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Sample records for black holes gravity

  1. Black Hole Interior in Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasunori; Sanches, Fabio; Weinberg, Sean J

    2015-05-22

    We discuss the interior of a black hole in quantum gravity, in which black holes form and evaporate unitarily. The interior spacetime appears in the sense of complementarity because of special features revealed by the microscopic degrees of freedom when viewed from a semiclassical standpoint. The relation between quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle is subtle, but they are still consistent. PMID:26047218

  2. Black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Borja, E. F.; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the recent progress on black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity, focusing in particular on the recently discovered discretization effect for microscopic black holes. Powerful analytical techniques have been developed to perform the exact computation of entropy. A statistical analysis of the structures responsible for this effect shows its progressive damping and eventual disappearance as one increases the considered horizon area.

  3. Black Hole Interior in Quantum Gravity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasunori; Sanches, Fabio; Weinberg, Sean J

    2015-05-22

    We discuss the interior of a black hole in quantum gravity, in which black holes form and evaporate unitarily. The interior spacetime appears in the sense of complementarity because of special features revealed by the microscopic degrees of freedom when viewed from a semiclassical standpoint. The relation between quantum mechanics and the equivalence principle is subtle, but they are still consistent.

  4. Charged dilatonic black holes in gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Faizal, Mir; Panah, B. Eslam; Panahiyan, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present charged dilatonic black holes in gravity's rainbow. We study the geometric and thermodynamic properties of black hole solutions. We also investigate the effects of rainbow functions on different thermodynamic quantities for these charged black holes in dilatonic gravity's rainbow. Then we demonstrate that the first law of thermodynamics is valid for these solutions. After that, we investigate thermal stability of the solutions using the canonical ensemble and analyze the effects of different rainbow functions on the thermal stability. In addition, we present some arguments regarding the bound and phase transition points in context of geometrical thermodynamics. We also study the phase transition in extended phase space in which the cosmological constant is treated as the thermodynamic pressure. Finally, we use another approach to calculate and demonstrate that the obtained critical points in extended phase space represent a second order phase transition for these black holes.

  5. Gravity, black holes and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, I.

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  6. Gravity, black holes, and the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolson, I.

    1981-01-01

    The book treats current understandings of the nature and properties of gravity, with particular emphasis on its role in the physics of black holes and the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. The development of modern ideas on force, motion and gravity is traced from the systems of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the work of Copernicus, Galileo and Kepler to Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's general theory of relativity. Particular attention is then given to the role of gravity in stellar motions and to the phenomena determined by the immense gravitational forces associated with bodies of such great density, including relativistic effects, tidal forces, space-time effects, event horizons, rotation, mass and electrical charge, the existence of naked singularities and white holes, and black-hole thermodynamics. The existence of actual black holes in the universe is considered, and various black-hole candidates in the Galaxy, quasars and galactic nuclei are indicated. The role of gravity in cosmology is then examined, with attention given to the implications of general relativity, the Hubble law, the age of the universe, the density of the universe and its eventual fate. Possible alternative to general relativity as a theory of gravitation are considered, including theories of variable gravitational constant, grand unified theories, and quantum gravity.

  7. Black holes in higher derivative gravity.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Perkins, A; Pope, C N; Stelle, K S

    2015-05-01

    Extensions of Einstein gravity with higher-order derivative terms arise in string theory and other effective theories, as well as being of interest in their own right. In this Letter we study static black-hole solutions in the example of Einstein gravity with additional quadratic curvature terms. A Lichnerowicz-type theorem simplifies the analysis by establishing that they must have vanishing Ricci scalar curvature. By numerical methods we then demonstrate the existence of further black-hole solutions over and above the Schwarzschild solution. We discuss some of their thermodynamic properties, and show that they obey the first law of thermodynamics.

  8. Black holes in higher derivative gravity.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Perkins, A; Pope, C N; Stelle, K S

    2015-05-01

    Extensions of Einstein gravity with higher-order derivative terms arise in string theory and other effective theories, as well as being of interest in their own right. In this Letter we study static black-hole solutions in the example of Einstein gravity with additional quadratic curvature terms. A Lichnerowicz-type theorem simplifies the analysis by establishing that they must have vanishing Ricci scalar curvature. By numerical methods we then demonstrate the existence of further black-hole solutions over and above the Schwarzschild solution. We discuss some of their thermodynamic properties, and show that they obey the first law of thermodynamics. PMID:25978224

  9. Black holes in scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Faraoni, Valerio

    2012-02-24

    Hawking has proven that black holes which are stationary as the end point of gravitational collapse in Brans-Dicke theory (without a potential) are no different than in general relativity. We extend this proof to the much more general class of scalar-tensor and f(R) gravity theories, without assuming any symmetries apart from stationarity.

  10. Astrophysical black holes in screened modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Jha, Rahul; Muir, Jessica; Gregory, Ruth E-mail: r.a.w.gregory@durham.ac.uk E-mail: jlmuir@umich.edu

    2014-08-01

    Chameleon, environmentally dependent dilaton, and symmetron gravity are three models of modified gravity in which the effects of the additional scalar degree of freedom are screened in dense environments. They have been extensively studied in laboratory, cosmological, and astrophysical contexts. In this paper, we present a preliminary investigation into whether additional constraints can be provided by studying these scalar fields around black holes. By looking at the properties of a static, spherically symmetric black hole, we find that the presence of a non-uniform matter distribution induces a non-constant scalar profile in chameleon and dilaton, but not necessarily symmetron gravity. An order of magnitude estimate shows that the effects of these profiles on in-falling test particles will be sub-leading compared to gravitational waves and hence observationally challenging to detect.

  11. Black hole complementarity in gravity's rainbow

    SciTech Connect

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae E-mail: wtkim@sogang.ac.kr

    2015-05-01

    To see how the gravity's rainbow works for black hole complementary, we evaluate the required energy for duplication of information in the context of black hole complementarity by calculating the critical value of the rainbow parameter in the certain class of the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole. The resultant energy can be written as the well-defined limit for the vanishing rainbow parameter which characterizes the deformation of the relativistic dispersion relation in the freely falling frame. It shows that the duplication of information in quantum mechanics could not be allowed below a certain critical value of the rainbow parameter; however, it might be possible above the critical value of the rainbow parameter, so that the consistent formulation in our model requires additional constraints or any other resolutions for the latter case.

  12. Light, Gravity and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falla, David

    2012-01-01

    The nature of light and how it is affected by gravity is discussed. Einstein's prediction of the deflection of light as it passes near the Sun was verified by observations made during the solar eclipse of 1919. Another prediction was that of gravitational redshift, which occurs when light emitted by a star loses energy in the gravitational field…

  13. Black Hole Formation in Lovelock Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taves, Timothy Mark

    Some branches of quantum gravity demand the existence of higher dimensions and the addition of higher curvature terms to the gravitational Lagrangian in the form of the Lovelock polynomials. In this thesis we investigate some of the classical properties of Lovelock gravity. We first derive the Hamiltonian for Lovelock gravity and find that it takes the same form as in general relativity when written in terms of the Misner-Sharp mass function. We then minimally couple the action to matter fields to find Hamilton's equations of motion. These are gauge fixed to be in the Painleve-Gullstrand co--ordinates and are well suited to numerical studies of black hole formation. We then use these equations of motion for the massless scalar field to study the formation of general relativistic black holes in four to eight dimensions and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in five and six dimensions. We study Choptuik scaling, a phenomenon which relates the initial conditions of a matter distribution to the final observables of small black holes. In both higher dimensional general relativity and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity we confirm the existence of cusps in the mass scaling relation which had previously only been observed in four dimensional general relativity. In the general relativistic case we then calculate the critical exponents for four to eight dimensions and find agreement with previous calculations by Bland et al but not Sorkin et al who both worked in null co-ordinates. For the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet case we find that the self-similar behaviour seen in the general relativistic case is destroyed. We find that it is replaced by some other form of scaling structure. In five dimensions we find that the period of the critical solution at the origin is proportional to roughly the cube root of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and that there is evidence for a minimum black hole radius. In six dimensions we see evidence for a new type of scaling. We also show, from the equations of

  14. Charged black holes in generalized teleparallel gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M.E.; Houndjo, M.J.S.; Tossa, J.; Momeni, D.; Myrzakulov, R. E-mail: sthoundjo@yahoo.fr E-mail: d.momeni@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate charged static black holes in 4D for generalized teleparallel models of gravity, based on torsion as the geometric object for describing gravity according to the equivalence principle. As a motivated idea, we introduce a set of non-diagonal tetrads and derive the full system of non linear differential equations. We prove that the common Schwarzschild gauge is applicable only when we study linear f(T) case. We reobtain the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter (or RN-AdS) solution for the linear case of f(T) and perform a parametric cosmological reconstruction for two nonlinear models. We also study in detail a type of the no-go theorem in the framework of this modified teleparallel gravity.

  15. Asymptotically charged BTZ black holes in gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by the wide applications of BTZ black holes and interesting results of gravity's rainbow, we consider three dimensional rainbow solutions and investigate their thermodynamic properties. In addition to investigate black holes thermodynamics related to AdS/CFT correspondence, one may regard gravity's rainbow to encode quantum gravity effects into the black hole solutions. We take into account the various models of linear and nonlinear electrodynamics and study their effects on the gravity's rainbow spacetime. We also examine thermal stability and find that obtained three dimensional rainbow black holes are thermally stable.

  16. Exact teleparallel gravity of binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hanafy, W.; Nashed, G. G. L.

    2016-02-01

    An exact solution of two singularities in the teleparallel equivalent to general relativity theory has been obtained. A holographic visualization of the binary black holes (BBHs) space-time, due to the non vanishing torsion scalar field, has been given. The acceleration tensor of BBHs space-time has been calculated. The results identify the repulsive gravity zones of the BBHs field. The total conserved quantities of the BBHs has been evaluated. Possible gravitational radiation emission by the system has been calculated without assuming a weak field initial data.

  17. Black hole radiance, short distances, and TeV gravity.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Iván; Navarro-Salas, José; Olmo, Gonzalo J

    2006-07-28

    Using a derivation of black hole radiance in terms of two-point functions one can provide a quantitative estimate of the contribution of short distances to the spectrum. Thermality is preserved for black holes with kappalp<1. However, deviations from the Planckian spectrum can be found for mini black holes in TeV gravity scenarios, even before reaching the Planck phase.

  18. Black holes in Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Yekta, Davood Mahdavian

    2011-05-15

    In this paper we find different types of black holes for the Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity. Our solutions include (un)charged warped (anti-)de Sitter black holes for four and six derivative expanded action. We also look at the black holes in unexpanded Born-Infeld action. In each case we calculate the entropy, angular momentum and mass of the black holes. We also find the central charges for the conformal field theory duals.

  19. Geometrothermodynamics of black holes in Lorentz noninvariant massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a static and spherically symmetric hairy black hole solution in noninvariant massive gravity. The formalism of geometrothermodynamics is used to describe the thermodynamic characteristics of this black hole in a Legendre invariant way. For a black hole in massive gravity, the geometry of the space of equilibrium states is computed showing that it contains information about the thermodynamic interaction, critical points, and phase transitions structure.

  20. Thermal gravity, black holes, and cosmological entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Stephen D.H.; Murray, Brian M.

    2006-02-15

    Taking seriously the interpretation of black hole entropy as the logarithm of the number of microstates, we argue that thermal gravitons may undergo a phase transition to a kind of black hole condensate. The phase transition proceeds via nucleation of black holes at a rate governed by a saddle point configuration whose free energy is of order the inverse temperature in Planck units. Whether the universe remains in a low entropy state as opposed to the high entropy black hole condensate depends sensitively on its thermal history. Our results may clarify an old observation of Penrose regarding the very low entropy state of the universe.

  1. Quantum black holes in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Olmedo, Javier; Pullin, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    We study the quantization of spherically symmetric vacuum spacetimes within loop quantum gravity. In particular, we give additional details about our previous work in which we showed that one could complete the quantization of the model and that the singularity inside black holes is resolved. Moreover, we consider an alternative quantization based on a slightly different kinematical Hilbert space. The ambiguity in kinematical spaces stems from how one treats the periodicity of one of the classical variables in these models. The corresponding physical Hilbert spaces solve the diffeomorphism and Hamiltonian constraint but their intrinsic structure is radically different depending on the kinematical Hilbert space one started from. In both cases there are quantum observables that do not have a classical counterpart. However, one can show that at the end of the day, by examining Dirac observables, both quantizations lead to the same physical predictions.

  2. Black hole remnant from gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag Ali, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we investigate black hole (BH) physics in the context of the gravity rainbow. We investigate this through rainbow functions that have been proposed by Amelino-Camelia [Living Rev. Relativity 16, 5 (2013)] and Amelino-Camelia et al. in [Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12, 607 (1997)]. This modification will give corrections to both the temperature and the entropy of BHs, and hence it changes the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of the BH approaches the Planck scale. It prevents the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a BH remnant, which may resolve the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero.

  3. Black hole phase transitions in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Qiaojun; Chen Yixin; Shao Kainan

    2011-03-15

    We study black hole phase transitions in (deformed) Horava-Lifshitz (H-L) gravity, including the charged/uncharged topological black holes and KS black hole. Stability analysis and state space geometry are both used. We find interesting phase structures in these black holes, some of the properties are never observed in Einstein gravity. Particularly, the stability properties of black holes in H-L gravity with small radius change dramatically, which can be considered as a leak of information about the small scale behavior of spacetime. A new black hole local phase transition in H-L gravity which cannot be revealed by thermodynamical metrics has been found. There is an infinite discontinuity at the specific heat curve for charged black hole in H-L gravity with hyperbolic event horizon. However, this discontinuity does not have a corresponding curvature singularity of thermodynamical metrics. Our results may provide new insights towards a better understanding of the H-L gravity, as well as black hole thermodynamics.

  4. Black holes and relativitic gravity theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1977-01-01

    All presently known relativistic gravitation theories were considered which have a Riemannian background geometry and possess exact static, spherically symmetric solutions which are asymptotically flat. Each theory predicts the existence of trapped surfaces (black holes). For a general static isotropic metric, MACSYMA was used to compute the Newman-Penrose equations, the black hole radius, the impact parameter, and capture radius for photon accretion. These results were then applied to several of the better known gravitation theories.

  5. Rotating Black Hole in Extended Chern-Simons Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, K.; Matsuyama, T.; Tanda, S.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate a slowly rotating black hole in four-dimensional extended Chern-Simons modified gravity. We obtain an approximate solution that reduces to the Kerr solution when a coupling constant vanishes. The Chern-Simons correction effectively reduces the frame-dragging effect around a black hole in comparison with that of the Kerr solution.

  6. Thermodynamic instability of black holes of third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pourhasan, R.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, we compute the mass and the temperature of the uncharged black holes of third order Lovelock gravity as well as the entropy using the first law of thermodynamics. We perform a stability analysis by studying the curves of the temperature versus the mass parameter, and find that an intermediate thermodynamically unstable phase exists for black holes with a hyperbolic horizon. This unstable phase for the uncharged topological black holes of third order Lovelock gravity does not exist in lower order Lovelock gravity. We also perform a stability analysis for a spherical, seven-dimensional black hole of Lovelock gravity and find that, while these kinds of black holes for small values of Lovelock coefficients have an intermediate unstable phase, they are stable for large values of Lovelock coefficients. We also find that an intermediate unstable phase exists for these black holes in higher dimensions. This analysis shows that the thermodynamic stability of black holes with curved horizons is not a robust feature of all the generalized theories of gravity.

  7. Inclination Angles of Black Hole X-Ray Binaries Manifest Strong Gravity around Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, S. N.; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Yao, Yangsen

    2002-01-01

    System inclination angles have been determined for about 15 X-ray binaries, in which stellar mass black holes are considered to exist. These inclination angles range between 25 degrees and 80 degrees, but peaked between 60-70 degrees. This peak is not explained in the frame work of Newtonian gravity. However, this peak is reproduced naturally if we model the observed X-ray radiations as being produced in the accretion disks very close to the black hole horizons, where the extremely strong general and special relativistic effects, caused by the extremely strong gravity near the black hole horizons, modify the local radiation significantly as the X-rays propagate to the remote observer. Therefore the peak of the inclination angle distribution provides evidence or strong gravity around stellar mass black holes.

  8. Probing loop quantum gravity with evaporating black holes.

    PubMed

    Barrau, A; Cailleteau, T; Cao, X; Diaz-Polo, J; Grain, J

    2011-12-16

    This Letter aims at showing that the observation of evaporating black holes should allow the usual Hawking behavior to be distinguished from loop quantum gravity (LQG) expectations. We present a full Monte Carlo simulation of the evaporation in LQG and statistical tests that discriminate between competing models. We conclude that contrarily to what was commonly thought, the discreteness of the area in LQG leads to characteristic features that qualify evaporating black holes as objects that could reveal quantum gravity footprints.

  9. Black hole spectroscopy from loop quantum gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrau, Aurelien; Cao, Xiangyu; Noui, Karim; Perez, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the integrated emission spectra of black holes in the framework of loop quantum gravity (LQG). The black hole emission rates are governed by the entropy whose value, in recent holographic loop quantum gravity models, was shown to agree at leading order with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Quantum corrections depend on the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ . Starting with black holes of initial horizon area A ˜102 in Planck units, we present the spectra for different values of γ . Each spectrum clearly decomposes into two distinct parts: a continuous background which corresponds to the semiclassical stages of the evaporation and a series of discrete peaks which constitutes a signature of the deep quantum structure of the black hole. We show that γ has an effect on both parts that we analyze in detail. Finally, we estimate the number of black holes and the instrumental resolution required to experimentally distinguish between the considered models.

  10. Extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Matsuno, Ken; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by considerable interests of Myers-Perry black holes, we employ the perturbative method to obtain a family of extremal charged rotating black hole solutions in odd dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity. We start with an extremal Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta, and then by adding the dilaton field and the nonlinear Born-Infeld electrodynamics, we find an extremal nonlinearly charged rotating black holes. The perturbative parameter is assumed to be the electric charge q and the perturbations are performed up to the third order. We then study the physical properties of these Born-Infeld-dilaton black holes. In particular, we show that the perturbative parameter, q, the dilaton coupling constant, α, and the Born-Infeld parameter, β, modify the Smarr formula and the values of the gyromagnetic ratio of the extremal charged rotating black holes.

  11. Matter conditions for regular black holes in f (T ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftergood, Joshua; DeBenedictis, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    We study the conditions imposed on matter to produce a regular (nonsingular) interior of a class of spherically symmetric black holes in the f (T ) extension of teleparallel gravity. The class of black holes studied (T spheres) is necessarily singular in general relativity. We derive a tetrad which is compatible with the black hole interior and utilize this tetrad in the gravitational equations of motion to study the black hole interior. It is shown that in the case where the gravitational Lagrangian is expandable in a power series f (T )=T +∑ n ≠1 bnTn black holes can be nonsingular while respecting certain energy conditions in the matter fields. Thus, the black hole singularity may be removed, and the gravitational equations of motion can remain valid throughout the manifold. This is true as long as n is positive but is not true in the negative sector of the theory. Hence, gravitational f (T ) Lagrangians which are Taylor expandable in powers of T may yield regular black holes of this type. Although it is found that these black holes can be rendered nonsingular in f (T ) theory, we conjecture that a mild singularity theorem holds in that the dominant energy condition is violated in an arbitrarily small neighborhood of the general relativity singular point if the corresponding f (T ) black hole is regular. The analytic techniques here can also be applied to gravitational Lagrangians which are not Laurent or Taylor expandable.

  12. Phase transitions of black holes in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Sharmanthie

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we have studied thermodynamics of a black hole in massive gravity in the canonical ensemble. The massive gravity theory in consideration here has a massive graviton due to Lorentz symmetry breaking. The black hole studied here has a scalar charge due to the massive graviton and is asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS). We have computed various thermodynamical quantities such as temperature, specific heat and free energy. Both the local and global stability of the black hole are studied by observing the behavior of the specific heat and the free energy. We have observed that there is a first-order phase transition between small (SBH) and large black hole (LBH) for a certain range of the scalar charge. This phase transition is similar to the liquid/gas phase transition at constant temperature for a van der Waals fluid. The coexistence curves for the SBH and LBH branches are also discussed in detail.

  13. An introduction to spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2015-03-26

    We review recent developments in the treatment of spherically symmetric black holes in loop quantum gravity. In particular, we discuss an exact solution to the quantum constraints that represents a black hole and is free of singularities. We show that new observables that are not present in the classical theory arise in the quantum theory. We also discuss Hawking radiation by considering the quantization of a scalar field on the quantum spacetime.

  14. An introduction to spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    We review recent developments in the treatment of spherically symmetric black holes in loop quantum gravity. In particular, we discuss an exact solution to the quantum constraints that represents a black hole and is free of singularities. We show that new observables that are not present in the classical theory arise in the quantum theory. We also discuss Hawking radiation by considering the quantization of a scalar field on the quantum spacetime.

  15. Entropy and temperature of black holes in a gravity's rainbow

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Pablo; Mena Marugan, Guillermo A.

    2006-08-15

    The linear relation between the entropy and area of a black hole can be derived from the Heisenberg principle, the energy-momentum dispersion relation of special relativity, and general considerations about black holes. There exist results in quantum gravity and related contexts suggesting the modification of the usual dispersion relation and uncertainty principle. One of these contexts is the gravity's rainbow formalism. We analyze the consequences of such a modification for black hole thermodynamics from the perspective of two distinct rainbow realizations built from doubly special relativity. One is the proposal of Magueijo and Smolin and the other is based on a canonical implementation of doubly special relativity put forward recently by the authors. In these scenarios, we obtain modified expressions for the entropy and temperature of black holes. We show that, for a family of doubly special relativity theories satisfying certain properties, the temperature can vanish in the limit of zero black hole mass. For the Magueijo and Smolin proposal, this is only possible for some restricted class of models with bounded energy and unbounded momentum. With the proposal of a canonical implementation, on the other hand, the temperature may vanish for more general theories; in particular, the momentum may also be bounded, with bounded or unbounded energy. This opens new possibilities for the outcome of black hole evaporation in the framework of a gravity's rainbow.

  16. Particle motion around black hole in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Hakimov, Abdullo

    2011-02-15

    Analytical solutions of Maxwell equations around a black hole immersed in an external uniform magnetic field in the background of the Kehagias-Sfetsos (KS) asymptotically flat black hole solution of Horava-Lifshitz gravity have been found. The influence of a magnetic field on the effective potential of the radial motion of a charged test particle around a black hole immersed in an external magnetic field in Horava-Lifshitz gravity has been investigated by using the Hamilton-Jacobi method. An exact analytical solution for dependence of the minimal radius of the circular orbits r{sub mc} from KS parameter {omega} for motion of a test particle around a spherical symmetric black hole in Horava-Lifshitz gravity has been derived. The critical values of the particle's angular momentum for captured particles by a black hole in Horava-Lifshitz gravity have been obtained numerically. The comparison of the obtained numerical results with the astrophysical observational data on the radii of the innermost stable circular orbits gives us the estimation of the parameter as {omega}{approx_equal}3.6{center_dot}10{sup -24} cm{sup -2}.

  17. Black holes without mass and entropy in Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Cao Liming; Ohta, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-15

    We present a class of new black hole solutions in D-dimensional Lovelock gravity theory. The solutions have a form of direct product M{sup m}xH{sup n}, where D=m+n, H{sup n} is a negative constant curvature space, and the solutions are characterized by two integration constants. When m=3 and 4, these solutions reduce to the exact black hole solutions recently found by Maeda and Dadhich in Gauss-Bonnet gravity theory. We study thermodynamics of these black hole solutions. Although these black holes have a nonvanishing Hawking temperature, surprisingly, the mass of these solutions always vanishes. While the entropy also vanishes when m is odd, it is a constant determined by an Euler characteristic of (m-2)-dimensional cross section of black hole horizon when m is even. We argue that the constant in the entropy should be thrown away. Namely, when m is even, the entropy of these black holes also should vanish. We discuss the implications of these results.

  18. Radiating black hole solutions in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Alfredo E.; Gallo, Emanuel

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we find some new exact solutions to the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet equations. First, we prove a theorem which allows us to find a large family of solutions to the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in n-dimensions. This family of solutions represents dynamic black holes and contains, as particular cases, not only the recently found Vaidya-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black hole, but also other physical solutions that we think are new, such as the Gauss-Bonnet versions of the Bonnor-Vaidya (de Sitter/anti-de Sitter) solution, a global monopole, and the Husain black holes. We also present a more general version of this theorem in which less restrictive conditions on the energy-momentum tensor are imposed. As an application of this theorem, we present the exact solution describing a black hole radiating a charged null fluid in a Born-Infeld nonlinear electrodynamics.

  19. Thermodynamic geometry of black holes in f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soroushfar, Saheb; Saffari, Reza; Kamvar, Negin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider three types (static, static charged, and rotating charged) of black holes in f( R) gravity. We study the thermodynamical behavior, stability conditions, and phase transition of these black holes. It is shown that the number and type of phase transition points are related to different parameters, which shows the dependency of the stability conditions to these parameters. Also, we extend our study to different thermodynamic geometry methods (Ruppeiner, Weinhold, and GTD). Next, we investigate the compatibility of curvature scalar of geothermodynamic methods with phase transition points of the above black holes. In addition, we point out the effect of different values of the spacetime parameters on the stability conditions of mentioned black holes.

  20. The Thermodynamic Limit for Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Fernando; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses the thermodynamic limit for black holes in loop quantum gravity by using the number-theoretic methods introduced to compute their entropy in this framework. We show how that the subdominant corrections for the entropy in this limit differ from the ones corresponding to the statistical entropy.

  1. Free-fall frame black hole in gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jun; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-09-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. To incorporate DSR into general relativity, one could use "gravity's rainbow," where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. In this scenario, one could rewrite the rainbow metric gμ ν(E ) in terms of some orthonormal frame fields and use the modified equivalence principle to determine the energy dependence of gμ ν(E ) . Obviously, the form of gμ ν(E ) depends on the choice of the orthonormal frame. For a static black hole, there are two natural orthonormal frames: the static one hovering above it and the freely falling one along geodesics. The cases with the static orthonormal frame have been extensively studied by many authors. The aim of this paper is to investigate properties of rainbow black holes in the scenario with the free-fall orthonormal frame. We first derive the metric of rainbow black holes and their Hawking temperatures in this free-fall scenario. Then, the thermodynamics of a rainbow Schwarzschild black hole is studied. Finally, we use the brick wall model to compute the thermal entropy of a massless scalar field near the horizon of a Schwarzschild rainbow black hole in this free-fall scenario.

  2. Gravitation. [consideration of black holes in gravity theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of several problems of gravitation are discussed. The question of the existence of black holes is considered. While black holes like those in Einstein's theory may not exist in other gravity theories, trapped surfaces implying such black holes certainly do. The theories include those of Brans-Dicke, Lightman-Lee, Rosen, and Yang. A similar two-tensor theory of Yilmaz is investigated and found inconsistent and nonviable. The Newman-Penrose formalism for Riemannian geometries is adapted to general gravity theories and used to implement a search for twisting solutions of the gravity theories for empty and nonempty spaces. The method can be used to find the gravitational fields for all viable gravity theories. The rotating solutions are of particular importance for strong field interpretation of the Stanford/Marshall gyroscope experiment. Inhomogeneous cosmologies are examined in Einstein's theory as generalizations of homogeneous ones by raising the dimension of the invariance groups by one more parameter. The nine Bianchi classifications are extended to Rosen's theory of gravity for homogeneous cosmological models.

  3. Thermodynamic instability of nonlinearly charged black holes in gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam; Momennia, M.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the violation of Lorentz invariance in quantum gravity, we study black hole solutions in gravity's rainbow in the context of Einstein gravity coupled with various models of nonlinear electrodynamics. We regard an energy dependent spacetime and obtain the related metric functions and electric fields. We show that there is an essential singularity at the origin which is covered by an event horizon. We also compute the conserved and thermodynamical quantities and examine the validity of the first law of thermodynamics in the presence of rainbow functions. Finally, we investigate the thermal stability conditions for these black hole solutions in the context of canonical ensemble. We show that the thermodynamical structure of the solutions depends on the choices of nonlinearity parameters, charge, and energy functions.

  4. Detecting gravity waves from binary black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlquist, Hugo D.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most attractive possible sources of strong gravitational waves would be a binary system comprising massive black holes (BH). The gravitational radiation from a binary is an elliptically polarized, periodic wave which could be observed continuously - or at intervals whenever a detector was available. This continuity of the signal is certainly appealing compared to waiting for individual pulses from infrequent random events. It also has the advantage over pulses that continued observation can increase the signal-to-noise ratio almost indefinitely. Furthermore, this system is dynamically simple; the theory of the generation of the radiation is unambiguous; all characteristics of the signal can be precisely related to the dynamical parameters of the source. The current situation is that while there is no observational evidence as yet for the existence of massive binary BH, their formation is theoretically plausible, and within certain coupled constraints of mass and location, their existence cannot be observationally excluded. Detecting gravitational waves from these objects might be the first observational proof of their existence.

  5. Stimulated emission in black holes and in analogue gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgiorno, F.; Cacciatori, S. L.

    2016-11-01

    Stimulated emission by black holes is discussed in light of the analogue gravity program. We first consider initial quantum states containing a definite number of particles, and then we take into account the case where the initial state is a coherent state. The latter case is particularly significant in the case where Hawking radiation is studied in dielectric black holes, and the emission is stimulated by a laser probe. We are particularly interested in the case of the electromagnetic field, for which examples of stimulated radiation are considered.

  6. A note on black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.

    2015-08-01

    Several recent results have hinted that black hole thermodynamics in loop quantum gravity simplifies if one chooses an imaginary Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ =i. This suggests a connection with {SL}(2,{{C}}) or {SL}(2,{{R}}) conformal field theories at the ‘boundaries’ formed by spin network edges intersecting the horizon. I present a bit of background regarding the relevant conformal field theories, along with some speculations about how they might be used to count black hole states. I show, in particular, that a set of unproven but plausible assumptions can lead to a boundary conformal field theory whose density of states matches the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  7. Black hole hair in generalized scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-27

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar--Horndeski's theory--is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling. PMID:25014801

  8. Black Hole Hair in Generalized Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-01

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar—Horndeski's theory—is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling.

  9. Detailed black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, Ivan; Barbero G., J. Fernando; Borja, Enrique F.; Diaz-Polo, Jacobo; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2010-10-01

    We give a complete and detailed description of the computation of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity by employing the most recently introduced number-theoretic and combinatorial methods. The use of these techniques allows us to perform a detailed analysis of the precise structure of the entropy spectrum for small black holes, showing some relevant features that were not discernible in previous computations. The ability to manipulate and understand the spectrum up to the level of detail that we describe in the paper is a crucial step toward obtaining the behavior of entropy in the asymptotic (large horizon area) regime.

  10. Black hole hair in generalized scalar-tensor gravity.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Thomas P; Zhou, Shuang-Yong

    2014-06-27

    The most general action for a scalar field coupled to gravity that leads to second-order field equations for both the metric and the scalar--Horndeski's theory--is considered, with the extra assumption that the scalar satisfies shift symmetry. We show that in such theories, the scalar field is forced to have a nontrivial configuration in black hole spacetimes, unless one carefully tunes away a linear coupling with the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Hence, black holes for generic theories in this class will have hair. This contradicts a recent no-hair theorem which seems to have overlooked the presence of this coupling.

  11. Detailed black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Agullo, Ivan; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Borja, Enrique F.; Diaz-Polo, Jacobo; Villasenor, Eduardo J. S.

    2010-10-15

    We give a complete and detailed description of the computation of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity by employing the most recently introduced number-theoretic and combinatorial methods. The use of these techniques allows us to perform a detailed analysis of the precise structure of the entropy spectrum for small black holes, showing some relevant features that were not discernible in previous computations. The ability to manipulate and understand the spectrum up to the level of detail that we describe in the paper is a crucial step toward obtaining the behavior of entropy in the asymptotic (large horizon area) regime.

  12. Terminating black holes in asymptotically free quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Malafarina, Daniele; Modesto, Leonardo

    2014-02-01

    We study the homogeneous gravitational collapse of a spherical cloud of matter in a super-renormalizable and asymptotically free theory of gravity. We find a picture that differs substantially from the classical scenario. The central singularity appearing in classical general relativity is replaced by a bounce, after which the cloud re-expands indefinitely. We argue that a black hole, strictly speaking, never forms. The collapse only generates a temporary trapped surface, which can be interpreted as a black hole when the observational timescale is much shorter than the one of the collapse. However, it may also be possible that the gravitational collapse produces a black hole and that after the bounce the original cloud of matter evolves into a new universe.

  13. Black holes, entropies, and semiclassical spacetime in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a coherent picture of the quantum mechanics of black holes. The picture does not require the introduction of any drastically new physical effect beyond what is already known; it arises mostly from synthesizing and (re)interpreting existing results in appropriate manners. We identify the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy as the entropy associated with coarse-graining performed to obtain semiclassical field theory from a fundamental microscopic theory of quantum gravity. This clarifies the issues around the unitary evolution, the existence of the interior spacetime, and the thermodynamic nature in black hole physics — any result in semiclassical field theory is a statement about the maximally mixed ensemble of microscopic quantum states consistent with the specified background, within the precision allowed by quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of information transfer in Hawking emission and black hole mining processes, clarifying what aspects of the underlying dynamics are (not) visible in semiclassical field theory. We also discuss relations between the black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy across the horizon. We then extend our discussions to more general contexts in quantum gravity. The subjects include extensions to de Sitter and Minkowski spaces and implications for complementarity and cosmology, especially the eternally inflating multiverse.

  14. Possible astrophysical observables of quantum gravity effects near black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Broderick, Avery E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent implications of results from quantum information theory applied to black holes have led to the confusing conclusions that require either abandoning the equivalence principle (e.g. the firewall picture), or locality, or even more unpalatable options. The recent discovery of a pulsar orbiting a black hole opens up new possibilities for tests of theories of gravity. We examine possible observational effects of semiclassical quantum gravity in the vicinity of black holes, as probed by pulsars and event horizon telescope imaging of flares. In some cases, pulsar radiation may be observable at wavelengths only two orders of magnitude shorter than the Hawking radiation, so precision interferometry of lensed pulsar images may shed light on the quantum gravitational processes and interaction of Hawking radiation with the space-time near the black hole. This paper discusses the impact on the pulsar radiation interference pattern, which is observable through the modulation index in the foreseeable future, and discusses a possible classical limit of non-locality.

  15. Slowly rotating black hole solutions in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, Andrea; Silva, Hector O.; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    We study black hole solutions at first order in the Hartle-Thorne slow-rotation approximation in Horndeski gravity theories. We derive the equations of motion including also cases where the scalar depends linearly on time. In the Hartle-Thorne formalism, all first-order rotational corrections are described by a single frame-dragging function. We show that the frame-dragging function is exactly the same as in general relativity for all known black hole solutions in shift-symmetric Horndeski theories, with the exception of theories with a linear coupling to the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Our results extend previous no-hair theorems for a broad class of Horndeski gravity theories.

  16. Black hole solutions in 5D Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Koutsoumbas, George; Papantonopoulos, Eletherios; Pasipoularides, Pavlos; Tsoukalas, Minas

    2010-06-15

    We study the full spectrum of spherically symmetric solutions in the five-dimensional nonprojectable Horava-Lifshitz type gravity theories. For appropriate ranges of the coupling parameters, we have found several classes of solutions which are characterized by an AdS{sub 5}, dS{sub 5}, or flat large distance asymptotic behavior, plus the standard 1/r{sup 2} tail of the usual five-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. In addition we have found solutions with an unconventional short or large distance behavior, and, for a special range of the coupling parameters, solutions which coincide with black hole solutions of conventional relativistic five-dimensional Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

  17. Black holes, information, and Hilbert space for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Varela, Jaime; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2013-04-01

    A coarse-grained description for the formation and evaporation of a black hole is given within the framework of a unitary theory of quantum gravity preserving locality, without dropping the information that manifests as macroscopic properties of the state at late times. The resulting picture depends strongly on the reference frame one chooses to describe the process. In one description based on a reference frame in which the reference point stays outside the black hole horizon for sufficiently long time, a late black hole state becomes a superposition of black holes in different locations and with different spins, even if the back hole is formed from collapsing matter that had a well-defined classical configuration with no angular momentum. The information about the initial state is partly encoded in relative coefficients—especially phases—of the terms representing macroscopically different geometries. In another description in which the reference point enters into the black hole horizon at late times, an S-matrix description in the asymptotically Minkowski spacetime is not applicable, but it still allows for an “S-matrix” description in the full quantum gravitational Hilbert space including singularity states. Relations between different descriptions are given by unitary transformations acting on the full Hilbert space, and they in general involve superpositions of “distant” and “infalling” descriptions. Despite the intrinsically quantum mechanical nature of the black hole state, measurements performed by a classical physical observer are consistent with those implied by general relativity. In particular, the recently-considered firewall phenomenon can occur only for an exponentially fine-tuned (and intrinsically quantum mechanical) initial state, analogous to an entropy decreasing process in a system with large degrees of freedom.

  18. New 2D dilaton gravity for nonsingular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Maeda, Hideki; Taves, Tim

    2016-05-01

    We construct a two-dimensional action that is an extension of spherically symmetric Einstein-Lanczos-Lovelock (ELL) gravity. The action contains arbitrary functions of the areal radius and the norm squared of its gradient, but the field equations are second order and obey Birkhoff’s theorem. In complete analogy with spherically symmetric ELL gravity, the field equations admit the generalized Misner-Sharp mass as the first integral that determines the form of the vacuum solution. The arbitrary functions in the action allow for vacuum solutions that describe a larger class of interesting nonsingular black hole spacetimes than previously available.

  19. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r→0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  20. Topological black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Alinejadi, N.; Hendi, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, we present topological black holes of third order Lovelock gravity in the presence of cosmological constant and nonlinear electromagnetic Born-Infeld field. Depending on the metric parameters, these solutions may be interpreted as black hole solutions with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black hole or naked singularity. We investigate the thermodynamics of asymptotically flat solutions and show that the thermodynamic and conserved quantities of these black holes satisfy the first law of thermodynamic. We also endow the Ricci flat solutions with a global rotation and calculate the finite action and conserved quantities of these class of solutions by using the counterterm method. We compute the entropy through the use of the Gibbs-Duhem relation and find that the entropy obeys the area law. We obtain a Smarr-type formula for the mass as a function of the entropy, the angular momenta, and the charge, and compute temperature, angular velocities, and electric potential and show that these thermodynamic quantities coincide with their values which are computed through the use of geometry. Finally, we perform a stability analysis for this class of solutions in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensemble and show that the presence of a nonlinear electromagnetic field and higher curvature terms has no effect on the stability of the black branes, and they are stable in the whole phase space.

  1. Einstein Gravity and Beyond: Aspects of Higher-Curvature Gravity and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saugata

    This thesis explores the different aspects of higher curvature gravity. The "membrane paradigm" of black holes in Einstein gravity is extended to black holes in f(R) gravity and it is shown that the higher curvature effects of f( R) gravity causes the membrane fluid to become non-Newtonian. Next a modification of the null energy condition in gravity is provided. The purpose of the null energy condition is to filter out ill-behaved theories containing ghosts. Conformal transformations, which are simple redefinitions of the spacetime, introduces serious violations of the null energy condition. This violation is shown to be spurious and a prescription for obtaining a modified null energy condition, based on the universality of the second law of thermodynamics, is provided. The thermodynamic properties of the black holes are further explored using merger of extremal black holes whose horizon entropy has topological contributions coming from the higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet term. The analysis refutes the prevalent belief in the literature that the second law of black hole thermodynamics is violated in the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term in four dimensions. Subsequently a specific class of higher derivative scalar field theories called the galileons are obtained from a Kaluza-Klein reduction of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Galileons are null energy condition violating theories which lead to violations of the second law of thermodynamics of black holes. These higher derivative scalar field theories which are non-minimally coupled to gravity required the development of a generalized method for obtaining the equations of motion. Utilizing this generalized method, it is shown that the inclusion of the Gauss-Bonnet term made the theory of gravity to become higher derivative, which makes it difficult to make any statements about the connection between the violation of the second law of thermodynamics and the galileon fields.

  2. Charged black hole solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.; Panah, B. Eslam

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by high interest in the close relation between string theory and black hole solutions, in this paper, we take into account the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian in the context of massive gravity. We examine the possibility of black hole in this regard, and discuss the types of horizons. Next, we calculate conserved and thermodynamic quantities and check the validity of the first law of thermodynamics. In addition, we investigate the stability of these black holes in context of canonical ensemble. We show that number, type and place of phase transition points may be significantly affected by different parameters. Next, by considering cosmological constant as thermodynamical pressure, we will extend phase space and calculate critical values. Then, we construct thermodynamical spacetime by considering mass as thermodynamical potential. We study geometrical thermodynamics of these black holes in context of heat capacity and extended phase space. We show that studying heat capacity, geometrical thermodynamics and critical behavior in extended phase space lead to consistent results. Finally, we will employ a new method for obtaining critical values and show that the results of this method are consistent with those of other methods.

  3. Black Hole Thermodynamic Products in Einstein Gauss Bonnet Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata

    2016-07-01

    By now, there are many hints from string theory that collective excitations of solitonic objects can be described by effective low energy theories. The entropy of general rotating black holes in five dimensions may be interpreted as an indication that, it derives from two independent microscopic contributions and each of these may be attributed to a gas of strings. In the present work, we consider a charged black hole in five dimensional Einstein Gauss Bonnet gravity. In spite of presenting the thermodynamic quantities' product as summation/ subtraction of two independent integers, our motive is to check whether the product of the same quantity for event horizon and Cauchy horizon is free of mass, i.e., global, or not. We derive the thermodynamic products of characteristic parameters to mark which are global. We further interpret the stability of the black holes by computing the specific heat for both horizons. Stable and unstable phases of horizons are pointed out. The phase transitions with respect to the charge in nature of specific heat are also observed. All these calculation might be helpful to understand the microscopic nature of such black holes.

  4. Dilaton gravity, charged dust, and (quasi-) black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Fabris, J. C.; Silveira, R.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2014-05-01

    We consider Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with charged dust and interaction of the form P(χ)FμνFμν, where P(χ) is an arbitrary function of the dilaton field χ that can be normal or phantom. For any regular P(χ), static configurations are possible with arbitrary functions g00=exp(2γ(xi)) (i =1, 2, 3) and χ=χ(γ), without any assumption of spatial symmetry. The classical Majumdar-Papapetrou system is restored by putting χ =const. Among possible solutions are black-hole (BH) and quasi-black-hole (QBH) ones. Some general results on BH and QBH properties are deduced and confirmed by examples. It is found, in particular, that asymptotically flat BHs and QBHs can exist with positive energy densities of matter and both scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  5. Slowly rotating black hole solutions to Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Sentuerk, Cetin

    2010-11-15

    We present a new stationary solution to the field equations of Horava-Lifshitz gravity with the detailed balance condition and for any value of the coupling constant {lambda}>1/3. This is the generalization of the corresponding spherically symmetric solution earlier found by Lue, Mei, and Pope to include a small amount of angular momentum. For the relativistic value {lambda}=1, the solution describes slowly rotating AdS type black holes. With a soft violation of the detailed balance condition and for {lambda}=1, we also find such a generalization for the Schwarzschild type black hole solution of the theory. Finally, using the canonical Hamiltonian approach, we calculate the mass and the angular momentum of these solutions.

  6. Slowly rotating black holes in alternative theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Crispino, Luis C. B.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2011-10-15

    We present, in closed analytic form, a general stationary, slowly rotating black hole, which is a solution to a large class of alternative theories of gravity in four dimensions. In these theories, the Einstein-Hilbert action is supplemented by all possible quadratic, algebraic curvature invariants coupled to a scalar field. The solution is found as a deformation of the Schwarzschild metric in general relativity. We explicitly derive the changes to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit and at the light ring in closed form. These results could be useful when comparing general relativity against alternative theories by (say) measurements of x-ray emission in accretion disks, or by stellar motion around supermassive black holes. When gravitational-wave astronomy comes into force, strong constraints on the coupling parameters can in principle be made.

  7. Statistics, holography, and black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Amit; Noui, Karim; Perez, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    In loop quantum gravity the quantum states of a black hole horizon consist of pointlike discrete quantum geometry excitations (or punctures) labeled by spin j. The excitations possibly carry other internal degrees of freedom, and the associated quantum states are eigenstates of the area A operator. The appropriately scaled area operator A/(8πℓ) can also be interpreted as the physical Hamiltonian associated with the quasilocal stationary observers located at a small distance ℓ from the horizon. Thus, the local energy is entirely accounted for by the geometric operator A. Assuming that: Close to the horizon the quantum state has a regular energy momentum tensor and hence the local temperature measured by stationary observers is the Unruh temperature. Degeneracy of matter states is exponential with the area exp(λA/ℓp2), which is supported by the well-established results of QFT in curved spacetimes, which do not determine λ but assert an exponential behavior. The geometric excitations of the horizon (punctures) are indistinguishable. And finally that the semiclassical limit the area of the black hole horizon is large in Planck units. It follows that: Up to quantum corrections, matter degrees of freedom saturate the holographic bound, viz., λ must be equal to 1/4. Up to quantum corrections, the statistical black hole entropy coincides with Bekenstein-Hawking entropy S =A/(4ℓp2). The number of horizon punctures goes like N∝√A/ℓp2 ; i.e., the number of punctures N remains large in the semiclassical limit. Fluctuations of the horizon area are small ΔA/A ∝(ℓp2/A)1/4, while fluctuations of the area of an individual puncture are large (large spins dominate). A precise notion of local conformal invariance of the thermal state is recovered in the A→∞ limit where the near horizon geometry becomes Rindler. We also show how the present model (constructed from loop quantum gravity) provides a regularization of (and gives a concrete meaning to) the formal

  8. Topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Cao Liming; Ohta, Nobuyoshi

    2009-07-15

    We find topological (charged) black holes whose horizon has an arbitrary constant scalar curvature 2k in Horava-Lifshitz theory. Without loss of generality, one may take k=1, 0, and -1. The black hole solution is asymptotically anti-de Sitter with a nonstandard asymptotic behavior. Using the Hamiltonian approach, we define a finite mass associated with the solution. We discuss the thermodynamics of the topological black holes and find that the black hole entropy has a logarithmic term in addition to an area term. We find a duality in Hawking temperature between topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory and Einstein's general relativity: the temperature behaviors of black holes with k=1, 0, and -1 in Horava-Lifshitz theory are, respectively, dual to those of topological black holes with k=-1, 0, and 1 in Einstein's general relativity. The topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory are thermodynamically stable.

  9. Analytic continuation of black hole entropy in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jibril, Ben Achour; Mouchet, Amaury; Noui, Karim

    2015-06-01

    We define the analytic continuation of the number of black hole microstates in Loop Quantum Gravity to complex values of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter γ. This construction deeply relies on the link between black holes and Chern-Simons theory. Technically, the key point consists in writing the number of microstates as an integral in the complex plane of a holomorphic function, and to make use of complex analysis techniques to perform the analytic continuation. Then, we study the thermodynamical properties of the corresponding system (the black hole is viewed as a gas of indistinguishable punctures) in the framework of the grand canonical ensemble where the energy is defined à la Frodden-Gosh-Perez from the point of view of an observer located close to the horizon. The semi-classical limit occurs at the Unruh temperature T U associated to this local observer. When γ = ± i, the entropy reproduces at the semi-classical limit the area law with quantum corrections. Furthermore, the quantum corrections are logarithmic provided that the chemical potential is fixed to the simple value μ = 2 T U.

  10. Thermodynamics of topological black holes in R2 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cognola, Guido; Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Vanzo, Luciano; Zerbini, Sergio

    2015-05-01

    We study topological black hole solutions of the simplest quadratic gravity action and we find that two classes are allowed. The first is asymptotically flat and mimics the Reissner-Nordström solution, while the second is asymptotically de Sitter or anti-de Sitter. In both classes, the geometry of the horizon can be spherical, toroidal or hyperbolic. We focus, in particular, on the thermodynamical properties of the asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions and we compute the entropy and the internal energy with Euclidean methods. We find that the entropy is positive-definite for all horizon geometries and this allows us to formulate a consistent generalized first law of black hole thermodynamics, which keeps in account the presence of two arbitrary parameters in the solution. The two-dimensional thermodynamical state space is fully characterized by the underlying scale invariance of the action and it has the structure of a projective space. We find a kind of duality between black holes and other objects with the same entropy in the state space. We briefly discuss the extension of our results to more general quadratic actions.

  11. Black hole entropy and viscosity bound in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Liu, Hai-Shan; Lü, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2015-11-01

    Horndeski gravities are theories of gravity coupled to a scalar field, in which the action contains an additional non-minimal quadratic coupling of the scalar, through its first derivative, to the Einstein tensor or the analogous higher-derivative tensors coming from the variation of Gauss-Bonnet or Lovelock terms. In this paper we study the thermodynamics of the static black hole solutions in n dimensions, in the simplest case of a Horndeski coupling to the Einstein tensor. We apply the Wald formalism to calculate the entropy of the black holes, and show that there is an additional contribution over and above those that come from the standard Wald entropy formula. The extra contribution can be attributed to unusual features in the behaviour of the scalar field. We also show that a conventional regularisation to calculate the Euclidean action leads to an expression for the entropy that disagrees with the Wald results. This seems likely to be due to ambiguities in the subtraction procedure. We also calculate the viscosity in the dual CFT, and show that the viscosity/entropy ratio can violate the η/S ≥ 1 /(4 π) bound for appropriate choices of the parameters.

  12. Gauge-gravity duality and the black hole interior.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Donald; Polchinski, Joseph

    2013-10-25

    We present a further argument that typical black holes with field theory duals have firewalls at the horizon. This argument makes no reference to entanglement between the black hole and any distant system, and so is not evaded by identifying degrees of freedom inside the black hole with those outside. We also address the Einstein-Rosen=Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen conjecture of Maldacena and Susskind, arguing that the correlations in generic highly entangled states cannot be geometrized as a smooth wormhole. PMID:24206473

  13. Gauge-gravity duality and the black hole interior.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Donald; Polchinski, Joseph

    2013-10-25

    We present a further argument that typical black holes with field theory duals have firewalls at the horizon. This argument makes no reference to entanglement between the black hole and any distant system, and so is not evaded by identifying degrees of freedom inside the black hole with those outside. We also address the Einstein-Rosen=Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen conjecture of Maldacena and Susskind, arguing that the correlations in generic highly entangled states cannot be geometrized as a smooth wormhole.

  14. Dilaton gravity, (quasi-) black holes, and scalar charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Fabris, J. C.; Silveira, R.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2014-09-01

    We consider static electrically charged dust configurations in the framework of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with the interaction term P(\\chi) F_{mn} F^{mn} in the Lagrangian, where P(\\chi) is an arbitrary function of the dilaton field \\chi, and the latter is allowed to be normal or phantom. It is shown that, for any regular P(\\chi), static configurations are possible with arbitrary functions g_{00} = e^{2\\gamma(x^i)} (i=1,2,3) and \\chi = \\chi(\\gamma), without any assumption of spatial symmetry. The corresponding matter, electric charge and scalar charge densities are found from the field equations. Meanwhile, configurations with nontrivial \\chi(x^i) generically require a nonzero scalar charge density distribution. The classical Majumdar-Papapetrou (MP) system is obtained as a special case where \\chi = const; there is its scalar analogue in the case F_{mn} = 0, but only with a phantom \\chi field. Among possible solutions are black-hole (BH) and quasi-black-hole (QBH) ones. Some general results on QBH properties obtained previously for the MP system are here extended to systems with the dilaton. Particular examples of asymptotically flat spherically symmetric BH and QBH solutions are found, some of them being phantom-free, that is, exist with positive energy densities of matter and both scalar and electromagnetic fields.

  15. Bumpy black holes in alternative theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeland, Sarah; Yunes, Nicolas; Stein, Leo C.

    2011-05-15

    We generalize the bumpy black hole framework to allow for alternative theory deformations. We construct two model-independent parametric deviations from the Kerr metric: one built from a generalization of the quasi-Kerr and bumpy metrics and one built directly from perturbations of the Kerr spacetime in Lewis-Papapetrou form. We find the conditions that these 'bumps' must satisfy for there to exist an approximate second-order Killing tensor so that the perturbed spacetime still possesses three constants of the motion (a deformed energy, angular momentum and Carter constant) and the geodesic equations can be written in first-order form. We map these parametrized metrics to each other via a diffeomorphism and to known analytical black hole solutions in alternative theories of gravity. The parametrized metrics presented here serve as frameworks for the systematic calculation of extreme mass-ratio inspiral waveforms in parametrized non-general relativity theories and the investigation of the accuracy to which space-borne gravitational wave detectors can constrain such deviations.

  16. Black hole initial data in Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Momentarily static case

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Hirotaka

    2011-05-15

    We study the method for generating the initial data of black hole systems in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. The initial data are assumed to be momentarily static and conformally flat. Although the equation for the conformal factor is highly nonlinear, it is successfully solved by numerical relaxation for one-black-hole and two-black-hole systems. The common apparent horizon is studied in the two-black-hole initial data, and the result suggests that the Penrose inequalities are satisfied in this system. This is the first step for simulating black hole collisions in higher-curvature theories.

  17. Entropy increase during physical processes for black holes in Lanczos-Lovelock gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Sanved; Padmanabhan, T.; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2012-07-01

    We study quasistationary physical process for black holes within the context of Lanczos-Lovelock gravity. We show that the Wald entropy of the stationary black holes in Lanczos-Lovelock gravity monotonically increases for quasistationary physical processes in which the horizon is perturbed by the accretion of positive energy matter and the black hole ultimately settles down to a stationary state. This result reinforces the physical interpretation of Wald entropy for Lanczos-Lovelock models and takes a step towards proving the analogue of the black hole area increase theorem in a wider class of gravitational theories.

  18. Hawking radiation from a spherical loop quantum gravity black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    We introduce quantum field theory on quantum space-times techniques to characterize the quantum vacua as a first step toward studying black hole evaporation in spherical symmetry in loop quantum gravity and compute the Hawking radiation. We use as quantum space-time the recently introduced exact solution of the quantum Einstein equations in vacuum with spherical symmetry and consider a spherically symmetric test scalar field propagating on it. The use of loop quantum gravity techniques in the background space-time naturally regularizes the matter content, solving one of the main obstacles to back-reaction calculations in more traditional treatments. The discreteness of area leads to modifications of the quantum vacua, eliminating the trans-Planckian modes close to the horizon, which in turn eliminates all singularities from physical quantities, like the expectation value of the stress-energy tensor. Apart from this, the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua differ little from the treatment on a classical space-time. The asymptotic modes near scri are reproduced very well. We show that the Hawking radiation can be computed, leading to an expression similar to the conventional one but with a high frequency cutoff. Since many of the conclusions concern asymptotic behavior, where the spherical mode of the field behaves in a similar way as higher multipole modes do, the results can be readily generalized to non spherically symmetric fields.

  19. Another approach to test gravity around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kengo; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2016-08-01

    Pulsars orbiting around the black hole (BH) at our galactic center provide us with a unique testing site for gravity. In this work, we propose an approach to probe the gravity around the BH introducing two phenomenological parameters which characterize deviation from the vacuum Einstein theory. The two phenomenological parameters are associated with the energy-momentum tensor in the framework of the Einstein theory. Therefore, our approach can be regarded as the complement to the parametrized post-Newtonian framework in which phenomenological parameters are introduced for deviation of gravitational theories from general relativity. In our formulation, we take into account the possibility of existence of a relativistic and exotic matter component. Since the pulsars can be regarded as test particles, as the first step, we consider geodesic motion in the system composed of a central BH and a perfect fluid whose distribution is static and spherically symmetric. It is found that the mass density of the fluid and a parameter of the equation of state can be determined with precision with 0.1 % if the density on the pulsar orbit is larger than {10}-9 {{g}} {{cm}}-3.

  20. Another approach to test gravity around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kengo; Yoo, Chul-Moon

    2016-08-01

    Pulsars orbiting around the black hole (BH) at our galactic center provide us with a unique testing site for gravity. In this work, we propose an approach to probe the gravity around the BH introducing two phenomenological parameters which characterize deviation from the vacuum Einstein theory. The two phenomenological parameters are associated with the energy–momentum tensor in the framework of the Einstein theory. Therefore, our approach can be regarded as the complement to the parametrized post-Newtonian framework in which phenomenological parameters are introduced for deviation of gravitational theories from general relativity. In our formulation, we take into account the possibility of existence of a relativistic and exotic matter component. Since the pulsars can be regarded as test particles, as the first step, we consider geodesic motion in the system composed of a central BH and a perfect fluid whose distribution is static and spherically symmetric. It is found that the mass density of the fluid and a parameter of the equation of state can be determined with precision with 0.1 % if the density on the pulsar orbit is larger than {10}-9 {{g}} {{cm}}-3.

  1. Paczynski-Wiita-like potential for any static spherical black hole in metric theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Belknap-Keet, Shawn D.; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne

    2016-02-01

    The pseudo-Newtonian potential of Paczynski and Wiita for particles orbiting a Schwarzschild black hole is generalized to arbitrary static and spherically symmetric spacetimes, including black hole solutions of alternative theories of gravity. In addition to being more general, our prescription differs substantially from a previous one in the literature, showing that the association of a pseudo-Newtonian potential even with a simple black hole metric is not unique.

  2. Charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black holes in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Allahverdizadeh, Masoud; Matsuno, Ken; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-02-15

    We obtain a class of slowly rotating charged Kaluza-Klein black hole solutions of the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with arbitrary dilaton coupling constant. At infinity, the spacetime is effectively four dimensional. In the absence of the squashing function, our solution reduces to the five-dimensional asymptotically flat slowly rotating charged dilaton black hole solution with two equal angular momenta. We calculate the mass, the angular momentum, and the gyromagnetic ratio of these rotating Kaluza-Klein dilaton black holes. It is shown that the dilaton field and the nontrivial asymptotic structure of the solutions modify the gyromagnetic ratio of the black holes. We also find that the gyromagnetic ratio crucially depends on the dilaton coupling constant, {alpha}, and decreases with increasing {alpha} for any size of the compact extra dimension.

  3. No-go theorem for slowly rotating black holes in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-11-01

    We consider slowly rotating, stationary, axisymmetric black holes in the infrared limit of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. We show that such solutions do not exist, provided that they are regular everywhere apart from the central singularity. This has profound implications for the viability of the theory, considering the astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes with nonzero spin.

  4. Uniqueness theorem for stationary axisymmetric black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2010-08-15

    We prove the uniqueness theorem for the stationary axisymmetric black hole solution in Einstein-Maxwell-axion-dilaton gravity being the low-energy limit of the heterotic string theory. We consider both the nonextremal and extremal Kerr-Sen black hole solutions.

  5. Dynamical black holes with symmetry in Einstein Gauss Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Masato; Maeda, Hideki

    2008-03-01

    We explore various aspects of dynamical black holes defined by a future outer trapping horizon in n(>=5)-dimensional Einstein Gauss Bonnet gravity. In the present paper, we assume that the spacetime has symmetries corresponding to the isometries of an (n - 2)-dimensional maximally symmetric space and the Gauss Bonnet coupling constant is non-negative. Depending on the existence or absence of the general relativistic limit, solutions are classified into GR and non-GR branches, respectively. Assuming the null energy condition on matter fields, we show that a future outer trapping horizon in the GR branch possesses the same properties as that in general relativity. In contrast, that in the non-GR branch is shown to be non-spacelike with its area non-increasing into the future. We can recognize that this peculiar behavior arises from the fact that the null energy condition necessarily leads to the null convergence condition for radial null vectors in the GR branch, but not in the non-GR branch. The energy balance law yields the first law of a trapping horizon, from which we can read off the entropy of a trapping horizon reproducing Iyer Wald's expression. The entropy of a future outer trapping horizon is shown to be non-decreasing in both branches along its generator.

  6. Stars and (furry) black holes in Lorentz breaking massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L.

    2011-04-01

    We study the exact spherically symmetric solutions in a class of Lorentz-breaking massive gravity theories, using the effective-theory approach where the graviton mass is generated by the interaction with a suitable set of Stückelberg fields. We find explicitly the exact black-hole solutions which generalizes the familiar Schwarzschild one, which shows a nonanalytic hair in the form of a powerlike term rγ. For realistic self-gravitating bodies, we find interesting features, linked to the effective violation of the Gauss law: (i) the total gravitational mass appearing in the standard 1/r term gets a multiplicative renormalization proportional to the area of the body itself; (ii) the magnitude of the powerlike hairy correction is also linked to size of the body. The novel features can be ascribed to the presence of the Goldstones fluid turned on by matter inside the body; its equation of state approaching that of dark energy near the center. The Goldstones fluid also changes the matter equilibrium pressure, leading to an upper limit for the graviton mass, m≲10-28÷29eV, derived from the largest stable gravitational bound states in the Universe.

  7. Scalar and spinor QNMs of a black hole with a global monopole in f ( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graça, J. P. Morais; Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-04-01

    The quasinormal modes for scalar and spinor fields in the background spacetime corresponding to a black hole with a global monopole in f( R) gravity are calculated using the WKB approximation. In the obtained results we emphasize the role played by the parameter ψ 0, associated with the f ( R) gravity. We discuss the appropriate limit ψ 0 → 0, in which case the results concerning to the Schwarzschild black hole are obtained, as it should be expected.

  8. Generalized uncertainty principle in f(R) gravity for a charged black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2011-02-15

    Using f(R) gravity in the Palatini formularism, the metric for a charged spherically symmetric black hole is derived, taking the Ricci scalar curvature to be constant. The generalized uncertainty principle is then used to calculate the temperature of the resulting black hole; through this the entropy is found correcting the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in this case. Using the entropy the tunneling probability and heat capacity are calculated up to the order of the Planck length, which produces an extra factor that becomes important as black holes become small, such as in the case of mini-black holes.

  9. A note on Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes in mimetic F(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the conditions under which a Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole spacetime is a solution of the mimetic F(R) gravity with Lagrange multiplier and potential. As we demonstrate, the resulting mimetic F(R) gravity is a slight modification of the ordinary F(R) gravity case, however the resulting perturbation equations are not in all cases identical to the ordinary F(R) gravity case. In the latter case, the perturbation equations are identical to the ones corresponding to the Reissner-Nordström anti-de Sitter black hole.

  10. The fate of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes in f(R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The semiclassical effects of anti-evaporating black holes can be discussed in the framework of f(R) gravity. In particular, the Bousso-Hawking-Nojiri-Odinstov anti-evaporation instability of degenerate Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes (the so-called Nariai spacetime) leads to a dynamical increasing of black hole horizon in f(R) gravity. This phenomenon causes the following transition: emitting marginally trapped surfaces (TS) become space-like surfaces before the effective Bekenstein-Hawking emission time. As a consequence, Bousso-Hawking thermal radiation cannot be emitted in an anti-evaporating Nariai black hole. Possible implications in cosmology and black hole physics are also discussed.

  11. Anomalies and Hawking fluxes from the black holes of topologically massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfyriadis, Achilleas P.

    2009-05-01

    The anomaly cancelation method proposed by Wilczek et al. is applied to the black holes of topologically massive gravity (TMG) and topologically massive gravito-electrodynamics (TMGE). Thus the Hawking temperature and fluxes of the ACL and ACGL black holes are found. The Hawking temperatures obtained agree with the surface gravity formula. Both black holes are rotating and this gives rise to appropriate terms in the effective U (1) gauge field of the reduced (1 + 1)-dimensional theory. It is found that the terms in this U (1) gauge field correspond exactly to the correct angular velocities on the horizon of both black holes as well as the correct electrostatic potential of the ACGL black hole. So the results for the Hawking fluxes derived here from the anomaly cancelation method, are in complete agreement with the ones obtained from integrating the Planck distribution.

  12. Nature of Microscopic Black Holes and Gravity in Theories with Particle Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia

    2010-01-01

    Relying solely on unitarity and the consistency with large-distance black hole physics, we derive model-independent properties of the microscopic black holes and of short-distance gravity in theories with N particle species. In this class of theories black holes can be as light as MPlanck /√ N and be produced in particle collisions above this energy. We show, that the micro black holes must come in the same variety as the species do, although their label is not associated with any conserved charge measurable at large distances. In contrast with big Schwarzschildian ones, the evaporation of the smallest black holes is maximally undemocratic and is biased in favor of particular species. With an increasing mass the democracy characteristic to the usual macro black holes is gradually regained. The lowest possible mass above which black holes become Einsteinian is √ N MPlanck . This fact uncovers the new fundamental scale (below the quantum gravity scale) above which gravity changes classically, and the properties of black holes and gravity are such as if some extra dimensions open up, although no such input exists in the theory. Our observations indicate that geometry of space may be an emergent concept following from large number of species and the consistency with macro black hole physics. We apply our findings to the phenomenological properties of the micro black holes that can be observed at LHC for large N. Extrapolating our findings to small N, one may ask whether the existence of quark and lepton flavors is already an evidence for emergent extra dimensions at short distances.

  13. Thermodynamics of asymptotically flat charged black holes in third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Shamirzaie, M.

    2005-12-15

    We present a new class of asymptotically flat charge static solutions in third order Lovelock gravity. These solutions present black hole solutions with two inner and outer event horizons, extreme black holes, or naked singularities provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We find that the uncharged asymptotically flat solutions can present black holes with two inner and outer horizons. This kind of solution does not exist in Einstein or Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and it is a special effect in third order Lovelock gravity. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, and mass of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also perform a stability analysis by computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix of the mass with respect to its thermodynamic variables in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles, and show that there exists only an intermediate stable phase.

  14. Violation of the first law of black hole thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao; Miao, Yan-Gang E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn

    2011-11-01

    We prove that, in general, the first law of black hole thermodynamics, δQ = TδS, is violated in f(T) gravity. As a result, it is possible that there exists entropy production, which implies that the black hole thermodynamics can be in non-equilibrium even in the static spacetime. This feature is very different from that of f(R) or that of other higher derivative gravity theories. We find that the violation of first law results from the lack of local Lorentz invariance in f(T) gravity. By investigating two examples, we note that f''(0) should be negative in order to avoid the naked singularities and superluminal motion of light. When f''(T) is small, the entropy of black holes in f(T) gravity is approximatively equal to f'(T)/4 A.

  15. Influence of self-gravity on the runaway instability of black-hole-torus systems.

    PubMed

    Montero, Pedro J; Font, José A; Shibata, Masaru

    2010-05-14

    Results from the first fully general relativistic numerical simulations in axisymmetry of a system formed by a black hole surrounded by a self-gravitating torus in equilibrium are presented, aiming to assess the influence of the torus self-gravity on the onset of the runaway instability. We consider several models with varying torus-to-black-hole mass ratio and angular momentum distribution orbiting in equilibrium around a nonrotating black hole. The tori are perturbed to induce the mass transfer towards the black hole. Our numerical simulations show that all models exhibit a persistent phase of axisymmetric oscillations around their equilibria for several dynamical time scales without the appearance of the runaway instability, indicating that the self-gravity of the torus does not play a critical role favoring the onset of the instability, at least during the first few dynamical time scales.

  16. Nonsingular black holes and degrees of freedom in quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Spherically symmetric space-times provide many examples for interesting black hole solutions, which classically are all singular. Following a general program, space-like singularities in spherically symmetric quantum geometry, as well as other inhomogeneous models, are shown to be absent. Moreover, one sees how the classical reduction from infinitely many kinematical degrees of freedom to only one physical one, the mass, can arise, where aspects of quantum cosmology such as the problem of initial conditions play a role.

  17. Black hole solutions in Horava-Lifshitz gravity with cubic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Koutsoumbas, George; Pasipoularides, Pavlos

    2010-08-15

    We study four-dimensional nonprojectable Horava-Lifshitz type gravity, in the case of an action with terms cubic in curvature. For special choices of the free parameters of the model, we obtain two new analytic black hole solutions which exhibit the standard Schwarzschild asymptotic behavior in the large-distance limit. The effect of cubic terms in the short-range behavior of the black hole solutions is discussed.

  18. Black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity: a number-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J Fernando; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernández-Borja, Enrique; Villaseñor, Eduardo J S

    2008-05-30

    We give an efficient method, combining number-theoretic and combinatorial ideas, to exactly compute black hole entropy in the framework of loop quantum gravity. Along the way we provide a complete characterization of the relevant sector of the spectrum of the area operator, including degeneracies, and explicitly determine the number of solutions to the projection constraint. We use a computer implementation of the proposed algorithm to confirm and extend previous results on the detailed structure of the black hole degeneracy spectrum.

  19. Physical process version of the first law of thermodynamics for black holes in higher dimensional gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2005-05-15

    The problem of physical process version of the first law of black hole thermodynamics for charged rotating black hole in n-dimensional gravity is elaborated. The formulas for the first order variations of mass, angular momentum and canonical energy in Einstein (n-2)-gauge form field theory are derived. These variations are expressed by means of the perturbed matter energy momentum tensor and charge matter current density.

  20. Thermodynamical first laws of black holes in quadratically-extended gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Lü, H.

    2015-03-01

    Einstein gravities in general dimensions coupled to a cosmological constant and extended with quadratic curvature invariants admit a variety of black holes that may asymptote to Minkowski, anti-de Sitter or Lifshitz spacetimes. We adopt the Wald formalism to derive an explicit formula for calculating the thermodynamical first law for the static black holes with spherical, toric, or hyperbolic isometries in these theories. This allows us to derive or rederive the first laws for a wide range of black holes in the literature. Furthermore, we construct many new exact solutions and obtain their first laws.

  1. Regular black holes in f(T) Gravity through a nonlinear electrodynamics source

    SciTech Connect

    Junior, Ednaldo L.B.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Houndjo, Mahouton J.S. E-mail: esialg@gmail.com

    2015-10-01

    We seek to obtain a new class of exact solutions of regular black holes in f(T) Gravity with non-linear electrodynamics material content, with spherical symmetry in 4D. The equations of motion provide the regaining of various solutions of General Relativity, as a particular case where the function f(T)=T. We developed a powerful method for finding exact solutions, where we get the first new class of regular black holes solutions in the f(T) Theory, where all the geometrics scalars disappear at the origin of the radial coordinate and are finite everywhere, as well as a new class of singular black holes.

  2. - criticality of AdS black hole in the Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Zou, De-Cheng; Xu, Wei; Yue, Rui-Hong

    2015-02-01

    We study the - critical behaivor of N-dimensional AdS black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-power-Yang-Mills gravity. Our results show the existence of the Van der Waals like small-large black hole phase transitions when taking some special values of charges of the Maxwell and Yang-Mills fields. Further to calculate the critical exponents of the black holes at the critical point, we find that they are the same as those in the Van der Waals liquid-gas system.

  3. New black hole solutions in Brans-Dicke theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongsu

    1999-07-01

    An existence check of nontrivial, stationary axisymmetric black hole solutions in the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity in different directions from those of Penrose, Thorne and Dykla, and Hawking is performed. Namely, working directly with the known explicit spacetime solutions in Brans-Dicke theory, it is found that nontrivial Kerr-Newman-type black hole solutions different from general relativistic solutions could occur for the generic Brans-Dicke parameter values -5/2<=ω<-3/2. Finally, issues such as whether these new black holes carry scalar hair and can really arise in nature, and if they can, what the associated physical implications would be, are discussed carefully.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Canonical Gravity and Applications: Cosmology, Black Holes, and Quantum Gravity Canonical Gravity and Applications: Cosmology, Black Holes, and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Viqar

    2012-03-01

    researchers in other areas who wish to learn about the canonical approach to gravity. However, given the brief chapter on quantization, the book would go well with a review paper, or parts of the other three quantum gravity books cited above. References [1] Kiefer C 2006 Quantum Gravity 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press) [2] Rovelli C 2007 Quantum Gravity (Cambridge University Press) [3] Thiemann T 2008 Modern Canonical Quantum Gravity (Cambridge University Press) [4] Posson E 2004 A Relativist's Toolkit: The Mathematics of Black-Hole Mechanics (Cambridge University Press) [5] Ryan M P and Shepley L C 1975 Homogeneous Relativistic Cosmology (Princeton University Press)

  5. Hawking, fiducial, and free-fall temperature of black hole on gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2016-03-01

    On gravity's rainbow, the energy of test particles deforms the geometry of a black hole in such a way that the corresponding Hawking temperature is expected to be modified. It means that the fiducial and free-fall temperatures on the black hole background should also be modified according to deformation of the geometry. In this work, the probing energy of test particles is assumed as the average energy of the Hawking particle in order to study the particle back reaction of the geometry by using the advantage of gravity's rainbow. We shall obtain the modified fiducial and free-fall temperatures, respectively. The behaviors of these two temperatures on the horizon tell us that black hole complementarity is still well defined on gravity's rainbow.

  6. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  7. Quantum Field Theory and Gravity: Black Holes and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Junseong

    1998-11-01

    This thesis examines the various field theory related issues motivated by the gravitational phenomena. Black Holes with quantum degrees of freedom, non-abelian generalization of vortex solutions, and WIMP detection rates for the ongoing experimental search for dark matter are explored. We derive a close relation between the Minkowski signature approach and the Euclidean formalism in the construction of quantum degrees of freedom on a Black hole solution. We demonstrate the benefit of a physically transparent energy momentum consideration and extend the previous analysis on Hawking temperature shifts. Specifically we clear up the issue of thick string limit behavior that obscures the direct intuition and draw an analogy that brings the instanton solutions in flat two dimensional planes to Euclidean vortex solutions in the black hole background. These considerations lead to the question on the various possibilities of non-abelian solutions which supply the seed for the source of quantum hair in general context. We construct an explicit non-abelian vortex solution with a remnant Z3 discrete symmetry and consider its new interaction properties distinct from the known abelian solution behavior. Dark Matter direct search experiments are now in operation yet the expected event rate is very low and the previously available theoretical formalism could not tell the differences among different halo models. We present a derivation of angle dependent differential event rates which allows this possibility, and enables the confirmation of detection of a galactic halo WIMP signal with a smaller number of experimental signals. It may open up realistic methods to distinguish one halo model from another.

  8. Membrane paradigm of black holes in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tian-Yi; Wang, Towe

    2016-06-01

    The membrane paradigm of black hole is studied in the Chern-Simons modified gravity. Derived with the action principle a la Parikh-Wilczek, the stress tensor of membrane manifests a rich structure arising from the Chern-Simons term. The membrane stress tensor, if related to the bulk stress tensor in a special form, obeys the low-dimensional fluid continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equation. This paradigm is applied to spherically symmetric static geometries, and in particular, the Schwarzschild black hole, which is a solution of a large class of dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

  9. Tunnelling of relativistic particles from new type black hole in new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gecim, Ganim; Sucu, Yusuf E-mail: ysucu@akdeniz.edu.tr

    2013-02-01

    In the framework of the three dimensional New Massive Gravity theory introduced by Bergshoeff, Hohm and Townsend, we analyze the behavior of relativistic spin-1/2 and spin-0 particles in the New-type Black Hole backgroud, solution of the New Massive Gravity.We solve Dirac equation for spin-1/2 and Klein-Gordon equation for spin-0. Using Hamilton-Jacobi method, we discuss tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature of the spin-1/2 and spin-0 particles for the black hole. We observe that the tunnelling probability and Hawking temperature are same for the spin-1/2 and spin-0.

  10. Fermions Tunnelling from Black String and Kerr AdS Black Hole with Consideration of Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-hua; Zhang, Li-mei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, using the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz, we discuss the tunnelling of fermions when effects of quantum gravity are taken into account. We investigate two cases, black string and Kerr AdS black hole. For black string, the uncharged and un-rotating case, we find that the correction of Hawking temperature is only affected by the mass of emitted fermions and the quantum gravitational corrections slow down the increases of the temperature, which naturally leads to remnants left in the evaporation. For another case, the Kerr AdS black hole, we find that the quantum gravitational corrections are not only determined by the mass of the emitted fermions but also affected by the rotating properties of the AdS black hole. So with consideration of the quantum gravity corrections, an offset around the standard temperature always exists.

  11. Strong gravity effects of rotating black holes: quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Daylan Esmer, Göksel; Talazan, Pamir

    2013-02-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: the orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which the radial epicyclic frequency attains its highest value. We find that the values of the epicyclic frequencies for a class of stable orbits exhibit good qualitative agreement with the observed frequencies of the twin peaks quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in some black hole binaries. We also find that at the characteristic stable circular orbits, where the radial (or the vertical) epicyclic frequency has maxima, the vertical and radial epicyclic frequencies exhibit an approximate 2:1 ratio even in the case of near-extreme rotation of the black hole. Next, we perform a similar analysis of the fundamental frequencies for a rotating braneworld black hole and argue that the existence of such a black hole with a negative tidal charge, whose angular momentum exceeds the Kerr bound in general relativity, does not confront with the observations of high-frequency QPOs.

  12. Thermodynamics of black holes in (n+1)-dimensional Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykhi, A.; Riazi, N.

    2007-01-15

    We construct a new class of (n+1)-dimensional (n{>=}3) black hole solutions in Einstein-Born-Infeld-dilaton gravity with Liouville-type potential for the dilaton field and investigate their properties. These solutions are neither asymptotically flat nor (anti)-de Sitter. We find that these solutions can represent black holes, with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black hole, or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitably. We compute the thermodynamic quantities of the black hole solutions and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also perform a stability analysis and investigate the effect of dilaton on the stability of the solutions.

  13. Critical behaviors of a black hole in an asymptotically safe gravity with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen; Ma, Ya-Qin

    2015-02-01

    We study the P-V/r+ criticality and phase transition of a quantum-corrected black hole in asymptotic safety (AS) gravity in the extended phase space. For a black hole, the cosmological constant is dependent on the momentum cutoff or energy scale; therefore, one can naturally treat it as a variable and connect it with thermodynamic pressure. We find that for a quantum-corrected black hole there is a first-order phase transition similar to that of the van der Waals liquid-gas system. We also analyze the types of phase transition between the smaller and larger black hole phases according to Ehrenfest's classification. It is shown that they are second-order phase transitions.

  14. Charged rotating black holes in higher-dimensional (A)dS gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Y.; Delsate, T.

    2009-05-15

    We present numerical evidences for the existence of rotating black holes in d-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with a cosmological constant and for an odd number of dimensions. The metric used possesses (d+1)/2 Killing vectors and the black holes have (d-1)/2 equal angular momenta. The Schwarzschild-like coordinate system used clearly reveals the influence of the electromagnetic field on the vacuum black holes where analytic expressions are available. The domain of existence of the charged rotating black holes is then characterized for both signs of the cosmological constant. The generic solutions are specified by their event horizon and by two additional parameters: the magnetic field and the angular velocity at the horizon. The dependence of several physical quantities - surface gravity, mass, angular momentum, etc. - is studied as a function of these parameters; Smarr-like relations are derived.

  15. Gauge/ gravity correspondence, bulk locality and quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debajyoti

    The aim of this dissertation is threefold. We begin by the study of two parallel ideal cosmic strings in the presence of non-minimal scalar fields and spin- 1 gauge fields. We show that the contributions of the non-minimal term on the interaction energy between the strings are similar to that of the gauge field for a particular value of non-minimal coupling parameter. In this context we clarify some of the issues that arise when comparing the renormalization of black hole entropy and entanglement entropy using the replica trick. In the second part of the dissertation we study the process of bound state formation in clusters of Dp- brane collision and Dp shell/ Membrane collapse processes. We consider two mechanisms for bound state formation. The first, operative at weak coupling in the worldvolume gauge theory, is creation of W-bosons. The second, operative at strong coupling, corresponds to formation of a black hole in the dual supergravity. These two processes agree qualitatively at intermediate coupling, in accord with the correspondence principle of Horowitz and Polchinski. We show that the size of the bound state and timescale for formation of a bound state agree at the correspondence point, along with other relevant thermodynamic quantities. The timescale involves matching a parametric resonance in the gauge theory to a quasinormal mode in supergravity. Finally we study construction of local operators in AdS using the generalized AdS/ CFT correspondence. After briefly sketching previous works on this topic which involve massless and massive scalar fields, we present similar construction for spin- 1 and spin- 2 gauge fields. Working in holographic gauge in the bulk, at leading order in 1/N bulk gauge fields are obtained by smearing boundary currents over a sphere on the complexified boundary, while linearized metric fluctuations are obtained by smearing the boundary stress tensor over a ball. This representation respects AdS covariance up to a compensating

  16. Black Hole Entropy with and without Log Correction in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, P.

    2014-06-01

    Earlier calculations of black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity have given a term proportional to the area with a correction involving the logarithm of the area when the area eigenvalue is close to the classical area. However the calculations yield an entropy proportional to the area eigenvalue with no such correction when the area eigenvalue is large compared to the classical area.

  17. Black Hole in Higher Curvature Gravity and AdS/CFT Correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, H.; Soda, J.

    2002-12-01

    The classical central charge for the higher curvature gravity in 3-dimensions is calculated using the Legendre transformation method. The statistical entropy of BTZ black hole is derived by the Cardy's formula and the result completely coincides with the Iyer-Wald formula for the geometrical entropy. This coincidence suggests the generalized AdS/CFT correspondence.

  18. Waveforms in massive gravity and neutralization of giant black hole ringings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine; Ould El Hadj, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    A distorted black hole radiates gravitational waves in order to settle down in a smoother geometry. During that relaxation phase, a characteristic damped ringing is generated. It can be theoretically constructed from both the black hole quasinormal frequencies (which govern its oscillating behavior and its decay) and the associated excitation factors (which determine intrinsically its amplitude) by carefully taking into account the source of the distortion. In the framework of massive gravity, the excitation factors of the Schwarzschild black hole have an unexpected strong resonant behavior which, theoretically, could lead to giant and slowly decaying ringings. If massive gravity is relevant to physics, one can hope to observe these extraordinary ringings by using the next generations of gravitational wave detectors. Indeed, they could be generated by supermassive black holes if the graviton mass is not too small. In fact, by focusing on the odd-parity ℓ=1 mode of the Fierz-Pauli field, we shall show here that such ringings are neutralized in waveforms due to (i) the excitation of the quasibound states of the black hole and (ii) the evanescent nature of the particular partial modes which could excite the concerned quasinormal modes. Despite this, with observational consequences in mind, it is interesting to note that the waveform amplitude is nevertheless rather pronounced and slowly decaying (this effect is now due to the long-lived quasibound states). It is worth noting also that, for very low values of the graviton mass (corresponding to the weak instability regime for the black hole), the waveform is now very clean and dominated by an ordinary ringing which could be used as a signature of massive gravity.

  19. A soliton and a black hole are in Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Who wins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Anson W. C.; Mann, Robert B.

    2012-12-01

    We study here the phase-transitional evolution between the Eguchi-Hanson soliton, the orbifolded Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter black hole, and orbifolded thermal anti-de Sitter space in Gauss-Bonnet gravity for a small Gauss-Bonnet coefficient α. Novel phase structure is uncovered for both negative and positive α with spacetime configurations that are stable in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without being so in Einsteinian gravity. The evolutionary tracks taken towards such stable configurations are guided by quantum tunneling and can be represented with a phase diagram constructed by comparing the Euclidean actions of each of our states as a function of α and the black hole radius rb. According to the AdS/CFT correspondence dictionary, it is expected that some generalized version of closed-string tachyon condensation will exhibit the phase behavior found here.

  20. Quantization of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    We show that black holes can be quantized in an intuitive and elegant way with results in agreement with conventional knowledge of black holes by using Bohr's idea of quantizing the motion of an electron inside the atom in quantum mechanics. We find that properties of black holes can also be derived from an ansatz of quantized entropy Δ S = 4π k Δ R/{{-{λ }}}, which was suggested in a previous work to unify the black hole entropy formula and Verlinde's conjecture to explain gravity as an entropic force. Such an Ansatz also explains gravity as an entropic force from quantum effect. This suggests a way to unify gravity with quantum theory. Several interesting and surprising results of black holes are given from which we predict the existence of primordial black holes ranging from Planck scale both in size and energy to big ones in size but with low energy behaviors.

  1. Daniel Heineman Prize: QCD, strings and black holes: A duality between gravity and field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldacena, Juan

    2007-04-01

    We discuss Yang Mills theory with a large number of colors. In this limit it becomes a theory of strings. We describe the string theory associated to the most supersymmetric version of Yang Mills theory. These strings live in a ten dimensional curved space. Thus supersymmetric Yang Mills theory is related to the ordinary ten dimensional superstring theory which describes quantum gravity. We will review some results in this area and discuss some recent developments. We will also discuss the implications for black hole entropy and the black hole information puzzle.

  2. Black holes with scalar hair in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Y.; Ducobu, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in five dimensions is extended by scalar fields and the corresponding equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear differential equations. A large family of regular solutions of these equations is shown to exist. Generically, these solutions are spinning black holes with scalar hairs. They can be characterized (but not uniquely) by an horizon and an angular velocity on this horizon. Taking particular limits, the black holes approach boson star or become extremal, in any case the limiting configurations remain hairy.

  3. - criticality of topological black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2014-04-01

    To understand the effect of third order Lovelock gravity, - criticality of topological AdS black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity is investigated. The thermodynamics is further explored with some more extensions and in some more detail than the previous literature. A detailed analysis of the limit case is performed for the seven-dimensional black holes. It is shown that, for the spherical topology, - criticality exists for both the uncharged and the charged cases. Our results demonstrate again that the charge is not the indispensable condition of - criticality. It may be attributed to the effect of higher derivative terms of the curvature because similar phenomenon was also found for Gauss-Bonnet black holes. For , there would be no - criticality. Interesting findings occur in the case , in which positive solutions of critical points are found for both the uncharged and the charged cases. However, the - diagram is quite strange. To check whether these findings are physical, we give the analysis on the non-negative definiteness condition of the entropy. It is shown that, for any nontrivial value of , the entropy is always positive for any specific volume . Since no - criticality exists for in Einstein gravity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we can relate our findings with the peculiar property of third order Lovelock gravity. The entropy in third order Lovelock gravity consists of extra terms which are absent in the Gauss-Bonnet black holes, which makes the critical points satisfy the constraint of non-negative definiteness condition of the entropy. We also check the Gibbs free energy graph and "swallow tail" behavior can be observed. Moreover, the effect of nonlinear electrodynamics is also included in our research.

  4. AdS and Lifshitz scalar hairy black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Lu-Yao

    2016-09-01

    We consider Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity in general dimensions, which is nonminimally coupled to a scalar field. By choosing a scalar potential of the type V (ϕ )=2 Λ0+1/2 m2ϕ2+γ4ϕ4 , we first obtain large classes of scalar hairy black holes with spherical/hyperbolic/planar topologies that are asymptotic to locally anti- de Sitter (AdS) space-times. We derive the first law of black hole thermodynamics using Wald formalism. In particular, for one class of the solutions, the scalar hair forms a thermodynamic conjugate with the graviton and nontrivially contributes to the thermodynamical first law. We observe that except for one class of the planar black holes, all these solutions are constructed at the critical point of GB gravity where there exist unique AdS vacua. In fact, a Lifshitz vacuum is also allowed at the critical point. We then construct many new classes of neutral and charged Lifshitz black hole solutions for an either minimally or nonminimally coupled scalar and derive the thermodynamical first laws. We also obtain new classes of exact dynamical AdS and Lifshitz solutions which describe radiating white holes. The solutions eventually become AdS or Lifshitz vacua at late retarded times. However, for one class of the solutions, the final state is an AdS space-time with a globally naked singularity.

  5. Regular black holes in f (R ) gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Marques, Glauber T.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a class of regular black hole solutions in four-dimensional f (R ) gravity, R being the curvature scalar, coupled to a nonlinear electromagnetic source. The metric formalism is used and static spherically symmetric spacetimes are assumed. The resulting f (R ) and nonlinear electrodynamics functions are characterized by a one-parameter family of solutions which are generalizations of known regular black holes in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. The related regular black holes of general relativity are recovered when the free parameter vanishes, in which case one has f (R )∝R . We analyze the regularity of the solutions and also show that there are particular solutions that violate only the strong energy condition.

  6. Covariant anomaly and Hawking radiation from the modified black hole in the rainbow gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun-Jin; Wu, Shuang-Qing

    2008-12-01

    Recently, Banerjee and Kulkarni (R. Banerjee, S. Kulkarni, arXiv: 0707. 2449 [hep-th]) suggested that it is conceptually clean and economical to use only the covariant anomaly to derive Hawking radiation from a black hole. Based upon this simplified formalism, we apply the covariant anomaly cancellation method to investigate Hawking radiation from a modified Schwarzschild black hole in the theory of rainbow gravity. Hawking temperature of the gravity’s rainbow black hole is derived from the energy-momentum flux by requiring it to cancel the covariant gravitational anomaly at the horizon. We stress that this temperature is exactly the same as that calculated by the method of cancelling the consistent anomaly.

  7. Black hole solutions in functional extensions of Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Wang, Yixu

    2016-09-01

    We consider electrovacuum black hole spacetimes in classical extensions of Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity. By rewriting the Born-Infeld action as the square root of the determinant of a matrix Ω ^ , we consider the family of models f (|Ω ^|) and study black hole solutions for a power-law family of models labeled by a simple parameter. We show how the innermost structure of the corresponding black holes is modified as compared to their general relativity counterparts, discussing in which cases a wormhole structure replaces the pointlike singularity. We go forward to argue that in such cases a geodesically complete and, thus, nonsingular spacetime is present, despite the existence of curvature divergences at the wormhole throat.

  8. Black Holes in Brans-Dicke Gravity:. a Possible Constituent of Cold Dark Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongsu

    2002-09-01

    Existence check of non-trivial, stationary axisymmetric black hole solutions in Brans-Dicke theory of gravity in different direction from those of Penrose, Thorne and Dykla, and Hawking is performed. Namely, working directly with the known explicit spacetime solutions in Brans-Dicke theory, it is found that non-trivial Kerr-Newman-type black hole solutions different from general relativistic solutions could occur for the generic Brans-Dicke parameter values -5/2 ≤ ω < -3/2. Finally, issues like whether these new black holes carry scalar hair and can really arise in nature and if they can, what the associated physical implications would be are discussed carefully.

  9. (Anti-) de Sitter electrically charged black-hole solutions in higher-derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kai; Qian, Wei-Liang; Pavan, A. B.; Abdalla, E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, static electrically charged black-hole solutions with cosmological constant are investigated in an Einstein-Hilbert theory of gravity with additional quadratic curvature terms. Beside the analytic Schwarzschild (Anti-) de Sitter solutions, non-Schwarzschild (Anti-) de Sitter solutions are also obtained numerically by employing the shooting method. The results show that there exist two groups of asymptotically (Anti-) de Sitter spacetimes for both charged and uncharged black holes. In particular, it was found that for uncharged black holes the first group can be reduced to the Schwarzschild (Anti-) de Sitter solution, while the second group is intrinsically different from a Schwarzschild (Anti-) de Sitter solution even when the charge and the cosmological constant become zero.

  10. Slowly-Rotating Black Hole Solution in Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayzenberg, Dimitry; Yunes, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    We present a stationary and axisymmetric black hole solution in Einstein-Dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity to quadratic order in the ratio of the spin angular momentum to the black hole mass squared. This solution introduces new corrections to previously found nonspinning and linear-in-spin solutions. The location of the event horizon and the ergosphere are modified, as well as the quadrupole moment. The new solution is of Petrov type I, although lower order in spin solutions are of Petrov type D. There are no closed timelike curves or spacetime regions that violate causality outside of the event horizon in the new solution. We calculate the modifications to the binding energy, Kepler's third law, and properties of the innermost stable circular orbit. These modifications are important for determining how the electromagnetic properties of accretion disks around supermassive black holes are changed from those expected in general relativity.

  11. Hawking radiation as tunneling from a Vaidya black hole in noncommutative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdipour, S. Hamid

    2010-06-15

    In the context of a noncommutative model of coordinate coherent states, we present a Schwarzschild-like metric for a Vaidya solution instead of the standard Eddington-Finkelstein metric. This leads to the appearance of an exact (t-r) dependent case of the metric. We analyze the resulting metric in three possible causal structures. In this setup, we find a zero remnant mass in the long-time limit, i.e. an instable black hole remnant. We also study the tunneling process across the quantum horizon of such a Vaidya black hole. The tunneling probability including the time-dependent part is obtained by using the tunneling method proposed by Parikh and Wilczek in terms of the noncommutative parameter {sigma}. After that, we calculate the entropy associated to this noncommutative black hole solution. However, the corrections are fundamentally trifling; one could respect this as a consequence of quantum inspection at the level of semiclassical quantum gravity.

  12. Gravitational lensing by self-dual black holes in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Satyabrata; Lochan, Kinjalk; Narasimha, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study gravitational lensing by a recently proposed black hole solution in loop quantum gravity. We highlight the fact that the quantum gravity corrections to the Schwarzschild metric in this model evade the "mass suppression" effects (that the usual quantum gravity corrections are susceptible to) by virtue of one of the parameters in the model being dimensionless, which is unlike any other quantum gravity motivated parameter. Gravitational lensing in the strong and weak deflection regimes is studied, and a sample consistency relation is presented which could serve as a test of this model. We discuss that, though the consistency relation for this model is qualitatively similar to what would have been in Brans-Dicke, in general it can be a good discriminator between many alternative theories. Although the observational prospects do not seem to be very optimistic even for a galactic supermassive black hole case, time delay between relativistic images for a billion solar mass black holes in other galaxies might be within reach of future relativistic lensing observations.

  13. Black hole bound on the number of species and quantum gravity at CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Redi, Michele

    2008-02-15

    In theories with a large number N of particle species, black hole physics imposes an upper bound on the mass of the species equal to M{sub Planck}/{radical}(N). This bound suggests a novel solution to the hierarchy problem in which there are N{approx_equal}10{sup 32} gravitationally coupled species, for example 10{sup 32} copies of the standard model. The black hole bound forces them to be at the weak scale, hence providing a stable hierarchy. We present various arguments, that in such theories the effective gravitational cutoff is reduced to {lambda}{sub G}{approx_equal}M{sub Planck}/{radical}(N) and a new description is needed around this scale. In particular, black holes smaller than {lambda}{sub G}{sup -1} are already no longer semiclassical. The nature of the completion is model dependent. One natural possibility is that {lambda}{sub G} is the quantum gravity scale. We provide evidence that within this type of scenarios, contrary to the standard intuition, micro-black-holes have a (slowly fading) memory of the species of origin. Consequently, the black holes produced at LHC will predominantly decay into the standard model particles, and negligibly into the other species.

  14. Black hole solutions and pressure terms in induced gravity with Higgs potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, Hemwati; Bezares-Roder, Nils M.; Dehnen, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    We study the quintessential properties of the black hole solutions in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity with Higgs potential in view of the static and spherically symmetric line element. The Reissner-Nordström-like and Schwarzschild black hole solutions are derived with the introduction of a series-expansion method to solve the field equations with and without Higgs field mass. The physical consequences of the black hole solutions and the solutions obtained in the weak field limit are discussed in detail by the virtue of the equation-of-state parameter, the scalar-field excitations and the geodesic motion. The appearance of naked singularities is also discussed together with the dependence of black hole horizons on the field excitations, which are themselves dependent on pressure terms which effectively screen the mass terms. A possible connection to flat rotation curves following the interaction with the scalar field is also presented in the weak field limit of gravity, together with a discussion of dynamical effects of scalar fields and pressure terms on mass.

  15. Statistical entropy of a BTZ black hole from loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodden, Ernesto; Geiller, Marc; Noui, Karim; Perez, Alejandro

    2013-05-01

    We compute the statistical entropy of a BTZ black hole in the context of three-dimensional Euclidean loop quantum gravity with a cosmological constant Λ. As in the four-dimensional case, a quantum state of the black hole is characterized by a spin network state. Now however, the underlying colored graph Γ lives in a two-dimensional spacelike surface Σ, and some of its links cross the black hole horizon, which is viewed as a circular boundary of Σ. Each link ℓ crossing the horizon is colored by a spin j ℓ (at the kinematical level), and the length L of the horizon is given by the sum L = ∑ ℓ L ℓ of the fundamental length contributions L ℓ carried by the spins j ℓ of the links ℓ. We propose an estimation for the number N_{\\varGamma}^{BTZ}( {L,Λ} ) of the Euclidean BTZ black hole microstates (defined on a fixed graph Γ) based on an analytic continuation from the case Λ > 0 to the case Λ < 0. In our model, we show that N_{\\varGamma}^{BTZ}( {L,Λ} ) reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in the classical limit. This asymptotic behavior is independent of the choice of the graph Γ provided that the condition L = ∑ ℓ L ℓ is satisfied, as it should be in three-dimensional quantum gravity.

  16. NUT-charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Mann, R.B.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) and Taub-bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the general form of these solutions in d dimensions. We find that for all nonextremal NUT solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that contain these solutions in the limit that the Gauss-Bonnet parameter {alpha} goes to zero. Furthermore there are no NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that yield nonextremal NUT solutions to Einstein gravity having a curvature singularity at r=N in the limit {alpha}{yields}0. Indeed, we have nonextreme NUT solutions in 2+2k dimensions with nontrivial fibration only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet gravity has extremal NUT solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a two-dimensional factor space of positive curvature. Indeed, when the base space has at most one positively curved two-dimensional space as one of its factor spaces, then Gauss-Bonnet gravity admits extreme NUT solutions, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with any base space with factor spaces of zero or positive constant curvature. The only case for which one does not have bolt solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  17. Decay of massive scalar hair in the background of a dilaton gravity black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2007-05-15

    We investigate analytically both the intermediate and late-time behavior of the massive scalar field in the background of the static spherically symmetric black hole solution in dilaton gravity with an arbitrary coupling constant. The intermediate asymptotic behavior of the scalar field depends on the field's parameter mass as well as the multiple number l. On its turn, the late-time behavior has the power-law decay rate independent on the coupling constant in the theory under consideration.

  18. Spherically symmetric black holes in minimally modified self-dual gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Akihiro; Speziale, Simone

    2009-09-01

    We discuss spherically symmetric black holes in the modified self-dual theory of gravity recently studied by Krasnov, obtained by adding a Weyl curvature- dependent 'cosmological term' to the Plebanski lagrangian for general relativity. This type of modified gravity admits two different types of singularities: one is a true singularity for the theory where the fundamental fields of the theory, as well as the (auxiliary) spacetime metric, become singular, and the other one is a milder 'non-metric singularity' where the metric description of the spacetime breaks down but the fundamental fields themselves are regular. We first generalize this modified self-dual gravity to include Maxwell's field and then study the basic features of spherically symmetric, charged black holes, with particular focus on whether these two types of singularities are hidden or naked. We restrict our attention to minimal forms of the modification, and find that the theory exhibits 'screening' effects of the electric charge (or 'anti-screening', depending upon the sign of the modification term), in the sense that it leads to the possibility of charging the black hole more (or less) than it would be possible in general relativity without exposing a naked singularity. We also find that for any (even arbitrarily large) value of charge, true singularities of the theory appear to be either achronal (non-timelike) covered by the hypersurface of a harmless non-metric singularity or simply hidden inside at least one Killing horizon.

  19. Near horizon symmetries of the non-extremal black hole solutions of Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the Generalized Minimal Massive Gravity (GMMG) model in the first order formalism. We show that all the solutions of the Einstein gravity with negative cosmological constants solve the equations of motion of considered model. Then we find an expression for the off-shell conserved charges of this model. By considering the near horizon geometry of a three dimensional black hole in the Gaussian null coordinates, we find near horizon conserved charges and their algebra. The obtained algebra is centrally extended. By writing the algebra of conserved charges in terms of Fourier modes and considering the BTZ black hole solution as an example, one can see that the charge associated with rotations along Y0 coincides exactly with the angular momentum, and the charge associated with time translations T0 is the product of the black hole entropy and its temperature. As we expect, in the limit when the GMMG tends to the Einstein gravity, all the results we obtain in this paper reduce to the results of the paper [1].

  20. Mass Gap for Black-Hole Formation in Higher-Derivative and Ghost-Free Gravity.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Valeri P

    2015-07-31

    We study a spherical gravitational collapse of a small mass in higher-derivative and ghost-free theories of gravity. By boosting a solution of linearized equations for a static point mass in such theories we obtain in the Penrose limit the gravitational field of an ultrarelativistic particle. Taking a superposition of such solutions we construct a metric of a collapsing null shell in the linearized higher-derivative and ghost-free gravity. The latter allows one to find the gravitational field of a thick null shell. By analyzing these solutions we demonstrate that in a wide class of the higher dimensional theories of gravity as well as for the ghost-free gravity there exists a mass gap for mini-black-hole production. We also found conditions when the curvature invariants remain finite at r=0 for the collapse of the thick null shell.

  1. Black holes in an asymptotically safe gravity theory with higher derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Easson, Damien A. E-mail: easson@asu.edu

    2010-09-01

    We present a class of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to an asymptotically safe theory of gravity containing high-derivative terms. We find quantum corrected Schwarzschild-(anti)-de Sitter solutions with running gravitational coupling parameters. The evolution of the couplings is determined by their corresponding renormalization group flow equations. These black holes exhibit properties of a classical Schwarzschild solution at large length scales. At the center, the metric factor remains smooth but the curvature singularity, while softened by the quantum corrections, persists. The solutions have an outer event horizon and an inner Cauchy horizon which equate when the physical mass decreases to a critical value. Super-extremal solutions with masses below the critical value correspond to naked singularities. The Hawking temperature of the black hole vanishes when the physical mass reaches the critical value. Hence, the black holes in the asymptotically safe gravitational theory never completely evaporate. For appropriate values of the parameters such stable black hole remnants make excellent dark matter candidates.

  2. Self-dual black holes in loop quantum gravity: Theory and phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto, Leonardo; Premont-Schwarz, Isabeau

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we have recalled the semiclassical metric obtained from a classical analysis of the loop quantum black hole (LQBH). We show that the regular Reissner-Nordstroem-like metric is self-dual in the sense of T-duality: the form of the metric obtained in loop quantum gravity is invariant under the exchange r{yields}a{sub 0}/r where a{sub 0} is proportional to the minimum area in loop quantum gravity and r is the standard Schwarzschild radial coordinate at asymptotic infinity. Of particular interest, the symmetry imposes that if an observer in r{yields}+{infinity} sees a black hole of mass m an observer in the other asymptotic infinity beyond the horizon (at r{approx_equal}0) sees a dual mass m{sub P}/m. We then show that small LQBH are stable and could be a component of dark matter. Ultralight LQBHs created shortly after the big bang would now have a mass of approximately 10{sup -5}m{sub P} and emit radiation with a typical energy of about 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} eV but they would also emit cosmic rays of much higher energies, albeit few of them. If these small LQBHs form a majority of the dark matter of the Milky Way's Halo, the production rate of ultra-high-energy-cosmic-rays (UHECR) by these ultralight black holes would be compatible with the observed rate of the Auger detector.

  3. {theta} parameter in loop quantum gravity: Effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez; Perez, Alejandro

    2008-10-15

    The precise analog of the {theta}-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case {theta} labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are superselection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless {theta}=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well-defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of {theta} is negligible in the semiclassical limit where proportionality to area holds.

  4. Thermodynamic instability of topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a generalized electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Panahiyan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the string corrections on the gravity and electrodynamics sides, we consider a quadratic Maxwell invariant term as a correction of the Maxwell Lagrangian to obtain exact solutions of higher dimensional topological black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We first investigate the asymptotically flat solutions and obtain conserved and thermodynamic quantities which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also analyze thermodynamic stability of the solutions by calculating the heat capacity and the Hessian matrix. Then, we focus on horizon-flat solutions with an anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptote and produce a rotating spacetime with a suitable transformation. In addition, we calculate the conserved and thermodynamic quantities for asymptotically AdS black branes which satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we perform thermodynamic instability criterion to investigate the effects of nonlinear electrodynamics in canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  5. Critical behavior of charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, Seyed Hossein; Panahiyan, Shahram; Eslam Panah, Behzad; Faizal, Mir; Momennia, Mehrab

    2016-07-01

    Following an earlier study regarding Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell black holes in the presence of gravity's rainbow [S. H. Hendi and M. Faizal, Phys. Rev. D 92, 044027 (2015)], in this paper, we consider all constants as energy dependent ones. The geometrical and thermodynamical properties of this generalization is studied and the validation of the first law of thermodynamics is examined. Next, through the use of proportionality between the cosmological constant and the thermodynamical pressure, van der Waals-like behavior of these black holes in extended phase space is investigated. An interesting critical behavior for sets of rainbow functions in this case is reported. Also, the critical behavior of uncharged and charged solutions is analyzed and it is shown that the generalization to a charged case puts an energy dependent restriction on values of different parameters.

  6. Gravitational signature of Schwarzschild black holes in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, C.; Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo

    2010-06-15

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity is an extension of general relativity in which the gravitational field is coupled to a scalar field through a parity-violating Chern-Simons term. In this framework, we study perturbations of spherically symmetric black hole spacetimes, assuming that the background scalar field vanishes. Our results suggest that these spacetimes are stable, and small perturbations die away as a ringdown. However, in contrast to standard general relativity, the gravitational waveforms are also driven by the scalar field. Thus, the gravitational oscillation modes of black holes carry imprints of the coupling to the scalar field. This is a smoking gun for Chern-Simons theory and could be tested with gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO or LISA. For negative values of the coupling constant, ghosts are known to arise, and we explicitly verify their appearance numerically. Our results are validated using both time evolution and frequency domain methods.

  7. Reissner–Nordström Anti-de Sitter Black Holes in Mimetic F(R) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study under which conditions the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-anti de Sitter black hole can be a solution of the vacuum mimetic $F(R)$ gravity with Lagrange multiplier and mimetic scalar potential. As we demonstrate, the resulting picture in the mimetic $F(R)$ gravity case, is different in comparison to the ordinary $F(R)$ gravity case, with the two descriptions resulting to a different set of constraints that need to hold true. We also investigate the metric perturbations in the mimetic $F(R)$ gravity case, for the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-anti de Sitter black hole metric, at first order of the perturbed variables. Interestingly enough, the resulting equations are identical to the ones corresponding to the ordinary $F(R)$ gravity Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-anti de Sitter black hole, at least at first order. We attribute this feature to the particular form of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-anti de Sitter metric, and we speculate for which cases there could be differences between the mimetic and non-mimetic case. Since the perturbation equations are the same for the two cases, it is possible to have black hole instabilities in the mimetic $F(R)$ gravity case too, which can be interpreted as anti-evaporation of the black hole.

  8. Slowly rotating stars and black holes in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Chen, Yanbei

    2011-12-01

    Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity is an extension to general relativity (GR) in which the metric is coupled to a scalar field, resulting in modified Einstein field equations. In the dynamical theory, the scalar field is itself sourced by the Pontryagin density of the space-time. In this paper, the coupled system of equations for the metric and the scalar field is solved numerically for slowly rotating neutron stars described with realistic equations of state and for slowly rotating black holes. An analytic solution for a constant-density nonrelativistic object is also presented. It is shown that the black hole solution cannot be used to describe the exterior space-time of a star as was previously assumed. In addition, whereas previous analysis were limited to the small-coupling regime, this paper considers arbitrarily large coupling strengths. It is found that the CS modification leads to two effects on the gravitomagnetic sector of the metric: (i) Near the surface of a star or the horizon of a black hole, the magnitude of the gravitomagnetic potential is decreased and frame-dragging effects are reduced in comparison to GR. (ii) In the case of a star, the angular momentum J, as measured by distant observers, is enhanced in CS gravity as compared to standard GR. For a large coupling strength, the near-zone frame-dragging effects become significantly screened, whereas the far-zone enhancements saturate at a maximum value ΔJmax⁡˜(M/R)JGR. Using measurements of frame-dragging effects around the Earth by Gravity Probe B and the LAGEOS satellites, a weak but robust constraint is set to the characteristic CS length scale, ξ1/4≲108km.

  9. Gravitational waves from quasicircular black-hole binaries in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2012-12-21

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to general relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the nonlinear, dynamical regime, and thus it could be greatly constrained with gravitational waves from the late inspiral of black-hole binaries. We complete the first self-consistent calculation of such gravitational waves in this theory. For favorable spin orientations, advanced ground-based detectors may improve existing solar system constraints by 6 orders of magnitude.

  10. Fine-grained state counting for black holes in loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Mitra, P

    2009-04-10

    A state of a black hole in loop quantum gravity is given by a distribution of spins on punctures on the horizon. The distribution is of the Boltzmann type, with the area playing the role of the energy. In investigations where the total area was kept approximately constant, there was a kind of thermal equilibrium between the spins which have the same analogue temperature and the entropy was proportional to the area. If the area is precisely fixed, however, multiple constraints appear, different spins have different analogue temperatures and the entropy is not strictly linear in the area, but is bounded by a linear rise.

  11. Gravitational waves from quasicircular black-hole binaries in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2012-12-21

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be strongly constrained with current experiments because it reduces to general relativity in the weak-field limit. This theory, however, introduces modifications in the nonlinear, dynamical regime, and thus it could be greatly constrained with gravitational waves from the late inspiral of black-hole binaries. We complete the first self-consistent calculation of such gravitational waves in this theory. For favorable spin orientations, advanced ground-based detectors may improve existing solar system constraints by 6 orders of magnitude. PMID:23368447

  12. Physical process first law and increase of horizon entropy for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ayan; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    We establish the physical process version of the first law by studying small perturbations of a stationary black hole with a regular bifurcation surface in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Our result shows that when the stationary black hole is perturbed by a matter stress energy tensor and finally settles down to a new stationary state, the Wald entropy increases as long as the matter satisfies the null energy condition.

  13. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  14. General parametrization of axisymmetric black holes in metric theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplya, Roman; Rezzolla, Luciano; Zhidenko, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Following previous work of ours in spherical symmetry, we here propose a new parametric framework to describe the spacetime of axisymmetric black holes in generic metric theories of gravity. In this case, the metric components are functions of both the radial and the polar angular coordinates, forcing a double expansion to obtain a generic axisymmetric metric expression. In particular, we use a continued-fraction expansion in terms of a compactified radial coordinate to express the radial dependence, while we exploit a Taylor expansion in terms of the cosine of the polar angle for the polar dependence. These choices lead to a superior convergence in the radial direction and to an exact limit on the equatorial plane. As a validation of our approach, we build parametrized representations of Kerr, rotating dilaton, and Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The match is already very good at lowest order in the expansion and improves as new orders are added. We expect a similar behavior for any stationary and axisymmetric black-hole metric.

  15. Dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity: Spinning black holes in the slow-rotation approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yunes, Nicolas; Pretorius, Frans

    2009-04-15

    The low-energy limit of string theory contains an anomaly-canceling correction to the Einstein-Hilbert action, which defines an effective theory: Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity. The CS correction consists of the product of a scalar field with the Pontryagin density, where the former can be treated as a background field (nondynamical formulation) or as an evolving field (dynamical formulation). Many solutions of general relativity persist in the modified theory; a notable exception is the Kerr metric, which has sparked a search for rotating black hole solutions. Here, for the first time, we find a solution describing a rotating black hole within the dynamical framework, and in the small-coupling/slow-rotation limit. The solution is axisymmetric and stationary, constituting a deformation of the Kerr metric with dipole scalar 'hair', whose effect on geodesic motion is to weaken the frame-dragging effect and shift the location of the innermost stable circular orbit outwards (inwards) relative to Kerr for corotating (counterrotating) geodesics. We further show that the correction to the metric scales inversely with the fourth power of the radial distance to the black hole, suggesting it will escape any meaningful bounds from weak-field experiments. For example, using binary pulsar data we can only place an initial bound on the magnitude of the dynamical coupling constant of {xi}{sup 1/4} < or approx. 10{sup 4} km. More stringent bounds will require observations of inherently strong-field phenomena.

  16. Evolution of {lambda} black holes in the minisuperspace approximation of loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Brannlund, J.; Kloster, S.; DeBenedictis, A.

    2009-04-15

    Using the improved quantization technique to the minisuperspace approximation of loop quantum gravity, we study the evolution of black holes supported by a cosmological constant. The addition of a cosmological constant allows for classical solutions with planar, cylindrical, toroidal, and higher-genus black holes. Here we study the quantum analog of these space-times. In all scenarios studied, the singularity present in the classical counterpart is avoided in the quantized version and is replaced by a bounce, and in the late evolution, a series of less severe bounces. Interestingly, although there are differences during the evolution between the various symmetries and topologies, the evolution on the other side of the bounce asymptotes to space-times of Nariai-type, with the exception of the planar black hole analyzed here, whose T-R=constant subspaces seem to continue expanding in the long-term evolution. For the other cases, Nariai-type universes are attractors in the quantum evolution, albeit with different parameters. We study here the quantum evolution of each symmetry in detail.

  17. Corrected entropy of the rotating black hole solution of the new massive gravity using the tunneling method and Cardy formula

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, Behrouz; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2011-05-15

    We study the AdS rotating black hole solution for the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend massive gravity in three dimensions. The field equations of the asymptotically AdS black hole of the static metric can be expressed as the first law of thermodynamics, i.e. dE=TdS-PdV. The corrected Hawking-like temperature and entropy of the asymptotically AdS rotating black hole are calculated using the Cardy formula and the tunneling method. Comparison of these methods will help identify the unknown leading correction parameter {beta}{sub 1} in the tunneling method.

  18. Equivalence of black hole thermodynamics between a generalized theory of gravity and the Einstein theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Jun-Ichirou; Maeda, Kei-Ichi

    1998-09-01

    We analyze black hole thermodynamics in a generalized theory of gravity whose Lagrangian is an arbitrary function of the metric, the Ricci tensor, and a scalar field. We can convert the theory into the Einstein frame via a ``Legendre'' transformation or a conformal transformation. We calculate thermodynamical variables both in the original frame and in the Einstein frame, following the Iyer-Wald definition which satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. We show that all thermodynamical variables defined in the original frame are the same as those in the Einstein frame, if the spacetimes in both frames are asymptotically flat, regular, and possess event horizons with nonzero temperatures. This result may be useful to study whether the second law is still valid in the generalized theory of gravity.

  19. Quantum gravity of Kerr-Schild spacetimes and the logarithmic correction to Schwarzschild black hole entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Menoufi, Basem Kamal

    2016-05-01

    In the context of effective field theory, we consider quantum gravity with minimally coupled massless particles. Fixing the background geometry to be of the Kerr-Schild type, we fully determine the one-loop effective action of the theory whose finite non-local part is induced by the long-distance portion of quantum loops. This is accomplished using the non-local expansion of the heat kernel in addition to a non-linear completion technique through which the effective action is expanded in gravitational curvatures. Via Euclidean methods, we identify a logarithmic correction to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of Schwarzschild black hole. Using dimensional transmutation the result is shown to exhibit an interesting interplay between the UV and IR properties of quantum gravity.

  20. Perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes in dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo

    2009-09-15

    Dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity is an attractive, yet relatively unexplored, candidate to an alternative theory of gravity. The dynamical Chern-Simons correction couples a dynamical scalar field to the gravitational field. In this framework, we analyze the perturbation formalism and stability properties of spherically symmetric black holes. Assuming that no background scalar field is present, gravitational perturbations with polar and axial parities decouple. We find no effect of the Chern-Simons coupling on the polar sector, while axial perturbations couple to the Chern-Simons scalar field. The axial sector can develop strong instabilities if the coupling parameter {beta}, associated to the dynamical coupling of the scalar field, is small enough; this yields a constraint on {beta} which is much stronger than the constraints previously known in the literature.

  1. Taub-NUT/bolt black holes in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Hendi, S. H.

    2006-04-15

    We present a class of higher-dimensional solutions to Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell equations in 2k+2 dimensions with a U(1) fibration over a 2k-dimensional base space B. These solutions depend on two extra parameters, other than the mass and the Newman-Unti-Tamburino charge, which are the electric charge q and the electric potential at infinity V. We find that the form of metric is sensitive to geometry of the base space, while the form of electromagnetic field is independent of B. We investigate the existence of Taub-Newman-Unti-Tamburino/bolt solutions and find that in addition to the two conditions of uncharged Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions, there exist two other conditions. These two extra conditions come from the regularity of vector potential at r=N and the fact that the horizon at r=N should be the outer horizon of the black hole. We find that for all nonextremal Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity. Indeed, we have nonextreme Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions in 2+2k dimensions only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity has extremal Newman-Unti-Tamburino solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a 2-dimensional factor space of positive curvature, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity with any base space. The only case for which one does not have black hole solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  2. Thermodynamics and gauge/gravity duality for Lifshitz black holes in the presence of exponential electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Dehyadegari, A.; Sheykhi, A.; Dehghani, M. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we construct a new class of topological black hole Lifshitz solutions in the presence of nonlinear exponential electrodynamics for Einstein-dilaton gravity. We show that the reality of Lifshitz supporting Maxwell matter fields exclude the negative horizon curvature solutions except for the asymptotic AdS case. Calculating the conserved and thermodynamical quantities, we obtain a Smarr type formula for the mass and confirm that thermodynamics first law is satisfied on the black hole horizon. Afterward, we study the thermal stability of our solutions and figure out the effects of different parameters on the stability of solutions under thermal perturbations. Next, we apply the gauge/gravity duality in order to calculate the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy for a three-dimensional hydrodynamic system by using the pole method. Furthermore, we study the behavior of holographic conductivity for two-dimensional systems such as graphene. We consider linear Maxwell and nonlinear exponential electrodynamics separately and disclose the effect of nonlinearity on holographic conductivity. We indicate that holographic conductivity vanishes for z > 3 in the case of nonlinear electrodynamics while it does not in the linear Maxwell case. Finally, we solve perturbative additional field equations numerically and plot the behaviors of real and imaginary parts of conductivity for asymptotic AdS and Lifshitz cases. We present experimental results match with our numerical ones.

  3. Conserved charges of black holes in Weyl and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jun-Jin

    2014-11-01

    An off-shell generalization of the Abbott-Deser-Tekin (ADT) conserved charge was recently proposed by Kim et al. They achieved this by introducing off-shell Noether currents and potentials. In this paper, we construct the crucial off-shell Noether current by the variation of the Bianchi identity for the expression of EOM, with the help of the property of Killing vector. Our Noether current, which contains an additional term that is just one half of the Lie derivative of a surface term with respect to the Killing vector, takes a different form in comparison with the one in their work. Then we employ the generalized formulation to calculate the quasi-local conserved charges for the most general charged spherically symmetric and the dyonic rotating black holes with AdS asymptotics in four-dimensional conformal Weyl gravity, as well as the charged spherically symmetric black holes in arbitrary dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to Maxwell or nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS spacetime. Our results confirm those obtained through other methods in the literature.

  4. Black holes and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-01

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole.

  5. Prospects for Probing Strong Gravity with a Pulsar-Black Hole System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wex, N.; Liu, K.; Eatough, R. P.; Kramer, M.; Cordes, J. M.; Lazio, T. J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of a pulsar (PSR) in orbit around a black hole (BH) is expected to provide a superb new probe of relativistic gravity and BH properties. Apart from a precise mass measurement for the BH, one could expect a clean verification of the dragging of space-time caused by the BH spin. In order to measure the quadrupole moment of the BH for testing the no-hair theorem of general relativity (GR), one has to hope for a sufficiently massive BH. In this respect, a PSR orbiting the super-massive BH in the center of our Galaxy would be the ultimate laboratory for gravity tests with PSRs. But even for gravity theories that predict the same properties for BHs as GR, a PSR-BH system would constitute an excellent test system, due to the high grade of asymmetry in the strong field properties of these two components. Here we highlight some of the potential gravity tests that one could expect from different PSR-BH systems.

  6. Two aspects of black hole entropy in Lanczos-Lovelock models of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolekar, Sanved; Kothawala, Dawood; Padmanabhan, T.

    2012-03-01

    We consider two specific approaches to evaluate the black hole entropy which are known to produce correct results in the case of Einstein’s theory and generalize them to Lanczos-Lovelock models. In the first approach (which could be called extrinsic), we use a procedure motivated by earlier work by Pretorius, Vollick, and Israel, and by Oppenheim, and evaluate the entropy of a configuration of densely packed gravitating shells on the verge of forming a black hole in Lanczos-Lovelock theories of gravity. We find that this matter entropy is not equal to (it is less than) Wald entropy, except in the case of Einstein theory, where they are equal. The matter entropy is proportional to the Wald entropy if we consider a specific mth-order Lanczos-Lovelock model, with the proportionality constant depending on the spacetime dimensions D and the order m of the Lanczos-Lovelock theory as (D-2m)/(D-2). Since the proportionality constant depends on m, the proportionality between matter entropy and Wald entropy breaks down when we consider a sum of Lanczos-Lovelock actions involving different m. In the second approach (which could be called intrinsic), we generalize a procedure, previously introduced by Padmanabhan in the context of general relativity, to study off-shell entropy of a class of metrics with horizon using a path integral method. We consider the Euclidean action of Lanczos-Lovelock models for a class of metrics off shell and interpret it as a partition function. We show that in the case of spherically symmetric metrics, one can interpret the Euclidean action as the free energy and read off both the entropy and energy of a black hole spacetime. Surprisingly enough, this leads to exactly the Wald entropy and the energy of the spacetime in Lanczos-Lovelock models obtained by other methods. We comment on possible implications of the result.

  7. Generalisation for regular black holes on general relativity to f( R) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Fabris, Júlio C.; Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Marques, Glauber T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we determine regular black hole solutions using a very general f( R) theory, coupled to a non-linear electromagnetic field given by a Lagrangian {L}_NED. The functions f( R) and {L}_NED are in principle left unspecified. Instead, the model is constructed through a choice of the mass function M( r) presented in the metric coefficients. Solutions which have a regular behaviour of the geometric invariants are found. These solutions have two horizons, the event horizon and the Cauchy horizon. All energy conditions are satisfied in the whole space-time, except the strong energy condition (SEC), which is violated near the Cauchy horizon. We present also a new theorem related to the energy conditions in f( R) gravity, re-obtaining the well-known conditions in the context of general relativity when the geometry of the solution is the same.

  8. Anyonic statistics and large horizon diffeomorphisms for loop quantum gravity black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pithis, Andreas G. A.; Ruiz Euler, Hans-Christian

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the role played by large diffeomorphisms of quantum isolated horizons for the statistics of loop quantum gravity (LQG) black holes by means of their relation to the braid group. To this aim the symmetries of Chern-Simons theory are recapitulated with particular regard to the aforementioned type of diffeomorphisms. For the punctured spherical horizon, these are elements of the mapping class group of S2, which is almost isomorphic to a corresponding braid group on this particular manifold. The mutual exchange of quantum entities in two dimensions is achieved by the braid group, rendering the statistics anyonic. With this we argue that the quantum isolated horizon model of LQG based on S U (2 )k-Chern-Simons theory exhibits non-Abelian anyonic statistics. In this way a connection to the theory behind the fractional quantum Hall effect and that of topological quantum computation is established, where non-Abelian anyons play a significant role.

  9. Braneworld Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisker, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In this thesis we investigate black holes in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld scenario. We begin with an overview of extra-dimensional physics, from the original proposal of Kaluza and Klein up to the modern braneworld picture of extra dimensions. A detailed description of braneworld gravity is given, with particular emphasis on its compatibility with experimental tests of gravity. We then move on to a discussion of static, spherically symmetric braneworld black hole solutions. Assuming an equation of state for the ``Weyl term'', which encodes the effects of the extra dimension, we are able to classify the general behaviour of these solutions. We then use the strong field limit approach to investigate the gravitational lensing properties of some candidate braneworld black hole solutions. It is found that braneworld black holes could have significantly different observational signatures to the Schwarzschild black hole of standard general relativity. Rotating braneworld black hole solutions are also discussed, and we attempt to generate rotating solutions from known static solutions using the Newman-Janis complexification ``trick''.

  10. Thermodynamics of Taub-NUT/bolt black holes in Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Khodam-Mohammadi, A.

    2006-06-15

    First, we construct the Taub-NUT/bolt solutions of (2k+2)-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell gravity, when all the factor spaces of 2k-dimensional base space B have positive curvature. These solutions depend on two extra parameters, other than the mass and the NUT charge. These are electric charge q and electric potential at infinity V. We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT solutions and find that in addition to the two conditions of uncharged NUT solutions, there exist two extra conditions. These two extra conditions come from the regularity of vector potential at r=N and the fact that the horizon at r=N should be the outer horizon of the NUT charged black hole. We find that the NUT solutions in 2k+2 dimensions have no curvature singularity at r=N, when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. For bolt solutions, there exists an upper limit for the NUT parameter which decreases as the potential parameter increases. Second, we study the thermodynamics of these spacetimes. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, action and mass of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We perform a stability analysis by computing the heat capacity, and show that the NUT solutions are not thermally stable for even k's, while there exists a stable phase for odd k's, which becomes increasingly narrow with increasing dimensionality and wide with increasing V. We also study the phase behavior of the 4 and 6 dimensional bolt solutions in canonical ensemble and find that these solutions have a stable phase, which becomes smaller as V increases.

  11. Perturbations of cosmological and black hole solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yoshida, Daisuke

    2016-10-01

    We investigate perturbations of a class of spherically symmetric solutions in massive gravity and bi-gravity. The background equations of motion for the particular class of solutions we are interested in reduce to a set of the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant. Thus, the solutions in this class include all the spherically symmetric solutions in general relativity, such as the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker solution and the Schwarzschild (-de Sitter) solution, though the one-parameter family of two parameters of the theory admits such a class of solutions. We find that the equations of motion for the perturbations of this class of solutions also reduce to the perturbed Einstein equations at first and second order. Therefore, the perturbative stability of the solutions coincides with that of the corresponding solutions in general relativity at least up to the second-order perturbations.

  12. Testing gravity of a regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole by quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songbai; Wang, Mei; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-01

    We extend firstly the regular phantom black hole solution to a slowly rotating black hole case and find that the phantom field depresses the angular velocity of the event horizon and suppresses the super-radiation of the black hole. We also probe the dependence of quasi-periodic oscillations frequencies in a relativistic precession model on the phantom parameter. With the observation data of GRO J1655-40, we make a constraint on the parameters of the regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole. Our results show that although the best-fit value of the phantom parameter b is small, the allowed value of b in the 1σ region is b\\lt 0.619, which means that the phantom theoretical model cannot be excluded by the constraint from quasi-periodic oscillations with the observation data of GRO J1655-40.

  13. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mišković, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  14. Conserved charges for black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics in AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-01-15

    Motivated by possible applications within the framework of anti-de Sitter gravity/conformal field theory correspondence, charged black holes with AdS asymptotics, which are solutions to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in D dimensions, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics are studied. For a topological static black hole ansatz, the field equations are exactly solved in terms of the electromagnetic stress tensor for an arbitrary nonlinear electrodynamic Lagrangian in any dimension D and for arbitrary positive values of Gauss-Bonnet coupling. In particular, this procedure reproduces the black hole metric in Born-Infeld and conformally invariant electrodynamics previously found in the literature. Altogether, it extends to D>4 the four-dimensional solution obtained by Soleng in logarithmic electrodynamics, which comes from vacuum polarization effects. Falloff conditions for the electromagnetic field that ensure the finiteness of the electric charge are also discussed. The black hole mass and vacuum energy as conserved quantities associated to an asymptotic timelike Killing vector are computed using a background-independent regularization of the gravitational action based on the addition of counterterms which are a given polynomial in the intrinsic and extrinsic curvatures.

  15. Black hole entropy in the Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity and Lorentz-diffeomorphism Noether charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setare, M. R.; Adami, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the first order formalism of gravity theories, there are some theories which are not Lorentz-diffeomorphism covariant. In the framework of such theories we cannot apply the method of conserved charge calculation used in Lorentz-diffeomorphism covariant theories. In this paper we firstly introduce the total variation of a quantity due to an infinitesimal Lorentz-diffeomorphism transformation. Secondly, in order to obtain the conserved charges of Lorentz-diffeomorphism non-covariant theories, we extend the Tachikawa method [1]. This extension includes not only Lorentz gauge transformation but also the diffeomorphism. We apply this method to the Chern-Simons-like theories of gravity (CSLTG) and obtain a general formula for the entropy of black holes in those theories. Finally, some examples on CSLTG are provided and the entropy of the BTZ black hole is calculated in the context of the examples.

  16. Massive Vector Particles Tunneling from the Neutral Rotating Anti-de Sitter Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Jun-Kun

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the massive vector particles' Hawking radiation from the neutral rotating Anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in conformal gravity by using the tunneling method. It is well known that the dynamics of massive vector particles are governed by the Proca field equation. Applying WKB approximation to the Proca equation, the tunneling probabilities and radiation spectrums of the emitted particles are derived. Hawking temperature of the neutral rotating AdS black holes in conformal gravity is recovered, which is consistent with the previous result in the literature. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11205048, and the Foundation for Young Key Teacher of Henan Normal University

  17. Uniqueness theorem for black holes with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2010-07-15

    In the present paper, we prove a uniqueness theorem for stationary multi-black hole configurations with Kaluza-Klein asymptotic in a certain sector of 5D Einstein-Maxwell gravity. As a part of the technical assumptions in the theorem, we assume that the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension is orthogonal to the other Killing vectors and that it is also hypersurface orthogonal. About the Maxwell field, we assume that it is invariant under the Killing symmetries and has a nonzero component only along the Killing vector associated with the compact dimension. We show that such multi-black hole configurations are uniquely specified by the interval structure, angular momenta of the horizons, magnetic charges, and the magnetic flux. A straightforward generalization of the uniqueness theorem for 5D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity is also given.

  18. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  19. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wove detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  20. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  1. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids. PMID:25768746

  2. Bringing Black Holes Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, John M.

    2003-03-01

    Black holes are difficult to study because they emit no light. To overcome this obstacle, scientists are trying to recreate a black hole in the laboratory. The article gives an overview of the theories of Einstein and Hawking as they pertain to the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, scheduled for completion in 2006. The LHC will create two beams of protons traveling in opposing directions that will collide and create a plethora of scattered elementary particles. Protons traveling in opposite directions at very high velocities may create particles that come close enough to each other to feel their compacted higher dimensions and create a mega force of gravity that can create tiny laboratory-sized black holes for fractions of a second. The experiments carried out with LHC will be used to test modern string theory and relativity.

  3. Spherically symmetric black holes in f (R) gravity: is geometric scalar hair supported?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañate, Pedro; Jaime, Luisa G.; Salgado, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    We critically discuss current research on black hole (BH) solutions in f (R) gravity and shed light on its geometrical and physical significance. We also investigate the meaning, existence or lack thereof of Birkhoff’s theorem (BT) in this kind of modified gravity. We then focus on the analysis and search for non-trivial (i.e. hairy) asymptotically flat (AF) BH solutions in static and spherically symmetric (SSS) spacetimes in vacuum having the property that the Ricci scalar does not vanish identically in the domain of outer communication. To do so, we provide and enforce regularity conditions at the horizon in order to prevent the presence of singular solutions there. Specifically, we consider several classes of f (R) models like those proposed recently for explaining the accelerated expansion in the Universe and which have been thoroughly tested in several physical scenarios. Finally, we report analytical and numerical evidence about the absence of geometric hair in AFSSSBH solutions in those f (R) models. First, we submit the models to the available no-hair theorems (NHTs), and in the cases where the theorems apply, the absence of hair is demonstrated analytically. In the cases where the theorems do not apply, we resort to a numerical analysis due to the complexity of the non-linear differential equations. With that aim, a code to solve the equations numerically was built and tested using well-known exact solutions. In a future investigation we plan to analyze the problem of hair in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter backgrounds.

  4. Black hole solutions in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Li, Xin-zhou; Xi, Ping

    2016-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the static spherically symmetric solutions in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) theory. Since the diffeomorphism invariance can be restored by introducing the Stückelberg fields ϕa , there is new invariant Ia b=gμ ν∂μϕa∂νϕb in the massive gravity, which adds to the ones usually encountered in general relativity (GR). In the unitary gauge ϕa=xμδμa, any inverse metric gμ ν that has divergence including the coordinate singularity in GR would exhibit a singularity in the invariant Ia b. Therefore, there is no conventional Schwarzschild metric if we choose unitary gauge. In this paper, we obtain a self-consistent static spherically symmetric ansatz in the nonunitary gauge. Under this ansatz, we find that there are seven solutions including the Schwarzschild solution, Reissner-Nordström solution and five other solutions. These solutions may possess an event horizon depending upon the physical parameters (Schwarzschild radius rs, scalar charge S and/or electric charge Q ). If these solutions possess an event horizon, we show that the singularity of Ia b is absent at the horizon. Therefore, these solutions may become candidates for black holes in dRGT.

  5. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Rohta

    2010-05-15

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  6. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  7. Thermodynamics of Lifshitz black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devecioǧlu, Deniz Olgu; Sarıoǧlu, Özgür

    2011-06-01

    We apply the recently extended conserved Killing charge definition of Abbott-Deser-Tekin formalism to compute, for the first time, the energies of analytic Lifshitz black holes in higher dimensions. We then calculate the temperature and the entropy of this large family of solutions, and study and discuss the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Along the way we also identify the possible critical points of the relevant quadratic curvature gravity theories. Separately, we also apply the generalized Killing charge definition to compute the energy and the angular momentum of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of the three-dimensional new massive gravity theory.

  8. Blandford-Znajek mechanism in black holes in alternative theories of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Guancheng; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Bambi, Cosimo; Middleton, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    According to the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, black hole jets are powered by the rotational energy of the compact object. In this work, we consider the possibility that the metric around black holes may not be described by the Kerr solution and we study how this changes the Blandford-Znajek model. If the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is responsible for the formation of jets, the estimate of the jet power in combination with another measurement can test the nature of black hole candidates and constrain possible deviations from the Kerr solution. However, this approach might become competitive with respect to other techniques only when it will be possible to have measurements much more precise than those available today.

  9. Extremal dyonic black holes in D=4 Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiang-Mei; Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.; Orlov, Dmitry G.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate extremal dyon black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory with higher curvature corrections in the form of the Gauss-Bonnet density coupled to the dilaton. In the same theory without the Gauss-Bonnet term the extremal dyon solutions exist only for discrete values of the dilaton coupling constant a. We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term acts as a dyon hair tonic enlarging the allowed values of a to continuous domains in the plane (a,qm) where qm is the magnetic charge. In the limit of the vanishing curvature coupling (a large magnetic charge) the dyon solutions obtained tend to the Reissner-Nordström solution but not to the extremal dyons of the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. Both solutions have the same dependence of the horizon radius in terms of charges. The entropy of new dyonic black holes interpolates between the Bekenstein-Hawking value in the limit of the large magnetic charge (equivalent to the vanishing Gauss-Bonnet coupling) and twice this value for the vanishing magnetic charge. Although an expression for the entropy can be obtained analytically using purely local near-horizon solutions, its interpretation as the black hole entropy is legitimate only once the global black hole solution is known to exist, and we obtain numerically the corresponding conditions on the parameters. Thus, a purely local analysis is insufficient to fully understand the entropy of the curvature-corrected black holes. We also find dyon solutions which are not asymptotically flat, but approach the linear dilaton background at infinity. They describe magnetic black holes on the electric linear dilaton background.

  10. Black Hole Grabs Starry Snack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This artist's concept shows a supermassive black hole at the center of a remote galaxy digesting the remnants of a star. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer had a 'ringside' seat for this feeding frenzy, using its ultraviolet eyes to study the process from beginning to end.

    The artist's concept chronicles the star being ripped apart and swallowed by the cosmic beast over time. First, the intact sun-like star (left) ventures too close to the black hole, and its own self-gravity is overwhelmed by the black hole's gravity. The star then stretches apart (middle yellow blob) and eventually breaks into stellar crumbs, some of which swirl into the black hole (cloudy ring at right). This doomed material heats up and radiates light, including ultraviolet light, before disappearing forever into the black hole. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer was able to watch this process unfold by observing changes in ultraviolet light.

    The area around the black hole appears warped because the gravity of the black hole acts like a lens, twisting and distorting light.

  11. Key Science with the Square Kilometer Array: Strong-field Tests of Gravity using Pulsars and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Kramer, M.; Backer, D. C.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Science Working Groupthe Square Kilometer Array Team

    2005-12-01

    A Galactic census of pulsars with the SKA will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. The sheer number of pulsars discovered, along with the exceptional timing precision the SKA can provide, will revolutionize the field of pulsar astrophysics and will enable significant tests of theories of gravity. Census discoveries will almost certainly include pulsar-black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black hole in the Galactic center. These systems provide unique opportunties for probing the ultra-strong field limit of relativistic gravity and will complement future gravitational wave detections using LISA-like instruments. SKA measurements can be used to test the Cosmic Censorship Conjecture and the No-Hair theorem. The large number of millisecond pulsars discovered with the SKA will also provide a dense array of precision clocks on the sky that can be used as multiple arms of a cosmic gravitational wave detector, which can be used to detect and measure the stochastic cosmological gravitational wave background that is expected from a number of sources. In addition to gravitational tests, the large number of lines of sight will provide a detailed map of the Galaxy's electron density and magnetic fields and important information on the dynamics and evolutionary histories of neutron stars. The census will provide examples of nearly every possible outcome of the evolution of massive stars, including (as above) pulsar black-hole systems and sub-millisecond pulsars, if they exist. These objects will yield constraints on the equation of state of matter at super-nuclear densities. Masses of pulsars and their binary companions planets, white dwarfs, other neutron stars, and black holes will be determined to ˜ 1% for hundreds of objects. The SKA will also provide partial censuses of nearby galaxies through periodicity and giant-pulse detections, yielding important information on the intergalactic medium.

  12. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  13. Null geodesics and shadow of a rotating black hole in extended Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Amarilla, Leonardo; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Giribet, Gaston

    2010-06-15

    The Chern-Simons modification to general relativity in four dimensions consists of adding to the Einstein-Hilbert term a scalar field that couples to the first-class Pontryagin density. In this theory, which has attracted considerable attention recently, the Schwarzschild metric persists as an exact solution, and this is why this model resists several observational constraints. In contrast, the spinning black hole solution of the theory is not given by the Kerr metric but by a modification of it, so far only known for slow rotation and small coupling constant. In the present paper, we show that, in this approximation, the null geodesic equation can be integrated, and this allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole. We discuss how, in addition to the angular momentum of the solution, the coupling to the Chern-Simons term deforms the shape of the shadow.

  14. Thermodynamics and holographic entanglement entropy for spherical black holes in 5D Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuan; Xu, Hao; Zhao, Liu

    2016-09-01

    The holographic entanglement entropy is studied numerically in (4+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric Gauss-Bonnet AdS black hole spacetime with compact boundary. On the bulk side the black hole spacetime undergoes a van der Waals-like phase transition in the extended phase space, which is reviewed with emphasis on the behavior on the temperature-entropy plane. On the boundary, we calculated the regularized HEE of a disk region of different sizes. We find strong numerical evidence for the failure of equal area law for isobaric curves on the temperature-HEE plane and for the correctness of first law of entanglement entropy, and briefly give an explanation for why the latter may serve as a reason for the former, i.e. the failure of equal area law on the temperature-HEE plane.

  15. Combinatorics of the SU(2) black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Agullo, Ivan; Barbero G, J. Fernando; Borja, Enrique F.; Diaz-Polo, Jacobo; Villasenor, Eduardo J. S.

    2009-10-15

    We use the combinatorial and number-theoretical methods developed in previous works by the authors to study black hole entropy in the new proposal put forth by Engle, Noui, and Perez. Specifically, we give the generating functions relevant for the computation of the entropy and use them to derive its asymptotic behavior, including the value of the Immirzi parameter and the coefficient of the logarithmic correction.

  16. Combined effects of f(R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field on the extended phase space thermodynamics of higher-dimensional black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Li, Gu-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Bao

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the thermodynamics of higher-dimensional f( R) black holes in the extended phase space. Both the analytic expressions and the numerical results for the possible critical physical quantities are obtained. It is proved that meaningful critical specific volume only exists when p is odd. This unique phenomenon may be attributed to the combined effect of f( R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field. It is also shown that the ratio P_cv_c/T_c differs from that of higher-dimensional charged AdS black holes in Einstein gravity. However, the ratio for four-dimensional f( R) black holes is the same as that of four-dimensional RN-AdS black holes, implying that f( R) gravity does not influence the ratio. So the ratio may be related to conformally invariant Maxwell field. To probe the phase transition, we derive the explicit expression of the Gibbs free energy with its graph plotted. A phase transition analogous to the van der Waals liquid-gas system takes place between the small black hole and the large black hole. Classical swallow tail behavior, characteristic of first-order phase transitions, can also be observed in the Gibbs free energy graph. Critical exponents are also calculated. It is shown that these exponents are exactly the same as those of other AdS black holes, implying that neither f( R) gravity nor conformally invariant Maxwell field influence the critical exponents. Since the investigated black hole solution depends on the form of the function f( R), we discuss in detail how our results put constraint on the form of the function f( R) and we also present a simple example.

  17. Thermodynamics of topological black holes in Brans-Dicke gravity with a power-law Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, M. Kord; Dehghani, M. H.; Sheykhi, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new class of higher-dimensional exact topological black hole solutions of the Brans-Dicke theory in the presence of a power-law Maxwell field as the matter source. For this aim, we introduce a conformal transformation which transforms the Einstein-dilaton-power-law Maxwell gravity Lagrangian to the Brans-Dicke-power-law Maxwell theory one. Then, by using this conformal transformation, we obtain the desired solutions. Next, we study the properties of the solutions and conditions under which we have black holes. Interestingly enough, we show that there is a cosmological horizon in the presence of a negative cosmological constant. Finally, we calculate the temperature and charge and then by calculating the Euclidean action, we obtain the mass, the entropy and the electromagnetic potential energy. We find that the entropy does not respect the area law, and also the conserved and thermodynamic quantities are invariant under conformal transformation. Using these thermodynamic and conserved quantities, we show that the first law of black hole thermodynamics is satisfied on the horizon.

  18. Distorted stationary rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoom, Andrey A.

    2015-03-01

    We study the interior of distorted stationary rotating black holes on the example of a Kerr black hole distorted by external static and axisymmetric mass distribution. We show that there is a duality transformation between the outer and inner horizons of the black hole, which is different from that of an electrically charged static distorted black hole. The duality transformation is directly related to the discrete symmetry of the space-time. The black hole horizon areas, surface gravity, and angular momentum satisfy the Smarr formula constructed for both the horizons. We formulate the zeroth, the first, and the second laws of black hole thermodynamics for both the horizons of the black hole and show the correspondence between the local and the global forms of the first law. The Smarr formula and the laws of thermodynamics formulated for both the horizons are related by the duality transformation. The distortion is illustrated on the example of a quadrupole and octupole fields. The distortion fields noticeably affect the proper time of a free fall from the outer to the inner horizon of the black hole along the symmetry semiaxes. There is some minimal nonzero value of the quadrupole and octupole moments when the time becomes minimal. The minimal proper time indicates the closest approach of the horizons due to the distortion.

  19. Microscopic entropy of the three-dimensional rotating black hole of Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Giribet, Gaston; Oliva, Julio; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2009-12-15

    Asymptotically anti-de Sitter rotating black holes for the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend massive gravity theory in three dimensions are considered. In the special case when the theory admits a unique maximally symmetric solution, apart from the mass and the angular momentum, the black hole is described by an independent 'gravitational hair' parameter, which provides a negative lower bound for the mass. This bound is saturated at the extremal case, and since the temperature and the semiclassical entropy vanish, it is naturally regarded as the ground state. The absence of a global charge associated with the gravitational hair parameter reflects itself through the first law of thermodynamics in the fact that the variation of this parameter can be consistently reabsorbed by a shift of the global charges, giving further support to consider the extremal case as the ground state. The rotating black hole fits within relaxed asymptotic conditions as compared with the ones of Brown and Henneaux, such that they are invariant under the standard asymptotic symmetries spanned by two copies of the Virasoro generators, and the algebra of the conserved charges acquires a central extension. Then it is shown that Strominger's holographic computation for general relativity can also be extended to the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend theory; i.e., assuming that the quantum theory could be consistently described by a dual conformal field theory at the boundary, the black hole entropy can be microscopically computed from the asymptotic growth of the number of states according to Cardy's formula, in exact agreement with the semiclassical result.

  20. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  1. Nonstationary analogue black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    We study the existence of analogue nonstationary spherically symmetric black holes. The prime example is the acoustic model see Unruh (1981 Phys. Rev. Lett. 46 1351). We consider also a more general class of metrics that could be useful in other physical models of analogue black and white holes. We give examples of the appearance of black holes and of disappearance of white holes. We also discuss the relation between the apparent and the event horizons for the case of analogue black holes. In the end we study the inverse problem of determination of black or white holes by boundary measurements for the spherically symmetric nonstationary metrics.

  2. Black holes without firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larjo, Klaus; Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2013-05-01

    The postulates of black hole complementarity do not imply a firewall for infalling observers at a black hole horizon. The dynamics of the stretched horizon, that scrambles and reemits information, determines whether infalling observers experience anything out of the ordinary when entering a large black hole. In particular, there is no firewall if the stretched horizon degrees of freedom retain information for a time of the order of the black hole scrambling time.

  3. Quasi normal modes and P-V criticallity for scalar perturbations in a class of dRGT massive gravity around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasia, P.; Kuriakose, V. C.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate black holes in a class of dRGT massive gravity for their quasi normal modes (QNMs) for neutral and charged ones using Improved Asymptotic Iteration Method and their thermodynamic behavior. The QNMs are studied for different values of the massive parameter m_g for both neutral and charged dRGT black holes under a massless scalar perturbation. As m_g increases, the magnitude of the quasi normal frequencies are found to be increasing. The results are also compared with the Schwarzchild de Sitter case. P-V criticallity of the aforesaid black hoels under massles scalar perturbation in the de Sitter space are also studied in this paper. It is found that the thermodynamic behavior of a neutral black hole shows no physically feasible phase transition while a charged black hole shows a definite phase transition.

  4. The Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Garcia, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this program is to study black holes, both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies. We aim to study both 'stellar mass' x-ray binaries containing black holes (both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies), and super-massive black holes in nearby galaxies.

  5. Perspectives: Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When asked to discuss Cyg XR-1, E. E. Salpeter once concluded, 'A black hole in Cyg X(R)-1 is the most conservative hypothesis.' Recent observations now make it likely that a black hole in Cyg XR-1 is the only hypothesis tenable. Chandrasekhar first showed that compact stars - those with the inward force of gravity on their outer layers balanced by the pressure generated by the Pauli exclusion principle acting on its electrons (in white dwarfs) or nucleons (in neutron stars) - have a maximum mass. Equilibrium is achieved at a minimum of the total energy of the star, which is the sum of the positive Fermi energy and the negative gravitational energy. The maximum mass attainable in equilibrium is found by setting E = 0: M(max) = 1.5 M(Sun). If the mass of the star is larger than this, then E can be decreased without bound by decreasing the star's radius and increasing its (negative) gravitational energy. No equilibrium value of the radius exist, and general relativity predicts that gravitational collapse to a point occurs. This point singularity is a black hole.

  6. Quantum compositeness of gravity: black holes, AdS and inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar E-mail: cesar.gomez@uam.es

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational backgrounds, such as black holes, AdS, de Sitter and inflationary universes, should be viewed as composite of N soft constituent gravitons. It then follows that such systems are close to quantum criticality of graviton Bose-gas to Bose-liquid transition. Generic properties of the ordinary metric description, including geodesic motion or particle-creation in the background metric, emerge as the large-N limit of quantum scattering of constituent longitudinal gravitons. We show that this picture correctly accounts for physics of large and small black holes in AdS, as well as reproduces well-known inflationary predictions for cosmological parameters. However, it anticipates new effects not captured by the standard semi-classical treatment. In particular, we predict observable corrections that are sensitive to the inflationary history way beyond last 60 e-foldings. We derive an absolute upper bound on the number of e-foldings, beyond which neither de Sitter nor inflationary Universe can be approximated by a semi-classical metric. However, they could in principle persist in a new type of quantum eternity state. We discuss implications of this phenomenon for the cosmological constant problem.

  7. Quantum compositeness of gravity: black holes, AdS and inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar

    2014-01-14

    Gravitational backgrounds, such as black holes, AdS, de Sitter and inflationary universes, should be viewed as composite of N soft constituent gravitons. It then follows that such systems are close to quantum criticality of graviton Bose-gas to Bose-liquid transition. Generic properties of the ordinary metric description, including geodesic motion or particle-creation in the background metric, emerge as the large-N limit of quantum scattering of constituent longitudinal gravitons. We show that this picture correctly accounts for physics of large and small black holes in AdS, as well as reproduces well-known inflationary predictions for cosmological parameters. However, it anticipates new effects not captured by the standard semi-classical treatment. In particular, we predict observable corrections that are sensitive to the inflationary history way beyond last 60 e-foldings. We derive an absolute upper bound on the number of e-foldings, beyond which neither de Sitter nor inflationary Universe can be approximated by a semi-classical metric. However, they could in principle persist in a new type of quantum eternity state. We discuss implications of this phenomenon for the cosmological constant problem.

  8. Black Hole Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna; D'Orazio, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Black holes are dark dead stars. Neutron stars are giant magnets. As the neutron star orbits the black hole, an electronic circuit forms that generates a blast of power just before the black hole absorbs the neutron star whole. The black hole battery conceivably would be observable at cosmological distances. Possible channels for luminosity include synchro-curvature radiation, a blazing fireball, or even an unstable, short-lived black hole pulsar. As suggested by Mingarelli, Levin, and Lazio, some fraction of the battery power could also be reprocessed into coherent radio emission to populate a subclass of fast radio bursts.

  9. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garica, M.

    2001-01-01

    In 1995 we proposed to carry out ground-based observations in order to securely identify stellar mass black holes in our galaxy. This type 4 proposal under NASA's UV, Visible, and Gravitational Astrophysics program compliments NASA's space-based research by following up black hole candidates found and studied with space-based observatories, in order to determine if they are indeed black holes. While our primary goal is to securely identify black holes by measuring their masses, a secondary goal is identifying unique visible-range signatures for black holes.

  10. More Hidden Black Hole Dangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Black holes such as GRO J1655-40 form from collapsed stars. When stars at least eight times more massive than our Sun exhaust their fuel supply, they no longer have the energy to support their tremendous bulk. These stars explode as supernovae, blasting their outer envelopes into space. If the core is more than three times the mass of the Sun, it will collapse into a singularity, a single point of infinite density.Although light cannot escape black holes, astronomers can see black holes by virtue of the hot, glowing gas often stolen from a neighboring star that orbits these objects. From our vantage point, the light seems to flicker. The Rossi Explorer has recorded this flickering (called quasiperiodic oscillations, or QPOs) around many black holes. QPOs are produced by gas very near the innermost stable orbit the closest orbit a blob of gas can maintain before falling pell-mell into the black hole. As gas whips around the black hole at near light speed, gravity pulls the gas in one direction, then another, adding to the flickering. The QPO is related to the speed and size of this orbit and the mass of the black hole.

  11. 'Black holes': escaping the void.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Sharn

    2013-02-01

    The 'black hole' is a metaphor for a reality in the psyche of many individuals who have experienced complex trauma in infancy and early childhood. The 'black hole' has been created by an absence of the object, the (m)other, so there is no internalized object, no (m)other in the psyche. Rather, there is a 'black hole' where the object should be, but the infant is drawn to it, trapped by it because of an intrinsic, instinctive need for a 'real object', an internalized (m)other. Without this, the infant cannot develop. It is only the presence of a real object that can generate the essential gravity necessary to draw the core of the self that is still in an undeveloped state from deep within the abyss. It is the moving towards a real object, a (m)other, that relativizes the absolute power of the black hole and begins a reformation of its essence within the psyche.

  12. Black hole production by cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jonathan L; Shapere, Alfred D

    2002-01-14

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays create black holes in scenarios with extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity. In particular, cosmic neutrinos will produce black holes deep in the atmosphere, initiating quasihorizontal showers far above the standard model rate. At the Auger Observatory, hundreds of black hole events may be observed, providing evidence for extra dimensions and the first opportunity for experimental study of microscopic black holes. If no black holes are found, the fundamental Planck scale must be above 2 TeV for any number of extra dimensions.

  13. Tev-Scale Black Hole Lifetimes in Extra-Dimensional Lovelock Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2006-01-05

    We examine the mass loss rates and lifetimes of TeV-scale extra dimensional black holes (BH) in ADD-like models with Lovelock higher-curvature terms present in the action. In particular we focus on the predicted differences between the canonical and microcanonical ensemble statistical mechanics descriptions of the Hawking radiation that results in the decay of these BH. In even numbers of extra dimensions the employment of the microcanonical approach is shown to generally lead to a significant increase in the BH lifetime as in case of the Einstein-Hilbert action. For odd numbers of extra dimensions, stable BH remnants occur when employing either description provided the highest order allowed Lovelock invariant is present. However, in this case, the time dependence of the mass loss rates obtained employing the two approaches will be different. These effects are in principle measurable at future colliders.

  14. TeV Scale Black Holes in Warped Higher-Curvature Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2005-11-09

    We examine the properties of TeV-scale extra dimensional black holes (BH) in Randall-Sundrum-like models with Gauss-Bonnet higher-curvature terms present in the action. These theories naturally lead to a mass threshold for BH production in TeV particle collisions which could be observable at LHC/ILC. The lifetimes of such BH are examined and, in particular, we focus on the predicted lifetime differences between the canonical and microcanonical thermodynamical descriptions of BH decaying to Standard Model brane fields and the possibility of long-lived relics. The sensitivity of these results to the particular mix of fermions and bosons present in the Standard Model spectrum is also briefly examined.

  15. Static electromagnetic fields and charged black holes in general covariant theory of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Borzou, Ahmad; Lin, Kai; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: k_lin@baylor.edu

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we study electromeganetic static spacetimes in the nonrelativisitc general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity, proposed recently by Hořava and Melby-Thompson, and present all the electric static solutions, which represent the generalization of the Reissner-Nordström solution found in Einstein's general relativity (GR). The global/local structures of spacetimes in the HL theory in general are different from those given in GR, because the dispersion relations of test particles now contain high-order momentum terms, so the speeds of these particles are unbounded in the ultraviolet (UV). As a result, the conception of light-cones defined in GR becomes invalid and test particles do not follow geodesics. To study black holes in the HL theory, we adopt the geometrical optical approximations, and define a horizon as a (two-closed) surface that is free of spacetime singularities and on which massless test particles are infinitely redshifted. With such a definition, we show that some of our solutions give rise to (charged) black holes, although the radii of their horizons in general depend on the energies of the test particles.

  16. Quantum statistical relation for black holes in nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2011-03-15

    We consider curvature-squared corrections to Einstein-Hilbert gravity action in the form of a Gauss-Bonnet term in D>4 dimensions. In this theory, we study the thermodynamics of charged static black holes with anti-de Sitter (AdS) asymptotics, and whose electric field is described by nonlinear electrodynamics. These objects have received considerable attention in recent literature on gravity/gauge dualities. It is well-known that, within the framework of anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) correspondence, there exists a nonvanishing Casimir contribution to the internal energy of the system, manifested as the vacuum energy for global AdS spacetime in odd dimensions. Because of this reason, we derive a quantum statistical relation directly from the Euclidean action and not from the integration of the first law of thermodynamics. To this end, we employ a background-independent regularization scheme which consists, in addition to the bulk action, of counterterms that depend on both extrinsic and intrinsic curvatures of the boundary (Kounterterm series). This procedure results in a consistent inclusion of the vacuum energy and chemical potential in the thermodynamic description for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet AdS gravity regardless of the explicit form of the nonlinear electrodynamics Lagrangian.

  17. The quantum nonthermal radiation and horizon surface gravity of an arbitrarily accelerating black hole with electric charge and magnetic charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhi-Kun; Pan, Wei-Zhen; Yang, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, we discuss the quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics near an event horizon by studying the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of a scalar particle in curved space-time, and obtain the event horizon surface gravity and the Hawking temperature on that event horizon. The results show that there is a crossing of particle energy near the event horizon. We derive the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels. It is also found that the Hawking temperature of a black hole depends not only on the time, but also on the angle. There is a problem of dimension in the usual tortoise coordinate, so the present results obtained by using a correct-dimension new tortoise coordinate transformation may be more reasonable.

  18. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  19. Naked black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, G.T.; Ross, S.F.

    1997-08-01

    It is shown that there are large static black holes for which all curvature invariants are small near the event horizon, yet any object which falls in experiences enormous tidal forces {ital outside} the horizon. These black holes are charged and near extremality, and exist in a wide class of theories including string theory. The implications for cosmic censorship and the black hole information puzzle are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Gravity and large black holes in Randall-Sundrum II braneworlds.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Pau; Wiseman, Toby

    2011-08-19

    We show how to construct low energy solutions to the Randall-Sundrum II (RSII) model by using an associated five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(5)) and/or four-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT(4)) problem. The RSII solution is given as a perturbation of the AdS(5)-CFT(4) solution, with the perturbation parameter being the radius of curvature of the brane metric compared to the AdS length ℓ. The brane metric is then a specific perturbation of the AdS(5)-CFT(4) boundary metric. For low curvatures the RSII solution reproduces 4D general relativity on the brane. Recently, AdS(5)-CFT(4) solutions with a 4D Schwarzschild boundary metric were numerically constructed. We modify the boundary conditions to numerically construct large RSII static black holes with radius up to ~20ℓ. For a large radius, the RSII solutions are indeed close to the associated AdS(5)-CFT(4) solution. PMID:21929155

  1. Gravity and large black holes in Randall-Sundrum II braneworlds.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Pau; Wiseman, Toby

    2011-08-19

    We show how to construct low energy solutions to the Randall-Sundrum II (RSII) model by using an associated five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(5)) and/or four-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT(4)) problem. The RSII solution is given as a perturbation of the AdS(5)-CFT(4) solution, with the perturbation parameter being the radius of curvature of the brane metric compared to the AdS length ℓ. The brane metric is then a specific perturbation of the AdS(5)-CFT(4) boundary metric. For low curvatures the RSII solution reproduces 4D general relativity on the brane. Recently, AdS(5)-CFT(4) solutions with a 4D Schwarzschild boundary metric were numerically constructed. We modify the boundary conditions to numerically construct large RSII static black holes with radius up to ~20ℓ. For a large radius, the RSII solutions are indeed close to the associated AdS(5)-CFT(4) solution.

  2. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  3. Black hole accretion.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Ramesh; Quataert, Eliot

    2005-01-01

    Black holes are most often detected by the radiation produced when they gravitationally pull in surrounding gas, in a process called accretion. The efficiency with which the hot gas radiates its thermal energy strongly influences the geometry and dynamics of the accretion flow. Both radiatively efficient thin disks and radiatively inefficient thick disks are observed. When the accreting gas gets close to the central black hole, the radiation it produces becomes sensitive to the spin of the hole and the presence of an event horizon. Analysis of the luminosities and spectra of accreting black holes has yielded tantalizing evidence for both rotating holes and event horizons. Numerical simulations imply that the relativistic jets often seen from accreting black holes may be powered in part by the spin of the hole. PMID:15637269

  4. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  5. Rotating black holes and Coriolis effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Jui; Wu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we consider the fluid/gravity correspondence for general rotating black holes. By using the suitable boundary condition in near horizon limit, we study the correspondence between gravitational perturbation and fluid equation. We find that the dual fluid equation for rotating black holes contains a Coriolis force term, which is closely related to the angular velocity of the black hole horizon. This can be seen as a dual effect for the frame-dragging effect of rotating black hole under the holographic picture.

  6. Black hole thermodynamics from Euclidean horizon constraints.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2007-07-13

    To explain black hole thermodynamics in quantum gravity, one must introduce constraints to ensure that a black hole is actually present. I show that for a large class of black holes, such "horizon constraints" allow the use of conformal field theory techniques to compute the density of states, reproducing the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in a nearly model-independent manner. One standard string theory approach to black hole entropy arises as a special case, lending support to the claim that the mechanism may be "universal." I argue that the relevant degrees of freedom are Goldstone-boson-like excitations arising from the weak breaking of symmetry by the constraints. PMID:17678209

  7. Black hole thermodynamics from Euclidean horizon constraints.

    PubMed

    Carlip, S

    2007-07-13

    To explain black hole thermodynamics in quantum gravity, one must introduce constraints to ensure that a black hole is actually present. I show that for a large class of black holes, such "horizon constraints" allow the use of conformal field theory techniques to compute the density of states, reproducing the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in a nearly model-independent manner. One standard string theory approach to black hole entropy arises as a special case, lending support to the claim that the mechanism may be "universal." I argue that the relevant degrees of freedom are Goldstone-boson-like excitations arising from the weak breaking of symmetry by the constraints.

  8. Black holes with vector hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider Einstein gravity coupled to a vector field, either minimally or non-minimally, together with a vector potential of the type V = 2{Λ}_0+1/2{m}^2{A}^2 + {γ}_4{A}^4 . For a simpler non-minimally coupled theory with Λ0 = m = γ4 = 0, we obtain both extremal and non-extremal black hole solutions that are asymptotic to Minkowski space-times. We study the global properties of the solutions and derive the first law of thermodynamics using Wald formalism. We find that the thermodynamical first law of the extremal black holes is modified by a one form associated with the vector field. In particular, due to the existence of the non-minimal coupling, the vector forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and partly contributes to the one form modifying the first law. For a minimally coupled theory with Λ0 ≠ 0, we also obtain one class of asymptotically flat extremal black hole solutions in general dimensions. This is possible because the parameters ( m 2 , γ4) take certain values such that V = 0. In particular, we find that the vector also forms thermodynamic conjugates with the graviton mode and contributes to the corresponding first law, although the non-minimal coupling has been turned off. Thus all the extremal black hole solutions that we obtain provide highly non-trivial examples how the first law of thermodynamics can be modified by a either minimally or non-minimally coupled vector field. We also study Gauss-Bonnet gravity non-minimally coupled to a vector and obtain asymptotically flat black holes and Lifshitz black holes.

  9. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  10. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    't entirely understand, the other one gets the upper hand." GRS 1915+105 Chandra X-ray Image of GRS 1915+105 The latest Chandra results also show that the wind and the jet carry about the same amount of matter away from the black hole. This is evidence that the black hole is somehow regulating its accretion rate, which may be related to the toggling between mass expulsion via either a jet or a wind from the accretion disk. Self-regulation is a common topic when discussing supermassive black holes, but this is the first clear evidence for it in stellar-mass black holes. "It is exciting that we may be on the track of explaining two mysteries at the same time: how black hole jets can be shut down and also how black holes regulate their growth," said co-author Julia Lee, assistant professor in the Astronomy department at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Maybe black holes can regulate themselves better than the financial markets!" Although micro-quasars and quasars differ in mass by factors of millions, they should show a similarity in behavior when their very different physical scales are taken into account. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption "If quasars and micro-quasars behave very differently, then we have a big problem to figure out why, because gravity treats them the same," said Neilsen. "So, our result is actually very reassuring, because it's one more link between these different types of black holes." The timescale for changes in behavior of a black hole should vary in proportion to the mass. For example, an hour-long timescale for changes in GRS 1915 would correspond to about 10,000 years for a supermassive black hole that weighs a billion times the mass of the Sun. "We cannot hope to explore at this level of detail in any single supermassive black hole

  11. Some aspects of virtual black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Faizal, M.

    2012-03-15

    We first consider consistently third-quantize modified gravity. We then analyze certain aspects of virtual black holes in this third-quantized modified gravity. We see how a statistical mechanical origin for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy naturally arises in this model. Furthermore, the area and hence the entropy of a real macroscopic black hole is quantized in this model. Virtual black holes cause a loss of quantum coherence, which gives an intrinsic entropy to all physical systems that can be used to define a direction of time and hence provide a solution to the problem of time.

  12. Escape of black holes from the brane.

    PubMed

    Flachi, Antonino; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2005-10-14

    TeV-scale gravity theories allow the possibility of producing small black holes at energies that soon will be explored at the CERN LHC or at the Auger observatory. One of the expected signatures is the detection of Hawking radiation that might eventually terminate if the black hole, once perturbed, leaves the brane. Here, we study how the "black hole plus brane" system evolves once the black hole is given an initial velocity that mimics, for instance, the recoil due to the emission of a graviton. The results of our dynamical analysis show that the brane bends around the black hole, suggesting that the black hole eventually escapes into the extra dimensions once two portions of the brane come in contact and reconnect. This gives a dynamical mechanism for the creation of baby branes.

  13. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-01-10

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production.

  14. Constraints on braneworld gravity models from a kinematic limit on the age of the black hole XTE J1118+480.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-05-01

    In braneworld gravity models with a finite anti-de Sitter space (AdS) curvature in the extra dimension, the AdS/conformal field theory correspondence leads to a prediction for the lifetime of astrophysical black holes that is significantly smaller than the Hubble time, for asymptotic curvatures that are consistent with current experiments. Using the recent measurements of the position, three-dimensional spatial velocity, and mass of the black hole XTE J1118+480, I calculate a lower limit on its kinematic age of > or =11 Myr (95% confidence). This translates into an upper limit for the asymptotic AdS curvature in the extra dimensions of <0.08 mm, which significantly improves the limit obtained by table top experiments of sub mm gravity. PMID:17501556

  15. Constraints on braneworld gravity models from a kinematic limit on the age of the black hole XTE J1118+480.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2007-05-01

    In braneworld gravity models with a finite anti-de Sitter space (AdS) curvature in the extra dimension, the AdS/conformal field theory correspondence leads to a prediction for the lifetime of astrophysical black holes that is significantly smaller than the Hubble time, for asymptotic curvatures that are consistent with current experiments. Using the recent measurements of the position, three-dimensional spatial velocity, and mass of the black hole XTE J1118+480, I calculate a lower limit on its kinematic age of > or =11 Myr (95% confidence). This translates into an upper limit for the asymptotic AdS curvature in the extra dimensions of <0.08 mm, which significantly improves the limit obtained by table top experiments of sub mm gravity.

  16. Shapes of rotating nonsingular black hole shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Muhammed; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-07-01

    It is believed that curvature singularities are a creation of general relativity and, hence, in the absence of a quantum gravity, models of nonsingular black holes have received significant attention. We study the shadow (apparent shape), an optical appearance because of its strong gravitational field, cast by a nonsingular black hole which is characterized by three parameters, i.e., mass (M ), spin (a ), and a deviation parameter (k ). The nonsingular black hole under consideration is a generalization of the Kerr black hole that can be recognized asymptotically (r ≫k ,k >0 ) explicitly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and in the limit k →0 as the Kerr black hole. It turns out that the shadow of a nonsingular black hole is a dark zone covered by a deformed circle. Interestingly, it is seen that the shadow of a black hole is affected due to the parameter k . Indeed, for a given a , the size of a shadow reduces as the parameter k increases, and the shadow becomes more distorted as we increase the value of the parameter k when compared with the analogous Kerr black hole shadow. We also investigate, in detail, how the ergoregion of a black hole is changed due to the deviation parameter k .

  17. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  18. Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

    2011-08-12

    Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem. PMID:21902381

  19. Black hole evaporation rates without spacetime.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Samuel L; Patra, Manas K

    2011-08-12

    Verlinde recently suggested that gravity, inertia, and even spacetime may be emergent properties of an underlying thermodynamic theory. This vision was motivated in part by Jacobson's 1995 surprise result that the Einstein equations of gravity follow from the thermodynamic properties of event horizons. Taking a first tentative step in such a program, we derive the evaporation rate (or radiation spectrum) from black hole event horizons in a spacetime-free manner. Our result relies on a Hilbert space description of black hole evaporation, symmetries therein which follow from the inherent high dimensionality of black holes, global conservation of the no-hair quantities, and the existence of Penrose processes. Our analysis is not wedded to standard general relativity and so should apply to extended gravity theories where we find that the black hole area must be replaced by some other property in any generalized area theorem.

  20. Charged black holes in string-inspired gravity II. Mass inflation and dependence on parameters and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jakob; Yeom, Dong-han

    2015-09-07

    We investigate the relation between the existence of mass inflation and model parameters of string-inspired gravity models. In order to cover various models, we investigate a Brans-Dicke theory that is coupled to a U(1) gauge field. By tuning a model parameter that decides the coupling between the Brans-Dicke field and the electromagnetic field, we can make both of models such that the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward strong or weak coupling directions after gravitational collapses. We observe that as long as the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward any (strong or weak) directions, there is no Cauchy horizon and no mass inflation. Therefore, we conclude that to induce a Cauchy horizon and mass inflation inside a charged black hole, either there is no bias of the Brans-Dicke field as well as no Brans-Dicke hair outside the horizon or such a biased Brans-Dicke field should be well trapped and controlled by a potential.

  1. Charged black holes in string-inspired gravity II. Mass inflation and dependence on parameters and potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Jakob; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the relation between the existence of mass inflation and model parameters of string-inspired gravity models. In order to cover various models, we investigate a Brans-Dicke theory that is coupled to a U(1) gauge field. By tuning a model parameter that decides the coupling between the Brans-Dicke field and the electromagnetic field, we can make both of models such that the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward strong or weak coupling directions after gravitational collapses. We observe that as long as the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward any (strong or weak) directions, there is no Cauchy horizon and no mass inflation. Therefore, we conclude that to induce a Cauchy horizon and mass inflation inside a charged black hole, either there is no bias of the Brans-Dicke field as well as no Brans-Dicke hair outside the horizon or such a biased Brans-Dicke field should be well trapped and controlled by a potential.

  2. Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    't entirely understand, the other one gets the upper hand." GRS 1915+105 Chandra X-ray Image of GRS 1915+105 The latest Chandra results also show that the wind and the jet carry about the same amount of matter away from the black hole. This is evidence that the black hole is somehow regulating its accretion rate, which may be related to the toggling between mass expulsion via either a jet or a wind from the accretion disk. Self-regulation is a common topic when discussing supermassive black holes, but this is the first clear evidence for it in stellar-mass black holes. "It is exciting that we may be on the track of explaining two mysteries at the same time: how black hole jets can be shut down and also how black holes regulate their growth," said co-author Julia Lee, assistant professor in the Astronomy department at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Maybe black holes can regulate themselves better than the financial markets!" Although micro-quasars and quasars differ in mass by factors of millions, they should show a similarity in behavior when their very different physical scales are taken into account. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption "If quasars and micro-quasars behave very differently, then we have a big problem to figure out why, because gravity treats them the same," said Neilsen. "So, our result is actually very reassuring, because it's one more link between these different types of black holes." The timescale for changes in behavior of a black hole should vary in proportion to the mass. For example, an hour-long timescale for changes in GRS 1915 would correspond to about 10,000 years for a supermassive black hole that weighs a billion times the mass of the Sun. "We cannot hope to explore at this level of detail in any single supermassive black hole

  3. Introducing the Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  4. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O’Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  5. Astrophysics: Monster black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2011-12-01

    A combination of ground-based and spacecraft observations has uncovered two black holes of 10 billion solar masses in the nearby Universe. The finding sheds light on how these cosmic monsters co-evolve with galaxies.

  6. Helical superconducting black holes.

    PubMed

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P

    2012-05-25

    We construct novel static, asymptotically five-dimensional anti-de Sitter black hole solutions with Bianchi type-VII(0) symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have a vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, nonisotropic dual ground states with an emergent scaling symmetry.

  7. Stationary black holes: large D analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryotaku; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    We consider the effective theory of large D stationary black holes. By solving the Einstein equations with a cosmological constant using the 1 /D expansion in near zone of the black hole we obtain the effective equation for the stationary black hole. The effective equation describes the Myers-Perry black hole, bumpy black holes and, possibly, the black ring solution as its solutions. In this effective theory the black hole is represented as an embedded membrane in the background, e.g., Minkowski or Anti-de Sitter spacetime and its mean curvature is given by the surface gravity redshifted by the background gravitational field and the local Lorentz boost. The local Lorentz boost property of the effective equation is observed also in the metric itself. In fact we show that the leading order metric of the Einstein equation in the 1 /D expansion is generically regarded as a Lorentz boosted Schwarzschild black hole. We apply this Lorentz boost property of the stationary black hole solution to solve perturbation equations. As a result we obtain an analytic formula for quasinormal modes of the singly rotating Myers-Perry black hole in the 1 /D expansion.

  8. Charged Galileon black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  9. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our UV/VIS work concentrates on black hole X-ray nova. These objects consist of two stars in close orbit, one of which we believe is a black hole - our goal is to SHOW that one is a black hole. In order to reach this goal we carry out observations in the Optical, UV, IR and X-ray bands, and compare the observations to theoretical models. In the past year, our UV/VIS grant has provided partial support (mainly travel funds and page charges) for work we have done on X-ray nova containing black holes and neutron stars. We have been very successful in obtaining telescope time to support our project - we have completed approximately a dozen separate observing runs averaging 3 days each, using the MMT (5M), Lick 3M, KPNO 2.1M, CTIO 4M, CTIO 1.5M, and the SAO/WO 1.2M telescopes. These observations have allowed the identification of one new black hole (Nova Oph 1977), and allowed the mass of another to be measured (GS2000+25). Perhaps our most exciting new result is the evidence we have gathered for the existence of 'event horizons' in black hole X-ray nova.

  10. Holographic interpretation of acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Sun, Jia-Rui; Tian, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2015-10-01

    With the attempt to find the holographic description of the usual acoustic black holes in fluid, we construct an acoustic black hole formed in the d -dimensional fluid located at the timelike cutoff surface of a neutral black brane in asymptotically AdSd +1 spacetime; the bulk gravitational dual of the acoustic black hole is presented at the first order of the hydrodynamic fluctuation. Moreover, the Hawking-like temperature of the acoustic black hole horizon is showed to be connected to the Hawking temperature of the real anti-de Sitter (AdS) black brane in the bulk, and the duality between the phonon scattering in the acoustic black hole and the sound channel quasinormal mode propagating in the bulk perturbed AdS black brane is extracted. We thus point out that the acoustic black hole appearing in fluid, which was originally proposed as an analogous model to simulate Hawking radiation of the real black hole, is not merely an analogy, it can indeed be used to describe specific properties of the real AdS black holes, in the spirit of the fluid/gravity duality.

  11. Black holes in loop quantum gravity: the complete space-time.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2008-10-17

    We consider the quantization of the complete extension of the Schwarzschild space-time using spherically symmetric loop quantum gravity. We find an exact solution corresponding to the semiclassical theory. The singularity is eliminated but the space-time still contains a horizon. Although the solution is known partially numerically and therefore a proper global analysis is not possible, a global structure akin to a singularity-free Reissner-Nordström space-time including a Cauchy horizon is suggested.

  12. Asymptotically flat black holes in 2 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaç, Gökhan; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-04-01

    Asymptotically flat black holes in 2 +1 dimensions are a rarity. We study the recently found black flower solutions (asymptotically flat black holes with deformed horizons), static black holes, rotating black holes and the dynamical black flowers (black holes with radiative gravitons) of the purely quadratic version of new massive gravity. We show how they appear in this theory and we also show that they are also solutions to the infinite order extended version of the new massive gravity, that is the Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity with an amputated Einsteinian piece. The same metrics also solve the topologically extended versions of these theories, with modified conserved charges and the thermodynamical quantities, such as the Wald entropy. Besides these we find new conformally flat radiating type solutions to these extended gravity models. We also show that these metrics do not arise in Einstein's gravity coupled to physical perfect fluids.

  13. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  14. Black holes with surrounding matter in scalar-tensor theories.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Vitor; Carucci, Isabella P; Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2013-09-13

    We uncover two mechanisms that can render Kerr black holes unstable in scalar-tensor gravity, both associated with the presence of matter in the vicinity of the black hole and the fact that this introduces an effective mass for the scalar. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the structure of spacetime in realistic, astrophysical black holes in scalar-tensor theories.

  15. 'Black holes': escaping the void.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Sharn

    2013-02-01

    The 'black hole' is a metaphor for a reality in the psyche of many individuals who have experienced complex trauma in infancy and early childhood. The 'black hole' has been created by an absence of the object, the (m)other, so there is no internalized object, no (m)other in the psyche. Rather, there is a 'black hole' where the object should be, but the infant is drawn to it, trapped by it because of an intrinsic, instinctive need for a 'real object', an internalized (m)other. Without this, the infant cannot develop. It is only the presence of a real object that can generate the essential gravity necessary to draw the core of the self that is still in an undeveloped state from deep within the abyss. It is the moving towards a real object, a (m)other, that relativizes the absolute power of the black hole and begins a reformation of its essence within the psyche. PMID:23351000

  16. Janus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  17. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C.

    2016-03-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar-tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory.

  18. Kerr Black Hole Entropy and its Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ji-Jian; Li, Chuan-An; Cheng, Xie-Feng

    2016-08-01

    By constructing the four-dimensional phase space based on the observable physical quantity of Kerr black hole and gauge transformation, the Kerr black hole entropy in the phase space was obtained. Then considering the corresponding mechanical quantities as operators and making the operators quantized, entropy spectrum of Kerr black hole was obtained. Our results show that the Kerr black hole has the entropy spectrum with equal intervals, which is in agreement with the idea of Bekenstein. In the limit of large event horizon, the area of the adjacent event horizon of the black hole have equal intervals. The results are in consistent with the results based on the loop quantum gravity theory by Dreyer et al.

  19. Problems of Construction of Black Holes and Traversed Wormholes in Various Theories of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbanovski, Valeri; Kairov, Taimuraz.; Melehina, Olga

    In the framework of general relativity found new vacuum solutions [1,2] for the spherically symmetric non-static metrics as a constant source ("dynamic analog" gravitational radius), and a source in the form of time-dependent functions. In the latter case, the conditions for a smooth cross-linking with the original static metric. Within Post-Einstein theory of gravitation (PETG, [3]), is consider the variant with zero scalar curvature of space-time is considered. Found external solutions for spherically symmetric objects that allow a smooth stitching at distances slightly exceeding the gravitational radius of the source. We also show that in the studied approach the traversable vacuum wormholes can not be realized. In the theory of gravity with vacuum polarization (TGVP, [4]) built vacuum static spherically symmetric nonsingular solutions. At this the "polarization effects" appear only under the gravitational radius of the source. Also obtained metric describing the vacuum traversable wormhole. References begin{enumerate} Karbanovski V.V. et. al. - JETP, 2012, Vol. 115, No. 2, pp. 208-211. Karbanovski V.V. et. al. - JETP, 2012, Vol. 115, No. 4, pp. 733. Karbanovski V.V. et. al. - Class. Quantum Grav., 2012, Vol. 29, No. 6, 065007. Karbanovski V.V. et. al. - Acta Phys. Pol. B, 2011, Vol. 42, No.1, p. 171.

  20. Black holes in magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Nair, V. P.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1991-11-01

    We study magnetically charged classical solutions of a spontaneously broken gauge theory interacting with gravity. We show that nonsingular monopole solutions exist only if the Higgs field vacuum expectation value v is less than or equal to a critical value vcr, which is of the order of the Planck mass. In the limiting case, the monopole becomes a black hole, with the region outside the horizon described by the critical Reissner-Nordstrom solution. For v less than vcr, we find additional solutions which are singular at f = 0, but which have this singularity hidden within a horizon. These have nontrivial matter fields outside the horizon, and may be interpreted as small black holes lying within a magnetic monopole. The nature of these solutions as a function of v and of the total mass M and their relation to the Reissner-Nordstrom solutions is discussed.

  1. Black holes in magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Nair, V. P.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1992-04-01

    We study magnetically charged classical solutions of a spontaneously broken gauge theory interacting with gravity. We show that nonsingular monopole solutions exist only if the Higgs-field vacuum expectation value v is less than or equal to a critical value vcr, which is of the order of the Planck mass. In the limiting case, the monopole becomes a black hole, with the region outside the horizon described by the critical Reissner-Nordström solution. For v

  2. Black holes in magnetic monopoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Nair, V. P.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1991-01-01

    We study magnetically charged classical solutions of a spontaneously broken gauge theory interacting with gravity. We show that nonsingular monopole solutions exist only if the Higgs field vacuum expectation value v is less than or equal to a critical value v sub cr, which is of the order of the Planck mass. In the limiting case, the monopole becomes a black hole, with the region outside the horizon described by the critical Reissner-Nordstrom solution. For v less than v sub cr, we find additional solutions which are singular at f = 0, but which have this singularity hidden within a horizon. These have nontrivial matter fields outside the horizon, and may be interpreted as small black holes lying within a magnetic monopole. The nature of these solutions as a function of v and of the total mass M and their relation to the Reissner-Nordstrom solutions is discussed.

  3. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Sean A.; di Criscienzo, R.; Nadalini, M.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2009-05-01

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  4. Extremal higher spin black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañados, Máximo; Castro, Alejandra; Faraggi, Alberto; Jottar, Juan I.

    2016-04-01

    The gauge sector of three-dimensional higher spin gravities can be formulated as a Chern-Simons theory. In this context, a higher spin black hole corresponds to a flat connection with suitable holonomy (smoothness) conditions which are consistent with the properties of a generalized thermal ensemble. Building on these ideas, we discuss a definition of black hole extremality which is appropriate to the topological character of 3 d higher spin theories. Our definition can be phrased in terms of the Jordan class of the holonomy around a non-contractible (angular) cycle, and we show that it is compatible with the zero-temperature limit of smooth black hole solutions. While this notion of extremality does not require supersymmetry, we exemplify its consequences in the context of sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and show that, as usual, not all extremal solutions preserve supersymmetries. Remarkably, we find in addition that the higher spin setup allows for non-extremal supersymmetric black hole solutions. Furthermore, we discuss our results from the perspective of the holographic duality between sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and two-dimensional CFTs with W (3|2) symmetry, the simplest higher spin extension of the N = 2 super-Virasoro algebra. In particular, we compute W (3|2) BPS bounds at the full quantum level, and relate their semiclassical limit to extremal black hole or conical defect solutions in the 3 d bulk. Along the way, we discuss the role of the spectral flow automorphism and provide a conjecture for the form of the semiclassical BPS bounds in general N = 2 two-dimensional CFTs with extended symmetry algebras.

  5. Discrete quantum spectrum of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2016-04-01

    The quantum genesis of Hawking radiation is a long-standing puzzle in black hole physics. Semi-classically one can argue that the spectrum of radiation emitted by a black hole look very much sparse unlike what is expected from a thermal object. It was demonstrated through a simple quantum model that a quantum black hole will retain a discrete profile, at least in the weak energy regime. However, it was suggested that this discreteness might be an artifact of the simplicity of eigen-spectrum of the model considered. Different quantum theories can, in principle, give rise to different complicated spectra and make the radiation from black hole dense enough in transition lines, to make them look continuous in profile. We show that such a hope from a geometry-quantized black hole is not realized as long as large enough black holes are dubbed with a classical mass area relation in any gravity theory ranging from GR, Lanczos-Lovelock to f(R) gravity. We show that the smallest frequency of emission from black hole in any quantum description, is bounded from below, to be of the order of its inverse mass. That leaves the emission with only two possibilities. It can either be non-thermal, or it can be thermal only with the temperature being much larger than 1/M.

  6. Thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild Black Hole in Noncommutative Space

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Payan, S.; Sabido, M.

    2009-04-20

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. In particular, we use a deform Schwarzschild solution in noncommutative gauge theory of gravity. By means of euclidean quantum gravity we obtain the entropy, temperatute and the time of evaporation of the noncommutative black hole.

  7. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  8. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Black-hole mergers take place in regions of very strong and dynamical gravitational fields, and are among the strongest sources of gravitational radiation. Probing these mergers requires solving the full set of Einstein's equations of general relativity numerically. For more than 40 years, progress towards this goal has been very slow, as numerical relativists encountered a host of difficult problems. Recently, several breakthroughs have led to dramatic progress, enabling stable and accurate calculations of black-hole mergers. This article presents an overview of this field, including impacts on astrophysics and applications in gravitational wave data analysis.

  9. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  10. Infinitely coloured black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2000-04-01

    We formulate the field equations for SU (icons/Journals/Common/infty" ALT="infty" ALIGN="TOP"/> ) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, and use an analytic approximation to elucidate the properties of spherically symmetric black hole solutions. This model may be motivated by string theory considerations, given the enormous gauge symmetries which characterize string theory. The solutions simplify considerably in the presence of a negative cosmological constant, particularly for the limiting cases of a very large cosmological constant or very small gauge field. The black holes possess infinite amounts of gauge field hair, and we speculate on possible consequences of this for quantum decoherence, which, however, we do not tackle here.

  11. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  12. Stability of f(R) black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon; Son, Edwin J.

    2011-06-15

    We investigate the stability of an f(R) (Schwarzschild) black hole obtained from the f(R) gravity. It is difficult to carry out the perturbation analysis around the black hole because the linearized Einstein equation is fourth order in f(R) gravity. In order to resolve this difficulty, we transform f(R) gravity into the scalar-tensor theory by introducing two auxiliary scalars. In this case, the linearized curvature scalar becomes a scalaron, showing that all linearized equations are second order, which are the same equations for the massive Brans-Dicke theory. It turns out that the f(R) black hole is stable against the external perturbations if the scalaron does not have a tachyonic mass.

  13. Slowly balding black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-01

    The “no-hair” theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively “frozen in” the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes NB=eΦ∞/(πcℏ), where Φ∞≈2π2BNSRNS3/(PNSc) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole’s magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  14. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  15. Black hole as a wormhole factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Won; Park, Mu-In

    2015-12-01

    There have been lots of debates about the final fate of an evaporating black hole and the singularity hidden by an event horizon in quantum gravity. However, on general grounds, one may argue that a black hole stops radiation at the Planck mass (ħc / G) 1 / 2 ∼10-5 g, where the radiated energy is comparable to the black hole's mass. And also, it has been argued that there would be a wormhole-like structure, known as "spacetime foam", due to large fluctuations below the Planck length (ħG /c3) 1 / 2 ∼10-33 cm. In this paper, as an explicit example, we consider an exact classical solution which represents nicely those two properties in a recently proposed quantum gravity model based on different scaling dimensions between space and time coordinates. The solution, called "Black Wormhole", consists of two different states, depending on its mass parameter M and an IR parameter ω: For the black hole state (with ωM2 > 1 / 2), a non-traversable wormhole occupies the interior region of the black hole around the singularity at the origin, whereas for the wormhole state (with ωM2 < 1 / 2), the interior wormhole is exposed to an outside observer as the black hole horizon is disappearing from evaporation. The black hole state becomes thermodynamically stable as it approaches the merging point where the interior wormhole throat and the black hole horizon merges, and the Hawking temperature vanishes at the exact merge point (with ωM2 = 1 / 2). This solution suggests the "Generalized Cosmic Censorship" by the existence of a wormhole-like structure which protects the naked singularity even after the black hole evaporation. One could understand the would-be wormhole inside the black hole horizon as the result of microscopic wormholes created by "negative" energy quanta which have entered the black hole horizon in Hawking radiation process; the quantum black hole could be a wormhole factory! It is found that this speculative picture may be consistent with the recent " ER

  16. Growth of Primordial Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tomohiro

    Primordial black holes have important observational implications through Hawking evaporation and gravitational radiation as well as being a candidate for cold dark matter. Those black holes are assumed to have formed in the early universe typically with the mass scale contained within the Hubble horizon at the formation epoch and subsequently accreted mass surrounding them. Numerical relativity simulation shows that primordial black holes of different masses do not accrete much, which contrasts with a simplistic Newtonian argument. We see that primordial black holes larger than the 'super-horizon' primordial black holes have decreasing energy and worm-hole like struture, suggesting the formation through quamtum processes.

  17. Bohr-like black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, Christian

    2015-03-10

    The idea that black holes (BHs) result in highly excited states representing both the “hydrogen atom” and the “quasi-thermal emission” in quantum gravity is today an intuitive but general conviction. In this paper it will be shown that such an intuitive picture is more than a picture. In fact, we will discuss a model of quantum BH somewhat similar to the historical semi-classical model of the structure of a hydrogen atom introduced by Bohr in 1913. The model is completely consistent with existing results in the literature, starting from the celebrated result of Bekenstein on the area quantization.

  18. Moulting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Chowdhury, Borun D.; de Boer, Jan; El-Showk, Sheer; Shigemori, Masaki

    2012-03-01

    We find a family of novel supersymmetric phases of the D1-D5 CFT, which in certain ranges of charges have more entropy than all known ensembles. We also find bulk BPS configurations that exist in the same range of parameters as these phases, and have more entropy than a BMPV black hole; they can be thought of as coming from a BMPV black hole shedding a "hair" condensate outside of the horizon. The entropy of the bulk configurations is smaller than that of the CFT phases, which indicates that some of the CFT states are lifted at strong coupling. Neither the bulk nor the boundary phases are captured by the elliptic genus, which makes the coincidence of the phase boundaries particularly remarkable. Our configurations are supersymmetric, have non-Cardy-like entropy, and are the first instance of a black hole entropy enigma with a controlled CFT dual. Furthermore, contrary to common lore, these objects exist in a region of parameter space (between the "cosmic censorship bound" and the "unitarity bound") where no black holes were thought to exist.

  19. Black hole magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-20

    We investigate the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole in various astrophysical settings. The solution Ψ(r, θ) depends on the distributions of the magnetic field line angular velocity ω(Ψ) and the poloidal electric current I(Ψ). These are obtained self-consistently as eigenfunctions that allow the solution to smoothly cross the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner light surface inside the ergosphere, and the outer light surface, which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. Magnetic field configurations that cross both singular surfaces (e.g., monopole, paraboloidal) are uniquely determined. Configurations that cross only one light surface (e.g., the artificial case of a rotating black hole embedded in a vertical magnetic field) are degenerate. We show that, similar to pulsars, black hole magnetospheres naturally develop an electric current sheet that potentially plays a very important role in the dissipation of black hole rotational energy and in the emission of high-energy radiation.

  20. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  1. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari; Torres, Diego F. E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es

    2014-08-01

    Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?.

  2. Quantum gravity effects on charged microblack holes thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasvandi, Niloofar; Soleimani, M. J.; Radiman, Shahidan; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermo dynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  3. Quantum gravity effects on charged microblack holes thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasvandi, Niloofar; Soleimani, M. J.; Radiman, Shahidan; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-08-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermo dynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  4. Quantum tunneling radiation from self-dual black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A. S.; Brito, F. A.

    2013-10-01

    Black holes are considered as objects that can reveal quantum aspects of spacetime. Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is a theory that propose a way to model the quantum spacetime behavior revealed by a black hole. One recent prediction of this theory is the existence of sub-Planckian black holes, which have the interesting property of self-duality. This property removes the black hole singularity and replaces it with another asymptotically flat region. In this work, we obtain the thermodynamical properties of this kind of black holes, called self-dual black holes, using the Hamilton-Jacobi version of the tunneling formalism. Moreover, using the tools of the tunneling approach, we investigate the emission spectrum of self-dual black holes, and investigate if some information about the black hole initial state can be recovered during the evaporation process. Back-reaction effects are included.

  5. Black Hole Mergers in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Portegies Zwart SF; McMillan

    2000-01-01

    Mergers of black hole binaries are expected to release large amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation. However, binary evolution models predict merger rates that are too low to be of observational interest. In this Letter, we explore the possibility that black holes become members of close binaries via dynamical interactions with other stars in dense stellar systems. In star clusters, black holes become the most massive objects within a few tens of millions of years; dynamical relaxation then causes them to sink to the cluster core, where they form binaries. These black hole binaries become more tightly bound by superelastic encounters with other cluster members and are ultimately ejected from the cluster. The majority of escaping black hole binaries have orbital periods short enough and eccentricities high enough that the emission of gravitational radiation causes them to coalesce within a few billion years. We predict a black hole merger rate of about 1.6x10-7 yr-1 Mpc-3, implying gravity-wave detection rates substantially greater than the corresponding rates from neutron star mergers. For the first-generation Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO-I), we expect about one detection during the first 2 years of operation. For its successor LIGO-II, the rate rises to roughly one detection per day. The uncertainties in these numbers are large. Event rates may drop by about an order of magnitude if the most massive clusters eject their black hole binaries early in their evolution. PMID:10587485

  6. Black Hole Mergers in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Portegies Zwart SF; McMillan

    2000-01-01

    Mergers of black hole binaries are expected to release large amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation. However, binary evolution models predict merger rates that are too low to be of observational interest. In this Letter, we explore the possibility that black holes become members of close binaries via dynamical interactions with other stars in dense stellar systems. In star clusters, black holes become the most massive objects within a few tens of millions of years; dynamical relaxation then causes them to sink to the cluster core, where they form binaries. These black hole binaries become more tightly bound by superelastic encounters with other cluster members and are ultimately ejected from the cluster. The majority of escaping black hole binaries have orbital periods short enough and eccentricities high enough that the emission of gravitational radiation causes them to coalesce within a few billion years. We predict a black hole merger rate of about 1.6x10-7 yr-1 Mpc-3, implying gravity-wave detection rates substantially greater than the corresponding rates from neutron star mergers. For the first-generation Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO-I), we expect about one detection during the first 2 years of operation. For its successor LIGO-II, the rate rises to roughly one detection per day. The uncertainties in these numbers are large. Event rates may drop by about an order of magnitude if the most massive clusters eject their black hole binaries early in their evolution.

  7. Exact formation of hairy planar black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Chen, Bin

    2016-04-01

    We consider Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field with a given potential in general dimensions. We obtain large classes of static hairy planar black holes which are asymptotic to anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-times. In particular, for a special case μ =(n -2 )/2 , we obtain new classes of exact dynamical solutions describing black hole formation. We find there are two classes of collapse solutions. The first class of solutions describes the evolution start from AdS space-time with a naked singularity at the origin. The space-time is linearly unstable and evolves into stationary black hole states even under small perturbation. The second class of solutions describes the space-time spontaneously evolving from AdS vacua into stationary black hole states undergoing nonlinear instability. We also discuss the global properties of all these dynamical solutions.

  8. Energy conservation for dynamical black holes.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sean A

    2004-12-17

    An energy conservation law is described, expressing the increase in mass-energy of a general black hole in terms of the energy densities of the infalling matter and gravitational radiation. This first law of black-hole dynamics describes how a black hole grows and is regular in the limit where it ceases to grow. An effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor is obtained, providing measures of both ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation on and near a black hole. Corresponding energy-tensor forms of the first law involve a preferred time vector which plays the role of a stationary Killing vector. Identifying an energy flux, vanishing if and only if the horizon is null, allows a division into energy supply and work terms. The energy supply can be expressed in terms of area increase and a newly defined surface gravity, yielding a Gibbs-like equation.

  9. Toward black hole entropy in shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gabriel; Shyam, Vasudev

    2015-11-01

    Shape dynamics is a classical theory of gravity which agrees with general relativity in many important cases, but possesses different gauge symmetries and constraints. Rather than spacetime diffeomorphism invariance, shape dynamics takes spatial diffeomorphism invariance and spatial Weyl invariance as the fundamental gauge symmetries associated with the gravitational field. Since the area of the event horizon of a black hole transforms under a generic spatial Weyl transformation, there has been some doubt that one can speak sensibly about the thermodynamics of black holes in shape dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to show that by treating the event horizon of a black hole as an interior boundary, one can recover familiar notions of black hole thermodynamics in shape dynamics and define a gauge invariant entropy that agrees with general relativity.

  10. GRMHD simulations of black hole accretion and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    As black holes accrete surrounding gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how the properties of a jet connect to those of the accretion flow and the black hole (e.g. black hole spin) remains an area of active research. I will discuss recent progress in first-principles general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) models of black hole accretion-jet systems, specifically the emerging picture of how jets form and the factors that determine jet properties. The speaker is supported by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  11. Statistical description of the black hole degeneracy spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero G, J. Fernando; Villasenor, Eduardo J. S.

    2011-05-15

    We use mathematical methods based on generating functions to study the statistical properties of the black hole degeneracy spectrum in loop quantum gravity. In particular we will study the persistence of the observed effective quantization of the entropy as a function of the horizon area. We will show that this quantization disappears as the area increases despite the existence of black hole configurations with a large degeneracy. The methods that we describe here can be adapted to the study of the statistical properties of the black hole degeneracy spectrum for all the existing proposals to define black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity.

  12. Black hole mass threshold from nonsingular quantum gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Goswami, Rituparno; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2005-08-26

    Quantum gravity is expected to remove the classical singularity that arises as the end state of gravitational collapse. To investigate this, we work with a toy model of a collapsing homogeneous scalar field. We show that nonperturbative semiclassical effects of loop quantum gravity cause a bounce and remove the black hole singularity. Furthermore, we find a critical threshold scale below which no horizon forms: quantum gravity may exclude very small astrophysical black holes.

  13. TESTS OF GENERAL RELATIVITY IN THE STRONG-GRAVITY REGIME BASED ON X-RAY SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF BLACK HOLES IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2012-08-01

    Although general relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in the weak-gravity regime, similar tests in the strong-gravity regime are still missing. In this paper, we explore the possibility to use X-ray spectropolarimetric observations of black holes in X-ray binaries to distinguish between the Kerr metric and the phenomenological metrics introduced by Johannsen and Psaltis (which are not vacuum solutions of Einstein's equation) and thus to test the no-hair theorem of GR. To this end, we have developed a numerical code that calculates the radial brightness profiles of accretion disks and parallel transports the wave vector and polarization vector of photons through the Kerr and non-GR spacetimes. We used the code to predict the observational appearance of GR and non-GR accreting black hole systems. We find that the predicted energy spectra and energy-dependent polarization degree and polarization direction do depend strongly on the underlying spacetime. However, for large regions of the parameter space, the GR and non-GR metrics lead to very similar observational signatures, making it difficult to observationally distinguish between the two types of models.

  14. Black Holes and Firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Our modern understanding of space, time, matter, and even reality itself arose from the three great revolutions of the early twentieth century: special relativity, general relativity, and quantum mechanics. But a century later, this work is unfinished. Many deep connections have been discovered, but the full form of a unified theory incorporating all three principles is not known. Thought experiments and paradoxes have often played a key role in figuring out how to fit theories together. For the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics, black holes have been an important arena. I will talk about the quantum mechanics of black holes, the information paradox, and the latest version of this paradox, the firewall. The firewall points to a conflict between our current theories of spacetime and of quantum mechanics. It may lead to a new understanding of how these are connected, perhaps based on quantum entanglement.

  15. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Benrong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang E-mail: pengw@scu.edu.cn

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ''Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ''Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E{sup 2} = m{sup 2}+p{sup 2}[1−η(E/m{sub p}){sup n}] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n ≥ 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  16. Thermodynamics and luminosities of rainbow black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Benrong; Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2015-11-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is ``Gravity's rainbow'', where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the ``Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation'' which is E2 = m2+p2[1-η(E/mp)n] with n > 0, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of η and n in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with η < 0 and n >= 2. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of η and n.

  17. Born-Infeld and charged black holes with non-linear source in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Houndjo, Mahouton J. S.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate f(T) theory coupled with a nonlinear source of electrodynamics, for a spherically symmetric and static spacetime in 4D. We re-obtain the Born-Infeld and Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS solutions. We generalize the no-go theorem for any content that obeys the relationship Script T00=Script T11 for the energy-momentum tensor and a given set of tetrads. Our results show new classes of solutions where the metrics are related through b(r)=-Na(r). We do the introductory analysis showing that solutions are that of asymptotically flat black holes, with a singularity at the origin of the radial coordinate, covered by a single event horizon. We also reconstruct the action for this class of solutions and obtain the functional form f(T)=f0(-T)(N+3)/[2(N+1)] and Script LNED=Script L0(-F)(N+3)/[2(N+1)]. Using the Lagrangian density of Born-Infeld, we obtain a new class of charged black holes where the action reads f(T)=-16βBI[1-√1+(T/4βBI)].

  18. Born-Infeld and charged black holes with non-linear source in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Junior, Ednaldo L.B.; Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Houndjo, Mahouton J.S. E-mail: esialg@gmail.com

    2015-06-01

    We investigate f(T) theory coupled with a nonlinear source of electrodynamics, for a spherically symmetric and static spacetime in 4D. We re-obtain the Born-Infeld and Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS solutions. We generalize the no-go theorem for any content that obeys the relationship T{sup 0}{sub 0}=T{sup 1}{sub 1} for the energy-momentum tensor and a given set of tetrads. Our results show new classes of solutions where the metrics are related through b(r)=−Na(r). We do the introductory analysis showing that solutions are that of asymptotically flat black holes, with a singularity at the origin of the radial coordinate, covered by a single event horizon. We also reconstruct the action for this class of solutions and obtain the functional form f(T)=f{sub 0}(−T){sup (N+3)/[2(N+1)]} and L{sub NED}=L{sub 0}(−F){sup (N+3)/[2(N+1)]}. Using the Lagrangian density of Born-Infeld, we obtain a new class of charged black holes where the action reads f(T)=−16β{sub BI}[1−√1+(T/4β{sub BI})].

  19. Improved black hole fireworks: Asymmetric black-hole-to-white-hole tunneling scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Tommaso; Perez, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    A new scenario for gravitational collapse has been recently proposed by Haggard and Rovelli. Presenting the model under the name of black hole fireworks, they claim that the accumulation of quantum gravitational effects outside the horizon can cause the tunneling of geometry from a black hole to a white hole, allowing a bounce of the collapsing star which can eventually go back to infinity. In this paper, we discuss the instabilities of this model and propose a simple minimal modification which eliminates them, as well as other related instabilities discussed in the literature. The new scenario is a time-asymmetric version of the original model with a time scale for the final explosion that is shorter than m log m in Planck units. Our analysis highlights the importance of irreversibility in gravitational collapse which, in turn, uncovers important issues that cannot be addressed in detail without a full quantum gravity treatment.

  20. Quantum black hole in the generalized uncertainty principle framework

    SciTech Connect

    Bina, A.; Moslehi, A.; Jalalzadeh, S.

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we study the effects of the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) on canonical quantum gravity of black holes. Through the use of modified partition function that involves the effects of the GUP, we obtain the thermodynamical properties of the Schwarzschild black hole. We also calculate the Hawking temperature and entropy for the modification of the Schwarzschild black hole in the presence of the GUP.

  1. Black holes and Abelian symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-09-01

    Black hole configurations offer insights on the nonlinear aspects of gravitational theories, and can suggest testable predictions for modifications of General Relativity. In this work, we examine exact black hole configurations in vector–tensor theories, originally proposed to explain dark energy by breaking the Abelian symmetry with a non-minimal coupling of the vector to gravity. We are able to evade the no-go theorems by Bekenstein on the existence of regular black holes in vector–tensor theories with Proca mass terms, and exhibit regular black hole solutions with a profile for the longitudinal vector polarisation, characterised by an additional charge. We analytically find the most general static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions with and without a cosmological constant, and study in some detail their features, such as how the geometry depends on the vector charges. We also include angular momentum, and find solutions describing slowly-rotating black holes. Finally, we extend some of these solutions to higher dimensions.

  2. Black holes and Abelian symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagoya, Javier; Niz, Gustavo; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-09-01

    Black hole configurations offer insights on the nonlinear aspects of gravitational theories, and can suggest testable predictions for modifications of General Relativity. In this work, we examine exact black hole configurations in vector-tensor theories, originally proposed to explain dark energy by breaking the Abelian symmetry with a non-minimal coupling of the vector to gravity. We are able to evade the no-go theorems by Bekenstein on the existence of regular black holes in vector-tensor theories with Proca mass terms, and exhibit regular black hole solutions with a profile for the longitudinal vector polarisation, characterised by an additional charge. We analytically find the most general static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions with and without a cosmological constant, and study in some detail their features, such as how the geometry depends on the vector charges. We also include angular momentum, and find solutions describing slowly-rotating black holes. Finally, we extend some of these solutions to higher dimensions.

  3. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Fragile, P. Chris

    2013-12-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  4. The First Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, T.

    star. Within this wide range of possible initial masses the death of these star will lead very different remnants (Heger and Woosley 2001). In the case of stars with masses larger than 260 solar mass no metals may be released in black holes are the natural outcome. This may be an interesting possibility to form intermediate mass black holes which are attractive seeds to be nurtured to the super-massive black holes observed in the centers of nearby galaxies. However, no metals would be released and it would prove difficult to understand the transition to the formation of low mass metal enriched population II stars. Stars with masses below 140 solar masses would enrich the intergalactic medium as well as form massive black holes. The coincidence of the Kelvin Helmholtz time with our computed accretion times at about 120 solar masses may argue in favor of such smaller masses. These first black holes may well leave the halos in which they formed for even rather modest kick velocities >~ 10 km/s. Nevertheless, up to about one hundred thousand of these first black holes may remain in the Milky Way. The realization that structure formation began within one hundred million years after big bang makes it difficult to study observationally these first crucial steps. Future observatories have hence to focus on larger collecting areas and wavelengths for which the universe is transparent up to redshifts of 30. XEUS offers the chance to open a new window to these so far dark ages. The limiting masses quoted here rely on stellar models of primordial stars that do not include rotation, magnetic fields or mass loss and hence are somewhat uncertain.

  5. Acceleration of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Frederick, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Zhang slightly modified the standard big bang theory and developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain all observations of the universe. Previous studies accounted for the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This paper investigates acceleration of the black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the redshift and luminosity distance measurements of type Ia supernovae. The results indicate that the black hole universe accelerates its expansion when it accretes the ambient matter in an increasing rate. In other words, i.e., when the second-order derivative of the mass of the black hole universe with respect to the time is positive . For a constant deceleration parameter , we can perfectly explain the type Ia supernova measurements with the reduced chi-square to be very close to unity, χ red˜1.0012. The expansion and acceleration of black hole universe are driven by external energy.

  6. Black holes as antimatter factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambi, Cosimo; Dolgov, Alexander D.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider accretion of matter onto a low mass black hole surrounded by ionized medium. We show that, because of the higher mobility of protons than electrons, the black hole would acquire positive electric charge. If the black hole's mass is about or below 1020 g, the electric field at the horizon can reach the critical value which leads to vacuum instability and electron-positron pair production by the Schwinger mechanism. Since the positrons are ejected by the emergent electric field, while electrons are back-captured, the black hole operates as an antimatter factory which effectively converts protons into positrons.

  7. Black holes and the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum bubbles may nucleate and expand during the inflationary epoch in the early universe. After inflation ends, the bubbles quickly dissipate their kinetic energy; they come to rest with respect to the Hubble flow and eventually form black holes. The fate of the bubble itself depends on the resulting black hole mass. If the mass is smaller than a certain critical value, the bubble collapses to a singularity. Otherwise, the bubble interior inflates, forming a baby universe, which is connected to the exterior FRW region by a wormhole. A similar black hole formation mechanism operates for spherical domain walls nucleating during inflation. As an illustrative example, we studied the black hole mass spectrum in the domain wall scenario, assuming that domain walls interact with matter only gravitationally. Our results indicate that, depending on the model parameters, black holes produced in this scenario can have significant astrophysical effects and can even serve as dark matter or as seeds for supermassive black holes. The mechanism of black hole formation described in this paper is very generic and has important implications for the global structure of the universe. Baby universes inside super-critical black holes inflate eternally and nucleate bubbles of all vacua allowed by the underlying particle physics. The resulting multiverse has a very non-trivial spacetime structure, with a multitude of eternally inflating regions connected by wormholes. If a black hole population with the predicted mass spectrum is discovered, it could be regarded as evidence for inflation and for the existence of a multiverse.

  8. How black holes saved relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda

    2016-02-01

    While there have been many popular-science books on the historical and scientific legacy of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, a gap exists in the literature for a definitive, accessible history of the theory's most famous offshoot: black holes. In Black Hole, the science writer Marcia Bartusiak aims for a discursive middle ground, writing solely about black holes at a level suitable for both high-school students and more mature readers while also giving some broader scientific context for black-hole research.

  9. String duality and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalara, S.; Nanopoulos, D. V.

    1991-09-01

    In the context of (semi) classical general relativity, the physics of black holes poses many unanswered and unsettling questions. Notable among them are the loss of quantum coherence, which casts doubts on the basic foundations of quantum mechanics, and the understanding of the enormous entropy carried by black holes which is at odds with strong ``no hair'' theorems. We point out that in string theory, black-hole type solutions (S-black holes) carry local discrete charges inherited from the duality symmetries of the string, which allow S-black holes to carry ``quantum hair''. It is further noted that the conservation of the discrete charges and the presence of quantum hair precludes the information about a quantum state from being completely lost in the black hole thus rescuing quantum coherence. We also note that a large number of quantum hair carried by S-black holes may explain their enormous entropy, i.e. it is the duality symmetry of the string theory which redeems outstanding problems of black-hole dynamics. We also discuss a possible description of black holes as solitons of string theory. Supported in part by DOE Grant DE-AS05-81 ER40039.

  10. Thermodynamics of Accelerating Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; KubizÅák, David

    2016-09-01

    We address a long-standing problem of describing the thermodynamics of an accelerating black hole. We derive a standard first law of black hole thermodynamics, with the usual identification of entropy proportional to the area of the event horizon—even though the event horizon contains a conical singularity. This result not only extends the applicability of black hole thermodynamics to realms previously not anticipated, it also opens a possibility for studying novel properties of an important class of exact radiative solutions of Einstein equations describing accelerated objects. We discuss the thermodynamic volume, stability, and phase structure of these black holes.

  11. Ultrarelativistic black hole formation.

    PubMed

    East, William E; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-03-01

    We study the head-on collision of fluid particles well within the kinetic energy dominated regime (γ = 8 to 12) by numerically solving the Einstein-hydrodynamic equations. We find that the threshold for black hole formation is lower (by a factor of a few) than simple hoop conjecture estimates, and, moreover, near this threshold two distinct apparent horizons first form postcollision and then merge. We argue that this can be understood in terms of a gravitational focusing effect. The gravitational radiation reaches luminosities of 0.014 c(5)/G, carrying 16 ± 2% of the total energy.

  12. Surfing a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    Star Orbiting Massive Milky Way Centre Approaches to within 17 Light-Hours [1] Summary An international team of astronomers [2], lead by researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) , has directly observed an otherwise normal star orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Ten years of painstaking measurements have been crowned by a series of unique images obtained by the Adaptive Optics (AO) NAOS-CONICA (NACO) instrument [3] on the 8.2-m VLT YEPUN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. It turns out that earlier this year the star approached the central Black Hole to within 17 light-hours - only three times the distance between the Sun and planet Pluto - while travelling at no less than 5000 km/sec . Previous measurements of the velocities of stars near the center of the Milky Way and variable X-ray emission from this area have provided the strongest evidence so far of the existence of a central Black Hole in our home galaxy and, implicitly, that the dark mass concentrations seen in many nuclei of other galaxies probably are also supermassive black holes. However, it has not yet been possible to exclude several alternative configurations. In a break-through paper appearing in the research journal Nature on October 17th, 2002, the present team reports their exciting results, including high-resolution images that allow tracing two-thirds of the orbit of a star designated "S2" . It is currently the closest observable star to the compact radio source and massive black hole candidate "SgrA*" ("Sagittarius A") at the very center of the Milky Way. The orbital period is just over 15 years. The new measurements exclude with high confidence that the central dark mass consists of a cluster of unusual stars or elementary particles, and leave little doubt of the presence of a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy in which we live . PR Photo 23a/02 : NACO image of the central region of the Milky Way

  13. Phase structure of higher spin black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Long, Jiang; Wang, Yi-Nan

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phase structure of the black holes with one single higher spin hair, focusing specifically on the spin 3 and spin widetilde{4} black holes. Based on dimensional analysis and the requirement of thermodynamic consistency, we derive a universal formula relating the entropy with the conserved charges for arbitrary AdS 3 higher spin black holes. Then we use it to study the phase structure of the higher spin black holes. We find that there are six branches of solutions in the spin 3 gravity, eight branches of solutions in the spin widetilde{4} gravity and twelve branches of solutions in the G 2 gravity. In each case, all the branches are related by a simple angle shift in the entropy functions. In the spin 3 case, we reproduce all the results found before. In the spin widetilde{4} case, we find that at low temperature it lies in the BTZ branch while at high temperature it undergoes a phase transition to one of the two other branches, depending on the signature of the chemical potential, a reflection of charge conjugate asymmetry found before.

  14. Entanglement Entropy of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2011-12-01

    The entanglement entropy is a fundamental quantity, which characterizes the correlations between sub-systems in a larger quantum-mechanical system. For two sub-systems separated by a surface the entanglement entropy is proportional to the area of the surface and depends on the UV cutoff, which regulates the short-distance correlations. The geometrical nature of entanglement-entropy calculation is particularly intriguing when applied to black holes when the entangling surface is the black-hole horizon. I review a variety of aspects of this calculation: the useful mathematical tools such as the geometry of spaces with conical singularities and the heat kernel method, the UV divergences in the entropy and their renormalization, the logarithmic terms in the entanglement entropy in four and six dimensions and their relation to the conformal anomalies. The focus in the review is on the systematic use of the conical singularity method. The relations to other known approaches such as ’t Hooft’s brick-wall model and the Euclidean path integral in the optical metric are discussed in detail. The puzzling behavior of the entanglement entropy due to fields, which non-minimally couple to gravity, is emphasized. The holographic description of the entanglement entropy of the blackhole horizon is illustrated on the two- and four-dimensional examples. Finally, I examine the possibility to interpret the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy entirely as the entanglement entropy.

  15. Breaking an Abelian gauge symmetry near a black hole horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.

    2008-09-15

    I argue that coupling the Abelian Higgs model to gravity plus a negative cosmological constant leads to black holes which spontaneously break the gauge invariance via a charged scalar condensate slightly outside their horizon. This suggests that black holes can superconduct.

  16. Black hole Skyrmion in a generalized Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    We study a Skyrme-like model with the Skyrme term and a sixth-order derivative term as higher-order terms, coupled to gravity and we construct Schwarzschild black hole Skyrme hair. We find, surprisingly, that the sixth-order derivative term alone cannot stabilize the black hole hair solutions; the Skyrme term with a large enough coefficient is a necessity.

  17. Primordial black holes and a large hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Calmet, Xavier

    2010-10-15

    In this note we point out that primordial black holes could be much shorter lived than usually assumed if there is a large hidden sector of particles that only interacts gravitationally with the particles of the standard model. The observation of the explosion of one of these black holes would severely constrain the energy scale at which gravity becomes strong.

  18. TESTING GRAVITY WITH QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS FROM ACCRETING BLACK HOLES: THE CASE OF THE EINSTEIN–DILATON–GAUSS–BONNET THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Maselli, Andrea; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Ferrari, Valeria; Pani, Paolo; Stella, Luigi

    2015-03-10

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray flux emitted by accreting black holes are associated with phenomena occurring near the horizon. Future very large area X-ray instruments will be able to measure QPO frequencies with very high precision, thus probing this strong-field region. Using the relativistic precession model, we show the way in which QPO frequencies could be used to test general relativity (GR) against those alternative theories of gravity which predict deviations from the classical theory in the strong-field and high-curvature regimes. We consider one of the best-motivated high-curvature corrections to GR, namely, the Einstein–Dilaton–Gauss–Bonnet theory, and show that a detection of QPOs with the expected sensitivity of the proposed ESA M-class mission LOFT would set the most stringent constraints on the parameter space of this theory.

  19. Orbital topography and other astrophysical consequences of Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity. [black holes hypothesis and neutron star upper mass limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Since Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity provides at present a worthy devil's advocate for the black hole hypothesis, it is important for eventual observational work to elaborate the astrophysical consequences and possibilities peculiar to it. This work is begun by deriving the orbital topography of the spherically symmetric solution to Rosen's field equations - which is relevant to the behavior of relativistic axisymmetric accretion flows - and calculating predicted accretion disk efficiencies, which can be as much as 2.5 times higher than for a disk in Schwarzschild. Thereafter, a brief treatment of the shortest kinematic time scale and the time dilations for in-falling material is given. Finally it is shown that Birkhoff's theorem does not hold in Rosen's theory, and, therefore, that genuine gravitational monopole radiation is possible. The energy it carries, however, is not positive definite.

  20. Massive antigravity field and incomplete black hole evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Corrado

    2008-04-01

    If gravity is a mixture of the ordinary attractive force carried by the massless graviton, and of a repulsive force carried by a particle with nonzero mass, an evaporating black hole might leave a stable remnant.

  1. Holographic description of a quantum black hole on a computer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Ishiki, Goro; Nishimura, Jun

    2014-05-23

    Black holes have been predicted to radiate particles and eventually evaporate, which has led to the information loss paradox and implies that the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics may be violated. Superstring theory, a consistent theory of quantum gravity, provides a possible solution to the paradox if evaporating black holes can actually be described in terms of standard quantum mechanical systems, as conjectured from the theory. Here, we test this conjecture by calculating the mass of a black hole in the corresponding quantum mechanical system numerically. Our results agree well with the prediction from gravity theory, including the leading quantum gravity correction. Our ability to simulate black holes offers the potential to further explore the yet mysterious nature of quantum gravity through well-established quantum mechanics. PMID:24790030

  2. Holographic description of a quantum black hole on a computer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Ishiki, Goro; Nishimura, Jun

    2014-05-23

    Black holes have been predicted to radiate particles and eventually evaporate, which has led to the information loss paradox and implies that the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics may be violated. Superstring theory, a consistent theory of quantum gravity, provides a possible solution to the paradox if evaporating black holes can actually be described in terms of standard quantum mechanical systems, as conjectured from the theory. Here, we test this conjecture by calculating the mass of a black hole in the corresponding quantum mechanical system numerically. Our results agree well with the prediction from gravity theory, including the leading quantum gravity correction. Our ability to simulate black holes offers the potential to further explore the yet mysterious nature of quantum gravity through well-established quantum mechanics.

  3. Black-Hole Feedback in Quasars

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how black-hole feedback works in quasars. Dense gas and dust in the center simultaneously fuels the black hole and shrouds it from view. The black-hole wind propels large...

  4. Thermodynamic Curvature and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppeiner, George

    In my talk, I will discuss black hole thermodynamics, particularly what happens when you add thermodynamic curvature to the mix. Although black hole thermodynamics is a little off the main theme of this workshop, I hope nevertheless that my message will be of some interest to researchers in supersymmetry and supergravity.

  5. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  6. String-Corrected Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

    2005-02-07

    We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

  7. When Charged Black Holes Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Most theoretical models assume that black holes arent charged. But a new study shows that mergers of charged black holes could explain a variety of astrophysical phenomena, from fast radio bursts to gamma-ray bursts.No HairThe black hole no hair theorem states that all black holes can be described by just three things: their mass, their spin, and their charge. Masses and spins have been observed and measured, but weve never measured the charge of a black hole and its widely believed that real black holes dont actually have any charge.That said, weve also never shown that black holes dont have charge, or set any upper limits on the charge that they might have. So lets suppose, for a moment, that its possible for a black hole to be charged. How might that affect what we know about the merger of two black holes? A recent theoretical study by Bing Zhang (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) examines this question.Intensity profile of a fast radio burst, a sudden burst of radio emission that lasts only a few milliseconds. [Swinburne Astronomy Productions]Driving TransientsZhangs work envisions a pair of black holes in a binary system. He argues that if just one of the black holes carries charge possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere then it may be possible for the system to produce an electromagnetic signal that could accompany gravitational waves, such as a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst!In Zhangs model, the inspiral of the two black holes generates a global magnetic dipole thats perpendicular to the plane of the binarys orbit. The magnetic flux increases rapidly as the separation between the black holes decreases, generating an increasingly powerful magnetic wind. This wind, in turn, can give rise to a fast radio burst or a gamma-ray burst, depending on the value of the black holes charge.Artists illustration of a short gamma-ray burst, thought to be caused by the merger of two compact objects. [ESO/A. Roquette]Zhang calculates lower limits on the charge

  8. On the Møller Energy Associated with Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltı, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Oktay

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we consider both Einstein's theory of general relativity and the teleparallel gravity (the tetrad theory of gravitation) analogs of the energy-momentum definition of Møller in order to explicitly evaluate the energy distribution (due to matter and fields including gravity) associated with a general black hole model which includes several well-known black holes. To calculate the special cases of energy distribution, here we consider eight different types of black hole models such as anti-de Sitter Cmetric with spherical topology, charged regular black hole, conformal scalar dyon black hole, dyadosphere of a charged black hole, regular black hole, charged topological black hole, charged massless black hole with a scalar field, and the Schwarzschild-de Sitter space-time. Our teleparallel gravitational result is also independent of the teleparallel dimensionless coupling constant, which means that it is valid not only in teleparallel equivalent of general relativity but also in any teleparallel model. This paper also sustains (a) the importance of the energy-momentum definitions in the evaluation of the energy distribution of a given spacetime and (b) the viewpoint of Lessner that the Møller energy-momentum complex is the powerful concept to calculate energy distribution in a given space-time.

  9. Vacuum polarization in asymptotically Lifshitz black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinta, Gonçalo M.; Flachi, Antonino; Lemos, José P. S.

    2016-06-01

    There has been considerable interest in applying the gauge-gravity duality to condensed matter theories with particular attention being devoted to gravity duals (Lifshitz spacetimes) of theories that exhibit anisotropic scaling. In this context, black hole solutions with Lifshitz asymptotics have also been constructed, focused on incorporating finite temperature effects. The goal here is to look at quantum polarization effects in these spacetimes and, to this aim, we develop a way to compute the coincidence limit of the Green's function for massive, nonminimally coupled scalar fields, adapting to the present situation the analysis developed for the case of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes. The basics are similar to previous calculations; however, in the Lifshitz case, one needs to extend the previous results to include a more general form for the metric and dependence on the dynamical exponent. All formulas are shown to reduce to the anti-de Sitter (AdS) case studied before once the value of the dynamical exponent is set to unity and the metric functions are accordingly chosen. The analytical results we present are general and can be applied to a variety of cases, in fact, to all spherically symmetric Lifshitz black hole solutions. We also implement the numerical analysis choosing some known Lifshitz black hole solutions as illustration.

  10. Thermodynamics of charged Lovelock: AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasobh, C. B.; Suresh, Jishnu; Kuriakose, V. C.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic behavior of maximally symmetric charged, asymptotically AdS black hole solutions of Lovelock gravity. We explore the thermodynamic stability of such solutions by the ordinary method of calculating the specific heat of the black holes and investigating its divergences which signal second-order phase transitions between black hole states. We then utilize the methods of thermodynamic geometry of black hole spacetimes in order to explain the origin of these points of divergence. We calculate the curvature scalar corresponding to a Legendre-invariant thermodynamic metric of these spacetimes and find that the divergences in the black hole specific heat correspond to singularities in the thermodynamic phase space. We also calculate the area spectrum for large black holes in the model by applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization to the adiabatic invariant calculated for the spacetime.

  11. Black hole evaporation with separated fermions.

    PubMed

    Han, Tao; Kribs, Graham D; McElrath, Bob

    2003-01-24

    In models with a low quantum gravity scale, fast proton decay can be avoided by localizing quarks and leptons to separated positions in an extra 1/TeV sized dimension with gauge and Higgs fields living throughout. Black holes with masses of the order of the quantum gravity scale are therefore expected to evaporate nonuniversally, preferentially radiating directly into quarks or leptons but not both. Should black holes be copiously produced at a future hadron collider, we find the ratio of final state jets to charged leptons to photons is 113:8:1, which differs from previous analyses that assumed all standard model fields live at the same point in the extra dimensional space.

  12. Gravitational crystal inside the black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje

    2015-10-01

    Crystals, as quantum objects typically much larger than their lattice spacing, are counterexamples to a frequent prejudice that quantum effects should not be pronounced at macroscopic distances. We propose that the Einstein theory of gravity only describes a fluid phase and that a phase transition of crystallization can occur under extreme conditions such as those inside the black hole. Such a crystal phase with lattice spacing of the order of the Planck length offers a natural mechanism for pronounced quantum-gravity effects at distances much larger than the Planck length. A resolution of the black hole information paradox is proposed, according to which all information is stored in a crystal-phase remnant with size and mass much above the Planck scale.

  13. Gravity Fields Generation In The Universe By The Large Range of Scales Convection Systems In Planets, Stars, Black Holes and Galaxies Based On The "Convection Bang Hypothesis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholibeigian, H.; Amirshahkarami, A.; Gholibeigian, K.

    2015-12-01

    In our vision it is believed that the Big Bang was Convection Bang (CB). When CB occurred, a gigantic large-scale forced convection system (LFCS) began to create space-time including gravitons and gluons in more than light speed. Then, simultaneously by a swirling wild wind, created inflation process including many quantum convection loops (QCL) in locations which had more density of temperature and energetic particles like gravitons. QCL including fundamental particles, grew and formed black holes (BHs) as the core of galaxies. LFCSs of heat and mass in planets, stars, BHs and galaxies generate gravity and electromagnetic fields and change the properties of matter and space-time around the systems. Mechanism: Samples: 1- Due to gravity fields of Sun and Moon, Earth's inner core is dislocated toward them and rotates around the Earth's center per day and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [AGU, 2012]. 2- Dislocated Sun's core due to gravity fields of planets/ Jupiter, rotates around the Sun's center per 25-35 days and generates LFCSs, Gholibeigian [EGU, 2014]. 3- If a planet/star falls into a BH, what happens? It means, its dislocated core rotates around its center in less than light speed and generates very fast LFCS and friction, while it is rotating/melting around/inward the center of BH. Observable Factors: 1- There is not logical relation between surface gravity fields of planets/Sun and their masses (general relativity); see Planetary Fact Sheet/Ratio to Earth Values-NASA: Earth: mass/gravity =1/1, Jupiter=317.8/2.36, Neptune=17.1/1.12, Saturn=95.2/0.916, Moon=0.0128/0.166, Sun=333000/28. 2- Convective systems in thunderstorms help bring ozone down to Earth [Brian-Kahn]. 3- In 12 surveyed BHs, produced gravity force & magnetic field strength were matched (unique LFCS source) [PhysOrg - June 4, 2014]. Justification: After BB/CB, gravitons were created without any other masses and curvature of space-time (general relativity), but by primary gigantic convection

  14. Black holes and Higgs stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of primordial black holes on the classical rate of nucleation of AdS regions within the standard electroweak vacuum. We find that the energy barrier for transitions to the new vacuum, which characterizes the exponential suppression of the nucleation rate, can be reduced significantly in the black-hole background. A precise analysis is required in order to determine whether the the existence of primordial black holes is compatible with the form of the Higgs potential at high temperature or density in the Standard Model or its extensions.

  15. Black Holes: A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1998-03-01

    BLACK HOLES A TRAVELER'S GUIDE Clifford Pickover's inventive and entertaining excursion beyond the curves of space and time. "I've enjoyed Clifford Pickover's earlier books . . . now he has ventured into the exploration of black holes. All would-be tourists are strongly advised to read his traveler's guide." -Arthur C. Clarke. "Many books have been written about black holes, but none surpass this one in arousing emotions of awe and wonder towards the mysterious structure of the universe." -Martin Gardner. "Bucky Fuller thought big. Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." -Wired. "The book is fun, zany, in-your-face, and refreshingly addictive." -Times Higher Education Supplement.

  16. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    PubMed

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-01

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely.

  17. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here.

  18. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here. PMID:25768747

  19. Gravitational polarizability of black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Lecian, Orchidea Maria

    2009-08-15

    The gravitational polarizability properties of black holes are compared and contrasted with their electromagnetic polarizability properties. The 'shape' or 'height' multipolar Love numbers h{sub l} of a black hole are defined and computed. They are then compared to their electromagnetic analogs h{sub l}{sup EM}. The Love numbers h{sub l} give the height of the lth multipolar 'tidal bulge' raised on the horizon of a black hole by faraway masses. We also discuss the shape of the tidal bulge raised by a test-mass m, in the limit where m gets very close to the horizon.

  20. Evaporation of primordial black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    The usual explanation of the isotropy of the universe is that inflation would have smoothed out any inhomogeneities. However, if the universe was initially fractal or in a foam like state, an overall inflation would have left it in the same state. I suggest that the universe did indeed begin with a tangled web of wormholes connecting pairs of black holes but that the inflationary expansion was unstable: wormholes that are slightly smaller correspond to black holes that are hotter than the cosmological background and evaporate away. This picture is supported by calculations with Raphael Bousso of the evaporation of primordial black holes in the s-wave and large N approximations.

  1. Quantum mechanics of black holes.

    PubMed

    Witten, Edward

    2012-08-01

    The popular conception of black holes reflects the behavior of the massive black holes found by astronomers and described by classical general relativity. These objects swallow up whatever comes near and emit nothing. Physicists who have tried to understand the behavior of black holes from a quantum mechanical point of view, however, have arrived at quite a different picture. The difference is analogous to the difference between thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. The thermodynamic description is a good approximation for a macroscopic system, but statistical mechanics describes what one will see if one looks more closely. PMID:22859480

  2. Rotating regular black hole solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    Based on the Newman-Janis algorithm, the Ayón-Beato-García spacetime metric [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5056 (1998)] of the regular spherically symmetric, static, and charged black hole has been converted into rotational form. It is shown that the derived solution for rotating a regular black hole is regular and the critical value of the electric charge for which two horizons merge into one sufficiently decreases in the presence of the nonvanishing rotation parameter a of the black hole.

  3. Holography of 3D asymptotically flat black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fareghbal, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Morteza

    2015-04-01

    We study the asymptotically flat rotating hairy black hole solution of a three-dimensional gravity theory which is given by taking the flat-space limit (zero cosmological constant limit) of new massive gravity. We propose that the dual field theory of the flat-space limit of new massive gravity can be described by a contracted conformal field theory which is invariant under the action of the BMS3 group. Using the flat/contracted conformal field theory correspondence, we construct a stress tensor which yields the conserved charges of the asymptotically flat black hole solution. We check that our expressions of the mass and angular momentum fit with the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Furthermore, by taking the appropriate limit of the Cardy formula in the parent conformal field theory, we find a Cardy-like formula which reproduces the Wald's entropy of the 3D asymptotically flat black hole.

  4. Asymptotically Lifshitz brane-world black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, Arash Sepangi, Hamid Reza Shahidi, Shahab

    2012-12-15

    We study the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of a RSII brane-world scenario, taking into account the effects of the extra dimension through the contribution of the electric part of the Weyl tensor. We study the thermodynamical behavior of such asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. It is shown that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. This maximum value of z corresponds to a positive infinite entropy as long as the temperature is kept positive. The stability and phase transition for different spatial topologies are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of brane-world scenario. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the thermodynamical behavior of asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Showing that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussing the phase transition for different spatial topologies.

  5. Black holes at the Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, S; Landsberg, G

    2001-10-15

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near TeV, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be producing one black hole (BH) about every second. The decays of the BHs into the final states with prompt, hard photons, electrons, or muons provide a clean signature with low background. The correlation between the BH mass and its temperature, deduced from the energy spectrum of the decay products, can test Hawking's evaporation law and determine the number of large new dimensions and the scale of quantum gravity.

  6. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  7. Black hole meiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herck, Walter; Wyder, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The enumeration of BPS bound states in string theory needs refinement. Studying partition functions of particles made from D-branes wrapped on algebraic Calabi-Yau 3-folds, and classifying states using split attractor flow trees, we extend the method for computing a refined BPS index, [1]. For certain D-particles, a finite number of microstates, namely polar states, exclusively realized as bound states, determine an entire partition function (elliptic genus). This underlines their crucial importance: one might call them the ‘chromosomes’ of a D-particle or a black hole. As polar states also can be affected by our refinement, previous predictions on elliptic genera are modified. This can be metaphorically interpreted as ‘crossing-over in the meiosis of a D-particle’. Our results improve on [2], provide non-trivial evidence for a strong split attractor flow tree conjecture, and thus suggest that we indeed exhaust the BPS spectrum. In the D-brane description of a bound state, the necessity for refinement results from the fact that tachyonic strings split up constituent states into ‘generic’ and ‘special’ states. These are enumerated separately by topological invariants, which turn out to be partitions of Donaldson-Thomas invariants. As modular predictions provide a check on many of our results, we have compelling evidence that our computations are correct.

  8. The Black Hole Universe Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2014-06-01

    The black hole universe model is a multiverse model of cosmology recently developed by the speaker. According to this new model, our universe is a fully grown extremely supermassive black hole, which originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up from a supermassive black hole with million to billion solar masses to the present state with trillion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient matter or merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers or universes hierarchically. The innermost three layers include the universe that we live, the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes, and the outside space called mother universe. The outermost layer is infinite in mass, radius, and entropy without an edge and limits to zero for both the matter density and absolute temperature. All layers are governed by the same physics and tend to expand physically in one direction (outward or the direction of increasing entropy). The expansion of a black hole universe decreases its density and temperature but does not alter the laws of physics. The black hole universe evolves iteratively and endlessly without a beginning. When one universe expands out, a new similar one is formed from inside star-like and supermassive black holes. In each of iterations, elements are resynthesized, matter is reconfigurated, and the universe is renewed rather than a simple repeat. The black hole universe is consistent with the Mach principle, observations, and Einsteinian general relativity. It has only one postulate but is able to explain all phenomena occurred in the universe with well-developed physics. The black hole universe does not need dark energy for acceleration and an inflation epoch for flatness, and thus has a devastating impact on the big bang model. In this talk, I will present how this new cosmological model explains the various aspects of the universe, including the origin

  9. Nonrotating black hole in a post-Newtonian tidal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stephanne; Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-15

    We examine the motion and tidal dynamics of a nonrotating black hole placed within a post-Newtonian external spacetime. The black hole's gravity is described accurately to all orders in Gm/c{sup 2}r, where m is the black-hole mass and r is the distance to the black hole. The tidal perturbation created by the external environment is treated as a small perturbation. At a large distance from the black hole, the gravitational field of the external distribution of matter is assumed to be sufficiently weak to be adequately described by the (first) post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity. There, the black hole is treated as a monopole contribution to the total gravitational field. There exists an overlap in the domains of validity of each description, and the black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics are matched in the overlap. The matching procedure produces (i) a justification of the statement that a nonrotating black hole is a post-Newtonian monopole; (ii) a complete characterization of the coordinate transformation between the inertial, barycentric frame and the accelerated, black-hole frame; (iii) the equations of motion for the black hole; and (iv) the gravito-electric and gravito-magnetic tidal fields acting on the black hole. We first calculate the equations of motion and tidal fields by making no assumptions regarding the nature of the post-Newtonian environment; this could contain a continuous distribution of matter (so as to model a galactic core) or any number of condensed bodies. We next specialize our discussion to a situation in which the black hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system. As an application of our results, we examine the geometry of the deformed event horizon and calculate the tidal heating of the black hole, the rate at which it acquires mass as a result of its tidal interaction with the companion body.

  10. Black holes: fundamentals and controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.

    2016-08-01

    Black holes are fully gravitational collapsed objects. They have been studied from a theoretical point of view during more than 40 years using the theory of General Relativity. Recently they have been also investigated in the context of alternative theories of gravitation. In this paper I review the main properties of black holes and I discuss, in an accesible way, some recent controversies about the nature of these objects.

  11. Black holes in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory and the geometry of their thermodynamics—II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2010-03-01

    In the present work we study (i) the charged black hole in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) theory, known as the Einstein-Maxwell-Gauss-Bonnet (EMGB) black hole and (ii) the black hole in EGB gravity with a Yang-Mills field. The thermodynamic geometry of these two black hole solutions has been investigated, using the modified entropy in Gauss-Bonnet theory.

  12. Thermodynamics of Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan; Park, Young-Jai

    2008-08-15

    We show that all thermodynamic quantities of the Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes in three dimensions can be obtained from the dilaton and its potential of two-dimensional dilaton gravity through dimensional reduction. These are all between nonrotating uncharged BTZ (Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli) black hole (NBTZ) and charged BTZ black hole (CBTZ)

  13. Scalar field conformally coupled to a charged BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtancoli, P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the Klein-Gordon equation of a scalar field conformally coupled to a charged BTZ black hole. The background metric is obtained by coupling a non-linear and conformal invariant Maxwell field to (2 + 1) gravity. We show that the radial part is generally solved by a Heun function and, in the pure gravity limit, by a hypergeometric function.

  14. Non-abelian black holes and black strings in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Betti

    2009-05-01

    We review the properties of static, higher dimensional black hole solutions in theories where non-abelian gauge fields are minimally coupled to gravity. It is shown that black holes with hyperspherically symmetric horizon topology do not exist in d>4, but that hyperspherically symmetric black holes can be constructed numerically in generalized Einstein-Yang-Mills models. 5-dimensional black strings with horizon topology S{sup 2}xS{sup 1} are also discussed. These are so-called undeformed and deformed non-abelian black strings, which are translationally invariant and correspond to 4-dimensional non-abelian black holes trivially extended into one extra dimensions. The fact that black strings can be deformed, i.e. axially symmetric for constant values of the extra coordinate is a new feature as compared to black string solutions of Einstein (-Maxwell) theory. It is argued that these non-abelian black strings are thermodynamically unstable.

  15. Gravitational Waves from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, data analysis, and astrophysics.

  16. Black holes as gravitational atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Cenalo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was argued [A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1207.3123, A. Almheiri et al., arXiv: 1304.6483], via a delicate thought experiment, that it is not consistent to simultaneously require that (a) Hawking radiation is pure, (b) effective field theory is valid outside a stretched horizon and (c) infalling observers encounter nothing unusual as they cross the horizon. These are the three fundamental assumptions underlying Black Hole Complementarity and the authors proposed that the most conservative resolution of the paradox is that (c) is false and the infalling observer burns up at the horizon (the horizon acts as a "firewall"). However, the firewall violates the equivalence principle and breaks the CPT invariance of quantum gravity. This led Hawking to propose recently that gravitational collapse may not end up producing event horizons, although he did not give a mechanism for how this may happen. Here we will support Hawking's conclusion in a quantum gravitational model of dust collapse. We will show that continued collapse to a singularity can only be achieved by combining two independent and entire solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We interpret the paradox as simply forbidding such a combination. This leads naturally to a picture in which matter condenses on the apparent horizon during quantum collapse.

  17. Giant Black Hole Rips Apart Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Thanks to two orbiting X-ray observatories, astronomers have the first strong evidence of a supermassive black hole ripping apart a star and consuming a portion of it. The event, captured by NASA's Chandra and ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories, had long been predicted by theory, but never confirmed. Astronomers believe a doomed star came too close to a giant black hole after being thrown off course by a close encounter with another star. As it neared the enormous gravity of the black hole, the star was stretched by tidal forces until it was torn apart. This discovery provides crucial information about how these black holes grow and affect surrounding stars and gas. "Stars can survive being stretched a small amount, as they are in binary star systems, but this star was stretched beyond its breaking point," said Stefanie Komossa of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Germany, leader of the international team of researchers. "This unlucky star just wandered into the wrong neighborhood." While other observations have hinted stars are destroyed by black holes (events known as "stellar tidal disruptions"), these new results are the first strong evidence. Evidence already exists for supermassive black holes in many galaxies, but looking for tidal disruptions represents a completely independent way to search for black holes. Observations like these are urgently needed to determine how quickly black holes can grow by swallowing neighboring stars. Animation of Star Ripped Apart by Giant Black Hole Star Ripped Apart by Giant Black Hole Observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, combined with earlier images from the German Roentgen satellite, detected a powerful X-ray outburst from the center of the galaxy RX J1242-11. This outburst, one of the most extreme ever detected in a galaxy, was caused by gas from the destroyed star that was heated to millions of degrees Celsius before being swallowed by the black hole. The energy liberated in the process

  18. Conformally invariant thermodynamics of a Maxwell-Dilaton black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Monsalvo, C. S.; Nettel, F.; Quevedo, H.

    2013-12-01

    The thermodynamics of Maxwell-Dilaton black holes has been extensively studied. It has served as a fertile ground to test ideas about temperature through various definitions of surface gravity. In this paper, we make an independent analysis of this black hole solution in both, Einstein and Jordan, frames. We explore a set of definitions for the surface gravity and observe the different predictions they make for the near extremal configuration of this black hole. Finally, motivated by the singularity structure in the interior of the event horizon, we use a holographic argument to remove the micro-states from the disconnected region of this solution. In this manner, we construct a frame independent entropy from which we obtain a temperature which agrees with the standard results in the non-extremal regime, and has a desirable behaviour around the extremal configurations according to the third law of black hole mechanics.

  19. Supermassive black hole ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A.; Ferrara, A.; Salvaterra, R.

    2012-05-01

    In the attempt to alleviate the difficulties created by their early formation, we study a model in which supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can grow by the combined action of gas accretion on heavy seeds and mergers of both heavy ? and light ? seeds. The former results from the direct collapse of gas in ? K, H2-free haloes; the latter are the end product of a standard H2-based star formation process. The H2-free condition is attained by exposing haloes to a strong (J21≳ 103) Lyman-Werner ultraviolet (UV) background produced by both accreting BHs and stars, thus establishing a self-regulated growth regime. We find that this condition is met already at z˜ 18 in the highly biased regions in which quasars are born. The key parameter allowing the formation of SMBHs by z= 6-7 is the fraction of haloes that can form heavy seeds: the minimum requirement is that fheavy≳ 0.001; SMBH as large as 2 × 1010 M⊙ can be obtained when fheavy approaches unity. Independently of fheavy, the model produces a high-z stellar bulge-BH mass relation which is steeper than the local one, implying that SMBHs formed before their bulge was in place. The formation of heavy seeds, allowed by the Lyman-Werner radiative feedback in the quasar-forming environment, is crucial to achieve a fast growth of the SMBH by merger events in the early phases of its evolution, i.e. z≳ 7. The UV photon production is largely dominated by stars in galaxies, i.e. BH accretion radiation is subdominant. Interestingly, we find that the final mass of light BHs and of the SMBH in the quasar is roughly equal by z= 6; by the same time, only 19 per cent of the initial baryon content has been converted into stars. The SMBH growth is dominated at all epochs z > 7.2 by mergers (exceeding accretion by a factor of 2-50); at later times, accretion becomes by far the most important growth channel. We finally discuss possible shortcomings of the model.

  20. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Jenny E.

    2012-12-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass `stellar mass' black holes and the `supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive `intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ~104-105Msolar black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism.

  1. Stability of Black Holes and Black Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, Stefan; Wald, Robert M.

    2013-08-01

    We establish a new criterion for the dynamical stability of black holes in D ≥ 4 spacetime dimensions in general relativity with respect to axisymmetric perturbations: Dynamical stability is equivalent to the positivity of the canonical energy, {{E}}, on a subspace, {{T}}, of linearized solutions that have vanishing linearized ADM mass, momentum, and angular momentum at infinity and satisfy certain gauge conditions at the horizon. This is shown by proving that—apart from pure gauge perturbations and perturbations towards other stationary black holes—{{E}} is nondegenerate on {{T}} and that, for axisymmetric perturbations, {{E}} has positive flux properties at both infinity and the horizon. We further show that {{E}} is related to the second order variations of mass, angular momentum, and horizon area by {{E} = δ^2 M -sum_A Ω_A δ^2 J_A - κ/8πδ^2 A}, thereby establishing a close connection between dynamical stability and thermodynamic stability. Thermodynamic instability of a family of black holes need not imply dynamical instability because the perturbations towards other members of the family will not, in general, have vanishing linearized ADM mass and/or angular momentum. However, we prove that for any black brane corresponding to a thermodynamically unstable black hole, sufficiently long wavelength perturbations can be found with {{E} < 0} and vanishing linearized ADM quantities. Thus, all black branes corresponding to thermodynmically unstable black holes are dynamically unstable, as conjectured by Gubser and Mitra. We also prove that positivity of {{E}} on {{T}} is equivalent to the satisfaction of a " local Penrose inequality," thus showing that satisfaction of this local Penrose inequality is necessary and sufficient for dynamical stability. Although we restrict our considerations in this paper to vacuum general relativity, most of the results of this paper are derived using general Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods and therefore can be

  2. Semiclassical geons as solitonic black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D. E-mail: gonzalo.olmo@csic.es

    2013-07-01

    We find that the end state of black hole evaporation could be represented by non-singular and without event horizon stable solitonic remnants with masses of the order the Planck scale and up to ∼ 16 units of charge. Though these objects are locally indistinguishable from spherically symmetric, massive electric (or magnetic) charges, they turn out to be sourceless geons containing a wormhole generated by the electromagnetic field. Our results are obtained by interpreting semiclassical corrections to Einstein's theory in the first-order (Palatini) formalism, which yields second-order equations and avoids the instabilities of the usual (metric) formulation of quadratic gravity. We also discuss the potential relevance of these solutions for primordial black holes and the dark matter problem.

  3. Noether currents of charged spherical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, M. C.; Hayward, Sean A.

    2000-09-01

    We calculate the Noether currents and charges for the Einstein-Maxwell theory using a version of the Wald approach. In spherical symmetry, the choice of time can be taken as the Kodama vector. For the static case, the resulting combined Einstein-Maxwell charge is just the mass of the black hole. Using either a classically defined entropy or the Iyer-Wald selection rules, the entropy is found to be just a quarter of the area of the trapping horizon. We propose identifying the combined Noether charge as an energy associated with the Kodama time. For the extremal black hole case, we discuss the problem of Wald's rescaling of the surface gravity to define the entropy.

  4. Remarks on the black hole information problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2006-05-15

    String theory provides numerous examples of duality between gravitational theories and unitary gauge theories. To resolve the black hole information paradox in this setting, it is necessary to better understand how unitarity is implemented on the gravity side. We argue that unitarity is restored by nonlocal effects whose initial magnitude is suppressed by the exponential of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Time-slicings for which effective field theory is valid are obtained by demanding the mutual back-reaction of quanta be small. The resulting bounds imply that nonlocal effects do not lead to observable violations of causality or conflict with the equivalence principle for infalling observers, yet implement information retrieval for observers who stay outside the black hole.

  5. Black hole gas in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Borunda, Mónica; Masip, Manuel E-mail: masip@ugr.es

    2010-01-01

    We consider the early universe at temperatures close to the fundamental scale of gravity (M{sub D} << M{sub Planck}) in models with extra dimensions. At such temperatures a small fraction of particles will experience transplanckian collisions that may result in microscopic black holes (BHs). BHs colder than the environment will gain mass, and as they grow their temperature drops further. We study the dynamics of a system (a black hole gas) defined by radiation at a given temperature coupled to a distribution of BHs of different mass. Our analysis includes the production of BHs in photon-photon collisions, BH evaporation, the absorption of radiation, collisions of two BHs to give a larger one, and the effects of the expansion. We show that the system may follow two different generic paths depending on the initial temperature of the plasma.

  6. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild black hole.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2013-05-24

    We quantize spherically symmetric vacuum gravity without gauge fixing the diffeomorphism constraint. Through a rescaling, we make the algebra of Hamiltonian constraints Abelian, and therefore the constraint algebra is a true Lie algebra. This allows the completion of the Dirac quantization procedure using loop quantum gravity techniques. We can construct explicitly the exact solutions of the physical Hilbert space annihilated by all constraints. New observables living in the bulk appear at the quantum level (analogous to spin in quantum mechanics) that are not present at the classical level and are associated with the discrete nature of the spin network states of loop quantum gravity. The resulting quantum space-times resolve the singularity present in the classical theory inside black holes. PMID:23745855

  7. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild black hole.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2013-05-24

    We quantize spherically symmetric vacuum gravity without gauge fixing the diffeomorphism constraint. Through a rescaling, we make the algebra of Hamiltonian constraints Abelian, and therefore the constraint algebra is a true Lie algebra. This allows the completion of the Dirac quantization procedure using loop quantum gravity techniques. We can construct explicitly the exact solutions of the physical Hilbert space annihilated by all constraints. New observables living in the bulk appear at the quantum level (analogous to spin in quantum mechanics) that are not present at the classical level and are associated with the discrete nature of the spin network states of loop quantum gravity. The resulting quantum space-times resolve the singularity present in the classical theory inside black holes.

  8. Rotating Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco

    2008-03-01

    The properties of higher-dimensional black holes can differ significantly from those of black holes in four dimensions, since neither the uniqueness theorem, nor the staticity theorem or the topological censorship theorem generalize to higher dimensions. We first discuss black holes of Einstein-Maxwell theory and Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with spherical horizon topology. Here new types of stationary black holes are encountered. We then discuss nonuniform black strings and present evidence for a horizon topology changing transition.

  9. Kerr-Gauss-Bonnet black holes: Exact analytical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, S. Popov, N.; Startseva, M.; Barrau, A. Grain, J.

    2008-04-15

    Gauss-Bonnet gravity provides one of the most promising frameworks for studying curvature corrections to the Einstein action in supersymmetric string theories while avoiding ghosts and keeping second-order field equations. Although Schwarzschild-type solutions for Gauss-Bonnet black holes have been known for a long time, the Kerr-Gauss-Bonnet metric was missing. A five dimensional Gauss-Bonnet solution is obtained analytically for spinning black holes, and the related thermodynamical properties are briefly outlined.

  10. Astrophysical Black Holes: Evidence of a Horizon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica

    In this Lecture Note we first follow a short account of the history of the black hole hypothesis. We then review on the current status of the search for astrophysical black holes with particular attention to the black holes of stellar origin. Later, we highlight a series of observations that reveal the albeit indirect presence of supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei, with mention to forthcoming experiments aimed at testing directly the black hole hypothesis. We further focus on evidences of a black hole event horizon in cosmic sources.

  11. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  12. Asymptotic Reissner–Nordström black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hendi, S.H.

    2013-06-15

    We consider two types of Born–Infeld like nonlinear electromagnetic fields and obtain their interesting black hole solutions. The asymptotic behavior of these solutions is the same as that of a Reissner–Nordström black hole. We investigate the geometric properties of the solutions and find that depending on the value of the nonlinearity parameter, the singularity covered with various horizons. -- Highlights: •We investigate two types of the BI-like nonlinear electromagnetic fields in the Einsteinian gravity. •We analyze the effects of nonlinearity on the electromagnetic field. •We examine the influences of the nonlinearity on the geometric properties of the black hole solutions.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as

  14. Calabi-Yau black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakova, Marina

    1997-07-01

    We find the entropy of N=2 extreme black holes associated with general Calabi-Yau moduli space and the prepotential F=dABC(XAXBXC/X0). We show that for arbitrary dABC and black hole charges p and q the entropy-area formula depends on combinations of these charges and parameters dABC. These combinations are the solutions of a simple system of algebraic equations. We give a few examples of particular Calabi-Yau moduli spaces for which this system has an explicit solution. For the special case when one of the black hole charges is equal to zero (p0=0) the solution always exists.

  15. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sachdev, Subir

    2007-08-22

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  16. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  17. Tomograms of spinning black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Chethan

    2009-12-15

    The classical internal structure of spinning black holes is vastly different from that of static black holes. We consider spinning Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes, and probe their interior from the gauge theory. Utilizing the simplicity of the geometry and reverse engineering from the geodesics, we propose a thermal correlator construction which can be interpreted as arising from two entangled conformal field theories. By analytic continuation of these correlators, we can probe the Cauchy horizon. Correlators that capture the Cauchy horizon in our work have a structure closely related to those that capture the singularity in a nonrotating Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli. As expected, the regions beyond the Cauchy horizon are not probed in this picture, protecting cosmic censorship.

  18. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    ScienceCinema

    Sachdev, Subir [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  19. Neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation of neutron stars is powered by accretion, rotation, or internal heat; accreting black holes are thought to be the central engines of AGNs and of a handful of binary X-ray sources in the Galaxy. The evolution of a neutron star depends on the coupling between the rotating neutron and proton fluids in the interior, and between these fluids and the crust; it also depends on the magnetic and thermal properties of the star. Significant progress has been made in recent years in the understanding of radial and disk accretion by black holes. Radiation from pair plasmas may make an important contribution to the X- and gamma-ray spectra of AGNs and black holes in binary systems.

  20. Close encounters of three black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Manuela; Lousto, Carlos O.; Zlochower, Yosef

    2008-05-15

    We present the first fully relativistic long-term numerical evolutions of three equal-mass black holes in a system consisting of a third black hole in a close orbit about a black-hole binary. These close-three-black-hole systems have very different merger dynamics from black-hole binaries; displaying complex trajectories, a redistribution of energy that can impart substantial kicks to one of the holes, distinctive waveforms, and suppression of the emitted gravitational radiation. In one configuration the binary is quickly disrupted and the individual holes follow complicated trajectories and merge with the third hole in rapid succession, while in another, the binary completes a half-orbit before the initial merger of one of the members with the third black hole, and the resulting two-black-hole system forms a highly elliptical, well separated binary that shows no significant inspiral for (at least) the first t{approx}1000M of evolution.

  1. Destroying the event horizon of regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2013-06-01

    Recently, several authors have studied the possibility of overspinning or overcharging an existing black hole to destroy its event horizon and make the central singularity naked. When all the effects are properly taken into account, any attempt to destroy the black hole seems to be doomed to fail, in agreement with the weak cosmic censorship conjecture. In this article, we study the possibility of destroying the event horizon of regular black holes. These objects have no central singularity and therefore they are not protected by the cosmic censorship hypothesis. Our results strongly support the conclusion that regular black holes can be destroyed. If we believe that the central singularity in astrophysical black holes is solved by quantum gravity effects, we might have a chance to see the black hole’s internal region and observe quantum gravity phenomena. As our finding implies the violation of the black hole’s area theorem, the collision of two black holes may release an amount of energy exceeding the Hawking bound, which can be experimentally tested by gravitational wave detectors.

  2. Wormholes as black hole foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2007-07-01

    We study to what extent wormholes can mimic the observational features of black holes. It is surprisingly found that many features that could be thought of as “characteristic” of a black hole (endowed with an event horizon) can be closely mimicked by a globally static wormhole, having no event horizon. This is the case for the apparently irreversible accretion of matter down a hole, no-hair properties, quasi-normal-mode ringing, and even the dissipative properties of black hole horizons, such as a finite surface resistivity equal to 377 Ohms. The only way to distinguish the two geometries on an observationally reasonable time scale would be through the detection of Hawking’s radiation, which is, however, too weak to be of practical relevance for astrophysical black holes. We point out the existence of an interesting spectrum of quantum microstates trapped in the throat of a wormhole which could be relevant for storing the information lost during a gravitational collapse.

  3. Black Hole Blows Big Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    Combining observations made with ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope, astronomers have uncovered the most powerful pair of jets ever seen from a stellar black hole. This object, also known as a microquasar, blows a huge bubble of hot gas, 1000 light-years across, twice as large and tens of times more powerful than other known microquasars. The discovery is reported this week in the journal Nature. "We have been astonished by how much energy is injected into the gas by the black hole," says lead author Manfred Pakull. "This black hole is just a few solar masses, but is a real miniature version of the most powerful quasars and radio galaxies, which contain black holes with masses of a few million times that of the Sun." Black holes are known to release a prodigious amount of energy when they swallow matter. It was thought that most of the energy came out in the form of radiation, predominantly X-rays. However, the new findings show that some black holes can release at least as much energy, and perhaps much more, in the form of collimated jets of fast moving particles. The fast jets slam into the surrounding interstellar gas, heating it and triggering an expansion. The inflating bubble contains a mixture of hot gas and ultra-fast particles at different temperatures. Observations in several energy bands (optical, radio, X-rays) help astronomers calculate the total rate at which the black hole is heating its surroundings. The astronomers could observe the spots where the jets smash into the interstellar gas located around the black hole, and reveal that the bubble of hot gas is inflating at a speed of almost one million kilometres per hour. "The length of the jets in NGC 7793 is amazing, compared to the size of the black hole from which they are launched," says co-author Robert Soria [1]. "If the black hole were shrunk to the size of a soccer ball, each jet would extend from the Earth to beyond the orbit of Pluto." This research will help

  4. Building Black Holes: Supercomputer Cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1988-07-01

    A new computer code can solve Einstein's equations of general relativity for the dynamical evolution of a relativistic star cluster. The cluster may contain a large number of stars that move in a strong gravitational field at speeds approaching the speed of light. Unstable star clusters undergo catastrophic collapse to black holes. The collapse of an unstable cluster to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy may explain the origin of quasars and active galactic nuclei. By means of a supercomputer simulation and color graphics, the whole process can be viewed in real time on a movie screen.

  5. Are black holes in alternative theories serious astrophysical candidates? The case for Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor

    2009-04-15

    It is generally accepted that Einstein's theory will get some as yet unknown corrections, possibly large in the strong-field regime. An ideal place to look for these modifications is in the vicinities of compact objects such as black holes. Here, we study dilatonic black holes, which arise in the framework of Gauss-Bonnet couplings and one-loop corrected four-dimensional effective theory of heterotic superstrings at low energies. These are interesting objects as a prototype for alternative, yet well-behaved gravity theories: they evade the 'no-hair' theorem of general relativity but were proven to be stable against radial perturbations. We investigate the viability of these black holes as astrophysical objects and try to provide some means to distinguish them from black holes in general relativity. We start by extending previous works and establishing the stability of these black holes against axial perturbations. We then look for solutions of the field equations describing slowly rotating black holes and study geodesic motion around this geometry. Depending on the values of mass, dilaton charge, and angular momentum of the solution, one can have differences in the innermost-stable-circular-orbit location and orbital frequency, relative to black holes in general relativity. In the most favorable cases, the difference amounts to a few percent. Given the current state-of-the-art, we discuss the difficulty of distinguishing the correct theory of gravity from electromagnetic observations or even with gravitational-wave detectors.

  6. Black Hole Formation in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissanke, Samaya

    2015-08-01

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in the formation, evolution and fate of stars. However, it remains unclear how massive stars, almost always in pairs, end their lives as extreme gravity objects (neutron stars and black holes) and what their eventual fate is. The physics driving these events in strong-field gravity are complex, rich but still remain elusive. Theoretical work in general relativity has long predicted that the formation of black holes through neutron star mergers emit vast amounts of gravitational radiation, through gravitational waves (GWs), and conventional electromagnetic (EM) radiation. Observing GWs and EM radiation from these elusive short-lived mergers remains one of the holy grails of modern astronomy and is only now possible with a suite of new time-domain telescopes and experiments. I will first review the most recent advances in this blossoming field of EM+GW astronomy, which combines three active disciplines: time-domain astronomy, computational astrophysics and general relativity. I will discuss the promises of this new convergence by illustrating the wealth of astrophysical information that a combined EM+GW measurement would immediately bring. I will then outline the main challenges that lie ahead for this new field in pinpointing the sky location of neutron star mergers using GW detectors and optical and radio wide-field synoptic surveys.

  7. Gravitational entropy of a Schwarzschild-type black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dil, Emre

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Clifton, Ellis and Tavakol's gravitational entropy proposal is used to determine the entropy of free gravitational fields due to a spherical symmetric Schwarzschild-type black hole which is considered in the framework of f( R) gravity. In order to obtain the gravitational entropy, we calculate the Weyl tensor of the black hole to determine the Bel-Robinson tensor, giving the super energy density. By using the super energy density, we obtain the gravitational energy density and the gravitational temperature to calculate the gravitational entropy of the f( R) gravity black hole. This proposal can reproduce the Bekenstein-Hawking value in general relativity limit, but cannot reproduce it in the f( R) gravity case.

  8. Giant black hole rips star apart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Astronomers believe that a doomed star came too close to a giant black hole after a close encounter with another star threw it off course. As it neared the enormous gravity of the black hole, the star was stretched by tidal forces until it was torn apart. This discovery provides crucial information on how these black holes grow and affect the surrounding stars and gas. "Stars can survive being stretched a small amount, as they are in binary star systems, but this star was stretched beyond its breaking point," said Dr Stefanie Komossa of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Germany, who led the international team of researchers. "This unlucky star just wandered into the wrong neighbourhood." While other observations have hinted that stars are destroyed by black holes (events known as ‘stellar tidal disruptions’), these new results are the first strong evidence. Observations with XMM-Newton and Chandra, combined with earlier images from the German Roentgensatellite (ROSAT), detected a powerful X-ray outburst from the centre of the galaxy RXJ1242-11. This outburst, one of the most extreme ever detected in a galaxy, was caused by gas from the destroyed star that was heated to millions of degrees before being swallowed by the black hole. The energy liberated in this process is equivalent to that of a supernova. "Now, with all of the data in hand, we have the smoking gun proof that this spectacular event has occurred," said co-author Prof. Guenther Hasinger, also of MPE. The black hole in the centre of RX J1242-11 is estimated to have a mass about 100 million times that of the Sun. By contrast, the destroyed star probably had a mass about equal to that of the Sun, making it a lopsided battle of gravity. "This is the ultimate ‘David versus Goliath’ battle, but here David loses," said Hasinger. The astronomers estimated that about one hundredth of the mass of the star was ultimately consumed, or accreted, by the black hole. This small

  9. Two Monster Black Holes at Work

    NASA Video Gallery

    Zoom into Markarian 739, a nearby galaxy hosting two monster black holes. Using NASA's Swift and Chandra, astronomers have shown that both black holes are producing energy as gas falls into them. T...

  10. Superradiance from a charged dilation black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K. )

    1992-12-07

    In this paper, the authors study the behavior of the wave function of charged Klein-Gordon field around a charge dilaton black hole. The rate of spontaneous charge loss is estimated for large black hole case.

  11. Black holes: Combinatorics and the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero G., J. Fernando

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to review the combinatorial methods used in loop quantum gravity to compute the entropy of black holes and discuss some applications of the formalism, in particular to the study of the thermodynamic limit. The main reason to look at this issue is the fact that the entropy must be a smooth function if one wants to remain within the confines of standard thermodynamics. Also, in precision studies of the entropy, it is important to check wether subdominant corrections for the statistical and the thermodynamical entropy coincide.

  12. Black Hole Paradox Solved By NASA's Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    Black holes are lighting up the Universe, and now astronomers may finally know how. New data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory show for the first time that powerful magnetic fields are the key to these brilliant and startling light shows. It is estimated that up to a quarter of the total radiation in the Universe emitted since the Big Bang comes from material falling towards supermassive black holes, including those powering quasars, the brightest known objects. For decades, scientists have struggled to understand how black holes, the darkest objects in the Universe, can be responsible for such prodigious amounts of radiation. Animation of a Black Hole Pulling Matter from Companion Star Animation of a Black Hole Pulling Matter from Companion Star New X-ray data from Chandra give the first clear explanation for what drives this process: magnetic fields. Chandra observed a black hole system in our galaxy, known as GRO J1655-40 (J1655, for short), where a black hole was pulling material from a companion star into a disk. "By intergalactic standards J1655 is in our backyard, so we can use it as a scale model to understand how all black holes work, including the monsters found in quasars," said Jon M. Miller of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, whose paper on these results appears in this week's issue of Nature. Gravity alone is not enough to cause gas in a disk around a black hole to lose energy and fall onto the black hole at the rates required by observations. The gas must lose some of its orbital angular momentum, either through friction or a wind, before it can spiral inward. Without such effects, matter could remain in orbit around a black hole for a very long time. Illustration of Magnetic Fields in GRO J1655-40 Illustration of Magnetic Fields in GRO J1655-40 Scientists have long thought that magnetic turbulence could generate friction in a gaseous disk and drive a wind from the disk that carries angular momentum outward allowing the gas to fall inward

  13. The case for artificial black holes.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Philbin, Thomas G

    2008-08-28

    The event horizon is predicted to generate particles from the quantum vacuum, an effect that bridges three areas of physics--general relativity, quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. The quantum radiation of real black holes is too feeble to be detectable, but black-hole analogues may probe several aspects of quantum black holes. In this paper, we explain in simple terms some of the motivations behind the study of artificial black holes.

  14. Merging galaxies and black hole ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valtonen, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    In mergers of galaxies their central black holes are accumulated together. Researchers show that few black hole systems arise which decay through black hole collisions and black hole ejections. The ejection statistics are calculated and compared with two observed systems where ejections have been previously suggested: double radio sources and high redshift quasars near low redshift galaxies. In both cases certain aspects of the associations are explained by the merger hypothesis.

  15. Black Holes: A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    Offers a selected bibliography pertaining to black holes with the following categories: introductory books; introductory articles; somewhat more advanced articles; readings about Einstein's general theory of relativity; books on the death of stars; articles on the death of stars; specific articles about Supernova 1987A; relevant science fiction…

  16. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    2014-10-06

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of “coded apertures”. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  17. Gravitational Collapse and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Lewis

    1973-01-01

    The newest and most exotic manner in which stars die is investigated. A brief outline is presented, along with a discussion of the role supernova play, followed by a description of how the black holes originate, exist, and how they might be detected. (DF)

  18. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    In the first part of this article I determine the geometry of a slowly rotating black hole deformed by generic tidal forces created by a remote distribution of matter. The metric of the deformed black hole is obtained by integrating the Einstein field equations in a vacuum region of spacetime bounded by r black hole's spin vector and the tidal moments, and captures all effects associated with the dragging of inertial frames. In the second part of the article I determine the tidal moments by immersing the black hole in a larger post-Newtonian system that includes an external distribution of matter; while the black hole's internal gravity is allowed to be strong, the mutual gravity between the black hole and the external matter is assumed to be weak. The post-Newtonian metric that describes the entire system is valid when r >rmin , where rmin is a minimum distance that must be much larger than the black hole's radius. The black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics provide alternative descriptions of the same gravitational field in an overlap rminblack hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system.

  19. Black holes, compact objects and solar system tests in non-relativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Jared; Satheeshkumar, V.H.; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: VHSatheeshkumar@baylor.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study spherically symmetric static spacetimes generally filled with an anisotropic fluid in the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity. In particular, we find that the vacuum solutions are not unique, and can be expressed in terms of the U(1) gauge field A. When solar system tests are considered, severe constraints on A are obtained, which seemingly pick up the Schwarzschild solution uniquely. In contrast to other versions of the Horava-Lifshitz theory, non-singular static stars made of a perfect fluid without heat flow can be constructed, due to the coupling of the fluid with the gauge field. These include the solutions with a constant pressure. We also study the general junction conditions across the surface of a star. In general, the conditions allow the existence of a thin matter shell on the surface. When applying these conditions to the perfect fluid solutions with the vacuum ones as describing their external spacetimes, we find explicitly the matching conditions in terms of the parameters appearing in the solutions. Such matching is possible even without the presence of a thin matter shell.

  20. Resource Letter BH-1: Black Holes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detweiler, Steven

    1981-01-01

    Lists resources on black holes, including: (1) articles of historical interest; (2) books and journal articles on elementary expositions; (3) elementary and advanced textbooks; and (4) research articles on analytic structure of black holes, black hole dynamics, and astrophysical processes. (SK)

  1. Compensating Scientism through "The Black Hole."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Lane

    The focal image of the film "The Black Hole" functions as a visual metaphor for the sacred, order, unity, and eternal time. The black hole is a symbol that unites the antinomic pairs of conscious/unconscious, water/fire, immersion/emersion, death/rebirth, and hell/heaven. The black hole is further associated with the quest for transcendent…

  2. Scalar field radiation from dilatonic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, H.; Saifullah, K.

    2012-12-01

    We study radiation of scalar particles from charged dilaton black holes. The Hamilton-Jacobi method has been used to work out the tunneling probability of outgoing particles from the event horizon of dilaton black holes. For this purpose we use WKB approximation to solve the charged Klein-Gordon equation. The procedure gives Hawking temperature for these black holes as well.

  3. Geometry of deformed black holes. I. Majumdar-Papapetrou binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerák, O.; Basovník, M.

    2016-08-01

    Although black holes are eminent manifestations of very strong gravity, the geometry of space-time around and even inside them can be significantly affected by additional bodies present in their surroundings. We study such an influence within static and axially symmetric (electro)vacuum space-times described by exact solutions of Einstein's equations, considering astrophysically motivated configurations (such as black holes surrounded by rings) as well as those of pure academic interest (such as specifically "tuned" systems of multiple black holes). The geometry is represented by the simplest invariants determined by the metric (the lapse function) and its gradient (gravitational acceleration), with special emphasis given to curvature (the Kretschmann and Ricci-square scalars). These quantities are analyzed and their level surfaces plotted both above and below the black-hole horizons, in particular near the central singularities. Estimating that the black hole could be most strongly affected by the other black hole, we focus, in this first paper, on the Majumdar-Papapetrou solution for a binary black hole and compare the deformation caused by "the other" hole (and the electrostatic field) with that induced by rotational dragging in the well-known Kerr and Kerr-Newman solutions.

  4. Black holes die hard: Can one spin up a black hole past extremality?

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Nerozzi, Andrea; Rocha, Jorge V.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-04-15

    A possible process to destroy a black hole consists on throwing point particles with sufficiently large angular momentum into the black hole. In the case of Kerr black holes, it was shown by Wald that particles with dangerously large angular momentum are simply not captured by the hole, and thus the event horizon is not destroyed. Here, we reconsider this gedanken experiment for a variety of black hole geometries, from black holes in higher dimensions to black rings. We show that this particular way of destroying a black hole does not succeed and that cosmic censorship is preserved.

  5. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  6. Thermodynamics of Nonspherical Black Holes from Liouville Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2012-08-01

    A Liouville formalism was proposed many years ago to account for the black hole entropy. It was recently updated to connect thermodynamics of general black holes, in particular the Hawking temperature, to two-dimensional Liouville theory. This relies on the dimensional reduction to two-dimensional black hole metric. The relevant dilaton gravity model can be rewritten as a Liouville-like theory. We refine the method and give general formulas for the corresponding scalar and energy-momentum tensors in Liouville theory. This enables us to read off the black hole temperature using a relation which was found about three decades ago. Then the range of application is extended to include nonspherical black holes such as neutral and charged black rings, topological black hole and the case coupled to a scalar field. As for the entropy, following previous authors, we invoke the Lagrangian approach to central charge by Cadoni and then use the Cardy formula. The general relevant parameters are also given. This approach is more advantageous than the usual Hamiltonian approach which was used by the old Liouville formalism for black hole entropy.

  7. Information retrieval from black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochan, Kinjalk; Chakraborty, Sumanta; Padmanabhan, T.

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that, when matter collapses to form a black hole, the complete information about the initial state of the matter cannot be retrieved by future asymptotic observers, through local measurements. This is contrary to the expectation from a unitary evolution in quantum theory and leads to (a version of) the black hole information paradox. Classically, nothing else, apart from mass, charge, and angular momentum is expected to be revealed to such asymptotic observers after the formation of a black hole. Semiclassically, black holes evaporate after their formation through the Hawking radiation. The dominant part of the radiation is expected to be thermal and hence one cannot know anything about the initial data from the resultant radiation. However, there can be sources of distortions which make the radiation nonthermal. Although the distortions are not strong enough to make the evolution unitary, these distortions carry some part of information regarding the in-state. In this work, we show how one can decipher the information about the in-state of the field from these distortions. We show that the distortions of a particular kind—which we call nonvacuum distortions—can be used to fully reconstruct the initial data. The asymptotic observer can do this operationally by measuring certain well-defined observables of the quantum field at late times. We demonstrate that a general class of in-states encode all their information content in the correlation of late time out-going modes. Further, using a 1 +1 dimensional dilatonic black hole model to accommodate backreaction self-consistently, we show that observers can also infer and track the information content about the initial data, during the course of evaporation, unambiguously. Implications of such information extraction are discussed.

  8. Black holes as parts of entangled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basini, G.; Capozziello, S.; Longo, G.

    A possible link between EPR-type quantum phenomena and astrophysical objects like black holes, under a new general definition of entanglement, is established. A new approach, involving backward time evolution and topology changes, is presented bringing to a definition of the system black hole-worm hole-white hole as an entangled system.

  9. Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

    PubMed

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen

    2014-06-01

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M, J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^{2}>1, a quadrupole moment larger than J^{2}/M, and a larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (and other) models with more general self-interactions.

  10. Horizons of description: Black holes and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Peter Joshua Martin

    Niels Bohr famously argued that a consistent understanding of quantum mechanics requires a new epistemic framework, which he named complementarity . This position asserts that even in the context of quantum theory, classical concepts must be used to understand and communicate measurement results. The apparent conflict between certain classical descriptions is avoided by recognizing that their application now crucially depends on the measurement context. Recently it has been argued that a new form of complementarity can provide a solution to the so-called information loss paradox. Stephen Hawking argues that the evolution of black holes cannot be described by standard unitary quantum evolution, because such evolution always preserves information, while the evaporation of a black hole will imply that any information that fell into it is irrevocably lost---hence a "paradox." Some researchers in quantum gravity have argued that this paradox can be resolved if one interprets certain seemingly incompatible descriptions of events around black holes as instead being complementary. In this dissertation I assess the extent to which this black hole complementarity can be undergirded by Bohr's account of the limitations of classical concepts. I begin by offering an interpretation of Bohr's complementarity and the role that it plays in his philosophy of quantum theory. After clarifying the nature of classical concepts, I offer an account of the limitations these concepts face, and argue that Bohr's appeal to disturbance is best understood as referring to these conceptual limits. Following preparatory chapters on issues in quantum field theory and black hole mechanics, I offer an analysis of the information loss paradox and various responses to it. I consider the three most prominent accounts of black hole complementarity and argue that they fail to offer sufficient justification for the proposed incompatibility between descriptions. The lesson that emerges from this

  11. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-04-01

    An exotic Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are "dumb", which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  12. Eternal higher spin black holes: a thermofield Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alejandra; Iqbal, Nabil; Llabrés, Eva

    2016-08-01

    We study Lorentzian eternal black holes in the Chern-Simons sector of AdS3 higher spin gravity. We probe such black holes using bulk Wilson lines and motivate new regularity conditions that must be obeyed by the bulk connections in order for the geometry to be consistent with an interpretation as a thermofield state in the dual CFT2. We demonstrate that any higher spin black hole may be placed in a gauge that satisfies these conditions: this is the Chern-Simons analogue of the construction of Kruskal coordinates that permit passage through the black hole horizon. We also argue that the Wilson line provides a higher-spin notion of causality in higher spin gravity that can be used to associate a Penrose diagram with the black hole. We present some applications of the formalism, including a study of the time-dependent entanglement entropy arising from the higher spin black hole interior and evidence for an emergent AdS2 region in the extremal limit.

  13. Chandra Catches "Piranha" Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Supermassive black holes have been discovered to grow more rapidly in young galaxy clusters, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These "fast-track" supermassive black holes can have a big influence on the galaxies and clusters that they live in. Using Chandra, scientists surveyed a sample of clusters and counted the fraction of galaxies with rapidly growing supermassive black holes, known as active galactic nuclei (or AGN). The data show, for the first time, that younger, more distant galaxy clusters contained far more AGN than older, nearby ones. Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe, consisting of many individual galaxies, a few of which contain AGN. Earlier in the history of the universe, these galaxies contained a lot more gas for star formation and black hole growth than galaxies in clusters do today. This fuel allows the young cluster black holes to grow much more rapidly than their counterparts in nearby clusters. Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus "The black holes in these early clusters are like piranha in a very well-fed aquarium," said Jason Eastman of Ohio State University (OSU) and first author of this study. "It's not that they beat out each other for food, rather there was so much that all of the piranha were able to really thrive and grow quickly." The team used Chandra to determine the fraction of AGN in four different galaxy clusters at large distances, when the Universe was about 58% of its current age. Then they compared this value to the fraction found in more nearby clusters, those about 82% of the Universe's current age. The result was the more distant clusters contained about 20 times more AGN than the less distant sample. AGN outside clusters are also more common when the Universe is younger, but only by factors of two or three over the same age span. "It's been predicted that there would be fast-track black holes in clusters, but we never

  14. Microscopic black holes and cosmic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daghigh, Ramin Ghasemzadeh

    In the first part of this thesis the relativistic viscous fluid equations describing the outflow of high temperature matter created via Hawking radiation from microscopic black holes are solved numerically for a realistic equation of state. We focus on black holes with initial temperatures greater than 100 GeV and lifetimes less than 6 days. The spectra of direct photons and photons from π0 decay are calculated for energies greater than 1 GeV. We calculate the diffuse gamma ray spectrum from black holes distributed in our galactic halo. However, the most promising route for their observation is to search for point sources emitting gamma rays of ever-increasing energy. We also calculate the spectra of all three flavors of neutrinos arising from direct emission from the fluid at the neutrino- sphere and from the decay of pions and muons from their decoupling at much larger radii and smaller temperatures for neutrino energies between 1 GeV and the Planck energy. The results for neutrino spectra may be applicable for the last few hours and minutes of the lifetime of a microscopic black hole. In the second part of this thesis the combined field equations of gravity and a scalar field are studied. When a potential for a scalar field has two local minima there arise spherical shell-type solutions of the classical field equations due to gravitational attraction. We establish such solutions numerically in a space which is asymptotically de Sitter. It generically arises when the energy scale characterizing the scalar field potential is much less than the Planck scale. It is shown that the mirror image of the shell appears in the other half of the Penrose diagram. The configuration is smooth everywhere with no physical singularity.* *This dissertation is a compound document (contains both a paper copy and a CD as part of the dissertation).

  15. Chaos may make black holes bright

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna

    1999-09-01

    Black holes cannot be seen directly since they absorb light and emit none, the very quality which earned them their name. We suggest that black holes may be seen indirectly through a chaotic defocusing of light. A black hole can capture light from a luminous companion in chaotic orbits before scattering the light in random directions. To a distant observer, the black hole would appear to light up. If the companion were a bright radio pulsar, this estimate suggests the black hole echo could be detectable.

  16. Iron Kα line of Kerr black holes with scalar hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yueying; Zhou, Menglei; Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Bambi, Cosimo; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen

    2016-07-01

    Recently, a family of hairy black holes in 4-dimensional Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field was discovered [1]. Besides the mass M and spin angular momentum J, these objects are characterized by a Noether charge Q, measuring the amount of scalar hair, which is not associated to a Gauss law and cannot be measured at spatial infinity. Introducing a dimensionless scalar hair parameter q, ranging from 0 to 1, we recover (a subset of) Kerr black holes for q = 0 and a family of rotating boson stars for q = 1. In the present paper, we explore the possibility of measuring q for astrophysical black holes with current and future X-ray missions. We study the iron Kα line expected in the reflection spectrum of such hairy black holes and we simulate observations with Suzaku and eXTP. As a proof of concept, we point out, by analyzing a sample of hairy black holes, that current observations can already constrain the scalar hair parameter q, because black holes with q close to 1 would have iron lines definitively different from those we observe in the available data. We conclude that a detailed scanning of the full space of solutions, together with data from the future X-ray missions, like eXTP, will be able to put relevant constraints on the astrophysical realization of Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

  17. Action growth for AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Wang, Shao-Jiang; Yang, Run-Qiu; Peng, Rong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Recently a Complexity-Action (CA) duality conjecture has been proposed, which relates the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state to the action of a Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch in the anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk. In this paper we further investigate the duality conjecture for stationary AdS black holes and derive some exact results for the growth rate of action within the Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch at late time approximation, which is supposed to be dual to the growth rate of quantum complexity of holographic state. Based on the results from the general D-dimensional Reissner-Nordström (RN)-AdS black hole, rotating/charged Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, Kerr-AdS black hole and charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole, we present a universal formula for the action growth expressed in terms of some thermodynamical quantities associated with the outer and inner horizons of the AdS black holes. And we leave the conjecture unchanged that the stationary AdS black hole in Einstein gravity is the fastest computer in nature.

  18. BlackMax: A black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Dechang; Starkman, Glenn; Stojkovic, Dejan; Issever, Cigdem; Tseng, Jeff; Rizvi, Eram

    2008-04-01

    We present a comprehensive black-hole event generator, BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at the LHC in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity, thus offering more realistic predictions for hadron-hadron colliders. The generator includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to date and incorporates the effects of black-hole rotation, splitting between the fermions, nonzero brane tension, and black-hole recoil due to Hawking radiation (although not all simultaneously). The generator can be interfaced with Herwig and Pythia. The main code can be downloaded from http://www-pnp.physics.ox.ac.uk/{approx}issever/BlackMax/blackmax.html.

  19. The Eikonal Quasinormal Modes of Kerr-Newman Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Zachary; Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Chen, Yanbei

    2015-04-01

    Due to the complicated coupling between gravity and electromagnetism near a Kerr-Newman black hole, a master, separable equation governing gravitational or electromagnetic perturbations has yet to be discovered, impeding efforts to calculate the quasinormal modes of perturbed black holes with arbitrary spin and charge. Instead, gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations are found to obey a pair of coupled, partial differential equations. To study the quasinormal modes, we examine these equations in the eikonal limit (where the waves are rapidly changing in space and time) via a newly developed WKB technique capable of handling coupled wave equations. Surprisingly, it turns out that an approximate master equation introduced by Dudley and Finley provides an accurate description of perturbations in the eikonal regime. These techniques allow the ``geometric correspondence'' between quasinormal modes and photon geodesics that is known to be true for Kerr black holes to be extended to Kerr-Newman black holes.

  20. Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, Izzet; Aslan, Onur Atilla

    2016-04-01

    We study the Hawking radiation of non-asymptotically flat rotating linear dilaton black holes, which are the solutions to the 4D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton-axion action by using the semi-classical radiation spectrum method. Using scalar perturbations, we show that both angular and radial equations produce exact analytical solutions. Thus, we obtain a precise radiation spectrum for the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The high-frequency regime does not yield the standard Hawking temperature of this black hole computed from the surface gravity. However, we show in detail that the specific low-frequency band of the radiation spectrum allows for the original Hawking temperature of the rotating linear dilaton black hole. The computations are also exhibited graphically.

  1. GUP assisted Hawking radiation of rotating acoustic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Övgün, A.; Jusufi, K.

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies (Steinhauer in Nat. Phys. 10:864, 2014, Phys. Rev. D 92:024043, 2015) provide compelling evidences that Hawking radiation could be experimentally proven by using an analogue black hole. In this paper, taking this situation into account we study the quantum gravitational effects on the Hawking radiation of rotating acoustic black holes. For this purpose, we consider the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) in the phenomenon of quantum tunneling. We firstly take the modified commutation relations into account to compute the GUP modified Hawking temperature when the massive scalar particles tunnel from this black hole. Then, we find a remarkably instructive expression for the GUP entropy to derive the quantum gravity corrected Hawking temperature of the rotating acoustic black hole.

  2. Strong gravitational lensing in a noncommutative black-hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Chikun; Kang Shuai; Chen Changyong; Chen Songbai; Jing Jiliang

    2011-04-15

    Noncommutative geometry may be a starting point to a quantum gravity. We study the influence of the spacetime noncommutative parameter on the strong field gravitational lensing in the noncommutative Schwarzschild black-hole spacetime and obtain the angular position and magnification of the relativistic images. Supposing that the gravitational field of the supermassive central object of the galaxy can be described by this metric, we estimate the numerical values of the coefficients and observables for strong gravitational lensing. In comparison to the Reissner-Norstroem black hole, we find that the influences of the spacetime noncommutative parameter is similar to those of the charge, but these influences are much smaller. This may offer a way to distinguish a noncommutative black hole from a Reissner-Norstroem black hole, and may permit us to probe the spacetime noncommutative constant {theta} by the astronomical instruments in the future.

  3. Lower bound on the spectral dimension near a black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Carlip, S.; Grumiller, D.

    2011-10-15

    We consider an evaporating Schwarzschild black hole in a framework in which the spectral dimension of spacetime varies continuously from four at large distances to a number smaller than three at small distances, as suggested by various approaches to quantum gravity. We demonstrate that the evaporation stops when the horizon radius reaches a scale at which spacetime becomes effectively three-dimensional, and argue that an observer remaining outside the horizon cannot probe the properties of the black hole at smaller scales. This result is universal in the sense that it does not depend on the details of the effective dimension as a function of the diffusion time. Observers falling into the black hole can resolve smaller scales, as can external observers in the presence of a cosmological constant. Even in these cases, though, we obtain an absolute bound D{>=}2 on the effective dimension that can be seen in any such attempt to measure the properties of the black hole.

  4. Massive vector particles tunneling from noncommutative charged black holes and their GUP-corrected thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Övgün, Ali; Jusufi, Kimet

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the tunneling process of charged massive bosons W^{±} (spin-1 particles) from noncommutative charged black holes such as charged RN black holes and charged BTZ black holes. By applying the WKB approximation and by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation we derive the tunneling rate and the corresponding Hawking temperature for those black holes configuration. Furthermore, we show the quantum gravity effects using the GUP on the Hawking temperature for the noncommutative RN black holes. The tunneling rate shows that the radiation deviates from pure thermality and is consistent with an underlying unitary theory.

  5. Quantum information erasure inside black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2015-12-01

    An effective field theory for infalling observers in the vicinity of a quasi-static black hole is given in terms of a freely falling lattice discretization. The lattice model successfully reproduces the thermal spectrum of outgoing Hawking radiation, as was shown by Corley and Jacobson, but can also be used to model observations made by a typical low-energy observer who enters the black hole in free fall at a prescribed time. The explicit short distance cutoff ensures that, from the viewpoint of the infalling observer, any quantum information that entered the black hole more than a scrambling time earlier has been erased by the black hole singularity. This property, combined with the requirement that outside observers need at least of order the scrambling time to extract quantum information from the black hole, ensures that a typical infalling observer does not encounter drama upon crossing the black hole horizon in a theory where black hole information is preserved for asymptotic observers.

  6. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    1999-03-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  7. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    2010-08-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  8. Black hole with quantum potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmed Farag; Khalil, Mohammed M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate black hole (BH) physics in the context of quantum corrections. These quantum corrections were introduced recently by replacing classical geodesics with quantal (Bohmian) trajectories and hence form a quantum Raychaudhuri equation (QRE). From the QRE, we derive a modified Schwarzschild metric, and use that metric to investigate BH singularity and thermodynamics. We find that these quantum corrections change the picture of Hawking radiation greatly when the size of BH approaches the Planck scale. They prevent the BH from total evaporation, predicting the existence of a quantum BH remnant, which may introduce a possible resolution for the catastrophic behavior of Hawking radiation as the BH mass approaches zero. Those corrections also turn the spacelike singularity of the black hole to be timelike, and hence this may ameliorate the information loss problem.

  9. Close supermassive binary black holes.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, C Martin

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that when the peaks of the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are significantly blueshifted or redshifted from the systemic velocity of the host galaxy, this could be a consequence of orbital motion of a supermassive black-hole binary (SMBB). The AGN J1536+0441 ( = SDSS J153636.22+044127.0) has recently been proposed as an example of this phenomenon. It is proposed here instead that J1536+0441 is an example of line emission from a disk. If this is correct, the lack of clear optical spectral evidence for close SMBBs is significant, and argues either that the merging of close SMBBs is much faster than has generally been hitherto thought, or if the approach is slow, that when the separation of the binary is comparable to the size of the torus and broad-line region, the feeding of the black holes is disrupted. PMID:20054358

  10. Inner mechanics of three-dimensional black holes.

    PubMed

    Detournay, Stéphane

    2012-07-20

    We investigate properties of the inner horizons of certain black holes in higher-derivative three-dimensional gravity theories. We focus on Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli and spacelike warped anti-de Sitter black holes, as well as on asymptotically warped de Sitter solutions exhibiting both a cosmological and a black hole horizon. We verify that a first law is satisfied at the inner horizon, in agreement with the proposal of Castro and Rodriguez [arXiv:1204.1284]. We then show that, in topologically massive gravity, the product of the areas of the inner and outer horizons fails to be independent on the mass, and we trace this to the diffeomorphism anomaly of the theory.

  11. Entanglement entropy of a black hole and isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Shuangqi; Zhao, Ren

    2013-02-01

    Using Unruh-Verlinde temperature obtained by entropic force, we directly calculate partition functions of quantum field in Schwarzschild spacetime via quantum statistical method and derive the expression of the black hole statistical entropy. In our calculation the lower limit of integral is the location of isolated horizon introduced in loop quantum gravity and the upper limit of integral is infinity. So the obtained entropy is the statistical entropy from isolated horizon to the infinite. In our calculation there are not the cutoff and approximation. The results showed that, as long as proper Immirzi parameters are selected, the entropy obtained by loop quantum gravity is consistent with the quantum statistical entropy outside the black hole horizon. Therefore the black hole entropy is a quantum entanglement entropy outside the isolated horizon.

  12. Inner mechanics of three-dimensional black holes.

    PubMed

    Detournay, Stéphane

    2012-07-20

    We investigate properties of the inner horizons of certain black holes in higher-derivative three-dimensional gravity theories. We focus on Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli and spacelike warped anti-de Sitter black holes, as well as on asymptotically warped de Sitter solutions exhibiting both a cosmological and a black hole horizon. We verify that a first law is satisfied at the inner horizon, in agreement with the proposal of Castro and Rodriguez [arXiv:1204.1284]. We then show that, in topologically massive gravity, the product of the areas of the inner and outer horizons fails to be independent on the mass, and we trace this to the diffeomorphism anomaly of the theory. PMID:22861835

  13. Gayge Fields and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'Tsov, D. V.

    1987-10-01

    Exact solutions of the Einstein-Yang-Mills and Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs systems of equations are examined, which describe Black Holes, with gluonic and scalar hairs. A simple deduction of these equations, based on the use of the gayge symmetry is given. The transition to a nonsingular gayge for gravitating Wu - Yang monopoles, in which the singularity is headen inside the horizon, is discussed. Bibliography: 11

  14. Complexity, action, and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Our earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the "Wheeler-DeWitt" patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  15. Complexity, action, and black holes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Adam R.; Roberts, Daniel A.; Susskind, Leonard; Swingle, Brian; Zhao, Ying

    2016-04-18

    In an earlier paper "Complexity Equals Action" we conjectured that the quantum computational complexity of a holographic state is given by the classical action of a region in the bulk (the `Wheeler-DeWitt' patch). We provide calculations for the results quoted in that paper, explain how it fits into a broader (tensor) network of ideas, and elaborate on the hypothesis that black holes are the fastest computers in nature.

  16. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  17. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units. PMID:27341223

  18. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  19. Constraints on black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, S.B. )

    1994-01-15

    One possible fate of information lost to black holes is its preservation in black hole remnants. It is argued that a type of effective field theory describes such remnants (generically referred to as informons). The general structure of such a theory is investigated and the infinite pair production problem is revisited. A toy model for remnants clarifies some of the basic issues; in particular, infinite remnant production is not suppressed simply by the large internal volumes as proposed in cornucopion scenarios. Criteria for avoiding infinite production are stated in terms of couplings in the effective theory. Such instabilities remain a problem barring what would be described in that theory as a strong coupling conspiracy. The relation to Euclidean calculations of cornucopion production is sketched, and potential flaws in that analysis are outlined. However, it is quite plausible that pair production of ordinary black holes (e.g., Reissner-Noerdstrom or others) is suppressed due to strong effective couplings. It also remains an open possibility that a microsopic dynamics can be found yielding an appropriate strongly coupled effective theory of neutral informons without infinite pair production.

  20. Soft Hair on Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, Stephen W.; Perry, Malcolm J.; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  1. Construction and enlargement of traversable wormholes from Schwarzschild black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Hiroko; Hayward, Sean A.

    2004-10-15

    Analytic solutions are presented which describe the construction of a traversable wormhole from a Schwarzschild black hole, and the enlargement of such a wormhole, in Einstein gravity. The matter model is pure radiation which may have negative-energy density (phantom or ghost radiation) and the idealization of impulsive radiation (infinitesimally thin null shells) is employed.

  2. Is there life inside black holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuchaev, V. I.

    2011-12-01

    Bound inside rotating or charged black holes, there are stable periodic planetary orbits, which neither come out nor terminate at the central singularity. Stable periodic orbits inside black holes exist even for photons. These bound orbits may be defined as orbits of the third kind, following the Chandrasekhar classification of particle orbits in the black hole gravitational field. The existence domain for the third-kind orbits is rather spacious, and thus there is place for life inside supermassive black holes in the galactic nuclei. Interiors of the supermassive black holes may be inhabited by civilizations, being invisible from the outside. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of black holes by observing their white hole counterparts.

  3. Black Holes, Worm Holes, and Future Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2000-01-01

    NASA has begun examining the technologies needed for an Interstellar Mission. In 1998, a NASA Interstellar Mission Workshop was held at the California Institute of Technology to examine the technologies required. Since then, a spectrum of research efforts to support such a mission has been underway, including many advanced and futuristic space propulsion concepts which are being explored. The study of black holes and wormholes may provide some of the breakthrough physics needed to travel to the stars. The first black hole, CYGXI, was discovered in 1972 in the constellation Cygnus X-1. In 1993, a black hole was found in the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. In 1994, the black hole GRO J1655-40 was discovered by the NASA Marshall Space Flight center using the Gamma Ray Observatory. Today, we believe we have found evidence to support the existence of 19 black holes, but our universe may contain several thousands. This paper discusses the dead star states - - both stable and unstable, white dwarfs, neutron stars, pulsars, quasars, the basic features and types of black holes: nonspinning, nonspinning with charge, spinning, and Hawking's mini black holes. The search for black holes, gravitational waves, and Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) are reviewed. Finally, concepts of black hole powered space vehicles and wormhole concepts for rapid interstellar travel are discussed in relation to the NASA Interstellar Mission.

  4. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune

    2010-11-15

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  5. A Black Hole in Our Galactic Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    An introductory approach to black holes is presented along with astronomical observational data pertaining to the presence of a supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Concepts of conservation of energy and Kepler's third law are employed so students can apply formulas from their physics class to determine the mass of the black hole…

  6. On dumb holes and their gravity duals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumit R.; Ghosh, Archisman; Oh, Jae-Hyuk; Shapere, Alfred D.

    2011-04-01

    Inhomogeneous fluid flows which become supersonic are known to produce acoustic analogs of ergoregions and horizons. This leads to Hawking-like radiation of phonons with a temperature essentially given by the gradient of the velocity at the horizon. We find such acoustic dumb holes in charged conformal fluids and use the fluid-gravity correspondence to construct dual gravity solutions. A class of quasinormal modes around these gravitational backgrounds perceive a horizon. Upon quantization, this implies a thermal spectrum for these modes.

  7. Black Hole Instabilities and Local Penrose Inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Pau; Murata, Keiju; Reall, Harvey S.

    2015-01-01

    Various higher-dimensional black holes have been shown to be unstable by studying linearized gravitational perturbations. A simpler method for demonstrating instability is to find initial data that describes a small perturbation of the black hole and violates a Penrose inequality. We use the method to confirm the existence of the "ultraspinning" instability of Myers-Perry black holes. We also study black rings and show that "fat" black rings are unstable. We find no evidence of any rotationally symmetric instability of "thin" black rings.

  8. Destroying Kerr-Sen black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahaan, Haryanto M.

    2016-03-01

    By neglecting the self-force, self-energy, and radiative effects, it has been shown that an extremal or near-extremal Kerr-Newman black hole can turn into a naked singularity when it captures charged and spinning massive particles. A straightforward question then arises: do charged and rotating black holes in string theory possess the same property? In this paper we apply Wald's gedanken experiment, in his study on the possibility of destroying extremal Kerr-Newman black holes, to the case of (near-)extremal Kerr-Sen black holes. We find that feeding a test particle into a (near-)extremal Kerr-Sen black hole could lead to a violation of the extremal bound for the black hole.

  9. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes

    PubMed Central

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M.; Garrett, Travis

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford–Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux. PMID:21768341

  10. Binary black hole merger dynamics and waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-II; Koppitz, Michael; vanMeter, James

    2006-01-01

    We apply recently developed techniques for simulations of moving black holes to study dynamics and radiation generation in the last few orbits and merger of a binary black hole system. Our analysis produces a consistent picture from the gravitational wave forms and dynamical black hole trajectories for a set of simulations with black holes beginning on circular-orbit trajectories at a variety of initial separations. We find profound agreement at the level of 1% among the simulations for the last orbit, merger and ringdown, resulting in a final black hole with spin parameter a/m = 0.69. Consequently, we are confident that this part of our waveform result accurately represents the predictions from Einstein's General Relativity for the final burst of gravitational radiation resulting from the merger of an astrophysical system of equal-mass non-spinning black holes. We also find good agreement at a level of roughly 10% for the radiation generated in the preceding few orbits.

  11. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-05-15

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M{sub D-1}xS{sup 1}, where D is the spacetime dimension and M{sub D-1} stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  12. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes.

    PubMed

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Garrett, Travis

    2011-08-01

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux.

  13. Dynamically self-regular quantum harmonic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais

    2015-04-01

    The recently proposed UV self-complete quantum gravity program is a new and very interesting way to envision Planckian/trans-Planckian physics. In this new framework, high energy scattering is dominated by the creation of micro black holes, and it is experimentally impossible to probe distances shorter than the horizon radius. In this letter we present a model which realizes this idea through the creation of self-regular quantum black holes admitting a minimal size extremal configuration. Their radius provides a dynamically generated minimal length acting as a universal short-distance cutoff. We propose a quantization scheme for this new kind of microscopic objects based on a Bohr-like approach, which does not require a detailed knowledge of quantum gravity. The resulting black hole quantum picture resembles the energy spectrum of a quantum harmonic oscillator. The mass of the extremal configuration plays the role of zero-point energy. Large quantum number re-establishes the classical black hole description. Finally, we also formulate a "quantum hoop conjecture" which is satisfied by all the mass eigenstates and sustains the existence of quantum black holes sourced by Gaussian matter distributions.

  14. Stellar black holes and the origin of cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh; Balogh, Michael L.

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has presented a unique challenge for cosmologists. As observational cosmology forges ahead, theorists have struggled to make sense of a standard model that requires extreme fine-tuning. This challenge is known as the cosmological constant problem. The theory of gravitational aether is an alternative to general relativity that does not suffer from this fine-tuning problem, as it decouples the quantum field theory vacuum from geometry, while remaining consistent with other tests of gravity. In this paper, we study static black hole solutions in this theory and show that it manifests a UV-IR coupling: Aether couples the space-time metric close to the black hole horizon, to metric at infinity. We then show that using the trans-Planckian ansatz (as a quantum gravity effect) close to the black hole horizon, leads to an accelerating cosmological solution, far from the horizon. Interestingly, this acceleration matches current observations for stellar-mass black holes. Based on our current understanding of the black hole accretion history in the Universe, we then make a prediction for how the effective dark energy density should evolve with redshift, which can be tested with future dark energy probes.

  15. Massive Binary Black Holes in the Cosmic Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica; Dotti, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    Binary black holes occupy a special place in our quest for understanding the evolution of galaxies along cosmic history. If massive black holes grow at the center of (pre-)galactic structures that experience a sequence of merger episodes, then dual black holes form as inescapable outcome of galaxy assembly, and can in principle be detected as powerful dual quasars. But, if the black holes reach coalescence, during their inspiral inside the galaxy remnant, then they become the loudest sources of gravitational waves ever in the universe. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is being developed to reveal these waves that carry information on the mass and spin of these binary black holes out to very large look-back times. Nature seems to provide a pathway for the formation of these exotic binaries, and a number of key questions need to be addressed: How do massive black holes pair in a merger? Depending on the properties of the underlying galaxies, do black holes always form a close Keplerian binary? If a binary forms, does hardening proceed down to the domain controlled by gravitational wave back reaction? What is the role played by gas and/or stars in braking the black holes, and on which timescale does coalescence occur? Can the black holes accrete on flight and shine during their pathway to coalescence? After outlining key observational facts on dual/binary black holes, we review the progress made in tracing their dynamics in the habitat of a gas-rich merger down to the smallest scales ever probed with the help of powerful numerical simulations. N-Body/hydrodynamical codes have proven to be vital tools for studying their evolution, and progress in this field is expected to grow rapidly in the effort to describe, in full realism, the physics of stars and gas around the black holes, starting from the cosmological large scale of a merger. If detected in the new window provided by the upcoming gravitational wave experiments, binary black holes will provide a deep view

  16. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr–Newman or Kerr–Newman–anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  17. Black holes in the milky way galaxy.

    PubMed

    Filippenko, A V

    1999-08-31

    Extremely strong observational evidence has recently been found for the presence of black holes orbiting a few relatively normal stars in our Milky Way Galaxy and also at the centers of some galaxies. The former generally have masses of 4-16 times the mass of the sun, whereas the latter are "supermassive black holes" with millions to billions of solar masses. The evidence for a supermassive black hole in the center of our galaxy is especially strong.

  18. Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2009-02-01

    Quantum radiation of general nonstationary black holes is investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise-coordinate transformation (GTT). It is shown in general that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on time and angle. Further, we find that the chemical potential in the thermal-radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative-energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for general nonstationary black holes.

  19. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr-Newman or Kerr-Newman-anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  20. Gravitational Rocket from the Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are expected to be among the most fascinating gravitational wave sources, observable by the NASA/ESA LISA detector. Not only will the merger events reveal the rich phenomenology of extremely strong and dynamical gravity deep inside the potential wells at the centers of galaxies (thus providing an excellent testing ground for general relativity), it will also make important contributions to the astrophysics of massive black hole evolutions. Typical black hole mergers involve asymmetric radiation of gravitational waves and lose linear momentum as well as energy and angular momentum. As a result, the merger remnant receives a kick from the GW emission: a gravitational rocket effect. High kick velocities (higher than the escape velocities of the host structure) would have a strong impact on our understanding of how massive black holes have evolved over time and, in particular, on the estimates of the merger rate for LISA. The main difficulties in calculations of the kick velocities has been in the last moments of the merger where the full theory of general relativity must be employed to accurately model the black hole dynamics. I describe a recent calculation of the kick velocities from numerical relativity simulations of the merging black hole binaries.

  1. Transition from regular to chaotic motion in black hole magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopáček, Ondřej

    2011-10-01

    Cosmic black holes can act as agents of particle acceleration. We study properties of a system consisting of a rotating black hole immersed in a large-scale organized magnetic field. Electrically charged particles in the immediate neighborhood of the horizon are influenced by strong gravity acting together with magnetic and induced electric components. We relax several constraints which were often imposed in previous works: the magnetic field does not have to share a common symmetry axis with the spin of the black hole but they can be inclined with respect to each other, thus violating the axial symmetry. Also, the black hole does not have to remain at rest but it can instead perform fast translational motion together with rotation. We demonstrate that the generalization brings new effects. Starting from uniform electro-vacuum fields in the curved spacetime, we find separatrices and identify magnetic neutral points forming in certain circumstances. We suggest that these structures can represent signatures of magnetic reconnection triggered by frame-dragging effects in the ergosphere. We further investigate the motion of charged particles in these black hole magnetospheres. We concentrate on the transition from the regular motion to chaos, and in this context we explore the characteristics of chaos in relativity. For the first time, we apply recurrence plots as a suitable technique to quantify the degree of chaoticness near a black hole.

  2. Gravitational Rocket from the Merging Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.

    2005-12-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are expected to be among the most fascinating gravitational wave sources, observable by the NASA/ESA LISA detector. Not only will the merger events reveal the rich phenomenology of extremely strong and dynamical gravity deep inside the potential wells at the centers of galaxies (thus providing an excellent testing ground for general relativity), it will also make important contributions to the astrophysics of massive black hole evolutions. Typical black hole mergers involve asymmetric radiation of gravitational waves and lose linear momentum as well as energy and angular momentum. As a result, the merger remnant receives a kick from the GW emission: a gravitational rocket effect. High kick velocities (higher than the escape velocites of the host structure) would have a strong impact on our understanding of how massive black holes have evolved over time and, in particular, on the estimates of the merger rate for LISA. The main difficulties in calculations of the kick velocities has been in the last moments of the merger where the full theory of general relativity must be employed to accurately model the black hole dynamics. I describe a recent calculation of the kick velocities from numerical relativity simulations of the merging black hole binaries. Support from NASA ATP#02-0043-0056 is greatly appreciated.

  3. Black hole remnants and the information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Ong, Y. C.; Yeom, D.-h.

    2015-11-01

    Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of the information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that the singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate the information loss paradox and the firewall controversy. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

  4. Interior dynamics of neutral and charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun-Qi; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we explore the interior dynamics of neutral and charged black holes. Scalar collapses in flat, Schwarzschild, and Reissner-Nordström background geometries are simulated. We examine the dynamics in the vicinities of the central singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole and of the inner horizon of a Reissner-Nordström black hole. In simulating scalar collapses in Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström geometries, Kruskal and Kruskal-like coordinates are used, respectively, with the presence of a scalar field being taken into account. It is found that, besides near the inner horizons of Reissner-Nordström and Kerr black holes, mass inflation also takes place near the central singularity in neutral scalar collapse. Approximate analytic expressions for different types of mass inflation are partially obtained via a close interplay between numerical and analytical approaches and an examination of the connections between Schwarzschild black holes, Reissner-Nordström black holes, neutral collapse, and charge scattering. We argue that the mass inflations near the central singularity and the inner horizon are related to the localness of the dynamics in strong gravity regions. This is in accord with the Belinskii, Khalatnikov, and Lifshitz conjecture.

  5. Binary Black Hole Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, J.; Boggs, W.; Kelly, B.; McWilliams, S.; vanMeter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The final merger of comparable mass binary black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for LISA. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer in order to calculate these waveforms. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. We will present the results of new simulations of black hole mergers with unequal masses and spins, focusing on the gravitational waves emitted and the accompanying astrophysical "kicks." The magnitude of these kicks has bearing on the production and growth of supermassive black holes during the epoch of structure formation, and on the retention of black holes in stellar clusters.

  6. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass 'stellar mass' black holes and the 'supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ∼10(4)-10(5) M(⊙) black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism.

  7. Low-mass black holes as the remnants of primordial black hole formation.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between the approximately ten solar mass 'stellar mass' black holes and the 'supermassive' black holes of millions to billions of solar masses are the elusive 'intermediate-mass' black holes. Their discovery is key to understanding whether supermassive black holes can grow from stellar-mass black holes or whether a more exotic process accelerated their growth soon after the Big Bang. Currently, tentative evidence suggests that the progenitors of supermassive black holes were formed as ∼10(4)-10(5) M(⊙) black holes via the direct collapse of gas. Ongoing searches for intermediate-mass black holes at galaxy centres will help shed light on this formation mechanism. PMID:23250434

  8. Supermassive Black Hole Mimics Smaller Cousins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    Scientists have caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy in the act of spurting energy into a jet of electrons and magnetic fields four distinct times in the past three years, a celestial take on a Yellowstone geyser. This quasar-like "active" galaxy is essentially a scaled-up model of the so-called microquasars within our Milky Way Galaxy, which are smaller black holes with as much as ten times the mass of the sun. This means that scientists can now use their close-up view of microquasars to develop working models of the most massive and powerful black holes in the universe. Artist's Conception of 3C 120. Scene from an animation of 3C 120. CREDIT: Cosmovision These results -- published in the June 6 issue of Nature -- are the fruit of a three-year monitoring campaign with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide radio-telescope system, and NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. "This is the first direct, observational evidence of what we had suspected: The jets in active galaxies are powered by disks of hot gas orbiting around supermassive black holes," said Alan Marscher of the Institute for Astrophysical Research at Boston University, who led this international team of astronomers. Active galaxies are distant celestial objects with exceedingly bright cores, often radiating with the brilliance of thousands of ordinary galaxies, fueled by the gravity of a central million- to billion-solar-mass black hole pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. Marscher and his colleagues have established the first direct observational link between a supermassive black hole and its jet. The source is an active galaxy named 3C120 about 450 million light-years from Earth. This link has been observed in microquasars, several of which are scattered across the Milky Way Galaxy, but never before in active galaxies, because the scale (distance and time) is so much greater. The jets in galaxy 3C120 are streams of particles

  9. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Drew R.; Piro, Anthony; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. Using the observed BH mass distribution from Galactic X-ray binaries, we investigate the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass. Although the shape of the black hole formation probability function is poorly constrained by current measurements, we believe that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. We also consider some of the implications of this probability distribution, from its impact on the chemical enrichment from massive stars, to its connection with the structure of the core at the time of collapse, to the birth kicks that black holes receive. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be a useful input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  10. Quantum capacity of quantum black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Chris; Bradler, Kamil

    2014-03-01

    The fate of quantum entanglement interacting with a black hole has been an enduring mystery, not the least because standard curved space field theory does not address the interaction of black holes with matter. We discuss an effective Hamiltonian of matter interacting with a black hole that has a precise analogue in quantum optics and correctly reproduces both spontaneous and stimulated Hawking radiation with grey-body factors. We calculate the quantum capacity of this channel in the limit of perfect absorption, as well as in the limit of a perfectly reflecting black hole (a white hole). We find that the white hole is an optimal quantum cloner, and is isomorphic to the Unruh channel with positive quantum capacity. The complementary channel (across the horizon) is entanglement-breaking with zero capacity, avoiding a violation of the quantum no-cloning theorem. The black hole channel on the contrary has vanishing capacity, while its complement has positive capacity instead. Thus, quantum states can be reconstructed faithfully behind the black hole horizon, but not outside. This work sheds new light on black hole complementarity because it shows that black holes can both reflect and absorb quantum states without violating the no-cloning theorem, and makes quantum firewalls obsolete.

  11. Schwarzschild black holes can wear scalar wigs.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-24

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  12. Particle accelerators inside spinning black holes.

    PubMed

    Lake, Kayll

    2010-05-28

    On the basis of the Kerr metric as a model for a spinning black hole accreting test particles from rest at infinity, I show that the center-of-mass energy for a pair of colliding particles is generically divergent at the inner horizon. This shows not only that classical black holes are internally unstable, but also that Planck-scale physics is a characteristic feature within black holes at scales much larger that the Planck length. The novel feature of the divergence discussed here is that the phenomenon is present only for black holes with rotation, and in this sense it is distinct from the well-known Cauchy horizon instability.

  13. Gamma ray astronomy and black hole astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1990-01-01

    The study of soft gamma emissions from black-hole candidates is identified as an important element in understanding black-hole phenomena ranging from stellar-mass black holes to AGNs. The spectra of Cyg X-1 and observations of the Galactic Center are emphasized, since thermal origins and MeV gamma-ray bumps are evident and suggest a thermal-pair cloud picture. MeV gamma-ray observations are suggested for studying black hole astrophysics such as the theorized escaping pair wind, the anticorrelation between the MeV gamma bump and the soft continuum, and the relationship between source compactness and temperature.

  14. Black holes and local dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegyi, D. J.; Kolb, E. W.; Olive, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    Two independent constraints are placed on the amount of dark matter in black holes contained in the galactic disk. First, gas accretion by black holes leads to X-ray emission which cannot exceed the observed soft X-ray background. Second, metals produced in stellar processes that lead to black hole formation cannot exceed the observed disk metal abundance. Based on these constraints, it appears unlikely that the missing disk mass could be contained in black holes. A consequence of this conclusion is that at least two different types of dark matter are needed to solve the various missing mass problems.

  15. Schwarzschild Black Holes can Wear Scalar Wigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  16. Black Hole Researchers in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    "Black Holes in my School" is a research project that aims to explore the impact of engaging students in real research experiences while learning new skills and topics addressed in the regular school curriculum. The project introduces teachers to innovative tools for science teaching, explore student centered methodologies such as inquiry based learning and provides a setting where students take the role of an astrophysicist researching the field of compact stellar mass objects in binary systems. Students will study already existing data and use the Faulkes Telescopes to acquire new data. In this presentation the main aim is to present the framework being built and the results achieved so far.

  17. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Local Hawking temperature for dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, S. A.; Di Criscienzo, R.; Nadalini, M.; Vanzo, L.; Zerbini, S.

    2009-03-01

    A local Hawking temperature is derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton Jacobi variant of the Parikh Wilczek tunneling method. It is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. The operational meaning of the temperature is that Kodama observers just outside the horizon measure an invariantly redshifted temperature, diverging at the horizon itself. In static, asymptotically flat cases, the Hawking temperature as usually defined by the Killing vector agrees in standard cases, but generally differs by a relative redshift factor between the horizon and infinity, this being the temperature measured by static observers at infinity. Likewise, the geometrical surface gravity reduces to the Newtonian surface gravity in the Newtonian limit, while the Killing definition instead reflects measurements at infinity. This may resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the Hawking temperature for the extremal limit of the charged stringy black hole, namely that it is the local temperature which vanishes. In general, this confirms the quasi-stationary picture of black-hole evaporation in early stages. However, the geometrical surface gravity is generally not the surface gravity of a static black hole with the same parameters.

  18. NASA Observatory Confirms Black Hole Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    The very largest black holes reach a certain point and then grow no more, according to the best survey to date of black holes made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. Scientists have also discovered many previously hidden black holes that are well below their weight limit. These new results corroborate recent theoretical work about how black holes and galaxies grow. The biggest black holes, those with at least 100 million times the mass of the Sun, ate voraciously during the early Universe. Nearly all of them ran out of 'food' billions of years ago and went onto a forced starvation diet. Focus on Black Holes in the Chandra Deep Field North Focus on Black Holes in the Chandra Deep Field North On the other hand, black holes between about 10 and 100 million solar masses followed a more controlled eating plan. Because they took smaller portions of their meals of gas and dust, they continue growing today. "Our data show that some supermassive black holes seem to binge, while others prefer to graze", said Amy Barger of the University of Wisconsin in Madison and the University of Hawaii, lead author of the paper describing the results in the latest issue of The Astronomical Journal (Feb 2005). "We now understand better than ever before how supermassive black holes grow." One revelation is that there is a strong connection between the growth of black holes and the birth of stars. Previously, astronomers had done careful studies of the birthrate of stars in galaxies, but didn't know as much about the black holes at their centers. DSS Optical Image of Lockman Hole DSS Optical Image of Lockman Hole "These galaxies lose material into their central black holes at the same time that they make their stars," said Barger. "So whatever mechanism governs star formation in galaxies also governs black hole growth." Astronomers have made an accurate census of both the biggest, active black holes in the distance, and the relatively smaller, calmer ones closer by. Now, for the first

  19. Distorted five-dimensional electrically charged black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Shoom, Andrey A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study distorted, five-dimensional, electrically charged (nonextremal) black holes on the example of a static and "axisymmetric" black hole distorted by external, electrically neutral matter. Such a black hole is represented by the solution derived here of the Einstein-Maxwell equations which admits an R1×U(1)×U(1) isometry group. The external matter, which is "located" at the asymptotic infinity, is not included in the solution. The space-time singularities are located behind the black hole's inner (Cauchy) horizon, provided that the sources of the distortion satisfy the strong energy condition. The inner (Cauchy) horizon remains regular if the distortion fields are finite and smooth at the outer horizon. The solution has some remarkable properties. There exists a certain duality transformation between the inner and the outer horizon surfaces which links surface gravity, electrostatic potential, and space-time curvature invariants calculated at the black hole horizons. The product of the inner and outer horizon areas depends only on the black hole's electric charge, and the geometric mean of the areas is the upper (lower) limit for the inner (outer) horizon area. The electromagnetic field invariant calculated at the horizons is proportional to the squared surface gravity of the horizons. The horizon areas, electrostatic potential, and surface gravity satisfy the Smarr formula. We formulated the zeroth and the first laws of mechanics and thermodynamics of the distorted black hole and found a correspondence between the global and local forms of the first law. To illustrate the effect of distortion, we consider the dipole-monopole and quadrupole-quadrupole distortion fields. The relative change in the Kretschmann scalar due to the distortion is greater at the outer horizon than at the inner one. By calculating the maximal proper time of free fall from the outer to the inner horizons, we show that the distortion can noticeably change the black hole

  20. Black hole thermodynamics, conformal couplings, and R 2 terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernicoff, Mariano; Galante, Mario; Giribet, Gaston; Goya, Andres; Leoni, Matias; Oliva, Julio; Perez-Nadal, Guillem

    2016-06-01

    Lovelock theory provides a tractable model of higher-curvature gravity in which several questions can be studied analytically. This is the reason why, in the last years, this theory has become the favorite arena to study the effects of higher-curvature terms in the context of AdS/CFT correspondence. Lovelock theory also admits extensions that permit to accommodate matter coupled to gravity in a non-minimal way. In this setup, problems such as the backreaction of matter on the black hole geometry can also be solved exactly. In this paper, we study the thermodynamics of black holes in theories of gravity of this type, which include both higher-curvature terms, U(1) gauge fields, and conformal couplings with matter fields in D dimensions. These charged black hole solutions exhibit a backreacting scalar field configuration that is regular everywhere outside and on the horizon, and may exist both in asymptotically flat and asymptotically Anti-de Sitter (AdS) spaces. We work out explicitly the boundary action for this theory, which renders the variational problem well-posed and suffices to regularize the Euclidean action in AdS. We also discuss several interrelated properties of the theory, such as its duality symmetry under field redefinition and how it acts on black holes and gravitational wave solutions.

  1. Angular momentum conservation for dynamical black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2006-11-15

    Angular momentum can be defined by rearranging the Komar surface integral in terms of a twist form, encoding the twisting around of space-time due to a rotating mass, and an axial vector. If the axial vector is a coordinate vector and has vanishing transverse divergence, it can be uniquely specified under certain generic conditions. Along a trapping horizon, a conservation law expresses the rate of change of angular momentum of a general black hole in terms of angular momentum densities of matter and gravitational radiation. This identifies the transverse-normal block of an effective gravitational-radiation energy tensor, whose normal-normal block was recently identified in a corresponding energy conservation law. Angular momentum and energy are dual, respectively, to the axial vector and a previously identified vector, the conservation equations taking the same form. Including charge conservation, the three conserved quantities yield definitions of an effective energy, electric potential, angular velocity and surface gravity, satisfying a dynamical version of the so-called first law of black-hole mechanics. A corresponding zeroth law holds for null trapping horizons, resolving an ambiguity in taking the null limit.

  2. Spectrum of charged black holes - the big fix mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barvinsky, Andrei; Das, Saurya; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2001-11-01

    Following an earlier suggestion of the authors (Barvinsky A and Kunstatter G 1997 Mass spectrum for black holes in generic 2-D dilaton gravity Proc. 2nd International A D Sakharov Conference on Physics ed I M Dremin and A M Seminkhatov (Singapore: World Scientific) pp 210-15), we use some basic properties of Euclidean black hole thermodynamics and the quantum mechanics of systems with periodic phase space coordinate to derive the discrete two-parameter area spectrum of generic charged spherically symmetric black holes in any dimension. For the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole we get A/4Gℎ = π(2n + p + 1), where the integer p = 0, 1, 2,... gives the charge spectrum, with Q = +/- √ ℎp. The quantity π(2n + 1), n = 0, 1,..., gives a measure of the excess of the mass/energy over the critical minimum (i.e. extremal) value allowed for a given fixed charge Q. The classical critical bound cannot be saturated due to vacuum fluctuations of the horizon, so that generically extremal black holes do not appear in the physical spectrum. Consistency also requires the black hole charge to be an integer multiple of any fundamental elementary particle charge: Q = +/-me, m = 0, 1, 2,.... As a by-product this yields a relation between the fine structure constant and integer parameters of the black hole - a kind of the Coleman big fix mechanism induced by black holes. In four dimensions, this relationship is e2/ℎ = p/m2 and requires the fine structure constant to be a rational number. Finally, we prove that the horizon area is an adiabatic invariant, as has been conjectured previously.

  3. Slowly rotating black holes with nonlinear electrodynamics in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Sepehri Rad, M.

    2014-10-01

    Employing linear order perturbation theory with the rotation parameter as the perturbative parameter, we obtain asymptotically AdS slowly rotating black hole solutions in the Einstein gravity with Born-Infeld (BI) type nonlinear electrodynamics (NED). We start from asymptotically AdS static black hole solutions coupled to BI type NED in five dimensions. Then, we consider the effect of adding a small amount of angular momenta to the seed solutions. Finally, we investigate the geometry and thermodynamic properties of the solutions.

  4. Charged Einstein-aether black holes and Smarr formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun; Wang, Anzhong; Wang, Xinwen

    2015-10-01

    In the framework of the Einstein-Maxwell-aether theory, we present two new classes of exact charged black hole solutions, which are asymptotically flat and possess the universal as well as Killing horizons. We also construct the Smarr formulas and calculate the temperatures of the horizons, using the Smarr mass-area relation. We find that, in contrast to the neutral case, a temperature obtained this way is not proportional to its surface gravity at either of the two types of horizons. Einstein-Maxwell-aether black holes with the cosmological constant and their topological cousins are also presented.

  5. Conformally flat black holes in Poincaré gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, M.; Cvetković, B.

    2016-02-01

    General criteria for the existence of conformally flat Riemannian solutions in three-dimensional Poincaré gauge theory without matter are formulated. Using these criteria, we show that the Oliva-Tempo-Troncoso black hole, a solution of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend gravity, is also an exact vacuum solution of the Poincaré gauge theory. The related conserved charges, calculated from the Hamiltonian boundary term, are shown to satisfy the first law of black hole thermodynamics. The form of the boundary term is verified by using the covariant Hamiltonian approach.

  6. Corrected Entropy of a General Spherically Symmetric Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tang-mei; Yang, Jin-bo; Wu, Feng-jie

    2012-07-01

    Adopting the tortoise coordinates transformation in the advanced Eddington coordinates and applying the generalized law of thermodynamics, we discuss the corrected entropy of a general spherically symmetric black hole beyond the semi-classical limit. We give the corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking area law following from the modified Hawking temperature. Two examples are explicitly worked out. The conclusion is that the corrected entropy includes a logarithmically term and an inverse term to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, which is the same form as that of the static and the stationary black holes discussed by using the loop quantum gravity and the string theory.

  7. Clocks, Computers, Black Holes, Spacetime Foam, and Holographic Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Y. Jack

    2002-08-01

    What do simple clocks, simple computers, black holes, space-time foam, and holographic principle have in common? I will show that the physics behind them is inter-related, linking together our concepts of information, gravity, and quantum uncertainty. Thus, the physics that sets the limits to computation and clock precision also yields Hawking radiation of black holes and the holographic principle. Moreover, the latter two strongly imply that space-time undergoes much larger quantum fluctuations than what the folklore suggests -- large enough to be detected with modern gravitational-wave interferometers through future refinements.

  8. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  9. Surprises in the evaporation of 2D black holes.

    PubMed

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Pretorius, Frans; Ramazanoğlu, Fethi M

    2011-04-22

    Quantum evaporation of Callan-Giddings-Harvey-Strominger black holes is analyzed in the mean-field approximation, incorporating backreaction. Detailed analytical and numerical calculations show that, while some of the assumptions underlying the standard evaporation paradigm are borne out, several are not. Furthermore, if the black hole is initially macroscopic, the evaporation process exhibits remarkable universal properties (which are distinct from the features observed in the simplified, exactly soluble models). Finally, our results provide support for the full quantum gravity scenario recently developed by Ashtekar, Taveras, and Varadarajan.

  10. Kerr black holes are not unique to general relativity.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Perrodin, Delphine; Dienes, Keith R; Mocioiu, Irina

    2008-03-01

    Considerable attention has recently focused on gravity theories obtained by extending general relativity with additional scalar, vector, or tensor degrees of freedom. In this Letter, we show that the black-hole solutions of these theories are essentially indistinguishable from those of general relativity. Thus, we conclude that a potential observational verification of the Kerr metric around an astrophysical black hole cannot, in and of itself, be used to distinguish between these theories. On the other hand, it remains true that detection of deviations from the Kerr metric will signify the need for a major change in our understanding of gravitational physics.

  11. Mimicking the QCD equation of state with a dual black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Gubser, Steven S.; Nellore, Abhinav

    2008-10-15

    We present numerical and analytical studies of the equation of state of translationally invariant black hole solutions to five-dimensional gravity coupled to a single scalar. As an application, we construct a family of black holes that closely mimics the equation of state of quantum chromodynamics at zero chemical potential.

  12. Overspinning a nearly extreme charged black hole via a quantum tunneling process.

    PubMed

    Matsas, George E A; da Silva, André R R

    2007-11-01

    We examine a nearly extreme macroscopic Reissner-Nördstrom black hole in the context of semiclassical gravity. The absorption rate associated with the quantum tunneling process of scalar particles whereby this black hole can acquire enough angular momentum to violate the weak cosmic-censorship conjecture is shown to be nonzero. PMID:17995395

  13. Remarks on the Equipartition Rule and Thermodynamics of Reissner-Nordstrom Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deyou

    2014-07-01

    In Verlinde's work, gravity is explained as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. In this paper, we investigate the thermodynamic property of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes from the equipartition rule and holographic scenario. As a result, the first law of thermodynamics of the black holes is recovered.

  14. NASA Observatory Confirms Black Hole Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-02-01

    The very largest black holes reach a certain point and then grow no more, according to the best survey to date of black holes made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. Scientists have also discovered many previously hidden black holes that are well below their weight limit. These new results corroborate recent theoretical work about how black holes and galaxies grow. The biggest black holes, those with at least 100 million times the mass of the Sun, ate voraciously during the early Universe. Nearly all of them ran out of 'food' billions of years ago and went onto a forced starvation diet. Focus on Black Holes in the Chandra Deep Field North Focus on Black Holes in the Chandra Deep Field North On the other hand, black holes between about 10 and 100 million solar masses followed a more controlled eating plan. Because they took smaller portions of their meals of gas and dust, they continue growing today. "Our data show that some supermassive black holes seem to binge, while others prefer to graze", said Amy Barger of the University of Wisconsin in Madison and the University of Hawaii, lead author of the paper describing the results in the latest issue of The Astronomical Journal (Feb 2005). "We now understand better than ever before how supermassive black holes grow." One revelation is that there is a strong connection between the growth of black holes and the birth of stars. Previously, astronomers had done careful studies of the birthrate of stars in galaxies, but didn't know as much about the black holes at their centers. DSS Optical Image of Lockman Hole DSS Optical Image of Lockman Hole "These galaxies lose material into their central black holes at the same time that they make their stars," said Barger. "So whatever mechanism governs star formation in galaxies also governs black hole growth." Astronomers have made an accurate census of both the biggest, active black holes in the distance, and the relatively smaller, calmer ones closer by. Now, for the first

  15. Dynamical moving mirrors and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tze-Dan; Verlinde, Herman

    1994-04-01

    A simple quantum mechanical model of N free scalar fields interacting with a dynamical moving mirror is formulated and shown to be equivalent to two-dimensional dilaton gravity. We derive the semi-classical dynamics of this system, by including the back reaction due to the quantum radiation. We develop a hamiltonian formalism that describes the time evolution as seen by an asymptotic observer, and write a scattering equation that relates the in-falling and out-going modes at low energies. At higher incoming energy flux, however, the semi-classical model appears to become unstable and the mirror seems to accelerate forever along a trajectory that runs off to infinity. This instability provides a useful paradigm for black hole formation and introduces an analogous information paradox. Finally, we indicate a possible mechanism that may restore the stability of the system at the quantum level without destroying quantum coherence.

  16. Dynamical moving mirrors and black holes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzedan, Chung; Verlinde, H.

    1994-04-01

    A simple quantum mechanical model of N free scalar fields interacting with a dynamical moving mirror is formulated and shown to be equivalent to two-dimensional dilaton gravity. The authors derive the semi-classical dynamics of this system, by including the back reaction due to the quantum radiation. They develop a hamiltonian formalism that describes the time evolution as seen by an asymptotic observer, and write a scattering equation that relates the in-falling and out-going modes at low energies. At higher incoming energy flux, however, the semi-classical model appears to become unstable and the mirror seems to accelerate forever along a trajectory that runs off to infinity. This instability provides a useful paradigm for black hole formation and introduces an analogous information paradox.

  17. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Christoph; Ver Steeg, Greg

    2015-06-01

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole’s absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal ‘quantum cloning machines’ and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is only equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as ω /T≥slant 10, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  18. Codimension-2 Brane Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, Nelson; Arias, Cesar; Ordenes, Ariel; Guzman, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    We analyze the geometry associated to a six dimensional solution of the Einstein's equations. It describes a Schwarzschild de-Sitter black hole on a 3-brane, surrounded by a two dimensional compact bulk. A four dimensional effective cosmological constant and a Planck mass are matched to their six dimensional counterpart. Deviation from Newton's law are computed in both of the solutions found. To learn about the geometry of the bulk, we study the geodesics in this sector. At least, in our opinion, there are some features of these solutions that makes worth to pursue this analysis. The singularity associated to the warped bulk is controlled by the mass M of the black hole. It vanishes if we set M=0. In the same context, it makes an interesting problem to study the Gregory-Laflamme instability in this context [1]. Another feature is the rugby ball type of geometry exhibited by these solutions [2]. They end up in two conical singularities at its respective poles. The branes are located precisely at the poles. Besides, a Wick's rotation generates a connection between different solutions. [4pt] [1] R. Gregory and R. Laflamme, Phys. Rev Lett., 70,2837 (1993)[0pt] [2] S. M. Carroll and M. M. Guica, arXiv:hep-th/0302067

  19. Quantum criticality and black holes.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Subir; Müller, Markus

    2009-04-22

    Many condensed matter experiments explore the finite temperature dynamics of systems near quantum critical points. Often, there are no well-defined quasiparticle excitations, and so quantum kinetic equations do not describe the transport properties completely. The theory shows that the transport coefficients are not proportional to a mean free scattering time (as is the case in the Boltzmann theory of quasiparticles), but are completely determined by the absolute temperature and by equilibrium thermodynamic observables. Recently, explicit solutions of this quantum critical dynamics have become possible via the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory duality discovered in string theory. This shows that the quantum critical theory provides a holographic description of the quantum theory of black holes in a negatively curved anti-de Sitter space, and relates its transport coefficients to properties of the Hawking radiation from the black hole. We review how insights from this connection have led to new results for experimental systems: (i) the vicinity of the superfluid-insulator transition in the presence of an applied magnetic field, and its possible application to measurements of the Nernst effect in the cuprates, (ii) the magnetohydrodynamics of the plasma of Dirac electrons in graphene and the prediction of a hydrodynamic cyclotron resonance. PMID:21825396

  20. Spacetime and orbits of bumpy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeland, Sarah J.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2010-01-15

    Our Universe contains a great number of extremely compact and massive objects which are generally accepted to be black holes. Precise observations of orbital motion near candidate black holes have the potential to determine if they have the spacetime structure that general relativity demands. As a means of formulating measurements to test the black hole nature of these objects, Collins and Hughes introduced ''bumpy black holes'': objects that are almost, but not quite, general relativity's black holes. The spacetimes of these objects have multipoles that deviate slightly from the black hole solution, reducing to black holes when the deviation is zero. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways. First, we show how to introduce bumps which are smoother and lead to better behaved orbits than those in the original presentation. Second, we show how to make bumpy Kerr black holes--objects which reduce to the Kerr solution when the deviation goes to zero. This greatly extends the astrophysical applicability of bumpy black holes. Using Hamilton-Jacobi techniques, we show how a spacetime's bumps are imprinted on orbital frequencies, and thus can be determined by measurements which coherently track the orbital phase of a small orbiting body. We find that in the weak field, orbits of bumpy black holes are modified exactly as expected from a Newtonian analysis of a body with a prescribed multipolar structure, reproducing well-known results from the celestial mechanics literature. The impact of bumps on strong-field orbits is many times greater than would be predicted from a Newtonian analysis, suggesting that this framework will allow observations to set robust limits on the extent to which a spacetime's multipoles deviate from the black hole expectation.