinity (Stewart Township), Chalkhill, Fayette County, PA