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Sample records for black-winged stilts disperse

  1. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields

    PubMed Central

    Toral, Gregorio M.; Baouab, Riad E.; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S.; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  2. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife.

  3. Variation in the mobilization of mercury into Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus chicks in coastal saltpans, as revealed by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, P. C.; Kelly, A.; Maia, R.; Lopes, R. J.; Serrão Santos, R.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A. C.; Furness, R. W.

    2008-03-01

    Causes of variation in mobilization of mercury into Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus chicks were studied through analysis of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. Blood and breast feathers were collected from chicks in coastal saltpans during successive breeding seasons. Detritus samples and potential prey (macroinvertebrates) were also collected. Total mercury concentrations and stable isotope signatures were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry respectively. Mercury levels in Chironomidae, Corixidae and Hydrophilidae correlated with mercury levels in chick feathers. Differences of δ 15N signatures between macroinvertebrate groups indicated that they belong to different trophic levels. δ 15N signatures of invertebrates correlated with mercury levels in invertebrates and chicks, but not with δ 15N signatures in chicks. Between-group and between-site differences of δ 15N signatures and mercury levels in invertebrates suggested that they contribute differently to mercury mobilization into chicks, and their relative contribution depends on prey availability in each site. Inter-site differences in the biomagnification factor reinforced that idea. δ 13C signatures in invertebrates marked a larger range of carbon sources than just detritus. Variation of water inflow regime and prey availability may cause between-group and between-site differences of δ 13C signatures in prey. Discrepancies between feather and blood for δ 13C signatures in Praias-Sado and Vaia suggested that temporal variation of prey availability may be the main factor affecting mercury mobilization into chicks in both those cases, since their water inflow regimes are the same. The lowest levels of δ 13C signatures in Vau suggested that water inflow regime may be the main factor in this case, since no discrepancy existed in δ 13C signatures between blood and feather.

  4. Drywall stilt dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E J; Prawer, S E; Crutchfield, C E

    1996-12-01

    We describe a previously unreported occupational dermatosis occurring in a worker employed in drywall installation and finishing. This 50-year-old man presented with bilaterally symmetrical, parallel, linear crusted erosions on his anteromedial legs after wearing drywall stilts. The pathophysiology of this condition is considered.

  5. Chapter 21: Programmatic Interfaces - STILTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M. J.

    STILTS is the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library Tool Set developed by Mark Taylor of the former Starlink Project. STILTS is a command-line tool (see the NVOSS_HOME/bin/stilts command) providing access to the same functionality driving the TOPCAT application and can be run using either the STILTS-specific jar file, or the more general TOPCAT jar file (both are available in the NVOSS_HOME/java/lib directory and are included in the default software environment classpath). The heart of both STILTS and TOPCAT is the STIL Java library. STIL is designed to efficiently handle the input, output and processing of very large tabular datasets and the STILTS task interface makes it an ideal tool for the scripting environment. Multiple formats are supported (including FITS Binary Tables, VOTable, CSV, SQL databases and ASCII, amongst others) and while some tools will generically handle all supported formats, others are specific to the VOTable format. Converting a VOTable to a more script-friendly format is the first thing most users will encounter, but there are many other useful tools as well.

  6. Diversity of cloacal microbial community in migratory shorebirds that use the Tagus estuary as stopover habitat and their potential to harbor and disperse pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Pardal, Sara; Proença, Diogo N; Lopes, Ricardo J; Ramos, Jaime A; Mendes, Luísa; Morais, Paula V

    2012-10-01

    The diversity of the cloacal microbial community in migratory shorebirds, caught at the Tagus estuary, Portugal, was assessed by cultivation (R2A and Nutrient Agar media) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling (DGGE) to provide a better understanding of the birds' potential to harbor and disperse pathogens. Three different bird species belonging to four different populations were studied: common redshank (Tringa totanus), black-winged stilt (Himantopus himantopus) and nominate and Icelandic populations of black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa). DGGE profiling and partial 16S RNA gene sequences of 240 isolates, and 26 DGGE bands resulting in 58 clones, were analyzed. Most isolates were members of the phylum Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and only a small portion belonged to the Proteobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus phyla. Potentially pathogenic strains carried by the birds were found such as Helicobacter and Staphylococcus in all bird species, and Clostridium, Mycobacterium, Rhodococcus, Legionella and Corynebacterium in black-winged stilts. Unexpectedly, bacteria from the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus were isolated in shorebirds and were present in all the bird species studied.

  7. Kinematics and kinetics of gait on stilts: identification of risk factors associated with construction stilt use.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Sharon S; Pan, Christopher S; Bhattacharya, Amit

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated kinematics and kinetic strategies and identified risk factors associated with gait on stilts. A six-camera motion-analysis system and two force platforms were used to test 20 construction workers for straight walking or turning, with or without carrying tools while wearing safety shoes or stilts at different heights. The results indicated that gait on stilts is characterised by increases in stride length, step width and the percentage of double support period, decreases in cadence, minimum foot clearance and a weaker heel-strike and push-off. Stilts place greater joint loadings on lower extremities to compensate for the added weight and limitation in joint mobility. Smaller foot clearances found for gait on stilts constitute an increased risk for tripping over obstacles. Workers may need to avoid prolonged use of stilts to alleviate stresses on the joints. This study was conducted to determine to what extent stilts alter the gait strategies and to explain the compensatory movements. Prior to this study, there has been little substantive research to evaluate the stresses and potential injuries associated with stilts.

  8. STILTS: Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library Tool Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    2011-05-01

    The STIL Tool Set is a set of command-line tools based on STIL, the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library. It deals with the processing of tabular data; the package has been designed for, but is not restricted to, astronomical tables such as object catalogues. Some of the tools are generic and can work with multiple formats (including FITS, VOTable, CSV, SQL and ASCII), and others are specific to the VOTable format. In some ways, STILTS forms the command-line counterpart of the GUI table analysis tool TOPCAT. The package is robust, fully documented, and designed for efficiency, especially with very large datasets. Facilities offered include: format conversioncrossmatchingplottingcolumn calculation and rearrangementrow selectionsdata and metadata manipulation and displaysortingstatistical calculationshistogram calculationdata validationVO service accessA powerful and extensible expression language is used for specifying data calculations. These facilities can be put together in very flexible and efficient ways. For tasks in which the data can be streamed, the size of table STILTS can process is effectively unlimited. For other tasks, million-row tables usually do not present a problem. STILTS is written in pure Java (J2SE1.5 or later), and can be run from the command line or from Jython, or embedded into java applications. It is released under the GPL.

  9. Expressed sequence tags from the black-winged sharpshooter: Application to biology and vector control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We identified 14 putative full-length transcripts of proteins important for the survival of the black-winged sharpshooter, BWSS, Oncometopia nigricans. The BWSS is considered a highly competent vector of several strains of the xylem-inhabiting bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of a numb...

  10. Stilt walking: how do we learn those first steps?

    PubMed

    Akram, Sakineh B; Frank, James S

    2009-09-01

    This study examined how young healthy adults learn stilt walking. Ten healthy male university students attended two sessions of testing held on two consecutive days. In each session participants performed three blocks of 10 stilt-walking trials. Angular movements of head and trunk and the spatial and temporal gait parameters were recorded. When walking on stilts young adults improved their gait velocity through modifications of step parameters while maintaining trunk movements close to that observed during normal over-ground walking. Participants improved their performance by increasing their step frequency and step length and reducing the double support percentage of the gait cycle. Stilts are often used for drywall installation, painting over-the-head areas and raising workers above the ground without the burden of erecting scaffolding. This research examines the locomotor adaptation as young healthy adults learn the complex motor task of stilt walking; a task that is frequently used in the construction industry.

  11. STILTS -- Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library Tool Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    STILTS is a set of command-line tools for processing tabular data. It has been designed for, but is not restricted to, use on astronomical data such as source catalogues. It contains both generic (format-independent) table processing tools and tools for processing VOTable documents. Facilities offered include crossmatching, format conversion, format validation, column calculation and rearrangement, row selection, sorting, plotting, statistical calculations and metadata display. Calculations on cell data can be performed using a powerful and extensible expression language. The package is written in pure Java and based on STIL, the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library. This gives it high portability, support for many data formats (including FITS, VOTable, text-based formats and SQL databases), extensibility and scalability. Where possible the tools are written to accept streamed data so the size of tables which can be processed is not limited by available memory. As well as the tutorial and reference information in this document, detailed on-line help is available from the tools themselves. STILTS is available under the GNU General Public Licence.

  12. Growth patterns of Hawaiian Stilt chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.M.; Gray, E.M.; Lewis, D.; Oring, L.W.; Coleman, R.; Burr, T.; Luscomb, P.

    1999-01-01

    We studied chick growth and plumage patterns in the endangered Hawaiian Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus knudseni). Body mass of captive chicks closely fit a Gompertz growth curve, revealing a growth coefficient (K) of 0.065 day-1 and point of inflection (T) of 17 days. When chicks fledged about 28 days after hatching, they weighed only 60% of adult body mass; at 42 d, birds still were only 75% of adult mass; culmen, tarsus, and wing chord at fledging also were less than adult size. This trend of continued growth to adult size after fledging is typical for most shorebirds. After hatching, captive chicks grew more rapidly than wild chicks, probably because of an unlimited food supply. We found no evidence for adverse effects of weather on the growth of wild chicks. As with other shorebirds, the tarsus started relatively long, with culmen and then wing chord growing more rapidly in later development. Tarsal and wing chord growth were sigmoidal, whereas culmen growth was linear. We describe plumage characteristics of weekly age classes of chicks to help researchers age birds in the wild.

  13. The ant odometer: stepping on stilts and stumps.

    PubMed

    Wittlinger, Matthias; Wehner, Rüdiger; Wolf, Harald

    2006-06-30

    Desert ants, Cataglyphis, navigate in their vast desert habitat by path integration. They continuously integrate directions steered (as determined by their celestial compass) and distances traveled, gauged by as-yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that navigating ants measure distances traveled by using some kind of step integrator, or "step counter." We manipulated the lengths of the legs and, hence, the stride lengths, in freely walking ants. Animals with elongated ("stilts") or shortened legs ("stumps") take larger or shorter strides, respectively, and concomitantly misgauge travel distance. Travel distance is overestimated by experimental animals walking on stilts and underestimated by animals walking on stumps.

  14. Pododermatitis in captive-reared black stilts (Himantopus novaezelandiae).

    PubMed

    Reissig, Elizabeth Chang; Tompkins, Daniel M; Maloney, Richard F; Sancha, Emily; Wharton, David A

    2011-09-01

    A potential cause of pododermatitis ("bumblefoot") was investigated in captive-reared juvenile black stilts at the Department of Conservation "Kaki Recovery Program" at Twizel, New Zealand. To address the importance of substrate, the development of clinical signs in individuals was compared among aviaries that contained rubber matting and/or salt footbaths, and controls. No effect of either experimental manipulation of the environment was apparent on pododermatitis development. With the substrate appearing not to be an initiating factor, and a previous study that indicated that the birds' diet fulfills the nutritional requirements for rearing black stilts in captivity, results of this study suggest that insufficient space for exercise may instead be the cause.

  15. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment Using ASCENDS Observations and WRF-STILT Footprints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Collatz, G. J.; Mountain, Marikate; Henderson, John; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Aschbrenner, Ryan; Zaccheo, T. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 is hampered by sparse measurements. The recent advent of satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations is increasing the density of measurements, and the future mission ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons) will provide even greater coverage and precision. Lagrangian atmospheric transport models run backward in time can quantify surface influences ("footprints") of diverse measurement platforms and are particularly well suited for inverse estimation of regional surface CO2 fluxes at high resolution based on satellite observations. We utilize the STILT Lagrangian particle dispersion model, driven by WRF meteorological fields at 40-km resolution, in a Bayesian synthesis inversion approach to quantify the ability of ASCENDS column CO2 observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution. This study focuses on land-based biospheric fluxes, whose uncertainties are especially large, in a domain encompassing North America. We present results based on realistic input fields for 2007. Pseudo-observation random errors are estimated from backscatter and optical depth measured by the CALIPSO satellite. We estimate a priori flux uncertainties based on output from the CASA-GFED (v.3) biosphere model and make simple assumptions about spatial and temporal error correlations. WRF-STILT footprints are convolved with candidate vertical weighting functions for ASCENDS. We find that at a horizontal flux resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree, ASCENDS observations are potentially able to reduce average weekly flux uncertainties by 0-8% in July, and 0-0.5% in January (assuming an error of 0.5 ppm at the Railroad Valley reference site). Aggregated to coarser resolutions, e.g. 5 degrees x 5 degrees, the uncertainty reductions are larger and more similar to those estimated in previous satellite data observing system simulation experiments.

  16. Baseline Blood Pb Concentrations in Black-Necked Stilts on the Upper Texas Coast.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Thomas V; Conway, Warren C; Haukos, David A; Moon, Jena A; Comer, Christopher E

    2015-10-01

    There are no known biological requirements for lead (Pb), and elevated Pb levels in birds can cause a variety of sub-lethal effects and mortality. Historic and current levels of Pb in mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula) suggest that environmental sources of Pb remain available on the upper Texas coast. Because of potential risks of Pb exposure among coexisting marsh birds, black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) blood Pb concentrations were measured during the breeding season. Almost 80 % (n = 120) of 152 sampled stilts exceeded the background threshold (>20 μg/dL) for Pb exposure. However, blood Pb concentrations did not vary by age or gender, and toxic or potentially lethal concentrations were rare (<5 %). Consistent, low-level blood Pb concentrations of black-necked stilts in this study suggest the presence of readily bioavailable sources of Pb, although potential impacts on local stilt populations remain unclear.

  17. Baseline blood Pb levels of black-necked stilts on the upper Texas coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riecke, Thomas V.; Conway, Warren C.; Haukos, David A.; Moon, Jena A.; Comer, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    There are no known biological requirements for lead (Pb), and elevated Pb levels in birds can cause a variety of sub-lethal effects and mortality. Historic and current levels of Pb in mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula) suggest that environmental sources of Pb remain available on the upper Texas coast. Because of potential risks of Pb exposure among coexisting marsh birds, black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) blood Pb concentrations were measured during the breeding season. Almost 80 % (n = 120) of 152 sampled stilts exceeded the background threshold (>20 μg/dL) for Pb exposure. However, blood Pb concentrations did not vary by age or gender, and toxic or potentially lethal concentrations were rare (<5 %). Consistent, low-level blood Pb concentrations of black-necked stilts in this study suggest the presence of readily bioavailable sources of Pb, although potential impacts on local stilt populations remain unclear.

  18. Comparative reproductive biology of sympatric species: Nest and chick survival of American avocets and black-necked stilts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Herzog, Mark P.; Takekawa, John Y.; Hartman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying differences in reproductive success rates of closely related and sympatrically breeding species can be useful for understanding limitations to population growth. We simultaneously examined the reproductive ecology of American avocets Recurvirostra americana and black-necked stilts Himantopus mexicanus using 1274 monitored nests and 240 radio-marked chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Although there were 1.8 times more avocet nests than stilt nests, stilts nonetheless fledged 3.3 times more chicks. Greater production by stilts than avocets was the result of greater chick survival from hatching to fledging (avocet: 6%; stilt: 40%), and not because of differences in clutch size (avocet: 3.84; stilt: 3.77), nest survival (avocet: 44%; stilt: 35%), or egg hatching success (avocet: 90%; stilt: 92%). We reviewed the literature and confirmed that nest survival and hatching success are generally similar when avocets and stilts breed sympatrically. In addition to species, chick survival was strongly influenced by age, site, and year. In particular, daily survival rates increased rapidly with chick age, with 70% of mortalities occurring ≤ 1 week after hatch. California gulls Larus californicus caused 55% of avocet, but only 15% of stilt, chick deaths. Differential use of micro-habitats likely reduced stilt chick’s vulnerability to gull predation, particularly during the first week after hatch, because stilts nested in vegetation 2.7 times more often than avocets and vegetation height was 65% taller at stilt nests compared with avocet nests. Our results demonstrate that two co-occurring and closely related species with similar life history strategies can differ markedly in reproductive success, and simultaneous studies of such species can identify differences that limit productivity.

  19. Extreme nomadism in desert waterbirds: flights of the banded stilt.

    PubMed

    Pedler, R D; Ribot, R F H; Bennett, A T D

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to well-studied Northern Hemisphere birds with spatially and temporally predictable seasonal migrations, waterbirds in desert biomes face major challenges in exploiting stochastic, rich, yet short-lived resource pulses in vast arid landscapes, leading to the evolution of nomadic behaviour. An extreme example is the banded stilt (Cladorhynchus leucocephalus), an opportunistic colonial breeder at remote inland salt lakes after infrequent rain events. Using satellite telemetry on 21 birds (tracked for a mean of 196.2 days), we reveal extensive, rapid and synchronized movement among individuals to and from salt lakes. Two birds left coastal refugia for the inland following rain, flying 1000-2000 km, while 12 others rapidly moved a mean of 684 km (range 357-1298 km) away from drying inland sites to the coast. Two individuals moved longitudinally across the continent, departing and arriving at the same points, yet travelling very different routes; one bird moving more than 2200 km in less than 2.5 days, the other more than 1500 km in 6 days. Our findings reveal movements nearly twice as long and rapid as recorded in other desert waterbirds. We reveal capability to rapidly detect and exploit ephemeral wetland resource pulses across the stochastic Australian desert.

  20. A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The stilt is identified by its distinct head pattern of black and white, its very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. The stilt's habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  1. A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The stilt is identified by its distinct head pattern of black and white, its very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. The stilt's habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  2. Sublethal effects in Avocet and Stilt hatchlings from selenium-contaminated sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Marn, C.M.; Marois, Katherine C.; Sproul, E.; Dunne, M.; Skorupa, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Excess selenium (Se) in the aquatic food chain is embryotoxic and teratogenic to avocets, stilts, and other waterbirds. American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) eggs were collected from three sites in the Tulare Lake Basin of California, USA, and hatched in the laboratory. These sites included the Tulare Lake Drainage District?north (TLDD-N, water 2.5 ppb Se), TLDD?south (TLDD-S, water 8.6 ppb Se), and Westfarmers (WF, water 190 ppb Se). Highest egg Se concentrations occurred at WF (geometric mean 31.4 ppm dry wt for avocets and 20.5 ppm dry wt for stilts). Mean egg Se concentrations were 6.7 ppm for avocets and 8.4 ppm for stilts at TLDD-S, and 3.3 ppm for avocets and 2.3 ppm for stilts at TLDD-N. Hatching success and incidence of malformations did not differ among sites, but yolk sac?free hatching weights and bone lengths were less for avocets at the WF site, whereas liver weights and liver to body weight ratios were greater at that site. With increasing Se concentration, oxidative stress was most apparent in avocet hatchlings from WF: hepatic glutathione (GSH) peroxidase activity increased, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity decreased, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration as well as the ratio of GSSG to reduced GSH concentration increased. In stilts, hepatic GSH concentration was lower in WF hatchlings. In conclusion, our findings of Se-impaired embryo growth and hepatotoxicity in avocet hatchlings suggest that oxidative stress observed in hatchlings may be related to these biological effects and may serve as a potential bioindicator of subsequent impaired functions.

  3. Mercury concentrations and space use of pre-breeding American avocets and black-necked stilts in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Takekawa, John Y; Demers, Scott A; Adelsbach, Terrence L; Bluso, Jill D; Keith Miles, A; Warnock, Nils; Suchanek, Thomas H; Schwarzbach, Steven E

    2007-10-01

    We examined factors influencing mercury concentrations in pre-breeding American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), the two most abundant breeding shorebirds in San Francisco Bay, California. We tested the effects of species, site, sex, year, and date on total mercury concentrations in blood of pre-breeding adult birds and used radio telemetry to determine space use and sites of dietary mercury exposure. We collected blood from 373 avocets and 157 stilts from February to April in 2005 and 2006, radio-marked and tracked 115 avocets and 94 stilts, and obtained 2393 avocet and 1928 stilt telemetry locations. Capture site was the most important factor influencing mercury concentrations in birds, followed by species and sex. Mercury concentrations were higher in stilts (geometric mean: 1.09 microg g(-1) wet weight [ww]) than in avocets (0.25 microg g(-1) ww) and males (stilts: 1.32 microg g(-1) ww; avocets: 0.32 microg g(-1) ww) had higher levels than females (stilts: 1.15 microg g(-1) ww; avocets: 0.21 microg g(-1) ww). Mercury concentrations were highest for both species at the southern end of San Francisco Bay, especially in salt pond A8 (stilts: 3.31 microg g(-1) ww; avocets: 0.58 microg g(-1) ww). Radio telemetry data showed that birds had strong fidelity to their capture site. Avocets primarily used salt ponds, tidal marshes, tidal flats, and managed marshes, whereas stilts mainly used salt ponds, managed marshes, and tidal marshes. Our results suggest that variation in blood mercury concentrations among sites was attributed to differences in foraging areas, and species differences in habitat use and foraging strategies may increase mercury exposure in stilts more than avocets.

  4. The function of stilt roots in the growth strategy of Socratea exorrhiza (Arecaceae) at two neotropical sites.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Gregory R; Zahawi, Rakan A

    2007-01-01

    Arboreal palms have developed a variety of structural root modifications and systems to adapt to the harsh abiotic conditions of tropical rain forests. Stilt roots have been proposed to serve a number of functions including the facilitation of rapid vertical growth to the canopy and enhanced mechanical stability. To examine whether stilt roots provide these functions, we compared stilt root characteristics of the neotropical palm tree Socratea exorrhiza on sloped (>20 degrees) and flat locations at two lowland neotropical sites. S. exorrhiza (n=80 trees) did not demonstrate differences in number of roots, vertical stilt root height, root cone circumference, root cone volume, or location of roots as related to slope. However, we found positive relationships between allocation to vertical growth and stilt root architecture including root cone circumference, number of roots, and root cone volume. Accordingly, stilt roots may allow S. exorrhiza to increase height and maintain mechanical stability without having to concurrently invest in increased stem diameter and underground root structure. This strategy likely increases the species ability to rapidly exploit light gaps as compared to non-stilt root palms and may also enhance survival as mature trees approach the theoretical limits of their mechanical stability.

  5. STILTS - A Package for Command-Line Processing of Tabular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. B.

    2006-07-01

    STILTS, the STIL Tool Set, is a set of non-interactive tools for manipulation of tables such as astronomical object catalogues. It can read and write data in many formats, including VOTable, FITS, relational databases and ASCII. Facilities provided include table format conversion, row selection and sorting, column creation and rearrangement, coordinate conversion, metadata manipulation and display, flexible cross-matching, per-row and statistical calculations and VOTable validation. STILTS is based on the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library, which also underlies the interactive table-analysis tool TOPCAT, and can be considered its non-interactive counterpart, providing many of the same features in a form which is suitable for headless, batch or scripted environments. Uses include data manipulation from the desktop or as part of server-based workflows or query operations. The package is portable (Java), open source, fully documented, efficient and scalable; in particular it is designed for use with large, and for many purposes arbitrarily large, tables.

  6. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  7. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  8. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  9. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  10. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  11. Mercury concentrations and space use of pre-breeding American avocets and black-necked stilts in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Takekawa, John Y.; Demers, Scott A.; Adelsbach, Terrence L.; Bluso, J.D.; Miles, A. Keith; Warnock, Nils; Suchanek, Thomas H.; Schwarzbach, Steven E.

    2007-01-01

    We examined factors influencing mercury concentrations in pre-breeding American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), the two most abundant breeding shorebirds in San Francisco Bay, California. We tested the effects of species, site, sex, year, and date on total mercury concentrations in blood of pre-breeding adult birds and used radio telemetry to determine space use and sites of dietary mercury exposure. We collected blood from 373 avocets and 157 stilts from February to April in 2005 and 2006, radio-marked and tracked 115 avocets and 94 stilts, and obtained 2393 avocet and 1928 stilt telemetry locations. Capture site was the most important factor influencing mercury concentrations in birds, followed by species and sex. Mercury concentrations were higher in stilts (geometric mean: 1.09 μg g− 1 wet weight [ww]) than in avocets (0.25 μg g− 1 ww) and males (stilts: 1.32 μg g− 1 ww; avocets: 0.32 μg g− 1 ww) had higher levels than females (stilts: 1.15 μg g− 1 ww; avocets: 0.21 μg g− 1 ww). Mercury concentrations were highest for both species at the southern end of San Francisco Bay, especially in salt pond A8 (stilts: 3.31 μg g− 1 ww; avocets: 0.58 μg g− 1 ww). Radio telemetry data showed that birds had strong fidelity to their capture site. Avocets primarily used salt ponds, tidal marshes, tidal flats, and managed marshes, whereas stilts mainly used salt ponds, managed marshes, and tidal marshes. Our results suggest that variation in blood mercury concentrations among sites was attributed to differences in foraging areas, and species differences in habitat use and foraging strategies may increase mercury exposure in stilts more than avocets.

  12. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  14. ICT for smart evaluation of vernacular architecture in a stilt-house village

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Filipa; Virtudes, Ana Lídia

    2016-12-01

    Vernacular architecture typologies, such as wooden stilt-houses, have been threatened by the vulnerability to conservation status degradation. This problem is not an exception in Portugal, where the few remaining examples have been neglected, with the disappearance or abandonment of almost all buildings, damaging architectural and urban spatial features. This legacy is rapidly disappearing, weakening the European cultural map. This research presents the results from a smart evaluation method using an ICT (information and communication technology) platform designed for the smart evaluation of wooden stilt-houses, considering their conservation status. This platform was used in the five remaining stilthouse villages still existing in Portugal including about 90 buildings and 300 inhabitants, located along Tagus river banks. This article refers to one of these case studies, the village of Escaroupim, which was chosen because it is the most urban space in between all of them. On one hand, the results are an exhaustive survey of vernacular buildings, useful as guideline for spatial strategies and instruments to protect this legacy. On the other hand, it can be used in other similar wooden buildings, to check their conservation status and therefore to define best rehabilitation actions.

  15. Assessing the competitive ability of Japanese stilt grass, Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht, S.A.; Silander, J.A.; Greenwood, K.

    2005-01-01

    Microstegium vimineum (Japanese stilt grass) is an invasive grass in the eastern half of the United States which can form dense monocultures in forest understories, displacing native species. Although the loss of native species has been observed in the field, the actual competitive ability of this grass has not been examined. Microstegium vimineum was grown under controlled environment, greenhouse conditions in competition with Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum (annual rye grass) and Muhlenbergia mexicana (Mexican muhly) in varying density ratios in full and low light treatments. Microstegium vimineum had a greater aboveground biomass, relative growth rate, and reproductive output than both competitors in both light treatments. The high competitive ability of Microstegium vimineum, especially in low light conditions, reflects its highly aggressive nature in forested or other landscapes of eastern North America.

  16. Biologic and molecular characteristics of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), black-winged lory (Eos cyanogenia), and cats (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Parnell, P G; Sreekumar, C; Vianna, M C B; De Young, R W; Dahl, E; Lehmann, T

    2004-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii isolates can be grouped into 3 genetic lineages. Type I isolates are considered virulent to outbred mice, whereas Type II and III isolates are not. In the present report, viable T. gondii was isolated for the first time from striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), and black-winged lory (Eos cyanogenia). For the isolation of T. gondii, tissues were bioassayed in mice, and genotyping was based on the SAG2 locus. Toxoplasma gondii was isolated from 3 of 6 skunks, 1 of 4 Canada geese, and 2 of 2 feral cats (Felis catus) from Mississippi. All donor animals were asymptomatic. Viable T. gondii was also isolated from 5 of 5 lories that had died of acute toxoplasmosis in an aviary in South Carolina. Genotypes of T. gondii isolates were Type III (all skunks, lories, and the goose) and Type II (both cats). All 5 Type III isolates from birds and 2 of the 3 isolates from skunks were mouse virulent.

  17. Estimating carbon fluxes for North America from a joint inversion for CO2 and COS using STILT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Petron, G.; Trudeau, M. E.; Karion, A.; Koch, F. T.; Kretschmer, R.; Gerbig, C.; Campbell, J. E.; Berry, J. A.; Baker, I. T.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Miller, B. R.; Montzka, S. A.; Jacobson, A. R.; Sweeney, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding biospheric CO2 fluxes is paramount if climate studies are to be able to analyze the response of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change and monitor fossil fuel emissions reductions. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) may be a useful tracer to provide a constraint on photosynthesis [gross primary production (GPP)]. Here we simulate both COS and CO2 using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model coupled with various biospheric fluxes, such as fluxes estimated from the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), CarbonTracker, and from the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model. The STILT model is driven by Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) meteorological fields. The WRF-STILT system is compared with the STILT driven by the ECMWF (European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting) meteorology for the North American domain. This study uses measurements of COS and CO2 in 2008 from the NOAA/ESRL tall tower and aircraft air sampling networks, with ~ 6,000 observations in total. Biospheric COS fluxes will be estimated from a GPP-based model coupled with the GPP estimates from above mentioned biosphere models. Soil uptakes of COS are derived from a biosphere model (SiB) that assimilates the soil moisture and temperature. Estimation of other COS fluxes, such as anthropogenic, biomass burning are based on existing analyses of temporal and spatial variations. Empirical boundary curtains are built based on observations at the NOAA/ESRL marine boundary layer stations and from aircraft vertical profiles, and are utilized as the lateral boundary conditions for COS and CO2 for North America. Comparison of the simulations for both COS and CO2 using different biospheric fluxes provides an opportunity to assess the performance of both the biospheric models and the representation of atmospheric transport. In addition, we will estimate the carbon fluxes for North America from a joint inversion for COS and CO2 in a Bayesian synthesis

  18. Mercury contamination and effects on survival of American avocet and black-necked stilt chicks in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Iverson, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated whether mercury influenced survival of free-ranging American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Using radio telemetry, we radio-marked 158 avocet and 79 stilt chicks at hatching and tracked them daily until their fate was determined. We did not find strong support for an influence of in ovo mercury exposure on chick survival, despite observing a wide range of mercury concentrations in chick down feathers at hatching (0.40-44.31 ??g g -1 fw). We estimated that chick survival rates were reduced by ???3% over the range of observed mercury concentrations during the 28-day period from hatching to fledging. We also salvaged newly-hatched chicks that were found dead during routine nest monitoring. In contrast to the telemetry results, we found that mercury concentrations in down feathers of dead chicks were higher than those in randomly-sampled live chicks of similar age. However, capture site was the most important variable influencing mercury concentrations, followed by year, species, and hatching date. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated negative effects of environmentally relevant mercury concentrations on chick survival, our results concur with the small number of previous field studies that have not been able to detect reduced survival in the wild. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. Mercury contamination and effects on survival of American avocet and black-necked stilt chicks in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Takekawa, John Y; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Iverson, Samuel A

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated whether mercury influenced survival of free-ranging American avocet (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Using radio telemetry, we radio-marked 158 avocet and 79 stilt chicks at hatching and tracked them daily until their fate was determined. We did not find strong support for an influence of in ovo mercury exposure on chick survival, despite observing a wide range of mercury concentrations in chick down feathers at hatching (0.40-44.31 microg g(-1) fw). We estimated that chick survival rates were reduced by < or =3% over the range of observed mercury concentrations during the 28-day period from hatching to fledging. We also salvaged newly-hatched chicks that were found dead during routine nest monitoring. In contrast to the telemetry results, we found that mercury concentrations in down feathers of dead chicks were higher than those in randomly-sampled live chicks of similar age. However, capture site was the most important variable influencing mercury concentrations, followed by year, species, and hatching date. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated negative effects of environmentally relevant mercury concentrations on chick survival, our results concur with the small number of previous field studies that have not been able to detect reduced survival in the wild.

  20. Identifying nest predators of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Takekawa, John Y.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Eadie, John M.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated predation on nests and methods to detect predators using a combination of infrared cameras and plasticine eggs at nests of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, California. Each technique indicated that predation was prevalent; 59% of monitored nests were depredated. Most identifiable predation (n = 49) was caused by mammals (71%) and rates of predation were similar on avocets and stilts. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) each accounted for 16% of predations, whereas gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and avian predators each accounted for 14%. Mammalian predation was mainly nocturnal (mean time, 0051 h +/- 5 h 36 min), whereas most avian predation was in late afternoon (mean time, 1800 h +/- 1 h 26 min). Nests with cameras and plasticine eggs were 1.6 times more likely to be predated than nests where only cameras were used in monitoring. Cameras were associated with lower abandonment of nests and provided definitive identification of predators.

  1. Identifying nest predators of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, G.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Takekawa, John Y.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Eadie, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated predation on nests and methods to detect predators using a combination of infrared cameras and plasticine eggs at nests of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) and black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) in Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties, California. Each technique indicated that predation was prevalent; 59% of monitored nests were depredated. Most identifiable predation (n = 49) was caused by mammals (71%) and rates of predation were similar on avocets and stilts. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) each accounted for 16% of predations, whereas gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and avian predators each accounted for 14%. Mammalian predation was mainly nocturnal (mean time, 0051 h ?? 5 h 36 min), whereas most avian predation was in late afternoon (mean time, 1800 h ?? 1 h 26 min). Nests with cameras and plasticine eggs were 1.6 times more likely to be predated than nests where only cameras were used in monitoring. Cameras were associated with lower abandonment of nests and provided definitive identification of predators.

  2. A new genus and species of cyclocoelid from the black-necked stilt, Himantopus mexicanus (Recurvirostridae), from Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Dronen, Norman O; Blend, Charles K

    2005-02-01

    Two black-necked stilts, Himantopus mexicanus (Recurvirostridae), from the Texas Gulf coast, died while in the care of bird rehabilitators and were found to be infected with Neoallopyge americanensis n. gen., n. sp. Neoallopyge n. gen. (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae) differs from Allopyge in having the testes situated some distance from the posterior extremity, 2 uterine loops on each side extensively invading the space posterior to the testes, no intertesticular uterine loops, and it is a parasite of Recurvirostridae in the western hemisphere rather than Gruidae from the Old World. The new species is unlike Allopyge antigones, Allopyge ominosus, and Allopyge undulatus in having the genital pore located anterior to the cecal bifurcation rather than posterior to it, and it is unlike A. ominosus and A. undulatus, where the uterus is entirely intercecal in having the uterine loops extending laterally, reaching the body wall on both sides. The new species further differs from A. antigones, A. ominosus, and Allopyge skrjabini in having larger eggs (148 [140-155] microm by 55 [45-63] microm compared with 95 by 55 microm, 65-80 by 40-46 microm, 119-124 by 55-66 microm, respectively), and it differs from Allopyge adolphi and A. undulatus in having narrower eggs (154 by 75 microm, 144 by 86 microm, respectively).

  3. Assessment of planetary boundary layer and residual layer heights in the Northeastern U.S. using Lidar, a network of surface observations, and the WRF-STILT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, Y.; Nehrkorn, T.; Hegarty, J. D.; Wofsy, S. C.; Gottlieb, E.; Sargent, M. R.; Decola, P.; Jones, T.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and residual layer (RL) are key requirements for forecasting air quality in cities and detecting transboundary air pollution events. This study combines information from a network of Mini Micropulse Lidar (MPL) instruments, the CALIOP satellite, meteorological and air pollution measuring sensors, and a particle-transport model to critically test mesoscale transport models at the regional level. Aerosol backscattering measurements were continuously taken with MPL units in various locations within the Northeastern U.S., between September 2012 to August 2015. Data is analyzed using wavelet covariance transforms and image processing techniques. Initial results for the city of Boston show a PBL growth rate between approx. 150 and 300 meters per hour, in the morning to early afternoon (~12-19 UTC). The RL was present throughout the night and day at approx. 1.3 to 2.0 km. Transboundary air pollution events were detected and quantified, and variations in concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols were also evaluated. Results were compared to information retrieved from Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model and the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model.

  4. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  5. Dispersing Agents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Also called dispersants, these chemicals used in spill cleanups contain surfactants and/or solvent compounds that act to break petroleum oil into small droplets, which can then break down further in the water.

  6. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  7. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  8. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  9. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  10. Genetics of dispersal.

    PubMed

    Saastamoinen, Marjo; Bocedi, Greta; Cote, Julien; Legrand, Delphine; Guillaume, Frédéric; Wheat, Christopher W; Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Garcia, Cristina; Henry, Roslyn; Husby, Arild; Baguette, Michel; Bonte, Dries; Coulon, Aurélie; Kokko, Hanna; Matthysen, Erik; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Nonaka, Etsuko; Stevens, Virginie M; Travis, Justin M J; Donohue, Kathleen; Bullock, James M; Del Mar Delgado, Maria

    2017-08-03

    Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences. Dispersal has a detectable genetic basis in many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals. Generally, there is evidence for significant genetic variation for dispersal or dispersal-related phenotypes or evidence for the micro-evolution of dispersal in natural populations. Dispersal is typically the outcome of several interacting traits, and this complexity is reflected in its genetic architecture: while some genes of moderate to large effect can influence certain aspects of dispersal, dispersal traits are typically polygenic. Correlations among dispersal traits as well as between dispersal traits and other traits under selection are common, and the genetic basis of dispersal can be highly environment-dependent. By contrast, models have historically considered a highly simplified genetic architecture of dispersal. It is only recently that models have started to consider multiple loci influencing dispersal, as well as non-additive effects such as dominance and epistasis, showing that the genetic basis of dispersal can influence evolutionary rates and outcomes, especially under non-equilibrium conditions. For example, the number of loci controlling dispersal can influence projected rates of dispersal evolution during range shifts and corresponding demographic impacts. Incorporating more realism in

  11. Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model Intercomparison and Evaluation Utilizing Measurements from Controlled Tracer Release Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J. D.; Draxler, R.; Stein, A. F.; Brioude, J.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Mountain, M.; Nehrkorn, T.; Andrews, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes estimated using inverse methods is highly dependent on the fidelity of the atmospheric transport model employed. Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) driven by customized meteorological output from mesoscale models have emerged as a powerful tool in inverse GHG estimates at policy-relevant regional and urban scales, for several reasons: 1) Mesoscale meteorology can be available at higher resolution than in most global models, and therefore has the potential to be more realistic, 2) the Lagrangian approach minimizes numerical diffusion present in Eulerian models and is thus better able to represent transport in the near-field of measurement locations, and 3) the Lagrangian approach offers an efficient way to compute the grid-scale adjoint of the transport model ("footprints") by running transport backwards in time. Motivated by these considerations, we intercompare three widely used LPDMs (HYSPLIT, STILT, and FLEXPART) driven by identical meteorological input from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model against measurements from the controlled tracer release experiments (ready-testbed.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT_datem.php). Our analysis includes statistical assessments of each LPDM in terms of its ability to simulate the observed tracer concentrations, reversibility, and sensitivity to the WRF configuration, particularly with regard to the simulation of the planetary boundary layer.

  12. Highly dispersive slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Xiao-Li, Yinying; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2009-04-27

    We propose a slot-waveguide with high dispersion, in which a slot waveguide is coupled to a strip waveguide. A negative dispersion of up to -181520 ps/nm/km is obtained due to a strong interaction of the slot and strip modes. A flat and large dispersion is achievable by cascading the dispersive slot-waveguides with varied waveguide thickness or width for dispersion compensation and signal processing applications. We show - 31300 ps/nm/km dispersion over 147-nm bandwidth with <1% variance.

  13. Student Rights in Canada: Nonsense upon Stilts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magsino, Romulo F.

    1977-01-01

    The author examines the constitutional bases of claims for student rights in Canada, presents various aspects of rights, including "option" and "welfare" rights, and suggests the embodiment of students' welfare rights and of a Bill of Rights affecting all of society, within the Canadian constitution. (MJB)

  14. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  15. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  16. Dispersion in the Surfzone: Tracer Dispersion Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    objective is to improve understanding and modeling of dispersion of tracers (pol­ lution, fecal indicator bacteria, fine sediments) within the...discussed further here. Stochastic Particle Simulation for Surfzone Dispersion Drifter-derived diffusivities are time-dependent. In an unbounded...diffusion. Here HB06 particle trajectories are stochastically simulated with the Langevin equations with a shoreline boundary to explain the observed

  17. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  18. Dispersants displace hot oiling

    SciTech Connect

    Wash, R.

    1984-02-01

    Laboratory experiments and field testing of dispersants in producing wells have resulted in development of 2 inexpensive paraffin dispersant packages with a broad application range, potential for significant savings over hot oiling, and that can be applied effectively by both continuous and batch treating techniques. The 2 dispersants are soluble in the carrier solvent (one soluble in oil, one in water); are able to readily disperse the wax during a hot flask test conducted in a laboratory; and leave the producing interval water wet. Field data on the 2 dispersants are tabulated, demonstrating their efficacy.

  19. Mercury pollution in three species of waders from Shadegan wetlands at the head of the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmoodi, Rasool; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas; Savabieasfahani, Mozhgan; Ghasempouri, Seyed Mahmoud; Bahramifar, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Persian Gulf supports diverse ecosystems and biota in need of remediation and protection, and metal data from this region is needed. Mercury (Hg) in tissues of three waders (Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantous, Red-wattled Plover Hoplopterus indicus, and White-tailed Plover Vanellus leucurus) from Shadegan Wetlands is reported. Black-winged Stilt had higher Hg in feather (6.6 +/- 0.6 microg/g dry weight), liver (3.5 +/- 1 microg/g dry weight), kidney (4.5 +/- 0.8 microg/g dry weight) and muscle (1.2 +/- 0.2 microg/g dry weight) (not statistically significant). Differences in Hg among waders could have resulted from diverse feeding habitats and dissimilar foraging sites.

  20. Reviews Equipment: Chameleon Nano Flakes Book: Requiem for a Species Equipment: Laser Sound System Equipment: EasySense VISION Equipment: UV Flash Kit Book: The Demon-Haunted World Book: Nonsense on Stilts Book: How to Think about Weird Things Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Requiem for a Species This book delivers a sober message about climate change Laser Sound System Sound kit is useful for laser demonstrations EasySense VISION Data Harvest produces another easy-to-use data logger UV Flash Kit Useful equipment captures shadows on film The Demon-Haunted World World-famous astronomer attacks pseudoscience in this book Nonsense on Stilts A thought-provoking analysis of hard and soft sciences How to Think about Weird Things This book explores the credibility of astrologers and their ilk WORTH A LOOK Chameleon Nano Flakes Product lacks good instructions and guidelines WEB WATCH Amateur scientists help out researchers with a variety of online projects

  1. Natal dispersal and senescence.

    PubMed

    Ronce, O; Clobert, J; Massot, M

    1998-01-20

    The potential existence of natal dispersal strategies depending on parental age has been suggested by Hamilton and May [Hamilton, W. D. & May, R. M. (1977) Nature 269, 578-581] for organisms whose survival rates decline with age. When competition between parent and offspring is strong, any individual should disperse a smaller fraction of its offspring when it ages. Here, we verify their verbal prediction. First, we determine the evolutionarily stable dispersal strategy conditional on parental age, associated with a particular senescence curve. We show that such a conditional dispersal strategy should evolve independently from the genotype controlling the offspring dispersal behavior. Second, studying a population of common lizards, we provide empirical evidence of a relation between dispersal of female offspring and maternal senescence, in agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  2. Dispersion management with metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-03-07

    An apparatus, system, and method to counteract group velocity dispersion in fibers, or any other propagation of electromagnetic signals at any wavelength (microwave, terahertz, optical, etc.) in any other medium. A dispersion compensation step or device based on dispersion-engineered metamaterials is included and avoids the need of a long section of specialty fiber or the need for Bragg gratings (which have insertion loss).

  3. Seed dispersal in fens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  4. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  5. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  6. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  7. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  8. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  9. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  10. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  11. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-05

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  12. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M.

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Dispersion in isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Moran; Santiago, Juan G.

    2008-11-01

    Isotachophoresis (ITP) is a widely used separation and preconcentration technique, which has been utilized in numerous applications including drug discovery, toxin detection, and food analysis. In ITP, analytes are segregated and focused between relatively high mobility leading ions and relatively low mobility trailing ions. These electromigration dynamics couple with advective processes associated with non-uniform electroosmotic flow (EOF). The latter generates internal pressure gradients leading to strong dispersive fluxes. This dispersion is nearly ubiquitous and currently limits the sensitivity and resolution of typical ITP assays. Despite this, there has been little work studying these coupled mechanisms. We performed an analytical and experimental study of dispersion dynamics in ITP. To achieve controlled pressure gradients, we suppressed EOF and applied an external pressure head to balance electromigration. Under these conditions, we show that radial electromigration (as opposed to radial diffusion as in Taylor dispersion) balances axial electromigration. To validate the analysis, we monitored the shape of a focusing fluorescent zone as a function of applied electric field. These experiments show that ITP dispersion may result in analyte widths an order of magnitude larger than predicted by the typical non-dispersive theory. Our goal is to develop a simplified dispersion model to capture this phenomenon, and to implement it in a numerical solver for general ITP problems.

  14. Rates of Gravel Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the three-dimensional dispersion of mixed size sediment. From a kinematics standpoint, few studies are available to inform on the streamwise and vertical rates of sediment dispersion in natural channels. This research uses a gravel tracing program to quantify dispersion rates over 19 flood seasons. Empirical observations come from Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. Frequent floods and the relatively limited armor layer facilitate streambed activity and relatively high bedload transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. Over 2500 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1989 and 1992 in four generations. To quantify gravel dispersion over distances up to 2.6 km, observations are taken from 11 recoveries. Over 280 floods capable of moving bedload occurred during this period, with five exceeding the estimated bankfull discharge. Streamwise dispersion is quantified by virtual velocity, while dispersion into the streambed is quantified by a vertical burial rate. The temporal trend in streamwise dispersion rates is described by a power function. Initial virtual velocities decline rapidly from around 1.4 m/hr to approach an asymptote value of about 0.2 m/hr. The rapid change corresponds to a significant increase in the proportion of buried tracers due to vertical mixing. Initial burial rates reflect the magnitude of the first flood after tracer deployment and range from 0.07 to 0.46 cm/hr depending on tracer generation. Burial rates converge to about 0.06 cm/hr after the fourth flood season and then gradually decline to about 0.01 cm/hr. Thus, the rate of streamwise dispersion exceeds that of vertical dispersion by three orders of magnitude when the movement of sediment routinely activated by floods is considered.

  15. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  16. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  17. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  18. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGES

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  19. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  20. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  1. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  2. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  3. MAMA Dispersion Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Wavelength dispersion solutions will be determined on a yearly basis as part of a long-term monitoring program. Deep engineering wavecals for each MAMA grating will be obtained at common cenwaves. Intermediate settings will also be taken to check the reliability of derived dispersion solutions. Final selection was determined on basis of past monitoring and C17 requirements. The internal wavelength calibrations will be taken using the LINE line lamp. Extra-deep wavecals are included for some echelle modes and first order modes to ensure detection of weak lines.

  4. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  5. Oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Curwick, L. R.; Merrick, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    MA6000E alloy is strengthened at high temperatures by dispersion of yttrium oxide. Strength properties are about twice those of conventional nickel base alloys. Good thermal fatigue, intermediate temperature strength, and good oxidation resistance give alloy unique combination of benefits. Application in aircraft gas turbine is improved.

  6. Longleaf Pine Seed Dispersal

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1963-01-01

    Production and dispersal of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seeds were sampled in 1955, 1957, and 1958 on the Escambia Experimental Forest in southwest Alabama.Two transects of seed traps were established at right angles to each of four forest walls enclosing a rectangular 80-acre clearing. Walls were oriented in the cardinal...

  7. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  8. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  9. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  10. Dispersions in semiclassical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska-Pfabé, M.; Grégoire, C.

    1988-06-01

    Dispersions around mean values of one-body observables are obtained by restoring classical many-body correlations in Vlasov and Landau-Vlasov dynamics. This method is applied to the calculation of fluctuations in mass, charge, and linear momentum in heavy-ion collisions. Results are compared with those obtained by the Balian-Veneroni variational principle in semiclassical approximation.

  11. Oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Curwick, L. R.; Merrick, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    MA6000E alloy is strengthened at high temperatures by dispersion of yttrium oxide. Strength properties are about twice those of conventional nickel base alloys. Good thermal fatigue, intermediate temperature strength, and good oxidation resistance give alloy unique combination of benefits. Application in aircraft gas turbine is improved.

  12. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  13. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  14. Ascent trajectory dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The results of a Space Transportation System ascent trajectory dispersion analysis are documented. Critical trajectory parameter values useful for the definition of lightweight external tank insulation requirements are provided. This analysis was conducted using two of the critical missions specified for the Space Transportation System: a 28.5 deg inclination trajectory launched from the Eastern Test Range (ETR) and a Western Test Range (WTR) trajectory launched into a 104 deg orbital inclination.

  15. Light dispersion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  16. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  17. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  20. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  1. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  2. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  3. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  4. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  5. Dispersal dynamics in food webs.

    PubMed

    Melián, Carlos J; Křivan, Vlastimil; Altermatt, Florian; Starý, Petr; Pellissier, Loïc; De Laender, Frederik

    2015-02-01

    Studies of food webs suggest that limited nonrandom dispersal can play an important role in structuring food webs. It is not clear, however, whether density-dependent dispersal fits empirical patterns of food webs better than density-independent dispersal. Here, we study a spatially distributed food web, using a series of population-dispersal models that contrast density-independent and density-dependent dispersal in landscapes where sampled sites are either homogeneously or heterogeneously distributed. These models are fitted to empirical data, allowing us to infer mechanisms that are consistent with the data. Our results show that models with density-dependent dispersal fit the α, β, and γ tritrophic richness observed in empirical data best. Our results also show that density-dependent dispersal leads to a critical distance threshold beyond which site similarity (i.e., β tritrophic richness) starts to decrease much faster. Such a threshold can also be detected in the empirical data. In contrast, models with density-independent dispersal do not predict such a threshold. Moreover, preferential dispersal from more centrally located sites to peripheral sites does not provide a better fit to empirical data when compared with symmetric dispersal between sites. Our results suggest that nonrandom dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes is an important driver that shapes local and regional richness (i.e., α and γ tritrophic richness, respectively) as well as the distance-decay relationship (i.e., β tritrophic richness) in food webs.

  6. Dispersion Interactions in Water Clusters.

    PubMed

    Guidez, Emilie B; Gordon, Mark S

    2017-05-18

    The importance of dispersion forces in water clusters is examined using the effective fragment potential (EFP) method. Since the original EFP1 water potential does not include dispersion, a dispersion correction to the EFP1 potential (EFP1-D) was derived and implemented. The addition of dispersion to the EFP1 potential yields improved geometries for water clusters that contain 2-6 molecules. The importance of the odd E7 contribution to the dispersion energy is investigated. The E7 dispersion term is repulsive for all of the water clusters studied here and can have a magnitude that is as large as half of the E6 value. The E7 term therefore contributes to larger intermolecular distances for the optimized geometries. Inclusion of many-body effects and/or higher order terms may be necessary to further improve dispersion energies and optimized geometries.

  7. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. Material and Methods The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. Results The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Conclusion Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:28149660

  8. QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Yolbaş, Servet; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Düzenci, Deccane; Karakaya, Bülent; Dağlı, Mustafa Necati; Koca, Süleyman Serdar

    2016-12-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic disease characterized by widespread pain. Somatic complaints associated with the cardiovascular system, such as chest pain and palpitations, are frequently seen in FM patients. P and QT dispersions are simple and inexpensive measurements reflecting the regional heterogeneity of atrial and ventricular repolarization, respectively. QT dispersion can cause serious ventricular arrhythmias. The aim of the present study was to evaluate QT dispersion and P wave dispersion in patients with FM. The study involved 48 FM patients who fulfilled the established criteria and 32 healthy controls (HC). A standard 12-lead electrocardiogram was performed on all participants. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between the longest and the shortest QT intervals. Similarly, the differences between the shortest and longest P waves were defined as P wave dispersion. The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion were shorter in the FM group compared with the HC group (p<0.001 for both). In terms of the P wave dispersion value, there was no significant difference between the FM and HC groups (p=0.088). Longer QT and P wave dispersions are not problems in patients with FM. Therefore, it may be concluded that fibromyalgia does not include an increased risk of atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias.

  9. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  10. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements.

  11. General relationships between consumer dispersal, resource dispersal and metacommunity diversity.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2014-02-01

    One of the central questions of metacommunity theory is how dispersal of organisms affects species diversity. Here, we show that the diversity-dispersal relationship should not be studied in isolation of other abiotic and biotic flows in the metacommunity. We study a mechanistic metacommunity model in which consumer species compete for an abiotic or biotic resource. We consider both consumer species specialised to a habitat patch, and generalist species capable of using the resource throughout the metacommunity. We present analytical results for different limiting values of consumer dispersal and resource dispersal, and complement these results with simulations for intermediate dispersal values. Our analysis reveals generic patterns for the combined effects of consumer and resource dispersal on the metacommunity diversity of consumer species, and shows that hump-shaped relationships between local diversity and dispersal are not universal. Diversity-dispersal relationships can also be monotonically increasing or multimodal. Our work is a new step towards a general theory of metacommunity diversity integrating dispersal at multiple trophic levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  12. SMED - Sulphur MEditerranean Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Sellitto, Pasquale; Corradini, Stefano; Di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio; Merucci, Luca; Caltabiano, Tommaso; La Spina, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of volcanic gases and particles can have profound impacts on terrestrial environment, atmospheric composition, climate forcing, and then on human health at various temporal and spatial scales. Volcanic emissions have been identified as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in our understanding of recent climate change trends. In particular, a primary role is acted by sulphur dioxide emission due to its conversion to volcanic sulphate aerosol via atmospheric oxidation. Aerosols may play a key role in the radiative budget and then in photochemistry and tropospheric composition. Mt. Etna is one of the most prodigious and persistent emitters of gasses and particles on Earth, accounting for about 10% of global average volcanic emission of CO2 and SO2. Its sulphur emissions stand for 0.7 × 106 t S/yr9 and then about 10 times bigger than anthropogenic sulphur emissions in the Mediterranean area. Centrepiece of the SMED project is to advance the understanding of volcanogenic sulphur dioxide and sulphate aerosol particles dispersion and radiative impact on the downwind Mediterranean region by an integrated approach between ground- and space-based observations and modelling. Research is addressed by exploring the potential relationship between proximal SO2 flux and aerosol measured remotely in the volcanic plume of Mt. Etna between 2000 and 2014 and distal aerosol ground-based measurements in Lampedusa, Greece, and Malta from AERONET network. Ground data are combined with satellite multispectral polar and geostationary imagers able to detect and retrieve volcanic ash and SO2. The high repetition time of SEVIRI (15 minutes) will ensure the potential opportunity to follow the entire evolution of the volcanic cloud, while, the higher spatial resolution of MODIS (1x1 km2), are exploited for investigating the probability to retrieve volcanic SO2 abundances from passive degassing. Ground and space observations are complemented with atmospheric Lagrangian model

  13. Natural dispersion revisited.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Øistein; Reed, Mark; Bodsberg, Nils Rune

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new semi-empirical model for oil droplet size distributions generated by single breaking wave events. Empirical data was obtained from laboratory experiments with different crude oils at different stages of weathering. The paper starts with a review of the most commonly used model for natural dispersion, which is followed by a presentation of the laboratory study on oil droplet size distributions formed by breaking waves conducted by SINTEF on behalf of the NOAA/UNH Coastal Response Research Center. The next section presents the theoretical and empirical foundation for the new model. The model is based on dimensional analysis and contains two non-dimensional groups; the Weber and Reynolds number. The model was validated with data from a full scale experimental oil spill conducted in the Haltenbanken area offshore Norway in July 1982, as described in the last section of the paper.

  14. Natal dispersal and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ronce, Ophélie; Clobert, Jean; Massot, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    The potential existence of natal dispersal strategies depending on parental age has been suggested by Hamilton and May [Hamilton, W. D. & May, R. M. (1977) Nature 269, 578–581] for organisms whose survival rates decline with age. When competition between parent and offspring is strong, any individual should disperse a smaller fraction of its offspring when it ages. Here, we verify their verbal prediction. First, we determine the evolutionarily stable dispersal strategy conditional on parental age, associated with a particular senescence curve. We show that such a conditional dispersal strategy should evolve independently from the genotype controlling the offspring dispersal behavior. Second, studying a population of common lizards, we provide empirical evidence of a relation between dispersal of female offspring and maternal senescence, in agreement with our theoretical predictions. PMID:9435238

  15. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  16. ACOUSTIC RECTIFICATION IN DISPERSIVE MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2009-03-03

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  17. Seed dispersal of desert annuals.

    PubMed

    Venable, D Lawrence; Flores-Martinez, Arturo; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Barron-Gafford, Greg; Becerra, Judith X

    2008-08-01

    We quantified seed dispersal in a guild of Sonoran Desert winter desert annuals at a protected natural field site in Tucson, Arizona, USA. Seed production was suppressed under shrub canopies, in the open areas between shrubs, or both by applying an herbicide prior to seed set in large, randomly assigned removal plots (10-30 m diameter). Seedlings were censused along transects crossing the reproductive suppression borders shortly after germination. Dispersal kernels were estimated for Pectocarya recurvata and Schismus barbatus from the change in seedling densities with distance from these borders via inverse modeling. Estimated dispersal distances were short, with most seeds traveling less than a meter. The adhesive seeds of P. recurvata went farther than the small S. barbatus seeds, which have no obvious dispersal adaptation. Seeds dispersed farther downslope than upslope and farther when dispersing into open areas than when dispersing into shrubs. Dispersal distances were short relative to the pattern of spatial heterogeneity created by the shrub and open space mosaic. This suggests that dispersal could contribute to local population buildup, possibly facilitating species coexistence. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that escape in time via delayed germination is likely to be more important for desert annuals than escape in space.

  18. Geometry of physical dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätzel, Dennis; Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-02-01

    To serve as a dispersion relation, a cotangent bundle function must satisfy three simple algebraic properties. These conditions are derived from the inescapable physical requirements that local matter field dynamics must be predictive and allow for an observer-independent notion of positive energy. Possible modifications of the standard relativistic dispersion relation are thereby severely restricted. For instance, the dispersion relations associated with popular deformations of Maxwell theory by Gambini-Pullin or Myers-Pospelov are not admissible. Dispersion relations passing the simple algebraic checks derived here correspond to physically admissible Finslerian refinements of Lorentzian geometry.

  19. Large deviations in Taylor dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlen, Marcel; Engel, Andreas; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We establish a link between the phenomenon of Taylor dispersion and the theory of empirical distributions. Using this connection, we derive, upon applying the theory of large deviations, an alternative and much more precise description of the long-time regime for Taylor dispersion.

  20. Procedure for dispersing fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fiber bundles are dispersed and fibers are cleaned within enclosed container; therefore, safety clothing, masks, and eye protection are not required. Procedure also could be used wherever materials, such as fiberglass or insulation, require dispersion, fluffing, or cleaning. Process could be automated into continuous operation for handling large quantities of fiber.

  1. Preparation of alkali metal dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Landel, R. F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A method is described for producing alkali metal dispersions of high purity. The dispersions are prepared by varying the equilibrium solubility of the alkali metal in a suitable organic solvent in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The equilibrium variation is produced by temperature change. The size of the particles is controlled by controlling the rate of temperature change.

  2. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  3. Hybrid Dispersion Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Goda, K.; Mahjoubfar, A.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points. PMID:22685627

  4. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  5. Disperser seal and method

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. T.

    1981-06-02

    A seal is described for a shaft of a disperser crusher, that pulverizes hot coal particles, maintains a higher than atmospheric pressure within a casing for the crusher, and is able to withstand elevated temperatures that are produced within the casing. The pressure and temperature result from hot gases that convey coal particles to the crusher. The seal includes self lubricating graphite packings that are urged in abutting relation with a smooth, ceramic sleeve on the shaft and are able to withstand the temperature on the shaft surface. A first, interior packing is on the inside of a wall of the casing while a second, exterior packing is outside of the wall. Superheated steam, a gas inert with the coal particles, is supplied to the interior packing with sufficient pressure to substantially prevent the migration of coal particles through the interior packing. The tendency of the coal particles to migrate from the container through the interior packing is further inhibited by providing a tortuous path from the casing to the interior packing.

  6. Auroral electron time dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Kletzing, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket flight was launched from Greenland in 1985 to study high latitude, early morning auroral physics. The payload was instrumented with electron and ion detectors, AC and DC electric field experiments, a plasma density experiment, and a magnetometer to measure the ambient field. The rocket was launched during disturbed conditions, when the polar cap was in a contracted state with visible aurora overhead. The electron data contained numerous signatures indicative of time-of-flight energy dispersion characterized by a coherent structure in which lower energy electrons arrived at the rocket after higher energy electrons. A model was constructed to explain this phenomena by the sudden application of a region of parallel electric field along a length of magnetic field line above the rocket. The model incorporates detector response and uses an altitudinal density profile based on auroral zone measurements. Three types of potential structures were tried: linear, quadratic and cubic. Of the three it was found that the cubic (electric field growing in a quadratic manner moving up the field line) produced the best fit to the data. The potential region was found to be approximately 1-2 R{sub e} in extent with the lower edge 3000-4000 km away from the rocket. The background electron temperature in the model which produced the best fit to the data was of the order of 15 eV.

  7. Hybrid dispersion laser scanner.

    PubMed

    Goda, K; Mahjoubfar, A; Wang, C; Fard, A; Adam, J; Gossett, D R; Ayazi, A; Sollier, E; Malik, O; Chen, E; Liu, Y; Brown, R; Sarkhosh, N; Di Carlo, D; Jalali, B

    2012-01-01

    Laser scanning technology is one of the most integral parts of today's scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and biomedicine. In many applications, high-speed scanning capability is essential for scanning a large area in a short time and multi-dimensional sensing of moving objects and dynamical processes with fine temporal resolution. Unfortunately, conventional laser scanners are often too slow, resulting in limited precision and utility. Here we present a new type of laser scanner that offers ∼1,000 times higher scan rates than conventional state-of-the-art scanners. This method employs spatial dispersion of temporally stretched broadband optical pulses onto the target, enabling inertia-free laser scans at unprecedented scan rates of nearly 100 MHz at 800 nm. To show our scanner's broad utility, we use it to demonstrate unique and previously difficult-to-achieve capabilities in imaging, surface vibrometry, and flow cytometry at a record 2D raster scan rate of more than 100 kHz with 27,000 resolvable points.

  8. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices.

  9. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  10. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard

    2017-03-01

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  11. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-06-08

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  12. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  13. Dispersing to Win in 2025

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-21

    opponent. Moreover, dispersed tactics may be the only way to "kick in the door" for future forcible entry operations. 16 End Notes ____________________ 1...CURRENT SHORTCOMINGS 13 SUMMARY 15 END ... NOTES 16 BIBILIOGRAPHY 17 1 The student

  14. Asphaltene dispersants as demulsification aids

    SciTech Connect

    Manek, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Destabilization of petroleum asphaltenes may cause a multitude of problems in crude oil recovery and production. One major problem is their agglomeration at the water-oil interface of crude oil emulsions. Once agglomeration occurs, destabilized asphaltenes can form a thick pad in the dehydration equipment, which significantly reduces the demulsification rate. Certain polymeric dispersants increase asphaltene solubilization in hydrocarbon media, and when used in conjunction with emulsion breakers, facilitate the demulsification process. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how asphaltene dispersants can efficiently inhibit pad formation and help reduce demulsifier dosage. Criteria for dispersant application and selection are discussed, which include the application of a novel laboratory technique to assess asphaltene stabilization in the crude oil. The technique monitors asphaltene agglomeration while undergoing titration with an incompatible solvent (precipitant). The method was used to evaluate stabilization of asphaltenes in the crude oil and to screen asphaltene dispersants.

  15. Does Random Dispersion Help Survival?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    2015-04-01

    Many species live in colonies that prosper for a while and then collapse. After the collapse the colony survivors disperse randomly and found new colonies that may or may not make it depending on the new environment they find. We use birth and death chains in random environments to model such a population and to argue that random dispersion is a superior strategy for survival.

  16. Dispersion coefficients for coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, B.L.; Kaleel, R.J.; Shearer, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken an extensive atmospheric dispersion research and measurement program from which it is intended will emerge improved predictive techniques for employment in licensing decisions and for emergency planning and response. Through this program the NRC has conducted field measurement programs over a wide range of geographic and topographic locations, and are using the acquired tracer and meteorological measurements to evaluate existing dispersion models and prediction techniques, and to develop new techniques when necessary.

  17. Concentrated dispersions of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truskett, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    In this talk, recent experiments characterizing highly concentrated dispersions of therapeutic proteins, which are of interest for at-home treatment of disease via subcutaneous injection, are discussed. In particular, evidence for protein nanocluster formation in these systems is explored. The roles of dispersion composition, pH, and experimental pathway are elucidated for several protein systems. Observed correlations between nanocluster properties, solution viscosity, and protein stability/activity, as well as prospective theoretical explanations for these behaviors, are highlighted.

  18. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  19. Precision measurements of pulsar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. A.; Wolszczan, A.

    1992-01-01

    Timing observations of eight pulsars over a frequency range from 25 MHz to 5 GHz are performed in order to investigate possible departures from the nu exp -2 dispersion law that applies to the propagation of radio waves through the tenuous interstellar plasma. Apparent deviations from a cold plasma law were found at high frequencies (2-5 GHz) for two pulsars: PSR 0525 + 21 and PSR 1237 + 25. The absence of LF deviations from a nu exp -2 dispersion law at the 1-ms level is consistent with a Kolmogorov spectrum of the interstellar plasma turbulence extending to scale sizes of about 10 exp 15 cm. Forms of the interstellar dispersion law which included nu exp -3 and nu exp -4 terms arising from clumping, magnetic fields, and temperature effects in the dispersing gas were examined. Pulsar dispersion was found to be an insensitive probe of gas temperature, even for a hot plasma. Dispersion delays varying as nu exp -4 could be detected at decameter wavelengths if the line of sight passes through a dense H II region.

  20. Predation risk increases dispersal distance in prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the ecological factors that affect dispersal distances allows us to predict the consequences of dispersal. Although predator avoidance is an important cause of prey dispersal, its effects on dispersal distance have not been investigated. We used simple experimental setups to test dispersal distances of the ambulatory dispersing spider mite ( Tetranychus kanzawai) in the presence or absence of a predator ( Neoseiulus womersleyi). In the absence of predators, most spider mites settled in adjacent patches, whereas the majority of those dispersing in the presence of predators passed through adjacent patches and settled in distant ones. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that predators induce greater dispersal distance in prey.

  1. KSC-2009-2488

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-01

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Distinctive with its black and white coloring and very long red legs trailing behind is a black-winged stilt. The bird is a common sight around Kennedy, which shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  2. KSC-04pd1248

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-06-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Distinctive with its black and white coloring and very long red legs trailing behind is a black-winged stilt. The bird is a common sight around KSC, which shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  3. Serological response to vaccination against avian influenza in zoo-birds using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Klausen, Joan; Holm, Elisabeth; Grøndahl, Carsten; Jørgensen, Poul H

    2007-05-30

    Five hundred and forty birds in three zoos were vaccinated twice against avian influenza with a 6-week interval using an inactivated H5N9 vaccine. Serological response was evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition test 4-6 weeks following the second vaccine administration. 84% of the birds seroconverted, and 76% developed a titre > or =32. The geometric mean titre after vaccination was 137. A significant species variation in response was noted; penguins, pelicans, ducks, geese, herons, Guinea fowl, cranes, cockatiels, lovebirds, and barbets showed very poor response to vaccination, while very high titres and seroconversion rates were seen in flamingos, ibis, rheas, Congo peafowl, black-winged stilts, amazon parrots, and kookaburras.

  4. Refraction and dispersion measurement using dispersive Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M.; El-Zaiat, S. Y.; Omar, M. F.; Farag, S. S.; Kamel, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    A new approach to a dispersive Michelson interferometer (DMI) is introduced. Rings of Equal Chromatic Order (RECO) are formed by a DMI illuminated by a white light source and crossed with an auxiliary dispersion spectrograph. The theoretical foundations are developed and then applied to different glass plates (BAK1, BK7, N-LAF35 and SK4) of thicknesses (12.101, 12.473, 9.930 and 6.602 mm), respectively. The sample is introduced in one of the arms of the interferometer. The refraction and dispersion of the samples are deduced from a single RECO interferogram. The refractive index and its variation are measured across the spectral range: 0.500-0.650 μm with relative errors of 10-3 and 1.6 × 10-4, respectively. A good agreement between our measurements and reference data is found.

  5. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Yorke, Harold W.; Johnstone, Doug; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the, inner disk (r approx. less than A 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approximately greater than 10 AU. Disk dispersed timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question.

  6. Quantum gravity without vacuum dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumbe, D. N.

    A generic prediction of quantum gravity is the vacuum dispersion of light, and hence that a photon’s speed depends on its energy. We present further numerical evidence for a scale-dependent speed of light in the causal dynamical triangulation (CDT) approach to quantum gravity. We show that the observed scale-dependent speed of light in CDT can be accounted for by a scale-dependent transformation of geodesic distance, whose specific functional form implies a discrete equidistant area spectrum. We make two nontrivial tests of the proposed scale transformation: a comparison with the leading-order quantum correction to the gravitational potential and a comparison with the generalized uncertainty principle. In both cases, we obtain the same functional form. However, contrary to the widespread prediction of vacuum dispersion in quantum gravity, numerous experiments have now definitively ruled out linear vacuum dispersion beyond Planckian energy scales EP, and have even constrained quadratic dispersion at the level ˜ 10‑8E P. Motivated by these experimental constraints, we seek to reconcile quantum gravity with the absence of vacuum dispersion. We point out that given a scale-dependent geodesic distance, a scale-dependent time interval becomes essential to maintaining an invariant speed of light. We show how a particular scale-dependent time interval allows a photon’s speed to remain independent of its energy.

  7. Dispersive properties of multisymplectic integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, C. M.; Wlodarczyk, T. H.

    2008-05-01

    Multisymplectic (MS) integrators, i.e. numerical schemes which exactly preserve a discrete space-time symplectic structure, are a new class of structure preserving algorithms for solving Hamiltonian PDEs. In this paper we examine the dispersive properties of MS integrators for the linear wave and sine-Gordon equations. In particular a leapfrog in space and time scheme (a member of the Lobatto Runge-Kutta family of methods) and the Preissman box scheme are considered. We find the numerical dispersion relations are monotonic and that the sign of the group velocity is preserved. The group velocity dispersion (GVD) is found to provide significant information and succinctly explain the qualitative differences in the numerical solutions obtained with the different schemes. Further, the numerical dispersion relations for the linearized sine-Gordon equation provides information on the ability of the MS integrators to capture the sine-Gordon dynamics. We are able to link the numerical dispersion relations to the total energy of the various methods, thus providing information on the coarse grid behavior of MS integrators in the nonlinear regime.

  8. Dispersive wave emission from wave breaking.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    We show that pulses undergoing wave breaking in nonlinear weakly dispersive fibers radiate, owing to phase-matching (assisted by higher-order dispersion) of linear dispersive waves with the shock-wave front. Our theoretical results perfectly explain the radiation observed recently from pulses propagating in the normal dispersion (i.e., nonsolitonic) regime.

  9. Phase tracking with differential dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, Xavier; Lacour, Sylvestre; Perrin, Guy S.; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Eisenhauer, Frank; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Straubmeier, Christian; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Differential chromatic dispersion in single-mode optical fibres leads to a loss of contrast of the white light fringe. For the GRAVITY instrument, this aspect is critical since it limits the fringe tracking performance. We present a real-time algorithm that compensates for differential dispersion due to varying fibre lengths using prior calibration of the optical fibres. This correction is limited by the accuracy to which the fibres stretch is known. We show how this affects the SNR on the white light fringe for different scenarios and we estimate how this phenomenon might eventually impact the astrometric accuracy of GRAVITY observations.

  10. Fog dispersion. [charged particle technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, L. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of using the charged particle technique to disperse warm fog at airports is investigated and compared with other techniques. The charged particle technique shows potential for warm fog dispersal, but experimental verification of several significant parameters, such as particle mobility and charge density, is needed. Seeding and helicopter downwash techniques are also effective for warm fog disperals, but presently are not believed to be viable techniques for routine airport operations. Thermal systems are currently used at a few overseas airports; however, they are expensive and pose potential environmental problems.

  11. Piston Dispersive Shock Wave Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefer, M. A.; Ablowitz, M. J.; Engels, P.

    2008-02-29

    The piston shock problem is a classical result of shock wave theory. In this work, the analogous dispersive shock wave (DSW) problem for a fluid described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equation is analyzed. Asymptotic solutions are calculated for a piston (step potential) moving with uniform speed into a dispersive fluid at rest. In contrast to the classical case, there is a bifurcation of shock behavior where, for large enough piston velocities, the DSW develops a periodic wave train in its wake with vacuum points and a maximum density that remains fixed as the piston velocity is increased further. These results have application to Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear optics.

  12. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  13. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOEpatents

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  14. Adaptive dispersion in vowel perception.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K

    2000-01-01

    The 'hyperspace effect' in vowel perception may be taken as evidence that adaptive dispersion is an active perceptual process. However, a previous study tested for adaptive dispersion in isolated vowel stimuli spoken in a voice unfamiliar to the listeners. The experiment reported in this paper addressed both of these potential concerns and found that both consonant context and talker familiarity modulate the hyperspace effect. However, the reductions induced by context and familiarity were slight. Listeners' preferred perceptual spaces remained hyperarticulated relative to the production vowel space. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Material dispersion in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Wemple, S H

    1979-01-01

    A three-parameter description of optical fiber material dispersion is proposed which fits the available data and reveals the key roles played by bond length, lattice structure, chemical valence, average energy gap, and atomic mass. Using broadly applicable trends in electronic and phonon oscillator strengths, simple expressions are deduced for material dispersion including the zero crossover wavelength lambda(c). These results impose severe constraints on fiber design which essentially limit the possibilities for significantly improving on pure silica to sulfates (particularly Li(2)SO(4)) and to BeF(2). The predicted value of lambda(c) for the latter material is 1.05 microm.

  16. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  17. Evaluation of dispersants for gelcasting

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Bleier, A.

    1992-05-01

    Dispersants were evaluated for producing fluid and pourable 50 vol % alumina slurries for use in aqueous gelcasting. The best dispersants are anionic polyelectrolytes with carboxylic acid sites. The major mechanism by which the anionic polyelectrolytes stabilize aqueous alumina suspensions is electrostatic. However, the presence of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, a precursor for MgO used as sintering aid for the alumina, and acrylamide monomer, used to form the gel, enhances the steric contribution of the adsorbed polymer to the interaction between alumina particles.

  18. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present calculations of the performance of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters (FADOF) on IR transitions indicate that such filters may furnish high transmission, narrow-pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth under optimum operating conditions. A FADOF consists of an atomic vapor cell between crossed polarizers that are subject to a dc magnetic field along the optical path; when linearly polarized light travels along the direction of the magnetic field through the dispersive atomic vapor, a polarization rotation occurs. If FADOF conditions are suitably adjusted, a maximum transmission with very narrow bandwidth is obtained.

  20. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  1. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  2. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  3. Anomalous dispersions of 'hedgehog' particles.

    PubMed

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-29

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these 'hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  4. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-27

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF$-$PV P>NIF$-$HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  5. Emerald ash borer adult dispersal

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2003-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an Asian buprestid beetle that was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al. 2002). Smaller populations, resulting from movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland, and Virginia in 2003. EAB adult dispersal has not been studied in Asia; however,...

  6. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  7. Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Brinkmann, Henner; Kosuch, Joachim; Veith, Michael; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-07

    Amphibians are thought to be unable to disperse over ocean barriers because they do not tolerate the osmotic stress of salt water. Their distribution patterns have therefore generally been explained by vicariance biogeography. Here, we present compelling evidence for overseas dispersal of frogs in the Indian Ocean region based on the discovery of two endemic species on Mayotte. This island belongs to the Comoro archipelago, which is entirely volcanic and surrounded by sea depths of more than 3500 m. This constitutes the first observation of endemic amphibians on oceanic islands that did not have any past physical contact to other land masses. The two species of frogs had previously been thought to be nonendemic and introduced from Madagascar, but clearly represent new species based on their morphological and genetic differentiation. They belong to the genera Mantidactylus and Boophis in the family Mantellidae that is otherwise restricted to Madagascar, and are distinguished by morphology and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from mantellid species occurring in Madagascar. This discovery permits us to update and test molecular clocks for frogs distributed in this region. The new calibrations are in agreement with previous rate estimates and indicate two further Cenozoic transmarine dispersal events that had previously been interpreted as vicariance: hyperoliid frogs from Africa to Madagascar (Heterixalus) and from Madagascar to the Seychelles islands (Tachycnemis). Our results provide the strongest evidence so far that overseas dispersal of amphibians exists and is no rare exception, although vicariance certainly retains much of its importance in explaining amphibian biogeography.

  8. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  9. An Introduction to Dispersive Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersive forces are a kind of van der Waals intermolecular force which could only be fully understood with the establishment of quantum mechanics and, in particular, of quantum electrodynamics. In this pedagogical paper, we introduce the subject in a more elementary approach, aiming at students with basic knowledge of quantum mechanics. We…

  10. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  11. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.; Byrne, H.; Osborne, J.; Pitt-Francis, J.; Gavaghan, D.; Quintard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher's equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels' network; (2) the solute's diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport.

  12. FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, J.S.

    1959-12-01

    BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

  13. Multiple overseas dispersal in amphibians.

    PubMed Central

    Vences, Miguel; Vieites, David R; Glaw, Frank; Brinkmann, Henner; Kosuch, Joachim; Veith, Michael; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Amphibians are thought to be unable to disperse over ocean barriers because they do not tolerate the osmotic stress of salt water. Their distribution patterns have therefore generally been explained by vicariance biogeography. Here, we present compelling evidence for overseas dispersal of frogs in the Indian Ocean region based on the discovery of two endemic species on Mayotte. This island belongs to the Comoro archipelago, which is entirely volcanic and surrounded by sea depths of more than 3500 m. This constitutes the first observation of endemic amphibians on oceanic islands that did not have any past physical contact to other land masses. The two species of frogs had previously been thought to be nonendemic and introduced from Madagascar, but clearly represent new species based on their morphological and genetic differentiation. They belong to the genera Mantidactylus and Boophis in the family Mantellidae that is otherwise restricted to Madagascar, and are distinguished by morphology and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences from mantellid species occurring in Madagascar. This discovery permits us to update and test molecular clocks for frogs distributed in this region. The new calibrations are in agreement with previous rate estimates and indicate two further Cenozoic transmarine dispersal events that had previously been interpreted as vicariance: hyperoliid frogs from Africa to Madagascar (Heterixalus) and from Madagascar to the Seychelles islands (Tachycnemis). Our results provide the strongest evidence so far that overseas dispersal of amphibians exists and is no rare exception, although vicariance certainly retains much of its importance in explaining amphibian biogeography. PMID:14667332

  14. Cellular basis for QT dispersion.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, C; Shimizu, W; Yan, G X; Sicouri, S

    1998-01-01

    The cellular basis for the dispersion of the QT interval recorded at the body surface is incompletely understood. Contributing to QT dispersion are heterogeneities of repolarization time in the three-dimensional structure of the ventricular myocardium, which are secondary to regional differences in action potential duration (APD) and activation time. While differences in APD occur along the apicobasal and anteroposterior axes in both epicardium and endocardium of many species, transitions are usually gradual. Recent studies have also demonstrated important APD gradients along the transmural axis. Because transmural heterogeneities in repolarization time are more abrupt than those recorded along the surfaces of the heart, they may represent a more onerous substrate for the development of arrhythmias, and their quantitation may provide a valuable tool for evaluation of arrhythmia risk. Our data, derived from the arterially perfused canine left ventricular wedge preparation, suggest that transmural gradients of voltage during repolarization contribute importantly to the inscription of the T wave. The start of the T wave is caused by a more rapid decline of the plateau, or phase 2 of the epicardial action potential, creating a voltage gradient across the wall. The gradient increases as the epicardial action potential continues to repolarize, reaching a maximum with full repolarization of epicardium; this juncture marks the peak of the T wave. The next region to repolarize is endocardium, giving rise to the initial descending limb of the upright T wave. The last region to repolarize is the M region, contributing to the final segment of the T wave. Full repolarization of the M region marks the end of the T wave. The time interval between the peak and the end of the T wave therefore represents the transmural dispersion of repolarization. Conditions known to augment QTc dispersion, including acquired long QT syndrome (class IA or III antiarrhythmics) lead to augmentation

  15. Adsorption and removal of graphene dispersants.

    PubMed

    Irin, Fahmida; Hansen, Matthew J; Bari, Rozana; Parviz, Dorsa; Metzler, Shane D; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K; Green, Micah J

    2015-05-15

    We demonstrate three different techniques (dialysis, vacuum filtration, and spray drying) for removal of dispersants from liquid-exfoliated graphene. We evaluate these techniques for elimination of dispersants from both the bulk liquid phase and from the graphene surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms dispersant removal by these treatments. Vacuum filtration (driving by convective mass transfer) is the most effective method of dispersant removal, regardless of the type of dispersant, removing up to ∼95 wt.% of the polymeric dispersant with only ∼7.4 wt.% decrease in graphene content. Dialysis also removes a significant fraction (∼70 wt.% for polymeric dispersants) of un-adsorbed dispersants without disturbing the dispersion quality. Spray drying produces re-dispersible, crumpled powder samples and eliminates much of the unabsorbed dispersants. We also show that there is no rapid desorption of dispersants from the graphene surface. In addition, electrical conductivity measurements demonstrate conductivities one order of magnitude lower for graphene drop-cast films (where excess dispersants are present) than for vacuum filtered films, confirming poor inter-sheet connectivity when excess dispersants are present.

  16. Dispersion compensation based on prism compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongying; Lan, Tian; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    A prism compressor can compensate dispersion of femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. An accurate expression of the group delay dispersion (GDD) of a prism compressor at arbitrary incident angle and at arbitrary incident point is obtained, which is of benefit to finely compensating dispersion of femtosecond pulses. Influences of several parameters on group delay dispersion are analyzed for the active compensation of dispersion of femtosecond pulses. These expressions are convenient to applications of intra- and extra-cavity dispersion compensation of ultra-short laser pulses, as well as fine compensation of satellite laser ranging and laser altimetry.

  17. Assessment of North America photosynthetic uptake of CO2 through simulations of COS in a Lagrangian particle dispersion model framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Montzka, S. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Jacobson, A. R.; Petron, G.; Trudeau, M.; Miller, B. R.; Karion, A.; Martin, J.; Gerbig, C.; Campbell, J.; Abu-Naser, M.; Berry, J. A.; Baker, I. T.; Nehrkorn, T.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Tans, P. P.

    2012-12-01

    Improving our understanding of terrestrial gross carbon fluxes, i.e. gross primary production (GPP) and respiration, plays a key role in evaluating feedbacks and thereby improving our ability to predict future climate. Since GPP can only be directly measured on very small scales, estimates of GPP at regional to global scales are derived only from biospheric model simulations. Recent studies suggest that carbonyl sulfide be a useful tracer to provide constraints on GPP, based on the fact that both COS and CO2 are simultaneously taken up by plants. Here we present an assessment of GPP estimates for North America from the Simple Biosphere (SiB) model, the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model, and the MPI-BGC model through atmospheric transport simulations of COS in a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) framework. We evaluate the impacts of boundary condition and soil uptake on the GPP estimates we derive. This study uses measurements of COS and CO2 from the NOAA/ESRL tall tower and aircraft air sampling networks, and LPDM simulations backward in time are used to quantify the contribution from different sources to observed mole fractions. A measurement over the continent contains information about terrestrial fluxes provided the upwind, or background concentration is known. Hence, the background state is an important part of the observed signal to be simulated. Empirical boundary curtains are built based on observations at the NOAA/ESRL marine boundary layer stations and from aircraft vertical profiles. These curtains are utilized as the lateral boundary conditions for COS and CO2 for the North American model domain. To assess the uncertainty of the background values for observations, we compare calculated background values based on the empirical curtains and two different models that identify where on the curtain the air entered the model domain: WRF-STILT and HYSPLIT-NAM12. Furthermore, the non-GPP related COS fluxes due to anthropogenic emissions and

  18. Nanocomposites from Stable Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymeric Matrices Using Dispersion Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymeric matrices include CNTs dispersed in a host polymer or copolymer whose monomers have delocalized electron orbitals, so that a dispersion interaction results between the host polymer or copolymer and the CNTs dispersed therein. Nanocomposite products, which are presented in bulk, or when fabricated as a film, fiber, foam, coating, adhesive, paste, or molding, are prepared by standard means from the present stable dispersions of CNTs in polymeric matrices, employing dispersion interactions, as presented hereinabove.

  19. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  20. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  1. A density dependent dispersion correction.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Corminboeuf, Clémence

    2011-01-01

    Density functional approximations fail to provide an accurate treatment of weak interactions. More recent, but not readily available functionals can lead to significant improvements. A simple alternative to correct for the missing weak interactions is to add, a posteriori, an atom pair-wise dispersion correction. We here present a density dependent dispersion correction, dDXDM, which dramatically improves the performance of popular functionals (e.g., PBE-dDXDM or B3LYP-dDXDM) for a set of 145 systems featuring both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Whereas the highly parameterized M06-2X functional, the long-range corrected LC-BLYP and the fully non-local van der Waals density functional rPW86-W09 also lead to improved results as compared to standard DFT methods, the enhanced performance of dDXDM remains the most impressive.

  2. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  3. Dispersion engineering of surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Isroel M; Bendoym, Igor; Jung, Young U; Golovin, Andrii B; Crouse, David T

    2013-12-30

    In this work, it is shown how the shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be engineered by manipulating the distribution of the electromagnetic fields in multilayer structures, which themselves are controlled by the free electron density in metal-like materials, such as doped semiconductors in the THz spectral range. By having a nonuniform free electron density profile, reduced relative to that in typical bulk metals, the electromagnetic fields of surface plasmons are distributed in different metallic materials that have different complex dielectric permittivities. As the in-plane component of surface plasmon's wave-vector increases, they become more confined to a particular layer of the multilayer structure and have energies that are predictable by considering the permittivity of the layer in which the fields are most concentrated. Unusual and arbitrary shapes of surface plasmon dispersion curves can be designed, including stair steps and dovetails shapes.

  4. Dispersion as a Survival Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, Valdivino Vargas; Machado, Fábio Prates; Roldán-Correa, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We consider stochastic growth models to represent population subject to catastrophes. We analyze the subject from different set ups considering or not spatial restrictions, whether dispersion is a good strategy to increase the population viability. We find out it strongly depends on the effect of a catastrophic event, the spatial constraints of the environment and the probability that each exposed individual survives when a disaster strikes.

  5. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  6. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  7. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  8. Temperature stability of nanocellulose dispersions.

    PubMed

    Heggset, Ellinor B; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Syverud, Kristin

    2017-02-10

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have potential as rheology modifiers of water based fluids, e.g. drilling fluids for use in oil wells or as additives in injection water for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The temperature in oil wells can be high (>100°C), and the retention time long; days for drilling fluids and months for EOR fluids. Hence, it is important to assess the temperature stability over time of nanocellulose dispersions to clarify their suitability as rheology modifiers of water based fluids at such harsh conditions. Dispersions of CNF produced mechanically, by using TEMPO mediated oxidation and by using carboxymethylation as pretreatment, in addition to cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), have been subjected to heat aging. Temperature stability was best for CNC and for mechanically produced CNF that were stable after heating to 140°C for three days. The effect of additives was evaluated; cesium formate and sodium formate increased the temperature stability of the dispersions, while there was no effect of using phosphate buffer.

  9. Dispersibility of crude oil in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, B A; Virkus, A; Mukherjee, B; Venosa, A D

    2009-06-01

    The effects of surfactant composition on the ability of chemical dispersants to disperse crude oil in fresh water were investigated. The objective of this research was to determine whether effective fresh water dispersants can be designed in case this technology is ever considered for use in fresh water environments. Previous studies on the chemical dispersion of crude oil in fresh water neither identified the dispersants that were investigated nor described the chemistry of the surfactants used. This information is necessary for developing a more fundamental understanding of chemical dispersion of crude oil at low salinity. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between surfactant chemistry and dispersion effectiveness. We found that dispersants can be designed to drive an oil slick into the freshwater column with the same efficiency as in salt water as long as the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance is optimum.

  10. Delayed dispersal: youth costs carry lifetime gains.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Jan

    2007-06-05

    An analysis of reproductive success in the green woodhoopoe Phoeniculus purpures challenges the view that delayed dispersal is costly. Females delaying dispersal for longer had more reproductive events in life and higher lifetime production of offspring.

  11. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  12. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  13. Dispersion of Droplet Clouds in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; Bertens, Guus; van der Voort, Dennis; van de Water, Willem

    2016-10-14

    We measure the absolute dispersion of clouds of monodisperse, phosphorescent droplets in turbulent air by means of high-speed image-intensified video recordings. Laser excitation allows the initial preparation of well-defined, pencil-shaped luminous droplet clouds in a completely nonintrusive way. We find that the dispersion of the clouds is faster than the dispersion of fluid elements. We speculate that preferential concentration of inertial droplet clouds is responsible for the enhanced dispersion.

  14. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  15. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  16. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  17. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent the...

  18. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent the...

  19. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent the...

  20. DISPERSION TOLERANCE CALCULATION FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    LIN,F.; GUO, W.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we discuss the effect on the emittance of the residual dispersion in the insertion devices. The dispersion in the straights could be generated by the lattice error, trim dipole, and insertion device. The effect on the emittance is examined, and the dispersion tolerances are given for the NSLS-11.

  1. 40 CFR 110.4 - Dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dispersants. 110.4 Section 110.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS DISCHARGE OF OIL § 110.4 Dispersants. Addition of dispersants or emulsifiers to oil to be discharged that would circumvent...

  2. DISPERSIBILITY OF CRUDE OIL IN FRESH WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of surfactant composition on the ability of chemical dispersants to disperse crude oil in fresh water were investigated. The objective of this research was to determine whether effective fresh water dispersants can be designed in case this technology is ever consider...

  3. Deriving dispersal distances from genetic data.

    PubMed Central

    Spong, G.; Creel, S.

    2001-01-01

    Dispersal is one of the most important factors determining the genetic structure of a population, but good data on dispersal distances are rare because it is difficult to observe a large sample of dispersal events. However, genetic data contain unbiased information about the average dispersal distances in species with a strong sex bias in their dispersal rates. By plotting the genetic similarity between members of the philopatric sex against some measure of the distance between them, the resulting regression line can be used for estimating how far dispersing individuals of the opposite sex have moved before settling. Dispersers showing low genetic similarity to members of the opposite sex will on average have originated from further away. Applying this method to a microsatellite dataset from lions (Panthera leo) shows that their average dispersal distance is 1.3 home ranges with a 95% confidence interval of 0.4-3.0 home ranges. These results are consistent with direct observations of dispersal from our study population and others. In this case, direct observations of dispersal distance were not detectably biased by a failure to detect long-range dispersal, which is thought to be a common problem in the estimation of dispersal distance. PMID:11749712

  4. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  5. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  9. Deriving dispersal distances from genetic data.

    PubMed

    Spong, G; Creel, S

    2001-12-22

    Dispersal is one of the most important factors determining the genetic structure of a population, but good data on dispersal distances are rare because it is difficult to observe a large sample of dispersal events. However, genetic data contain unbiased information about the average dispersal distances in species with a strong sex bias in their dispersal rates. By plotting the genetic similarity between members of the philopatric sex against some measure of the distance between them, the resulting regression line can be used for estimating how far dispersing individuals of the opposite sex have moved before settling. Dispersers showing low genetic similarity to members of the opposite sex will on average have originated from further away. Applying this method to a microsatellite dataset from lions (Panthera leo) shows that their average dispersal distance is 1.3 home ranges with a 95% confidence interval of 0.4-3.0 home ranges. These results are consistent with direct observations of dispersal from our study population and others. In this case, direct observations of dispersal distance were not detectably biased by a failure to detect long-range dispersal, which is thought to be a common problem in the estimation of dispersal distance.

  10. Dispersion analysis for baseline reference mission 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    A dispersion analysis considering uncertainties (or perturbations) in platform, vehicle, and environmental parameters was performed for baseline reference mission (BRM) 2. The dispersion analysis is based on the nominal trajectory for BRM 2. The analysis was performed to determine state vector and performance dispersions (or variations) which result from the indicated uncertainties. The dispersions are determined at major mission events and fixed times from liftoff (time slices). The dispersion results will be used to evaluate the capability of the vehicle to perform the mission within a specified level of confidence and to determine flight performance reserves.

  11. Asymptotic dispersion energies from distributed polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Fazle; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-05-01

    A new algorithm is proposed for calculations of distributed molecular polarizabilities. In contrast to published algorithms, it virtually eliminates the charge-flow terms that result in a slower than inverse sixth power decay of dispersion energy whereas the remaining terms have unique and physically reasonable values. Dispersion energies computed from these polarizabilities are very close to unexpanded dispersion energies in the region of small charge overlap. The method is expected to provide reference data for development of dispersion functions used in simulations of biomolecules and in dispersion-supplemented density-functional approaches.

  12. Bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides with four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuhao; Jafari, Zeinab; Agarwal, Anu M; Kimerling, Lionel C; Li, Guifang; Michel, Jurgen; Zhang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We propose a new type of bilayer dispersion-flattened waveguides that have four zero-dispersion wavelengths. Low and flat dispersion can be achieved by using two different material combinations, with a much smaller index contrast as compared to the previously proposed slot-assisted dispersion-flattened waveguides. Without using a nano-slot, dispersion becomes less sensitive to waveguide dimensions, which is highly desirable for high-yield device fabrication. Ultra-low dispersion, high nonlinearity, and fabrication-friendly design would make it promising for practical implementation of nonlinear photonic functions. The proposed waveguide configuration deepens our understanding of the dispersion flattening principle.

  13. Physiological, Morphological and Behavioural Responses of Self-Feeding Precocial Chicks Copying with Contrasting Levels of Water Salinity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Afonso R.; Silva, Rita; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M.; Ramos, Jaime A.; Masero, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Combined physiological and behavioural responses to salt loads during development have rarely been studied in air-breathing vertebrates able to inhabit hypersaline habitats, but they may be of particular importance in understanding, for example, the differences among species in patterns of habitat use or ontogenetic diet switches. Here, we compared the physiological and behavioural responses of self-feeding precocial chicks developed in contrasting levels of water salinity. The model species was the Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) a precocial shorebird that breeds in a range of habitats from freshwater to hypersaline wetlands. Specifically, we compared resting metabolic rate (RMR), heat shock proteins (Hsp70), plasma ions, hematocrit, body mass, body size, growth rate and head-shaking behaviour of captive-reared Black-winged Stilt fledglings developed under fresh (0 ‰), saline (20 ‰), and hypersaline (60 ‰) water. Contrary to expectations, none of the physiological and morphological variables measured differed significantly among treatments. Likewise, the RMR of wild and captive-reared fledglings was similar. Surprisingly, the saltgland mass of wild fledglings from freshwater and those from hypersaline habitats was also similar. However, head-shaking, a behavioural response associated to minimize salt intake and to expel the secretions of salt glands, differed according to salinity source: head-shaking rate increased with increasing salinity. The results of this study support the key role of behavioural osmoregulation in avoiding salt stress during development. PMID:27788200

  14. A nonlocal inhomogeneous dispersal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortázar, C.; Coville, J.; Elgueta, M.; Martínez, S.

    This article in devoted to the study of the nonlocal dispersal equation u(x,t)=∫R J({x-y}/{g(y)}){u(y,t)}/{g(y)} dy-u(x,t) in R×[0,∞), and its stationary counterpart. We prove global existence for the initial value problem, and under suitable hypothesis on g and J, we prove that positive bounded stationary solutions exist. We also analyze the asymptotic behavior of the finite mass solutions as t→∞, showing that they converge locally to zero.

  15. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  16. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  17. Incorporating patterns of disperser behaviour into models of seed dispersal and its effects on estimated dispersal curves.

    PubMed

    Westcott, David A; Bentrupperbäumer, Joan; Bradford, Matt G; McKeown, Adam

    2005-11-01

    The processes determining where seeds fall relative to their parent plant influence the spatial structure and dynamics of plant populations and communities. For animal dispersed species the factors influencing seed shadows are poorly understood. In this paper we test the hypothesis that the daily temporal distribution of disperser behaviours, for example, foraging and movement, influences dispersal outcomes, in particular the shape and scale of dispersal curves. To do this, we describe frugivory and the dispersal curves produced by the southern cassowary, Casuarius casuarius, the only large-bodied disperser in Australia's rainforests. We found C. casuarius consumed fruits of 238 species and of all fleshy-fruit types. In feeding trials, seeds of 11 species were retained on average for 309 min (+/-256 SD). Sampling radio-telemetry data randomly, that is, assuming foraging occurs at random times during the day, gives an estimated average dispersal distance of 239 m (+/-207 SD) for seeds consumed by C. casuarius. Approximately 4% of seeds were dispersed further than 1,000 m. However, observation of wild birds indicated that foraging and movement occur more frequently early and late in the day. Seeds consumed early in the day were estimated to receive dispersal distances 1.4 times the 'random' average estimate, while afternoon consumed seeds received estimated mean dispersal distances of 0.46 times the 'random' estimate. Sampling movement data according to the daily distribution of C. casuarius foraging gives an estimated mean dispersal distance of 337 m (+/-194 SD). Most animals' behaviour has a non-random temporal distribution. Consequently such effects should be common and need to be incorporated into seed shadow estimation. Our results point to dispersal curves being an emergent property of the plant-disperser interaction rather than being a property of a plant or species.

  18. Density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal affect the stability of predator-prey metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Hauzy, Céline; Gauduchon, Mathias; Hulot, Florence D; Loreau, Michel

    2010-10-07

    Although density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal (the difference in dispersal rates between species) have been documented in natural systems, their effects on the stability of metacommunities are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effects of intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal on the regional stability in a predator-prey metacommunity model. We show that, when the dynamics of the populations reach equilibrium, the stability of the metacommunity is not affected by density-dependent dispersal. However, the regional stability, measured as the regional variability or the persistence, can be modified by density-dependent dispersal when local populations fluctuate over time. Moreover these effects depend on the relative dispersal of the predator and the prey. Regional stability is modified through changes in spatial synchrony. Interspecific density-dependent dispersal always desynchronizses local dynamics, whereas intraspecific density-dependent dispersal may either synchronize or desynchronize it depending on dispersal rates. Moreover, intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal strengthen the top-down control of the prey by the predator at intermediate dispersal rates. As a consequence the regional stability of the metacommunity is increased at intermediate dispersal rates. Our results show that density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal of species are keys to understanding the response of ecosystems to fragmentation.

  19. Exciton dispersion in molecular solids.

    PubMed

    Cudazzo, Pierluigi; Sottile, Francesco; Rubio, Angel; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-03-25

    The investigation of the exciton dispersion (i.e. the exciton energy dependence as a function of the momentum carried by the electron-hole pair) is a powerful approach to identify the exciton character, ranging from the strongly localised Frenkel to the delocalised Wannier-Mott limiting cases. We illustrate this possibility at the example of four prototypical molecular solids (picene, pentacene, tetracene and coronene) on the basis of the parameter-free solution of the many-body Bethe-Salpeter equation. We discuss the mixing between Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons and the origin of their Davydov splitting in the framework of many-body perturbation theory and establish a link with model approaches based on molecular states. Finally, we show how the interplay between the electronic band dispersion and the exchange electron-hole interaction plays a fundamental role in setting the nature of the exciton. This analysis has a general validity holding also for other systems in which the electron wavefunctions are strongly localized, as in strongly correlated insulators.

  20. Exciton dispersion in molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudazzo, Pierluigi; Sottile, Francesco; Rubio, Angel; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    The investigation of the exciton dispersion (i.e. the exciton energy dependence as a function of the momentum carried by the electron-hole pair) is a powerful approach to identify the exciton character, ranging from the strongly localised Frenkel to the delocalised Wannier-Mott limiting cases. We illustrate this possibility at the example of four prototypical molecular solids (picene, pentacene, tetracene and coronene) on the basis of the parameter-free solution of the many-body Bethe-Salpeter equation. We discuss the mixing between Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons and the origin of their Davydov splitting in the framework of many-body perturbation theory and establish a link with model approaches based on molecular states. Finally, we show how the interplay between the electronic band dispersion and the exchange electron-hole interaction plays a fundamental role in setting the nature of the exciton. This analysis has a general validity holding also for other systems in which the electron wavefunctions are strongly localized, as in strongly correlated insulators.

  1. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration.

  2. Modeling the dispersion in electromechanically coupled myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Thomas S. E.; Prassl, Anton J.; Plank, Gernot; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We present an approach to model the dispersion of fiber and sheet orientations in the myocardium. By utilizing structure parameters, an existing orthotropic and invariant-based constitutive model developed to describe the passive behavior of the myocardium is augmented. Two dispersion parameters are fitted to experimentally observed angular dispersion data of the myocardial tissue. Computations are performed on a unit myocardium tissue cube and on a slice of the left ventricle indicating that the dispersion parameter has an effect on the myocardial deformation and stress development. The use of fiber dispersions relating to a pathological myocardium had a rather big effect. The final example represents an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle indicating the influence of fiber and sheet dispersions upon contraction over a cardiac cycle. Although only a minor shift in the pressure–volume (PV) loops between the cases with no dispersions and with fiber and sheet dispersions for a healthy myocardium was observed, a remarkably different behavior is obtained with a fiber dispersion relating to a diseased myocardium. In future simulations, this dispersion model for myocardial tissue may advantageously be used together with models of, for example, growth and remodeling of various cardiac diseases. PMID:23868817

  3. Chromatic dispersion profile optimization of dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fibers for broadband dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takeshi; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Wada, Keisuke; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-01-23

    Chromatic dispersion profile of dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fibers is optimized for broadband dispersion compensation of single mode fibers (SMFs) by using genetic algorithm incorporated with full-vector finite-element method. From the numerical results presented here, it is found that by increasing the distance between central core and outer ring core, larger negative dispersion coefficient and better dispersion slope compensation are possible. There is a tradeoff between the magnitude of negative dispersion coefficient and dispersion slope compensation due to the concave dispersion profile of dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fibers. In spite of the tradeoff, dual-concentric-core photonic crystal fibers having larger negative dispersion coefficient as well as compensating for dispersion slope of SMFs in the entire C band with large effective area can be designed.

  4. Optical Properties of Concentrated Dispersions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Peter J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Apparatus and methods have been developed to measure the diffuse transmittance T and reflectance R of multiple scattering, concentrated, colloidal dispersions. The variation of R and T with pathlength, wavelength, and concentration has been investigated for non-spherical particles in concentrated dispersions, over a range of pH and surfactant concentrations. Measurements of diffuse transmittance and reflectance required large corrections to be made for the presence of any specular interfaces i.e. windows. These corrections were minimised by developing a bifurcated fibre optic bundle reflectance method, which allowed R and T to be measured at volume fractions up to at least 0.3. Using magnetic, acoustic and shear fields to align the non-spherical kaolinite particles changes in R and T were measured at volume fractions upto 0.3. The amplitude of the changes and the relaxation of the changes induced by the applied fields were measured. The amplitude of the change was found to vary strongly with pH and surfactant concentration. For any particular face diameter platelet, the amplitude of the change followed closely the flocculation process, and was sensitive to the mode of particle-particle aggregation, e.g. face-face, or face-edge. The amount of surfactant per unit mass of kaolinite required to stabilise dispersions is found to vary with particle size and concentration. This showed that information about particle orientation can be obtained through multiple scattering systems when subjected to an aligning field. Kubelka-Munk two flux theory was used to relate R and T to the diffuse flux scattering parameter S. A simple theory was developed relating S to the size shape and orientation of the non-spherical particles, hence allowing the particle orientation to be determined for any aligning field. The insight into particle behaviour given by the optical method is superior to that given by rheology alone, which

  5. Soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fiber with two zero dispersive wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Yang, Hua; Tang, Pinghua; Zhao, Chujun; Gao, Jing

    2013-05-06

    Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we present a numerical study of trapping of dispersive waves by solitons during supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers pumped with femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region. Numerical simulation results show that the generated supercontinuum is bounded by two branches of dispersive waves, namely blue-shifted dispersive waves (B-DWs) and red-shifted dispersive waves (R-DWs). We find a novel phenomenon that not only B-DWs but also R-DWs can be trapped by solitons across the zero-dispersion wavelength when the group-velocity matching between the soliton and the dispersive wave is satisfied, which may led to the generation of new spectral components via mixing of solitons and dispersive waves. Mixing of solitons with dispersive waves has been shown to play an important role in shaping not only the edge of the supercontinuum, but also its central part around the higher zero-dispersion wavelength. Further, we show that the phenomenon of soliton trapping of dispersive waves in photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths has a very close relationship with pumping power and the interval between two zero-dispersion wavelengths. In order to clearly display the evolution of soliton trapping of dispersive waves, the spectrogram of output pulses is observed using cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating technique (XFROG).

  6. Post-crash fuel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    This paper is a brief overview of work over the last several decades in understanding what occurs to jet fuel stored in aircraft fuel tanks on impact with the ground. Fuel dispersal is discussed in terms of the overall crash dynamics process and impact regimes are identified. In a generic sense, the types of flow regimes which can occur are identified and general descriptions of the processes are given. Examples of engineering level tools, both computational and experimental, which have applicability to analyzing the complex environments are presented. Finally, risk based decision is discussed as a quick means of identifying requirements for development of preventative or mitigation strategies, such as further work on the development of an anti-misting agent.

  7. Dispersion relations for unphysical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Generalized dispersion relations are discussed for unphysical particles, e.g. confined degrees of freedom that are not present in the physical spectra but can give rise to observable bound states. While in general the propagator of the unphysical particles can have complex poles and cannot be reconstructed from the knowledge of the imaginary part, under reasonable assumptions the missing piece of information is shown to be in the rational function that contains the poles and must be added to the integral representation. For pure Yang-Mills theory, the rational part and the spectral term are identified in the explicit analytical expressions provided by the massive expansion of the gluon propagator. The multi particle spectral term turns out to be very small and the simple rational part provides, from first principles, an approximate propagator that is equivalent to the tree-level result of simple phenomenological models like the refined Gribov-Zwanziger model.

  8. Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. This drawing depicts a cross-section of a set of Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus (DMDA) specimen wells, one of which can include a reverse osmosis membrane to dewater a protein solution and thus cause crystallization. Depending on individual needs, two or three wells may be used, the membrane may be absent, or other proprietary enhancements may be present. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  9. Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to seek solutions for a range of biomedical issues are at the heart of several investigations that will be hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates (ITA), Inc. Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. CIBX-2 is unique, encompassing more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments, and student hands-on experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. This drawing depicts a cross-section of a set of Dual-Materials Dispersion Apparatus (DMDA) specimen wells, one of which can include a reverse osmosis membrane to dewater a protein solution and thus cause crystallization. Depending on individual needs, two or three wells may be used, the membrane may be absent, or other proprietary enhancements may be present. The experiments are sponsored by NASA's Space Product Development Program (SPD).

  10. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  11. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  12. Dispersive interactions in graphitic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, L. M.; Popescu, A.; Drosdoff, D.; Bondarev, I. V.

    2013-02-01

    The Casimir interaction between graphitic nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets, is investigated at the quantum mechanical limit (T = 0 K) using a quantum electrodynamical approach for absorbing and dispersive media. It is found that the nanotube/nanotube interaction in a double wall carbon nanotube configuration is profoundly affected by the collective low frequency excitations of individual nanotubes. It is shown that pronounced, low frequency peaks in the nanotube electron energy loss spectra are a main factor contributing to the strength of the intertube attraction. The graphene/graphene force is also investigated. It is obtained that the graphene optical transparency is the main reason for the reduced attraction as compared to the one for perfect metals. This study presents a unified approach for electromagnetic interactions in graphitic nanostructures, which is able to account for their unique electronic and response properties and geometry configurations.

  13. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  14. Magnetic particle dispersion in polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kwang Seoung

    Magnetic particle dispersions were prepared in order to observe the effect of particle surface properties, concentration and functional group of binder, milling time, and solvent on dispersion properties. Rheology and transverse susceptibility measurements were used to characterize the dispersion quality of the magnetic paints macroscopically and microscopically, respectively. In this study, by applying the acid-base concept, methods to optimize magnetic dispersions were established. Initially, interaction between acid-base sites on particles and binder was investigated by poisoning the sites with chemicals, then quantifying each type of adsorption (hydrogen and chemical adsorption) using thermogravimetric analysis. With this fundamental information, effects of typical dispersion parameters were investigated. The acid base interaction between binder solution and particles was related to the magnetic and rheological properties of magnetic inks. The results have significant implications for high density particulate media where dispersion will become increasingly important.

  15. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  16. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  17. Tunable chromatic dispersion and dispersion slope compensator using a planar lightwave circuit lattice-form filter.

    PubMed

    Takiguchi, K; Takahashi, H; Shibata, T

    2008-06-01

    A tunable chromatic dispersion and dispersion slope compensator is proposed that has a single lattice-form filter configuration. Wavelength dependence is intentionally added to its tunable couplers, which produces dispersion slope compensation in addition to the dispersion compensation. Dispersion tunability of +/- 500 ps/nm and a slope of -4.9 ps/nm(2) over 40 GHz are successfully demonstrated, thus meeting the requirement for 40 Gbits/s differential quadrature phase shift keying transmission with an 80 km long nonzero dispersion-shifted fiber.

  18. Dispersion of tsunamis: does it really matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimsdal, S.; Pedersen, G. K.; Harbitz, C. B.; Løvholt, F.

    2013-06-01

    This article focuses on the effect of dispersion in the field of tsunami modeling. Frequency dispersion in the linear long-wave limit is first briefly discussed from a theoretical point of view. A single parameter, denoted as "dispersion time", for the integrated effect of frequency dispersion is identified. This parameter depends on the wavelength, the water depth during propagation, and the propagation distance or time. Also the role of long-time asymptotes is discussed in this context. The wave generation by the two main tsunami sources, namely earthquakes and landslides, are briefly discussed with formulas for the surface response to the bottom sources. Dispersive effects are then exemplified through a semi-idealized study of a moderate-strength inverse thrust fault. Emphasis is put on the directivity, the role of the "dispersion time", the significance of the Boussinesq model employed (dispersive effect), and the effects of the transfer from bottom sources to initial surface elevation. Finally, the experience from a series of case studies, including earthquake- and landslide-generated tsunamis, is presented. The examples are taken from both historical (e.g. the 2011 Japan tsunami and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami) and potential tsunamis (e.g. the tsunami after the potential La Palma volcanic flank collapse). Attention is mainly given to the role of dispersion during propagation in the deep ocean and the way the accumulation of this effect relates to the "dispersion time". It turns out that this parameter is useful as a first indication as to when frequency dispersion is important, even though ambiguity with respect to the definition of the wavelength may be a problem for complex cases. Tsunamis from most landslides and moderate earthquakes tend to display dispersive behavior, at least in some directions. On the other hand, for the mega events of the last decade dispersion during deep water propagation is mostly noticeable for transoceanic propagation.

  19. Atmospheric turbulence and pollutant dispersion near roadways

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.T.; Keenan, M.T.; Sistla, G.; Wilson, J.S.

    1980-12-01

    The major objectives of this investigation are: (1) to determine the time and space scales of the eddies generated by the traffic, (2) to study the effects of traffic-induced turbulence on the near-field dispersion of pollutants, (3) to evaluate several commonly used highway air pollution dispersion models, and (4) to improve methods of modeling pollutant dispersion near roadways. To this end, meteorological and tracer concentration data from two field experiments, namely, General Motors and New York State, are used.

  20. Phonon dispersion and heat capacity in polyfuran.

    PubMed

    Ali, Parvej; Srivastava, Seema; Ali Khan, Irfan; Gupta, V D; Ansari, Saif-Ul-Islam

    2012-07-01

    A study of the normal modes of vibration and their dispersion in polyfuran (Pfu) based on the Urey-Bradley force field is reported. It provides a detailed interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Characteristic features of dispersion curves such as regions of high density-of-states, repulsion and character mixing of dispersive modes are discussed. Predictive values of heat capacity as a function of temperature are calculated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phonon dispersion and heat capacity in polyfuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Parvej; Srivastava, Seema; Ali Khan, Irfan; Gupta, V. D.; Ansari, Saif-ul-Islam

    A study of the normal modes of vibration and their dispersion in polyfuran (Pfu) based on the Urey-Bradley force field is reported. It provides a detailed interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Characteristic features of dispersion curves such as regions of high density-of-states, repulsion and character mixing of dispersive modes are discussed. Predictive values of heat capacity as a function of temperature are calculated.

  2. General relationships between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    General relationships between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion are presented. The validity of these nonlocal relationships hinges only on the properties of causality and linearity, and does not depend upon details of the mechanism responsible for the attenuation and dispersion. Approximate, nearly local relationships are presented and are demonstrated to predict accurately the ultrasonic dispersion in solutions of hemoglobin from the results of attenuation measurements.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of QT dispersion.

    PubMed

    Batchvarov, V; Malik, M

    2000-01-01

    QT dispersion was proposed as an index of the spatial inhomogeneity of ventricular recovery times. The results of studies that found significant correlation between dispersion of ventricular recovery times measured with monophasic action potentials and QT dispersion were interpreted as proof of the direct link between QT dispersion and the dispersion of ventricular recovery times. Later it was shown that QT dispersion is not a direct reflection of the spatial variation of the recovery times and cannot be used for quantification of this variation. The interlead variability of the QT intervals is a result of different projections of the spatial T-wave loop into the various electrocardiographic leads. The reliability of both manual and automatic measurement of QT dispersion is low and is often of the order of the differences of Qt dispersion between different patient groups. The measurement reliability is influenced by intrinsic factors (e.g., amplitude of the T wave) and extrinsic factors (e.g., noise, paper speed of recording, instruments for manual measurements, and type of algorithm and interalgorithmic settings for automatic measurement). There is very little to choose between the different indices of expression of QT dispersion, as well as between the different lead configurations used for its measurement. QT dispersion is not simply a result of measurement error, but a crude measure of abnormalities during the whole course of repolarization. Only grossly prolonged QT dispersion (e.g., > or =100 ms), must be interpreted simply as a sign of the abnormal course of the repolarization, and inferences about the actual dispersion of the ventricular recovery times should not be made. Newer concepts of assessment of the morphology of the T wave are already emerging and will probably be of higher clinical value.

  4. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2012-01-01

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed–dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology. PMID:22566677

  5. Dispersive modeling of the 2009 Samoa tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongqiang; Wei, Yong; Titov, Vasily V.

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the dispersive effects in the 2009 Samoa tsunami through numerical simulations. The wave propagation is first simulated with a weakly nonlinear and dispersive Boussinesq model and a non-dispersive shallow-water-equations model. Comparison of the numerical results between these models indicates that tsunami propagation is significantly affected by the frequency dispersion east of Tonga Trench. Neglecting dispersive effects results in larger wave heights and speeds. The strong frequency dispersion is primarily attributed to the dramatic variation of water surface elevations generated by the earthquake doublet, and enhanced by the uneven bathymetry in Tonga Trench. Tsunami propagation is also simulated with MOST (“Method of Splitting Tsunamis”), which is based on the shallow water equations but uses numerical dispersion to mimic physical frequency dispersion at operational resolutions. A good agreement is observed between MOST and the Boussinesq model, as well as the field measurements in the leading wave. In the shorter trailing waves, agreement becomes poorer due to the mismatch between numerical and physical dispersions.

  6. Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Margareth L.; Alphey, Luke; Donnelly, Christl A.; McKemey, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of ‘genetically sterile’ male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed. Methodology/Principal Findings The dispersal ability of released ‘genetically sterile’ male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of ‘genetically sterile’ male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8m (95% CI: 49.9m, 56.8m) and Malaysia: 58.0m (95% CI: 51.1m, 71.0m). Conclusions/Significance Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released ‘genetically sterile’ male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects’ dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using ‘genetically sterile’ male Aedes aegypti. PMID:26554922

  7. Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Winskill, Peter; Carvalho, Danilo O; Capurro, Margareth L; Alphey, Luke; Donnelly, Christl A; McKemey, Andrew R

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed. The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8 m (95% CI: 49.9 m, 56.8 m) and Malaysia: 58.0 m (95% CI: 51.1 m, 71.0 m). Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

  8. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. The conservation physiology of seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2012-06-19

    At a time when plant species are experiencing increasing challenges from climate change, land-use change, harvesting and invasive species, dispersal has become a very important aspect of plant conservation. Seed dispersal by animals is particularly important because some animals disperse seeds to suitable sites in a directed fashion. Our review has two aims: (i) to highlight the various ways plant dispersal by animals can be affected by current anthropogenic change and (ii) to show the important role of plant and (particularly) animal physiology in shaping seed-dispersal interactions. We argue that large-bodied seed dispersers may be particularly important for plant conservation because seed dispersal of large-seeded plants is often more specialized and because large-bodied animals are targeted by human exploitation and have smaller population sizes. We further argue that more specialized seed-dispersal systems on island ecosystems might be particularly at risk from climate change both owing to small population sizes involved but also owing to the likely thermal specialization, particularly on tropical islands. More generally, the inherent vulnerability of seed-dispersal mutualisms to disruption driven by environmental change (as well as their ubiquity) demands that we continue to improve our understanding of their conservation physiology.

  10. Dispersive Time-Delay Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenov, Alexander; Slepneva, Svetlana; Huyet, Guillaume; Vladimirov, Andrei G.

    2017-05-01

    We present a theoretical approach to investigate the effect of dispersion in dynamical systems commonly described by time-delay models. The introduction of a polarization equation provides a means to introduce dispersion as a distributed delay term. The expansion of this term in power series, as usually performed to study the propagation of waves in spatially extended systems, can lead to the appearance of spurious instabilities. This approach is illustrated using a long cavity laser, where in the normal dispersion regime both the experiment and theory show a stable operation, while a modulation instability, commonly referred as the Benjamin-Feir instability, is observed in the anomalous dispersion regime.

  11. Broadband dispersion-compensating photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Zhang, Yejin; He, Lina; Xie, Shizhong

    2006-10-01

    We present a modified dual-core photonic crystal fiber, based on pure silica, with special grapefruit holes in the inner cladding. The fiber has large, broadband negative dispersion, and the dispersion value varies linearly from -380to-420 ps/(nmkm) in the C band. To decrease the fabrication difficulty, large air holes are adopted. Furthermore, the chromatic dispersion of the fiber is not sensitive to the structure parameters. So the proposed fiber structure can greatly facilitate fiber drawing and can be used for broadband dispersion compensation.

  12. Black Brant X third stage dispersion dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Maksimovic, V. M.; Lindahl, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The successful development of the Black Brant X (BBX) launch vehicle resulted from the application of a gyroscopically stabilized, unguided third stage motor configuration. Design analyses indicated sufficient gyroscopic stability and acceptable impact dispersion could be realized by optimizing second/third stage separation time. By flying an unguided third stage motor, significant program cost savings were realized. One flight test and two operational missions demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing gyroscopic stability to achieve satisfactory trajectory dispersion on a high performance rocket. A detailed assessment of the major dispersion contributors identified for the first three BBX missions is presented, offering important insight into the dispersion sensitivity of unguided, spin-stabilized flight.

  13. The General Fishbone Like Dispersion Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Motivation and outline * Fundamental equations * The collisionless gyrokinetic equation * Vorticity equation * Quasi-neutrality condition * Perpendicular Ampère's law * Studying collective modes in burning plasmas * Ideal plasma equilibrium in the low-β limit * Approximations for the energetic population * Characteristic frequencies of particle motions * Alfvén wave frequency and wavelength orderings * Applications of the general theoretical framework * The general fishbone like dispersion relation * Properties of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Derivation of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Special cases of the fishbone like dispersion relation * Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE) * Alfvén Cascades * Summary and discussions * Acknowledgments * References

  14. Chromatic dispersion control in photonic crystal fibers: application to ultra-flattened dispersion.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Koshiba, M; Hasegawa, T; Sasaoka, E

    2003-04-21

    In order to control dispersion and dispersion slope of indexguiding photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), a new controlling technique of chromatic dispersion in PCF is reported. Moreover, our technique is applied to design PCF with both ultra-low dispersion and ultra-flattened dispersion in wide wavelength range. A full-vector finite element method with anisotropic perfectly matched layers is used to analyze the dispersion properties and the confinement losses in a PCF with finite number of air holes. It is shown from numerical results that it is possible to design a fourring PCF with flattened dispersion of 0 +/- 0.5 ps/(km.nm) from 1.19 m to 1.69 m wavelength range and a five-ring PCF with flattened dispersion of 0 +/- 0.4 ps/(km.nm) from 1.23 m to 1.72 m wavelength range.

  15. A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. S.; Morawska, L.

    This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

  16. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  17. Personality-dependent dispersal cancelled under predation risk.

    PubMed

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Tymen, Blaise; Sih, Andrew; Brodin, Tomas

    2013-12-22

    Dispersal is a fundamental life-history trait for many ecological processes. Recent studies suggest that dispersers, in comparison to residents, display various phenotypic specializations increasing their dispersal inclination or success. Among them, dispersers are believed to be consistently more bold, exploratory, asocial or aggressive than residents. These links between behavioural types and dispersal should vary with the cause of dispersal. However, with the exception of one study, personality-dependent dispersal has not been studied in contrasting environments. Here, we used mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to test whether personality-dependent dispersal varies with predation risk, a factor that should induce boldness or sociability-dependent dispersal. Corroborating previous studies, we found that dispersing mosquitofish are less social than non-dispersing fish when there was no predation risk. However, personality-dependent dispersal is negated under predation risk, dispersers having similar personality types to residents. Our results suggest that adaptive dispersal decisions could commonly depend on interactions between phenotypes and ecological contexts.

  18. Chromatic dispersion monitoring in electronic dispersion equalizers using tapped delay lines.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingwen; Buchali, Fred; Chen, Wei; Shieh, William

    2007-01-22

    We propose a chromatic dispersion monitoring technique by analyzing the tap coefficients in electronic dispersion equalizers using tapped delay lines without needing additional hardware. This technique is robust to varying optical signal-to-noise ratio. The successful chromatic dispersion monitoring is demonstrated by simulation and experiment.

  19. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  20. Hominoid dispersal patterns and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Andreas; Borries, Carola

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in DNA and isotope analyses have allowed tentative reconstructions of dispersal strategies of Plio-Pleistocene hominins.(1,2) Comparing their findings to dispersal patterns of some extant apes and humans suggested groups of related males and unrelated females in Neandertals indicating patrilocality(2) and Pan-like male philopatry in australopiths.(1) Here we review the demographic, ethnographic, and genetic evidence of dispersal patterns in extant apes and humans and compare the results to the suggestions for Plio-Pleistocene hominins. We find that alternative dispersal patterns, for example among gorillas or gibbons, could explain the findings of related or natal males in a confined geographic area. Based on sexual size dimorphism, we speculate that gorillas might currently be the best model for reconstructing dispersal in robust australopiths. Given that the sexual size dimorphism in other australopiths is still hotly debated, the question of which hominoid model best matches their dispersal pattern must remain unanswered. Neandertal dispersal patterns have been compared to patrilocality of modern humans. However, the latter is related to the advent of food production. Consequently, hunter-gatherers exhibiting primarily multilocality appear to be the better comparison for Neandertals. Overall, human-like patrilocality and Pan-like male philopatry appear to be poor models for the reconstruction of dispersal patterns in Plio-Pleistocene hominins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A method of measuring crystal birefringence dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Suslikov, L.M.; Khazitarkhanov, Y.A.; Gad`mashi, Z.P.

    1994-07-01

    A method of measuring crystal birefringence dispersion is considered that is based on analysis of evolution of the birefringent interference spectrum depending on the angle between the light beam and optic axis of the crystal. Results of measuring the birefringence dispersion of layered Cs{sub 3}Sb{sub 2}Br{sub 9} crystals are presented. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  3. Employee Attitudes in a Dispersed Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Larry

    1976-01-01

    Defines dispersion as the degree to which the membership of an organization is spatially distributed and contends that employees' attitudes within an organization are affected by their employment level and the relative level of dispersion of their work location. (Available from the Journal of Applied Communications Research, Ed., Drawer NJ,…

  4. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS ON OIL SPILLS - EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a dispersant is applied to an oil slick, its effectiveness in dispersing the spilled oil depends on various factors such as oil properties, wave mixing energy, temperature of both oil and water, and salinity of the water. Estuaries represent water with varying salinities. In...

  5. DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS ON OIL SPILLS - EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When a dispersant is applied to an oil slick, its effectiveness in dispersing the spilled oil depends on various factors such as oil properties, wave mixing energy, temperature of both oil and water, and salinity of the water. Estuaries represent water with varying salinities. In...

  6. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant-animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous vertebrates. Even though plant reproduction largely depends on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurr...

  7. On the dispersion of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Bashir, M. F.; Elfimov, A. G.; Yagi, M.; Miyato, N.

    2016-05-15

    The problem of dispersion of geodesic acoustic modes is revisited with two different methods for the solution of the kinetic equation. The dispersive corrections to the mode frequency are calculated by including the m = 2 poloidal harmonics. Our obtained results agree with some earlier results but differ in various ways with other previous works. Limitations and advantages of different approaches are discussed.

  8. Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blends of ascarosides regulate dispersal in nematodes Presenter: Dr. Fatma Kaplan Dispersal is an important behavior for many organisms. It can easily be observed when infectious juveniles of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernema and Heterorhabditis) leave a consumed insect host. Dauer larvae of ...

  9. Interspecific nematode signals regulate dispersal behavior

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective ...

  10. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of app...

  11. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  12. Intermolecular forces: a solution to dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ken D

    2013-12-01

    London dispersion forces have been cited as an important factor in protein folding, drug–receptor interactions, and catalyst selectivities. However, careful analysis of a model system finds that the dispersion interactions are only minor contributors to the formation of complexes in solution.

  13. Stable aqueous film coating dispersion of zein.

    PubMed

    Guo, H X; Heinämäki, J; Yliruusi, J

    2008-06-15

    The effects of plasticizers, pH, and electrolytes on film formation and physical stability of aqueous film coating dispersions (pseudolatexes) of zein were evaluated. The influence of plasticizer on film formation mechanism and minimum film-formation temperature (MFT) were monitored by means of hot stage microscopy (HSM). Furthermore, the effects of pH and electrolytes on the short-term physical stability of pseudolatexes were investigated by measuring relative absorbance, zeta potential, and particle size of the dispersions. With aqueous coating dispersions of zein, stages of film formation were identified. The dispersions plasticized with 20% (w/w) PEG 400 or glycerol formed mechanically strong and flexible films with the lowest glass transition temperature (T(g)). Physical stability of the aqueous zein dispersions was dependent on both pH and electrolyte content. At a pH ranging from 3 to 4, the aqueous dispersions of zein were stable for at least 2 months exhibiting the highest values for zeta potential, the smallest particle size, and a low volume of aggregates. The stable dispersion could be obtained containing a lower concentration of electrolytes (e.g., 10(-5) M). The physical stability of aqueous zein dispersions can be determined by the combined measurements of relative absorbance, zeta potential, and particle size.

  14. Are western juniper seeds dispersed through diplochory?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed dispersal of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis) appears to be convergent on a strategy utilized by fruit-bearing trees in that this conifer produces fleshy female cones (a.k.a., juniper “berries”) that are consumed by frugivorous birds, which then disperse the seeds through endozoochory b...

  15. An atmospheric dispersion index for prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    Leonidas G. Lavdas

    1986-01-01

    A numerical index that estimates the atmosphere's capacity to disperse smoke from prescribed burning is described. The physical assumptions and mathematical development of the index are given in detail. A preliminary interpretation of dispersion index values is offered. A FORTRAN subroutine package for computing the index is included.

  16. Airflow and dispersion around multiple buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S T; Lee, R L; Leone, J M., Jr.; Stevens, D E

    1999-02-01

    A three dimensional, finite element-based, flow and dispersion model is used to simulate the transport and fate of hazardous releases in the atmosphere. Numerical results are presented for two experimental studies: (1) Airflow and dispersion over multiple blocks in a wind tunnel; and (2) Tracer study of a point release in the neighborhood of a building complex.

  17. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of app...

  18. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Peanut Flour Dispersions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rheological behaviors of aqueous peanut flour dispersions were characterized across a range of conditions, including controlled heating and cooling rates under both large and small-strain deformations. Fat content of the dry flours influenced rheological changes, as dispersions of higher fat fl...

  19. Dispersing carbon nanotubes by chiral network surfactants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pengcheng; Cong, Yuehua; Zhang, Baoyan

    2015-04-01

    Chiral network surfactants (CNSs) possessing miscibility with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chiral materials are applied to disperse CNTs. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy is used to quantitatively determine the CNT concentration in homogeneous CNT-CNS dispersions, results indicate that CNSs with more mole fraction of polycyclic conjugated structure have better ability to load and disperse CNTs and the maximal concentration reaches 0.79 mg mL(-1). Fourier transform infrared imaging system is utilized to analyze the dispersibility of CNTs in CNT-CNS composites, and CNS with 6 mol % nonmesogens (S6) induces the best dispersibility. The CNT doped CNSs exhibit lower glass transition temperature, strengthened thermal stability, decreased the thermochromic temperature and enriched reflected colors of CNSs. Furthermore, S6 are used as a promoter to disperse CNTs in chiral host, here, a left-handed chiral liquid crystal (CLC) is selected, the miscibility between CNTs and CLCs is studied by polarized optical microscope, and CNTs can be effectively dispersed in CLCs by S6. The CNT dispersed CLCs can exhibit a faster electro-optical response process than neat CLCs.

  20. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Long-Distance Dispersal of Fungi.

    PubMed

    Golan, Jacob J; Pringle, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Dispersal is a fundamental biological process, operating at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Despite an increasing understanding of fungal biodiversity, most research on fungal dispersal focuses on only a small fraction of species. Thus, any discussion of the dispersal dynamics of fungi as a whole is problematic. While abundant morphological and biogeographic data are available for hundreds of species, researchers have yet to integrate this information into a unifying paradigm of fungal dispersal, especially in the context of long-distance dispersal (LDD). Fungal LDD is mediated by multiple vectors, including meteorological phenomena (e.g., wind and precipitation), plants (e.g., seeds and senesced leaves), animals (e.g., fur, feathers, and gut microbiomes), and in many cases humans. In addition, fungal LDD is shaped by both physical constraints on travel and the ability of spores to survive harsh environments. Finally, fungal LDD is commonly measured in different ways, including by direct capture of spores, genetic comparisons of disconnected populations, and statistical modeling and simulations of dispersal data. To unify perspectives on fungal LDD, we propose a synthetic three-part definition that includes (i) an identification of the source population and a measure of the concentration of source inoculum and (ii) a measured and/or modeled dispersal kernel. With this information, LDD is defined as (iii) the distance found within the dispersal kernel beyond which only 1% of spores travel.

  2. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  3. Faraday Dispersion Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Akahori, Takuya; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  4. QT Dispersion after Thrombolytic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oni Heris, Saeed; Rahimi, Behzad; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Hajahmadi, Mojgan; Sayyadi, Hojjat; Naghipour, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: QT dispersion (QTd) is equal to longer QTc minus shorter QTc measured by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). QTd reflects inhomogeneity in repolarization of ventricular myocardium and because of easy and fast measurement of QTd, it can be used to predict high-risk patients for dysrhythmia after Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI). Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of thrombolytic therapy on QTd before and 1 hour and 4 days after beginning of thrombolytic therapy. Patients and Methods: The patients with chest pain and ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) that underwent thrombolytic therapy were enrolled into this study. Streptokinase was the thrombolytic agent in all the patients. Standard 12-lead (ECG) was evaluated before beginning of thrombolytic therapy (QTd 1) and 1 hour (QTd2) and 4 days (QTd3) after thrombolytic therapy. First, ECG was magnified × 10 for exact calculation of QT and QTd. After all, the variables were compared using one–way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Besides, P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: This study was conducted on 160 patients. The results revealed no significant differences among QTd 1, QTd 2, and QTd 3 (P > 0.05). At inferior AMI, however, a significant difference was observed among QTd1, QTd2, and QTd3 (P = 0.031). Conclusions: Thrombolytic therapy had no significant effects on QTd. Thus, thrombolytic therapy does not increase the risk of arrhythmia. PMID:25614860

  5. Dispersive internal long wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Holm, D.D.; Levermore, C.D.; Lvov, Y.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work is a joint analytical and numerical study of internal dispersive water wave propagation in a stratified two-layer fluid, a problem that has important geophysical fluid dynamics applications. Two-layer models can capture the main density-dependent effects because they can support, unlike homogeneous fluid models, the observed large amplitude internal wave motion at the interface between layers. The authors have derived new model equations using multiscale asymptotics in combination with the method they have developed for vertically averaging velocity and vorticity fields across fluid layers within the original Euler equations. The authors have found new exact conservation laws for layer-mean vorticity that have exact counterparts in the models. With this approach, they have derived a class of equations that retain the full nonlinearity of the original Euler equations while preserving the simplicity of known weakly nonlinear models, thus providing the theoretical foundation for experimental results so far unexplained.

  6. Dispersion dynamics of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Burghoff, David; Yang, Yang; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2016-12-20

    A key parameter underlying the efficacy of any nonlinear optical process is group velocity dispersion. In quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), there have been several recent demonstrations of devices exploiting nonlinearities in both the mid-infrared and the terahertz. Though the gain of QCLs has been well studied, the dispersion has been much less investigated, and several questions remain about its dynamics and precise origin. In this work, we use time-domain spectroscopy to investigate the dispersion of broadband terahertz QCLs, and demonstrate that contributions from both the material and the intersubband transitions are relevant. We show that in contrast to the laser gain—which is clamped to a fixed value above lasing threshold—the dispersion changes with bias even above threshold, which is a consequence of shifting intersubband populations. In conclusion, we also examine the role of higher-order dispersion in QCLs and discuss the ramifications of our result for devices utilizing nonlinear effects, such as frequency combs.

  7. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  8. Rheological behaviour of heated potato starch dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszczak, L.; Witczak, M.; Ziêba, T.; Fortuna, T.

    2012-10-01

    The study was designed to investigate the rheological properties of heated potato starch dispersions. Water suspensions of starch were heated at 65, 80 or 95°C for 5, 15, 30 or 60 min. The dispersions obtained were examined for granule size distribution and rheology. It was found that the starch dispersions significantly differed in both respects. The mean diameters of starch granules were largest for the dispersion heated at 65°C and smallest for that heated at 95°C. As the heating temperature was raised, the yield stresses and consistency coefficients decreased, while the flow behaviour indexes and Casson plastic viscosities increased. There were also differences in the viscoelastic properties of the dispersions: for those heated at 65°C the storage and loss moduli increased with heating time whereas for those heated at 80°C both moduli decreased.

  9. Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2010-09-13

    We propose a silicon strip/slot hybrid waveguide that produces flattened dispersion of 0 ± 16 ps/(nm∙km), over a 553-nm wavelength range, which is 20 times flatter than previous results. Different from previously reported slot waveguides, the strip/slot hybrid waveguide employs the mode transition from a strip mode to a slot mode to introduce unique waveguide dispersion. The flat dispersion profile is featured by three zero-dispersion wavelengths, which is obtained for the first time in on-chip silicon waveguides, to the best of our knowledge. The waveguide exhibits flattened dispersion from 1562-nm to 2115-nm wavelength, which is potentially useful for both telecom and mid-infrared applications.

  10. Surface dispersion in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Sansón, L.

    2015-09-01

    Surface dispersion is measured in the Gulf of California by means of Argos drifters released along this semi-enclosed, elongated basin. First, basic one-particle statistics (Lagrangian scales, absolute dispersion and diffusion coefficients) are estimated along and across the Gulf. Absolute dispersion shows a nearly ballistic regime during the Lagrangian time scale (<2 days) in both directions (it grows as ∼t2, where t is time). During the subsequent 30 days, absolute dispersion enters a random-walk regime (∼t) along the Gulf, while being saturated across the basin due to the lateral boundaries. Secondly, the analysis is extended to two-particle statistics (relative dispersion between pairs of drifters and Finite Scale Lyapunov Exponents, FSLE). Relative dispersion is nearly exponential in both directions during the first few days, though evidence is not conclusive. During the subsequent 30 days, it grows as ∼t1.5 along the Gulf, while being saturated across the basin again. It is shown that relative dispersion along the Gulf is proportional to t̂3 , where t ̂ represents a shifted time that depends on the initial separation of the particles. This form of the Richardson regime is consistently measured for particles that are sufficiently separated (30 km or more). The Richardson regime is verified with the FSLE for particle separations ranging from 30 to 140 km, approximately. The obtained dispersion properties are discussed in terms of the main circulation features within the basin, such as mesoscale vortices that occupy the width of the Gulf. These structures might retain buoys during days or weeks, thus preventing or delaying further displacements and therefore affecting the particle dispersion. The vortices are also an important mechanism to translate particles across the Gulf, between the Peninsula and the continent, thus promoting the saturation of dispersion along this direction.

  11. Diurnal and nocturnal visual capabilities in shorebirds as a function of their feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Rojas, L M; McNeil, R; Cabana, T; Lachapelle, P

    1999-01-01

    Some shorebird species forage with the same feeding strategy at night and during daytime, e.g. visual pecking in the Wilson's Plover (Charadrius wilsonia) or tactile probing in the Short-billed Dowitcher (Limnodromus griseus). The American Woodcock (Scolopax minor) uses tactile probing, by day and by night, but sometimes pecks for insects during daytime. The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) is a visual pecker, both by day and by night, and sometimes forages tactilely on windy (agitated water surface) moonless nights. Territorial Willets (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) are visual peckers during daylight and on moonlight conditions but switch to tactile feeding under lower light conditions. It could be postulated that some shorebird species would switch from visual feeding during daytime to tactile foraging at night because they have poor night vision compared to species that are always sight foragers irrespective of the time of the day. This issue was examined by comparing retinal structure and function in the above species. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were obtained at different light intensities from anesthetized birds, and the retinae were processed for histological observations. Based on ERGs, retinal sensitivity, and rod:cone ratios, both plovers and stilts are well adapted for nocturnal vision. Although they have low rod density compared to that of stilts and plovers, Willets and woodcocks have a scotopic retinal sensitivity similar to that of stilts and plovers but rank midway between plovers and dowitchers for the b-wave amplitude. Dowitchers have the lowest scotopic b-wave amplitude and retinal sensitivity and appear the least well adapted for night vision. Based on photopic ERGs and cone densities, although stilts, Willets and dowitchers appear as well adapted for daytime vision, plovers occupy the last rank of all species examined. Compared to the nighttime tactile feeders and those that switch from daytime visual pecking to tactile feeding at night

  12. Relative bioavailability of deferasirox tablets administered without dispersion and dispersed in various drinks.

    PubMed

    Séchaud, R; Dutreix, C; Balez, S; Pommier, F; Dumortier, T; Morisson, S; Brun, E

    2008-02-01

    Deferasirox (ExjadeA, ICL670) is a new, once-daily oral iron chelator, recently approved as first-line therapy in the treatment of iron overload resulting from blood transfusions. In registration studies, deferasirox tablets were dispersed in non-carbonated water prior to administration. In routine clinical practice, however, patients may prefer to take the tablet dispersed in a flavored drink rather than with water. Stability and compatibility tests were performed to identify beverages suitable for the dispersion of tablets for further testing in man. This was followed by a pharmacokinetic study to assess the relative bioavailability of deferasirox tablets dispersed in two types of soft drinks, dispersed in water, and without dispersion. An open-label, randomized, 4-period, crossover study was carried out with 28 healthy volunteers who received single 20 mg/kg oral doses of deferasirox without dispersion, dispersed in orange juice, dispersed in apple juice and dispersed in non-carbonated water (reference). Deferasirox and Fe-[deferasirox]2 were measured in plasma using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared using standard bioequivalence tests. Mean deferasirox AUC0-t were 1,040 A+/- 530, 1,010 A+/- 278, 882 A+/- 252 and 996 A+/- 352 h x micromol/l when deferasirox tablets were administered without dispersion, dispersed in orange juice, dispersed in apple juice and dispersed in water, respectively, indicating that these forms of deferasirox administrations met bioequivalence criteria. Therefore, the oral bioavailability of deferasirox tablets was not affected neither by the degree of dispersion nor by the type of drink (orange or apple juice versus water) used for dispersion. This study shows that deferasirox bioavailability is unaltered when dispersed with orange or apple juice compared with dispersion in water. Thus, in addition to water, patients have the option of taking deferasirox tablets in orange or apple juice

  13. Modulation instability in the weak dispersion regime of a dispersion modulated passive fiber-ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Trillo, Stefano; Mussot, Arnaud

    2017-05-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the modulation instability process in a dispersion oscillating passive fiber-ring resonator in the low dispersion region. Generally, the modulation of the dispersion along the cavity length is responsible for the emergence of a regime characterised by multiple parametric resonances (or Faraday instabilities). We show that, under weak dispersion conditions, a huge number of Faraday sidebands can grow under the influence of fourth order dispersion. We specifically designed a piecewise uniform fiber-ring cavity and report on experiments that confirm our theoretical predictions. We recorded the dynamics of this system revealing strong interactions between the different sidebands in agreement with numerical simulations.

  14. Fluctuating Concentrations in Atmospheric Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaull, George Ellis, III

    This thesis presents theoretical models and experimental results of average and instantaneous concentration measurements from a series of atmospheric dispersion experiments conducted under both unstable and stable meteorological conditions. The experiments were undertaken at two different sites, over both flat and gently rolling terrain. Two types of surface -level point aerosol sources were used. One is a fog-oil smoke and the other is a hexachloroethane chemical smoke. Measurements of concentration at points along crosswind transects were taken over time periods of an hour at distances to several kilometers from the source. These measurements included both aerosol photometer records of the instantaneous concentration taken at a 1 Hz sampling rate and aspirated filters for mean concentration measurements. The flat terrain site was located at Camp Atterbury, Indiana, while the gently rolling terrain site was near Red Bluff, California. Meteorological measurements at these sites included both tower measurements and upper -air balloon soundings. These measurements were used in determining the atmospheric boundary layer scaling parameters in the unstable tests and in characterizing the complex wind field for the stable tests. The data compare favorably with developed models for both the mean and variance in concentration. Concentration fluctuation intensity ranges from 2 near the plume centerline to greater than 20 at the plume edge. Intermittency is important at all locations, with positive concentrations recorded on the mean plume centerline only 20% to 50% of the time. Point concentration histograms are shown to agree with the exponential distribution for concentrations greater than zero. Spectra of the concentration data show an inertial -convective subrange with a -5/3 power law versus frequency behavior. Integral time scales of the concentration records at all individual sampling points are approximately constant within a test and are equal to the mean duration

  15. Dispersal syndromes and the use of life-histories to predict dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Virginie M; Trochet, Audrey; Blanchet, Simon; Moulherat, Sylvain; Clobert, Jean; Baguette, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Due to its impact on local adaptation, population functioning or range shifts, dispersal is considered a central process for population persistence and species evolution. However, measuring dispersal is complicated, which justifies the use of dispersal proxies. Although appealing, and despite its general relationship with dispersal, body size has however proven unsatisfactory as a dispersal proxy. Our hypothesis here is that, given the existence of dispersal syndromes, suites of life-history traits may be alternative, more appropriate proxies for dispersal. We tested this idea by using butterflies as a model system. We demonstrate that different elements of the dispersal process (i.e., individual movement rates, distances, and gene flow) are correlated with different suites of life-history traits: these various elements of dispersal form separate syndromes and must be considered real axes of a species' niche. We then showed that these syndromes allowed accurate predictions of dispersal. The use of life-history traits improved the precision of the inferences made from wing size alone by up to five times. Such trait-based predictions thus provided reliable dispersal inferences that can feed simulation models aiming at investigating the dynamics and evolution of butterfly populations, and possibly of other organisms, under environmental changes, to help their conservation. PMID:23789030

  16. Seed dispersal by pulp consumers, not "legitimate" seed dispersers, increases Guettarda viburnoides population growth.

    PubMed

    Loayza, Andrea P; Knight, Tiffany

    2010-09-01

    We examined the effect of seed dispersal by Purplish Jays (Cyanocorax cyanomelas; pulp consumers) and the Chestnut-eared Araçari (Pteroglossus castanotis; "legitimate" seed dispersers) on population growth of the small tree Guettarda viburnoides (Rubiaceae) in northeastern Bolivian savannas. Because each bird species differs with respect to feeding and post-feeding behavior, we hypothesized that seed dispersal by each species will contribute differently to the rate of increase of G. viburnoides, but that seed dispersal by either species will increase population growth when compared to a scenario with no seed dispersal. To examine the effects of individual dispersers on the future population size of G. viburnoides, we projected population growth rate using demographic models for G. viburnoides that explicitly incorporate data on quantitative and qualitative aspects of seed dispersal by each frugivore species. Our model suggests that seed dispersal by C. cyanomelas leads to positive population growth of G. viburnoides, whereas seed dispersal by P. castanotis has a detrimental effect on the population growth of this species. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report negative effects of a "legitimate" seed disperser on the population dynamics of the plant it consumes. Our results stress the importance of incorporating frugivore effects into population projection matrices, to allow a comprehensive analysis of the effectiveness of different dispersers for plant population dynamics.

  17. Evolution of dispersal under a fecundity-dispersal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Weigang, Helene C; Kisdi, Éva

    2015-04-21

    Resources invested in dispersal structures as well as time and energy spent during transfer may often decrease fecundity. Here we analyse an extended version of the Hamilton-May model of dispersal evolution, where we include a fecundity-dispersal trade-off and also mortality between competition and reproduction. With adaptive dynamics and critical function analysis we investigate the evolution of dispersal strategies and ask whether adaptive diversification is possible. We exclude evolutionary branching for concave trade-offs and show that for convex trade-offs diversification is promoted in a narrow parameter range. We provide theoretical evidence that dispersal strategies can monotonically decrease with increasing survival during dispersal. Moreover, we illustrate the existence of two alternative attracting dispersal strategies. The model exhibits fold bifurcation points where slight changes in survival can lead to evolutionary catastrophes.

  18. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  19. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  20. Acorn dispersal estimated by radio-tracking.

    PubMed

    Pons, Josep; Pausas, Juli G

    2007-10-01

    Bird-dispersed seeds are difficult to track, especially in the case of long-distance dispersal events. To estimate the oak dispersal distance and the seed shadow generated by the European jay (Garrulus glandarius), we inserted radio-transmitters in 239 acorns, placed them in bird-feeders and then located them by radio-tracking. Using this methodology we located the exact caching site of 94 Quercus ilex and 54 Q. suber acorns and determined the caching habitat characteristics (vegetation type, distance, spatial distribution). The results show that: (1) there is no differences in the dispersal distance distribution between the different acorn species or sizes, (2) dispersal distances range from approximately 3 m up to approximately 550 m (mean = 68.6 m; median = 49.2 m), (3) recently abandoned fields and forest tracks were the sites preferred by jays to cache acorns, whereas fields and shrublands were avoided and (4) seed shadows showed acorn aggregation zones (i.e. clusters of caches) close to the feeder as well as isolated caches at longer distances. The results also suggest that radio-transmitters are a cheap and reliable way to determine seed shadows and quantify both seed dispersal and post-dispersal seed predation for medium to large seeds.

  1. Individual dispersal, landscape connectivity and ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Baguette, Michel; Blanchet, Simon; Legrand, Delphine; Stevens, Virginie M; Turlure, Camille

    2013-05-01

    Connectivity is classically considered an emergent property of landscapes encapsulating individuals' flows across space. However, its operational use requires a precise understanding of why and how organisms disperse. Such movements, and hence landscape connectivity, will obviously vary according to both organism properties and landscape features. We review whether landscape connectivity estimates could gain in both precision and generality by incorporating three fundamental outcomes of dispersal theory. Firstly, dispersal is a multi-causal process; its restriction to an 'escape reaction' to environmental unsuitability is an oversimplification, as dispersing individuals can leave excellent quality habitat patches or stay in poor-quality habitats according to the relative costs and benefits of dispersal and philopatry. Secondly, species, populations and individuals do not always react similarly to those cues that trigger dispersal, which sometimes results in contrasting dispersal strategies. Finally, dispersal is a major component of fitness and is thus under strong selective pressures, which could generate rapid adaptations of dispersal strategies. Such evolutionary responses will entail spatiotemporal variation in landscape connectivity. We thus strongly recommend the use of genetic tools to: (i) assess gene flow intensity and direction among populations in a given landscape; and (ii) accurately estimate landscape features impacting gene flow, and hence landscape connectivity. Such approaches will provide the basic data for planning corridors or stepping stones aiming at (re)connecting local populations of a given species in a given landscape. This strategy is clearly species- and landscape-specific. But we suggest that the ecological network in a given landscape could be designed by stacking up such linkages designed for several species living in different ecosystems. This procedure relies on the use of umbrella species that are representative of other species

  2. Characterizing SWCNT Dispersion in Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke; Park, Cheol

    2007-01-01

    The new wave of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) infused composites will yield structurally sound multifunctional nanomaterials. The SWCNT network requires thorough dispersion within the polymer matrix in order to maximize the benefits of the nanomaterial. However, before any nanomaterials can be used in aerospace applications a means of quality assurance and quality control must be certified. Quality control certification requires a means of quantification, however, the measurement protocol mandates a method of seeing the dispersion first. We describe here the new tools that we have developed and implemented to first be able to see carbon nanotubes in polymers and second to measure or quantify the dispersion of the nanotubes.

  3. Dispersion Method Using Focused Ultrasonic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungsoon Kim,; Moojoon Kim,; Kanglyel Ha,; Minchul Chu,

    2010-07-01

    The dispersion of powders into liquids has become one of the most important techniques in high-tech industries and it is a common process in the formulation of various products, such as paint, ink, shampoo, beverages, and polishing media. In this study, an ultrasonic system with a cylindrical transducer is newly introduced for pure nanoparticle dispersion. The acoustics pressure field and the characteristics of the shock pulse caused by cavitation are investigated. The frequency spectrum of the pulse from the collapse of air bubbles in the cavitation is analyzed theoretically. It was confirmed that a TiO2 water suspension can be dispersed effectively using the suggested system.

  4. Plasma Dispersion Function for the Kappa Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma dispersion function is computed for a homogeneous isotropic plasma in which the particle velocities are distributed according to a Kappa distribution. An ordinary differential equation is derived for the plasma dispersion function and it is shown that the solution can be written in terms of Gauss' hypergeometric function. Using the extensive theory of the hypergeometric function, various mathematical properties of the plasma dispersion function are derived including symmetry relations, series expansions, integral representations, and closed form expressions for integer and half-integer values of K.

  5. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D.; Cahill, P.A.

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  6. An expert system for dispersion model interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Skyllingstad, E.D.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1988-10-01

    A prototype expert system designed to diagnose dispersion model uncertainty is described in this paper with application to a puff transport model. The system obtains qualitative information from the model user and through an expert-derived knowledge base, performs a rating of the current simulation. These results can then be used in combination with dispersion model output for deciding appropriate evacuation measures. Ultimately, the goal of this work is to develop an expert system that may be operated accurately by an individual uneducated in meteorology or dispersion modeling. 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Physical models of polarization mode dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Menyuk, C.R.; Wai, P.K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of randomly varying birefringence on light propagation in optical fibers is studied theoretically in the parameter regime that will be used for long-distance communications. In this regime, the birefringence is large and varies very rapidly in comparison to the nonlinear and dispersive scale lengths. We determine the polarization mode dispersion, and we show that physically realistic models yield the same result for polarization mode dispersion as earlier heuristic models that were introduced by Poole. We also prove an ergodic theorem.

  8. Dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in dispersant-seawater-sediment systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Fu, Jie; Cai, Zhengqing; O'Reilly, S E; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-08-15

    This work examined effects of model oil dispersants on dispersion, sorption and photodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in simulated marine systems. Three dispersants (Corexit 9500A, Corexit 9527A and SPC 1000) were used to prepare dispersed water accommodated oil (DWAO). While higher doses of dispersants dispersed more n-alkanes and PAHs, Corexit 9500A preferentially dispersed C11-C20 n-alkanes, whereas Corexit 9527A was more favorable for smaller alkanes (C10-C16), and SPC 1000 for C12-C28 n-alkanes. Sorption of petroleum hydrocarbons on sediment was proportional to TPH types/fractions in the DWAOs. Addition of 18mg/L of Corexit 9500A increased sediment uptake of 2-3 ring PAHs, while higher dispersant doses reduced the uptake, due to micelle-enhanced solubilization effects. Both dispersed n-alkanes and PAHs were susceptible to photodegradation under simulated sunlight. For PAHs, both photodegradation and photo-facilitated alkylation were concurrently taking place. The information can facilitate sounder assessment of fate and distribution of dispersed oil hydrocarbons in marine systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimisation of dispersion parameters of Gaussian plume model for CO₂ dispersion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Lu, Cheng; Michal, Guillaume; Venton, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects entail the possibility of accidental release of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere. To quantify the spread of CO2 following such release, the 'Gaussian' dispersion model is often used to estimate the resulting CO2 concentration levels in the surroundings. The Gaussian model enables quick estimates of the concentration levels. However, the traditionally recommended values of the 'dispersion parameters' in the Gaussian model may not be directly applicable to CO2 dispersion. This paper presents an optimisation technique to obtain the dispersion parameters in order to achieve a quick estimation of CO2 concentration levels in the atmosphere following CO2 blowouts. The optimised dispersion parameters enable the Gaussian model to produce quick estimates of CO2 concentration levels, precluding the necessity to set up and run much more complicated models. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were employed to produce reference CO2 dispersion profiles in various atmospheric stability classes (ASC), different 'source strengths' and degrees of ground roughness. The performance of the CFD models was validated against the 'Kit Fox' field measurements, involving dispersion over a flat horizontal terrain, both with low and high roughness regions. An optimisation model employing a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the best dispersion parameters in the Gaussian plume model was set up. Optimum values of the dispersion parameters for different ASCs that can be used in the Gaussian plume model for predicting CO2 dispersion were obtained.

  10. Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Karen E; Stamps, Judy A

    2007-01-01

    During natal dispersal, young animals leave their natal area and search for a new area to live. In species in which individuals inhabit different types of habitat, experience with a natal habitat may increase the probability that a disperser will select the same type of habitat post-dispersal (natal habitat preference induction or NHPI). Despite considerable interest in the ecological and the evolutionary implications of NHPI, we lack empirical evidence that it occurs in nature. Here we show that dispersing brush mice (Peromyscus boylii) are more likely to search and settle within their natal habitat type than expected based on habitat availability. These results document the occurrence of NHPI in nature and highlight the relevance of experience-generated habitat preferences for ecological and evolutionary processes. PMID:18077253

  11. The Flying Sunflower: A Seed Dispersal Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buege, Douglas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an open-ended activity in which students build a "plant" that launches its seeds as far as possible to study the dispersal strategies of various plants. Recommends extension activities for elementary- and secondary-level students. (WRM)

  12. PROBABILISTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersion models are used to assess the possible extent and severity of accidental or terrorist releases of toxic materials. Most operational models only provide a characterization of average concentrations and conditions following a release. Knowledge of the variability about...

  13. Sex-biased dispersal of human ancestors.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru

    2017-07-01

    Some anthropologists and primatologists have argued that, judging by extant chimpanzees and humans, which are female-biased dispersers, the common ancestors of humans and chimpanzees were also female-biased dispersers. It has been thought that sex-biased dispersal patterns have been genetically transmitted for millions of years. However, this character has changed many times with changes in environment and life-form during human evolution and historical times. I examined life-form and social organization of nonhuman primates, among them gatherers (foragers), hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, industrialists, and modern and extant humans. I conclude that dispersal patterns changed in response to environmental conditions during primate and human evolution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. London Dispersion Forces and "The Wave"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, C. Jayne

    1998-10-01

    An analogy is presented likening London dispersion forces to "The Wave", a popular ritual performed by fans attending sports events in large stadia. Similarities between people in the stands and electrons in atoms are emphasized.

  15. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  16. PROBABILISTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dispersion models are used to assess the possible extent and severity of accidental or terrorist releases of toxic materials. Most operational models only provide a characterization of average concentrations and conditions following a release. Knowledge of the variability about...

  17. Controlling Dispersion Characteristics of Terahertz Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Wu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Bao-Jie; Yi, Huan; Bai, Xue; Ng, Kung Bo; Chan, Chi Hou

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) metasurfaces have been explored recently due to their properties such as low material loss and ease of fabrication compared to three-dimensional (3D) metamaterials. Although the dispersion properties of the reflection/transmission-type THz metasurface were observed in some published literature, the method to control them at will has been scarcely reported to the best of our knowledge. In this context, flexible dispersion control of the THz metasurface will lead to great opportunities toward unprecedented THz devices. As an example, a THz metasurface with controllable dispersion characteristics has been successfully demonstrated in this article, and the incident waves at different frequencies from a source in front of the metasurface can be projected into different desired anomalous angular positions. Furthermore, this work provides a potential approach to other kinds of novel THz devices that need controllable metasurface dispersion properties. PMID:25797336

  18. Tackifier Dispersions to Make Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Development of new processes for tackifier dispersion could improve the production of pressure sensitive adhesives. Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) have the ability to adhere to different surfaces with manual or finger pressure.

  19. The Flying Sunflower: A Seed Dispersal Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buege, Douglas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an open-ended activity in which students build a "plant" that launches its seeds as far as possible to study the dispersal strategies of various plants. Recommends extension activities for elementary- and secondary-level students. (WRM)

  20. Controlling dispersion characteristics of terahertz metasurface.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Wu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Bao-Jie; Yi, Huan; Bai, Xue; Ng, Kung Bo; Chan, Chi Hou

    2015-03-23

    Terahertz (THz) metasurfaces have been explored recently due to their properties such as low material loss and ease of fabrication compared to three-dimensional (3D) metamaterials. Although the dispersion properties of the reflection/transmission-type THz metasurface were observed in some published literature, the method to control them at will has been scarcely reported to the best of our knowledge. In this context, flexible dispersion control of the THz metasurface will lead to great opportunities toward unprecedented THz devices. As an example, a THz metasurface with controllable dispersion characteristics has been successfully demonstrated in this article, and the incident waves at different frequencies from a source in front of the metasurface can be projected into different desired anomalous angular positions. Furthermore, this work provides a potential approach to other kinds of novel THz devices that need controllable metasurface dispersion properties.

  1. Relative dispersion in 2D stochastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piterbarg, L. I.

    We investigate the relative dispersion for two types of stochastic flows—Brownian flow (Kraichnan model) and a flow with memory (inertial particles). In the first case well-known asymptotics are rigorously derived for a self-similar spectrum of the velocity field by using a half-century-old Feller's theorem. Exact limits of the asymptotics and exact values for dimensionless constants are obtained. The second part of the paper addresses a relatively new object: the first-order Markov stochastic flow modelling inertial particle motion. Both local and non-local dynamics are investigated. In the first case an exact exponential asymptotic is obtained for the relative dispersion. In turn, two regimes are considered in the case of non-smooth forcing: weak and strong turbulence. For weak turbulence the obtained asymptotic of relative dispersion is similar to that of the Brownian flow. As for strong turbulence, an upper bound is obtained for the scaling of relative dispersion.

  2. Dispersion properties of x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccia, D.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S

    2006-04-20

    We study the propagation of ultrashort pulses in x-ray waveguides (WGs) by addressing the problem of the temporal dispersion. Starting from basic equations, by means of numerical calculation we demonstrate that far from the absorption edges of the WGs the cladding's material dispersion is negligible. However, close to the absorption edge significant dispersion can take place. This behavior could in principle be exploited to manipulate incoming chirped beams. Moreover, using the two coherent beams produced by the WG in the second (and higher) order of resonance suggests the use of the WC as a dispersion-free beam splitter, which can facilitate x-ray pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond temporal range without the need for external sources.

  3. Optical carrier wave shocking: detection and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, P; Radnor, S B P; Tyrrell, J C A; New, G H C

    2007-06-01

    Carrier wave shocking is studied using the pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) technique. We describe the shock detection diagnostics necessary for this numerical study and verify them against theoretical shocking predictions for the dispersionless case. These predictions show a carrier envelope phase and pulse bandwidth sensitivity in the single-cycle regime. The flexible dispersion management offered by the PSSD enables us to independently control the linear and nonlinear dispersion. Customized dispersion profiles allow us to analyze the development of both carrier self-steepening and shocks. The results exhibit a marked asymmetry between normal and anomalous dispersion, both in the limits of the shocking regime and in the (near) shocked pulse wave forms. Combining these insights, we offer some suggestions on how carrier shocking (or at least extreme self-steepening) might be realized experimentally.

  4. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  5. Dispersal and survival of a polygynandrous passerine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Heather R.; Kendall, Steve J.; Wild, Teri C.; Powell, Abby N.

    2015-01-01

    Although sex biases in survival and dispersal are thought to be linked to avian mating systems, little is known about these demographic patterns in less common mating strategies such as polygynandry. We investigated breeding-site fidelity, natal philopatry, and apparent survival of the polygynandrous Smith's Longspur (Calcarius pictus) over a 7-yr period at 2 areas in Alaska's Brooks Range. We used capture–recapture histories of 243 color-banded adults and 431 juveniles to estimate annual survival and determined dispersal patterns from 34 adults that were found breeding within the study areas over multiple years. Most adults (88%) returned to nest in the same breeding neighborhood as in previous years; mean dispersal distance was 300.9 ± 74.2 m and did not differ between sexes. Juveniles exhibited low natal philopatry; only 4% of banded hatch-year birds were resighted as adults during subsequent years. Those that did return dispersed, on average, 1,674.4 ± 465.8 m from their natal nests (n = 6). Model-averaged survival estimates indicated that annual survival of adult females (50–58%) was only slightly lower than that of males (60–63%); juvenile survival was 41% but was paired with a low (13%) encounter probability. We attribute the lack of sex bias in adult dispersal to this species' polygynandrous mating strategy. Within this system, there are multiple mates within a breeding neighborhood. We argue that natural selection may favor females that remain on the same, familiar breeding site, because they do not have to disperse to a new area to find a suitable mate. Dispersal among breeding populations most likely occurs by juveniles returning as adults. Our findings support hypotheses that suggest a relationship between dispersal and mating strategy and provide some of the first insight into the demographic patterns of a polygynandrous passerine.

  6. Dispersion Characteristics of a Dielectric Loaded Waveguide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-30

    NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOAODS-1963-A ., ’I A NSWC TR 84-338 00 In ’DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SDIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE By H. CROSBY J. CHOE Y...4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Dielectric Loaded Waveguide ) " Resonant Cavity) a

  7. Slow oscillations of dispersion-managed solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, H.; Boehm, M.; Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2010-03-15

    In dispersion-managed fibers, soliton-like solutions with periodically recurring shapes exist. These so called dispersion-managed solitons are relevant for fiber-optic telecommunication. In this article we address their behavior when there is deviation from the stationary solution, which is accompanied by the excitation of a long-lived periodic oscillation. We give a possible interpretation by applying soliton radiation beat analysis, a method capable of analyzing the soliton content.

  8. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments N. Ross...our understanding of the interaction of sound with the ocean bottom is the frequency dependence of sound speed and attenuation in marine sediments...The long term goals of this research project are related to the investigation of dispersion of sound speed and attenuation at low frequencies (< 2

  9. Interspecific Nematode Signals Regulate Dispersal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T.; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Ali, Jared G.; Akyazi, Faruk; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Edison, Arthur S.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Teal, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJ)s of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs. Methodology/Principal Findings Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9). A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9) and C. elegans (ascr#2) dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers. Conclusions/Significance Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes. PMID:22701701

  10. Alfven Wave Generated Electron Time Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Hu, S.

    2001-01-01

    The results from a model of kinetic Alfven waves which includes varying magnetic field and density show that time-dispersed bursts of auroral electrons can be accelerated by Alfven, wave pulses propagating from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. The modeled electron signatures have similar energy range and temporal structure to those observed on sounding rockets and satellites suggesting that electron time dispersion is generated by Alfven waves.

  11. Alfven Wave Generated Electron Time Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Hu, S.

    2001-01-01

    The results from a model of kinetic Alfven waves which includes varying magnetic field and density show that time-dispersed bursts of auroral electrons can be accelerated by Alfven, wave pulses propagating from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. The modeled electron signatures have similar energy range and temporal structure to those observed on sounding rockets and satellites suggesting that electron time dispersion is generated by Alfven waves.

  12. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  13. Dispersive radiation induced by shock waves in passive resonators.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Stefania; Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We show that passive Kerr resonators pumped close to zero dispersion wavelengths on the normal dispersion side can develop the resonant generation of linear waves driven by cavity (mixed dispersive-dissipative) shock waves. The resonance mechanism can be successfully described in the framework of the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation with higher-order dispersive terms. Substantial differences with radiation from cavity solitons and purely dispersive shock waves dispersion are highlighted.

  14. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of applications. For example, such models can be useful for evaluating the mitigation potential of roadside barriers in reducing near-road exposures and their associated adverse health effects. Two databases, a tracer field study and a wind tunnel study, provide measurements used in the development and/or validation of algorithms to simulate dispersion in the presence of noise barriers. The tracer field study was performed in Idaho Falls, ID, USA with a 6-m noise barrier and a finite line source in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The second study was performed in the meteorological wind tunnel at the US EPA and simulated line sources at different distances from a model noise barrier to capture the effect on emissions from individual lanes of traffic. In both cases, velocity and concentration measurements characterized the effect of the barrier on dispersion.This paper presents comparisons with the two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s ADMS model (ADMS-Urban). In R-LINE the physical features reveal

  15. Dispersal behavior of yellowjacket (Vespula germanica) queens.

    PubMed

    Masciocchi, Maité; Martinez, Andrés S; Pereira, Ana J; Villacide, José M; Corley, Juan C

    2016-06-30

    Understanding the factors that affect animal dispersal behavior is important from both fundamental and applied perspectives. Dispersal can have clear evolutionary and ecological consequences, but for nonnative insect pests, dispersal capacity can also help to explain invasion success. Vespula germanica is a social wasp that, in the last century, has successfully invaded several regions of the world, showing one of the highest spread rates reported for a nonnative insect. In contrast with nonsocial wasps, in social species, queens are responsible for population redistribution and spread, as workers are sterile. For V. germanica, it has been observed that queen flight is limited to 2 distinct periods: early autumn, when new queens leave the nest to mate and find sheltered places in which to hibernate, and spring when new colonies are founded. Our aim was to study the flight behavior of V. germanica queens by focusing on the different periods in which dispersal occurs, characterizing as well the potential contribution of queen flight (i.e., distance) to the observed geographical spread. Our results suggest that the distances flown by nonoverwintered queens is greater than that flown by overwintered individuals, suggesting that the main queen dispersal events would occur before queens enter hibernation. This could relate to a behavioral trait of the queens to avoid the inbreeding with related drones. Additionally, given the short distances flown and remarkable geographical spread observed, we provide evidence showing that queen dispersal by flight is likely to contribute proportionately less to population spread than human-aided factors.

  16. Quantification of statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Matthew; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of turbulent dispersions is of great importance for environmental and industrial applications. This includes developing a greater understanding of particle movement in atmospheric flows, and providing data that can be used to validate CFD models aimed at producing more accurate simulations of dispersed turbulent flows, aiding design of many industrial components. Statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. Experiments were carried out in a two dimensional channel over a Reynolds number range of 10000-30000, using water and 500 micron hydrogel particles. Particles were injected at the channel entrance, and dispersion properties were characterised at different distances downstream from the injection point. Probability density functions were compiled for the velocity components of the hydrogels for differing flow conditions. Higher order PDFs were constructed to investigate the behaviour of particle pairs. Dispersed phase data was also used to investigate the mechanics of collisions between hydrogel particles, allowing for calculation of the co-efficient of restitution. PIV algorithms were used to create velocity maps for the continuous phase for varying dispersed phase fractions. Thanks to support of Chevron grant as part of TMF consortium.

  17. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  19. Dispersive shock waves and modulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    There is growing physical and mathematical interest in the hydrodynamics of dissipationless/dispersive media. Since G.B. Whitham's seminal publication fifty years ago that ushered in the mathematical study of dispersive hydrodynamics, there has been a significant body of work in this area. However, there has been no comprehensive survey of the field of dispersive hydrodynamics. Utilizing Whitham's averaging theory as the primary mathematical tool, we review the rich mathematical developments over the past fifty years with an emphasis on physical applications. The fundamental, large scale, coherent excitation in dispersive hydrodynamic systems is an expanding, oscillatory dispersive shock wave or DSW. Both the macroscopic and microscopic properties of DSWs are analyzed in detail within the context of the universal, integrable, and foundational models for uni-directional (Korteweg-de Vries equation) and bi-directional (Nonlinear Schrödinger equation) dispersive hydrodynamics. A DSW fitting procedure that does not rely upon integrable structure yet reveals important macroscopic DSW properties is described. DSW theory is then applied to a number of physical applications: superfluids, nonlinear optics, geophysics, and fluid dynamics. Finally, we survey some of the more recent developments including non-classical DSWs, DSW interactions, DSWs in perturbed and inhomogeneous environments, and two-dimensional, oblique DSWs.

  20. Dispersing hemipteran vectors have reduced arbovirus prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy T.; Brown, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in managing vector-borne zoonotic diseases in human and wildlife populations is predicting where epidemics or epizootics are likely to occur, and this requires knowing in part the likelihood of infected insect vectors dispersing pathogens from existing infection foci to novel areas. We measured prevalence of an arbovirus, Buggy Creek virus, in dispersing and resident individuals of its exclusive vector, the ectoparasitic swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius), that occupies cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) colonies in western Nebraska. Bugs colonizing new colony sites and immigrating into established colonies by clinging to the swallows’ legs and feet had significantly lower virus prevalence than bugs in established colonies and those that were clustering in established colonies before dispersing. The reduced likelihood of infected bugs dispersing to new colony sites indicates that even heavily infected sites may not always export virus to nearby foci at a high rate. Infected arthropods should not be assumed to exhibit the same dispersal or movement behaviour as uninfected individuals, and these differences in dispersal should perhaps be considered in the epidemiology of vector-borne pathogens such as arboviruses. PMID:24694692

  1. Uncertainty in spatially explicit animal dispersal models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooij, Wolf M.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainty in estimates of survival of dispersing animals is a vexing difficulty in conservation biology. The current notion is that this uncertainty decreases the usefulness of spatially explicit population models in particular. We examined this problem by comparing dispersal models of three levels of complexity: (1) an event-based binomial model that considers only the occurrence of mortality or arrival, (2) a temporally explicit exponential model that employs mortality and arrival rates, and (3) a spatially explicit grid-walk model that simulates the movement of animals through an artificial landscape. Each model was fitted to the same set of field data. A first objective of the paper is to illustrate how the maximum-likelihood method can be used in all three cases to estimate the means and confidence limits for the relevant model parameters, given a particular set of data on dispersal survival. Using this framework we show that the structure of the uncertainty for all three models is strikingly similar. In fact, the results of our unified approach imply that spatially explicit dispersal models, which take advantage of information on landscape details, suffer less from uncertainly than do simpler models. Moreover, we show that the proposed strategy of model development safeguards one from error propagation in these more complex models. Finally, our approach shows that all models related to animal dispersal, ranging from simple to complex, can be related in a hierarchical fashion, so that the various approaches to modeling such dispersal can be viewed from a unified perspective.

  2. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mierlo, Camille Van; Pinto, Luis Abegão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Iatrogenic pigment dispersion syndrome generally originates from a repetitive, mechanical trauma to the pigmented posterior epithelium of the iris. This trauma can arise after intraocular surgery, most commonly due to an abnormal contact between the intraocular lens (IOL) and the iris. Whether surgical removal of this primary insult can lead to a successful intraocular pressure (IOP) control remains unclear. Methods: Case-series. Patients with IOP elevation and clinical signs of pigment dispersion were screened for a diagnosis of iatrogenic IOL-related pigment dispersion. Results: Three patients in which the IOL or the IOL-bag complex caused a pigment dispersion through a repetitive iris chafing were selected. In two cases, replacement of a sulcus-based single-piece IOL (patient 1) or a sub-luxated in-the-bag IOL (patient 2) by an anterior-chamber (AC) iris-fixed IOL led to a sustained decrease in IOP. In the third case, extensive iris atrophy and poor anatomical AC parameters for IOL implantation precluded further surgical intervention. Conclusion: IOL-exchange appears to be a useful tool in the management of iatrogenic pigment dispersion glaucoma due to inappropriate IOL implantation. This cause-oriented approach seems to be effective in controlling IOP, but should be offered only if safety criteria are met. How to cite this article: Van Mierlo C, Abegao Pinto L, Stalmans I. Surgical Management of Iatrogenic Pigment Dispersion Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):28-32. PMID:26997830

  3. Beyond dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Mei-I; Fuh, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shang-Da

    2014-03-28

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and other dispersion liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) methods have been developed since the first DLLME method was reported in 2006. DLLME is simple, rapid, and affords high enrichment factor, this is due to the large contact surface area of the extraction solvent. DLLME is a method suitable for the extraction in many different water samples, but it requires using chlorinated solvents. In recent years, interest in DLLME or dispersion LPME has been focused on the use of low-toxicity solvents and more conveniently practical procedures. This review examines some of the most interesting developments in the past few years. In the first section, DLLME methods are separated in two categories: DLLME with low-density extraction solvent and DLLME with high-density extraction solvent. Besides these methods, many novel special devices for collecting low-density extraction solvent are also mentioned. In addition, various dispersion techniques with LPME, including manual shaking, air-assisted LPME (aspirating and injecting the extraction mixture by syringe), ultrasound-assisted emulsification, vortex-assisted emulsification, surfactant-assisted emulsification, and microwave-assisted emulsification are described. Besides the above methods, combinations of DLLME with other extraction techniques (solid-phase extraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, molecularly imprinted matrix solid-phase dispersion and supercritical fluid extraction) are introduced. The combination of nanotechnique with DLLME is also introduced. Furthermore, this review illustrates the application of DLLME or dispersion LPME methods to separate and preconcentrate various organic analytes, inorganic analytes, and samples.

  4. Rheological Behavior of Bentonite-Polyester Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Omari, Salah Addin

    2013-07-01

    The rheological behavior of a bentonite clay dispersed in unsaturated polyester was investigated. The effects of the solid content and particle size on the steady and transient rheological properties of the dispersions were studied. In addition, two types of bentonite with different Na+/Ca+2 ratio were used in this study. The Herschel-Bulkley and the Weltman models were used to describe the apparent viscosity of the bentonite-polyester composite in relation to the shear rate and shearing time. The bentonite-polyester dispersions were found to exhibit both Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior. The transition from a Newtonian to a Bingham plastic and then to a shear-thinning material with a yield stress was found to depend on the solid concentration, the particle size, and the type of bentonite. At a low solid content, the apparent viscosity of the bentonite dispersion increased linearly with solid concentration. But a dramatic increase in the apparent viscosity beyond a solid content of 20 wt.% was observed. On the other hand, a thixotropic behavior was detected in bentonite-polyester dispersions with a high solid content and a low particle size. However, this behavior was more pronounced in dispersions with a high Na+/Ca+2 ratio.

  5. Juvenile dispersal in Calomys venustus (Muridae: Sigmodontinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priotto, José; Steinmann, Andrea; Provensal, Cecilia; Polop, Jaime

    2004-05-01

    Both spacing behaviour and dispersal movement are viewed as hierarchical processes in which the effects may be expressed at spatial scale. This research was carried out to examine the hypothesis that the presence of parents promotes the dispersal of juveniles from their natal nest and their father or mother home-range, in Calomys venustus.The study was carried out in four 0.25 ha fences (two controls and two experimentals), in a natural pasture. This study had two periods: Father Removal (FR) (August and December 1997; year one) and Mother Removal (MR) (August 1998 and January 1999; year two). For the FR treatment fathers were removed after juveniles were born, but in the MR treatment mothers were removed after the juveniles were weaned. The effect of parents on the dispersal distance of juveniles was analysed with respect to their natal nest and their mother and father home-range. Dispersal distance from the nest of C. venustus was independent of either male or female parent. Juveniles were more dispersing in relation to the centre of activity of their mothers than to that of their fathers, and females were more dispersing than males. Female juveniles overlap their home-range with their parents less than male juveniles do. The differences observed between female and male juveniles would be related to their different sexual maturation times, as well as to the female territoriality.

  6. Carbon nanotube suspensions, dispersions, & composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Trevor John

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are amazing structures that hold the potential to revolutionize many areas of scientific research. CNTs can be behave both as semiconductors and metals, can be grown in highly ordered arrays and patterns or in random orientation, and can be comprised of one graphene cylinder (single wall nanotube, SWNT) or several concentric graphene cylinders (multi-wall nanotube, MWNT). Although these structures are usually only a few nanometers wide, they can be grown up to centimeter lengths, and in massive quantities. CNTs can be produced in a variety of processes ranging from repeated combustion of organic material such as dried grass, arc-discharge with graphite electrodes, laser ablation of a graphitic target, to sophisticated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. CNTs are stronger than steel but lighter than aluminum, and can be more conductive than copper or semiconducting like silicon. This variety of properties has been matched by the wide variety of applications that have been developed for CNTs. Many of these applications have been limited by the inability of researchers to tame these structures, and incorporating CNTs into existing technologies can be exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. It is therefore the aim of the current study to develop strategies for the solution processing and deposition of CNTs and CNT-composites, which will enable the use of CNTs in existing and emerging technologies. CNTs are not easily suspended in polar solvents and are extremely hydrophobic materials, which has limited much of the solution processing to organic solvents, which also cannot afford high quality dispersions of CNTs. The current study has developed a variety of aqueous CNT solutions that employ surfactants, water-soluble polymers, or both to create suspensions of CNTs. These CNT 'ink' solutions were deposited with a variety of techniques that have afforded many interesting structures, both randomly oriented as well as highly

  7. Proximate influences on female dispersal in white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lutz, Clayton L.; Diefenbach, Duane R.; Rosenberry, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Ultimate causes of animal dispersal have been hypothesized to benefit the dispersing individual because dispersal reduces competition for local resources, potential for inbreeding, and competition for breeding partners. However, proximate cues influence important features of dispersal behavior, including when dispersal occurs, how long it lasts, and direction, straightness, and distance of the dispersal path. Therefore, proximate cues that affect dispersal influence ecological processes (e.g., population dynamics, disease transmission, gene flow). We captured and radio-marked 277 juvenile female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), of which 27 dispersed, to evaluate dispersal behavior and to determine proximate cues that may influence dispersal behavior. Female dispersal largely occurred at 1 year of age and coincided with the fawning season. Dispersal paths varied but generally were non-linear and prolonged. Physical landscape features (i.e., roadways, rivers, residential areas) influenced dispersal path direction and where dispersal terminated. Additionally, forays outside of the natal range that did not result in dispersal occurred among 52% of global positioning system (GPS)-collared deer (n = 25) during the dispersal period. Our results suggest intra-specific social interactions and physical landscape features influence dispersal behavior in female deer. Female dispersal behavior, particularly the lack of directionality, the semi-permeable nature of physical barriers, and the frequency of forays outside of the natal range, should be considered in regard to population management and controlling the spread of disease.

  8. Determining The Dispersibility Of South Louisiana Crude Oil By Eight Oil Dispersant Products Listed On The NCP Product Schedule

    EPA Science Inventory

    We recently conducted a laboratory study to measure the dispersion effectiveness of eight dispersants currently listed on the National Contingency Plan Product Schedule. Results are useful in determining how many commercial dispersant products would have been effective for use o...

  9. Determining The Dispersibility Of South Louisiana Crude Oil By Eight Oil Dispersant Products Listed On The NCP Product Schedule

    EPA Science Inventory

    We recently conducted a laboratory study to measure the dispersion effectiveness of eight dispersants currently listed on the National Contingency Plan Product Schedule. Results are useful in determining how many commercial dispersant products would have been effective for use o...

  10. On-line simultaneous monitoring of polarization mode dispersion and chromatic dispersion.

    PubMed

    Ning, G; Shum, P; Aditya, S; Liu, N; Gong, Y D

    2006-04-20

    We have developed new expressions for power fading and average power fading owing to polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and chromatic dispersion in terms of the angle of precession of the output state of polarization about the PMD vector. Based on these expressions, a simple and novel pilot-tone-based technique for simultaneous monitoring of chromatic dispersion and PMD is proposed. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique; these results agree well with the theoretical analysis.

  11. Dispersal kernel estimation: A comparison of empirical and modelled particle dispersion in a coastal marine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrycik, Janelle M.; Chassé, Joël; Ruddick, Barry R.; Taggart, Christopher T.

    2013-11-01

    Early life-stage dispersal influences recruitment and is of significance in explaining the distribution and connectivity of marine species. Motivations for quantifying dispersal range from biodiversity conservation to the design of marine reserves and the mitigation of species invasions. Here we compare estimates of real particle dispersion in a coastal marine environment with similar estimates provided by hydrodynamic modelling. We do so by using a system of magnetically attractive particles (MAPs) and a magnetic-collector array that provides measures of Lagrangian dispersion based on the time-integration of MAPs dispersing through the array. MAPs released as a point source in a coastal marine location dispersed through the collector array over a 5-7 d period. A virtual release and observed (real-time) environmental conditions were used in a high-resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to estimate the dispersal of virtual particles (VPs). The number of MAPs captured throughout the collector array and the number of VPs that passed through each corresponding model location were enumerated and compared. Although VP dispersal reflected several aspects of the observed MAP dispersal, the comparisons demonstrated model sensitivity to the small-scale (random-walk) particle diffusivity parameter (Kp). The one-dimensional dispersal kernel for the MAPs had an e-folding scale estimate in the range of 5.19-11.44 km, while those from the model simulations were comparable at 1.89-6.52 km, and also demonstrated sensitivity to Kp. Variations among comparisons are related to the value of Kp used in modelling and are postulated to be related to MAP losses from the water column and (or) shear dispersion acting on the MAPs; a process that is constrained in the model. Our demonstration indicates a promising new way of 1) quantitatively and empirically estimating the dispersal kernel in aquatic systems, and 2) quantitatively assessing and (or) improving regional hydrodynamic

  12. Predation of cassowary dispersed seeds: is the cassowary an effective disperser?

    PubMed

    Bradford, Matt G; Westcott, David A

    2011-09-01

    Post-dispersal predation is a potentially significant modifier of the distribution of recruiting plants and an often unmeasured determinant of the effectiveness of a frugivore's dispersal service. In the wet tropical forests of Australia and New Guinea, the cassowary provides a large volume, long distance dispersal service incorporating beneficial gut processing; however, the resultant clumped deposition might expose seeds to elevated mortality. We examined the contribution of post-dispersal seed predation to cassowary dispersal effectiveness by monitoring the fate of 11 species in southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii Linnaeus) droppings over a period of 1 year. Across all species, the rate of predation and removal was relatively slow. After 1 month, 70% of seeds remained intact and outwardly viable, while the number fell to 38% after 1 year. The proportion of seeds remaining intact in droppings varied considerably between species: soft-seeded and large-seeded species were more likely to escape removal and predation. Importantly, across all species, seeds in droppings were no more likely to be predated than those left undispersed under the parent tree. We speculate that seed predating and scatter-hoarding rodents are responsible for the vast majority of predation and removal from droppings and that the few seeds which undergo secondary dispersal survive to germination. Our findings reinforce the conclusion that the cassowary is an important seed disperser; however, dispersal effectiveness for particular plant species can be reduced by massive post-dispersal seed mortality. © 2011 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  13. Investigation of dense dispersion management optical links with non-perfect dispersion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Andreev, Vladimir A.; Dashkov, Mikhail V.; Volkov, Kirill A.

    2010-01-01

    There is no doubt that dispersion management soliton systems (DDMS) are the most applicable for the short-haul transport. However on practice it is unbelievable to realize an ideal coincidence between projected and installed lengths of dispersion map fibers, which can be explained, for example, by business problems or an optical closure placement. Here we present results of numerical simulations of optical pulse propagation and following bit-error-ratio estimation in a dense dispersion manage optical link with non-perfect dispersion maps.

  14. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  15. Are introduced species better dispersers than native species? A global comparative study of seed dispersal distance.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Thomson, Fiona J; Warton, David I; Moles, Angela T

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first global test of the idea that introduced species have greater seed dispersal distances than do native species, using data for 51 introduced and 360 native species from the global literature. Counter to our expectations, there was no significant difference in mean or maximum dispersal distance between introduced and native species. Next, we asked whether differences in dispersal distance might have been obscured by differences in seed mass, plant height and dispersal syndrome, all traits that affect dispersal distance and which can differ between native and introduced species. When we included all three variables in the model, there was no clear difference in dispersal distance between introduced and native species. These results remained consistent when we performed analyses including a random effect for site. Analyses also showed that the lack of a significant difference in dispersal distance was not due to differences in biome, taxonomic composition, growth form, nitrogen fixation, our inclusion of non-invasive introduced species, or our exclusion of species with human-assisted dispersal. Thus, if introduced species do have higher spread rates, it seems likely that these are driven by differences in post-dispersal processes such as germination, seedling survival, and survival to reproduction.

  16. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Are Introduced Species Better Dispersers Than Native Species? A Global Comparative Study of Seed Dispersal Distance

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Thomson, Fiona J.; Warton, David I.; Moles, Angela T.

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first global test of the idea that introduced species have greater seed dispersal distances than do native species, using data for 51 introduced and 360 native species from the global literature. Counter to our expectations, there was no significant difference in mean or maximum dispersal distance between introduced and native species. Next, we asked whether differences in dispersal distance might have been obscured by differences in seed mass, plant height and dispersal syndrome, all traits that affect dispersal distance and which can differ between native and introduced species. When we included all three variables in the model, there was no clear difference in dispersal distance between introduced and native species. These results remained consistent when we performed analyses including a random effect for site. Analyses also showed that the lack of a significant difference in dispersal distance was not due to differences in biome, taxonomic composition, growth form, nitrogen fixation, our inclusion of non-invasive introduced species, or our exclusion of species with human-assisted dispersal. Thus, if introduced species do have higher spread rates, it seems likely that these are driven by differences in post-dispersal processes such as germination, seedling survival, and survival to reproduction. PMID:23818991

  18. Applications of KinetiSol dispersing for the production of plasticizer free amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    DiNunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-06-14

    Thermal manufacturing methods for the production of solid dispersions frequently require the addition of a plasticizer in order to achieve requisite molten material flow properties when processed by unit operations such as hot melt extrusion. KinetiSol Dispersing, a rapid high energy thermal manufacturing process, was investigated for the ability to produce amorphous solid dispersions without the aid of a plasticizer. For this study itraconazole was used as a model active ingredient, while Eudragit L100-55 and Carbomer 974P were used as model solid dispersion carriers. Triethyl citrate (TEC) was used as necessary as a model plasticizer. Compositions prepared by KinetiSol Dispersing and hot melt extrusion were evaluated for solid state properties, supersaturated in vitro dissolution behavior under pH change conditions and accelerated stability performance. Results showed that both manufacturing processes were capable of producing amorphous solid dispersions, however compositions produced by hot melt extrusion required the presence of TEC and yielded a glass transition temperature (T(g)) of approximately 54 degrees C. Plasticized and unplasticized compositions were successfully produced by KinetiSol Dispersing, with plasticizer free solid dispersions exhibiting a T(g) of approximately 101 degrees C. Supersaturated in vitro dissolution testing revealed a significantly higher dissolution rate of plasticized material which was attributed to the pore forming behavior of TEC during the acidic phase of testing. A further contribution to release may also have been provided by the greater diffusivity in the plasticized polymer. X-ray diffraction testing revealed that under accelerated stability conditions, plasticized compositions exhibited partial recrystallization, while plasticizer free materials remained amorphous throughout the 6-month testing period. These results demonstrated that KinetiSol Dispersing could be used for the production of amorphous solid dispersions

  19. Dispersion dynamics of quantum cascade lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Burghoff, David; Yang, Yang; Reno, John L.; ...

    2016-12-20

    A key parameter underlying the efficacy of any nonlinear optical process is group velocity dispersion. In quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), there have been several recent demonstrations of devices exploiting nonlinearities in both the mid-infrared and the terahertz. Though the gain of QCLs has been well studied, the dispersion has been much less investigated, and several questions remain about its dynamics and precise origin. In this work, we use time-domain spectroscopy to investigate the dispersion of broadband terahertz QCLs, and demonstrate that contributions from both the material and the intersubband transitions are relevant. We show that in contrast to the lasermore » gain—which is clamped to a fixed value above lasing threshold—the dispersion changes with bias even above threshold, which is a consequence of shifting intersubband populations. In conclusion, we also examine the role of higher-order dispersion in QCLs and discuss the ramifications of our result for devices utilizing nonlinear effects, such as frequency combs.« less

  20. Does Environmental Knowledge Inhibit Hominin Dispersal?

    PubMed

    Wren, Colin D; Costopoulos, Andre

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the dispersal potential of a hominin population, its local-scale foraging strategies, and the characteristics of the resource environment using an agent-based modeling approach. In previous work we demonstrated that natural selection can favor a relatively low capacity for assessing and predicting the quality of the resource environment, especially when the distribution of resources is highly clustered. That work also suggested that the more knowledge foraging populations had about their environment, the less likely they were to abandon the landscape they know and disperse into novel territory. The present study gives agents new individual and social strategies for learning about their environment. For both individual and social learning, natural selection favors decreased levels of environmental knowledge, particularly in low-heterogeneity environments. Social acquisition of detailed environmental knowledge results in crowding of agents, which reduces available reproductive space and relative fitness. Agents with less environmental knowledge move away from resource clusters and into areas with more space available for reproduction. These results suggest that, rather than being a requirement for successful dispersal, environmental knowledge strengthens the ties to particular locations and significantly reduces the dispersal potential as a result. The evolved level of environmental knowledge in a population depends on the characteristics of the resource environment and affects the dispersal capacity of the population.

  1. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae).

    PubMed

    Lomáscolo, Silvia B; Levey, Douglas J; Kimball, Rebecca T; Bolker, Benjamin M; Alborn, Hans T

    2010-08-17

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant-animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous animals. Even though plant reproduction depends largely on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurring traits in fruits with differences in behavior, physiology, and morphology of fruit-eating vertebrates. Hence, the origin and maintenance of fruit diversity remains largely unexplained. Using a multivariate phylogenetic comparative test with unbiased estimates of odor and color in figs, we demonstrate that fruit traits evolve in concert and as predicted by differences in the behavior, physiology (perceptive ability) and morphology of their frugivorous seed dispersers. The correlated evolution of traits results in the convergence of general appearance of fruits in species that share disperser types. Observations at fruiting trees independently confirmed that differences in fig traits predict differences in dispersers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that differences among frugivores have shaped the evolution of fruit traits. More broadly, our results underscore the importance of mutualisms in both generating and maintaining biodiversity.

  2. Drug-induced spatial dispersion of repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Spatial dispersion of repolarization in the form of transmural, trans-septal and apico-basal dispersion of repolarization creates voltage gradients that inscribe the J wave and T wave of the ECG. Amplification of this spatial dispersion of repolarization (SDR) underlies the development of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias associated with inherited or acquired ion channelopathies giving rise to the long QT, short QT and Brugada syndromes (BrS). This review focuses on the role of spatial dispersion of repolarization in drug-induced arrhythmogenesis associated with the long QT and BrS. In the long QT syndrome, drug-induced amplification of SDR is often secondary to preferential prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) of M cells, whereas in the BrS, it is thought to be due to selective abbreviation of the APD of right ventricular epicardium. Among the challenges ahead is the identification of a means to quantitate SDR non-invasively. This review also discusses the value of the interval between the peak and end of the T wave (Tpeak–Tend, Tp–Te) as an index of SDR and transmural dispersion of repolarization, in particular. PMID:18651395

  3. Dispersers shape fruit diversity in Ficus (Moraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Lomáscolo, Silvia B.; Levey, Douglas J.; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Alborn, Hans T.

    2010-01-01

    Seed dispersal by vertebrates is one of the most common and important plant–animal mutualisms, involving an enormous diversity of fruiting plants and frugivorous animals. Even though plant reproduction depends largely on seed dispersal, evolutionary ecologists have been unable to link co-occurring traits in fruits with differences in behavior, physiology, and morphology of fruit-eating vertebrates. Hence, the origin and maintenance of fruit diversity remains largely unexplained. Using a multivariate phylogenetic comparative test with unbiased estimates of odor and color in figs, we demonstrate that fruit traits evolve in concert and as predicted by differences in the behavior, physiology (perceptive ability) and morphology of their frugivorous seed dispersers. The correlated evolution of traits results in the convergence of general appearance of fruits in species that share disperser types. Observations at fruiting trees independently confirmed that differences in fig traits predict differences in dispersers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that differences among frugivores have shaped the evolution of fruit traits. More broadly, our results underscore the importance of mutualisms in both generating and maintaining biodiversity. PMID:20679219

  4. Solvent-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohammad Reza; Firouzjah, Ahmad; Rahnama, Reyhaneh

    2013-11-15

    In this research, a novel extraction technique termed solvent-assisted dispersive solid phase extraction (SADSPE) was developed for the first time. The new method was based on the dispersion of the sorbent into the sample to maximize the contact surface. In this method, the dispersion of the sorbent at a very low milligram level was achieved by injecting a solution of the sorbent into the aqueous sample. Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the dispersion of the fine particles of the sorbent in the bulk aqueous sample. After extraction, phase separation was performed by centrifugation and the enriched analyte in the sedimented phase could be determined by instrumental methods. The performance of SADSPE was illustrated with the determination of the trace amounts of cobalt(II) as a test analyte in food and environmental water samples by using flame atomic absorption spectrometry detection. Some key parameters for SADSPE, such as sorbent selection and amount, type and volume of dispersive solvent, pH, chelating agent concentration, and salt concentration, were investigated. Under the most favorable conditions, good limit of detection (as low as 0.2 µg L(-1)) and repeatability of extraction (RSD below 2.2%, n=10) was obtained. The accuracy of the method was tested with standard reference material (SRM-1643e and SRM-1640a) and spiked addition. The advantages of SADSPE method are simplicity of operation, rapidity, low cost, high recovery, and enrichment factor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterodyne-Detected Dispersed Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-11-01

    We develop heterodyned dispersed vibrational echo spectroscopy (HDVE) and demonstrate the new capabilities in biophysical applications. HDVE is a robust ultrafast technique that provides a characterization of the real and imaginary components of third-order nonlinear signals with high sensitivity and single-laser-shot capability and can be used to extract dispersed pump-probe and dispersed vibrational echo spectra. Four methods for acquiring HDVE phase and amplitude spectra were compared: Fourier transform spectral interferometry, a new phase modulation spectral interferometry technique, and combination schemes. These extraction techniques were demonstrated in the context of protein amide I spectroscopy. Experimental HDVE and heterodyned free induction decay amide I spectra were explicitly compared to conventional dispersed pump-probe, dispersed vibrational echo, and absorption spectra. The new capabilities of HDVE were demonstrated by acquiring single-shot spectra and melting curves of ubiquitin and concentration-dependent spectra of insulin suitable for extracting the binding constant for dimerization. The introduced techniques will prove particularly useful in transient experiments, studying irreversible reactions, and micromolar concentration studies of small proteins.

  6. NEXT Ion Thruster Performance Dispersion Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT ion thruster is a low specific mass, high performance thruster with a nominal throttling range of 0.5 to 7 kW. Numerous engineering model and one prototype model thrusters have been manufactured and tested. Of significant importance to propulsion system performance is thruster-to-thruster performance dispersions. This type of information can provide a bandwidth of expected performance variations both on a thruster and a component level. Knowledge of these dispersions can be used to more conservatively predict thruster service life capability and thruster performance for mission planning, facilitate future thruster performance comparisons, and verify power processor capabilities are compatible with the thruster design. This study compiles the test results of five engineering model thrusters and one flight-like thruster to determine unit-to-unit dispersions in thruster performance. Component level performance dispersion analyses will include discharge chamber voltages, currents, and losses; accelerator currents, electron backstreaming limits, and perveance limits; and neutralizer keeper and coupling voltages and the spot-to-plume mode transition flow rates. Thruster level performance dispersion analyses will include thrust efficiency.

  7. Using Dispersed Modes During Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.; Hathcock, Megan L.

    2017-01-01

    The model correlation process for the modal characteristics of a launch vehicle is well established. After a test, parameters within the nominal model are adjusted to reflect structural dynamics revealed during testing. However, a full model correlation process for a complex structure can take months of man-hours and many computational resources. If the analyst only has weeks, or even days, of time in which to correlate the nominal model to the experimental results, then the traditional correlation process is not suitable. This paper describes using model dispersions to assist the model correlation process and decrease the overall cost of the process. The process creates thousands of model dispersions from the nominal model prior to the test and then compares each of them to the test data. Using mode shape and frequency error metrics, one dispersion is selected as the best match to the test data. This dispersion is further improved by using a commercial model correlation software. In the three examples shown in this paper, this dispersion based model correlation process performs well when compared to models correlated using traditional techniques and saves time in the post-test analysis.

  8. Oak Dispersal Syndromes: Do Red and White Oaks Exhibit Different Dispersal Srategies?

    Treesearch

    Michael Steele; Peter Smallwood; William B. Terzaghi; John E. Carlson; Thomas conteras; Amy McEuen

    2004-01-01

    We provide an overview of the ecological and evolutionary interactions between oaks and several of their dispersal agents, and review a series of studies that demonstrate how various acorn characteristics affect feeding and caching decisions of these animals, which in turn may influence oak dispersal and establishment. We demonstrate that acorns of red oak species show...

  9. Analysis and correction of vertical dispersion in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Minty, M.

    2011-09-14

    In the context of preserving the polarization of proton beams, the source of vertical dispersion in RHIC is analyzed. Contributions to dispersion from non-coupling sources and coupling sources are compared. Based on the analysis of sources for dispersion, the right actuator for correcting dispersion is determined and a corresponding algorithm is developed.

  10. Simple semi-empirical model for chromatic dispersion estimation of dispersion compensating photonic-crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Delmukhametov, Oleg R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple semi-empirical model for chromatic dispersion estimation of dispersion compensating photonic-crystal fibers in a limited range of wavelengths is presented in this paper. The proposed approach is widely used in the field of electromagnetic waves of the microwave range, for instance, for calculation of approximate estimates of the effectiveness of electromagnetic shields and here in this paper we adopted it for the estimation of chromatic dispersion of photonic-crystal fibers. It worth to note that this approach provides the possibility to evaluate approximate magnitude of the chromatic dispersion of dispersion compensating photonic-crystal fibers without extensive numerical calculations, but the main drawback of this method is that the validity of it is restricted only for the certain range of the wavelengths.

  11. Contrast dispersion imaging for cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer growth is associated with angiogenic processes in many types of cancer. Several imaging strategies have therefore been developed that target angiogenesis as a marker for cancer localization. To this end, intravascular and extravascular tissue perfusion is typically assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) ultrasound (US) and MRI. All the proposed strategies, however, overlook important changes in the microvascular architecture that result from angiogenic processes. To overcome these limitations, we have recently introduced a new imaging strategy that analyzes the intravascular dispersion kinetics of contrast agents spreading through the microvasculature. Contrast dispersion is mainly determined by microvascular multi-path trajectories, reflecting the underlying microvascular architecture. This paper reviews the results obtained for prostate cancer localization by US and MRI dispersion imaging, also presenting the latest new developments and future perspectives.

  12. Dispersion analysis of arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Sonja; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Uecker, Reinhard; Kwasniewski, Albert; Popp, Jürgen; Mayerhöfer, Thomas G

    2017-06-05

    We developed a measurement and evaluation scheme to perform dispersion analysis on arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals based on the schemes developed for triclinic and uniaxial crystals. As byproduct of dispersion analysis the orientations of the crystal axes are found. In contrast to the spectra of arbitrarily cut uniaxial crystals, where the fit routine has to separate two independent principal spectra, the spectra of arbitrarily cut orthorhombic crystals are a combination of three independent spectra and the evaluation scheme gets more complex. Dispersion analysis is exemplary performed on two different crystals, which show different spectral features and different levels of difficulties to evaluate. Neodymium gallate (NdGaO3) has broad overlapping reflections bands while topaz (Al2SiO4 [F, OH]2) has a quite high total number of infrared active bands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. EMAT enhanced dispersion of particles in liquid

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger A.; Rios, Orlando; Melin, Alexander M.; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz; Wilgen, John B.

    2016-11-29

    Particulate matter is dispersed in a fluid material. A sample including a first material in a fluid state and second material comprising particulate matter are placed into a chamber. The second material is spatially dispersed in the first material utilizing EMAT force. The dispersion process continues until spatial distribution of the second material enables the sample to meet a specified criterion. The chamber and/or the sample is electrically conductive. The EMAT force is generated by placing the chamber coaxially within an induction coil driven by an applied alternating current and placing the chamber and induction coil coaxially within a high field magnetic. The EMAT force is coupled to the sample without physical contact to the sample or to the chamber, by another physical object. Batch and continuous processing are utilized. The chamber may be folded within the bore of the magnet. Acoustic force frequency and/or temperature may be controlled.

  14. Origin of strong dispersion in Hubbard insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Jia, C. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Wu, K.; Chen, C. -C.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-08-10

    Using cluster perturbation theory, we explain the origin of the strongly dispersive feature found at high binding energy in the spectral function of the Hubbard model. By comparing the Hubbard and $t₋J₋3s$ model spectra, we show that this dispersion does not originate from either coupling to spin fluctuations ($∝ J$ ) or the free hopping ($∝ t$ ). Instead, it should be attributed to a long-range, correlated hopping $∝ t²/U$ which allows an effectively free motion of the hole within the same antiferromagnetic sublattice. This origin explains both the formation of the high-energy anomaly in the single-particle spectrum and the sensitivity of the high-binding-energy dispersion to the next-nearest-neighbor hopping $t'$ .

  15. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-15

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  16. Dispersion of Acoustic Phonons in Quasiperiodic Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Misra, K. D.; Tiwari, R. P.

    The aim of this work is to present an up-to-date study of acoustic phonon excitations that can propagate in multilayered structure with constituents arranged in quasiperiodic fashion. In this paper, the dispersion relation of acoustic phonons for the quasiperiodic superlattice using different semiconducting materials, with the help of transfer matrix method, is derived at normal angle of incidence. Calculation is presented for (a) Ge/Si and (b) Nb/Cu semiconductor superlattices from 5th to 9th generations and dispersion diagrams are plotted using the famous Kronning-Penny model obtained from the transfer matrix of the structure. The concept of allowed and forbidden bands with the help of these dispersion curves in various generations of Fibonacci superlattices and the relation between imaginary value of propagation vector and the existence of forbidden bands is demonstrated.

  17. Migratory Birds as Global Dispersal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Viana, Duarte S; Santamaría, Luis; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-10-01

    Propagule dispersal beyond local scales has been considered rare and unpredictable. However, for many plants, invertebrates, and microbes dispersed by birds, long-distance dispersal (LDD) might be regularly achieved when mediated by migratory movements. Because LDD operates over spatial extents spanning hundreds to thousands of kilometers, it can promote rapid range shifts and determine species distributions. We review evidence supporting this widespread LDD service and propose a conceptual framework for estimating LDD by migratory birds. Although further research and validation efforts are still needed, we show that current knowledge can be used to make more realistic estimations of LDD mediated by regular bird migrations, thus refining current predictions of its ecological and evolutionary consequences.

  18. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  19. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOEpatents

    Nevitt, Michael V.; Aldred, Anthony T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1987-07-07

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  20. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOEpatents

    Nevitt, Michael V.; Aldred, Anthony T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  1. Subduction, collision and initiation of hominin dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Uri; Lazar, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Subduction is the main driving force of plate tectonics controlling the physiography of the Earth. The northward subduction of the Sinai plate was interrupted during the Early Pleistocene when the Eratosthenes Seamount began to collide with the Cyprian arc. A series of synchronous structural deformations was triggered across the entire eastern Mediterranean, and local topography was drastically accentuation along the Levantine corridor - one of the main pathways of hominin dispersal out of Africa. However, the choice of this preferred pathway and timing of dispersal has not been resolved. Though causes for dispersal out of Africa are in debate, we show that the transition from subduction to collision in the eastern Mediterranean set the route.

  2. Studies of aircraft wake chemistry and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.; Farlow, N. H.; Anderson, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Use of aerospace technology to study aircraft wakes is reviewed. It is shown how aerospace vehicles can be used to provide data for increased understanding of the atmosphere and of aircraft exhaust trails where knowledge is inadequate to evaluate fully the potential impact of the engine emissions. Models of aircraft near-field exhaust wakes are characterized by jet, vortex, and dispersion regimes. Wake growth in the jet regime is self-determined and rapid, whereas further spreading is inhibited in the vortex regime because of circulating vortex motion. Wake diffusion in the dispersion regime is initially influenced by aircraft induced turbulence but is dominated later by small-scale atmospheric turbulence. Computed fluid mechanical results show the importance of effects such as wake buoyancy, wind shear, turbulence, and traffic corridor exhaust buildup on dispersion of the wake. In the jet regime the exhaust characteristics and thermochemistry serve to illustrate initial chemical changes involving potential pollutant species.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Jeffrey A.; Bauer, Barry J.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Becker, Matthew L.; Hight-Walker, Angela; Simpson, Jeffrey R.; Chun, Jaehun; Obrzut, Jan; Bajpai, Vardhan; Phelan, Fred R.; Simien, Daneesh; Yeon Huh, Ji; Migler, Kalman B.

    2011-03-01

    Advanced technological uses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid phase post processing. The foundation of all of these processing steps is the attainment of individualized nanotube dispersion in solution; an understanding of the collodial properties of the dispersed SWCNTs can then be used to designed appropriate conditions for separations. In many instances nanotube size, particularly length, is especially active in determining the achievable properties from a given population, and thus there is a critical need for measurement technologies for both length distribution and effective separation techniques. In this Progress Report, we document the current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations, including separations, and use examples to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  4. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time.

  5. Sphagnum moss disperses spores with vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Dwight L; Edwards, Joan

    2010-07-23

    Sphagnum spores, which have low terminal velocities, are carried by turbulent wind currents to establish colonies many kilometers away. However, spores that are easily kept aloft are also rapidly decelerated in still air; thus, dispersal range depends strongly on release height. Vascular plants grow tall to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, but nonvascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently high. High-speed videos show that exploding capsules of Sphagnum generate vortex rings to efficiently carry spores high enough to be dispersed by turbulent air currents. Spores launched ballistically at similar speeds through still air would travel a few millimeters and not easily reach turbulent air. Vortex rings are used by animals; here, we report vortex rings generated by plants.

  6. Source estimation methods for atmospheric dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Rao, K.

    Both forward and backward transport modeling methods are being developed for characterization of sources in atmospheric releases of toxic agents. Forward modeling methods, which describe the atmospheric transport from sources to receptors, use forward-running transport and dispersion models or computational fluid dynamics models which are run many times, and the resulting dispersion field is compared to observations from multiple sensors. Forward modeling methods include Bayesian updating and inference schemes using stochastic Monte Carlo or Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques. Backward or inverse modeling methods use only one model run in the reverse direction from the receptors to estimate the upwind sources. Inverse modeling methods include adjoint and tangent linear models, Kalman filters, and variational data assimilation, among others. This survey paper discusses these source estimation methods and lists the key references. The need for assessing uncertainties in the characterization of sources using atmospheric transport and dispersion models is emphasized.

  7. Cryptococcus gattii dispersal mechanisms, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sarah E; Bach, Paxton J; Hingston, Adrian O; Mak, Sunny; Chow, Yat; MacDougall, Laura; Kronstad, James W; Bartlett, Karen H

    2007-01-01

    Recent Cryptococcus gattii infections in humans and animals without travel history to Vancouver Island, as well as environmental isolations of the organism in other areas of the Pacific Northwest, led to an investigation of potential dispersal mechanisms. Longitudinal analysis of C. gattii presence in trees and soil showed patterns of permanent, intermittent, and transient colonization, reflecting C. gattii population dynamics once the pathogen is introduced to a new site. Systematic sampling showed C. gattii was associated with high-traffic locations. In addition, C. gattii was isolated from the wheel wells of vehicles on Vancouver Island and the mainland and on footwear, consistent with anthropogenic dispersal of the organism. Increased levels of airborne C. gattii were detected during forestry and municipal activities such as wood chipping, the byproducts of which are frequently used in park landscaping. C. gattii dispersal by these mechanisms may be a useful model for other emerging pathogens.

  8. Hamiltonian description of composite fermions: Magnetoexciton dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    1999-11-01

    A microscopic Hamiltonian theory of the FQHE, developed by Shankar and myself based on the fermionic Chern-Simons approach, has recently been quite successful in calculating gaps in fractional quantum hall states, and in predicting approximate scaling relations between the gaps of different fractions. I now apply this formalism towards computing magnetoexciton dispersions (including spin-flip dispersions) in the ν=13, 25, and 37 gapped fractions, and find approximate agreement with numerical results. I also analyze the evolution of these dispersions with increasing sample thickness, modelled by a potential soft at high momenta. New results are obtained for instabilities as a function of thickness for 25 and 37, and it is shown that the spin-polarized 25 state, in contrast to the spin-polarized 13 state, cannot be described as a simple quantum ferromagnet.

  9. Origin of strong dispersion in Hubbard insulators

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; ...

    2015-08-10

    Using cluster perturbation theory, we explain the origin of the strongly dispersive feature found at high binding energy in the spectral function of the Hubbard model. By comparing the Hubbard and $t₋J₋3s$ model spectra, we show that this dispersion does not originate from either coupling to spin fluctuations ($∝ J$ ) or the free hopping ($∝ t$ ). Instead, it should be attributed to a long-range, correlated hopping $∝ t²/U$ which allows an effectively free motion of the hole within the same antiferromagnetic sublattice. This origin explains both the formation of the high-energy anomaly in the single-particle spectrum and themore » sensitivity of the high-binding-energy dispersion to the next-nearest-neighbor hopping $t'$ .« less

  10. Electrokinetic Flow and Dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2006-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care, and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis (which has evolved from its predecessor, slab-gel electrophoresis), the sample migrates through a single microcapillary instead of through the network of pores in a gel. A fundamental design problem is to minimize dispersion in the separation direction. Molecular diffusion is inevitable and sets a theoretical limit on the best separation that can be achieved. But in practice, there are a number of effects arising out of the interplay between fluid flow, chemistry, thermal effects, and electric fields that result in enhanced dispersion. This paper reviews the subject of fluid flow in such capillary microchannels and examines the various causes of enhanced dispersion that limit the efficiency of separation.

  11. Cryptococcus gattii Dispersal Mechanisms, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sarah E.; Bach, Paxton J.; Hingston, Adrian O.; Mak, Sunny; Chow, Yat; MacDougall, Laura; Kronstad, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent Cryptococcus gattii infections in humans and animals without travel history to Vancouver Island, as well as environmental isolations of the organism in other areas of the Pacific Northwest, led to an investigation of potential dispersal mechanisms. Longitudinal analysis of C. gattii presence in trees and soil showed patterns of permanent, intermittent, and transient colonization, reflecting C. gattii population dynamics once the pathogen is introduced to a new site. Systematic sampling showed C. gattii was associated with high-traffic locations. In addition, C. gattii was isolated from the wheel wells of vehicles on Vancouver Island and the mainland and on footwear, consistent with anthropogenic dispersal of the organism. Increased levels of airborne C. gattii were detected during forestry and municipal activities such as wood chipping, the byproducts of which are frequently used in park landscaping. C. gattii dispersal by these mechanisms may be a useful model for other emerging pathogens. PMID:17370515

  12. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    1987-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described.

  13. THE EFFECT OF NUCLEAR RADIATION ON DISPERSION FUEL MATERIALS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    performance of the following dispersions is discussed in the report: BeO- UO2 , BeO- UO2 -ThO2, Al2O3- UO2 , MgO- UO2 , UO2 , UC, UC2, and *U, Th)C2 U3O8 glass...and UAl3 dispersed in aluminum; UO2 , UC, and UN dispersed in stainless steel; UO2 and UO2 -Y2O3 dispersed in nickel-chromium alloys; UO2 dispersed in...niobium, UO2 dispersed in molybdenum, UO2 , UN, and UC dispersed in tungsten. The data which is summarized includes percentage of fuel by weight and

  14. Seed dispersal potential of Asian elephants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harich, Franziska K.; Treydte, Anna C.; Ogutu, Joseph O.; Roberts, John E.; Savini, Chution; Bauer, Jan M.; Savini, Tommaso

    2016-11-01

    Elephants, the largest terrestrial mega-herbivores, play an important ecological role in maintaining forest ecosystem diversity. While several plant species strongly rely on African elephants (Loxodonta africana; L. cyclotis) as seed dispersers, little is known about the dispersal potential of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). We examined the effects of elephant fruit consumption on potential seed dispersal using the example of a tree species with mega-faunal characteristics, Dillenia indica L., in Thailand. We conducted feeding trials with Asian elephants to quantify seed survival and gut passage times (GPT). In total, 1200 ingested and non-ingested control seeds were planted in soil and in elephant dung to quantify differences in germination rates in terms of GPT and dung treatment. We used survival analysis as a novel approach to account for the right-censored nature of the data obtained from germination experiments. The average seed survival rate was 79% and the mean GPT was 35 h. The minimum and maximum GPT were 20 h and 72 h, respectively. Ingested seeds were significantly more likely to germinate and to do so earlier than non-ingested control seeds (P = 0.0002). Seeds with the longest GPT displayed the highest germination success over time. Unexpectedly, seeds planted with dung had longer germination times than those planted without. We conclude that D. indica does not solely depend on but benefits from dispersal by elephants. The declining numbers of these mega-faunal seed dispersers might, therefore, have long-term negative consequences for the recruitment and dispersal dynamics of populations of certain tree species.

  15. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  16. Turbulent dispersion via fan-generated flows

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, Siobhan K.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent dispersion of passive scalar quantities has been extensively studied in wind tunnel settings, where the flow is carefully conditioned using flow straighteners and grids. Much less is known about turbulent dispersion in the “unconditioned” flows generated by fans that are ubiquitous in indoor environments, despite the importance of these flows to pathogen and contaminant transport. Here, we demonstrate that a point source of scalars released into an airflow generated by an axial fan yields a plume whose width is invariant with respect to the fan speed. The results point toward a useful simplification in modeling of disease and pollution spread via fan-generated flows. PMID:24932096

  17. Weakly relativistic dispersion of Bernstein waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Weakly relativistic effects on the dispersion of Bernstein waves are investigated for waves propagating nearly perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in a Maxwellian plasma. Attention is focused on those large-wave-vector branches that are either weakly damped or join continuously onto weakly damped branches since these are the modes of most interest in applications. The transition between dispersion at perpendicular and oblique propagation is examined and major weakly relativistic effects can dominate even in low-temperature plasmas. A number of simple analytic criteria are obtained which delimit the ranges of harmonic number and propagation angle within which various types of weakly damped Bernstein modes can exist.

  18. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  19. Dispersion Operators Algebra and Linear Canonical Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambololona, Raoelina; Ranaivoson, Ravo Tokiniaina; Hasimbola Damo Emile, Randriamisy; Rakotoson, Hanitriarivo

    2017-02-01

    This work intends to present a study on relations between a Lie algebra called dispersion operators algebra, linear canonical transformation and a phase space representation of quantum mechanics that we have introduced and studied in previous works. The paper begins with a brief recall of our previous works followed by the description of the dispersion operators algebra which is performed in the framework of the phase space representation. Then, linear canonical transformations are introduced and linked with this algebra. A multidimensional generalization of the obtained results is given.

  20. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling.

    PubMed

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-05

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals.

  1. Weakly relativistic dispersion of Bernstein waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Weakly relativistic effects on the dispersion of Bernstein waves are investigated for waves propagating nearly perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in a Maxwellian plasma. Attention is focused on those large-wave-vector branches that are either weakly damped or join continuously onto weakly damped branches since these are the modes of most interest in applications. The transition between dispersion at perpendicular and oblique propagation is examined and major weakly relativistic effects can dominate even in low-temperature plasmas. A number of simple analytic criteria are obtained which delimit the ranges of harmonic number and propagation angle within which various types of weakly damped Bernstein modes can exist.

  2. Dispersion Operators Algebra and Linear Canonical Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriambololona, Raoelina; Ranaivoson, Ravo Tokiniaina; Hasimbola Damo Emile, Randriamisy; Rakotoson, Hanitriarivo

    2017-04-01

    This work intends to present a study on relations between a Lie algebra called dispersion operators algebra, linear canonical transformation and a phase space representation of quantum mechanics that we have introduced and studied in previous works. The paper begins with a brief recall of our previous works followed by the description of the dispersion operators algebra which is performed in the framework of the phase space representation. Then, linear canonical transformations are introduced and linked with this algebra. A multidimensional generalization of the obtained results is given.

  3. Single-shot quantitative dispersion phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Niyom; Kang, Jeon Woong; Hillman, Timothy R.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2012-08-01

    We present an imaging modality capable of providing high-speed optical dispersion measurements of live cells. The technique permits wide-field measurement of the optical phase shifts introduced by a sample for multiple discrete wavelengths in a single image capture. Utilizing spatial modulation and the wavelength dependence of the interference-fringe spacing, average refractive index as a function of wavelength is obtained, yielding optical dispersion measurements of the sample under observation. Because of its simple and low-cost design, the technique can be readily integrated into a standard microscope to collect additional diagnostic information about biological cells.

  4. Turbulent dispersion via fan-generated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, Siobhan K.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent dispersion of passive scalar quantities has been extensively studied in wind tunnel settings, where the flow is carefully conditioned using flow straighteners and grids. Much less is known about turbulent dispersion in the "unconditioned" flows generated by fans that are ubiquitous in indoor environments, despite the importance of these flows to pathogen and contaminant transport. Here, we demonstrate that a point source of scalars released into an airflow generated by an axial fan yields a plume whose width is invariant with respect to the fan speed. The results point toward a useful simplification in modeling of disease and pollution spread via fan-generated flows.

  5. Using Dispersed Modes During Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric; Hathcock, Megan

    2017-01-01

    Using model dispersions as a starting point allows us to quickly adjust a model to reflect new test data: a) The analyst does a lot of work before the test to save time post-test. b) Creating 1000s of model dispersions to provide "coarse tuning," then use Attune to provide the "fine tuning." ?Successful model tuning on three structures: a) TAURUS. b) Ares I-X C) Cart (in backup charts). ?Mode weighting factors, matrix norm method, and XOR vs. MAC all play key roles in determining the BME. The BME process will be used on future tests: a) ISPE modal test (ongoing work). b) SLS modal test (mid 2018).

  6. Dense dispersion management soliton-like pulse dynamic in fiber optic line with deviation of dispersion map parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Dashkov, Michael V.; Volkov, Kirill A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper influence of DDMS dispersion segment deviations from nominal values on system performance was investigated. The model of dispersion managed soliton propagation based on variatonal approach was used. The results of statistical simulation of soliton-like pulse propagation in optical communication lines with different dispersion maps and taking into account deviation of dispersion map parameters are represented.

  7. Dense dispersion management soliton-like pulse dynamic in fiber optic line with deviation of dispersion map parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Dashkov, Michael V.; Volkov, Kirill A.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper influence of DDMS dispersion segment deviations from nominal values on system performance was investigated. The model of dispersion managed soliton propagation based on variatonal approach was used. The results of statistical simulation of soliton-like pulse propagation in optical communication lines with different dispersion maps and taking into account deviation of dispersion map parameters are represented.

  8. The enhanced stability and biodegradation of dispersed crude oil droplets by Xanthan Gum as an additive of chemical dispersant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiqin; Li, Yiming; Yang, Xiaolong; Bao, Mutai; Cheng, Hua

    2017-03-07

    It is necessary for chemical dispersant to disperse oil effectively and maintain the stability of oil droplets. In this work, Xanthan Gum (XG) was used as an environmentally friendly additive in oil dispersant formulation to enhance the stability and biodegradation of dispersed crude oil droplets. When XG was used together with chemical dispersant 9500A, the dispersion effectiveness of crude oil in artificial sea water (ASW) and the oil droplet stability were both greatly enhanced. In the presence of XG, lower concentration of 9500A was needed to achieve the effective dispersion and stabilization. In addition to the enhancement of dispersion and stabilization, it was found that the biodegradation rate of crude oil by bacteria was dramatically enhanced when a mixture of 9500A and XG was used as a dispersant. Because of the low environmental impact of XG, this would be a potential way to formulate the dispersant with lower toxicity.

  9. Fusion processing of itraconazole solid dispersions by kinetisol dispersing: a comparative study to hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    DiNunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-03-01

    KinetiSol Dispersing (KSD) is a novel high energy manufacturing process investigated here for the production of pharmaceutical solid dispersions. Solid dispersions of itraconazole (ITZ) and hypromellose were produced by KSD and compared to identical formulations produced by hot melt extrusion (HME). Materials were characterized for solid state properties by modulated differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Dissolution behavior was studied under supersaturated conditions. Oral bioavailability was determined using a Sprague-Dawley rat model. Results showed that KSD was able to produce amorphous solid dispersions in under 15 s while production by HME required over 300 s. Dispersions produced by KSD exhibited single phase solid state behavior indicated by a single glass transition temperature (T(g)) whereas compositions produced by HME exhibited two T(g)s. Increased dissolution rates for compositions manufactured by KSD were also observed compared to HME processed material. Near complete supersaturation was observed for solid dispersions produced by either manufacturing processes. Oral bioavailability from both processes showed enhanced AUC compared to crystalline ITZ. Based on the results presented from this study, KSD was shown to be a viable manufacturing process for the production of pharmaceutical solid dispersions, providing benefits over conventional techniques including: enhanced mixing for improved homogeneity and reduced processing times.

  10. Characterizing short dispersion-length fiber via dispersive virtual reference interferometry.

    PubMed

    Galle, Michael A; Zhu, Eric Y; Saini, Simarjeet S; Mohammed, Waleed S; Qian, Li

    2014-06-16

    The ability to characterize fibers with near-zero dispersion-length products is of considerable practical interest. We introduce dispersive virtual reference interferometry (DVRI) as a technique for the characterization of short length (<1m) fibers with near-zero disperison-length. DVRI has an accuracy equivalent to standard balanced spectral interferometry (on the order of 10(−3) ps and 10(−5) ps/nm for the group delay and dispersion-length measurements respectively) but does not require wide spectral bandwidths or multiple spectral scans. Following experimental validation, the DVRI technique is used to characterize a 23.3-cm erbium-doped gain fiber (dispersion-length product <0.002 ps/nm), using a tunable laser with a bandwidth of 145 nm. Furthermore, the dispersion in a 28.6-cm commercial dispersion shifted fiber is characterized across the zero-dispersion wavelength and the zero-disperison-wavelength and slope were determined to be 1566.7 nm and 8.57 × 10(−5) ps/(nm2∙m) with a precision of ± 0.2 nm and ± 0.06 × 10(−5) ps/(nm2∙m), respectively.

  11. Biologically Inspired Purification and Dispersion of SWCNTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S.; Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired method has been developed for (1) separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from other materials (principally, amorphous carbon and metal catalysts) in raw production batches and (2) dispersing the SWCNTs as individual particles (in contradistinction to ropes and bundles) in suspension, as required for a number of applications. Prior methods of purification and dispersal of SWCNTs involve, variously, harsh physical processes (e.g., sonication) or harsh chemical processes (e.g., acid reflux). These processes do not completely remove the undesired materials and do not disperse bundles and ropes into individual suspended SWCNTs. Moreover, these processes cut long SWCNTs into shorter pieces, yielding typical nanotube lengths between 150 and 250 nm. In contrast, the present method does not involve harsh physical or chemical processes. The method involves the use of biologically derived dispersal agents (BDDAs) in an aqueous solution that is mechanically homogenized (but not sonicated) and centrifuged. The dense solid material remaining after centrifugation is resuspended by vortexing in distilled water, yielding an aqueous suspension of individual, separated SWCNTs having lengths from about 10 to about 15 microns.

  12. EPA's New Oil and Dispersant Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA has initiated a new component of its oil spills research program to develop baseline data on the ecotoxicity of selected petroleum products and toxicity and efficacy of dispersant agents. Two diluted bitumens (dilbits) from the Alberta Tar Sands are currently being t...

  13. Factors affecting dispersion of backcountry campsites

    Treesearch

    Lance Kirkpatrick Canon; Steven Adler; Raymond E. Leonard

    1979-01-01

    A study using observational and survey techniques found that no backcountry users fully complied with rules designed to promote campsite dispersion and to avoid recurrent use of particular sites. Users perceived hiking/camping in general, and movement away from established trails in particular, as involving an element of risk. They indicated that convenience was an...

  14. Angular radiation transfer in inhomogeneous dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. A.; El Ghazaly, A. A.; Krim, M. S. Abdel

    1988-10-01

    The equation of radiative transfer for an inhomogeneous dispersive finite medium subject to general boundary conditions is solved. The Padé approximation technique is used to calculate the angular distribution of radiation. Numerical results for the [0/1] Padé approximant lead to numerical results that compare with the exact results.

  15. Dispersive solitons in magneto-optic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Guzman, Jose; Ullah, Malik Zaka; Asma, Mir; Zhou, Qin; Biswas, Anjan

    2017-03-01

    This paper obtains bright, dark and singular dispersive optical soliton solutions with magneto-optic waveguides. The governing equation is the coupled Schrödinger-Hirota equation. The existence criteria of these solitons are also presented. Both Kerr law and power law of nonlinearity are considered.

  16. MEDUSAHEAD DISPERSAL AND ESTABLISHMENT IN SAGEBRUSH STEPPE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski) is a nonnative, winter-annual grass that reduces biodiversity and production of rangelands. To prevent medusahead invasion land managers need to know more about its invasion process. Specifically, 1) when and how far medusahead seeds disperse and...

  17. MODELING DISPERSANT INTERACTIONS WITH OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing a model called the EPA Research Object-Oriented Oil Spill Model (ERO3S) and associated databases to simulate the impacts of dispersants on oil slicks. Because there are features of oil slicks that align naturally with major concepts of object-oriented programmi...

  18. Dynamical dispersal of primordial asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasil, P. I. O.; Roig, F.; Nesvorný, D.; Carruba, V.; Aljbaae, S.; Huaman, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Many asteroid families are identified and well characterized all over the main asteroid belt. Interestingly, however, none of them are older than 4 Gyr. Many mechanisms have been proposed to disperse such old primordial asteroid families that presumably have existed, but only very few have really worked. Here we present a plausible mechanism for dispersing primordial asteroid families that is based on the 5-planet instability model known as jumping Jupiter. Using two different evolutions for the jumping-Jupiter model, we have numerically integrated orbits of eight putative primordial families. Our results show that the most important effect on the asteroid families' eccentricity and inclination dispersal is that of the secular resonances, in some cases associated with the mean motion resonances. As for the semimajor axes spreading we find that the principal effect is that of close encounters with the fifth giant planet whose orbit briefly overlaps with (part of) the main belt. Therefore, the existence of a fifth giant planet with the mass comparable with that of Uranus' or Neptune's could contribute in important ways to dispersal of the primordial asteroid families. To have that effect, the interloper planet should go into and considerably interact with the asteroids during the instability phase.

  19. New Information Dispersal Techniques for Trustworthy Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parakh, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Information dispersal algorithms (IDA) are used for distributed data storage because they simultaneously provide security, reliability and space efficiency, constituting a trustworthy computing framework for many critical applications, such as cloud computing, in the information society. In the most general sense, this is achieved by dividing data…

  20. Mars Exploration Rovers Landing Dispersion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, Philip C.; Wawrzyniak, Geoffrey G.; Kennedy, Brian M.; Desai, Prasun N.; Parker, TImothy J.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Duxbury, Thomas C.; Kass, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Landing dispersion estimates for the Mars Exploration Rover missions were key elements in the site targeting process and in the evaluation of landing risk. This paper addresses the process and results of the landing dispersion analyses performed for both Spirit and Opportunity. The several contributors to landing dispersions (navigation and atmospheric uncertainties, spacecraft modeling, winds, and margins) are discussed, as are the analysis tools used. JPL's MarsLS program, a MATLAB-based landing dispersion visualization and statistical analysis tool, was used to calculate the probability of landing within hazardous areas. By convolving this with the probability of landing within flight system limits (in-spec landing) for each hazard area, a single overall measure of landing risk was calculated for each landing ellipse. In-spec probability contours were also generated, allowing a more synoptic view of site risks, illustrating the sensitivity to changes in landing location, and quantifying the possible consequences of anomalies such as incomplete maneuvers. Data and products required to support these analyses are described, including the landing footprints calculated by NASA Langley's POST program and JPL's AEPL program, cartographically registered base maps and hazard maps, and flight system estimates of in-spec landing probabilities for each hazard terrain type. Various factors encountered during operations, including evolving navigation estimates and changing atmospheric models, are discussed and final landing points are compared with approach estimates.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulations of Transient Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M.; Valdes-Parada, F.; Wood, B.

    2008-12-01

    Transient dispersion is important in many engineering applications, including transport in porous media. A common theoretical approach involves upscaling the micro-scale mass balance equations for convection- diffusion to macro-scale equations that contain effective medium quantities. However, there are a number of assumptions implicit in the various upscaling methods. For example, results obtained from volume averaging are often dependent on a given set of length and time scale constraints. Additionally, a number of the classical models for dispersion do not fully capture the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute for a general set of initial conditions. In this work, we present direct numerical simulations of micro-scale transient mass balance equations for convection-diffusion in both capillary tubes and porous media. Special attention is paid to analysis of the influence of a new time- decaying coefficient that filters the effects of the initial conditions. The direct numerical simulations were compared to results obtained from solving the closure problem associated with volume averaging. These comparisons provide a quantitative measure of the significance of (1) the assumptions implicit in the volume averaging method and (2) the importance of the early-time dispersive behavior of the solute due to various initial conditions.

  2. Nonlinear dispersive similariton: spectral interferometric study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeytunyan, A S; Khachikyan, T J; Palandjan, K A; Esayan, G L; Muradyan, L Kh

    2010-06-23

    A similariton formed in a passive optical fibre is experimentally found and investigated by spectral interferometry completely characterising the complex radiation field. A nonlinear dispersive character of similariton formation leads to chirp linearisation and spectrotemporal similarity of this similariton. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Pesticide dispersion by spraying under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Langenbach, Tomaz; Mano, Denise; Campos, Maize M; Cunha, Alessandra L M C; De Campos, Tácio M P

    2017-09-26

    Pesticide air pollution by spraying was evaluated under different temperature, humidity and wind climatic conditions in Brazil. Field experiments were performed with application towards the soil and in guava orchards, where spray dispersion was monitored by adding p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a fluorescent substance, as a tracer to the water contained in the spray tanks. Samples were collected with filter membranes (Whatman 180025), and the PABA was extracted from the filters by shaking with water in a Petri dish and measured in a spectrofluorometer. A spray aimed towards the soil with filters positioned on the ground and hung at different heights did not show different upward dispersion as observed when lateral pulverization was conducted. In this case, a tractor with a sprayer moved through a 3 m high and 6 m wide frame with filter membranes mounted at 60 cm intervals. Spray dispersion patterns were modified by guava leaf resistance. No influence of temperature and humidity was observed in this short-lived spraying process. Nevertheless, wind drift can occur during airborne dispersion and is an important pesticide pollution source which requires control. Droplets with PABA powered by assisted spraying upwards returned to the ground by gravity and, therefore, did not constitute a vertical source of atmospheric pollution.

  4. Oil spill dispersants: boon or bane?

    PubMed

    Prince, Roger C

    2015-06-02

    Dispersants provide a reliable large-scale response to catastrophic oil spills that can be used when the preferable option of recapturing the oil cannot be achieved. By allowing even mild wave action to disperse floating oil into tiny droplets (<70 μm) in the water column, seabirds, reptiles, and mammals are protected from lethal oiling at the surface, and microbial biodegradation is dramatically increased. Recent work has clarified how dramatic this increase is likely to be: beached oil has an environmental residence of years, whereas dispersed oil has a half-life of weeks. Oil spill response operations endorse the concept of net environmental benefit, that any environmental costs imposed by a response technique must be outweighed by the likely benefits. This critical review discusses the potential environmental debits and credits from dispersant use and concludes that, in most cases, the potential environmental costs of adding these chemicals to a polluted area are likely outweighed by the much shorter residence time, and hence integrated environmental impact, of the spilled oil in the environment.

  5. Swallowwort dispersal: seed tracking under field conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vincetoxicum rossicum (pale swallowwort) and V. nigrum (black swallowwort) are invasive, perennial vines found in natural areas of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. Seeds of both species are primarily wind-dispersed in the form of achenes with an attached coma. For this study,...

  6. New Information Dispersal Techniques for Trustworthy Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parakh, Abhishek

    2011-01-01

    Information dispersal algorithms (IDA) are used for distributed data storage because they simultaneously provide security, reliability and space efficiency, constituting a trustworthy computing framework for many critical applications, such as cloud computing, in the information society. In the most general sense, this is achieved by dividing data…

  7. Metapopulation dynamics and the evolution of dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvinen, Kalle

    A metapopulation consists of local populations living in habitat patches. In this chapter metapopulation dynamics and the evolution of dispersal is studied in two metapopulation models defined in discrete time. In the first model there are finitely many patches, and in the other one there are infinitely many patches, which allows to incorporate catastrophes into the model. In the first model, cyclic local population dynamics can be either synchronized or not, and increasing dispersal both synchronizes and stabilizes metapopulation dynamics. On the other hand, the type of dynamics has a strong effect on the evolution of dispersal. In case of non-synchronized metapopulation dynamics, dispersal is much more beneficial than in the case of synchronized metapopulation dynamics. Local dynamics has a substantial effect also on the possibility of evolutionary branching in both models. Furthermore, with an Allee effect in the local dynamics of the second model, even evolutionary suicide can occur. It is an evolutionary process in which a viable population adapts in such a way that it can no longer persist.

  8. Nonturbulent dispersion processes in complex terrain

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fosberg; Douglas G. Fox; E.A. Howard; Jack D. Cohen

    1976-01-01

    Mass divergence influences on plume dispersion modify classic Gaussian calculations by as much as a factor of two in complex terrain. The Gaussian plume was derived in flux form to include this process.Authors' response to comments and criticism received following this publication:

  9. DISPERSIONS: PROGRESSES AND PROSPECTS. (R823301)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The papers presented in this session on dispersion, rheology and mixing cover a broad
    spectrum of topics ranging from instrumentation for better characterization, to process development
    for improved stabilization, selective flocculation and dense packing, to modeling of col...

  10. Characterization of pollutant dispersion near elongated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper presents a wind tunnel study of the effects of elongated rectangular buildings on the dispersion of pollutants from nearby stacks. The study examines the influence of source location, building aspect ratio, and wind direction on pollutant dispersion with the goal of developing improved algorithms within dispersion models. The paper also examines the current AERMOD/PRIME modeling capabilities compared to wind tunnel observations. Differences in the amount of plume material entrained in the wake region downwind of a building for various source locations and source heights are illustrated with vertical and lateral concentration profiles. These profiles were parameterized using the Gaussian equation and show the influence of building/source configurations on those parameters. When the building is oriented at 45° to the approach flow, for example, the effective plume height descends more rapidly than it does for a perpendicular building, enhancing the resulting surface concentrations in the wake region. Buildings at angles to the wind cause a cross-wind shift in the location of the plume resulting from a lateral mean flow established in the building wake. These and other effects that are not well represented in many dispersion models are important considerations when developing improved algorithms to estimate the location and magnitude of concentrations downwind of elongated buildings. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposur

  11. Dispersant for aqueous slurry of coal powder

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, N.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamura, M.

    1982-05-18

    A dispersant for forming an aqueous slurry of coal powder having a good flowability, which comprises as the active ingredient at least one member selected from sulfonation products of polycyclic aromatic compounds which may have a hydrocarbon group as a substituent, salts thereof and formaldehyde condensates thereof.

  12. Phase space distributions tailored for dispersive media.

    PubMed

    Petruccelli, Jonathan C; Alonso, Miguel A

    2010-05-01

    New phase space distributions are proposed for describing pulse propagation in dispersive media for one spatial dimension. These distributions depend on time, position, and velocity, so that the pulse's spatial propagation or temporal evolution is described by a free-particle-like transformation followed by integration over velocity. Examples are considered for approximate Lorentz-model dielectrics and metallic waveguides.

  13. Dispersal-mediated coexistence of competing predators.

    PubMed

    Namba, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Chiemi

    2004-08-01

    Models of metapopulations have often ignored local community dynamics and spatial heterogeneity among patches. However, persistence of a community as a whole depends both on the local interactions and the rates of dispersal between patches. We study a mathematical model of a metacommunity with two consumers exploiting a resource in a habitat of two different patches. They are the exploitative competitors or the competing predators indirectly competing through depletion of the shared resource. We show that they can potentially coexist, even if one species is sufficiently inferior to be driven extinct in both patches in isolation, when these patches are connected through diffusive dispersal. Thus, dispersal can mediate coexistence of competitors, even if both patches are local sinks for one species because of the interactions with the other species. The spatial asynchrony and the competition-colonization trade-off are usual mechanisms to facilitate regional coexistence. However, in our case, two consumers can coexist either in synchronous oscillation between patches or in equilibrium. The higher dispersal rate of the superior prompts rather than suppresses the inferior. Since differences in the carrying capacity between two patches generate flows from the more productive patch to the less productive, loss of the superior by emigration relaxes competition in the former, and depletion of the resource by subsidized consumers decouples the local community in the latter.

  14. Feeding, flight and dispersal in thrips

    Treesearch

    Trevor Lewis

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to amplify some of the general points made in my introductory paper on the order Thysanoptera (Lewis 1990, this proceedings), with particular reference to feeding, flight and dispersal. These aspects of thrips behaviour are clearly of great relevance to the spread and effects of infestations of Taeniothrips inconsequens in...

  15. Combined dispersant fluid loss control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, J. L.; Zeiner, R. N.

    1985-12-31

    Water soluble polymer compositions containing polyacrylic acid and copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide are useful as combined dispersant and fluid loss control additives for aqueous drilling fluids, particularly fresh water, gypsum and seawater muds. An example is a polymer composition containing about 80% by weight polyacrylic acid and about 20% by weight copolymer of itaconic acid and acrylamide in its ammonium salt form.

  16. DISPERSIONS: PROGRESSES AND PROSPECTS. (R823301)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The papers presented in this session on dispersion, rheology and mixing cover a broad
    spectrum of topics ranging from instrumentation for better characterization, to process development
    for improved stabilization, selective flocculation and dense packing, to modeling of col...

  17. Localized overlap algorithm for unexpanded dispersion energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Fazle; Misquitta, Alston J.; Podeszwa, Rafał; Szalewicz, Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    First-principles-based, linearly scaling algorithm has been developed for calculations of dispersion energies from frequency-dependent density susceptibility (FDDS) functions with account of charge-overlap effects. The transition densities in FDDSs are fitted by a set of auxiliary atom-centered functions. The terms in the dispersion energy expression involving products of such functions are computed using either the unexpanded (exact) formula or from inexpensive asymptotic expansions, depending on the location of these functions relative to the dimer configuration. This approach leads to significant savings of computational resources. In particular, for a dimer consisting of two elongated monomers with 81 atoms each in a head-to-head configuration, the most favorable case for our algorithm, a 43-fold speedup has been achieved while the approximate dispersion energy differs by less than 1% from that computed using the standard unexpanded approach. In contrast, the dispersion energy computed from the distributed asymptotic expansion differs by dozens of percent in the van der Waals minimum region. A further increase of the size of each monomer would result in only small increased costs since all the additional terms would be computed from the asymptotic expansion.

  18. UNSTEADY DISPERSION IN RANDOM INTERMITTENT FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient of a conservative tracer was calculated from flow tests in a dead-end pipe loop system. Flow conditions for these tests ranged from laminar to transitional flow, and from steady to intermittent and random. Two static mixers linked in series...

  19. Dispersion-strengthened copper-niobium composites

    SciTech Connect

    Troxell, J.

    1995-06-01

    GlidCop dispersion-strengthened copper is a family of engineered alloys which combine high strength, high thermal and electrical conductivities, and outstanding resistance to softening following exposure to elevated temperatures. A proprietary process based on GlidCop dispersion-strengthened copper technology improves mechanical properties through the addition of niobium. Two grades have been developed: Al-60 + NB1000 and Al-15 + NB1000. Each composite contains 10% niobium by weight, in the form of uniformly dispersed particles. The technology produces a uniform distribution of niobium in the internally oxidized, dispersion-strengthened copper powder. This powder can be consolidated in the same manner as conventional GlidCop Powder to produce a variety of mill shapes. The addition of 10% niobium to the Al-60 matrix increases strength and hardness with only minimal reduction in electrical conductivity. The room-temperature properties of Al-60 + NB1000 following exposure to 980 C (1,800 F), are compared with the properties of some commonly used RWMA welding materials which have also been exposed to elevated temperatures. While Al-60 + NB1000 has outstanding as-extruded mechanical properties, the cold workability of this material is limited. A cold-workable composite using the lower aluminum oxide Al-15 + NB1000 indicate that the properties of the as-extruded bar are improved by cold work, specifically drawing.

  20. An Experiment on the Dispersion of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A simplified theoretical explanation of dispersion in dielectric materials has been given and experiments have been carried out on two liquids, namely, distilled water and sunflower oil. The appendix contains a detailed description of the construction of a homemade spectrometer and hollow prism and an assessment of its suitability for the above…

  1. An Experiment on the Dispersion of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A simplified theoretical explanation of dispersion in dielectric materials has been given and experiments have been carried out on two liquids, namely, distilled water and sunflower oil. The appendix contains a detailed description of the construction of a homemade spectrometer and hollow prism and an assessment of its suitability for the above…

  2. On the mathematics underlying dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Cecille; Labuda, Iwo

    2014-12-01

    The history of mathematical methods underlying the study of dispersion relations in physics is discussed. In particular, some misconceptions connected with a theorem known in the physics literature as Titchmarsh's Theorem are addressed. It is pointed out that the aforementioned theorem is a compilation of two well-known theorems in mathematics, the Paley-Wiener theorem and the Marcel Riesz theorem.

  3. MODELING DISPERSANT INTERACTIONS WITH OIL SPILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing a model called the EPA Research Object-Oriented Oil Spill Model (ERO3S) and associated databases to simulate the impacts of dispersants on oil slicks. Because there are features of oil slicks that align naturally with major concepts of object-oriented programmi...

  4. Broadband terahertz dispersion control in hybrid waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fobbe, Tobias; Markmann, Sergej; Fobbe, Felix; Hekmat, Negar; Nong, Hanond; Pal, Shovon; Balzerwoski, Patrick; Savolainen, Janne; Havenith, Martina; Wieck, Andreas D; Jukam, Nathan

    2016-09-19

    Dispersion control is a key objective in the field of photonics and spectroscopy, since it enhances non-linear effects by both enabling phase matching and offering slow light generation. In addition, it is essential for frequency comb generation, which requires a phase-lock mechanism that is provided by broadband compensation of group velocity dispersion (GVD). At optical frequencies, there are several well-established concepts for dispersion control such as prism or grating pairs. However, terahertz dispersion control is still a challenge, thus hindering further progress in the field of terahertz science and technology. In this work, we present a hybrid waveguide with both broadband, tuneable positive and more than octave-spanning negative terahertz GVD on the order of 10-22 s2/m, which is suitable for either intra- or extra cavity operation. This new terahertz device will enable ultra-short pulse compression, allow soliton propagation, improve frequency comb operation and foster the development of novel non-linear applications.

  5. Residential Preferences and Population Dispersal Migration Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, Gordon F.

    In order to test the hypothesis that size of place of residence and urban proximity preferences constitute factors in population dispersal migration behavior, a random sample of 777 Pennsylvania households plus a sample screened for moving probability (N=319) were surveyed via personal interviews in 1974. A follow-up survey on actual migration…

  6. EPA's New Oil and Dispersant Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA has initiated a new component of its oil spills research program to develop baseline data on the ecotoxicity of selected petroleum products and toxicity and efficacy of dispersant agents. Two diluted bitumens (dilbits) from the Alberta Tar Sands are currently being t...

  7. Wideband dispersion reversal of lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; Hu, Bo; Laugier, Pascal; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have been widely acknowledged as the most promising tools for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). However, because of the multimodal dispersion, the received guided modes usually overlap in both time and frequency, which highly complicates the mode separation and signal interpretation. The time-reversal technique can be used to realize the time recompression of the Lamb waves, but because of the multimode excitation and reception, it still may not be able to remove the mode ambiguity and achieve the pure pulse compression. With the goal of overcoming this limitation, a wideband dispersion reversal (WDR) technique is proposed. The technique makes use of a priori knowledge of the guided dispersion characteristics to synthesize the corresponding dispersion reversal excitations, which are able to selectively excite the self-compensation pure mode pulse. The theoretical basis of the technique is thoroughly described. A two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) method is employed to simulate the propagation of two fundamental Lamb modes, the symmetrical S0 and antisymmetrical A0 modes in a steel plate. The proposed method was verified through experimental investigation. Finally, the advantages and potential applications of the method are briefly discussed.

  8. Use of microbubble dispersion for soil scouring

    SciTech Connect

    Longe, T.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Michelsen, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Techniques for generating a microbubble dispersion (colloidal gas aphrons) have been developed. The microbubbles typically consist of 60 to 70% dispersion of 55-{micro} microbubbles in water, although dispersion up to 90 to 95% can be generated continuously. A number of laboratory soil column flow studies have been completed to define the potential of using these microbubbles to scour and release dispersed organics for subsequent pumping and removal or to enhance in situ degradation. The higher viscosity foams flow forward and fill up larger channels. The pressure drop builds up in the channel, resulting in foam flow into less accessible spill zones. In scouring hexadecane from columns containing 50- to 70-mesh sand, following a water preflush, up to 80% of the remaining organic could be flushed using a 70% CGA quality (70% air, 30% liquid). The technique was less effective at lower CGA quality. In genera, a surfactant concentration of 1,000 to 5,000 ppm was needed to generate the microbubbles.

  9. Review: physical chemistry of solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Sandrien; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2009-12-01

    With poorly soluble drug candidates emerging in the drug discovery pipeline, the importance of the solid dispersion formulation approach is increasing. This strategy includes complete removal of drug crystallinity, and molecular dispersion of the poorly soluble compound in a hydrophilic polymeric carrier. The potential of this technique to increase oral absorption and hence bioavailability is enormous. Nevertheless, some issues have to be considered regarding thermodynamic instability, as well in supersaturated solutions that are formed upon dissolution as in the solid state. After a brief discussion on the historical background of solid dispersions and their current role in formulation, an overview will be given on the physical chemistry and stability of glass solutions as they form supersaturated solutions, and during their shelf life. Thorough understanding of these aspects will elicit conscious evaluation of carrier properties and eventually facilitate rational excipient selection. Thus, full exploitation of the solid dispersion strategy may provide an appropriate answer to drug attrition due to low aqueous solubility in later stages of development.

  10. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Inoka E.; Sapko, Michael J.; Harris, Marcia L.; Zlochower, Isaac A.; Weiss, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that “… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …” However, a proper definition or quantification of “light blast of air” is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule. PMID:26834390

  11. Cooperation-mediated plasticity in dispersal and colonization.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Staffan; Wehi, Priscilla; Clobert, Jean; Legrand, Delphine; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Huet, Michele; Chaine, Alexis

    2016-10-01

    Kin selection theory predicts that costly cooperative behaviors evolve most readily when directed toward kin. Dispersal plays a controversial role in the evolution of cooperation: dispersal decreases local population relatedness and thus opposes the evolution of cooperation, but limited dispersal increases kin competition and can negate the benefits of cooperation. Theoretical work has suggested that plasticity of dispersal, where individuals can adjust their dispersal decisions according to the social context, might help resolve this paradox and promote the evolution of cooperation. Here, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that conditional dispersal decisions are mediated by a cooperative strategy: we quantified the density-dependent dispersal decisions and subsequent colonization efficiency from single cells or groups of cells among six genetic strains of the unicellular Tetrahymena thermophila that differ in their aggregation level (high, medium, and low), a behavior associated with cooperation strategy. We found that the plastic reaction norms of dispersal rate relative to density differed according to aggregation level: highly aggregative genotypes showed negative density-dependent dispersal, whereas low-aggregation genotypes showed maximum dispersal rates at intermediate density, and medium-aggregation genotypes showed density-independent dispersal with intermediate dispersal rate. Dispersers from highly aggregative genotypes had specialized long-distance dispersal phenotypes, contrary to low-aggregation genotypes; medium-aggregation genotypes showing intermediate dispersal phenotype. Moreover, highly aggregation genotypes showed evidence for beneficial kin-cooperation during dispersal. Our experimental results should help to resolve the evolutionary conflict between cooperation and dispersal: cooperative individuals are expected to avoid kin-competition by dispersing long distances, but maintain the benefits of cooperation by dispersing in small groups.

  12. The influence of dispersion slope to the higher-order dispersion coefficients for highly-nonlinear fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N.; Shah, N. S. M.; Tay, K. G.; Pakarzadeh, H.; Cholan, N. A.; Talib, R.

    2017-09-01

    The highly-nonlinear fiber is the ideal gain medium for many applications particularly because its dispersion can be easily engineered. However, the modification of the fiber dispersion will affect the higher-order dispersion coefficients. Hence, this paper investigates the effect of highly-nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber dispersion profile on the higher-order dispersion coefficients which are the fourth-order and sixth-order dispersion coefficients. The dispersion profile was modified by varying the slope at zero-dispersion wavelength. The fourth-order dispersion coefficient exhibits changes from positive to negative value as the slope at zero-dispersion wavelength is getting higher. Meanwhile, sixth-order dispersion coefficient remains with the positive value even though it shows the reduction as the slope is increased, however it will eventually become negative when the dispersion is high enough. In short, the values of both fourth-order and sixth-order dispersion coefficients at zero-dispersion wavelength decrease when the slope increases.

  13. The First Modern Human Dispersals across Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rito, Teresa; Richards, Martin B.; Fernandes, Verónica; Alshamali, Farida; Cerny, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of more refined chronologies for climate change and archaeology in prehistoric Africa, and for the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), now make it feasible to test more sophisticated models of early modern human dispersals suggested by mtDNA distributions. Here we have generated 42 novel whole-mtDNA genomes belonging to haplogroup L0, the most divergent clade in the maternal line of descent, and analysed them alongside the growing database of African lineages belonging to L0’s sister clade, L1’6. We propose that the last common ancestor of modern human mtDNAs (carried by “mitochondrial Eve”) possibly arose in central Africa ~180 ka, at a time of low population size. By ~130 ka two distinct groups of anatomically modern humans co-existed in Africa: broadly, the ancestors of many modern-day Khoe and San populations in the south and a second central/eastern African group that includes the ancestors of most extant worldwide populations. Early modern human dispersals correlate with climate changes, particularly the tropical African “megadroughts” of MIS 5 (marine isotope stage 5, 135–75 ka) which paradoxically may have facilitated expansions in central and eastern Africa, ultimately triggering the dispersal out of Africa of people carrying haplogroup L3 ~60 ka. Two south to east migrations are discernible within haplogroup LO. One, between 120 and 75 ka, represents the first unambiguous long-range modern human dispersal detected by mtDNA and might have allowed the dispersal of several markers of modernity. A second one, within the last 20 ka signalled by L0d, may have been responsible for the spread of southern click-consonant languages to eastern Africa, contrary to the view that these eastern examples constitute relicts of an ancient, much wider distribution. PMID:24236171

  14. The first modern human dispersals across Africa.

    PubMed

    Rito, Teresa; Richards, Martin B; Fernandes, Verónica; Alshamali, Farida; Cerny, Viktor; Pereira, Luísa; Soares, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of more refined chronologies for climate change and archaeology in prehistoric Africa, and for the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), now make it feasible to test more sophisticated models of early modern human dispersals suggested by mtDNA distributions. Here we have generated 42 novel whole-mtDNA genomes belonging to haplogroup L0, the most divergent clade in the maternal line of descent, and analysed them alongside the growing database of African lineages belonging to L0's sister clade, L1'6. We propose that the last common ancestor of modern human mtDNAs (carried by "mitochondrial Eve") possibly arose in central Africa ~180 ka, at a time of low population size. By ~130 ka two distinct groups of anatomically modern humans co-existed in Africa: broadly, the ancestors of many modern-day Khoe and San populations in the south and a second central/eastern African group that includes the ancestors of most extant worldwide populations. Early modern human dispersals correlate with climate changes, particularly the tropical African "megadroughts" of MIS 5 (marine isotope stage 5, 135-75 ka) which paradoxically may have facilitated expansions in central and eastern Africa, ultimately triggering the dispersal out of Africa of people carrying haplogroup L3 ~60 ka. Two south to east migrations are discernible within haplogroup LO. One, between 120 and 75 ka, represents the first unambiguous long-range modern human dispersal detected by mtDNA and might have allowed the dispersal of several markers of modernity. A second one, within the last 20 ka signalled by L0d, may have been responsible for the spread of southern click-consonant languages to eastern Africa, contrary to the view that these eastern examples constitute relicts of an ancient, much wider distribution.

  15. Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy: Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Genevieve B.

    The subject of this thesis is the fundamentals, implementation, and applications of Chirped Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (CLaDS), an alternative dispersion spectroscopy technique that aims to overcome some limitations of absorption-based sensing. CLaDS preserves many of the benefits of dispersion sensing, namely baseline-free operation, immunity to received intensity, and linearity with sample concentration, and is fairly easy to implement without the need for stabilized interferometers, mode-locked lasers, and complex optical configurations required by many other dispersion-based sensors. First an introduction to CLaDS and a derivation of the spectroscopic signals are provided, highlighting fundamental similarities and differences to absorption-based sensing. Next the fundamental limit of CLaDS is investigated through analysis of the shot-noise limited performance under ideal operating conditions. This in turn allows for a theoretical and direct comparison to the shot-noise-limited performance of direct laser absorption spectroscopy (DLAS). This investigation shows that when full spectral scan fitting of realistic unknown parameters for each technique is used, both techniques demonstrate the same efficiency of parameter extraction. Following this theoretical investigation of ideal CLaDS performance, the technical details, methods of implementation, and component-introduced limitations of real-world CLaDS systems are discussed. Also included is a discussion of the first demonstration of an optical heterodyne enhanced CLaDS technique (HE-CLaDS). To overcome some of the technical limitations imposed by system instability, a modulation based technique (CM-CLaDS) was developed; the theory, optimization and noise characteristics of which are detailed. Finally, several applications of CLaDS are provided. These include atmospheric sensing, distributed sensor networks, and fiber dispersion characterization, all of which aim at demonstrating the technical advantages of the

  16. A dispersion flattened tellurite composite holey fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Meisong; Duan, ZhongChao; Gao, Weiqing; Yan, Xin; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2012-02-01

    Highly nonlinear tellurite holey fiber can be transparent from visible to 5 μm. Its nonlinearity can be higher than highly nonlinear silica fiber by more than one order of magnitude. However, the dispersion of tellurite holey fiber is difficult to tailor because of the difficulties in fabrication. Tellurite glass shows a low viscosity at the fiber drawing temperature. Moreover the viscosity decreases sharply with increasing temperature. Tellurite holey fiber with a complex microstructure could be subject to heavy deformation during fabrication process. So far most tellurite highly nonlinear holey fibers just have a simple structure which results in an unflattened dispersion. It cancels the advantage of high nonlinearity greatly in practical applications. In this work we try to develop a dispersion flattened tellurite composite holey fiber (TCHF). The holey structure of the TCHF is composed of only one ring of holes, so the heavy deformation, which probably occurs for tellurite complex microstructured fiber during the fabrication process, can be avoided. Since the holey structure is simple, to improve the flexibility in tailoring dispersion, we use two kinds of tellurite glasses which have different refractive-indices to design and fabricate the TCHF. The holes are formed by two tellurite glasses. The fiber can be fabricated by a simple rod-in-tube method. By using this structure the dispersion is engineered to be the most flattened for the highly nonlinear soft glass fiber within 1.5-1.6 μm. More than one octave supercontinuum generation, mainly broadened by self phase modulation, is demonstrated by using the fabricated TCHF.

  17. Functional crossover in the dispersion relations of magnons and phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoser, A.; Köbler, U.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental data are presented showing that the dispersion relations of magnons and acoustic phonons can consist of two sections with different functions of wave vector. In the low wave vector range a power function of wave vector often holds over a finite q-range while dispersions for larger wave vector values better approach the atomistic model predictions. In the magnon spectra ∼⃒qx power functions with exponents x=1.25, 1.5 and 2 are identified. The dispersion of the acoustic phonons can be a linear function of wave vector over a surprisingly large range of energy. Since the slope of the linear section agrees with the known sound velocities it can be concluded that the dispersion of the acoustic phonons has got attracted by the linear dispersion of the mass less Debye bosons (sound waves). Due to the different (translational) symmetries of bosons and atomistic excitations (magnons, phonons) the associated dispersions can attract each other. In the same way the different ∼⃒qx power functions in the magnon dispersions indicate that magnon dispersions are attracted by the dispersion of the bosons of the magnetic continuum (Goldstone bosons). This allows evaluation of the otherwise difficult to obtain dispersions of the Goldstone bosons from the known magnon dispersions. Interestingly, the dispersions of Goldstone bosons (Debye bosons) attract magnon dispersions (phonon dispersions) and not vice versa.

  18. The Trajectory of Dispersal Research in Conservation Biology. Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Don A.; Banks, Sam C.; Barton, Philip S.; Ikin, Karen; Lentini, Pia; Lindenmayer, David B.; Smith, Annabel L.; Berry, Laurence E.; Burns, Emma L.; Edworthy, Amanda; Evans, Maldwyn J.; Gibson, Rebecca; Heinsohn, Rob; Howland, Brett; Kay, Geoff; Munro, Nicola; Scheele, Ben C.; Stirnemann, Ingrid; Stojanovic, Dejan; Sweaney, Nici; Villaseñor, Nélida R.; Westgate, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management

  19. Reversed dispersion slope photonic bandgap fibers for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Várallyay, Z; Saitoh, K; Fekete, J; Kakihara, K; Koshiba, M; Szipocs, R

    2008-09-29

    Higher-order-mode solid and hollow core photonic bandgap fibers exhibiting reversed or zero dispersion slope over tens or hundreds of nanometer bandwidths within the bandgap are presented. This attractive feature makes them well suited for broadband dispersion control in femtosecond pulse fiber lasers, amplifiers and optical parametric oscillators. The canonical form of the dispersion profile in photonic bandgap fibers is modified by a partial reflector layer/interface placed around the core forming a 2D cylindrical Gires-Tournois type interferometer. This small perturbation in the index profile induces a frequency dependent electric field distribution of the preferred propagating higher-order-mode resulting in a zero or reversed dispersion slope.

  20. Stable dispersions of polymer-coated graphitic nanoplatelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Nguyen, Sonbinh T. (Inventor); Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of making a dispersion of reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets involves providing a dispersion of graphite oxide nanoplatelets and reducing the graphite oxide nanoplatelets in the dispersion in the presence of a reducing agent and a polymer. The reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets are reduced to an extent to provide a higher C/O ratio than graphite oxide. A stable dispersion having polymer-treated reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets dispersed in a dispersing medium, such as water or organic liquid is provided. The polymer-treated, reduced graphite oxide nanoplatelets can be distributed in a polymer matrix to provide a composite material.

  1. Chromatic dispersion effect in a microwave photonic filter using superstructured fiber Bragg grating and dispersive fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bennion, Ian; Williams, John

    2005-08-22

    In this paper a microwave photonic filter using superstructured fiber Bragg grating and dispersive fiber is investigated. A theoretical model to describe the transfer function of the filter taking into consideration the spectral width of light source is established. Experiments are carried out to verify the theoretical analysis. Both theoretical and experimental results indicate that due to chromatic dispersion the source spectral width introduces an additional power penalty to the microwave photonic response of the filter.

  2. Hierarchical mechanisms of spatially contagious seed dispersal in complex seed-disperser networks.

    PubMed

    Fedriani, José M; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-02-01

    Intra- and interspecific spatially contagious seed dispersal has far-reaching implications for plant recruitment, distribution, and community assemblage. However, logistical and analytical limitations have curtailed our understanding concerning the mechanisms and resulting spatial patterns of contagious seed dispersal in most systems and, especially, in complex seed-disperser networks. We investigated mechanisms of seed aggregation using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis and extensive data sets on mutispecific endozoochorous seed rain generated by five frugivorous mammals in three Mediterranean shrublands over two seasons. Our novel analytical approach revealed three hierarchical and complementary mechanisms of seed aggregation acting at different levels (fecal samples, seeds, pairs of seed species) and spatial scales. First, the three local guilds of frugivores tended to deliver their feces highly aggregated at small and intermediate spatial scales, and the overall pattern of fecal delivery could be described well by a nested double-cluster Thomas process. Second, once the strong observed fecal aggregation was accounted for, the distribution of mammal feces containing seeds was clustered within the pattern of all feces (i.e., with and without seeds), and the density of fecal samples containing seeds was higher than expected around other feces containing seeds in two out of the three studied seed-disperser networks. Finally, at a finer level, mark correlation analyses revealed that for some plant species pairs, the number of dispersed seeds was positively associated either at small or large spatial scales. Despite the relatively invariant patterning of nested double-clustering, some attributes of endozoochorous seed rain (e.g., intensity, scales of aggregation) were variable among study sites due to changes in the ecological context in which seeds and their dispersers interact. Our investigation disentangles for the first time the hierarchy of synergic

  3. Bushmeat poaching reduces the seed dispersal and population growth rate of a mammal-dispersed tree.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Jedediah F; Helmy, Olga E; Brockelman, Warren Y; Maron, John L

    2009-06-01

    Myriad tropical vertebrates are threatened by overharvest. Whether this harvest has indirect effects on nonhunted organisms that interact with the game species is a critical question. Many tropical birds and mammals disperse seeds. Their overhunting in forests can cause zoochorous trees to suffer from reduced seed dispersal. Yet how these reductions in seed dispersal influence tree abundance and population dynamics remains unclear. Reproductive parameters in long-lived organisms often have very low elasticities; indeed the demographic importance of seed dispersal is an open question. We asked how variation in hunting pressure across four national parks with seasonal forest in northern Thailand influenced the relative abundance of gibbons, muntjac deer, and sambar deer, the sole dispersers of seeds of the canopy tree Choerospondias axillaris. We quantified how variation in disperser numbers affected C. axillaris seed dispersal and seedling abundance across the four parks. We then used these data in a structured population model based on vital rates measured in Khao Yai National Park (where poaching pressure is minimal) to explore how variation in illegal hunting pressure might influence C. axillaris population growth and persistence. Densities of the mammals varied strongly across the parks, from relatively high in Khao Yai to essentially zero in Doi Suthep-Pui. Levels of C. axillaris seed dispersal and seedling abundance positively tracked mammal density. If hunting in Khao Yai were to increase to the levels seen in the other parks, C. axillaris population growth rate would decline, but only slightly. Extinction of C. axillaris is a real possibility, but may take many decades. Recent and ongoing extirpations of vertebrates in many tropical forests could be creating an extinction debt for zoochorous trees whose vulnerability is belied by their current abundance.

  4. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  5. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  6. What is the required minimum landscape size for dispersal studies?

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2007-11-01

    Among small animals dispersal parameters are mainly obtained by traditional methods using population studies of marked individuals. Dispersal studies may underestimate the rate and distance of dispersal, and be biased because of aggregated habitat patches and a small study area. The probability of observing long distance dispersal events decreases with distance travelled by the organisms. In this study a new approach is presented to solve this methodological problem. An extensive mark-release-recapture programme was performed in an area of 81 km(2) in southern Sweden. To estimate the required size of the study area for adequate dispersal measures we examined the effect of study area size on dispersal distance using empirical data and a repeated subsampling procedure. In 2003 and 2004, two species of diurnal burnet moths (Zygaenidae) were studied to explore dispersal patterns. The longest confirmed dispersal distance was 5600 m and in total 100 dispersal events were found between habitat patches for the two species. The estimated dispersal distance was strongly affected by the size of the study area and the number of marked individuals. For areas less than 10 km(2) most of the dispersal events were undetected. Realistic estimates of dispersal distance require a study area of at least 50 km(2). To obtain adequate measures of dispersal, the marked population should be large, preferably over 500 recaptured individuals. This result was evident for the mean moved distance, mean dispersal distance and maximum dispersal distance. In general, traditional dispersal studies are performed in small study areas and based on few individuals and should therefore be interpreted with care. Adequate dispersal measures for insects obtained by radio-tracking and genetic estimates (gene flow) is still a challenge for the future.

  7. Intense or Spatially Heterogeneous Predation Can Select against Prey Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Barraquand, Frederic; Murrell, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal theory generally predicts kin competition, inbreeding, and temporal variation in habitat quality should select for dispersal, whereas spatial variation in habitat quality should select against dispersal. The effect of predation on the evolution of dispersal is currently not well-known: because predation can be variable in both space and time, it is not clear whether or when predation will promote dispersal within prey. Moreover, the evolution of prey dispersal affects strongly the encounter rate of predator and prey individuals, which greatly determines the ecological dynamics, and in turn changes the selection pressures for prey dispersal, in an eco-evolutionary feedback loop. When taken all together the effect of predation on prey dispersal is rather difficult to predict. We analyze a spatially explicit, individual-based predator-prey model and its mathematical approximation to investigate the evolution of prey dispersal. Competition and predation depend on local, rather than landscape-scale densities, and the spatial pattern of predation corresponds well to that of predators using restricted home ranges (e.g. central-place foragers). Analyses show the balance between the level of competition and predation pressure an individual is expected to experience determines whether prey should disperse or stay close to their parents and siblings, and more predation selects for less prey dispersal. Predators with smaller home ranges also select for less prey dispersal; more prey dispersal is favoured if predators have large home ranges, are very mobile, and/or are evenly distributed across the landscape. PMID:22247764

  8. Bouncing universe with modified dispersion relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Huang, Yong-Chang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, employing the modified dispersion relation, we have derived the general modified Friedmann equations and the corresponding modified entropy relations for the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) Universe. In this setup, we find that when the big bounce happens, its energy scale and its corresponding modified entropy behavior are sensitive to the value of k. In contrast to the previous work with k=0, our work mainly demonstrates that the bouncing behavior for the closed Universe with k=1 appears at the normal energy limit of the modified dispersion relation introduced, and when bouncing phenomenon is in presence, its modified entropy is just equal to zero. Surprisingly, when k=-1, the bouncing behavior is in absence.

  9. Wastewater effluent dispersal in Southern California Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yusuke; Idica, Eileen Y.; McWilliams, James C.; Stolzenbach, Keith D.

    2014-03-01

    The dispersal and dilution of urban wastewater effluents from offshore, subsurface outfalls is simulated with a comprehensive circulation model with downscaling in nested grid configurations for San Pedro and Santa Monica Bays in Southern California during Fall of 2006. The circulation is comprised of mean persistent currents, mesoscale and submesoscale eddies, and tides. Effluent volume inflow rates at Huntington Beach and Hyperion are specified, and both their present outfall locations and alternative nearshore diversion sites are assessed. The effluent tracer concentration fields are highly intermittent mainly due to eddy currents, and their probability distribution functions have long tails of high concentration. The dilution rate is controlled by submesoscale stirring and straining in tracer filaments. The dominant dispersal pattern is alongshore in both directions, approximately along isobaths, over distances of more than 10 km before dilution takes over. The current outfall locations mostly keep the effluent below the surface and away from the shore, as intended, but the nearshore diversions do not.

  10. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  11. Multiwavelength achromatic metasurfaces by dispersive phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aieta, Francesco; Kats, Mikhail A.; Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico

    2015-03-01

    The replacement of bulk refractive optical elements with diffractive planar components enables the miniaturization of optical systems. However, diffractive optics suffers from large chromatic aberrations due to the dispersion of the phase accumulated by light during propagation. We show that this limitation can be overcome with an engineered wavelength-dependent phase shift imparted by a metasurface, and we demonstrate a design that deflects three wavelengths by the same angle. A planar lens without chromatic aberrations at three wavelengths is also presented. Our designs are based on low-loss dielectric resonators, which introduce a dense spectrum of optical modes to enable dispersive phase compensation. The suppression of chromatic aberrations in metasurface-based planar photonics will find applications in lightweight collimators for displays, as well as chromatically corrected imaging systems.

  12. Dispersion management of the SULF front end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Xu, Yi; Liu, Zhengzheng; Lu, Jun; Li, Yanyan; Liu, Xingyan; Li, Zhaoyang; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin

    2017-04-01

    To manage dispersion of the front end in the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility (SULF), which is a large-scale project aimed at delivering 10 PW laser pulses, a stretcher based on a combination of a grating and a prism (grism) pair is inserted between an Öffner-triplet-type stretcher and a regenerative amplifier to reduce high-order dispersion introduced by optical materials at the amplification stage. The alignment of the grism pair is implemented by controlling the far-field pattern of the output beam of the grism pair. The energy of the front end reaches up to 7 J at a 1-Hz repetition rate. Experimental results show that the pulse duration can be compressed to 22.4 fs and the spectral distortion over the spectrum is less than 2.25 rad.

  13. Highly dispersible disk-like graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakilas, Vasilios; Vrettos, Katerina; Katomeri, Katerina; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Dimos, Konstantinos; Gournis, Dimitris; Zboril, Radek

    2015-09-01

    We present the preparation of disk-like graphene nanoflakes, highly dispersible in dimethylformamide (DMF), with uniform size and thickness. The preparation procedure includes an overnight mild sonication of natural graphite in DMF, followed by a purification step using ultra-centrifugation. The mean diameter of the as produced well defined round shaped graphene nanoflakes is about 100 nm and they consisted of less than twenty graphenic layers.We present the preparation of disk-like graphene nanoflakes, highly dispersible in dimethylformamide (DMF), with uniform size and thickness. The preparation procedure includes an overnight mild sonication of natural graphite in DMF, followed by a purification step using ultra-centrifugation. The mean diameter of the as produced well defined round shaped graphene nanoflakes is about 100 nm and they consisted of less than twenty graphenic layers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04422g

  14. Radiation pressure of active dispersive chiral slabs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoyan; Li, Hailong; Gao, Dongliang; Gao, Lei; Xu, Jun; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-06-29

    We report a mechanism to obtain optical pulling or pushing forces exerted on the active dispersive chiral media. Electromagnetic wave equations for the pure chiral media using constitutive relations containing dispersive Drude models are numerically solved by means of Auxiliary Differential Equation Finite Difference Time Domain (ADE-FDTD) method. This method allows us to access the time averaged Lorentz force densities exerted on the magnetoelectric coupling chiral slabs via the derivation of bound electric and magnetic charge densities, as well as bound electric and magnetic current densities. Due to the continuously coupled cross-polarized electromagnetic waves, we find that the pressure gradient force is engendered on the active chiral slabs under a plane wave incidence. By changing the material parameters of the slabs, the total radiation pressure exerted on a single slab can be directed either along the propagation direction or in the opposite direction. This finding provides a promising avenue for detecting the chirality of materials by optical forces.

  15. Calculating the Phonon Dispersion From First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Frank; O'Hara, Andy; Slepko, Alexander; Demkov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project was to construct a user-friendly tool that can compute the phonon dispersion for any solid with a periodic crystal structure. The phonon dispersion describes the crystal's vibrational properties and thermodynamic properties of the solid. Using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) we compute the forces between the atoms. Assuming harmonic approximation we numerically evaluate force constant matrix. The lattice Fourier transform of the force constants yields the dynamical matrix, whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors represent the allowed phonon frequencies and displacement patterns for specific k-vectors. Our code then plots the frequencies along high symmetry lines in the Brillouin zone. We will present our results for silicon, GaAs and ZrO2.

  16. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  17. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  18. Uncertainty in dispersion forecasts using meteorological ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H N; Leach, M J

    1999-07-12

    The usefulness of dispersion forecasts depends on proper interpretation of results. Understanding the uncertainty in model predictions and the range of possible outcomes is critical for determining the optimal course of action in response to terrorist attacks. One of the objectives for the Modeling and Prediction initiative is creating tools for emergency planning for special events such as the upcoming the Olympics. Meteorological forecasts hours to days in advance are used to estimate the dispersion at the time of the event. However, there is uncertainty in any meteorological forecast, arising from both errors in the data (both initial conditions and boundary conditions) and from errors in the model. We use ensemble forecasts to estimate the uncertainty in the forecasts and the range of possible outcomes.

  19. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  20. Aerated concrete with mineral dispersed reinforcing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdov, G. I.; Ilina, L. V.; Mukhina, I. N.; Rakov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    To guarantee the production of aerated concrete with the lowest average density while ensuring the required strength it is necessary to use a silica component with a surface area of 250-300 m2 / kg. The article presents experimental data on grinding the silica component together with clinker to the optimum dispersion. This allows increasing the strength of non-autoclaved aerated concrete up to 33%. Furthermore, the addition to aerated concrete the mixture of dispersed reinforcing agents (wollastonite, diopside) and electrolytes with multiply charged cations and anions (1% Fe2 (SO4)3; Al2 (SO4)3) provides the growth of aerated concrete strength at 30 - 75%. As a cohesive the clinker, crushed together with silica and mineral supplements should be used. This increases the strength of aerated concrete at 65% in comparing with Portland cement.

  1. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Planetary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Harbeck, D; Lloyd, J

    2005-07-06

    We describe a plan to study the radial velocity of low mass stars and brown dwarfs using a combination of interferometry and multichannel dispersive spectroscopy, Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI). The EDI technology allows implementation of precision velocimetry and spectroscopy on existing moderate-resolution echelle or linear grating spectrograph over their full and simultaneous bandwidth. We intend to add EDI to the new Cornell TripleSpec infrared simultaneous JHK-band spectrograph at the Palomar Observatory 200'' telescope for a science-demonstration program that will allow a unique Doppler-search for planets orbiting low mass faint M, L and T type stars. The throughput advantage of EDI with a moderate resolution spectrograph is critical to achieving the requisite sensitivity for the low luminosity late L and T dwarfs.

  2. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  3. Braze joints of dispersion strengthened copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaofeng; Bao, Tingshan; Chin, Bryan A.

    1996-10-01

    Prior attempts to join alumina dispersion strengthened alloys (GlidCop) to itself, stainless steel (SS) and other materials have been less than successful. Typically these joints show low strength and poor ductility due to the segregation of alumina particles at the braze interface. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to develop low activation brazing alloys, fluxes and processes for vacuum, argon and air environments to join alumina dispersion strengthened copper alloys to 304 SS. Vacuum and argon experiments were conducted using a Gleeble resistance heated system. Air brazing experiments were conducted in a resistance heated furnace with active fluxes. A reactive braze alloy composition has been developed which eliminates the segregation of Al 2O 3 particles at the braze interface and produces joints with excellent strength and ductility. Wetting and mechanical properties of the braze alloys were measured. Tensile properties, microstructure, microhardness and measurements of the compositional segregation across the braze joint are discussed.

  4. Dispersed phase effects on boundary layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, David; Helgans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    In natural and environmental settings, turbulence is often seeded with some sort of dispersed phase: dust, rain, snow, sediment, etc. Depending on the circumstances, elements of the dispersed phase can participate in both dynamic and thermodynamic coupling, thereby altering the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum through several complex avenues. In this study, evaporating droplets are two-way coupled to turbulent wall-bounded flow via direct numerical simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian point particle tracking, and we are specifically interested in the wall-normal transport of momentum, heat, and moisture. Our studies show that particles can carry significant portions of all three, and that this is a strong function of the particle Stokes number. These findings are interpreted in the context of environmental flows and the practical implications will be discussed. The authors acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding under Grant #AGS-1429921.

  5. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  6. Morphomechanical Innovation Drives Explosive Seed Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Hofhuis, Hugo; Moulton, Derek; Lessinnes, Thomas; Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Bomphrey, Richard J; Mosca, Gabriella; Reinhardt, Hagen; Sarchet, Penny; Gan, Xiangchao; Tsiantis, Miltos; Ventikos, Yiannis; Walker, Simon; Goriely, Alain; Smith, Richard; Hay, Angela

    2016-06-30

    How mechanical and biological processes are coordinated across cells, tissues, and organs to produce complex traits is a key question in biology. Cardamine hirsuta, a relative of Arabidopsis thaliana, uses an explosive mechanism to disperse its seeds. We show that this trait evolved through morphomechanical innovations at different spatial scales. At the organ scale, tension within the fruit wall generates the elastic energy required for explosion. This tension is produced by differential contraction of fruit wall tissues through an active mechanism involving turgor pressure, cell geometry, and wall properties of the epidermis. Explosive release of this tension is controlled at the cellular scale by asymmetric lignin deposition within endocarp b cells-a striking pattern that is strictly associated with explosive pod shatter across the Brassicaceae plant family. By bridging these different scales, we present an integrated mechanism for explosive seed dispersal that links evolutionary novelty with complex trait innovation. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  7. Phonon dispersion relation of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Daniel; Bruna, Pere; Valles, Araceli; Pineda, Eloi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental data on the phase sound speed of metallic glasses show anomalies in the terahertz range, reflecting an underlying complex behavior of their phonon dispersion spectrum not yet explained. We determine the phonon dispersion curve of metallic glasses by means of massive molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to obtain the low-q region behavior with unprecedented detail. Results confirm that the sound speed is constant below the THz range, down to the macroscopic limit. On the contrary, a hardening of the sound speed, more notable in the transverse case, is found in the THz range. This behavior is modeled in terms of a relaxation model. The model gives quantitative agreement and allows us to determine a new threshold frequency ωh, at the end of the boson-peak region. Above ωh the shear modulus increases dramatically, reflecting the end of the amorphous-like acoustic propagation region characterized by the excess density of vibrational states.

  8. The dispersal of staphylococci in hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Noble, W. C.

    1962-01-01

    The air of three hospital wards was examined frequently for staphylococci for a period of nearly four years using slit samplers. `Broadcasts' of staphylococci into the air were observed with the air count rising well above the mean of 0·2 staphylococcal particle per cubic foot and these broadcasts often appeared to be due to single patients. Eight of the 3,675 patients admitted to the wards possessed an ability to disperse staphylococci into the air of the wards which was markedly greater than normal. The actual dispersal about the ward appeared to be mediated by the bedclothes, for, when these were disturbed, large numbers of staphylococci were disseminated into the air. PMID:16810990

  9. Dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-11-01

    We present the first proof-of-principle spectroscopic measurements with purely passive dispersive Fourier transformation femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering. In femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering, the full Raman scattering spectrum is efficiently obtained, as all Raman transitions are coherently excited with the combination of a narrow-bandwidth and a broad-bandwidth (femtosecond) pulse at once. Currently, the detection speed of the spectra is limited by the read-out time of classical, comparably slow CCD-based spectrometers. We show a reduction in the acquisition time of Raman signatures by applying the dispersive Fourier transformation, a method employing wavelength-to-time transformation, in order to record the spectral composition of a single pulse with a single fast photodiode. This arrangement leads to an acquisition time of Raman signatures, scaling inversely with the repetition frequency of the applied laser system, which in our case corresponds to the order of microseconds.

  10. Dispersive radiation and regime switching of oscillating bound solitons in twin-core fibers near zero-dispersion wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshnikov, Ivan; Driben, Rodislav; Yulin, Alexey

    2017-07-01

    We study resonant radiation generated by bound solitons in a twin-core fiber near a zero-dispersion wavelength, in the presence of higher order dispersion terms. We propose a theoretical description of a dispersive wave generation mechanism and derive resonance conditions. The presence of a third order dispersion term leads to generation of polychromatic dispersive radiation and transition from the regime of center-of-mass oscillations to the regime of amplitude oscillations. Such a transition is not reproduced in the case of symmetric fourth order dispersion.

  11. [Disperse endocrine system and APUD concept].

    PubMed

    Mil'to, I V; Sukhodolo, I V; Gereng, E A; Shamardina, L A

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the problems of disperse endocrine system and APUD-system morphology, summarizes some debatable issues of single endocrine cell biology. The data presented refer to the history of both systems discovery, morphological methods of their study, developmental sources, their structural organization and physiological roles of their cells. The significance of single endocrine cells in the regulation of the organism functions is discussed.

  12. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  13. Colorimetric estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Hallen, R M

    1980-05-01

    A method for the estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions is described. The method is based on the formation of a lipid-molybdenum blue complex, which is extracted into chloroform from the aqueous phase. Phosphate ions, detergents, proteins, neutral lipids and various other ions do not interfere in the lipid estimation. The method is sensitive down to a lipid concentration of 0.1 mumol/ml, with an accuracy better than +/- 3%.

  14. Dispersion of Sound in Marine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    at which the modes are well separated in time. The objective here is to investigate the use of time warping as a means to resolve modes at much...shorter ranges. Time warping involves transforming the initial time-frequency domain to a new domain in which the modal dispersion relationships are...single tones. Warping is not strongly sensitive to precise knowledge of the experimental geometry (i.e. the source range), and enables resolution of

  15. Wave modulation in a nonlinear dispersive medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.C.; Khadra, L.; Powers, E.J.

    1980-11-01

    A model describing the simultaneous amplitude and phase modulation of a carrier wave propagating in a nonlinear dispersive medium is developed in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions between the sidebands and a low frequency wave. It is also shown that the asymmetric distribution of sidebands is determined by the wavenumber dependence of the coupling coefficient. Digital complex demodulation techniques are used to study modulated waves in a weakly ionized plasma and the experimental results support the analytical model.

  16. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  17. Time Dispersive Spectrometer Using Digital Switching Means

    DOEpatents

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2004-09-07

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  18. GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2005-03-21

    The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

  19. Atmospheric Dispersion of High Velocity Jets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    jet "penetrates" the atmosphere before coming essentially to rest relative to the ambient wind. Stationary sources such as engine run up test staids...used to non-dimensionalize or standardize the abscissa of the temperature profile. The standard deviations are ta- bulated in Tables I, II and III for...incidence was in- creased, the length normal to the wind direction where the dispersion tribution was essentially uniform (ie. sigma approaches infinity

  20. Beam Quality Deterioration Due to Angular Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Sergiy

    2014-03-01

    Laser pulses are often manipulated by different optical elements in free space for purposes of filtering, stretching/compression, shaping, and splitting. This is due to the impossibility of using fiber optical components to withstand high energy pulses. The beam quality factor for free-space propagating optical beams, M2, is typically used to characterize the performance of optical elements. Optical element which preserves M2 in the CW regime may in fact worsen M2 for pulses with the same time-averaged power if this optical element exhibits dispersion in the spectral range of the pulse's bandwidth. Basic dispersive effects can be expressed in terms of aberration-free monochromatic beam optics, and they are longitudinal shift of the waist position, transversal shift of the waist center and angular shift of the propagation direction with wavelength tuning. The first two effects are negligible for optical elements much shorter than the Rayleigh length. We have found an analytical expression for the deterioration of M2 from unity due to angular dispersion for a test pulse which has transverse Gaussian beam profile. This expression depends on both the transverse size of the pulse and the mean square variation of the spectral-angular characteristic of the optical element averaged with the spectral weight distribution of the pulse. In particular, with decreasing of beam size, the M2 deteriorates less because the spectral-angular variation of the propagation direction is mitigated by increasing beam divergence due to diffraction. In our judgment, an optical element should be characterized by its angular dispersion properties rather than measurements of M2.