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Sample records for bladder cancer tissues

  1. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer often starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  2. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  3. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-23

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  4. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Oner; Dobruch, Jakub; Knowles, Margaret A; Burger, Maximilian; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Nielsen, Matthew E; Lotan, Yair

    2017-04-13

    Bladder cancer is a highly prevalent disease and is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and cost. Environmental or occupational exposures to carcinogens, especially tobacco, are the main risk factors for bladder cancer. Most bladder cancers are diagnosed after patients present with macroscopic haematuria, and cases are confirmed after transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT), which also serves as the first stage of treatment. Bladder cancer develops via two distinct pathways, giving rise to non-muscle-invasive papillary tumours and non-papillary (solid) muscle-invasive tumours. The two subtypes have unique pathological features and different molecular characteristics. Indeed, The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified genetic drivers of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) as well as subtypes of MIBC with distinct characteristics and therapeutic responses. For non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), intravesical therapies (primarily Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)) with maintenance are the main treatments to prevent recurrence and progression after initial TURBT; additional therapies are needed for those who do not respond to BCG. For localized MIBC, optimizing care and reducing morbidity following cystectomy are important goals. In metastatic disease, advances in our genetic understanding of bladder cancer and in immunotherapy are being translated into new therapies.

  5. Spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Muslet, Nafie A.; Ali, Essam E.

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Africa. It takes several days to reach a diagnosis using histological examinations of specimens obtained by endoscope, which increases the medical expense. Recently, spectroscopic analysis of bladder cancer tissues has received considerable attention as a diagnosis technique due to its sensitivity to biochemical variations in the samples. This study investigated the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to analyze a number of bladder cancer tissues. Twenty-two samples were collected from 11 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer from different hospitals without any pretreatment. From each patient two samples were collected, one normal and another cancerous. FTIR spectrometer was used to differentiate between normal and cancerous bladder tissues via changes in spectra of these samples. The investigations detected obvious changes in the bands of proteins (1650, 1550 cm-1), lipids (2925, 2850 cm-1), and nucleic acid (1080, 1236 cm-1). The results show that FTIR spectroscopy is promising as a rapid, accurate, nondestructive, and easy to use alternative method for identification and diagnosis of bladder cancer tissues.

  6. Comparative Tissue Proteomics of Microdissected Specimens Reveals Novel Candidate Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lun; Chung, Ting; Wu, Chih-Ching; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Yu, Jau-Song; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Chang, Yu-Sun; Liang, Ying; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting

    2015-01-01

    More than 380,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide, accounting for ∼150,200 deaths each year. To discover potential biomarkers of bladder cancer, we employed a strategy combining laser microdissection, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling, and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) analysis to profile proteomic changes in fresh-frozen bladder tumor specimens. Cellular proteins from four pairs of surgically resected primary bladder cancer tumor and adjacent nontumorous tissue were extracted for use in two batches of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation experiments, which identified a total of 3220 proteins. A DAVID (database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery) analysis of dysregulated proteins revealed that the three top-ranking biological processes were extracellular matrix organization, extracellular structure organization, and oxidation-reduction. Biological processes including response to organic substances, response to metal ions, and response to inorganic substances were highlighted by up-expressed proteins in bladder cancer. Seven differentially expressed proteins were selected as potential bladder cancer biomarkers for further verification. Immunohistochemical analyses showed significantly elevated levels of three proteins—SLC3A2, STMN1, and TAGLN2—in tumor cells compared with noncancerous bladder epithelial cells, and suggested that TAGLN2 could be a useful tumor tissue marker for diagnosis (AUC = 0.999) and evaluating lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer patients. ELISA results revealed significantly increased urinary levels of both STMN1 and TAGLN2 in bladder cancer subgroups compared with control groups. In comparisons with age-matched hernia urine specimens, urinary TAGLN2 in bladder cancer samples showed the largest fold change (7.13-fold), with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.70 (p < 0.001, n = 205). Overall, TAGLN2 showed the most significant

  7. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... RESEARCHERS Research Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Research Network Explore all research programs View all stories NEWSLETTER ...

  8. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... schistosomiasis) is a common cause of bladder infections. Adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma begins in cells that make up mucus-secreting glands in the bladder. Adenocarcinoma of the bladder is rare in the United ...

  10. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    PubMed

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bingsong Lei; Xiaoyuan Deng; Huajiang Wei; Zhouyi Guo; Guoyong Wu; Hongqin Yang; Shusen Xie; Yonghong He

    2014-12-31

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  12. The Prolidase Activity, Oxidative Stress, and Nitric Oxide Levels of Bladder Tissues with or Without Tumor in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gecit, İlhan; Eryılmaz, Recep; Kavak, Servet; Meral, İsmail; Demir, Halit; Pirinççi, Necip; Güneş, Mustafa; Taken, Kerem

    2017-08-16

    This study was designed to evaluate the malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) levels, and also prolidase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activities in malignant and benign cancers of bladder tissue. A total of 59 patients admitted to our clinic due to microscopic or macroscopic haematuria, were prospectively included in the study. Because of some reasons (no request to participate in the study, the inability to reach, other malignancies, alcohol consumption, metabolic disease), eight patients were excluded from study. Of the 51 patients, 25 were bladder tumor patients, and 26 were patients without cancers. The bladder tissue samples were obtained from all patients under anesthesia (spinal, epidural or general) for the measurement of MDA, GSH and NO levels, and prolidase, GSH-Px and SOD enzyme activities. Among the patients with bladder cancers, 7 patients were females and 18 patients were males, with an average age of 68.4 ± 2.49. Among patients without tumors, 6 patients were females and 20 patients were males, with an average age of 58 ± 2.05. In patients with bladder tumors, the oxidants (MDA, NO, prolidase) were higher, and the antioxidants (SOD, GSH, GSH-Px) were lower than those in patients without tumors. It was concluded that the oxygen free radicals play a role in the etiology of bladder cancers similar to many other tumors and inflammatory conditions. Therefore, we assume that antioxidants may provide benefits in the prevention and treatment of bladder cancer.

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud; Elsobky, Emad; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahim, Mona; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir

    2016-12-01

    The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this

  14. MALDI imaging-based identification of prognostically relevant signals in bladder cancer using large-scale tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Stefan; Singer, Julius Magnus; Rink, Michael; Chun, Felix; Dahlem, Roland; Simon, Ronald; Burandt, Eike; Stahl, Phillip; Terracciano, Luigi; Schlomm, Thorsten; Wagner, Walter; Höppner, Wolfgang; Omidi, Maryam; Kraus, Olga; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Doh, Ousman; Fisch, Margit; Soave, Armin; Sauter, Guido; Wurlitzer, Marcus; Schlüter, Hartmut; Minner, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    Although most patients with urinary bladder cancer present with noninvasive and low-malignant stages of the disease, about 20% eventually develop life-threatening metastatic tumors. This study was designed to evaluate the potential of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to identify molecular markers predicting the clinical course of bladder cancer. We employed MALDI-MSI to a bladder cancer tissue microarray including paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 697 patients with clinical follow-up data to search for prognostically relevant associations. Analysis of our MALDI imaging data revealed 40 signals in the mass spectra (m/z signals) associated with epithelial structures. The presence of numerous m/z signals was statistically related to one or several phenotypical findings including tumor aggressiveness (stage, grade, or nodal status; 30 signals), solid (5 signals) or papillary (3 signals) growth patterns, and increased (6 signals) or decreased (12 signals) cell proliferation, as determined by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Two signals were linked with tumor recurrence in noninvasive (pTa category) tumors, of which one was also related to progression from pTa-category to pT1-category disease. The absence of one m/z signal was linked with decreased survival in the subset of 102 muscle-invasive cancers. Our data demonstrate the suitability of combining MSI and large-scale tissue microarrays to simultaneously identify and validate clinically useful molecular markers in urinary bladder cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  16. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozen, H

    1996-05-01

    For many years it has been apparent that transitional cell carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with two clinical forms that exhibit distinctly different prognoses. Approximately 20% of the tumors are invasive at presentation, which is associated with poor prognoses. The remaining carcinomas are superficial, and an excellent outcome can be expected in the majority of patients treated with local therapies. However, 20% of the latter will progress to muscle invasive disease during the follow-up. The problem is to identify those who will progress and to distinguish those tumors likely to respond to therapy. Genetic changes that identify the subgroups of these tumors may be the key issue. During the past decade, studies of human cancer have begun to yield molecular information on the identity of multiple genetic changes that underline development and progression. Attention was focused initially on oncogenes and more recently on tumor-suppressor genes.

  17. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy.

  18. Circulating Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Lakshminarayanan; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple unmet needs in the realm of diagnosis, clinical staging, monitoring and therapy. There is an urgent need to develop precision medicine for advanced urothelial carcinoma. Given the difficulty of serial analyses of metastatic tumor tissue to identify resistance and new therapeutic targets, development of non-invasive monitoring using circulating molecular biomarkers is critically important. Although the development of circulating biomarkers for the management of bladder cancer is in its infancy and may currently suffer from lower sensitivity of detection, they have inherent advantages owing to non-invasiveness. Additionally, circulating molecular alterations may capture tumor heterogeneity without the sampling bias of tissue biopsy. This review describes the accumulating data to support further development of circulating biomarkers including circulating tumor cells, cell-free circulating tumor (ct)-DNA, RNA, micro-RNA and proteomics to improve the management of bladder cancer. PMID:28035318

  19. Garlic extract in bladder cancer prevention: Evidence from T24 bladder cancer cell xenograft model, tissue microarray, and gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Tae; Seo, Sung-Pil; Byun, Young Joon; Kang, Ho-Won; Kim, Yong-June; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Jeong, Pildu; Seo, Yoonhee; Choe, Soo Young; Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Lee, Geun Taek; Kim, Isaac Yi; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of naturally occurring agents in cancer prevention. This study investigated the garlic extract affects in bladder cancer (BC) prevention. The effect of garlic extract in cancer prevention was evaluated using the T24 BC BALB/C-nude mouse xenograft model. Microarray analysis of tissues was performed to identify differences in gene expression between garlic extract intake and control diet, and gene network analysis was performed to assess candidate mechanisms of action. Furthermore, we investigated the expression value of selected genes in the data of 165 BC patients. Compared to the control group, significant differences in tumor volume and tumor weight were observed in the groups fed 20 mg/kg (p<0.05), 200 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg of garlic extract (p<0.01). Genes (645) were identified as cancer prevention-related genes (fold change >2 and p<0.05) by tissue microarray analysis. A gene network analysis of 279 of these genes (p<0.01) was performed using Cytoscape/ClueGo software: 36 genes and 37 gene ontologies were mapped to gene networks. Protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway including AKAP12, RDX, and RAB13 genes were identified as potential mechanisms for the activity of garlic extract in cancer prevention. In BC patients, AKAP12 and RDX were decreased but, RAB13 was increased. Oral garlic extract has strong cancer prevention activity in vivo and an acceptable safety profile. PKA signaling process, especially increasing AKAP12 and RDX and decreasing RAB13, are candidate pathways that may mediate this prevention effect.

  20. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder, which is called the urothelium or transitional epithelium . As the cancer grows into or through the ... in the inner layer of cells (the transitional epithelium) but have not grown into the deeper layers. ...

  1. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    PubMed

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (P<0.05). The cancer cells could be detected in nodular tumor of mice in each group. The volume of the tumor-bearing mice in the nodular tumor of the non-coating group was larger than that of anti-Robol antibody coating group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in tumor volume between anti-Robo4 antibody coating group and non-coating group (P>0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (P<0.01). In conclusion, Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a

  3. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  4. Rates of MAGE-A3 and PRAME expressing tumors in FFPE tissue specimens from bladder cancer patients: potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Evelyne; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Gruselle, Olivier; Coche, Thierry; Therasse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antigen-specific active immunotherapy is an investigational therapeutic approach of potential interest for bladder cancer regardless of disease stage. Clinical development of antigen-specific immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer must be preceded by assessment of the expression of relevant genes in bladder tumors. The objectives of this study (NCT01706185) were to assess the rate of expression of the MAGE-A3 and PRAME genes in bladder tumors and to investigate the feasibility of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues for testing. Materials and methods: Archived FFPE bladder tumor specimens (any stage) were tested for mRNA expression of MAGE-A3 and PRAME using antigen-specific quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Data on patients and tumor characteristics were obtained from hospital records to investigate these characteristics’ possible association with the antigen expression. Results: Over 92% of the 156 tumors examined gave valid antigen test results. Of the tumors with a valid test, 46.5% were MAGE-A3-positive, 32.2% were PRAME-positive and 59.7% positive for at least one of them. Exploratory analyses of possible associations between antigen expression and patient or tumor characteristics did not identify clear associations between antigen expression and any of the variables investigated. Conclusions: Assessment of tumor antigen mRNA expression by using FFPE bladder tissues was feasible. The rates of MAGE-A3-positive and PRAME-positive tumors indicate that both antigens may be interesting targets for immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer. PMID:26464715

  5. Tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in syngeneic orthotopic rat bladder cancer model: possible pathways of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Hjelde, Astrid; Krokan, Hans E.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2011-02-01

    Orthotopic bladder cancer model in rats mimics human bladder cancer with respect to urothelial tumorigenesis and progression. Utilizing this model at pT1 (superficial stage), we analyze the tissue responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic therapy (HAL-PDT). In comparison to untreated rats, HAL-PDT causes little change in tumor-free rat bladder but induces inflammatory changes with increased lymphocytes and mononuclear cell infiltration in rat bladders with tumor. Immunohistochemistry reveals that HAL-PDT is without effect on proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression within the tumor and increases caspase-3 expression in both normal urothelium and the tumor. Transmission electron microscopy reveals severe mitochondrial damage, formations of apoptotic bodies, vacuoles, and lipofuscin bodies, but no microvillus-formed niches in HAL-PDT-treated bladder cancer rats. Bioinformatics analysis of the gene expression profile indicates an activation of T-cell receptor signaling pathway in bladder cancer rats without PDT. HAL-PDT increases the expression of CD3 and CD45RA in the tumor (determined by immunohistochemistry). We suggest that pathways of action of HAL-PDT may include, at least, activations of mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy, breakdown of cancer stem cell niches, and importantly, enhancement of T-cell activation.

  6. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  7. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure.

  8. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  9. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  10. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  11. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  12. Bladder cancer epidemiology and genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system. The incidence of bladder cancer of men is higher than that of women (approximately 4:1). Here, we summarize the bladder cancer-related risk factors, including environmental and genetic factors. In recent years, although the mortality rate induced by bladder cancer has been stable or decreased gradually, the public health effect may be pronounced. The well-established risk factors for bladder cancer are cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. Genetic factors also play important roles in the susceptibility to bladder cancer. A recent study demonstrated that hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. Since 2008, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to identify the susceptibility loci for bladder cancer. Further gene-gene or gene-environment interaction studies need to be conducted to provide more information for the etiology of bladder cancer. PMID:23720672

  13. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kozlowski JM. The p53 tumor suppressor gene and nuclear protein: basic science review and relevance in the ... Zwarthoff EC, Radvanyi F. Novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations in bladder cancer previously identified ...

  14. Evaluation of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and transforming growth factor-beta2 expression in bladder cancer tissue in comparison with healthy adjacent tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavinezhad, Ali; Yadegarazari, Reza; Mousavi-Bahar, Seyed Habibollah; Poorolajal, Jalal; Jafari, Mohammad; Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Effatpanah, Hosein

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The fifth most common cancer is allocated to bladder cancer (BC) worldwide. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of BC invasion and metastasis to identify target therapeutic strategies will improve disease survival. So the aim of this study was to measure expression rate of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-β2) mRNA in tissue samples of patients with BC and its healthy adjacent tissue samples and their association with muscle invasion, size and grade of the tumor. Materials and Methods Tissue samples were collected from 35 newly diagnosed untreated patients with BC from 2013 to 2014. Total RNA was extracted from about 50-mg tissue samples using TRIzol reagent. TAKARA SYBR Premix EX Tag II was applied to determine the rate of mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To obtain final validation, PCR product of ZEB1 and TGF-β2 were sequenced. STATA 11 software was used to analyze the data. Results The expression level of ZEB1 in tumor samples was significantly more than of in healthy adjacent tissue samples. Up-regulation of TGF-β2 showed a strong association with muscle invasion (p=0.017). There was also demonstrated a relationship between over expression of ZEB1 with the tumor size (p=0.050). Conclusions It looks ZEB1 and TGF-β2 had a role in BC patients. In this study ZEB1 expression was higher in BC tissues than that of in healthy control tissues. There was demonstrated a markedly association between overexpression of TGF-β2 and muscle invasion. Therefore, they are supposed to be candidate as potential biomarkers for early detection and progression of BC. PMID:28261684

  15. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  16. Videofetoscopically assisted fetal tissue engineering: bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Fishman, S J; Mehegan, K; Atala, A

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of several congenital anomalies is frequently hindered by lack of enough tissue for surgical reconstruction in the neonatal period. Minimally invasive harvest of fetal tissue, which is then processed through tissue engineering techniques in vitro while pregnancy is allowed to continue so that at delivery a newborn with a prenatally diagnosed congenital anomaly can benefit from having autologous, expanded tissue promptly available for surgical reconstruction at birth. This concept was applied to a bladder defect. Bladder exstrophy was surgically created in ten 90- to 95-day gestation fetal lambs, which were divided in two groups. In group I, a small fetal bladder specimen was harvested through a minimally invasive technique (videofetoscopy). Urothelial and smooth muscle cells were then separately cultivated and expanded in vitro for 55 to 60 days, resulting in a total of approximately 200 million cells. Seven to 10 days before delivery, the cells were seeded in two layers in a 16- to 20-cm2, 3-mm thick biodegradable polyglycolic acid polymer matrix. One to 4 days after delivery, autologous engineered tissue was used for surgical augmentation of the exstrophic bladder. In group II, no harvest was performed, and the bladder exstrophy was primarily closed after delivery. In both groups, a catheter was left inside the bladder for 3 weeks, at which time a cystogram was performed and the catheter then removed. In all animals, at 60 days, another cystogram was performed and urodynamic studies of the bladder were performed. The bladder was then removed for histological analysis. Fetal survival rate was 100%. One newborn died immediately after the implantation of the engineered bladder from an anesthetic accident. The other nine (four in group I and five in group II) survived. One of the animals from group I lost its bladder catheter prematurely and had a urinary leak detected only at the time of death. There were no other complications. The engineered bladders

  17. Treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Morales, A.

    1980-01-01

    Most patients with bladder cancer initially present with localized, potentially curable tumours. Endoscopic surgery offers the best opportunity to eliminate these early lesions, but the rate of tumour recurrence after adequate resection is high (around 70%). Conventional methods of treatment have a place in the management of early bladder neoplasms, but their success rate is still unsatisfactory and they frequently fail to decrease the risk of recurrence. New drugs and more effective forms of administration have enhanced the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Fundamentally different approaches, such as specific immunotherapy, the use of laser energy and photodynamic therapy, are emerging as valuable approaches in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer and the prevention of recurrence. Randomized trials to assess their value and a concerted multidisciplinary effort with combined treatment give hope for effective control of early bladder cancer. PMID:6770987

  18. Treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Morales, A

    1980-05-24

    Most patients with bladder cancer initially present with localized, potentially curable tumours. Endoscopic surgery offers the best opportunity to eliminate these early lesions, but the rate of tumour recurrence after adequate resection is high (around 70%). Conventional methods of treatment have a place in the management of early bladder neoplasms, but their success rate is still unsatisfactory and they frequently fail to decrease the risk of recurrence. New drugs and more effective forms of administration have enhanced the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Fundamentally different approaches, such as specific immunotherapy, the use of laser energy and photodynamic therapy, are emerging as valuable approaches in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer and the prevention of recurrence. Randomized trials to assess their value and a concerted multidisciplinary effort with combined treatment give hope for effective control of early bladder cancer.

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bladder cancer in the United States. Personal history of bladder or other urothelial cancer Urothelial carcinomas ... urinary infections and bladder cancer. Genetics and family history People who have family members with bladder cancer ...

  20. The role of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9 and TIMP-2 tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases as serum markers of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramón de Fata, F; Ferruelo, A; Andrés, G; Gimbernat, H; Sánchez-Chapado, M; Angulo, J C

    2013-09-01

    The diagnosis and molecular staging of bladder cancer based on the detection of gelatinases mRNA (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in peripheral blood circulating and mononuclear cells have shown promising results. We analyze if the determination of the corresponding protein synthesis products makes it possible to diagnose and characterize patients with bladder cancer. Quantification of the serum levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-2 in a series of 42 individuals (31 patients with bladder cancer in different stages and 11 healthy controls) using the ELISA technique was carried out. The determinations were compared between cases and controls (Mann-Whitney U) and between different groups of tumors (Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis), according to the clinical-pathological characteristics (age, gender, T category, M category or grade). Diagnostic yield of these markers was evaluated by analysis of the ROC curves. There is a correlation between the determinations of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 (R=.699; P>.0001) and MMP-9 and TIMP-2 (R=.305; P=.049). Patients with bladder cancer have higher levels of MMP-9 (p<0.0001) and TIMP-2 (P=.047) than the controls. Furthermore, the MMP-9/TIMP-2 ratio is also superior in cancer patients (P<.001). Differences were not detected between cancer and controls regarding age (P=.64) or gender (P=.64). Differences were also not detected regarding MMP-2 (P=.35) or MMP-2/TIMP-2 rate (P=.45). Within the cancer patient population, the MMP-2 and MMP-9 values differ according to T category (P=.022 and P=.038, respectively) and those of the TIMP-2 according to M category (P=.036). ROC curve analysis showed that both MMP-9 and the MMP-9/TIMP-2 ratio discriminate patients with cancer and controls, with equivalent diagnostic accuracy (ABC 0.953) and cut offs of 3.93 ng/mL (S 90%; Sp 81%) and 0.053 ng/mL (S 96%; Sp 84%), respectively. The results obtained suggest that both serum MMP-9 and TIMP-2 would have an application in the prediction of the development and progression of

  1. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  2. [Staging urinary bladder cancer with dynamic MR imaging].

    PubMed

    Tsuda, K; Narumi, Y; Nakamura, H; Nonomura, I; Okuyama, A

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) staging of bladder cancer. The multiplanar and soft-tissue characterization capabilities of MR imaging make it a valuable diagnostic tool to image the urinary bladder. Recent advances of MR imaging such as fast imaging, pelvic phased array coil, and dynamic imaging improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy for staging bladder cancer. Some patient-related factors are also important for optimal imaging of the urinary bladder, especially motion artifacts from the gastrointestinal tract and the degree of bladder distension. An anticholinergic agent should be used for suppressing the motion artifacts. Optimal bladder filling can be achieved by asking patients to void and drink water 1 hour before examinations. Scanning perpendicular to the bladder wall is necessary for optimal evaluation for staging bladder cancer. Oblique scanning is needed in cases when a tumor is not located on the dome, base, anterior wall, posterior wall, or lateral walls. The early phase image of dynamic imaging is most useful for staging tumors. Better contrast between tumor and bladder wall on dynamic images provides high staging accuracy, especially in differentiation between superficial tumors and tumors with muscle invasion. MR imaging is comparable to computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of lymph nodes. Although MR imaging currently is not appropriate for screening for bladder cancer and detecting small tumors, it has been proved to be most useful in the staging of bladder cancer.

  3. High resolution photoacoustic imaging of microvasculature in normal and cancerous bladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Roberts, William; Carson, Paul L.; Liu, Xiaojun; Tao, Chao; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    We explored the potential of an emerging laser-based technology, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), for bladder cancer diagnosis through high resolution imaging of microvasculature in the interior bladder tissues. Images of ex vivo canine bladders demonstrated the excellent ability of PAI to map three-dimensional microvasculature in optically scattering bladder tissues. By comparing the results from human bladder specimens affected by cancer to those from the normal control, the feasibility of PAI in differentiating malignant from benign bladder tissues was explored. The reported distinctive morphometric characteristics of tumor microvasculature can be seen in the images from cancer samples, suggesting that PAI may allow in vivo assessment of neoangiogenesis that is closely associated with bladder cancer generation and progression. By presenting subsurface morphological and physiological information in bladder tissues, PAI, when performed in a similar way to that in conventional endoscopy, provides an opportunity for improved diagnosis, staging and treatment guidance of bladder cancer.

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a high rate of recurrence and poor outcomes as a result of relapse. Bladder cancer patients require lifelong invasive monitoring and treatment, making bladder cancer one of the most expensive malignancies. Lines of evidence increasingly point to distinct genetic and epigenetic alteration patterns in bladder cancer, even between the different stages and grades of disease. In addition, genetic and epigenetic alterations have been demonstrated to play important roles during bladder tumorigenesis. This review will focus on bladder cancer-associated genomic and epigenomic alterations, which are common in bladder cancer and provide potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27915480

  5. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. [Occupational hazards and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nizamova, R S

    1991-01-01

    Occupational exposure to health hazards was studied in 258 industrial workers who had developed cancer of the bladder against 454 matched controls. All the test subjects and controls were residents of the Tambov Province centers of chemical industry. Statistical significance (relative risk-4.7) was established for exposure to aromatic amines. For those contacting with aniline dyes the relative risk (RR) made up 2.4. The risk to develop bladder cancer in powder shops (RR-3.2) was attributed to the hazards of dyes and diphenylamine. In leather-shoe and textile industry the exposure to dyes was not safe (RR-6.1), neither was it to chemicals, oil products, pesticides, overheating (RR-3.2, 1.6, 3.2 and 2.9, respectively). It is stated that in line with a significant risk to develop bladder cancer at exposure to aromatic amines there exist a number of occupational factors contributing to this risk.

  7. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  8. Immunobiology of human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Herr, H W

    1976-02-01

    The immune destruction of bladder cancer most likely results from an interaction of specific and non-specific cellular and humoral responses evoked by tumor-associated antigens. We are just beginning to comprehend the complex immune mechanisms operating to retard or facilitate tumor growth in patients with this disease. This understanding has led to renewed hope that the immune system may be manipulated for the benefit of the tumor-bearing patient. However, only a thorough understanding of the basic functions of the immune system in man will permit a rational approach to immunotherapy in patients with bladder cancer.

  9. Noninvasive Electromagnetic Detection of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Vedruccio, Clarbruno; Leucci, Giorgio; Massenio, Paolo; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Vincenzo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Normal and neoplastic human tissues have different electromagnetic properties. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive electromagnetic detection of bladder cancer (BC) by the tissue-resonance interaction method (TRIM-prob). Patients and Methods. Consecutive patients were referred for cystoscopy because of (i) microscopic or gross hematuria and/or irritative voiding symptoms and (ii) bladder ultrasounds and urinary cytology findings negative or just suspicious of malignancy. Patients were first submitted to TRIM-prob bladder scanning by a single investigator and then to cystoscopy by another investigator blind to TRIM-prob data. Results. In 125 evaluated patients cystoscopy was positive for BC in 47 and negative in the remaining 78; conversely, TRIM-prob bladder scanning was positive for BC in 53 and negative in 72. In particular, TRIM-prob scanning yielded 7 false positives and only one false negative; therefore, its overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 97.9%, 89.9%, 86.8%, 98.6%, and 93.6%, respectively. Conclusions. TRIM-prob bladder scanning was a simple and quite accurate method for non-invasive electromagnetic detection of BC. If the elevated positive and negative predictive values will be replicated in further well-designed studies, it could be used to screen asymptomatic patients at high risk of BC. PMID:24563795

  10. Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Bladder Cancer Cell Transitional; Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Urinary Bladder; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urinary Bladder Diseases; Urologic Diseases

  11. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  12. HPLC assisted Raman spectroscopic studies on bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, W. L.; Cheng, Y.; Yu, W.; Zhang, X. B.; Shen, A. G.; Hu, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    We applied confocal Raman spectroscopy to investigate 12 normal bladder tissues and 30 tumor tissues, and then depicted the spectral differences between the normal and the tumor tissues and the potential canceration mechanism with the aid of the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) technique. Normal tissues were demonstrated to contain higher tryptophan, cholesterol and lipid content, while bladder tumor tissues were rich in nucleic acids, collagen and carotenoids. In particular, β-carotene, one of the major types of carotenoids, was found through HPLC analysis of the extract of bladder tissues. The statistical software SPSS was applied to classify the spectra of the two types of tissues according to their differences. The sensitivity and specificity of 96.7 and 66.7% were obtained, respectively. In addition, different layers of the bladder wall including mucosa (lumps), muscle and adipose bladder tissue were analyzed by Raman mapping technique in response to previous Raman studies of bladder tissues. All of these will play an important role as a directive tool for the future diagnosis of bladder cancer in vivo.

  13. Obesity, Physical Activity and Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Jonathan L; Liss, Michael A; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2015-10-01

    While smoking and exposure to certain chemicals are well-defined risk factors for bladder cancer, there is no consensus as to the roles of modifiable lifestyle factors, notably physical activity, and obesity. We evaluated associations of obesity and physical activity with bladder cancer risk by performing a system-wide search of PubMed for cohort and case-control studies focused on obesity, exercise, and bladder cancer. A total of 31 studies were identified that evaluated the associations of obesity and physical activity with bladder cancer risk: 20 focused on obesity, eight on physical activity, and three on both. There was marked heterogeneity in population composition and outcomes assessment. Fifteen (65%) of the obesity studies used prevalence or incidence as the primary outcome and seven (30%) used bladder cancer mortality. Ten (44%) observed positive and 13 (56%) null associations of obesity with bladder cancer. Three (100%) of three studies also noted strong positive associations of obesity with bladder cancer progression or recurrence. Ten (91%) of the physical activity studies analyzed prevalence or incidence and one (9%) mortality. One (9%) study observed positive, seven (64%) null, and three (27%) negative associations of physical activity with bladder cancer. Study heterogeneity precluded quantitative assessment of outcomes. Obesity is potentially associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, particularly for progression, recurrence, or death. Further studies of physical activity and bladder cancer are needed to validate these observations and elucidate the associations of exercise with bladder cancer progression and mortality.

  14. Molecular pathology and biomarkers of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer originates in the epithelial lining of the bladder's mucosa and develops in association with several habitual, industrial, and environmental risk factors via papillary and non-papillary pathways. In this chapter we review novel concepts concerning the molecular mechanisms of early field change in bladder neoplasia stemming from whole-organ genomic mapping studies. These mechanisms are discussed in the context of molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer and in relation to treatment and biomarker-based detection strategies.

  15. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  16. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  17. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-04-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is an established standard for resectable muscle-invasive bladder cancer, a disease with a pattern of predominantly distant and early recurrences. Pathologic complete remission appears to be an intermediate surrogate for survival when employing combination chemotherapy. Moreover, baseline host and tumor tissue studies may enable the discovery of biomarkers predictive of activity. The neoadjuvant setting also provides a window of opportunity to evaluate novel biologic agents or rational combinations of biologic agents to obtain a signal of biologic activity. The residual tumor after neoadjuvant therapy may be exploited to study the mechanism of action and resistance. Cisplatin-ineligible patients warrant the evaluation of tolerable neoadjuvant regimens. Given that bladder cancer is characterized by initial localized presentation in the vast majority of cases, the paradigm of neoadjuvant therapy may expedite the development of novel systemic agents.

  19. Gene expression profiling in bladder cancer identifies potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed A.; Palmer, Daniel H.; Syn, Wing-Kin; Sacco, Joseph J.; Greensmith, Richard M.D.; Elmetwali, Taha; Aachi, Vijay; Lloyd, Bryony H.; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Arrand, John; Barton, Darren; Ansari, Jawaher; Sibson, D. Ross; James, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Despite advances in management, bladder cancer remains a major cause of cancer related complications. Characterisation of gene expression patterns in bladder cancer allows the identification of pathways involved in its pathogenesis, and may stimulate the development of novel therapies targeting these pathways. Between 2004 and 2005, cystoscopic bladder biopsies were obtained from 19 patients and 11 controls. These were subjected to whole transcript-based microarray analysis. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to identify samples with similar expression profiles. Hypergeometric analysis was used to identify canonical pathways and curated networks having statistically significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes. Osteopontin (OPN) expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Hierarchical clustering defined signatures, which differentiated between cancer and healthy tissue, muscle-invasive or non-muscle invasive cancer and healthy tissue, grade 1 and grade 3. Pathways associated with cell cycle and proliferation were markedly upregulated in muscle-invasive and grade 3 cancers. Genes associated with the classical complement pathway were downregulated in non-muscle invasive cancer. Osteopontin was markedly overexpressed in invasive cancer compared to healthy tissue. The present study contributes to a growing body of work on gene expression signatures in bladder cancer. The data support an important role for osteopontin in bladder cancer, and identify several pathways worthy of further investigation. PMID:28259975

  20. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P.; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples. Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland–Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers. Although the Bland–Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs. Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder

  1. Comparison between whole mount tissue preparations and virtual tissue microarray samples for measuring Ki-67 and apoptosis indices in human bladder cancer: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Hisashi; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Tsuta, Koji; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Keyhani, Afsaneh; Dinney, Colin P; Nagai, Takeshi; Kamat, Ashish M

    2016-08-01

    Recent tissue microarray (TMA)-based studies have shown that cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related biomarkers are associated with clinical outcomes in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, little is known about the differences in these biomarker measurements between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs. This study aimed to elucidate the discrepancy in the measurements of Ki-67 indices (KIs) and apoptosis indices (AIs) between whole mount tissue preparations and TMAs of bladder urothelial carcinoma samples.Whole mount tissue preparations for Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling were made from 30 patients who underwent transurethral resection of bladder urothelial carcinoma. Digital microscopy-assisted virtual TMAs, consisting of 3 small round areas (1 or 0.6 mm in diameter), were generated from the same whole mount tissue preparations. The measurement results in highly reactive areas of biomarkers were compared between the whole mount tissue preparation- and the TMA-based methods. Bland-Altman plot analysis, regression analysis, and Kendall τ were performed to investigate differences in the measurement results, systematic biases, and correlations between biomarkers.Although the Bland-Altman plot analysis demonstrated that almost all the plots were within the limits of agreement, fixed biases were detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the KI (0.181 and 0.222, respectively) and the AI (0.055 and 0.063, respectively). Proportional biases were also detected in the 1- and 0.6-mm TMAs for the AI (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, positive correlations between KIs and AIs were observed in whole mount tissue preparations (r = 0.260, P = 0.044) and in the 1 mm TMAs (r = 0.375, P = 0.004); however, no such correlation was observed in the 0.6 mm TMAs.Our study suggests that the measurement results for certain biomarkers of bladder urothelial

  2. Bladder cancer: Present and future.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Roberto Hugo; Buisan Rueda, Oscar; Ibarz, Luis

    2017-07-20

    Bladder cancer has a high incidence and involves high associated morbidity and mortality. Since its initial clinical suspicion, early diagnostic confirmation and multimodal treatment involve different medical specialties. For this reason, we consider it important to spread the current consensus for its management. Recent advances in immunology and Chemotherapy make it necessary to expose and reflect on future perspectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Bladder Cancer: A Simple Model Becomes Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Giovanni Battista Di; Gulia, Caterina; Cristini, Cristiano; Fraietta, Giorgio; Marini, Lorenzo; Grande, Pietro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in developed countries and it is also characterized by a high number of recurrences. Despite this, several authors in the past reported that only two altered molecular pathways may genetically explain all cases of bladder cancer: one involving the FGFR3 gene, and the other involving the TP53 gene. Mutations in any of these two genes are usually predictive of the malignancy final outcome. This cancer may also be further classified as low-grade tumors, which is always papillary and in most cases superficial, and high-grade tumors, not necessarily papillary and often invasive. This simple way of considering this pathology has strongly changed in the last few years, with the development of genome-wide studies on expression profiling and the discovery of small non-coding RNA affecting gene expression. An easy search in the OMIM (On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database using “bladder cancer” as a query reveals that genes in some way connected to this pathology are approximately 150, and some authors report that altered gene expression (up- or down-regulation) in this disease may involve up to 500 coding sequences for low-grade tumors and up to 2300 for high-grade tumors. In many clinical cases, mutations inside the coding sequences of the above mentioned two genes were not found, but their expression changed; this indicates that also epigenetic modifications may play an important role in its development. Indeed, several reports were published about genome-wide methylation in these neoplastic tissues, and an increasing number of small non-coding RNA are either up- or down-regulated in bladder cancer, indicating that impaired gene expression may also pass through these metabolic pathways. Taken together, these data reveal that bladder cancer is far to be considered a simple model of malignancy. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in the genome-wide analysis of bladder cancer, and analyse non

  4. [The latest news on bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Retz, M; Lehmann, J; Nawroth, R; Gschwend, J E

    2007-07-01

    A review of the current literature provides new scientific insights into the diagnosis, prognosis and novel molecular targets for bladder cancer. The new WHO classification refines our staging system and influences treatment options. International clinical databases provide new tools for calculating the individual risk for bladder cancer recurrence and progression. Systematic gene cluster analysis defines multimarker panels that can serve as robust predictors of outcome. Discoveries of new signaling pathways in bladder cancer are leading to novel molecular targets for innovative therapies.

  5. The C228T mutation of TERT promoter frequently occurs in bladder cancer stem cells and contributes to tumorigenesis of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ying; He, Luyun; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jiansong; Fan, Zusen

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Bladder cancer stem cells (BCSCs) have been isolated recently but have not been defined yet. Here we sorted BCSCs from bladder tumor tissues or normal bladder stem cells (NBBCs) from adjacent normal bladder tissues. We found that the C228T mutation (chr5, 1, 295, 228 C > T) of TERT promoter frequently occurs in BCSCs, but not exist in NBBCs. Importantly, introducing the C228T mutation in NBBCs causes TERT overexpression and transformation of bladder cancer. Restoration of the C228T mutation to T228C in BCSCs can recover the TERT expression to a basal level and abolish tumor formation. Additionally, the C228T mutation of TERT promoter triggers TERT expression leading to increased telomerase activity. TERT expression levels are consistent with clinical severity and prognosis of bladder cancer. PMID:26143634

  6. Safety of sequential whole bladder photodynamic therapy (WBPT) in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime O.; Lamm, Donald L.; Carpenter, Cindy

    2001-05-01

    Bladder cancer remains a serious public health problem in many parts of the world with an estimated 300,000 new cases a year. In the US, there were 53,200 new cases of bladder cancer with 12,200 deaths in 2000. A majority (75%-90%) of these cancers are diagnosed pathologically as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Superficial TCC constitutes 85% of newly diagnosed bladder cancer cases. Superficial bladder cancer includes papillary tumors involving only the mucosa (Ta) or submucosa (T1) and flat carcinoma in suit (CIS). Transurethral resection (TUR) of bladder tumor effectively controls the primary tumors, confirms the superficial or non-muscle invasive nature of the disease, provides cytological and histological tumor characteristics for determining prognostic significance and allows for assessment of the extent of bladder tissue involvement by tumor. Intravesical therapy provides a high concentration of drug in contact with tumor-bearing mucosa for prolonged periods, reduces the likelihood of tumor implantation after resection by destroying viable cancer cells, provides a cytotoxic effect on residual carcinoma, and potentially alters precursor mucosal lesions.

  7. Kindlin-2 Expression in Arsenite and Cadmium Transformed Bladder Cancer Cell Lines and in Archival Specimens of Human Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Sherine; Somji, Seema; Toni, Conrad; Garrett, Scott H.; Zhou, Xu Dong; Sens, Mary Ann; Sens, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to confirm a microarray study that suggested that Kindlin-2 might play a role in the development and progression of bladder cancer. There has been no previous examination of Kindlin-2 expression in human bladder cancer. Methods A combination of real time PCR, western analysis and immunohistochemistry was used to characterize Kindlin-2 expression in arsenite (As+3) and cadmium (Cd+2) transformed human cell lines, their tumor transplants in immune-compromised mice, and in archival specimens of human bladder and bladder cancer. Results The results show that the Kindlin-2 expression patterns in the cell lines were not duplicated in the tumor tissues. However, it was shown that Kindlin-2 was expressed in the stromal element of all the transplanted tumors and archival specimens of human bladder cancer. It was also shown that a small number of high grade invasive urothelial cancers have focal expression of Kindlin-2 in the tumor cells. Conclusion Kindlin-2 is expressed in the stromal component of most, if not all, human bladder cancers. Kindlin-2 is not expressed in normal urothelium. Kindlin-2 is expressed in a small subset of high grade invasive bladder cancers and may have potential as a prognostic marker for tumor progression. PMID:21624607

  8. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  9. Urinary Bladder Cancer in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah Saleh; Aulaqi, Saleh Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are to highlight the clinicopathological features of urinary bladder cancer in Yemen, and to describe the histological grading of urothelial neoplasms according to the World Health Organization and International Society of Urologic pathology (WHO/ISUP 1998) classification. Methods This is a descriptive record-based study of 316 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed by two pathologists at the Department of pathology, Sana'a University from 1st January 2005 to 30th April 2009. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and categorized according to WHO/ISUP 1998 classification. Results Out of 316 urinary bladder cancers, 248 (78%) were urothelial neoplasms, 53 (17%) were squamous cell carcinoma, 7 (2%) were adenocarcinoma, and 3 (1%) were rhabdomyosarcoma. The remaining cases were metastatic carcinomas (n=3), small cell carcinoma (n=1), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n=1). The urothelial neoplasms observed were carcinoma in situ 4 (2%), papilloma 7 (3%), papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential 26 (11%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade 107 (43%), papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 18 (7%), and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade 85 (34%), with 60 years mean age for males and 58 years for females; along with a male to female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was observed in the 61-70 years age group. Conclusion This study documents a high frequency of urothelial neoplasms, mostly papillary urothelial carcinoma of low grade and non-papillary urothelial carcinoma of high grade with male preponderance and peak incidence in 6th decade of age. PMID:24044060

  10. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-06-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc.

  11. Elective bladder-sparing treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Rico-López, J; Moreno, S; Fernández Parra, E; González-Almeida, C; Camacho Martínez, E

    2014-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We offer a bladder-sparing treatment with TURB +/- Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy to selected patients as an alternative. We analyze, retrospectively, 30 patients diagnosed with MIBC from March 1991 to October 2010. The mean age was 62.7 years (51-74). All patients were candidates for a curative treatment, and underwent strict selection criteria: T2 stage, primary tumor, solitary lesion smaller than 5cm with a macroscopic disease-free status after TURB, negative random biopsy without hydronephrosis. Staging CT evaluation was normal. Restaging TURB or tumor bed biopsy showed a disease-free status or microscopic muscle invasion. 14 patients underwent TURB alone, 13 TURB+Chemotherapy and 3 TURB+Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy. The mean follow up was 88.7 months (19-220). 14 patients remained disease free (46.6%), 10 had recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (33%). 81.3% complete clinical response. 71% bladder preserved at 5-years. Overall, 5-years survival rate was 79% and 85% cancer-specific survival rate. Although radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised MIBC, in strictly selected cases, bladder-sparing treatment offers an alternative with good long term results. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  13. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi; Nørgaard, Mette; Thind, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. Study population All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47%) patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC) and 512 (53%) were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC). A total of 300 (31%) patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50%) received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5) in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31) in 2013. Conclusion This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and monitor treatment and mortality. In the future, DaBlaCa-data will be a valuable data source and expansive observational studies on BC will be available. PMID:27822081

  14. Significance of random bladder biopsies in superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    May, F; Treiber, U; Hartung, R; Schwaibold, H

    2003-07-01

    We investigated to what extent biopsies of normal-appearing urothelium taken from patients with superficial bladder cancer (Ta, T1, Tis) showed malignant disease and whether those findings had impact on therapeutical decisions. 1033 consecutive patients presenting with Ta, T1 or Tis (carcinoma in situ) superficial bladder tumors at increased risk for recurrence underwent multiple random biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium during transurethral resection (TUR). Patients with small, primary, singular tumors (smaller or equal to 1cm) were excluded from random biopsies. No tumor was found in the random biopsies of 905 patients (87.6%). 128 patients (12.4%) showed urothelial bladder cancer in their random biopsies (Tis: 74, Ta: 41, T1: 12, T2: 1). In 14 patients, where transurethral resection of the primary tumor revealed no signs of malignancy, urothelial bladder cancer was detected in the random biopsy material: Ta 8 patients, Tis 5 patients and T1 one patient. 21 patients with Ta tumors and 29 patients with T1 disease showed concomitant Tis. Upstaging of the primary, resected tumor by histological examination of the random biopsy material occurred in 75 patients (7%). Altogether, due to the random biopsy results therapy was altered in 70 patients (6.8%) of our series: It changed intravesical chemotherapy to BCG in 45, provoked a second TUR in 48 and cystectomy in 15 patients. While the clinical significance of random biopsies is still controversial, random biopsy results had strong impact on therapeutical decisions in our series. Regarding random bladder biopsies a simple tool for the urologist to identify high risk groups of patients, we recommend them as part of the routine management of superficial bladder cancer.

  15. Blindness in a bladder cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Remón, J; Guardeño, R; Badía, A; Cardona, T; Picaza, J M; Lianes, P

    2007-02-01

    Blindness is an unusual symptom in the clinical course of cancer. When it appears it is necessary to differentiate between benign and malign causes. Brain metastases in bladder cancer are extremely rare. MRI is the best diagnostic option. We present a deaf-and-dumb male with subacute blindness, 12 months after the diagnosis of a metastatic bladder cancer. Computerised tomography scan and MRI revealed a mass into the pituitary gland and sella, probably of metastatic origin.

  16. miR-613 inhibits bladder cancer proliferation and migration through targeting SphK1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haifeng; Duan, Ping; Zhu, Haibo; Rao, Dapang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Increasing evidence has suggested that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation may contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the role of miR-613 in bladder cancer was still unknown. Materials and methods: qRT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the expression of miR-613 and its direct target gene. CCK-8 analysis, qRT-PCR and cell invasion were performed to measure the cell function. Results: We demonstrated that the expression of miR-613 was downregulated in the bladder cancer cell lines. In addition, miR-613 expression was downregulated in the bladder cancer tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues. Out of 35 bladder cancer tissues, miR-613 was downregulated in 27 cases compared to the adjacent tissues. Ectopic expression of miR-613 suppressed the bladder cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Moreover, miR-613 overexpression enhanced the expression of epithelial biomarker, Ecadherin, and suppressed the expression of mesenchymal biomarker, Vimentin, Snail and N-cadherin. Furthermore, we identified the Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as the direct target gene of miR-613 in the bladder cancer cell. Restoration of Sphk1 partially rescued miR-613-inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation, invasion and EMT. Conclusions: These data suggested that miR-613 acted a tumor suppressive role in bladder cancer through targeting SphK1 in bladder. PMID:28386347

  17. Hyperthermia as Adjunct to Intravesical Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Richmond A.; Abern, Michael R.; Inman, Brant A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer remains a very costly cancer to manage because of high recurrence rates requiring long-term surveillance and treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that adjunct and concurrent use of hyperthermia with intravesical chemotherapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumor further reduces recurrence risk and progression to advanced disease. Hyperthermia has both direct and immune-mediated cytotoxic effect on tumor cells including tumor growth arrest and activation of antitumor immune system cells and pathways. Concurrent heat application also acts as a sensitizer to intravesical chemotherapy agents. As such the ability to deliver hyperthermia to the focus of tumor while minimizing damage to surrounding benign tissue is of utmost importance to optimize the benefit of hyperthermia treatment. Existing chemohyperthermia devices that allow for more localized heat delivery continue to pave the way in this effort. Current investigational methods involving heat-activated drug delivery selectively to tumor cells using temperature-sensitive liposomes also offer promising ways to improve chemohyperthermia efficacy in bladder cancer while minimizing toxicity to benign tissue. This will hopefully allow more widespread use of chemohyperthermia to all bladder cancer patients, including metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:24073396

  18. Long noncoding RNA linc00346 promotes the malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tingyu; Ding, Wei; Wang, Nanxiong; Huang, Hang; Pan, Yue; Wei, Anyang

    2017-09-09

    More and more reports have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the development of a variety of carcinomas, including bladder cancer. However, only a small fraction of them have been characterized. Linc00346 have been found to be upregulated in bladder cancer tissues compared to normal tissues in a microarray-based lncRNA profiling study. In this study, we would like to explore the expression pattern and functional role of linc00346 in bladder cancer. We determined the expression of linc00346 in a cohort of bladder cancer tissues with matched normal tissues as well as human bladder cancer cell lines. We investigated the biological function of linc00346 with CCK-8 assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry analysis, transwell assay and tumor xenografts mice model. We found that linc00346 was upregulated in bladder cancer tissues compared to normal tissues. Knockdown of linc00346 inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and migration, induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that linc00346 could be a potential oncogene and a therapeutic target in bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of Bladder Cancer Using Proteomic Profiling of Urine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Tadeusz; Spiess, Philippe E.; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Black, Peter; Clarke, Charlotte; Benedict, William; Dinney, Colin P.; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Tang, Kuang S.; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    We used protein expression profiles to develop a classification rule for the detection and prognostic assessment of bladder cancer in voided urine samples. Using the Ciphergen PBS II ProteinChip Reader, we analyzed the protein profiles of 18 pairs of samples of bladder tumor and adjacent urothelium tissue, a training set of 85 voided urine samples (32 controls and 53 bladder cancer), and a blinded testing set of 68 voided urine samples (33 controls and 35 bladder cancer). Using t-tests, we identified 473 peaks showing significant differential expression across different categories of paired bladder tumor and adjacent urothelial samples compared to normal urothelium. Then the intensities of those 473 peaks were examined in a training set of voided urine samples. Using this approach, we identified 41 protein peaks that were differentially expressed in both sets of samples. The expression pattern of the 41 protein peaks was used to classify the voided urine samples as malignant or benign. This approach yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 59% and 90%, respectively, on the training set and 80% and 100%, respectively, on the testing set. The proteomic classification rule performed with similar accuracy in low- and high-grade bladder carcinomas. In addition, we used hierarchical clustering with all 473 protein peaks on 65 benign voided urine samples, 88 samples from patients with clinically evident bladder cancer, and 127 samples from patients with a history of bladder cancer to classify the samples into Cluster A or B. The tumors in Cluster B were characterized by clinically aggressive behavior with significantly shorter metastasis-free and disease-specific survival. PMID:22879988

  20. Detection of bladder cancer using proteomic profiling of urine sediments.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Tadeusz; Spiess, Philippe E; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Black, Peter; Clarke, Charlotte; Benedict, William; Dinney, Colin P; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Tang, Kuang S; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    We used protein expression profiles to develop a classification rule for the detection and prognostic assessment of bladder cancer in voided urine samples. Using the Ciphergen PBS II ProteinChip Reader, we analyzed the protein profiles of 18 pairs of samples of bladder tumor and adjacent urothelium tissue, a training set of 85 voided urine samples (32 controls and 53 bladder cancer), and a blinded testing set of 68 voided urine samples (33 controls and 35 bladder cancer). Using t-tests, we identified 473 peaks showing significant differential expression across different categories of paired bladder tumor and adjacent urothelial samples compared to normal urothelium. Then the intensities of those 473 peaks were examined in a training set of voided urine samples. Using this approach, we identified 41 protein peaks that were differentially expressed in both sets of samples. The expression pattern of the 41 protein peaks was used to classify the voided urine samples as malignant or benign. This approach yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 59% and 90%, respectively, on the training set and 80% and 100%, respectively, on the testing set. The proteomic classification rule performed with similar accuracy in low- and high-grade bladder carcinomas. In addition, we used hierarchical clustering with all 473 protein peaks on 65 benign voided urine samples, 88 samples from patients with clinically evident bladder cancer, and 127 samples from patients with a history of bladder cancer to classify the samples into Cluster A or B. The tumors in Cluster B were characterized by clinically aggressive behavior with significantly shorter metastasis-free and disease-specific survival.

  1. Does phosphorylation of cofilin affect the progression of human bladder cancer?

    PubMed

    Chung, Hong; Kim, Bokyung; Jung, Seung-Hyo; Won, Kyung-Jong; Jiang, Xiaowen; Lee, Chang-Kwon; Lim, So Dug; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Song, Ki Hak; Kim, Hong Sup

    2013-02-01

    We determined the differently expressed protein profiles and their functions in bladder cancer tissues with the aim of identifying possible target proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms for taking part in their progression. We examined the expression of proteins by proteomic analysis and western blot in normal urothelium, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs), and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs). The function of cofilin was analyzed using T24 human bladder cancer cells. The expression levels of 12 proteins were altered between bladder cancers and normal bladder tissues. Of these proteins, 14-3-3σ was upregulated in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with controls. On the other hand, myosin regulatory light chain 2, galectin-1, lipid-binding AI, annexin V, transthyretin, CARD-inhibitor of NF-κB-activating ligand, and actin prepeptide were downregulated in cancer samples. Cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, was prominent in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with normal bladder tissues. Furthermore, we confirmed that cofilin phosphorylation was more prominent in MIBCs than in NMIBCs using immunoblotting and immunohistochemcal analyses. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) increased the phosphorylation of cofilin and elevated the migration in T24 cells. Knockdown of cofilin expression with small interfering RNA attenuated the T24 cell migration in response to EGF. These results demonstrate that the increased expression and phosphorylation of cofilin might play a role in the occurrence and invasiveness of bladder cancer. We suspected that changes in cofilin expression may participate in the progression of the bladder cancer.

  2. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  3. Bladder cancer clusters in Florida: identifying populations at risk.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Alan M; MacKinnon, Jill A; Fleming, Lora E; Kearney, Greg; Hu, Jennifer J; Sherman, Recinda L; Huang, Youjie; Lee, David J

    2009-07-01

    Modifiable risk factors for bladder cancer have been identified, ie tobacco and chemical exposure. We identified high risk bladder cancer areas and risk factors associated with bladder cancer clusters in Florida using individual and area based data. Spatial modeling was applied to 23,266 early and advanced bladder cancer cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2002 in Florida to identify areas of excess bladder cancer risk. Multivariable regression was used to determine whether sociodemographic indicators, smoking history and proximity to known arsenic contaminated drinking water well sites were associated with bladder cancer diagnosis in a specific area (cluster). A total of 25 clusters were found to have a higher than expected bladder cancer rate, including 13 and 12 of early and late stage disease, respectively. Urban white patients were more likely to live in an advanced bladder cancer cluster. Advanced bladder cancer cluster membership was associated with living in close proximity to known arsenic contaminated drinking water wells. There are multiple areas of early and late stage bladder cancer clusters in Florida. Individuals in an advanced bladder cancer cluster tended to live close to arsenic contaminated wells. Increased evaluation of potentially contaminated well water is warranted in these high risk areas. Targeted bladder cancer public awareness campaigns, smoking cessation support and potentially targeted screening should also be considered in communities at increased risk for bladder cancer. Our analytical approach can also be used by others to systematically identify communities at high risk for bladder and other cancers.

  4. Targeted therapies in the management of metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fassan, Matteo; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Gomella, Leonard G; Baffa, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    The management of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is a common and complex clinical challenge. Despite the fact that UC is one of the most frequent tumors in the population, long term survival for metastatic disease remains low, and chemotherapy is curative for only a small minority of patients. UC is genetically heterogeneous, and it is surrounded by a complex tissue microenvironment. The problems of clinical practice in the field of metastatic bladder cancer have begun to stimulate translational research. Advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of urothelial cancer continue to contribute to the identification of molecular pathways upon which new therapeutic approaches can be targeted. New agents and strategies have recently been developed which can direct the most appropriate choice of treatment for advanced disease. A review of literature published on the targeted therapy for metastatic bladder cancer is presented, focusing on the molecular pathways shut down by the new therapeutic agents. PMID:19707309

  5. Preclinical dosimetry of magnetic fluid hyperthermia for bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-02-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in <10min and maintaining for 60min. Temperatures were measured throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic temperature probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec Canada) to characterize our ability to localize heat within the bladder target. Results The MRI study confirms the effectiveness of the catheterization procedure to homogenously distribute nanoparticles throughout the bladder. Thermal dosimetry data demonstrate our ability to controllably raise temperature of rat bladder >1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  6. Preclinical Dosimetry of Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago R; Stauffer, Paul R; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2013-02-26

    Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in <10min and maintaining for 60min. Temperatures were measured throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic temperature probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec Canada) to characterize our ability to localize heat within the bladder target. The MRI study confirms the effectiveness of the catheterization procedure to homogenously distribute nanoparticles throughout the bladder. Thermal dosimetry data demonstrate our ability to controllably raise temperature of rat bladder ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  7. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy for gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Bhawna; Singh, Ashish; Jagannath, P; Shrikhande, Shailesh V

    2014-06-01

    Gall bladder cancer is a common cancer in the Ganges belt of North-eastern India. In view of incidental diagnosis of gall bladder cancer by physicians and surgeons, the treatment is not optimised. Most patients present in advanced stages and surgery remains the only option to cure. This review highlights the current evidence in advances in systemic therapy of gall bladder cancer.

  8. Expression of Annexin A2 and Its Correlation With Drug Resistance and Recurrence of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huihui; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Man

    2016-12-01

    To explore the expressions of annexin A2 in bladder cancer cell lines and bladder cancer tissues, we want to find the relationship among annexin A2, drug resistance, and recurrence of bladder cancer. Our laboratory established the PUMC-91 bladder cancer cell line against gradient concentration of Adriamycin (0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 μg/mL), and we also collected 60 cases of surgically resected bladder cancer recurrent tissue samples. The tissues were classified into 2 groups according to the frequency of recurrence (<6 months and >2 years) after initial surgery. The method of immunohistochemistry was used to examine the differences in the expression of annexin A2. There were statistical differences in annexin A2 among normal bladder epithelial cell line SV-HUC-1, PUMC-91, PUMC-91 against 0.3 μg/mL Adriamycin, and PUMC-91 against 1.0 μg/mL Adriamycin (P < .05). The expressions of Annexin A2 were found to be higher than those that recurred at >2 years (P = .002) in the bladder cancer tissues and that recurred at <6 months after initial surgery. It was also associated with invasion depth (stage) of bladder cancer, such as higher expression in T2 (invasive muscular) group than Tis (carcinoma in situ) and T1 (invasive mucosa lamina propria) groups (P = .003 and P = .000, respectively). But, it did not correlate with the differentiation (grade) of cancer cells in bladder cancer tissues (P = .593). Annexin A2 can act as a valuable biomarker for predicting the drug resistance and recurrence of bladder cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hongxue; Li, Xuechao; Song, Yarong; Zhang, Peng; Xiao, Yajun; Xing, Yifei

    2015-11-13

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is a member of long non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be dysregulated in several human cancers. However, the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how ANRIL involved in bladder cancer. Our results showed up-regulation of ANRIL in bladder cancer tissues versus the corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the specific mechanisms, ANRIL was silenced by small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA transfection in human bladder cancer T24 and EJ cells. Knockdown of ANRIL repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expressions of Bax, cytoplasmic cytochrome c and Smac and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. However, no change of cleaved caspase-8 level was observed. Furthermore, in vivo experiment confirmed that knockdown of ANRIL inhibited tumorigenic ability of EJ cells in nude mice. Meanwhile, in accordance with in vitro study, knockdown of ANRIL inhibited expression of Bcl-2 and up-regulated expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase-9, but did not affect cleaved caspase-8 level. In conclusion, we first report that ANRIL possibly serves as an oncogene in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • We first report the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer. • ANRIL is obviously up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues. • ANRIL regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and cell apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway.

  10. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  11. Expression of Aggrus/podoplanin in bladder cancer and its role in pulmonary metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Sato, Shigeo; Gong, Bo; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is associated with tumor malignancy by promoting hematogenous metastasis. Aggrus overexpression has been reported in some tumor tissues including lung, esophagus, head and neck and brain. We here found the frequent upregulation of aggrus mRNA in urinary bladder cancers using cancer tissue panels from various organs. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed Aggrus protein expression in urinary bladder cancers and suggested a positive correlation between Aggrus expression and metastatic tendency in bladder cancers. Endogenous expression of Aggrus protein on the cell surface was found in the mouse bladder cancer MBT-2 cell line and human bladder cancer SCaBER cell lines. Knockdown of Aggrus expression in MBT-2 cells decreased their ability to induce platelet aggregation and form pulmonary metastasis in syngeneic mouse models. Knockdown of Aggrus expression in the human bladder cancer SCaBER cells also attenuated their ability to induce platelet aggregation and form pulmonary metastasis in mice. Moreover, pulmonary metastasis of SCaBER cells was prevented by prior administration of our generated anti-Aggrus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by attenuating their retention in lung. These results indicate that Aggrus plays an important role in bladder cancer metastasis. Thus, anti-Aggrus neutralizing antibodies would be useful for the prevention of hematogenous metastasis of Aggrus-positive bladder cancer. PMID:24222607

  12. Bladder cancer screening in aluminum smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Taiwo, Oyebode A; Slade, Martin D; Cantley, Linda F; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R; Donoghue, A Michael; Cullen, Mark R

    2015-04-01

    To present results of a bladder cancer screening program conducted in 18 aluminum smelters in the United States from January 2000 to December 2010. Data were collected on a cohort of workers with a history of working in coal tar pitch volatile exposed areas including urine analysis for conventional cytology and ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ assay. ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and cytology in combination showed a sensitivity of 62.30%, a specificity of 92.60%, a negative predictive value of 99.90%, and a positive predictive value of 2.96%. Fourteen cases of bladder cancer were detected, and the standardized incidence ratio of bladder cancer was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.99). Individuals who tested positive on either test who were later determined to be cancer free had undergone expensive and invasive tests. Evidence to support continued surveillance of this cohort has not been demonstrated.

  13. The West Midlands Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Zeegers, Maurice P; Bryan, Richard T; Langford, Carolyn; Billingham, Lucinda; Murray, Paul; Deshmukh, Neeta S; Hussain, Syed; James, Nick; Wallace, D Michael A; Cheng, K K

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the rationale and design of the Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme (BCPP), and to demonstrate the capability of this design. METHODS There is a need to understand the determinants of bladder cancer to help reduce recurrence, progression, morbidity, mortality and related costs. We previously showed that lifestyle factors are important for determining the risk of bladder cancer, but little is known about their importance in determining the risk of recurrence or progression after diagnosis. Also, histopathological factors alone provide only crude prognostication; the analysis of molecular markers represents a method for refinement but research in this area has not been useful in informing therapeutic decisions or prognostication. The BCPP is a prospective longitudinal cohort study of all patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer within the West Midlands (UK), investigating the influence of lifestyle factors on recurrence and progression, health-related quality of life, the predictive effect of a panel of molecular markers on recurrence or progression, and the establishment of Europe's largest comprehensive bladder cancer bio-repository. It also incorporates the first randomized clinical trial on the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E on bladder cancer. The numbers and proportions of eligible patients recruited, questionnaires completed and specimens obtained were all recorded. RESULTS Since December 2005, 771 patients have been recruited (68% of eligible patients) and of these, 331 are currently being followed up by questionnaires. We have obtained blood, urine and tumour tissues from 92%, 80% and 80% of patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The design of the BCPP has allowed this study to be incorporated into routine clinical work throughout the West Midlands, achieving high levels of recruitment, and data and specimen collection. This might represent a model for the future investigation of urological and other malignancies.

  14. Current perspectives in bladder cancer management.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, T R L

    2013-05-01

    More than 350,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year; the vast majority (> 90%) of these are transitional cell carcinomas (TCC). The most important risk factors for the development of bladder cancer are smoking and occupational exposure to toxic chemicals. Painless visible haematuria is the most common presenting symptom of bladder cancer; significant haematuria requires referral to a specialist urology service. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are currently the recommended tools for diagnosis of bladder cancer. Excluding muscle invasion is an important diagnostic step, as outcomes for patients with muscle invasive TCC are less favourable. For non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, transurethral resection followed by intravesical chemotherapy (typically Mitomycin C or epirubicin) or immunotherapy [bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)] is the current standard of care. For patients failing BCG therapy, cystectomy is recommended; for patients unsuitable for surgery, the choice of treatment options is currently limited. However, novel interventions, such as chemohyperthermia and electromotive drug administration, enhance the effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents and are being evaluated in Phase III trials. Radical cystectomy (with pelvic lymphadenectomy and urinary diversion) or radical radiotherapy are the current established treatments for muscle invasive TCC. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is recommended before definitive treatment of muscle invasive TCC; cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy is the recommended regimen. Palliative chemotherapy is the first-choice treatment in metastatic TCC. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression.

  16. Relationship between Schistosomiasis and Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, M. H.; Sheweita, S. A.; O’Connor, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma of the urinary bladder is the most common malignancy in the Middle East and parts of Africa where schistosomiasis is a widespread problem. Much evidence supports the association between schistosomiasis and bladder cancer: this includes the geographical correlation between the two conditions, the distinctive patterns of gender and age at diagnosis, the clinicopathological identity of schistosome-associated bladder cancer, and extensive evidence in experimentally infected animals. Multiple factors have been suggested as causative agents in schistosome-associated bladder carcinogenesis. Of these, N-nitroso compounds appear to be of particular importance since they were found at high levels in the urine of patients with schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Various strains of bacteria that can mediate nitrosation reactions leading to the formation of N-nitrosamines have been identified in the urine of subjects with schistosomiasis at higher intensities of infection than in normal subjects. In experimental schistosomiasis, the activities of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes are increased soon after infection but are reduced again during the later chronic stages of the disease. Not only could this prolong the period of exposure to activated N-nitrosamines, but also inflammatory cells, sitmulated as a result of the infection, may induce the endogenous synthesis of N-nitrosamines as well as generating oxygen radicals. Higher than normal levels of host cell DNA damage are therefore anticipated, and they have indeed been observed in the case of alkylation damage, together with an inefficiency in the capacity of relevant enzymes to repair this damaged DNA. In experimental schistosomiasis, it was also found that endogenous levels of host cell DNA damage were related to the intensity of infection. All of these factors could contribute to an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients with schistosomiasis, and in particular, the gene changes observed may have

  17. Use of donor bladder tissues for in vitro research.

    PubMed

    Garthwaite, Mary; Hinley, Jennifer; Cross, William; Warwick, Ruth M; Ambrose, Anita; Hardaker, Henry; Eardley, Ian; Southgate, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate deceased non-heart beating (DNHB) donors and deceased heart beating (DHB) brain-stem dead donors, as sources of viable urological tissue for use in biomedical research. To identify sources of viable human bladder tissue as an essential resource for cell biological research aimed at understanding human diseases of the bladder and for developing new tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies for bladder reconstruction. Typically, normal human urinary tract tissue is obtained from adult or paediatric surgical patients with benign urological conditions, but few surgical procedures yield useful quantities of healthy bladder tissue for research. Research ethics committee approval was obtained for collection of donor bladder tissue. Consent for DHB donors was undertaken by the Donor Transplant Coordinators. Tissue Donor Coordinators were responsible for consent for DNHB donors and the retrieval of bladders was coordinated through the National Blood Service Tissue Banking Service. All retrievals were performed by practicing urologists and care was taken to maintain sterility and to minimise bacterial contamination. Two bladders were retrieved from DNHB donors and four were retrieved from DHB donors. By histology, DNHB donor bladder tissue exhibited marked urothelial tissue damage and necrosis, with major loss or absence of urothelium. No cell cultures could be established from these specimens, as the urothelial cells were not viable in primary culture. Bladder urothelium from DHB donors was intact, but showed some damage, including loss of superficial cells and variable separation from the basement membrane. All four DHB bladder specimens yielded viable urothelial cells that attached in primary culture, but cell growth was slow to establish and cultures showed a limited capacity to form a functional barrier epithelium and a propensity to senesce early. We have shown that normal human bladder urothelial cell cultures can be established and serially

  18. [Tissue engineering in urology, new approaches for urinary bladder reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A N; Orlova, N V; Blinova, M I; Iudintseva, N M

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering as applied to urologic pathology is covered extremely poor in the literature despite recently gaining popularity of regenerative medicine. The review reflects the current problems associated with reconstructive surgery of the urinary bladder, experience of the researchers from the United States in implementing cellular technologies for bladder replacement, the problems and prospects of this direction in case of such a severe pathology, as fibrous transformated bladder.

  19. Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Jain, Meera G.

    1974-01-01

    A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners. There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer. PMID:4429932

  20. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Jinbo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging preclinical findings have indicated that steroid hormone receptor signaling plays an important role in bladder cancer outgrowth. In particular, androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals have been shown to correlate with the promotion of tumor development and progression, which may clearly explain some sex-specific differences in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses the available data, suggesting the involvement of androgens and/or the androgen receptor pathways in urothelial carcinogenesis as well as tumor growth. While the precise mechanisms of the functions of the androgen receptor in urothelial cells remain far from being fully understood, current evidence may offer chemopreventive or therapeutic options, using androgen deprivation therapy, in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28241422

  1. Correlation of ANXA1 expression with drug resistance and relapse in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuliang; Meng, Qian; Hu, Huihui; Zhang, Man

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of annexin a1 (ANXA1) in adriamycin-resistant human bladder cancer cell line (pumc-91/ADM) compared with the parental cell line (pumc-91) and its relevance to the drug resistance of bladder cancer, as well as explore the relevance of ANXA1 in recurrent bladder cancer tissues as pertinent to relapse. Methods: qRT-PCR and Western blot were implemented to research the level of ANXA1 in two cell lines (pumc-91/ADM and pumc-91). Immunohistochemistry was applied to explore ANXA1 expression in bladder cancer tissues of different intervals of relapse. The association of ANXA1 with clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Results: The expression of ANXA1 was downregulated in drug-resistant cell line pumc-91/ADM compared to pumc-91. The bladder cancer tissues recurring two years later exhibited higher ANXA1 levels. ANXA1 expression level was positively correlated with T stage, while it was not connected with histological grade strongly. The expression level and influencing factors of ANXA1 in recurrent tissues of bladder cancer were clarified for the first time. Conclusion: ANXA1 may become a promising marker to predict the recurrence and drug resistance of bladder cancer and provide guidance for surveillance. PMID:25337195

  2. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  3. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Carolyn Ritterson; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis—two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist. PMID:26032551

  4. Levels of certain tumor markers as differential factors between bilharzial and non-biharzial bladder cancer among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective Bladder cancer is the commonest type of malignant tumors as a result of schistosomaisis which is a major healthy problem in many subtropical developing countries. The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying biochemical tumor markers in schistosomal bladder cancer versus non-schistosomal bladder cancer when compared to normal healthy ones. Methods This work was performed on tissue specimens from total 25 patients and serum samples from total 30 patients versus ten healthy individuals served as control. The investigated parameters in serum are: xanthine oxidase (XO), fructosamine, lactate dehydrogense (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total proteins, essential and non- essential amino acids profile, hydroxyproline, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In addition, the current investigation also extended to study some markers in tumor bladder tissues including, pyruvate kinase enzyme (PK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Results Results showed that biharzial bladder cancer patients recored more significant elevation in serum XO, fructosamine, LDH, AST, ALT, hydroxyproline, IgE and TNF-α than in bladder cancer patients when compared to control ones. While, in tissues there were significant increase in PK, LDH, AST & ALT activities of schistosomal bladder cancer than in bladder cancer as compared to control healthy patients. Conclusions It could be concluded that, bilharzial and non-bilharzial bladder cancer showed distinct biochemical profile of tumor development and progression which can be taken into consideration in diagnosis of bladder cancer. PMID:21473769

  5. MiR-4295 promotes cell growth in bladder cancer by targeting BTG1

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yong-Hao; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yao; Sun, Peng-Hao; Han, Yu-Ping; Fan, Li; Wang, Kai-Chen; Shen, Fu-Jun; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to contribute to tumor progression and metastasis, and have been proposed to be key regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we report that miR-4295 is deregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. To characterize the role of miR-4295 in bladder cancer cells, we performed functional assays. The overexpression of miR-4295 significantly promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, and migration. Moreover, its downregulation induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter assay and rescue experiment indicated that miR-4295 directly targets BTG1 by binding its 3’UTR. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that miR-4295 acts as an oncogene and may be a potential biomarker for bladder cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27904689

  6. Quantitative glycome analysis of N-glycan patterns in bladder cancer vs normal bladder cells using an integrated strategy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ganglong; Tan, Zengqi; Lu, Wei; Guo, Jia; Yu, Hanjie; Yu, Jingmin; Sun, Chengwen; Qi, Xiaowei; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis of bladder cancer, one of the most common types of human cancer, at an early (nonmuscle-invasive) stage is the best way to reduce the mortality rate. Tumor malignancy in general is closely associated with alterations of glycan expression. Glycosylation status, particularly global glycomes, in bladder cancer has not been well studied. We integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) methods to quantitatively analyze and compare glycan expression in four bladder cancer cell lines (KK47, YTS1, J82, T24) and one normal bladder mucosa cell line (HCV29). Glycopattern alterations were analyzed using lectin microarray analysis and confirmed by lectin staining and lectin blotting. Associations of glycopatterns with diverging stages were evaluated by lectin histochemistry on tissue microarrays. N-Glycans were derivatized by amidation of sialylated glycans with acetohydrazide and reductive amination with the stable isotope tags [(12)C6]- and [(13)C6]-aniline, and were quantitatively analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). N-Glycan biosynthesis-associated proteins were quantitatively analyzed by a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) proteomics method, which revealed significant differences in expression of 13 glycosyltransferases and 4 glycosidases. Our findings indicate that sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)), terminal GalNAc and Gal, and high mannose-type N-glycans were more highly expressed in bladder cancer cells and tissues than in normal cells. Bladder cancer cells showed high expression of core-fucosylated N-glycans but low expression of terminally fucosylated N-glycans. Each of these glycome changes may be directly related to bladder cancer progression.

  7. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  8. New discoveries in the molecular landscape of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Roger; Choi, Woonyoung; Ferguson 3rd, J.E.; Metcalfe, Michael J.; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    We are currently on the cusp of exponential growth in the understanding of the molecular landscape of bladder cancer. Emerging data regarding the mutational burden and targetable genomic and protein alterations in bladder cancer have allowed us to tap into treatments directed toward specific molecular characteristics of bladder cancer. In parallel, these developments will enable us to better select patients for existing treatments of bladder cancer in a step toward personalized therapy. The present article reviews select discoveries that have advanced our understanding of bladder cancer and gives a glimpse of the exciting opportunities on the not-so-distant horizon. PMID:28105319

  9. Curcumin inhibits bladder cancer progression via regulation of β-catenin expression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yunpeng; Jia, Zhuomin; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Chaofei; Yao, Yuanxin

    2017-07-01

    Bladder cancer has a considerable morbidity and mortality impact with particularly poor prognosis. Curcumin has been recently noticed as a polyphenolic compound separated from turmeric to regulate tumor progression. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the invasion and metastasis of bladder cancer cells is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigate the effect of curcumin on the bladder cancer as well as possible mechanisms of curcumin. The expression of β-catenin was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis in a series of bladder cancer tissues. In addition, bladder cancer cell lines T24 and 5637 cells were treated with different concentrations of curcumin. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin on cell proliferation of T24 and 5637 cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The migration and invasion capacity of T24 and 5637 cells were measured by transwell assay. The effects of curcumin on expression levels of β-catenin and epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker were determined by western blotting. The β-catenin expression was significantly upregulated in bladder cancer tissues when compared with corresponding peri-tumor tissues. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited the cell proliferation of T24 and 5637 cells, and curcumin reduced the migration and invasive ability of T24 and 5637 cells via regulating β-catenin expression and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Curcumin may be a new drug for bladder cancer.

  10. MiR-122 targets VEGFC in bladder cancer to inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Xing, Qing-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Qiang; Guo, Zhan-Jun; Li, Chang-Ying; Sun, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that microRNA-122 (miR-122) is down-regulated in several cancer cells and regulates cell apoptosis, proliferation, metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the mount of miR-122 in bladder cancer and the pivotal molecular mechanisms of miR-122 used to regulate bladder carcinogenesis and angiogenesis remain to be clarified. Here, we reveal that miR-122 expression is down-regulated in human bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. MiR-122 represses vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) post-transcriptional expression by directly binding to its 3’-UTR. The protein kinase B (AKT) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which are the most important downstream molecules of VEGFC, are also decreased in bladder cancer cell after miR-122 overexpression. Furthermore, miR-122 over-expression decreases bladder cancer cell migration, invasion, colony formation in vitro and slow bladder cancer growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Finally, miR-122 sensitizes bladder cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these studies suggest that miR-122 serves as a tumor suppressor and down-regulating VEGFC expression, leading to the inhibition of bladder cancer growth and angiogenesis. PMID:27508026

  11. The role of the androgen receptor in the development and progression of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    Men are at a higher risk of developing bladder cancer than women. Since bladder cancer cell lines and tissues were found to express the androgen receptor, efforts have been made to inspect whether androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals are implicated in bladder carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression. Mounting evidence supports the view that bladder cancer is a member of the endocrine-related tumors and may clearly explain the gender-specific difference in the incidence. However, the underlying mechanisms of how androgen receptor signals regulate bladder cancer growth are still far from fully characterized. Moreover, it remains controversial whether the androgen receptor pathway always plays a dominant role in bladder cancer progression. In this review, we summarize the available data on the involvement of androgen receptor signaling in bladder cancer. In particular, current evidence demonstrating the stimulatory effects of androgens on tumor progression or, more convincingly, tumorigenesis via the androgen receptor pathway may offer great potential for androgen deprivation as a therapeutic or chemopreventive option in patients with bladder cancer.

  12. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  13. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  14. Imatinib radiosensitises bladder cancer by targeting homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Boling; Kerr, Martin; Groselj, Blaz; Teo, Mark TW; Knowles, Margaret A; Bristow, Robert G; Phillips, Roger M; Kiltie, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality used to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer, with patient outcomes similar to surgery. However, radioresistance is a significant factor in treatment failure. Cell-free extracts of muscle-invasive bladder tumours are defective in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), and this phenotype might be exploited clinically by combining radiotherapy with a radiosensitising drug that targets homologous recombination (HR), thereby sparing normal tissues with intact NHEJ. The response of the HR protein RAD51 to radiation is inhibited by the small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib. Stable RT112 bladder cancer Ku knockdown (Ku80KD) cells were generated using shRNA technology to mimic the invasive tumour phenotype, and also RAD51 knockdown (RAD51KD) cells to demonstrate imatinib’s pathway selectivity. Ku80KD, RAD51KD, non-silencing vector control and parental RT112 cells were treated with radiation in combination with either imatinib or lapatinib, which inhibits NHEJ, and cell survival assessed by clonogenic assay. Drug doses were chosen at approximately IC40 and IC10 (non-toxic) levels. Imatinib radiosensitised Ku80KD cells to a greater extent than RAD51KD or RT112 cells. In contrast, lapatinib radiosensitised RAD51KD and RT112 cells, but not Ku80KD cells. Taken together, our findings suggest a new application for imatinib in concurrent use with radiotherapy to treat muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:23302228

  15. Upregulated UHRF1 Promotes Bladder Cancer Cell Invasion by Epigenetic Silencing of KiSS1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Jianwei; Han, Zhiyou; Ma, Xuetao; Zhang, Yuhai

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1), as an epigenetic regulator, plays important roles in the tumorigenesis and cancer progression. KiSS1 functions as a metastasis suppressor in various cancers, and epigenetic silencing of KiSS1 increases the metastatic potential of cancer cells. We therefore investigated whether UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by inhibiting KiSS1. The expression levels of UHRF1 and KiSS1 were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay in vitro and in vivo. The role of UHRF1 in regulating bladder cancer metastasis was evaluated in bladder cancer cell. We found that UHRF1 levels are upregulated in most clinical specimens of bladder cancer when compared with paired normal tissues, and UHRF1 expression levels are significantly increased in primary tumors that subsequently metastasized compared with non-metastatic tumors. Forced expression of UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas UHRF1 knockdown decreases cell invasion. Overexpression of UHRF1 increases the methylation of CpG nucleotides and reduces the expression of KiSS1. UHRF1 and KiSS1 expression level is negatively correlated in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of KiSS1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion. Importantly, forced expression of KiSS1 partly abrogates UHRF1-induced cell invasion. These data demonstrated that upregulated UHRF1 increases bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1. PMID:25272010

  16. Upregulated UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Jianwei; Han, Zhiyou; Ma, Xuetao; Zhang, Yuhai

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1), as an epigenetic regulator, plays important roles in the tumorigenesis and cancer progression. KiSS1 functions as a metastasis suppressor in various cancers, and epigenetic silencing of KiSS1 increases the metastatic potential of cancer cells. We therefore investigated whether UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by inhibiting KiSS1. The expression levels of UHRF1 and KiSS1 were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay in vitro and in vivo. The role of UHRF1 in regulating bladder cancer metastasis was evaluated in bladder cancer cell. We found that UHRF1 levels are upregulated in most clinical specimens of bladder cancer when compared with paired normal tissues, and UHRF1 expression levels are significantly increased in primary tumors that subsequently metastasized compared with non-metastatic tumors. Forced expression of UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas UHRF1 knockdown decreases cell invasion. Overexpression of UHRF1 increases the methylation of CpG nucleotides and reduces the expression of KiSS1. UHRF1 and KiSS1 expression level is negatively correlated in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of KiSS1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion. Importantly, forced expression of KiSS1 partly abrogates UHRF1-induced cell invasion. These data demonstrated that upregulated UHRF1 increases bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1.

  17. Differentially expressed genes in metastatic advanced Egyptian bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Hassan, Zeinab Korany; Bahnassy, Abeer A; Khaled, Hussein M; El-Rouby, Mahmoud N; Haggag, Rasha M; Abu-Taleb, Fouad M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Gene expression profiling using microarray technologies improves the understanding of cancer biology. The aim of this study was to determine the gene expression profile in Egyptian bladder cancer patients. Samples from 29 human bladder cancers and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues were analyzed by cDNA microarray, with hierarchical clustering and multidimensional analysis. Five hundred and sixteen genes were differentially expressed of which SOS1, HDAC2, PLXNC1, GTSE1, ULK2, IRS2, ABCA12, TOP3A, HES1, and SRP68 genes were involved in 33 different pathways. The most frequently detected genes were: SOS1 in 20 different pathways; HDAC2 in 5 different pathways; IRS2 in 3 different pathways. There were 388 down-regulated genes. PLCB2 was involved in 11 different pathways, MDM2 in 9 pathways, FZD4 in 5 pathways, p15 and FGF12 in 4 pathways, POLE2 in 3 pathways, and MCM4 and POLR2E in 2 pathways. Thirty genes showed significant differences between transitional cell cancer (TCC) and squamous cell cancer (SCC) samples. Unsupervised cluster analysis of DNA microarray data revealed a clear distinction between low and high grade tumors. In addition 26 genes showed significant differences between low and high tumor stages, including fragile histidine triad, Ras and sialyltransferase 8 (alpha) and 16 showed significant differences between low and high tumor grades, like methionine adenosyl transferase II, beta. The present study identified some genes, that can be used as molecular biomarkers or target genes in Egyptian bladder cancer patients.

  18. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  19. JNK2 downregulation promotes tumorigenesis and chemoresistance by decreasing p53 stability in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Qian, Chenchen; Wang, Liguo; Qi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary system, and the 5-year survival rate remains low. A comprehensive understanding of the carcinogenesis and progression of bladder cancer is urgently needed to advance treatment. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2 (JNK2) exhibits both tumor promoter and tumor suppressor actions, depending on tumor type. Here, we analyzed the JNK2 function in bladder cancer. Using gene expression microarrays, we demonstrated that JNK2 mRNA is downregulated in an orthotopic rat model of bladder cancer. JNK2 protein levels were lower in rat and human bladder cancer tissues than in normal tissues, and the levels correlated with those of p53. Moreover, JNK2 phosphorylated p53 at Thr-81, thus protecting p53 from MDM2-induced proteasome degradation. Decreased expression of JNK2 in T24 cells conferred resistance to cell death induced by mitomycin C. Furthermore, lower JNK2 expression was associated with poorer overall survival among patients who underwent radical cystectomy. These results indicate that JNK2 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer, and that decreased JNK2 expression promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:27147566

  20. Metabolic alterations in bladder cancer: applications for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Whyard, Terry; Waltzer, Wayne C; Waltzer, Douglas; Romanov, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Treatment planning, outcome and prognosis are strongly related to the adequate tumor staging for bladder cancer (BC). Unfortunately, a large discrepancy exists between the preoperative clinical and final pathologic staging. Therefore, an advanced imaging-based technique is crucial for adequate staging. Although Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the best in vivo imaging technique for BC staging because of its excellent soft-tissue contrast and absence of ionizing radiation it lacks cancer-specificity. Tumor-specific positron emission tomography (PET), which is based on the Warburg effect (preferential uptake of glucose by cancer cells), exploits the radioactively-labeled glucose analogs, i.e., FDG. Although FDG-PET is highly cancer specific, it lacks resolution and contrast quality comparable with MRI. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI enables the detection of low concentrations of metabolites containing protons. BC is an attractive target for glucose CEST MRI because, in addition to the typical systemic administration, glucose might also be directly applied into the bladder to reduce toxicity-related complications. As a first stage of the development of a contrast-specific BC imaging technique we have studied glucose uptake by bladder epithelial cells and have observed that glucose is, indeed, consumed by BC cells with higher intensity than by non-transformed urothelial cells. This effect might be partly explained by increased expression of glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3 in transformed cells as compared to normal urothelium. We also detected higher lactate production by BC cells which is another cancer-specific manifestation of the Warburg effect. In addition, we have observed other metabolic alterations in BC cells as compared to non-transformed cells: in particular, increased pyruvate synthesis. When glucose was substituted by glutamine in culture media, preferential uptake of glutamine by BC cells was observed. The preferential

  1. Bladder cancer: approaches to prevention and control*

    PubMed Central

    Koroltchouk, V.; Stanley, K.; Stjernswärd, J.; Mott, K.

    1987-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the twelfth most common cancer globally, with approximately 170 000 new cases each year; a third of these cases are in the developing countries. There are two major etiological types. The first is more common in the industrialized countries and is associated with exposure to certain occupational and environmental carcinogens, but most importantly with tobacco smoking. The second type is associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection of the urinary tract and is one of the most frequent tumours in eastern Mediterranean and African countries. Both types of bladder cancer are largely preventable. Comprehensive education and legislative approaches are recommended to reduce tobacco consumption and exposure to industrial carcinogens. Safe and effective drugs are available to treat schistosomiasis within integrated control programmes in endemic areas. PMID:3121200

  2. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  3. A Methylation Panel for Bladder Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Participate in a prevalidation study for methylation based detection of bladder cancer. In addition, a panel of three markers identified will be evaluated for their ability to a) identify bladder cancer patients from those with benign urologic disease; b) identify patients with superficial (papillary) cancers from those with high grade invasive cancers

  4. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  5. Cytochrome P4501A2 Phenotype and Bladder Cancer Risk: The Shanghai Bladder Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Li; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Chan, Kenneth K.; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yu, Mimi C.; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is hypothesized to catalyze the activation of arylamines, known human bladder carcinogens present in cigarette smoke. The relationship between CYP1A2 phenotype and bladder cancer risk was examined in a case-control study involving 519 patients and 514 controls in Shanghai, China. Both CYP1A2 and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotypic status were determined by a caffeine-based urinary assay. The present study showed that among smokers at urine collection, bladder cancer patients had statistically significantly higher CYP1A2 phenotype scores compared with control subjects (P = 0.001). The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of bladder cancer for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles of the CYP1A2 score were 1.31 (0.53–3.28), 2.04 (0.90–4.60) and 2.82 (1.32–6.05), respectively, relative to the lowest quartile (P for trend = 0.003). NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype was associated with a statistically significant 40% increased risk of bladder cancer, and the relationship was independent of subjects’ smoking status. Subjects possessing the NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype and the highest tertile of CYP1A2 scores showed the highest risk for bladder cancer. Their odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) was 2.13 (1.24–3.68) relative to their counterparts possessing the NAT2 rapid acetylation phenotype and the lowest tertile of CYP1A2 scores. The findings of the present study demonstrate that CYP1A2 phenotype may be an important contributing factor in the development of smoking-related bladder cancer in humans. PMID:21480221

  6. Bladder Cancer Screening in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Oyebode A.; Slade, Martin D.; Cantley, Linda F.; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R.; Donoghue, A. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present results of a bladder cancer screening program conducted in 18 aluminum smelters in the United States from January 2000 to December 2010. Methods: Data were collected on a cohort of workers with a history of working in coal tar pitch volatile exposed areas including urine analysis for conventional cytology and ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ assay. Results: ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and cytology in combination showed a sensitivity of 62.30%, a specificity of 92.60%, a negative predictive value of 99.90%, and a positive predictive value of 2.96%. Fourteen cases of bladder cancer were detected, and the standardized incidence ratio of bladder cancer was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.99). Individuals who tested positive on either test who were later determined to be cancer free had undergone expensive and invasive tests. Conclusions: Evidence to support continued surveillance of this cohort has not been demonstrated. PMID:25525927

  7. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer.

  8. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jiajia; Zhu, Xi; Zhang, Jie

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Outlines on nanotechnologies applied to bladder tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Alberti, C

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering technologies are more and more expanding as consequence of recent developments in the field of biomaterial science and nanotechnology research. An important issue in designing scaffold materials is that of recreating the ECM (extra-cellular matrix) functional features - particularly ECM-derived complex molecule signalling - to mimic its capability of directing cell-growth and neotissue morphogenesis. In this way the nanotechnology may offer intriguing chances, biomaterial nanoscale-based scaffold geometry behaving as nanomechanotransducer complex interacting with different cell nanosize proteins, especially with those of cell surface mechanoreceptors. To fabricate 3D-scaffold complex architectures, endowed with controlled geometry and functional properties, bottom-up approaches, based on molecular self-assembling of small building polymer units, are used, sometimes functionalizing them by incorporation of bioactive peptide sequences such as RDG (arginine - glycine - aspartic acid, a cell-integrin binding domain of fibronectin), whereas the top-down approaches are useful to fabricate micro/nanoscale structures, such as a microvasculature within an existing complex bioarchitecture. Synthetic polymer-based nanofibers, produced by electrospinning process, may be used to create fibrous scaffolds that can facilitate, given their nanostructured geometry and surface roughness, cell adhesion and growth. Also bladder tissue engineering may benefit by nanotechnology advances to achieve a better reliability of the bladder engineered tissue. Particularly, bladder smooth muscle cell adhesion to nanostructured polymeric surfaces is significantly enhanced in comparison with that to conventional biomaterials. Moreover nanostructured surfaces of bladder engineered tissue show a decreased calcium stone production. In a bladder tumor animal model, the dispersion of carbon nanofibers in a polymeric scaffold-based tissue engineered replacement neobladder, appears to

  10. [Management of bladder cancer in unfit patients].

    PubMed

    Mongiat-Artus, P; Pfister, C; Théodore, C; De Crevoisier, R; Guillotreau, J

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant therapies in bladder cancer are based on risk of recurrence and associated comorbidities (renal failure). Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor for decision. Two adjuvant chemotherapies exist: MVAC or GC. In unfit patients, association (Gemcitabine and Taxanes) could be proposed. Indication of adjuvant radiotherapy depends on metastatic risk and resection margins. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be proposed to selected patients who refuse or are not candidate for radical cystectomy.

  11. MicroRNA-490-5p inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer by targeting c-Fos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shiqi; Xu, Xianglai; Xu, Xin; Hu, Zhenghui; Wu, Jian; Zhu, Yi; Chen, Hong; Mao, Yeqing; Lin, Yiwei; Luo, Jindan; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We examined the level of miR-490-5p in bladder cancer tissues and three cancer cell lines. •We are the first to show the function of miR-490-5p in bladder cancer. •We demonstrate c-Fos may be a target of miR-490-5p. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding sequences that play a crucial role in tumorigenesis by negatively regulating gene expression. Here, we found that miR-490-5p is down-regulated in human bladder cancer tissue and cell lines compared to normal adjacent tissue and a non-malignant cell line. To better characterize the function of miR-490-5p in bladder cancer, we over-expressed miR-490-5p in bladder cancer cell lines with chemically synthesized mimics. Enforced expression of miR-490-5p in bladder cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation via G1-phase arrest. Further studies found the decreased c-Fos expression at both mRNA and protein levels and Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that c-Fos is a direct target of miR-490-5p in bladder cancer. These findings indicate miR-490-5p to be a novel tumor suppressor of bladder cancer cell proliferation through targeting c-Fos.

  12. Bladder cancer and occupational exposure to leather.

    PubMed Central

    Marrett, L D; Hartge, P; Meigs, J W

    1986-01-01

    A large case-control study of bladder cancer (2982 cases; 5782 controls) included information about occupational exposure to leather. Occupational histories of exposed white study subjects were reviewed and 150 were determined to have had "true" on the job exposure to leather. The odds ratio estimate (OR) of bladder cancer associated with such exposure in white subjects (n = 8063) was 1.4 (95% confidence limits = 1.0, 1.9) after adjustment for sex, age, and cigarette smoking. The risk was highest in those first employed in a leather job before 1945, although no dose-response relation with duration of leather employment was found. Subjects employed in "dusty" leather jobs had a slightly higher risk than those with other types of leather jobs. Our results are consistent with reports of an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with exposure to leather. Although the agents responsible have not been identified, our findings of an increased risk associated with exposure in the earlier years of this century and in dusty jobs suggest that leather dusts may be important. PMID:3947575

  13. Nursing care and treatment of patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    Bladder cancer is the second most common urological cancer after prostate cancer in the UK. This article aims to update nurses knowledge about the disease, focusing on diagnosis, treatment and nursing care.

  14. Nitrative DNA damage and Oct3/4 expression in urinary bladder cancer with Schistosomahaematobium infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ning; Thanan, Raynoo; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Hammam, Olfat; Wishahi, Mohamed; Leithy, Tarek El; Hiraku, Yusuke; Amro, EL-Karef; Oikawa, Shinji; Ohnishi, Shiho; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Oct3/4-positive cells increase in Schistosoma haematobium (SH)-associated bladder cancer. {yields} iNOS-dependent DNA lesion, 8-nitroguanine, was formed in Oct3/4-positive cells. {yields} 8-Nitroguanine formed in stem-like cells plays a role in SH-induced carcinogenesis. {yields} Mutant stem cells may participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis. -- Abstract: To investigate whether mutant stem cells participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis to examine nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions (8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG) and a stem cell marker Oct3/4 in bladder tissues obtained from cystitis and bladder cancer patients infected with Schistosomahaematobium (S. haematobium). We also detected the expression of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which lead to 8-nitroguanine formation. The staining intensity of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG was significantly higher in bladder cancer and cystitis tissues than in normal tissues. iNOS expression was colocalized with NF-{kappa}B in 8-nitroguanine-positive tumor cells from bladder cancer patients. Oct3/4 expression was significantly increased in cells from S. haematobium-associated bladder cancer tissues in comparison to normal bladder and cancer tissues without infection. Oct3/4 was also expressed in epithelial cells of cystitis patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in S. haematobium-associated cystitis and cancer tissues. In conclusion, inflammation by S.haematobium infection may increase the number of mutant stem cells, in which iNOS-dependent DNA damage occurs via NF-{kappa}B activation, leading to tumor development.

  15. Hair dye use and risk of bladder cancer in the New England bladder cancer study.

    PubMed

    Koutros, Stella; Silverman, Debra T; Baris, Dalsu; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Morton, Lindsay M; Colt, Joanne S; Hein, David W; Moore, Lee E; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Cherala, Sai; Schned, Alan; Doll, Mark A; Rothman, Nathaniel; Karagas, Margaret R

    2011-12-15

    Aromatic amine components in hair dyes and polymorphisms in genes that encode enzymes responsible for hair dye metabolism may be related to bladder cancer risk. We evaluated the association between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk and effect modification by N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1), NAT2, glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1) genotypes in a population-based case-control study of 1193 incident cases and 1418 controls from Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire enrolled between 2001 and 2004. Individuals were interviewed in person using a computer-assisted personal interview to assess hair dye use and information on potential confounders and effect modifiers. No overall association between age at first use, year of first use, type of product, color, duration or number of applications of hair dyes and bladder cancer among women or men was apparent, but increased risks were observed in certain subgroups. Women who used permanent dyes and had a college degree, a marker of socioeconomic status, had an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-8.9]. Among these women, we found an increased risk of bladder cancer among exclusive users of permanent hair dyes who had NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype (OR = 7.3, 95% CI: 1.6-32.6) compared to never users of dye with NAT2 rapid/intermediate acetylation phenotype. Although we found no relation between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk in women overall, we detected evidence of associations and gene-environment interaction with permanent hair dye use; however, this was limited to educated women. These results need confirmation with larger numbers, requiring pooling data from multiple studies. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Beyond proliferation: KLF5 promotes angiogenesis of bladder cancer through directly regulating VEGFA transcription.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Wu, Kaijie; Chen, Yule; Zhou, Jiancheng; Du, Chong; Shi, Qi; Xu, Shan; Jia, Jing; Tang, Xiaoshuang; Li, Feng; Hui, Ke; He, Dalin; Guo, Peng

    2015-12-22

    Abundant evidence has demonstrated critical roles of KLF5 in regulating cell proliferation in various cancers, however, its additional roles in other aspects of cancer development remain to be further clarified. In this study, we found that KLF5 was essential for cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction in vitro and tumor angiogenesis in nude mice based on lentivirus-mediated KLF5 knockdown bladder cancer cell models. Moreover, KLF5 insufficiency abolished the ability of bladder cancer cells to induce neovascularization in rabbit cornea. Mechanistically, the pro-angiogenic factor VEGFA was identified as a direct downstream target of KLF5, which bound to GC-boxes and CACCC elements of VEGFA promoter and regulated its transcriptional activity. In addition, there was a positive correlation between KLF5 and VEGFA expression in human bladder cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry assay and statistical analysis from TCGA and GEO data. Furthermore, we found that two pivotal pathways in bladder cancer, RTKs/RAS/MAPK and PI3K/Akt, might convey their oncogenic signaling through KLF5-VEGFA axis. Taken together, our results indicate that KLF5 promotes angiogenesis of bladder cancer through directly regulating VEGFA transcription and suggest that KLF5 could be a novel therapeutic target for angiogenesis inhibition in bladder cancer.

  17. Beyond proliferation: KLF5 promotes angiogenesis of bladder cancer through directly regulating VEGFA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yule; Zhou, Jiancheng; Du, Chong; Shi, Qi; Xu, Shan; Jia, Jing; Tang, Xiaoshuang; Li, Feng; Hui, Ke; He, Dalin; Guo, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has demonstrated critical roles of KLF5 in regulating cell proliferation in various cancers, however, its additional roles in other aspects of cancer development remain to be further clarified. In this study, we found that KLF5 was essential for cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction in vitro and tumor angiogenesis in nude mice based on lentivirus-mediated KLF5 knockdown bladder cancer cell models. Moreover, KLF5 insufficiency abolished the ability of bladder cancer cells to induce neovascularization in rabbit cornea. Mechanistically, the pro-angiogenic factor VEGFA was identified as a direct downstream target of KLF5, which bound to GC-boxes and CACCC elements of VEGFA promoter and regulated its transcriptional activity. In addition, there was a positive correlation between KLF5 and VEGFA expression in human bladder cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry assay and statistical analysis from TCGA and GEO data. Furthermore, we found that two pivotal pathways in bladder cancer, RTKs/RAS/MAPK and PI3K/Akt, might convey their oncogenic signaling through KLF5-VEGFA axis. Taken together, our results indicate that KLF5 promotes angiogenesis of bladder cancer through directly regulating VEGFA transcription and suggest that KLF5 could be a novel therapeutic target for angiogenesis inhibition in bladder cancer. PMID:26544730

  18. MicroRNA-23b functions as a tumor suppressor by regulating Zeb1 in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Chang, Inik; Greene, Kirsten; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Yamamura, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeted repression of transcription and translation. In this study we show that miRNA-23b (miR-23b) acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that miR-23b is significantly down-regulated in bladder cancer cell lines and tumor tissues compared to non-malignant cells and normal tissue samples. We also demonstrate that miR-23b expression has a potential to be diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in bladder cancer. High miR-23b expression is positively correlated with higher overall survival of bladder cancer patients as revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. ROC analysis showed that miR-23b expression can distinguish between normal and bladder cancer tissues. Further we elucidated the biological significance of miR-23b in bladder cancer. Over-expression of miR-23b in bladder cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and impaired colony formation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed that re-expression of miR-23b in bladder cancer cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis while inhibiting cell migration and invasion. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Zeb1, a crucial regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is a direct target of miR-23b in bladder cancer. These results show that loss of miR-23b confers a proliferative advantage and promotes bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, re-expression of miR-23b may be a beneficial therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human bladder cancer.

  19. MicroRNA-23b Functions as a Tumor Suppressor by Regulating Zeb1 in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A.; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Chang, Inik; Greene, Kirsten; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir; Yamamura, Soichiro

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeted repression of transcription and translation. In this study we show that miRNA-23b (miR-23b) acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that miR-23b is significantly down-regulated in bladder cancer cell lines and tumor tissues compared to non-malignant cells and normal tissue samples. We also demonstrate that miR-23b expression has a potential to be diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in bladder cancer. High miR-23b expression is positively correlated with higher overall survival of bladder cancer patients as revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. ROC analysis showed that miR-23b expression can distinguish between normal and bladder cancer tissues. Further we elucidated the biological significance of miR-23b in bladder cancer. Over-expression of miR-23b in bladder cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and impaired colony formation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed that re-expression of miR-23b in bladder cancer cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis while inhibiting cell migration and invasion. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Zeb1, a crucial regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is a direct target of miR-23b in bladder cancer. These results show that loss of miR-23b confers a proliferative advantage and promotes bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, re-expression of miR-23b may be a beneficial therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human bladder cancer. PMID:23844063

  20. The emerging role of the androgen receptor in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Alan P; Mudryj, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Men are three to four times more likely to get bladder cancer than women. The gender disparity characterizing bladder cancer diagnoses has been investigated. One hypothesis is that androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved in the etiology and progression of this disease. Although bladder cancer is not typically described as an endocrine-related malignancy, it has become increasingly clear that AR signaling plays a role in bladder tumors. This review summarizes current findings regarding the role of the AR in bladder cancer. We discuss work demonstrating AR expression in bladder cancer and its role in promoting formation and progression of tumors. Additionally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting the AR in this disease.

  1. Podoplanin serum and urine concentration in transitional bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sankiewicz, Anna; Guszcz, Tomasz; Mena-Hortelano, Rocio; Zukowski, Krzysztof; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDP) is a mucin - a type of transmembrane protein expressed in numerous tissues during ontogeny and in adult animals, including the brain, heart, kidney, osteoblasts and lymphoid organs. The aim of this study was to determine podoplanin concentration in the blood serum and urine of patients with bladder cancer. Quantifying podoplanin concentration and its correlation with various clinicopathological parameters may be useful for more accurate predictions and identifying high-risk patients. The present study included 82 patients with bladder cancer confirmed by transurethral resection or cystectomy and 27 healthy volunteers. The Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging biosensor was applied for the detection of podoplanin in the serum and urine samples. Significant differences in serum and urine podoplanin concentration levels were observed between bladder cancer patients. The statistically significant higher values of PDP were detected in serum of patients with invasive, more aggressive, larger, multifocal tumors. The association between podoplanin concentration and clinicopathological features indicates that it might be useful while making therapeutic decisions.

  2. EFFECT OF TERAZOSIN ON TISSUE VASCULARITY AND APOPTOSIS IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF BLADDER

    PubMed Central

    TAHMATZOPOULOS, ANASTASIOS; LAGRANGE, CHAD A.; ZENG, LI; MITCHELL, BONNIE L.; CONNER, WILLIAM T.; KYPRIANOU, NATASHA

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To present a pilot study to determine whether the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin can induce apoptosis in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder, similar to the effect seen with prostate cancer. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin has recently been shown to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo and to reduce prostatic tissue vascularity by potentially affecting endothelial cell adhesion. Methods The records of 24 men who underwent radical cystectomy for TCC of the bladder at the Lexington Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. The control group consisted of 15 men who were never exposed to terazosin. The study group consisted of 9 men who were treated with terazosin before cystectomy. Sections of the bladder tumor and normal trigone were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis for microvessel density, endothelial cell CD31 expression, and apoptosis detection (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling), as well as high-molecular-weight cytokeratin staining. Results A significant reduction in tissue vascularity (14.0 versus 19.2, P <0.05) and a significant increase in the apoptotic index (3.0% versus 1.7%, P <0.05) was detected in terazosin-treated bladder tumors compared with untreated bladder tumors. Most TCC specimens (80%) exhibited strong and consistently uniform immunostaining for high-molecular-weight cytokeratin staining. Conclusions These results suggest that terazosin reduces tumor vascularity and induces apoptosis in TCC of the bladder. Additional studies with more patients are necessary to reach definitive conclusions. However, considering the proven apoptotic action of terazosin in prostatic tissue, this study may have implications for the use of terazosin in the treatment of bladder TCC. PMID:15882756

  3. Bladder tissue passive response to monotonic and cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Perrini, Michela; Bignardi, Cristina; Audenino, Alberto L

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental passive mechanical properties of the bladder need to be known in order to design the most appropriate long-term surgical repair procedures and develop materials for bladder reconstruction. This study has focused on the bladder tissue viscoelastic behavior, providing a comprehensive analysis of the effects of fibers orientation, strain rate and loading history. Whole bladders harvested from one year old fat pigs (160 kg approximate weight) were dissected along the apex-to-base direction and samples were isolated from the lateral region of the wall, as well as along apex-to-base and transverse directions. Uniaxial monotonic (stress relaxation) and cyclic tests at different frequencies have been performed with the Bose Electroforce(®) 3200. Normalized stress relaxation functions have been interpolated using a second-order exponential series and loading and unloading stress-strain curves have been interpolated with a non-linear elastic model. The passive mechanical behavior of bladder tissue was shown to be heavily influenced by frequency and loading history, both in monotonic and cyclic tests. The anisotropy of the tissue was evident in monotonic and in cyclic tests as well, especially in tests performed on an exercised tissue and at high frequencies. In contrast, transverse and apex-to-base samples demonstrated an analogous relaxation behavior.

  4. Preoperative irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Batata, M; Grabstald, H; Sogani, P C; Herr, H; Whitmore, W F

    1982-03-01

    Between 1971 and 1974, 101 patients at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center underwent planned integrated treatment for bladder cancer with 2000 rads by megavoltage delivered to the whole pelvis over five consecutive days followed by radical cystectomy within a week. The overall five-year survival rate was 39%; the hospital mortality rate was 2%. In the pelvis alone tumor recurred in 9% of the patients. These results support other studies demonstrating the efficacy of this and other regimens of preoperative irradiation and cystectomy.

  5. Comparison of adaptive radiotherapy techniques for external radiation therapy of canine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nieset, Jessica R; Harmon, Joseph F; Johnson, Thomas E; Larue, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Daily bladder variations make it difficult to utilize standard radiotherapy as a primary treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Our purpose was to develop a model comparing dose distributions of image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) techniques for canine bladder cancer. Images were obtained retrospectively from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans used for daily positioning of four dogs undergoing fractionated image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Four different treatment plans were modeled for each dog, and dosimetric data were compared. Two plans were developed using planning target volumes based on planning computed tomography (CT) bladder volume. These plans then used bony anatomy or soft tissue anatomy for daily positioning and dosimetric modeling. The third plan type was a hybrid IGRT and ART technique utilizing a library of premade anisotropic planning target volumes using bladder wall motion data and selection of a "plan-of-the-day" determined from positioning CBCT bladder volumes. The fourth plan was an ART technique that constructed a new planning target volume each day based on daily bladder volume as determined by pretreatment CBCT. Dose volume histograms were generated for each plan type and dose distribution for the bladder and rectum were compared between plan types. Irradiated rectal volume decreased and irradiated bladder volume increased as plan conformality increased. ART provided the greatest rectal sparing, with lowest irradiated rectal volume (P < 0.001), and largest bladder volume receiving 95% of the prescription dose (P < 0.001). In our model, adaptive radiotherapy techniques for canine bladder cancer showed significant reduction in rectal volume irradiated when compared to nonadaptive techniques, while maintaining appropriate bladder coverage.

  6. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-02

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  7. Diagnostics techniques in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soubra, Ayman; Risk, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common presentation of bladder cancer and is often treatable with endoscopic resection and intravesical therapies. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the gold standard in diagnosis and surveillance but are limited by their sensitivity in some situations. We seek to provide an overview of recent additions to the diagnostic armamentarium for urologists treating this disease. Methods: Articles were identified through a literature review of articles obtained through PubMed searches including the terms “bladder cancer” and various diagnostic techniques described in the article. Results: A variety of urinary biomarkers are available to assist the diagnosis and management of patients with NMIBC. Many have improved sensitivity over urine cytology, but less specificity. There are certain situations in which this has proved valuable, but as yet these are not part of the standard guidelines for NMIBC. Fluorescence cystoscopy has level 1 evidence demonstrating increased rates of tumor detection and prolonged recurrence-free survival when utilized for transurethral resection. Other technologies seeking to enhance cystoscopy, such as narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are still under evaluation. Conclusions: A variety of urine biomarker and adjunctive endoscopic technologies have been developed to assist the management of NMIBC. While some, such as fluorescence cystoscopy, have demonstrated a definite benefit in this disease, others are still finding their place in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Future studies should shed light on how these can be incorporated to improve outcomes in NMIBC. PMID:26604438

  8. Fluorescence detection of bladder cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Guillemin, François

    2002-11-01

    An effective therapeutic outcome in the treatment of bladder cancer is largely defined by its early detection. In this context, big expectations have been placed on the fluorescence-guided diagnosis of bladder cancer. This paper reviews the applications of endo- and exogenous fluorescence for early diagnosis of in situ carcinoma of the bladder. Despite certain advantages of autofluorescence, exogenous fluorescence, based on the intravesical instillation of fluorophores with the following visible light excitation, has been shown to be more effective in terms of sensitivity and specificity for detecting carcinoma in situ. The equipment consists of a slightly modified light source in order to choose between white (conventional endoscopy) or blue light (fluorescence endoscopy) excitation, and specific lenses, in order to enhance maximally the contrast between normal (blue) autofluorescence and red fluorescence from malignancies. Among exogenous fluorophores, a particular emphasis will be put on the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), its ester derivative (h-ALA) and hypericin. These dyes demonstrated an excellent sensitivity above 90% and specificity ranging from 70% to 90%.

  9. 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Keiji

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid is a treatment method in which the fluorescent substance of protoporphyrin IX excessively accumulated specifically in cancer cells is excited by visible red or green light irradiation, and reactive oxygen is produced and injures cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid less markedly influences the surrounding normal cells and tissue as a result of no accumulation of protoporphyrin IX, being a low-invasive, less harmful treatment localized to cancer. Furthermore, photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid is painless, requiring no anesthesia because localized lesions are treated at a low-energy level, and repeatedly applicable, unlike radiotherapy, and so is expected to be a new low-invasive treatment based on a concept completely different from existing treatments. In fact, photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid for bladder cancer was clinically demonstrated mainly for treatment-resistant bladder carcinoma in situ, and favorable outcomes have been obtained. Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolevulinic acid are photodynamic technologies based on the common biological characteristic of cancers, and are expected as novel therapeutic strategies for many types of cancer. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Trace metal quantification in bladder biopsies from tumoral lesions of Tunisian cancer and controls subjects.

    PubMed

    Feki-Tounsi, Molka; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Mhiri, Mohamed-Nabil; Rebai, Ahmed; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of bladder tumors has been dramatically increasing since the 1970s, possibly as a consequence of ongoing environmental pollution. Previous studies have provided some evidence of an association between cancer and exposure to carcinogenic metals. In order to examine the association between levels of toxic metals in patients with bladder tumors and controls, the amounts of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel were measured in tumoral lesions and adjacent normal part of the bladder mucosa excised for carcinoma and compared with those in the bladder mucosa of volunteer subjects operated for non-neoplastic diseases. The quantification of metals in tissue was assessed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In tumoral tissues of the excised bladder mucosa, content of Cr and Ni was significantly low compared to that of adjacent normal tissues and control tissues while that of As and Cd in normal tissues adjacent to the tumor were significantly elevated compared to controls. Though the sample size was small, the present study shows that concentrations of metals such as Cd, Cr, As, and Ni in bladder tissue may be used as a biomarker of exposure. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, high amounts of As and Cd in adjacent normal parts of the bladders with carcinomas compared to controls would strongly suggest possible, individual or synergistic, effects of these pollutants on enzymatic systems, priming an oncogenic pathway.

  12. Expression of the VLA beta 1 integrin family in bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Liebert, M.; Washington, R.; Stein, J.; Wedemeyer, G.; Grossman, H. B.

    1994-01-01

    Integrins are a family of transmembrane heterodimers, many of which function as receptors for extracellular matrix molecules and play a role in adherence to and motility on matrix components. Because of these functions, integrins are suspected of participating in metastatic processes. We investigated the expression of beta 1 integrins in human bladder cancer cell lines and tissues. Expression of beta 1 integrins on cultured bladder cancer cell lines was evaluated by flow cytometry, of 8 cell lines tested, alpha 1 was found in 4, alpha 2 and alpha 3 in all 8, alpha 4 in 1, and alpha 5 in 3. These results were in sharp contrast to the expression detected by immunostaining tissues containing normal urothelium and low stage (noninvasive) and high stage (invasive) bladder cancers. All normal urothelial tissues tested expressed alpha 2 and alpha 3 and none expressed alpha 1, alpha 4, or alpha 5. Similarly, a majority (77%) of low stage (noninvasive) bladder cancers stained positively for alpha 3, whereas only 6 of 13 expressed alpha 2 and none expressed alpha 1, alpha 4, or alpha 5. Among invasive bladder cancers, alpha 1 was detected in 7%, alpha 2 in 24%, alpha 3 in 68%, alpha 5 in 10%, and alpha 4 was not found in any samples. These results indicate that integrin expression in cultured human bladder cancer cell lines does not represent expression observed in tissue samples and may reflect adaption to or selection during tissue culture conditions. A progressive loss of alpha 2 expression is seen from normal urothelial cells through invasive bladder cancers. This loss may contribute to an invasive phenotype by a loss of the cell-cell adherence function mediated by the alpha 2 beta 1 and alpha 3 beta 1 integrins. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8178925

  13. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Kyle G.; Hitt, Mary M.; Moore, Ronald B.

    2012-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS). These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity. PMID:22899907

  14. DIRECTED DIFFERENTIATION OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS INTO BLADDER TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Oottamasathien, Siam; Wang, YongQing; Williams, Karin; Franco, Omar E.; Wills, Marcia L.; Thomas, John C.; Saba, Katrina; Sharif-Afshar, Ali-Reza; Makari, John H.; Bhowmick, Neil A; DeMarco, Romano T.; Hipkens, Susan; Magnuson, Mark; Brock, John W.; Hayward, Simon W.; Pope, John C.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Manipulatable models of bladder development which interrogate specific pathways are badly needed. Such models will allow a systematic investigation of the multitude of pathologies which result from developmental defects of the urinary bladder. In the present communication, we describe a model in which mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are directed to differentiate to form bladder tissue by specific interactions with fetal bladder mesenchyme. This model allows us to visualize the various stages in the differentiation of urothelium from ES cells, including the commitment to an endodermal cell lineage, with the temporal profile characterized by examining the induction of specific endodermal transcription factors (Foxa1 and Foxa2). In addition, final functional urothelial differentiation was characterized by examining uroplakin expression. It is well established that ES cells will spontaneously develop teratomas when grown within immunocompromised mouse hosts. We determined the specific mesenchymal to ES cell ratios necessary to dictate organ-specific differentiation while completely suppressing teratomatous growth. Embryonic mesenchyme is well established as an inductive tissue which dictates organ-specific programming of epithelial tissues. The present study demonstrates that embryonic bladder mesenchyme can also steer ES cells towards developing specific endodermal derived urothelium. These approaches allow us to capture specific stages of stem cell differentiation and to better define stem cell hierarchies. PMID:17289017

  15. Reprogramming bladder cancer cells for studying cancer initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Iskender, Banu; Izgi, Kenan; Canatan, Halit

    2016-10-01

    The induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology is the forced expression of specific transcription factors in somatic cells resulting in transformation into self-renewing, pluripotent cells which possess the ability to differentiate into any type of cells in the human body. While malignant cells could also be reprogrammed into iPSC-like cells with lower efficiency due to the genetic and epigenetic barriers in cancer cells, only a limited number of cancer cell types could be successfully reprogrammed until today. In the present study, we aimed at reprogramming two bladder cancer cell lines HTB-9 and T24 using a non-integrating Sendai virus (SeV) system. We have generated six sub-clones using distinct combinations of four factors-OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC-in two bladder cancer cell lines. Only a single sub-clone, T24 transduced with 4Fs, gave rise to iPSC-like cells. Bladder cancer cell-derived T24 4F cells represent unique features of pluripotent cells such as epithelial-like morphology, colony-forming ability, expression of pluripotency-associated markers and bearing the ability to differentiate in vitro. This is the first study focusing on the reprogramming susceptibility of two different bladder cancer cell lines to nuclear reprogramming. Further molecular characterisation of T24 4F cells could provide a better insight for biomarker research in bladder carcinogenesis and could offer a valuable tool for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in bladder carcinoma.

  16. Rb knockdown accelerates bladder cancer progression through E2F3 activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang-Ping; Jiao, Yong; Wang, Cheng-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed in the world and leads to significant mortality and morbidity among affected patients. The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a main tumor suppressor, controlling cellular responses to potentially oncogenic stimulation. E2F3 was invariably disrupted in different human cancers for its central role in the control of cellular proliferation. Here, we investigated how Rb is integrated to control bladder cancer progression through E2F3 and p53 regulation. The results exhibit that Rb expression is lower in patients with bladder tumor, while E2F3 level is high. Rb knockdown enhanced bladder tumor cell proliferation and migration, aggravated with p53 silence. Interestingly, Rb silence results in E2F3, Myc and mTOR signaling pathway activation, contributing to bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis suppression mainly through caspase-3 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that Rb is highly expressed in normal bladder cells, but was repressed in tumor tissues of the bladder completely, suggesting a possible role of Rb as a tumor suppressor.

  17. Involvement of cancer-derived IgG in the proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhengzuo; Liu, Yang; Qin, Caipeng; Liu, Zhenhua; Yuan, Yeqing; Yin, Huaqi; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that immunoglobulin (Ig), the classical immune molecule, is extensively expressed in many cell types other than B-cells (non-B-IgG), including some malignant cells. The expression of Ig in malignant cells has been associated with a poor prognosis. In the present study, immunohistochemical analysis detected strong positive staining of IgG in three bladder cancer cell lines, the cancer cells in 77 bladder cancer patient samples and the cells in 3 cystitis glandularis tissue samples, while negative staining was observed in 4 specimens of normal transitional epithelial tissues. Importantly, functional transcripts of IgG with unique VHDJH rearrangement patterns were also found in bladder cancer cells. The knockdown of IgG in bladder cancer cell lines using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of the cells. Notably, high IgG expression, as determined by immunostaining, was significantly correlated with a high histological grade and recurrence. The results of the present study suggested that IgG expression is involved in the malignant biological behavior and poor prognosis of bladder cancer. Therefore, IgG may serve as a novel target for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:28105218

  18. Frequent truncating mutations of STAG2 in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David A; Kim, Jung-Sik; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gerard, Julia; Zhuang, Dazhong; Zhang, Shizhen; Navai, Neema; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Phillips, Joanna J; Robinson, Brian D; Rubin, Mark A; Volkmer, Björn; Hautmann, Richard; Küfer, Rainer; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Netto, George; Theodorescu, Dan; James, C David; Czerniak, Bogdan; Miettinen, Markku; Waldman, Todd

    2013-12-01

    Here we report the discovery of truncating mutations of the gene encoding the cohesin subunit STAG2, which regulates sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, in 36% of papillary non-invasive urothelial carcinomas and 16% of invasive urothelial carcinomas of the bladder. Our studies suggest that STAG2 has a role in controlling chromosome number but not the proliferation of bladder cancer cells. These findings identify STAG2 as one of the most commonly mutated genes in bladder cancer.

  19. Frequent truncating mutations of STAG2 in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David A.; Kim, Jung-Sik; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gerard, Julia; Zhuang, DaZhong; Zhang, Shizhen; Navai, Neema; Siefker-Radtker, Arleen; Phillips, Joanna J.; Robinson, Brian D.; Rubin, Mark A.; Volkmer, Björn; Hautmann, Richard; Küfer, Rainer; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Netto, George; Theodorescu, Dan; James, C. David; Czerniak, Bogdan; Miettinen, Markku; Waldman, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of truncating mutations of the gene encoding the cohesin subunit STAG2, which regulates sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, in 36% of papillary non-invasive urothelial carcinomas and 16% of invasive urothelial carcinomas of the bladder. Our studies suggest that STAG2 plays a role in controlling chromosome number but not proliferation of bladder cancer cells. These findings identify STAG2 as among the most commonly mutated genes in bladder cancer discovered to date. PMID:24121789

  20. Lack of Decorin Expression by Human Bladder Cancer Cells Offers New Tools in the Therapy of Urothelial Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Riikka; Vuorikoski, Sanna; Boström, Pia; Laato, Matti; Boström, Peter J.; Järveläinen, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Decorin, a multifunctional small leucine-rich extracellular matrix proteoglycan, has been shown to possess potent antitumour activity. However, there is some uncertainty whether different cancer cells express decorin in addition to non-malignant stromal cells. In this study we clarified decorin expression by human bladder cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the effect of adenovirus-mediated decorin expression on human bladder cancer cells in vitro was examined. We first demonstrated using the publicly available GeneSapiens databank that decorin gene expression is present in both normal and malignant human bladder tissues. However, when we applied in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled RNA probes for decorin on human bladder carcinoma tissue samples derived from a large radical cystectomy patient cohort (n = 199), we unambiguously demonstrated that invasive and non-invasive bladder carcinoma cells completely lack decorin mRNA. The cancer cells were also negative for decorin immunoreactivity. Instead, decorin expression was localized solely to original non-malignant stromal areas of bladder tissue. In accordance with the aforementioned results, human bladder cancer cells in vitro were also negative for decorin expression as shown by RT-qPCR analyses. The lack of decorin expression by bladder cancer cells was shown not to be due to the methylation of the proximal promoter region of the decorin gene. When bladder cancer cells were transfected with a decorin adenoviral vector, their proliferation was significantly decreased. In conclusion, we have shown that human bladder cancer cells are totally devoid of decorin expression. We have also shown that adenovirus-mediated decorin gene transduction of human bladder cancer cell lines markedly inhibits their proliferation. Thus, decorin gene delivery offers new potential therapeutic tools in urothelial malignancies. PMID:24146840

  1. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care.

  2. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed. PMID:26860539

  3. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed.

  4. Bladder tissue biomechanical behavior: Experimental tests and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Natali, A N; Audenino, A L; Artibani, W; Fontanella, C G; Carniel, E L; Zanetti, E M

    2015-09-18

    A procedure for the constitutive analysis of bladder tissues mechanical behavior is provided, by using a coupled experimental and computational approach. The first step pertains to the design and development of mechanical tests on specimens from porcine bladders. The bladders have been harvested, and the specimens have been subjected to uniaxial cyclic tests at different strain rates along preferential directions, considering the distribution of tissue fibrous components. Experimental results showed the anisotropic, non-linear and time-dependent stress-strain behavior, due to tissue conformation with fibers distributed along preferential directions and their interaction phenomena with ground substance. In detail, experimental data showed a greater tissue stiffness along transversal direction. Viscous behavior was assessed by strain rate dependence of stress-strain curves and hysteretic phenomena. The second step pertains the development of a specific fiber-reinforced visco-hyperelastic constitutive model, in the light of bladder tissues structural conformation and experimental results. Constitutive parameters have been identified by minimizing the discrepancy between model and experimental data. The agreement between experimental and model results represent a term for evaluating the reliability of the constitutive models by means of the proposed operational procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Neuberger, Molly; Daurkin, Irina; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Dahm, Philipp; Rosser, Charles; Vieweg, Johannes; Gilbert, Scott M; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Both cancer-related inflammation and tumor-induced immune suppression are associated with expansion of myeloid cell subsets including myeloid-derived suppressor cells. However, little known regarding characteristics of myeloid cells in patients with bladder cancer. In this study, we analyzed myeloid cells from peripheral blood (PBMC) and tumor tissue that were collected from patients with superficial noninvasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that PBMC from bladder cancer patients contain two major CD11b myeloid cell subsets: granulocyte-type CD15(high) CD33(low) cells and monocyte-type CD15(low) CD33(high) cells. The number of circulating granulocytic but not monocytic myeloid cells in cancer patients was markedly increased when compared to healthy individuals. Both myeloid cell subsets from cancer patients were highly activated and produced substantial amounts of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, G-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6. Granulocytic myeloid cells were able to inhibit in vitro T cell proliferation through induction of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells. Analysis of bladder cancer tissues revealed that tumors were infiltrated with monocyte-macrophage CD11b(+) HLA-DR(+) and granulocytic CD11b(+) CD15(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid cells. Collectively, this study identifies myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that these highly activated inflammatory myeloid cells represent a source of multiple chemokines/cytokines and may contribute to inflammation and immune dysfunction in bladder cancer.

  6. UBE2T silencing suppresses proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan Qing; Peng, Ding; Ning, Xiang Hui; Yang, Xin Yu; Li, Xue Song; Zhou, Li Qun; Guo, Ying Lu

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2T (UBE2T), a member of the ubiquitin-conjugating E2 family in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, has been reported to be overexpressed in certain tumor types and to have an important role in the Fanconi anemia pathway. In the present study, the expression of UBE2T and its association with bladder cancer were investigated; to the best of our knowledge, this has not been reported previously. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis demonstrated that UBE2T was significantly upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines compared with adjacent normal bladder tissues and a normal human urinary tract epithelial cell line, respectively. UBE2T was detectable in the nuclei and cytoplasm of cancer cells, exhibiting stronger expression in the nuclei. A UBE2T-siRNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed and used to infect human bladder cancer 5637 cells, in order to examine the role of UBE2T in bladder cancer cell growth in vitro. The knockdown of UBE2T significantly decreased bladder cancer cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, UBE2T silencing induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and increased cell apoptosis. Therefore, UBE2T serves an important role in the growth of bladder cancer cells, and may be considered as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder cancer. PMID:28101210

  7. Chemoimmunotherapy of implanted murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Akaza, H; Crabtree, W N; Matheny, R B; Soloway, M S

    1983-03-01

    The unaltered incidence of recurrence of superficial bladder tumor after discontinuation of intravesical chemotherapy has prompted a search for effective adjuvant therapy. The technique of cauterization and implantation of tumor cells was performed in C3H/He mice to simulate the early stage of bladder cancer to evaluate a regimen of intravesical mitomycin C followed by the systemic immunopotentiator, levamisole. Mice received either normal saline (control), mitomycin C (MMC), levamisole (Leva), or MMC plus Leva. Chemotherapy was given intravesically on days 6 and 13. Immunotherapy was given intraperitoneally on days 7 and 14. All mice were sacrificed on day 21. In the treatment groups, the incidences of bladder tumor varied from 50 to 63 per cent whereas that of the control group was 91 per cent. An increase in spleen weight was observed in the treatment groups of Leva and MMC plus Leva as well as the control group but not observed in the group receiving MMC. Our study suggests that although Leva did not reduce the tumor incidence, an immunostimulator might be of benefit when used in conjunction with MMC.

  8. Homing peptide guiding optical molecular imaging for the diagnosis of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-feng; Pang, Jian-zhi; Liu, Jie-hao; Zhao, Yang; Jia, Xing-you; Li, Jun; Liu, Reng-xin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Zi-qiang; Yan, San-hua; Luo, Jun-qian; Zhang, Xiao-lei

    2014-11-01

    Background: The limitations of primary transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBt) have led the residual tumors rates as high as 75%. The intraoperative fluorescence imaging offers a great potential for improving TURBt have been confirmed. So we aim to distinguish the residual tumors and normal mucosa using fluorescence molecular imaging formed by conjugated molecule of the CSNRDARRC bladder cancer homing peptide with fluorescent dye. The conjugated molecule was abbreviated FIuo-ACP. In our study, we will research the image features of FIuo-ACP probe targeted bladder cancer for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Methods: After the FIuo-ACP probe was synthetized, the binding sites, factors affecting binding rates, the specificity and the targeting of Fluo-ACP labeled with bladder cancer cells were studied respectively by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), immunofluorescence and multispectral fluorescence ex vivo optical molecular imaging system. Results: The binding sites were located in nucleus and the binding rates were correlated linearly with the dose of probe and the grade of pathology. Moreover, the probe has a binding specificity with bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo. Tumor cells being labeled by the Fluo-ACP, bright green spots were observed under LSCM. The tissue samples and tumor cells can be labeled and identified by fluorescence microscope. Optical molecular imaging of xenograft tumor tissues was exhibited as fluorescent spots under EMCCD. Conclusion: The CSNRDARRC peptides might be a useful bladder cancer targeting vector. The FIuo-ACP molecular probe was suitable for fluorescence molecular imaging diagnosis for bladder cancer in vivo and ex vivo.

  9. Strategies to improve drug delivery in bladder cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, M; Plattner, V E; Gabor, F

    2009-07-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common malignancy in the world featuring very high gender variability in occurrence. Current options for bladder cancer therapy include surgery, immunotherapy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy with a trend towards multimodal treatments. However, successful management remains a challenge for urologists and oncologists because of the high risk for recurrence and progression. Particularly in the field of bladder cancer chemotherapy, efficacy of treatment might be improved by advanced drug delivery strategies aimed at prolonged residence time within the bladder cavity and increased permeability of the bladder wall during intravesical instillation. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the biology of bladder carcinogenesis and malignant progression stimulated the development of a new generation of anticancer drugs for targeted therapies that might result in increased treatment specificity together with lower toxic potential and higher therapeutic indices. This review discusses the available strategies for 'targeted therapy', focusing on molecular targets, and for 'controlled delivery', comprising all other approaches towards improved drug delivery.

  10. [Expression of NF-kappa B in human bladder cancer and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xie, Dong-hua; Tang, Xiao-da; Xia, Shu-jie; Tan, Jian-ming; Wang, Xiang-hui; Cai, Yong

    2002-06-01

    Studies on solid cancer(such as breast cancer, hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer) indicated that the abnormal expression of nuclear transcription factor Kappa B (NF-kappa B) regulates angiogenesis and cyclin-related genes. This study was designed to investigate the expression differences of NF-kappa B and its regulated genes between human primary transitional cell carcinoma(TCCs) of bladder and non-cancer bladder mucosa and its clinical significance. Forty-three frozen sections including 30 bladder cancer and 13 non-cancer bladder mucosa were subjected to immunohistochemistry and nucleus staining for determining levels of NF-kappa B family and I kappa B alpha; Five paired cancer and non-cancer specimens were subjected to Western blot for analysis p65, an important subtype of NF-kappa B; Thirteen paired specimens were subjected to RT-PCR for determination mRNA levels of p50, p52, p65, c-Rel, RelB, I kappa B alpha, CyclinD1, IL-8. Expressions of p50, p52, p65, c-Rel, RelB, I kappa B alpha, CyclinD1, IL-8 mRNAs in bladder cancer were higher than that in non-cancer bladder mucosa (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively). Nucelus stainings of p50, p52, p65, c-Rel, RelB were also stronger in bladder cancer(P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, p65 was expressed more in cancer tissue than that in non-cancer mucosa evidenced by Western blot. In bladder cancer, the ranking score differences of p52, p65, c-Rel protein between lymphatic metastasis group and non-lymphatic metastasis group were statistically significant (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). Compared to noncancer bladder mucosa, expressions of NF-kappa B family and its regulated genes in bladder cancer are markedly higher. NF-kappa B may be related to lymphatic metastasis.

  11. Pharmacologic down-regulation of EZH2 suppresses bladder cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shou-Hung; Huang, Hsu-Shan; Wu, Hong-Ui; Tsai, Yi-Ta; Chuang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Huang, Shih-Ming; Sun, Guang-Huan; Chang, Sun-Yran; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Cha, Tai-Lung

    2014-01-01

    The polycomb group gene, EZH2, is highly expressed in advanced bladder cancer. Here we demonstrated that down-regulation of EZH2 in tumor tissues after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy correlated with good therapeutic response in advanced bladder cancer. We next developed a small molecule, NSC745885, derived from natural anthraquinone emodin, which down-regulated EZH2 via proteasome-mediated degradation. NSC745885 showed potent selective toxicity against multiple cancer cell lines but not normal cells. NSC745885 treatment overcame multiple-drug resistance and inhibited growth of resistant cancer cells. Over-expression of EZH2 in cancer cells attenuated effects of NSC745885, suggesting that down-regulation of EZH2 was responsible for growth inhibition of NSC745885. NSC745885 also suppressed tumor growth and down-regulated EZH2 in vivo. These results indicate that NSC7455889 suppresses bladder cancer by targeting EZH2. PMID:25431950

  12. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Askeland, Eric J; Newton, Mark R; O'Donnell, Michael A; Luo, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1) immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10.

  13. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, Eric J.; Newton, Mark R.; O'Donnell, Michael A.; Luo, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1) immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10. PMID:22778725

  14. Metabolomics in bladder cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yidong; Yang, Xiao; Deng, Xiaheng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Pengchao; Tao, Jun; Qin, Chao; Wei, Jifu; Lu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the most common urological malignancy. Early diagnosis of BC is crucial to improve patient outcomes. Currently, metabolomics is a potential technique that can be used to detect BC. We reviewed current publications and synthesised the findings on BC and metabolomics, i.e. metabolite upregulation and downregulation. Fourteen metabolites (lactic acid, leucine, valine, phenylalanine, glutamate, histidine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine, uracil, hypoxanthine, carnitine, pyruvic acid and citric acid) were identified as potential biomarkers for BC. In conclusion, this systematic review presents new opportunities for the diagnosis of BC. PMID:26379905

  15. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  16. Optical spectroscopy by 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester induced photodynamic treatment in rat bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Krokan, Hans E.; Hjelme, Dag R.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality which has been shown to be effective for both malignant and non-malignant diseases. New photosensitizers such as 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester (hALA) may increase the efficiency of PDT. Monitoring of the tissue response provides important information for optimizing factors such as drug and light dose for this treatment modality. Optical spectroscopy may be suited for this task. To test the efficacy of hALA induced PDT, a study on rats with a superficial bladder cancer model, in which a bladder cancer cell line (AY-27) is instilled, will be performed. Preliminary studies have included a PDT feasibility study on rats, fluorescence spectroscopy on AY-27 cell suspensions, and optical reflection and fluorescence spectroscopy in rat bladders in vivo. The results from the preliminary studies are promising, and the study on hALA induced PDT treatment of bladder cancer will be continued.

  17. Epigenetics application in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Harb-de la Rosa, Alfredo; Acker, Matthew; Kumar, Raj A; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2015-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the Western world. Patients with bladder cancer require close monitoring, which may include frequent cystoscopy and urine cytology. Such monitoring results in significant health care cost. The application of epigenetics may allow for a risk adapted approach and more cost-effective method of monitoring. A number of epigenetic changes have been described for many cancer sites, including the urinary bladder. In this review, we discuss the use of epigenetics in bladder cancer and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A comprehensive search of the English medical literature was conducted in PubMed using the terms microRNA regulation, DNA methylation, histone modification and bladder cancer. The most important epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA regulation. Both DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation have been associated with higher rate of cancer. The association of epigenetic changes with bladder cancer has led to the research of its diagnostic and prognostic implications as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Recently, epigenetics has been shown to play a much greater role than previously anticipated in the initiation and propagation of many tumors. The use of epigenetics for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is an evolving and promising field. The possibility of reversing epigenetic changes may facilitate additional cancer treatment options in the future.

  18. Inhibiting cell migration and cell invasion by silencing the transcription factor ETS-1 in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Liu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xintao; Chen, Mingwei; Wu, Hanwei; Lin, Muqi; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Lin, Junhao; Li, Jianfa; Xu, Wen; Fu, Xing; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren

    2016-05-03

    As one of the members of the ETS gene family, the transcription factor v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS-1) plays key role in the regulation of physiological processes in normal cells and tumors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the transcription factor ETS-1 and malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer. We demonstrated that ETS-1 was up-regulated in human bladder cancer tissue compared to paired normal bladder tissue. In order to evaluate the functional role of ETS-1 in human bladder cancer, vectors expressing ETS-1 shRNA and ETS-1 protein were constructed in vitro and transfected into the human bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Our results showed that the transcription factor ETS-1 could promote cell migration and cell invasion in human bladder cancer, without affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. In conclusion, ETS-1 plays oncogenic roles through inducing cell migration and invasion in human bladder cancer, and it can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer.

  19. DDX39 acts as a suppressor of invasion for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Minoru; Wei, Min; Yamano, Shotaro; Kakehashi, Anna; Tamada, Satoshi; Nakatani, Tatsuya; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2012-07-01

    The object of the present study was to identify markers for predicting urinary bladder cancer progression by comparative proteome analysis of bladder cancers and paired normal mucosas. We found that DDX39 was overexpressed in four of six bladder cancers examined compared with respective control tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis using 303 bladder cancer specimens revealed that DDX39 was inversely correlated to pT stage and histological grade progression. The incidence of DDX39(high) tumors (positive cells ≥50%) was 68.6%, 43.5%, 20.0%, and 5.3% in pTa, pT1, pTis, and ≥pT2 tumors, respectively, and 65.2%, 60.7%, and 19.6% in G1, G2, and G3 tumors, respectively. The incidence of DDX39(high) tumors was significantly lower in pT1 and ≥pT2 compared to pTa tumors, and also significantly lower in G3 compared to G1 and G2 tumors. Follow-up analysis (n = 105) revealed that DDX39(low) tumors (positive cells <50%) were associated with disease progression (hazard ratio 7.485; P = 0.0083). Furthermore, DDX39-knockdown bladder cancer cells increased their invasion ability compared to negative control cells. These results suggest that DDX39 is a suppressor of invasion and loss of its function predicts disease progression in bladder cancers.

  20. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Yang, Zhao; Ye, Rui; An, Dan; Li, Chong; Wang, Yitian; Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-19

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer.

  1. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer. PMID:26625313

  2. Investigational cell cycle inhibitors in clinical trials for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok Joong; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2013-03-01

    Cancer-related cell cycle defects are often mediated by alterations in activity of diverse cell cycle regulators. The development of cell cycle inhibitors has undergone a gradual evolution, and new investigational drugs have been extensively tested as a single agent or combination with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. This review covers a broad perspective of how the cell cycle is deregulated in bladder cancer and discusses the clinical trials of cell cycle inhibitors. Although diverse cell cycle inhibitors have been considered as relevant drug candidates for cancer therapy owing to their potential role in restoring control of the cell cycle, these inhibitors have not been yet widely tested in human bladder cancer. Numerous studies already reported that deregulation of cell cycle controls has been commonly observed in bladder cancer cells, thus warranting clinical trials of these inhibitors in advanced bladder cancer patients. In addition, nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) show different clinical and molecular biological characteristics, although ∼ 10 - 20% of NMIBC will progress to MIBC. Therefore, adequate cell cycle inhibitors have to be chosen for bladder cancer treatment based on the different genetic features between NMIBC and MIBC related to cell cycle regulators.

  3. miR-1182 inhibits growth and mediates the chemosensitivity of bladder cancer by targeting hTERT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jun; Dai, Wenbin; Song, Jianming

    2016-02-05

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to contribute to tumor progression and metastasis and proposed to be key regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we report that miR-1182 is deregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. To characterize the role of miR-1182 in bladder cancer cells, we performed functional assays. The overexpression of miR-1182 significantly inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. Moreover, its up-regulation induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and mediated chemosensitivity to cisplatin in bladder cancer. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter assay and a rescue experiment indicated that miR-1182 directly targets hTERT by binding its 3′UTR. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that miR-1182 acts as a tumor suppressor and may be a potential biomarker for bladder cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  4. MicroRNA-1280 Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis by Targeting ROCK1 in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A.; Saini, Sharanjot; Shahryari, Varahram; Arora, Sumit; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Chang, Inik; Yamamura, Soichiro; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Deng, Guoren; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding sequences that can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This study documents the tumor suppressor role of miR-1280 in bladder cancer. Quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that miR-1280 is significantly down-regulated in bladder cancer cell lines and tumors compared to a non-malignant cell line or normal tissue samples. To decipher the functional significance of miR-1280 in bladder cancer, we ectopically over-expressed miR-1280 in bladder cancer cell lines. Over-expression of miR-1280 had antiproliferative effects and impaired colony formation of bladder cancer cell lines. FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) analysis revealed that re-expression of miR-1280 in bladder cancer cells induced G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that miR-1280 inhibited migration and invasion of bladder cancer cell lines. miR-1280 also attenuated ROCK1 and RhoC protein expression. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that oncogene ROCK1 is a direct target of miR-1280 in bladder cancer. This study also indicates that miR-1280 may be of diagnostic and prognostic importance in bladder cancer. For instance, ROC analysis showed that miR-1280 expression can distinguish between malignant and normal bladder cancer cases and Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with miR-1280 high expression had higher overall survival compared to those with low miR-1280 expression. In conclusion, this is the first study to document that miR-1280 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting oncogene ROCK1 to invasion/migration and metastasis. Various compounds are currently being used as ROCK1 inhibitors; therefore restoration of tumor suppressor miR-1280 might be therapeutically useful either alone or in combination with these compounds in the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:23056431

  5. MicroRNA-1280 inhibits invasion and metastasis by targeting ROCK1 in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A; Saini, Sharanjot; Shahryari, Varahram; Arora, Sumit; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Chang, Inik; Yamamura, Soichiro; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Deng, Guoren; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-protein-coding sequences that can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This study documents the tumor suppressor role of miR-1280 in bladder cancer. Quantitative real-time PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that miR-1280 is significantly down-regulated in bladder cancer cell lines and tumors compared to a non-malignant cell line or normal tissue samples. To decipher the functional significance of miR-1280 in bladder cancer, we ectopically over-expressed miR-1280 in bladder cancer cell lines. Over-expression of miR-1280 had antiproliferative effects and impaired colony formation of bladder cancer cell lines. FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) analysis revealed that re-expression of miR-1280 in bladder cancer cells induced G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that miR-1280 inhibited migration and invasion of bladder cancer cell lines. miR-1280 also attenuated ROCK1 and RhoC protein expression. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that oncogene ROCK1 is a direct target of miR-1280 in bladder cancer. This study also indicates that miR-1280 may be of diagnostic and prognostic importance in bladder cancer. For instance, ROC analysis showed that miR-1280 expression can distinguish between malignant and normal bladder cancer cases and Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with miR-1280 high expression had higher overall survival compared to those with low miR-1280 expression. In conclusion, this is the first study to document that miR-1280 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting oncogene ROCK1 to invasion/migration and metastasis. Various compounds are currently being used as ROCK1 inhibitors; therefore restoration of tumor suppressor miR-1280 might be therapeutically useful either alone or in combination with these compounds in the treatment of bladder cancer.

  6. Efficient intravesical therapy of bladder cancer with cationic doxorubicin nanoassemblies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xun; Zhang, Peilan; Luo, Li; Cheng, Hao; Li, Yunzu; Du, Ting; Zou, Bingwen; Gou, Maling

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have promising applications in drug delivery for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane/methoxypoly (ethyleneglycol) (DPP) nanoparticles to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) for intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. The DPP micelles have a mean dynamic diameter of 18.65 nm and a mean zeta potential of +19.6 mV. The DPP micelles could prolong the residence of Dox in the bladder, enhance the penetration of Dox into the bladder wall, and improve cellular uptake of Dox. The encapsulation by DPP micelles significantly improved the anticancer effect of Dox against orthotopic bladder cancer in vivo. This work described a Dox-loaded DPP nanoparticle with potential applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. PMID:27660445

  7. Molecular substratification of bladder cancer: moving towards individualized patient management

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Anirban P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, perioperative therapies and postoperative management, outcomes for patients with bladder cancer have largely remained unchanged. Current management of bladder cancer still relies on pathologic staging that does not always reflect the risk for an individual patient. Studies assessing molecular alterations in individual tumors are offering insights into the myriad of cellular pathways that are deregulated in bladder tumorigenesis and progression. Alterations in pathways involved in cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, cell signaling, angiogenesis and tumor-cell invasion have been shown to influence disease behavior. High-throughput assays are now allowing multiplexed assessment of biomarker alterations, thereby enabling characterization of novel molecular subtypes of bladder cancer. Such approaches have also been used for discovery and validation of robust prognostic molecular signatures. The future of bladder cancer management will rely on the use of validated multimarker panels for risk stratification, optimal surgical management, and theranostic strategies to identify and target specific alterations in individual tumors. PMID:27247631

  8. Efficient intravesical therapy of bladder cancer with cationic doxorubicin nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xun; Zhang, Peilan; Luo, Li; Cheng, Hao; Li, Yunzu; Du, Ting; Zou, Bingwen; Gou, Maling

    Nanoparticles have promising applications in drug delivery for cancer therapy. Herein, we prepared cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane/methoxypoly (ethyleneglycol) (DPP) nanoparticles to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) for intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. The DPP micelles have a mean dynamic diameter of 18.65 nm and a mean zeta potential of +19.6 mV. The DPP micelles could prolong the residence of Dox in the bladder, enhance the penetration of Dox into the bladder wall, and improve cellular uptake of Dox. The encapsulation by DPP micelles significantly improved the anticancer effect of Dox against orthotopic bladder cancer in vivo. This work described a Dox-loaded DPP nanoparticle with potential applications in intravesical therapy of bladder cancer.

  9. Inorganic arsenic in drinking water accelerates N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced bladder tissue damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Paul-Yann; Lin, Yung-Lun; Huang, Chin-Chin; Chen, Sin-Syu; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2012-02-15

    Epidemiological studies have revealed that exposure to an arsenic-contaminated environment correlates with the incidence of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly recurrent after intravesical therapy, and most of the deaths from this disease are due to invasive metastasis. In our present study, the role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in a mouse model. This work provides the first evidence that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder tissue damage, including the urothelium and submucosal layer. This damage to the bladder epithelium induced by BBN includes thickening of the submucosal layer, the loss of the glycosaminoglycan layer and an increase in both the deoxyguanosine oxidation and cytosine methylation levels in the DNA. Further, when 10 ppm inorganic arsenic is combined with BBN, the number of bladder submucosal capillaries is increased. In addition, inorganic arsenic also increases the deoxyguanosine oxidation level, alters the cytosine methylation state, decreases the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreases the protein expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and increases the protein expression of specific protein 1 (Sp1) in bladder tissues. In summary, our data reveal that inorganic arsenic in drinking water promotes the BBN-induced pre-neoplastic damage of bladder tissue in mice, and that the 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, 5-methylcytosine, NQO-1 protein and Sp1 protein levels may be pre-neoplastic markers of bladder tumors. -- Highlights: ► The role of inorganic arsenic in bladder carcinogenesis is characterized in mice. ► We examine the changes in the histology and biochemistry of bladder tissues. ► Inorganic arsenic enhances BBN-induced DNA oxidation while decreases BBN-induced DNA methylation in the mouse bladder. ► Inorganic arsenic alters the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes in

  10. Place of cystectomy in superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chéchile, G; Sarroca, J; Zungri, E; Rosales, E; Martinez, E

    1988-01-01

    Between January 1978 and June 1985, 44 patients underwent cystectomy for clinically diagnosed superficial bladder cancer. Operative mortality was 13.6%. Early and late complications were observed in 34 and 55% patients, respectively. Clinical understaging was seen in 23%, and stage reduction in 18% of the patients. Clinical staging was correct in 59% of the patients. The mean follow-up was 40 months (range, 24-84 months). Five patients presented local recurrence (13%) of the tumor and 10 patients showed distant metastases (26%). Urethral and upper urinary tract recurrences were observed in 7 and 4 patients, respectively. Fourteen patients (39%) died of cancer after a mean follow-up of 24 months. The actuarial 5-year survival was achieved by 77% of the patients with PTo-PTa-PTis and by 67% of the patients with PT1 (p, not significant).

  11. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Next generation of optical diagnostics for bladder cancer using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jen-Jane; Chang, Timothy C.; Pan, Ying; Hsiao, Shelly T.; Mach, Kathleen E.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Real-time imaging with confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) probes that fit in standard endoscopes has emerged as a clinically feasible technology for optical biopsy of bladder cancer. Confocal images of normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic urothelium obtained with intravesical fluorescein can be differentiated by morphologic characteristics. We compiled a confocal atlas of the urinary tract using these diagnostic criteria to be used in a prospective diagnostic accuracy study. Patients scheduled to undergo transurethral resection of bladder tumor underwent white light cystoscopy (WLC), followed by CLE, and histologic confirmation of resected tissue. Areas that appeared normal by WLC were imaged and biopsied as controls. We imaged and prospectively analyzed 135 areas in 57 patients. We show that CLE improves the diagnostic accuracy of WLC for diagnosing benign tissue, low and high grade cancer. Interobserver studies showed a moderate level of agreement by urologists and nonclinical researchers. Despite morphologic differences between inflammation and cancer, real-time differentiation can still be challenging. Identification of bladder cancer-specific contrast agents could provide molecular specificity to CLE. By using fluorescently-labeled antibodies or peptides that bind to proteins expressed in bladder cancer, we have identified putative molecular contrast agents for targeted imaging with CLE. We describe one candidate agent - anti-CD47 - that was instilled into bladder specimens. The tumor and normal urothelium were imaged with CLE, with increased fluorescent signal demonstrated in areas of tumor compared to normal areas. Thus, cancer-specificity can be achieved using molecular contrast agents ex vivo in conjunction with CLE.

  13. Tissue uptake of docetaxel loaded hydrophobically derivatized hyperbranched polyglycerols and their effects on the morphology of the bladder urothelium.

    PubMed

    Mugabe, Clement; Raven, Peter A; Fazli, Ladan; Baker, Jennifer H E; Jackson, John K; Liggins, Richard T; So, Alan I; Gleave, Martin E; Minchinton, Andrew I; Brooks, Donald E; Burt, Helen M

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that docetaxel (DTX) loaded, amine terminated hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2)) nanoparticles significantly increased drug uptake in mouse bladder tissues and was the most effective formulation to significantly inhibit tumor growth in an orthotopic model of bladder cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles on bladder urothelial morphology and integrity, DTX uptake and permeability in bladder tissue and the extent of bladder urothelial recovery following exposure to, and then washout of, HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles. HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles significantly increased the uptake of DTX in both isolated pig bladder as well as in live mouse bladder tissues. Furthermore, HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles were demonstrated to increase the permeability of the urinary bladder wall by causing changes to the urothelial barrier function and morphology through opening of tight junctions and exfoliation of the superficial umbrella cells. These data suggest that exfoliation may be triggered by an apoptosis mechanism, which was followed by a rapid recovery of the urothelium within 24 h post-instillation of HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles. HPG-C(8/10)-MePEG-NH(2) nanoparticles cause significant but rapidly recoverable changes in the bladder urothelial morphology, which we believe may make them suitable for increasing drug permeability of bladder tissue and intravesical drug delivery.

  14. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  15. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  16. Downregulation of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 contributes to bladder cancer metastasis by regulating Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingyue; Gong, Hua; Zeng, Yigang; Tao, Le; Wang, Jun; Jiang, Juntao; Xu, Dongliang; Bao, Erdun; Qiu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-10-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (Hipk2) has been shown to have important regulatory roles in cancer biology, such as cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle, and cell invasion. However, the contributions of Hipk2 to bladder cancer metastasis remain largely unknown. In the current study, we assayed the expression level of Hipk2 in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR, and defined its biological functions. We found that Hipk2 levels were downregulated in most bladder cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues, and Hipk2 levels were remarkably decreased in metastasized tumor tissues when compared with primary tumors. SiRNA-mediated Hipk2 silencing increased bladder cancer cell invasion. Hipk2 knockdown resulted in decrease of E-cadherin expression and increase of N-cadherin and fibronectin expression, indicated that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was induced. We further demonstrated that Hipk2 knockdown induced Wnt signaling activation and β-catenin nuclear localization. Finally, we confirmed that Hipk2 inhibition promoted EMT and subsequent cell invasion, at least in part by activating Wnt signaling. These data suggest an important role of Hipk2 in regulating metastasis of bladder cancer and implicate the potential application of Hipk2 in bladder cancer therapy.

  17. In vivo characterization of muscarinic receptors in peripheral tissues: evaluation of bladder selectivity of anticholinergic agents to treat overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shuji; Hasuike, Naoki; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Shizuo

    2008-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterize in vivo muscarinic receptors in peripheral tissues (urinary bladder, submaxillary gland, colon, stomach, heart) of mice, and further to evaluate bladder-selectivity of anticholinergic agents to treat overactive bladder. Following i.v. injection of [3H]QNB in mice, the radioactivity in peripheral tissues was exclusively detected as the unchanged form. The in vivo specific [3H]QNB binding in particulate fraction of tissue homogenates of mice showed a pharmacological specificity which characterized muscarinic receptors. Binding parameters (Kd and Bmax) for in vivo specific [3H]QNB binding differed between mouse tissues. Oral administration of oxybutynin attenuated significantly in vivo specific [3H]QNB binding in all tissues of mice. From ratios of AUCurinary bladder/AUCother tissues of time-dependent muscarinic receptor occupancy, oral oxybutynin has been shown to exert little urinary bladder selectivity. Following oral administration of propiverine, there was a significant reduction of in vivo specific [3H]QNB binding in the urinary bladder, colon and submaxillary gland, but not in the stomach and heart. From the ratios of AUCurinary bladder to AUCsubmaxillary gland or AUCheart, it has been shown that oral propiverine exerts higher selectivity to muscarinic receptors in the urinary bladder than in the submaxillary gland and heart. Similarly, tolterodine displayed high selectivity to muscarinic receptors in the urinary bladder than in the submaxillary gland. Thus, the present study has demonstrated that [3H]QNB may be a useful ligand for in vivo characterization of muscarinic receptor binding of anticholinergic agents to treat overactive bladder. Propiverine and tolterodine have exhibited in vivo selectivity of muscarinic receptor in the mouse urinary bladder rather than in the submaxillary gland, and such receptor binding specificity may be the reason of lower incidence of dry mouth.

  18. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  19. Near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy in surgery and medicine: detection of renal stones and bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming; Redd, Douglas C. B.; Li, Yunzhi; Yu, Nai-Teng

    1992-06-01

    Tissue diagnosis and characterization are critically important to the development and applications of laser-based therapeutic procedures in urology (viz., laser lithotripsy and bladder cancer treatment). Recently, we demonstrated for the first time that the new technique of near-infrared laser excited Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy can readily differentiate various types of renal stones and bladder cancer from normal kidney/bladder tissues. It has thus become possible to develop an FT-Raman-based fiberoptic sensor for clinical use in laser lithotripsy and bladder cancer treatment. The future development of such a diagnostic modality will allow a surgeon/physician to take real-time Raman spectra of urinary calculi or cancerous tissue via a flexible fiberoptic probe.

  20. Cellular origin of bladder neoplasia and tissue dynamics of its progression to invasive carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kunyoo; Lim, Agnes; Odegaard, Justin I.; Honeycutt, Jared D.; Kawano, Sally; Hsieh, Michael H.; Beachy, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how malignancies arise within normal tissues requires identification of the cancer cell of origin and knowledge of the cellular and tissue dynamics of tumor progression. Here we examine bladder cancer in a chemical carcinogenesis model that mimics muscle-invasive human bladder cancer. With no prior bias regarding genetic pathways or cell types, we prospectively mark or ablate cells to show that muscle-invasive bladder carcinomas arise exclusively from Sonic hedgehog (Shh)-expressing stem cells in basal urothelium. These carcinomas arise clonally from a single cell whose progeny aggressively colonize a major portion of the urothelium to generate a lesion with histological features identical to human carcinoma-in-situ. Shh-expressing basal cells within this precursor lesion become tumor-initiating cells, although Shh expression is lost in subsequent carcinomas. We thus find that invasive carcinoma is initiated from basal urothelial stem cells but that tumor cell phenotype can diverge significantly from that of the cancer cell-of-origin. PMID:24747439

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Luca; Russo, Giovanna; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Urinary clearance of F-FDG and variability in bladder wall FDG uptake may hamper the interpretation and limit the use of FDG-PET/CT for imaging bladder tumors. Nevertheless, careful combined evaluation of both CT and FDG-PET images of the urinary tract can provide useful findings. We present 2 cases of bladder cancer detected by FDG-PET/CT. These cases suggest that FDG uptake can be indicative of malignancy in bladder cancer when viewed in conjunction with CT scans and that whole-body FDG-PET/CT scans should always be reviewed with particular attention to the urinary tract because abnormalities suggestive of bladder cancer can be found unexpectedly.

  2. Angiogenesis in Schistosoma haematobium-associated urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Dematei, Anderson; Fernandes, Rúben; Soares, Raquel; Alves, Helena; Richter, Joachim; Botelho, Monica C

    2017-09-28

    Schistosoma haematobium, a parasitic flatworm that infects more than 100 million people, mostly in the developing world, is the causative agent of urogenital schistosomiasis, and is associated with a high incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the bladder. During infection, eggs are deposited in the bladder causing an intense inflammatory reaction. Angiogenesis is defined as the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones and is recognized as a key event in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis and spread of malignant lesions. A growing amount of evidence points to angiogenesis playing a key role in schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Thus, identifying biomarkers of this process plays an important role in the study of cancer. Here, we review recent findings on the role of angiogenesis in bladder cancer and the growth factors that induce and assist in their development, particularly SCC of the bladder associated to urogenital schistosomiasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. DNA methylation patterns in bladder cancer and washing cell sediments: a perspective for tumor recurrence detection

    PubMed Central

    Negraes, Priscilla D; Favaro, Francine P; Camargo, João Lauro V; Oliveira, Maria Luiza CS; Goldberg, José; Rainho, Cláudia A; Salvadori, Daisy MF

    2008-01-01

    Background Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of human cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes is related to urinary bladder cancer recurrence. Methods A set of 4 genes, including CDH1 (E-cadherin), SFN (stratifin), RARB (retinoic acid receptor, beta) and RASSF1A (Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family 1), had their methylation patterns evaluated by MSP (Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis in 49 fresh urinary bladder carcinoma tissues (including 14 cases paired with adjacent normal bladder epithelium, 3 squamous cell carcinomas and 2 adenocarcinomas) and 24 cell sediment samples from bladder washings of patients classified as cancer-free by cytological analysis (control group). A third set of samples included 39 archived tumor fragments and 23 matched washouts from 20 urinary bladder cancer patients in post-surgical monitoring. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation patterns were determined and correlated with standard clinic-histopathological parameters. Results CDH1 and SFN genes were methylated at high frequencies in bladder cancer as well as in paired normal adjacent tissue and exfoliated cells from cancer-free patients. Although no statistically significant differences were found between RARB and RASSF1A methylation and the clinical and histopathological parameters in bladder cancer, a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 71% were observed for RARB methylation (Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.0001; OR = 48.89) and, 58% and 17% (p < 0.05; OR = 0.29) for RASSF1A gene, respectively, in relation to the control group. Conclusion Indistinct DNA hypermethylation of CDH1 and SFN genes between tumoral and normal urinary bladder samples suggests that these epigenetic features are not suitable biomarkers for urinary bladder cancer. However, RARB and RASSF1A gene methylation appears to be an initial event in urinary bladder carcinogenesis and

  4. Targeting protein kinase CK2 suppresses bladder cancer cell survival via the glucose metabolic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Yuan, Wenbo; Deng, Xiaheng; Cheng, Yidong; Li, Pengchao; Yang, Haiwei; Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase that promotes cell proliferation and resists apoptosis. Elevated CK2 expression has been demonstrated in several solid tumors. The expression of CK2α in bladder cancer was elevated in tumor tissues compared with that in adjacent normal tissues. Amplified expression of CK2α was highly correlated with histological grade in bladder cancer(P = 0.024). Knockdown of CK2α in bladder cancer cell lines resulted in a reduction in tumor aerobic glycolysis, accompanied with lower phosphorylated AKT. Moreover, low CK2α levels suppressed cell growth, and similar results could be reproduced after treatment with CX-4945 with a dose-dependent response. CX-4945 inhibited migration and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, knockdown of CK2α decreased the tumorigenicity of bladder cancer cells in vivo. This study is the first to report that CK2 increases glucose metabolism in human bladder cancer. Blocking CK2 function may provide novel diagnostic and potential therapeutic. PMID:27888634

  5. Unusual location of a urinary bladder cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Forte, Serafino; Kos, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy among men in the Western world. Bone metastasis occurs in 27 % of the cases. Usually, the location is the spine. The present report describes the first case of a proven distant bone metastasis to the acromion from a urinary bladder carcinoma in a patient with shoulder pain.

  6. Clinical states model for biomarkers in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apolo, Andrea B; Milowsky, Matthew; Bajorin, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a significant health care problem in the United States, with a high recurrence rate, the need for expensive continuous surveillance, and limited treatment options for patients with advanced disease. Research has contributed to an understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of bladder cancer, and that understanding has led to the discovery of potentially diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers. In this review, a clinical states model of bladder cancer is introduced and integrated into a paradigm for biomarker development. Biomarkers are systematically incorporated with predefined endpoints to aid in clinical management. PMID:19792967

  7. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  8. Bladder cancer risk from occupational and environmental exposures.

    PubMed

    Kiriluk, Kyle J; Prasad, Sandip M; Patel, Amit R; Steinberg, Gary D; Smith, Norm D

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 50% of bladder cancer incidence in the United States has been attributed to known carcinogens, mainly from cigarette smoking. Following the identification of this important causative factor, many investigators have attempted to identify other major causes of bladder cancer in the environment. Genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis in the bladder have been linked to environmental and occupational factors unrelated to cigarette smoking and may account for a significant portion of bladder cancer cases in non-smokers. The interaction between genetics and exposures may modulate bladder cancer risk and influence the differing incidence, progression, and mortality of this disease in different genders and races. Comparative molecular studies are underway to measure the relative effects of environment and inheritance to account for observed differences in the epidemiology of bladder cancer. The use of geospatial tools and population-based data will offer further insight into the environmentally-linked causes of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Trimodality therapy in bladder cancer: who, what, and when?

    PubMed

    Premo, Christopher; Apolo, Andrea B; Agarwal, Piyush K; Citrin, Deborah E

    2015-05-01

    Radical cystectomy is a standard treatment of nonmetastatic, muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Treatment with trimodality therapy consisting of maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation has emerged as a method to preserve the native bladder in highly motivated patients. Several factors can affect the likelihood of long-term bladder preservation after trimodality therapy and therefore should be taken into account when selecting patients. New radiation techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy may decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy in this setting. Novel chemotherapy regimens may improve response rates and minimize toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Expression of long noncoding RNA lncRNA-n336928 is correlated with tumor stage and grade and overall survival in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Xie, Wanqin; Xie, Linguo; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Zhonghua; Sha, Nan; Xu, Hao; Wu, Zhouliang; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2015-12-25

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated playing important roles in human urologic cancers. In the present study, microarray analysis was initially performed to screen the differentially expressed lncRNAs between bladder cancer tissues and paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues (n = 3). Subsequent qRT-PCR validation was conducted using tissue samples from 95 patients with bladder cancer. Results showed that the expression level of lncRNA-n336928 (noncode database ID: n336928) was significantly higher in bladder cancer tissues compared to that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P < 0.001). Chi-square test showed that expression of lncRNA-n336928 was positively correlated with bladder tumor stage and histological grade (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with bladder cancer with high expression of lncRNA-n336928 had shorter overall survival time compared to the patients with low expression of lncRNA-n336928. Multivariate analysis indicated that lncRNA-n336928 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival for bladder cancer patients. Collectively, our study shows that high expression of lncRNA-n336928 is associated with the progression of bladder cancer, and that lncRNA-n336928 might serve as a biomarker for prognosis of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AB266. Expression of long noncoding RNA lncRNA-n336928 is correlated with tumor stage and grade and overall survival in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Wu, Changli; Hu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Background Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated playing important roles in human urologic cancers. Up to date, quite a few lncRNAs have been implicated as promising biomarkers for tumor early detection and prognosis monitoring. Methods In the present study, microarray analysis was initially performed to screen the differentially expressed lncRNAs between bladder cancer tissues and paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues (n=3).Subsequent qRT-PCR validation was conducted using tissue samples from 95 patients with bladder cancer. Results Results showed that the expression level of lncRNA-n336928 (noncode database ID: n336928) was significantly higher in bladder cancer tissues compared to that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P<0.001). Chi-square test showed that expression of lncRNA-n336928 was positively correlated with bladder tumor stage and histological grade (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with bladder cancer with high expression of lncRNA-n336928 had shorter overall survival time compared to patients with low expression of lncRNA-n336928. Multivariate analysis indicated that lncRNA-n336928 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival for bladder cancer patients. Conclusions our study shows that high expression of lncRNA-n336928 is associated with the progression of bladder cancer, and that lncRNA-n336928 might serve as a biomarker for prognosis of bladder cancer

  12. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Millikan, Randall E; Stadler, Walter; De Mulder, Pieter; Sherif, Amir; von der Maase, Hans; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Soloway, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of the disease were made with reference to a 4-point scale. Results of the authors' deliberations are presented as a consensus document. Meta-analysis of randomized trials on cisplatin-containing combination neoadjuvant chemotherapy revealed a 5% difference in favor of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No randomized trials have yet compared survival with transurethral resection of bladder tumor alone versus cystectomy for the management of patients with muscle-invasive disease. Collaborative international adjuvant chemotherapy trials are needed to assist researchers in assessing the true value of adjuvant chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients

  13. Development and Application of a Microfluidics-Based Panel in the Basal/Luminal Transcriptional Characterization of Archival Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Oded; Tam, Rachel N.; Patel, Rajesh; Schleifman, Erica B.; Motlhabi, Maipelo; French, Dorothy; Wong, Cheryl V.; Peters, Eric; Molinero, Luciana; Raja, Rajiv; Amler, Lukas C.; Hampton, Garret M.; Lackner, Mark R.; Kabbarah, Omar

    2016-01-01

    In the age of personalized medicine stratifying tumors into molecularly defined subtypes associated with distinctive clinical behaviors and predictable responses to therapies holds tremendous value. Towards this end, we developed a custom microfluidics-based bladder cancer gene expression panel for characterization of archival clinical samples. In silico analysis indicated that the content of our panel was capable of accurately segregating bladder cancers from several public datasets into the clinically relevant basal and luminal subtypes. On a technical level, our bladder cancer panel yielded robust and reproducible results when analyzing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. We applied our panel in the analysis of a novel set of 204 FFPE samples that included non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs), muscle invasive disease (MIBCs), and bladder cancer metastases (METs). We found NMIBCs to be mostly luminal-like, MIBCs to include both luminal- and basal-like types, and METs to be predominantly of a basal-like transcriptional profile. Mutational analysis confirmed the expected enrichment of FGFR3 mutations in luminal samples, and, consistently, FGFR3 IHC showed high protein expression levels of the receptor in these tumors. Our bladder cancer panel enables basal/luminal characterization of FFPE tissues and with further development could be used for stratification of bladder cancer samples in the clinic. PMID:27846280

  14. Development and Application of a Microfluidics-Based Panel in the Basal/Luminal Transcriptional Characterization of Archival Bladder Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doris; Choi, YounJeong; Ireland, James; Foreman, Oded; Tam, Rachel N; Patel, Rajesh; Schleifman, Erica B; Motlhabi, Maipelo; French, Dorothy; Wong, Cheryl V; Peters, Eric; Molinero, Luciana; Raja, Rajiv; Amler, Lukas C; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R; Kabbarah, Omar

    2016-01-01

    In the age of personalized medicine stratifying tumors into molecularly defined subtypes associated with distinctive clinical behaviors and predictable responses to therapies holds tremendous value. Towards this end, we developed a custom microfluidics-based bladder cancer gene expression panel for characterization of archival clinical samples. In silico analysis indicated that the content of our panel was capable of accurately segregating bladder cancers from several public datasets into the clinically relevant basal and luminal subtypes. On a technical level, our bladder cancer panel yielded robust and reproducible results when analyzing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. We applied our panel in the analysis of a novel set of 204 FFPE samples that included non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs), muscle invasive disease (MIBCs), and bladder cancer metastases (METs). We found NMIBCs to be mostly luminal-like, MIBCs to include both luminal- and basal-like types, and METs to be predominantly of a basal-like transcriptional profile. Mutational analysis confirmed the expected enrichment of FGFR3 mutations in luminal samples, and, consistently, FGFR3 IHC showed high protein expression levels of the receptor in these tumors. Our bladder cancer panel enables basal/luminal characterization of FFPE tissues and with further development could be used for stratification of bladder cancer samples in the clinic.

  15. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khochikar, Makarand V.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A total of 356,557 new cases were diagnosed annually worldwide in 2009, it was estimated that 52,810 new patients were to be diagnosed with bladder cancer and there were 10,180 projected deaths from the disease in the USA. Despite being the fourth commonest cancer in men, we do not have an early detection/screening program for bladder cancer. The review was aimed at looking at the evidence for the rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: A detailed search on bladder cancer epidemiology, diagnosis, pathology, tumor markers, treatment outcomes, screening, morbidity and mortality of bladder cancer was carried out on Pubmed central/Medline. Original articles, review articles, monograms, book chapters on bladder cancer, text books on urological oncology, oncology and urology were reviewed. The latest information for new articles before publication was last accessed in June 2010. Discussion and Conclusions: Bladder cancer is the fourth commonest cancer in men, the annual death rate from this disease is significant and every year there is an increase in its incidence globally. The prognosis of bladder cancer is stage and grade dependent; the lower the stage (T2 or less) the better is the survival. Delay in the diagnosis and treatment does alter the overall outcome. Therefore, there is a clear need for early detection of bladder cancer and screening program. Although we do not have an ideal marker for bladder cancer, it is time we maximize the potential of markers such as UroVysion, NMP22 along with cytology to start such a program. May be as a first step the early detection and screening program could be started in high-risk population. It is not worth waiting till we find the best marker as it would be unfair to our patients. The fear of unnecessary tests and treatment in bladder cancer after its detection in screening program is without any substance. The cost-effectiveness of such a program is certainly

  16. Synthetic hydrogel matrices for guided bladder tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Adelöw, Catharina A M; Frey, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to provide a temporary scaffold for repair at the site of injury or disease that is able to support cell attachment and growth while synthesis of matrix proteins and reorganization take place. Although relatively successful, bladder tissue engineering suffers from the formation of scar tissue at the scaffold implant site partly due to the phenotypic switch of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from a quiescent contractile phenotype to a synthetic proliferative phenotype, known as myofibroblast. We hypothesize that culturing human SMCs in enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogels modified with integrin-binding peptides, and in co-culture with human urothelial cells (UCs), will offer some insight as to the required environment for their subsequent differentiation into quiescent SMCs. We have established protocols for isolation, culture, and characterization of human bladder UCs, SMCs, and fibroblasts and investigated co-culture conditions for SMCs and UCs. The optimal PEG hydrogel properties, promoting growth of these cells, have been investigated by varying the amounts of cell adhesion peptide, PEG, and crosslinker and examined using light and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the cell organization within and on top of gels 14 days post seeding has been examined by histology and immunohistochemistry. We have investigated a co-culture model for UCs and SMCs integrated into PEG hydrogels, mimicking a section of the bladder wall for reconstructive purposes that also could contribute to the understanding of the underlying basic mechanisms of SMC differentiation.

  17. Potential role of melastatin-related transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M gene expression in the pathogenesis of urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Gülay Güleç; Önalan, Ebru Etem; Kuloğlu, Tuncay; Aydoğ, Gülten; Keleş, İbrahim; Tonyali, Şenol; Ceylan, Cavit

    2016-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary tract. Ion channels and calcium homeostasis are involved in almost all basic cellular mechanisms. The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M (TRPM) takes its name from the melastatin protein, which is classified as potential tumor suppressor. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous studies in the literature investigating the role of these ion channels in bladder cancer. The present study aimed to determine whether bladder cancer is associated with mRNA expression levels of TRPM ion channel genes, and whether there is the potential to conduct further studies to establish novel treatment modalities. The present study included a total of 47 subjects, of whom 40 were bladder cancer patients and 7 were controls. Following the histopathological evaluation for bladder carcinoma, the mRNA and protein expression of TRPM were examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry in tumor and normal tissues, in order to determine whether there is a difference in the expression of these channels in tumor and normal tissues. Immunoreactivity for TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPM8 was observed in epithelial bladder cells in the two groups. RT-qPCR revealed a significant increase in TRPM7 expression in bladder cancer tissue compared to the controls (healthy bladder tissue), whereas no differences in TRPM2 or TRPM4 expression levels were observed. There were significant reductions in the expression levels of TRPM5 and TRPM8 in bladder cancer tissues. In the present study, the effects of TRP ion channels on the formation of bladder cancer was investigated. This study is instructive for TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM7 and TRPM8 and their therapeutic role in bladder cancer. The results support the fact that these gens can be novel targets and can also be tested for during the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:28101241

  18. Highly specific urine-based marker of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Thu-Suong; Miller, Raymond; Barder, Timothy; Babjuk, Marko; Potter, Douglas M; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2005-12-01

    Bladder cancer represents a major health problem throughout the world, but advances in tumor biomarker development are revolutionizing how physicians diagnose the disease. We previously used an indirect immunoassay to demonstrate that the bladder cancer specific biomarker, BLCA-4, is present in urine samples from patients with bladder cancer, but not in samples from healthy individuals. In this study, a sandwich immunoassay was used to measure BLCA-4 in urine samples from patient populations with various urologic conditions and healthy individuals. Urine was collected from healthy individuals and from patients with bladder cancer, benign urologic conditions, or prostate cancer. BLCA-4 levels were evaluated by a sandwich immunoassay using two antibodies directed against distinct epitopes on BLCA-4. Using a prospectively determined cutoff of an absorbance unit (OD) of 0.04, 67 of the 75 samples from patients with bladder cancer were positive for BLCA-4, resulting in an assay sensitivity of 89%. Also, 62 of the 65 samples from individuals without bladder cancer were negative for BLCA-4, resulting in an assay specificity of 95%. The high sensitivity and specificity of the sandwich BLCA-4 immunoassay may allow for earlier detection and treatment of disease, thus greatly improving patient care.

  19. CMTM8 inhibits the carcinogenesis and progression of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    GAO, DENGHUI; HU, HAO; WANG, YING; YU, WEIDONG; ZHOU, JIANHUA; WANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, WEIPING; ZHOU, CHUNYAN; XU, KEXIN

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common tumor of the urinary tract. The incidence of bladder cancer has increased in the last few decades, thus novel molecular markers for early diagnosis and more efficacious treatment are urgently needed. Chemokine-like factor (CKLF)-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 8 (CMTM8) is downregulated in several types of cancers and is associated with tumor progression. However, CMTM8 expression has been unexplored in bladder cancer to date. Our results revealed that the expression of CMTM8 was negative in 46 of 74 (62.2%) bladder cancer samples via immunohistochemistry assay. CMTM8 downregulation was associated with advancing tumor stage and tumor grade. CMTM8 was successfully overexpressed by lentivirus in EJ and T24 cells, and the CCK-8 and Transwell assays showed that CMTM8 overexpression decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. In tumor xenografts upregulation of CMTM8 inhibited tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in vivo. In conclusion, overexpression of CMTM8 in bladder cancer results in reduced malignant cell growth, migration and invasion, which could make it a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:26503336

  20. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  1. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  2. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  3. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    PubMed

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  4. High Expression of Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Indicates a Poor Prognosis and Promotes Clinical Progression and Metastasis in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Cui, Yu; Liu, Long-Fei; Ren, Wen-Biao; Li, Qia-Qia; Zhou, Xu; Li, Yang-Le; Li, Yang; Bai, Xiang-Yang; Zu, Xiong-Bing

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the expression of long noncoding RNA metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in many tumor types, but the association between bladder cancer and MALAT1 remains unknown. The expression of MALAT1 was tested by in situ hybridization (ISH) in 120 bladder cancer specimens. The association between MALAT1 expression and clinicopathological features and prognosis of the patients with bladder cancer was analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the relationship between the expression of MALAT1 and progression and metastasis of bladder cancer. ISH showed that high MALAT1 expression was associated with advanced histological grade, high tumor stage, and positive lymph nodes. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis indicated that high tumor stage, positive lymph nodes, and high MALAT1 expression were independent prognostic indicators for overall survival (OS) of patients with bladder cancer. qRT-PCR showed that the expression of MALAT1 in bladder cancer tissues was 2.85 times higher than those measured in adjacent normal tissues (P < .001). The expression of MALAT1 was 2.673 ± 0.254 in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer and 2.987 ± 0.381 in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (P = .018). In bladder cancer specimens with positive lymph nodes, MALAT1 expression was 3.167 ± 0.297 versus 2.896 ± 0.329 in bladder cancer specimens with negative lymph nodes (P = .020). High MALAT1 expression could serve as an independent prognostic factor for OS of patients with bladder cancer and could be considered as a potential therapeutic target of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tetracycline-inducible shRNA targeting long non-coding RNA PVT1 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Chengle; Li, Jianfa; Liu, Yuchen; Chen, Mingwei; Yuan, Jiancheng; Fu, Xing; Zhan, Yonghao; Liu, Li; Lin, Junhao; Zhou, Qing; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Guoping; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies show that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may be significant functional regulators in tumor development, including bladder cancer. Here, we found that PVT1 was upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cells. Further experiments revealed that PVT1 promoted cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Furthermore we also used the emerging technology, synthetic biology, to create tetracycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors which silenced PVT1 in a dosage-dependent manner to inhibit the progression of bladder cancer. In conclusion, data suggest that PVT1 could be an oncogene and may be a therapeutic target in bladder cancer. Synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system can be used to quantitatively control the expression of PVT1 in bladder cancer in response to different concentration of doxycycline to suppress the progression of bladder cancer.

  6. Water intake and bladder cancer risk in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuejuan; Castelao, Jose E; Groshen, Susan; Cortessis, Victoria K; Shibata, Darryl K; Conti, David V; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela

    2008-10-01

    The overall evidence of an association between fluid intake and bladder cancer is not entirely consistent. We examined the fluid intake-bladder cancer relationship in the Los Angeles bladder cancer case-control study. A total of 1,586 cases and their age-, sex-, and race-matched neighborhood controls were interviewed in-person from 1987 to 1999. Information on total fluid intake was derived from the consumption of specific fluids including water, coffee, tea, alcohol, milk, juice, hot chocolate and soda. Total fluid intake was not associated with bladder cancer. Daily water intake was associated with a slight decrease in bladder cancer risk, with the protection more pronounced among women (p for trend = 0.039) than among men (p for trend = 0.62). Compared to drinking <1 glass of water per day, drinking > or =6 glasses/day was associated with 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-1.22) times the risk of bladder cancer among all subjects, 0.94 (0.67-1.32) times the risk among men, and 0.69 (0.36-1.33) times the risk among women. The water intake-bladder cancer association also seemed to be modified by daytime urination frequency with significant inverse association among subjects who urinated > or =6 times/day (p for trend = 0.015), but not among those who urinated less frequently. Similarly, the protection from water intake was confined to women who did not experience nocturia and to men who did. Results from our study suggest that water intake may be associated with a slight reduction in bladder cancer risk.

  7. Risk of Bladder Cancer Among Diabetic Patients Treated With Pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Peng, Tiffany; Hedderson, Monique; Bilker, Warren B.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Vaughn, David J.; Nessel, Lisa; Selby, Joseph; Strom, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Some preclinical in vivo studies and limited human data suggest a possible increased risk of bladder cancer with pioglitazone therapy. This is an interim report of an ongoing cohort study examining the association between pioglitazone therapy and the risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study includes 193,099 patients in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry who were ≥40 years of age between 1997 and 2002. Those with prior bladder cancer were excluded. Ever use of each diabetes medication (defined as two or more prescriptions within 6 months) was treated as a time-dependent variable. Cox regression–generated hazard ratios (HRs) compared pioglitazone use with nonpioglitazone use adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes medications, A1C, heart failure, household income, renal function, other bladder conditions, and smoking. RESULTS The group treated with pioglitazone comprised 30,173 patients. There were 90 cases of bladder cancer among pioglitazone users and 791 cases of bladder cancer among nonpioglitazone users. Overall, ever use of pioglitazone was not associated with risk of bladder cancer (HR 1.2 [95% CI 0.9–1.5]), with similar results in men and women (test for interaction P = 0.8). However, in the a priori category of >24 months of therapy, there was an increased risk (1.4 [1.03–2.0]). Ninety-five percent of cancers diagnosed among pioglitazone users were detected at early stage. CONCLUSIONS In this cohort of patients with diabetes, short-term use of pioglitazone was not associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer, but use for more than 2 years was weakly associated with increased risk. PMID:21447663

  8. Randomized-Control Screening Trials to Lower Gall Bladder Cancer Mortality in High Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Kataki, Amal Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer is generally fatal. The high morbidity and mortality due to gall bladder cancer exerts a significant impact on efforts towards cancer control in high risk populations of the World and a rationale program for control of gall bladder cancer mortality has remained as an unmet need in these populations. Currently there are no effective strategies for controlling gall bladder cancer mortality. This mini review is to highlight the need and feasibility for secondary prevention of gall bladder cancer by screening in high risk populations. A way forward is to assess the role of secondary prevention of gall bladder cancers by conducting randomized- controlled screening trials in high risk populations.

  9. Involvement of the Androgen and Glucocorticoid Receptors in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Lucien; Grabnar, Maria; Selman, Steven; Hinds, Terry D.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is encountered worldwide having been associated with a host of environmental and lifestyle risk factors. The disease has a male to female prevalence of 3 : 1. This disparity has raised the possibility of the androgen receptor (AR) pathway being involved in the genesis of the disease; indeed, research has shown that AR is involved in and is likely a driver of bladder cancer. Similarly, an inflammatory response has been implicated as a major player in bladder carcinogenesis. Consistent with this concept, recent work on anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid signaling points to a pathway that may impact bladder cancer. The glucocorticoid receptor- (GR-) α isoform has an important role in suppressing inflammatory processes, which may be attenuated by AR in the development of bladder cancer. In addition, a GR isoform that is inhibitory to GRα, GRβ, is proinflammatory and has been shown to induce cancer growth. In this paper, we review the evidence of inflammatory mediators and the relationship of AR and GR isoforms as they relate to the propensity for bladder cancer. PMID:26347776

  10. Combination of Rapamycin and Resveratrol for Treatment of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S; Schwartz, Naomi S; Berman, Adi Y; Wiener, Sara L; Holz, Marina K

    2017-02-01

    Loss of TSC1 function, a crucial negative regulator of mTOR signaling, is a common alteration in bladder cancer. Mutations in other members of the PI3K pathway, leading to mTOR activation, are also found in bladder cancer. This provides rationale for targeting mTOR for treatment of bladder cancer characterized by TSC1 mutations and/or mTOR activation. In this study, we asked whether combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol could be effective in concurrently inhibiting mTOR and PI3K signaling and inducing cell death in bladder cancer cells. In combination with rapamycin, resveratrol was able to block rapamycin-induced Akt activation, while maintaining mTOR pathway inhibition. In addition, combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol induced cell death specifically in TSC1(-/-) MEF cells, and not in wild-type MEFs. Similarly, resveratrol alone or in combination with rapamycin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cell lines. These data indicate that administration of resveratrol together with rapamycin may be a promising therapeutic option for treatment of bladder cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 436-446, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Real time diagnosis of bladder cancer with probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jen-Jane; Wu, Katherine; Adams, Winifred; Hsiao, Shelly T.; Mach, Kathleen E.; Beck, Andrew H.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2011-02-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) is an emerging technology for in vivo optical imaging of the urinary tract. Particularly for bladder cancer, real time optical biopsy of suspected lesions will likely lead to improved management of bladder cancer. With pCLE, micron scale resolution is achieved with sterilizable imaging probes (1.4 or 2.6 mm diameter), which are compatible with standard cystoscopes and resectoscopes. Based on our initial experience to date (n = 66 patients), we have demonstrated the safety profile of intravesical fluorescein administration and established objective diagnostic criteria to differentiate between normal, benign, and neoplastic urothelium. Confocal images of normal bladder showed organized layers of umbrella cells, intermediate cells, and lamina propria. Low grade bladder cancer is characterized by densely packed monomorphic cells with central fibrovascular cores, whereas high grade cancer consists of highly disorganized microarchitecture and pleomorphic cells with indistinct cell borders. Currently, we are conducting a diagnostic accuracy study of pCLE for bladder cancer diagnosis. Patients scheduled to undergo transurethral resection of bladder tumor are recruited. Patients undergo first white light cystocopy (WLC), followed by pCLE, and finally histologic confirmation of the resected tissues. The diagnostic accuracy is determined both in real time by the operative surgeon and offline after additional image processing. Using histology as the standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of WLC and WLC + pCLE are calculated. With additional validation, pCLE may prove to be a valuable adjunct to WLC for real time diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  12. Economic Burden of Bladder Cancer Across the European Union.

    PubMed

    Leal, Jose; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Sullivan, Richard; Witjes, J Alfred

    2016-03-01

    More than 120,000 people are diagnosed annually with bladder cancer in the 28 countries of the European Union (EU). With >40,000 people dying of it each year, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer. However, to date, no systematic cost-of-illness study has assessed the economic impact of bladder cancer in the EU. To estimate the annual economic costs of bladder cancer in the EU for 2012. Country-specific cancer cost data were estimated using aggregate data on morbidity, mortality, and health care resource use, obtained from numerous international and national sources. Health care costs were estimated from expenditures on primary, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care, as well as medications. Costs of unpaid care and lost earnings due to morbidity and early death were estimated. Bladder cancer cost the EU €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion (59%) and representing 5% of total health care cancer costs. Bladder cancer accounted for 3% of all cancer costs in the EU (€143 billion) in 2012 and represented an annual health care cost of €57 per 10 EU citizens, with costs varying >10 times between the country with the lowest cost, Bulgaria (€8 for every 10 citizens), and highest cost, Luxembourg (€93). Productivity losses and informal care represented 23% and 18% of bladder cancer costs, respectively. The quality and availability of comparable cancer-related data across the EU need further improvement. Our results add to essential public health and policy intelligence for delivering affordable bladder cancer care systems and prioritising the allocation of public research funds. We looked at the economic costs of bladder cancer across the European Union (EU). We found bladder cancer to cost €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion. Our study provides data that can be used to inform affordable cancer care in the EU. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  13. [The use of NMP22 Bladder-Chek for the diagnosis and follow-up bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Gonzalo Rodríguez, Victoria; Sanz Justo, Lourdes; de Miguel Santamaría, Isabel; Martínez de Iturrate, Javier; Fernández del Busto, Ernesto

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the usefulness of NMP22 BladderChek in the diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer, comparing it with cystoscopy and urine cytology. Group 1: 109 asymptomatic patients on follow up for bladder cancer underwent cystoscopy, cytology and NMP22 BladderChek. Group 2:15 patients with history of hematuria underwent cystoscopy and NMP22 BladderChek. Group 1: 9 patients had tumor relapse. Sensitivity was 25% for NMP22 test, 50% for citology and 100% for cystoscopy Specificity was 91.1%, 94.1% and 95% respectively. Group 2: 12 patients had bladder cancer. The sensitivity was of 83.3% for NMP22 BladderChek and 100% for cystoscopy. The specificity was of 100% for NMP22 BladderChek and 66.7% for cystoscopy. The low sensitivity of NMP22 Bladder-Chek invalidates it as alternative method to cystoscopy in the follow-up of bladder cancer. But it can be recommended for screening in patients without history of bladder cancer but with an increased risk (smokers, patients with dysuria and hematuria).

  14. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    TRUTA, ANAMARIA; POPON, TUDOR ADRIAN HODOR; SARACI, GEORGE; GHERVAN, LIVIU; POP, IOAN VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, −145, −222, −210, −10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population. PMID:27152066

  15. Novel non invasive diagnostic strategies in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Truta, Anamaria; Popon, Tudor Adrian Hodor; Saraci, George; Ghervan, Liviu; Pop, Ioan Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies worldwide, derived from the urothelium of the urinary bladder and defined by long asymptomatic and atypical clinical picture. Its complex etiopathogenesis is dependent on numerous risk factors that can be divided into three distinct categories: genetic and molecular abnormalities, chemical or environmental exposure and previous genitourinary disorders and family history of different malignancies. Various genetic polymorphisms and microRNA might represent useful diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. Genetic and molecular abnormalities - risk factors are represented by miRNA or genetic polymorphisms proved to be part of bladder carcinogenesis such as: genetic mutations of oncogenes TP53, Ras, Rb1 or p21 oncoproteins, cyclin D or genetic polymorhisms of XPD,ERCC1, CYP1B1, NQO1C609T, MDM2SNP309, CHEK2, ERCC6, NRF2, NQO1Pro187Ser polymorphism and microRNA (miR-143, -145, -222, -210, -10b, 576-3p). The aim of our article is to highlight the most recent acquisitions via molecular biomarkers (miRNAs and genetic polymorphisms) involved in bladder cancer in order to provide early diagnosis, precise therapy according to the molecular profile of bladder tumors, as well as to improve clinical outcome, survival rates and life quality of oncological patients. These molecular biomarkers play a key role in bladder carcinogenesis, clinical evolution, prognosis and therapeutic response and explain the molecular mechanisms involved in bladder carcinogenesis; they can also be selected as therapeutic targets in developing novel therapeutic strategies in bladder malignancies. Moreover, the purpose in defining these molecular non invasive biomarkers is also to develop non invasive screening programs in bladder malignancies with the result of decreasing bladder cancer incidence in risk population.

  16. Splicing variants of carbonic anhydrase IX in bladder cancer and urine sediments.

    PubMed

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Vinci, Serena; Della Melina, Alessandro; Kuncova, Jitka; Villari, Donata; Giannarini, Gianluca; Nesi, Gabriella; Selli, Cesare; Orlando, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    In human cancers, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) influences cell proliferation and tumor progression, maintaining intracellular and extracellular pH under hypoxic conditions. An alternative CAIX isoform, lacking of exons 8-9 (AS) and independent from the levels of hypoxia, was recently demonstrated in cancer cells. AS-CAIX competes with the full-length (FL) isoform in the regulation of the extracellular pH, mainly in a mild hypoxic status. In the present study, we evaluated mRNA expression of the 2 CAIX isoforms and their clinical relevance in bladder cancers and urine sediments. We measured mRNA expression of FL- and AS-CAIX isoforms in tumor tissues and benign mucosa from 45 patients with bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The expression of the 2 isoforms was also measured in urine sediment of 81 bladder cancer patients and 93 control subjects. Expression of FL-CAIX mRNA was lower than AS-CAIX in benign mucosa (P = 0.006) whereas in paired bladder cancers FL-CAIX mRNA was higher (P = 0.007). Consequently, the percentage of FL-CAIX in bladder cancers [median: 62.6%] was significantly higher than in benign mucosa [15.0%] (P < 0.0001). In the urinary sediments of bladder cancer patients FL-CAIX mRNA was significantly higher in comparison with normal controls (P = 0.003). FL-CAIX percentage appeared dramatically higher in urine sediments of bladder cancer patients [64.5%] in comparison with controls [7.5%] (P < 0.0001). In addition, FL-CAIX% was significantly different in sediments from pTa-pT1 and ≥ pT2 patients [51.5% and 91.7%, respectively] (P = 0.016). Stratification according tumor grade indicated that FL-CAIX% was significantly lower in G1 bladder cancers [33.3%] in comparison with G2-G3 [88.6%] (P = 0.005) The clinical sensitivity for FL-CAIX% in urine sediments was 0.93, with a 0.76 specificity. Using the same cut-off positive predictive value (PPV) was 0.78, whereas negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.93. Our results seem to indicate that in bladder

  17. Transplantation of Autologous Minced Bladder Mucosa for a One-Step Reconstruction of a Tissue Engineered Bladder Conduit

    PubMed Central

    Reinfeldt Engberg, Gisela; Chamorro, Clara Ibel; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    Surgical intervention is sometimes needed to create a conduit from the abdominal wall to the bladder for self-catheterization. We developed a method for tissue engineering a conduit for bladder emptying without in vitro cell culturing as a one-step procedure. In a porcine animal model bladder, wall tissue was excised and the mucosa was minced to small particles. The particles were attached to a tube in a 1 : 3 expansion rate with fibrin glue and transplanted back by attaching the tube to the bladder and through the abdominal wall. Sham served as controls. After 4-5 weeks, conduits were assessed in respect to macroscopic and microscopic appearance in 6 pigs. Two pigs underwent radiology before termination. Gross examination revealed a patent conduit with an opening to the bladder. Histology and immunostaining showed a multilayered transitional uroepithelium in all cases. Up to 89% of the luminal surface area was neoepithelialized but with a loose attachment to the submucosa. No epithelium was found in control animals. CT imaging revealed a patent channel that could be used for filling and emptying the bladder. Animals that experienced surgical complications did not form conduits. Minced autologous bladder mucosa can be transplanted around a tubular mold to create a conduit to the urinary bladder without in vitro culturing. PMID:24288669

  18. Immune Response Following Photodynamic Therapy For Bladder Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond K.

    1989-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if photodynamic therapy (PDT) produces an immunologic response in patients treated for bladder cancer. Gamma interferon, interleukin 1-beta, interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were assayed in the urine of four patients treated with photodynamic therapy for bladder cancer, in seven patients undergoing transurethral procedures, and in five healthy control subjects. Quantifiable concentrations of all cytokines, except gamma interferon, were measured in urine samples from the PDT patients treated with the highest light energies, while no urinary cytokines were found in the PDT patient who received the lowest light energy or in the control subjects. These findings suggest that a local immunologic response may occur following PDT for bladder cancer. Such an immunologic response activated by PDT may be an additional mechanism involved in bladder tumor destruction.

  19. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Marcia R; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Background The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. Methods A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. Results SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Yiannis; Hadjipavlou, Marios; Khan, Shahid; Rane, Abhay

    2013-12-01

    To provide an overview of the scientific and clinical studies underlying the most common vitamin and herbal preparations used in prostate and bladder cancer and evaluate the evidence behind them. A literature search was undertaken on PubMed using various keywords relating to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.Vitamin E and selenium supplementation can potentially have adverse effects by increasing the risk of prostate cancer. Initial clinical studies of pomegranate and green tea, investigating their chemotherapeutic properties in prostate and bladder cancer have yielded encouraging results. Curcumin, resveratrol, and silibinin have potential anticancer properties through multiple molecular targets; their clinical effectiveness in prostate and bladder cancer is yet to be evaluated. Zyflamend, like PC-SPES, is a combined CAM therapy used in prostate cancer. Acupuncture is popular among patients experiencing hot flushes who are receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Conclusive evidence for the use of CAM in prostate and bladder cancer is lacking and not without risk.

  1. Investigating Genetic Alterations in Bladder Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the sixth most common cancer in the U.S. Mutations in a number of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were previously associated with invasive or noninvasive forms of the disease. More recently, next generation sequencing (NGS) of bladder tumors from over 100 Chinese patients revealed alterations in additional genes, including those encoding chromatin remodeling enzymes, like lysine specific histone demethylase 6A (KDM6A) and ARID1A, and spindle checkpoint proteins. Because the NGS studies analyzed tumors from patients of a single ethnicity, the results may not be representative of alterations in other patients. To expand on these findings, Michael Nickerson, Ph.D., and Michael Dean, Ph.D., of CCR’s Cancer and Inflammation Program and their colleagues, including Dan Theodorescu, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the University of Colorado NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, performed exome sequencing of 14 tumors and targeted sequencing of another 40 tumors all from non-Asian patients diagnosed with BC in the U.S.

  2. [Synchronous male bladder cancer and breast cancer - a case report].

    PubMed

    Yabe, Nobushige; Murai, Shinji; Kunugi, Chikara; Nakadai, Jyunpei; Oto, Ippei; Yoshikawa, Takahisa; Kitasato, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Hirotomo; Nakamura, Akihiko; Masuda, Aya; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Ohashi, Masakazu; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-11-01

    A 74-year-old man complained of blood in his urine over a 1-week period beginning in early October 2013, and was examined in the urology department of our hospital. A thorough examination revealed bladder cancer, and surgery was planned after two cycles of preoperative gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy. A chest computed tomography (CT) performed to evaluate the response to chemotherapy revealed a mass in the right breast. The patient had previously complained about the same site, and mammography and ultrasonography had suggested the possibility of a malignant mammary gland tumor. The results of aspiration cytology were Class V, and based on that finding, a diagnosis of cancer of the right breast was made. In February 2014, we performed a mastectomy, while preserving the pectoral muscles, along with sentinel node biopsy, total cystectomy, urethrectomy, pelvic lymph node dissection, and ureteroileal anastomosis. The histopathological diagnosis of the right breast tumor was invasive ductal carcinoma[scirrhous carcinoma, ly (+), v (-), g (+), f (+), s (+), nuclear grade 1=atypia 2+mitosis 1, EIC (-), ICT (-), NCAT (-)]. A micrometastatic tumor measuring approximately 1mm was observed in the sentinel lymph node. The breast disease was classified as pT1N1mi(sn)M0, Stage IIA, and the tumor was ER (+), PgR (+), HER2/neu (2+), and FISH (-). The bladder cancer was diagnosed as urothelial carcinoma, non-papillary, invasive G2>G3, pT2a; no pelvic lymph node metastases were detected, and it was classified as pT2aN0M0, Stage II. Synchronous male breast cancer and bladder cancer is a very rare condition, and we report the case with a review of the literature.

  3. Conditional Expression of the Androgen Receptor Increases Susceptibility of Bladder Cancer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Richard; Yu, Eun-Jeong; He, Yongfeng; Gonzalgo, Mark L.; Sun, Zijie

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer represents a significant human tumor burden, accounting for about 7.7% and 2.4% of all cancer cases in males and females, respectively. While men have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer, women tend to present at a later stage of disease and with more aggressive tumors. Previous studies have suggested a promotional role of androgen signaling in enhancing bladder cancer development. To directly assess the role of androgens in bladder tumorigenesis, we have developed a novel transgenic mouse strain, R26hARLoxP/+:Upk3aGCE/+, in which the human AR transgene is conditionally expressed in bladder urothelium. Intriguingly, both male and female R26hARLoxP/+:Upk3aGCE/+ mice display a higher incidence of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) than the age and sex matched control littermates in response to the carcinogen, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN). We detect expression of the human AR transgene in CK5-positive and p63-positive basal cells in bladder urothelium. Further analyses of UCC tissues from R26hARLoxP/+:Upk3aGCE/+ mice showed that the majority of tumor cells are of urothelial basal cell origin. Positive immunostaining of transgenic AR protein was observed in the majority of tumor cells of the transgenic mice, providing a link between transgenic AR expression and oncogenic transformation. We observed an increase in Ki67 positive cells within the UCC lesions of transgenic AR mice. Manipulating endogenous androgen levels by castration and androgen supplementation directly affected bladder tumor development in male and female R26hARLoxP/+:Upk3aGCE/+ mice, respectively. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time that conditional activation of transgenic AR expression in bladder urothelium enhances carciongen-induced bladder tumor formation in mice. This new AR transgenic mouse line mimics certain features of human bladder cancer and can be used to study bladder tumorigenesis and for drug development. PMID:26862755

  4. Multiplexed Methylation Profiles of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Maria José; Grau, Laura; Franco, Noreli; Orenes, Esteban; Alvarez, Miguel; Blanca, Ana; Heredero, Oscar; Palacios, Alberto; Urrutia, Manuel; Fernández, Jesus María; López-Beltrán, Antonio; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation of tumor suppressors can occur early in carcinogenesis and are potentially important early indicators of cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the methylation of 25 tumor suppressor genes in bladder cancer using a methylation-specific (MS) multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA). Initial analyses in bladder cancer cell lines (n = 14) and fresh-frozen primary bladder tumor specimens (n = 31) supported the panel of genes selected being altered in bladder cancer. The process of MS-MLPA was optimized for its application in body fluids using two independent training and validation sets of urinary specimens (n = 146), including patients with bladder cancer (n = 96) and controls (n = 50). BRCA1 (71.0%), WT1 (38.7%), and RARB (38.7%) were the most frequently methylated genes in bladder tumors, with WT1 methylation being significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.011). WT1 and PAX5A were identified as methylated tumor suppressors. In addition, BRCA1, WT1, and RARB were the most frequently methylated genes in urinary specimens. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed significant diagnostic accuracies in both urinary sets for BRCA1, RARB, and WT1. The novelty of this report relates to applying MS-MLPA, a multiplexed methylation technique, for tumor suppressors in bladder cancer and body fluids. Methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes were clinically relevant for histopathological stratification of bladder tumors and offered a noninvasive diagnostic strategy for the clinical management of patients affected with uroepithelial neoplasias. PMID:21227392

  5. Argonaute 2 is up-regulated in tissues of urothelial carcinoma of bladder

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Huang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Min; Yang, Feng-Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Guang-Chun; Che, Jian-Ping; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Argonaute 2 proteins (Ago2) have been demonstrated to be widely expressed and involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing and play key roles in carcinogenesis. However, its expression profile and prognostic value in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) have not been investigated. Methods: Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were used to explore Ago2 expression in UCBs and normal bladder tissues. Moreover immunohistochemistry (ICH) was used to detect the expression of Ago2 in UCBs. Spearman’s rank correlation, Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to analyze the data. Results: Up-regulated expression of Ago2 mRNA and protein was observed in the majority of UCBs by qRT-PCR and Western blot when compared with their paired normal bladder tissues. Clinic pathological analysis was showed a significant correlation existed between the higher expression of Ago2 protein with the Histological grade, lymph node metastasis and Distant metastasis (P<0.05); Survival analysis by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test demonstrated that elevated Ago2 expression in cancer tissue predicted poorer overall survival (OS) compared with group in lower expression (62.2% VS 86.3%, P<0.05). Notably, multivariate analyses by Cox’s proportional hazard model revealed that expression of Ago2 was an independent prognostic factor in UCB. Conclusions: These results suggest that the aberrant expression of Ago2 in human UCB is possibly involved with tumorigenesis and development, and the Ago2 protein could act as a potential biomarker for prognosis assessment of bladder cancer. Further studies on the cellular functions of Ago2 need to address these issues. PMID:24427355

  6. Hypertension, diuretics and antihypertensives in relation to bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuejuan; Castelao, J.Esteban; Yuan, Jian-Min; Groshen, Susan; Stern, Mariana C.; Conti, David V.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between hypertension, hypertension medication and bladder cancer risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in Los Angeles. Non-Asians between the ages of 25 and 64 years with histologically confirmed bladder cancers diagnosed between 1987 and 1996 were identified through the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. A total of 1585 cases and their age-, gender- and race-matched neighborhood controls were included in the analyses. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between history of hypertension, medication use and bladder cancer risk. A history of hypertension was not related to bladder cancer; however, among hypertensive individuals, there was a significant difference in bladder cancer risk related to the use of diuretics or antihypertensive drugs (P for heterogeneity = 0.004). Compared with individuals without hypertension, hypertensive individuals who regularly used diuretics/antihypertensives had a similar risk [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86–1.30], whereas untreated hypertensive subjects had a 35% reduction in risk (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48–0.88). A greater reduction in bladder cancer risk was observed among current-smokers (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27–0.71) and carriers of GSTM1-null (homozygous absence) genotypes (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22–0.85). Similarly, among smokers with GSTM1-null genotype, levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-hemoglobin adducts were significantly lower among untreated hypertensive individuals (45.7 pg/g Hb) compared with individuals without hypertension (79.8 pg/g Hb) (P = 0.009). In conclusion, untreated hypertension was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. PMID:20732908

  7. Occupational risk of bladder cancer among Iranian male workers

    PubMed Central

    Aminian, Omid; Saburi, Amin; Mohseni, Hossein; Akbari, Hamed; Chavoshi, Farzaneh; Akbari, Hesam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Approximately 5-10% of human cancers are thought to be caused by occupational exposure to carcinogens. Compare to other cancers, bladder cancer is most strongly linked to occupational exposure to chemical toxins. This study has been performed to understand which occupations and exposures are related to bladder cancer in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study is a case-control study which is conducted on cases with bladder cancer (160 cases) diagnosed in Baharlou hospital in 2007-2009. One hundred sixty cases without any occupational exposure were considered as controls matched for demographic characteristics. Demographic data and characteristics of occupation were compared. Results: Mean age of cases and controls were 63.7 and 64 years, respectively (P = 0.841). History of urinary tract stone had significantly difference in two groups (P = 0.039). Occupations such as bus and truck driving, road and asphalt making, mechanics, working in refinery and Petrochemical, plastic, metal manufactory, welding, and pipeline founded a higher risk for bladder cancer rather than controls. Conclusion: Our findings on Iranian workers are concurrent and compatible with findings of previous reports about occupational and environmental risk factors of bladder cancer. Although our study population was PMID:24833825

  8. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  9. Key concerns about the current state of bladder cancer: a position paper from the Bladder Cancer Think Tank, the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, and the Society of Urologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Yair; Kamat, Ashish M; Porter, Michael P; Robinson, Victoria L; Shore, Neal; Jewett, Michael; Schelhammer, Paul F; deVere White, Ralph; Quale, Diane; Lee, Cheryl T

    2009-09-15

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States and, on a per capita basis, is the most expensive cancer from diagnosis to death. Unfortunately, National Cancer Institute funding for bladder cancer is quite low when compared with other common malignancies. Limited funding has stifled research opportunities for new and established investigators, ultimately encouraging them to redirect research efforts to other organ sites. Waning interest of scientists has further fueled the cycle of modest funding for bladder cancer. One important consequence of this has been a lack of scientific advancement in the field. Patient advocates have decidedly advanced research efforts in many cancer sites. Breast, prostate, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer advocates have organized highly successful campaigns to lobby the federal government and the medical community to devote increased attention and funding to understudied malignancies and to conduct relevant studies to better understand the therapy, diagnosis, and prevention of these diseases. Bladder cancer survivors have lacked a coordinated advocacy voice until recently. A concerted effort to align bladder cancer advocates, clinicians, and urologic organizations is essential to define the greatest needs in bladder cancer and to develop related solutions. This position paper represents a collaborative discussion to define the most concerning trends and greatest needs in the field of bladder cancer as outlined by the Bladder Cancer Think Tank, the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, and the Society of Urologic Oncology.

  10. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Bladder Cancer Growth And Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Wang, Zhiqiang; Flaveny, Colin; Long, Jun; Singh, Samer; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Tokhunts, Robert; Giambelli, Camilla; Briegel, Karoline J.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Karagas, Margaret; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Jorda, Merce; Bejarano, Pablo; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Robbins, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of HEDGEHOG (HH) signaling in bladder cancer remains controversial. The gene encoding the HH receptor and negative regulator PATCHED1 (PTCH1) resides on a region of chromosome 9q, one copy of which is frequently lost in bladder cancer. Inconsistent with PTCH1 functioning as a classic tumor suppressor gene, loss-of-function mutations in the remaining copy of PTCH1 are not commonly found. Here, we provide direct evidence for a critical role of HH signaling in bladder carcinogenesis. We show that transformed human urothelial cells and many urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell lines exhibit constitutive HH signaling, which is required for their growth and tumorigenic properties. Surprisingly, rather than originating from loss of PTCH1, the constitutive HH activity observed in UC cell lines was HH ligand-dependent. Consistent with this finding, increased levels of HH and the HH target gene product GLI1 were found in resected human primary bladder tumors. Furthermore, based on the difference in intrinsic HH dependence of UC cell lines, a gene expression signature was identified that correlated with bladder cancer progression. Our findings therefore indicate that therapeutic targeting of the HH signaling pathway may be beneficial in the clinical management of bladder cancer. PMID:22815529

  11. Ciprofloxacin criteria in antimicrobial prophylaxis and bladder cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gurtowska, Natalia; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2010-10-01

    Oral ciprofloxacin might achieve higher concentration in urine than in serum; theoretically, this drug might act as an anticancer drug against bladder cancer cells. Among fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin is distinguished by strong inhibition of topoisomerase II. A good correlation between cytotoxic activity of ciprofloxacin toward eukaryotic cells and its ability to induce the cleavable complexes topoisomerase II-DNA has been demonstrated. These data provide a basis for supposing that ciprofloxacin may act as anticancer drug. The efforts of evaluating ciprofloxacin's influence on human bladder cell lines have been shown by many authors. The cells were exposed to ciprofloxacin at various concentrations that are attainable in the urine after oral drug administration. Antiproliferative potential of the ciprofloxacin against human bladder cells varies according to drug concentration and time of incubation. It seems that ciprofloxacin can act as an anticancer drug in eukaryotic cells. Low urine pH can enhance the antitumor effect of ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin enhances the effect of action of doxorubicin and epirubicin, which are used to prevent bladder cancer recurrence after transurethral resection of superficial bladder cancer. We think that ciprofloxacin might be used for antibacterial prophylaxis and as an anticancer agent in patients with superficial bladder cancer. This idea must be checked in future placebo controlled trials.

  12. Quantitative Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Measurements Obtained by 3-Tesla MRI Are Correlated with Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer Proliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sevcenco, Sabina; Haitel, Andrea; Ponhold, Lothar; Susani, Martin; Fajkovic, Harun; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Hiess, Manuela; Spick, Claudio; Szarvas, Tibor; Baltzer, Pascal A. T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values and cell cycle and proliferative biomarkers (p53, p21, Ki67,) in order to establish its potential role as a noninvasive biomarker for prediction of cell cycle, proliferative activity and biological aggressiveness in bladder cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with bladder cancer who underwent 3,0 Tesla DW-MRI of the bladder before TUR-B or radical cystectomy were eligible for this prospective IRB-approved study. Histological specimen were immunohistochemically stained for the following markers: p53, p21 and ki67. Two board-certified uropathologists reviewed the specimens blinded to DW-MRI results. Histological grade and T-stage were classified according to the WHO 2004 and the 2009 TNM classification, respectively. Nonparametric univariate and multivariate statistics including correlation, logistic regression and ROC analysis were applied. Results Muscle invasive bladder cancer was histologically confirmed in 10 out of 41 patients. All examined tissue biomarkers were significantly correlated with ADC values (p<0.05, respectively). Based on multivariate analysis, p53 and ADC are both independent prognostic factors for muscle invasiveness of bladder cancer (>/ = T2). (p = 0.013 and p = 0.018). Conclusion ADC values are associated with cell cycle and proliferative biomarkers and do thereby reflect invasive and proliferative potential in bladder cancer. ADC and p53 are both independent prognostic factors for muscle invasiveness in bladder cancer. PMID:25202965

  13. Does increased urination frequency protect against bladder cancer?

    PubMed

    Silverman, Debra T; Alguacil, Juan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Real, Francisco X; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Cantor, Kenneth P; Malats, Nuria; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Carrato, Alfredo; Lloreta, Josep; Samanic, Claudine; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2008-10-01

    Experimental studies suggest that increased urination frequency may reduce bladder cancer risk if carcinogens are present in the urine. Only 2 small studies of the effect of increased urination frequency on bladder cancer risk in humans have been conducted with conflicting results. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of urination frequency on risk of bladder cancer in a large, multicenter case-control study. We analyzed data based on interviews conducted with 884 patients with newly diagnosed, bladder cancer and 996 controls from 1998 to 2001 in Spain. We observed a consistent, inverse trend in risk with increasing nighttime voiding frequency in both men (p = 0.0003) and women (p = 0.07); voiding at least 2 times per night was associated with a significant, 40-50% risk reduction. The protective effect of nocturia was apparent among study participants with low, moderate and high water consumption. The risk associated with cigarette smoking was reduced by nocturia. Compared with nonsmokers who did not urinate at night, current smokers who did not urinate at night had an OR of 7.0 (95% CI = 4.7-10.2), whereas those who voided at least twice per night had an OR of 3.3 (95% CI = 1.9-5.8) (p value for trend = 0.0005). Our findings suggest a strong protective effect of nocturia on bladder cancer risk, providing evidence in humans that bladder cancer risk is related to the contact time of the urothelium with carcinogens in urine. Increased urination frequency, coupled with possible dilution of the urine from increased water intake, may diminish the effect of urinary carcinogens on bladder cancer risk.

  14. Functional characterization of the bladder cancer marker, BLCA-4.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Thu-Suong; Myers, Julie; Konety, Badrinath R; Barder, Timothy; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2004-02-15

    Bladder cancer is a common disease of the genitourinary tract for which the development of a noninvasive detection technique would have a significant impact on disease management. One of our previously identified bladder cancer-specific proteins, BLCA-4, appears to be associated with a "field effect" of the disease, and in clinical trials is able to separate individuals with bladder cancer from those without the disease with high sensitivity and specificity. The potential clinical utility of this marker has led to the analysis of its function in bladder cancer pathobiology. To additionally analyze the specificity of this marker, the expression in the urine of a variety of benign urologic conditions was analyzed. After cloning the gene encoding BLCA-4, functional aspects of the protein were analyzed by overexpressing it in cell systems, as well as its interaction with other transcription factors and in gel mobility shift assays. Finally, to determine the timing of expression in relation to the observance of bladder cancer, an animal model of the disease was examined. Expression of BLCA-4, the cDNA of which reveals that it is a novel member of the ETS transcription factor family, is not found in benign urologic conditions. Overexpression leads to increased growth rates of cells, and the protein interacts with other transcription factors. In vivo studies reveal that BLCA-4 expression occurs significantly before the observance of grossly visible tumors in an animal model of the disease. BLCA-4 is a bladder cancer marker that is highly specific and occurs early in the development of the disease. It appears to be a transcription factor that may play a role in the regulation of the gene expression in bladder cancer. BLCA-4 is a marker with significant clinical utility that may have an active role in the disease.

  15. Stem cell marker-positive stellate cells and mast cells are reduced in benign-appearing bladder tissue in patients with urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Isfoss, Björn L; Busch, Christer; Hermelin, Helena; Vermedal, Anette T; Kile, Marianne; Braathen, Geir J; Majak, Bernard; Berner, Aasmund

    2014-04-01

    Survival after invasive bladder cancer has improved less than that of other common non-skin cancers. In many types of malignancy, treatment failure has been attributed to therapy-resistant stem-like cancer cells. Our aim was therefore to determine identities of stem cell marker-positive cells in bladder cancer tissue and to investigate possible associations between these cells and different forms of bladder neoplasia. We investigated tissue from 52 patients with bladder neoplasia and 18 patients with benign bladder conditions, from a cohort that had been previously described with regard to diagnosis and outcome. The samples were analysed immunohistologically for the stem cell markers aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 A1 (ALDH1) and CD44, and markers of cell differentiation. The majority of stem cell marker-positive cells were located in connective tissue, and a smaller fraction in epithelial tissue. Stem cell marker-positive cells exhibiting possible stem cell characteristics included cells in deeper locations of benign and malignant epithelium, and sub-endothelial cells in patients with or without neoplasia. Stem cell marker-positive cells with non-stem cell character included stellate cells, mast cells, endothelial cells, foamy histiocytes, and neurons. Significantly, ALDH1+ stellate cells and ALDH1+ mast cells were reduced in number in stroma of benign-appearing mucosa of bladder cancer patients. The stem cell markers ALDH1 and CD44 label several types of differentiated cells in bladder tissue. ALDH1+ stellate cells and mast cells appear to be reduced in stroma of normal-appearing mucosa of bladder cancer patients, and may be part of a "field effect" in cancer-near areas.

  16. Human urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering - an analysis of 131 clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Adamowicz, Jan; Sharma, Arun K; Drewa, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of urinary bladder tissue with functional equivalents remains one of the most challenging problems of reconstructive urology over the last several decades. The gold standard treatment for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is the ileal conduit or neobladder; however, this technique is associated with numerous complications including electrolyte imbalances, mucus production, and the potential for malignant transformation. Tissue engineering techniques provide the impetus to construct functional bladder substitutes de novo. Within this review, we have thoroughly perused the literature utilizing PubMed in order to identify clinical studies involving bladder reconstruction utilizing tissue engineering methodologies. The idea of urinary bladder regeneration through tissue engineering dates back to the 1950s. Many natural and synthetic biomaterials such as plastic mold, gelatin sponge, Japanese paper, preserved dog bladder, lyophilized human dura, bovine pericardium, small intestinal submucosa, bladder acellular matrix, or composite of collagen and polyglycolic acid were used for urinary bladder regeneration with a wide range of outcomes. Recent progress in the tissue engineering field suggest that in vitro engineered bladder wall substitutes may have expanded clinical applicability in near future but preclinical investigations on large animal models with defective bladders are necessary to optimize the methods of bladder reconstruction by tissue engineering in humans.

  17. Bladder cancer, a review of the environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many epidemiological studies and reviews have been performed to identify the causes of bladder cancer. The aim of this review is to investigate the links between various environmental risk factors and cancer of the bladder. Methods A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Scholar Google and Russian Google databases to identify reviews and epidemiological studies on bladder cancer risk factors associated with the environment published between 1998 and 2010. Only literature discussing human studies was considered. Results Smoking, mainly cigarette smoking, is a well known risk factor for various diseases, including bladder cancer. Another factor strongly associated with bladder cancer is exposure to arsenic in drinking water at concentrations higher than 300 µg/l. The most notable risk factor for development of bladder cancer is occupational exposure to aromatic amines (2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine) and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline), which can be found in the products of the chemical, dye and rubber industries as well as in hair dyes, paints, fungicides, cigarette smoke, plastics, metals and motor vehicle exhaust. There are also data suggesting an effect from of other types of smoking besides cigarettes (cigar, pipe, Egyptian waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and environmental tobacco smoking), and other sources of arsenic exposure such as air, food, occupational hazards, and tobacco. Other studies show that hairdressers and barbers with occupational exposure to hair dyes experience enhanced risk of bladder cancer. For example, a study related to personal use of hair dyes demonstrates an elevated bladder cancer risk for people who used permanent hair dyes at least once a month, for one year or longer. Conclusion Smoking, in particular from cigarettes, exposure to arsenic in drinking water, and occupational exposure to aromatic amines and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) are well known risk

  18. The impact of advanced proteomics in the search for markers and therapeutic targets of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongshuo; Fan, Yue; Xia, Lingling; Gao, Chunhui; Tong, Xin; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lili; Ji, Tuo; Jin, Mingyu; Gu, Bing; Fan, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common cancer of the urinary tract and can be avoided through proper surveillance and monitoring. Several genetic factors are known to contribute to the progression of bladder cancer, many of which produce molecules that serve as cancer biomarkers. Blood, urine, and tissue are commonly analyzed for the presence of biomarkers, which can be derived from either the nucleus or the mitochondria. Recent advances in proteomics have facilitated the high-throughput profiling of data generated from bladder cancer-related proteins or peptides in parallel with high sensitivity and specificity, providing a wealth of information for biomarker discovery and validation. However, the transmission of screening results from one laboratory to another remains the main disadvantage of these methods, a fact that emphasizes the need for consistent and standardized procedures as suggested by the Human Proteome Organization. This review summarizes the latest discoveries and progress of biomarker identification for the early diagnosis, projected prognosis, and therapeutic response of bladder cancer, informs the readers of the current status of proteomic-based biomarker findings, and suggests avenues for future work.

  19. Long-term bladder, colorectal, and sexual functions after radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; Meldgaard, Peter; von der Maase, Hans

    2004-08-01

    To describe bladder, colorectal, and sexual dysfunctions among long time survivors after radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer, and compare the results with a healthy control group. We identified 261 patients who had received radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer in the period 1994-2001. Patients were treated with a CT-based three-field technique with 60 Gy in 2 Gy fractions, 5 fractions/week. Sixty-two patients were alive and candidates for the study. For comparison, 185 controls were selected from the Danish National Register. Information was collected in an interview based on the LENT SOMA tables and questions concerning changes in daily life following radiotherapy. Fifty-three patients (85%), median age 77 years (range 51-84) entered the study. Median follow-up time was 29 months (range 18-103 months). There were 63 controls (34%). Fourteen percent of the patients reported that radiotherapy had moderate to severe impact on their present bladder function. Compared with the control group, significantly more patients had dysuria, and urethral stenosis, and were using bladder catheter. Twenty-nine percent of the patients reported moderate to severe impact on their present bowel function. Significantly more patients had diarrhoea, fecal urgency and fecal incontinence, and were using antidiarrhoea medication and sanitary pads. Twenty-five percent of the patients reported moderate to severe impact on their present sexual function. Impotence and lack of sexual desire were significantly higher among the male patients. Following radical radiotherapy, most patients had a well functioning bladder, whereas 14% reported moderate to severe bladder dysfunctions. Due to the presence of bowel in the treatment field, radiotherapy is associated with considerable long-term intestinal side effects. Moreover, radiotherapy may result in sexual dysfunctions.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Sun, Chengwen; Guo, Jia; Xue, Peng; Guan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia), KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC), and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer) have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO) term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer. PMID:26230496

  1. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  2. PET/Computed Tomography in Renal, Bladder, and Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/computed tomography (CT) is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in urooncology. In both bladder and renal cancers, there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder, and testicular cancers.

  3. Is 5´-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Both Jekyll and Hyde in Bladder Cancer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-Jae

    2015-06-01

    The 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis in mammalian tissues. Metabolic adaptation is a critical step in ensuring cell survival during metabolic stress. Because of its critical role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism, AMPK is involved in many human diseases, including cancers. Although AMPK signaling was originally characterized as a tumor-suppressive signaling pathway, several lines of evidence suggest that AMPK plays a much broader role and cannot simply be defined as either an oncogenic regulator or tumor suppressor. Notably, several recent studies demonstrated that the antitumorigenic effects of many indirect AMPK activators, such as metformin, do not depend on AMPK. Conversely, activation of AMPK induces the progression of cancers, emphasizing its oncogenic effect. Bladder cancer can be divided into two groups: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The molecular mechanisms underlying these two types of cancer are distinct: NMIBC is associated with activation of the Ras pathway, whereas MIBC is characterized by loss of major tumor suppressors. Importantly, both pathways are connected to the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In addition, our recent metabolomic findings suggest that β-oxidation of fatty acids is an important factor in the development of bladder cancer. Both mTOR and β-oxidation are tightly associated with the AMPK pathway. Here, I summarize and discuss the recent findings on the two distinct roles of AMPK in cancer, as well as the relationship between bladder cancer and AMPK.

  4. Current therapeutic strategies for invasive and metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Mathew, Jacob; Tan, Winston W

    2011-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe, the United States, and Northern African countries. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is an aggressive epithelial tumor, with a high rate of early systemic dissemination. Superficial, noninvasive bladder cancer can most often be cured; a good proportion of invasive cases can also be cured by a combined modality approach of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Recurrences are common and mostly manifest as metastatic disease. Those with distant metastatic disease can sometime achieve partial or complete remission with combination chemotherapy. Recent developments Better understanding of the biology of the disease has led to the incorporation of molecular and genetic features along with factors such as tumor grade, lympho-vascular invasion, and aberrant histology, thereby allowing identification of ‘favorable’ and ‘unfavorable’ cancers which helps a more accurate informed and objective selection of patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Gene expression profiling has been used to find molecular signature patterns that can potentially be predictive of drug sensitivity and metastasis. Understanding the molecular pathways of invasive bladder cancer has led to clinical investigation of several targeted therapeutics such as anti-angiogenics, mTOR inhibitors, and anti-EGFR agents. Conclusion With improvements in the understanding of the biology of bladder cancer, clinical trials studying novel and targeted agents alone or in combination with chemotherapy have increased the armamentarium for the treatment of bladder cancer. Although the novel biomarkers and gene expression profiles have been shown to provide important predictive and prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation. PMID:21792316

  5. Sox4 Expression Confers Bladder Cancer Stem Cell Properties and Predicts for Poor Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, He; Blijlevens, Maxime; Yang, Nuo; Frangou, Costakis; Wilson, Kayla E.; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Yinglong; Zhang, Lirui; Morrison, Carl D.; Shepherd, Lori; Hu, Qiang; Zhu, Qianqian; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Song; Zhang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified as to contribute directly or indirectly to the generation of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (TCC-UB). We have previously found that amplification of chromosome 6p22 is significantly associated with the muscle-invasive rather than superficial TCC-UB. Here, we demonstrated that Sox4, one of the candidate oncogenes located within the chromosome 6p22 amplicon, confers bladder cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. Down-regulation of Sox4 led to the inhibition of cell migration, colony formation as well as mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Interestingly, knockdown of Sox4 also reduced the sphere formation, enriched cell population with high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH high) and tumor formation potential. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified novel Sox4 target genes. Last, immunohistochemistry analysis of human bladder tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs) indicated that high Sox4 expression was correlated with advanced cancer stages and poor survival rate. In summary, our data show that Sox4 is an important regulator of the bladder CSC properties and it may serve as a biomarker of the aggressive phenotype in bladder cancer. PMID:26681916

  6. miR-143 inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation and enhances their sensitivity to gemcitabine by repressing IGF-1R signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengbing; Li, Qi; Niu, Xiaobing; Wang, Gongcheng; Zheng, Sinian; Fu, Guangbo; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression. It has been demonstrated that aberrant miRNA expression is associated with cancer development and carcinogenesis. Altered miRNA expression has been suggested to occur in bladder cancer. In other cancer systems, studies have indicated that miR-143, as a tumor suppressor gene, plays essential roles in cancer progression. However, its role in bladder cancer has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we observed that miR-143 expression was downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and cells, and that its levels were negatively correlated with bladder cancer clinical stages. We further demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a functional target of miR-143. Their expression levels were inversely correlated in bladder cancer samples. Overexpression of miR-143 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted chemosensitivity of bladder cancer 5637 cells to gemcitabine. Consistently, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of IGF-1R phenocopied miR-143 overexpression. Notably, the expression of IGF-1R is a predictor of patient prognosis. Collectively, our findings indicate that miR-143 is a valuable biomarker for bladder cancer. The miR-143/IGF-1R axis is associated with bladder cancer drug resistance and patient survival. PMID:28123579

  7. Bladder and bowel symptoms in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kristine A; Boyington, Alice R; Judson, Patricia L; Wyman, Jean F

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies likely underestimate the prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms in gynecologic cancer survivors. We sought to estimate the prevalence of these symptoms in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors who had completed treatment 1 year previously compared with non-cancer controls, and to examine factors associated with more severe symptoms in survivors. As part of a larger quality of life study, survivors who were 1-year posttreatment for cervical or endometrial cancer (n = 104) completed measures of bladder and bowel symptoms. An age-matched and race/ethnicity-matched sample of women with no history of cancer was recruited for comparison purposes. Survivors reported a higher prevalence of bladder symptoms, specifically storage and incontinence symptoms, than non-cancer controls. Prevalence rates for bowel symptoms in survivors were higher than those reported in previous studies. Greater symptom severity was associated with younger age, lower annual incomes, and less education. Other correlates included higher body mass index and history of smoking. As hypothesized, more severe symptoms were associated with radical hysterectomy and pelvic radiation. Bladder and bowel symptoms are more prevalent in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors than non-cancer controls. Future research should replicate these findings in a larger, prospective study. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Urinary Bladder and Small Intestine and How to Apply Them in Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jerman, Urška Dragin; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Veranič, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme are essential for the establishment of proper tissue morphology during organogenesis and tissue regeneration as well as for the maintenance of cell differentiation. With this review, we highlight the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk in healthy tissue and further discuss its significance in engineering functional tissues in vitro. We focus on the urinary bladder and small intestine, organs that are often compromised by disease and are as such in need of research that would advance effective treatment or tissue replacement. To date, the understanding of epithelial-mesenchymal reciprocal interactions has enabled the development of in vitro biomimetic tissue equivalents that have provided many possibilities in treating defective, damaged, or even cancerous tissues. Although research of the past several years has advanced the field of bladder and small intestine tissue engineering, one must be aware of its current limitations in successfully and above all safely introducing tissue-engineered constructs into clinical practice. Special attention is in particular needed when treating cancerous tissues, as initially successful tumor excision and tissue reconstruction may later on result in cancer recurrence due to oncogenic signals originating from an altered stroma. Recent rather poor outcomes in pioneering clinical trials of bladder reconstructions should serve as a reminder that recreating a functional organ to replace a dysfunctional one is an objective far more difficult to reach than initially foreseen. When considering effective tissue engineering approaches for diseased tissues in humans, it is imperative to introduce animal models with dysfunctional or, even more importantly, cancerous organs, which would greatly contribute to predicting possible complications and, hence, reducing risks when translating to the clinic.

  9. Cell adhesion and urothelial bladder cancer: the role of cadherin switching and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Richard T

    2015-02-05

    Cadherins are mediators of cell-cell adhesion in epithelial tissues. E-cadherin is a known tumour suppressor and plays a central role in suppressing the invasive phenotype of cancer cells. However, the abnormal expression of N- and P-cadherin ('cadherin switching', CS) has been shown to promote a more invasive and m̀alignant phenotype of cancer, with P-cadherin possibly acting as a key mediator of invasion and metastasis in bladder cancer. Cadherins are also implicated in numerous signalling events related to embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. It is these wide ranging effects and the serious implications of CS that make the cadherin cell adhesion molecules and their related pathways strong candidate targets for the inhibition of cancer progression, including bladder cancer. This review focuses on CS in the context of bladder cancer and in particular the switch to P-cadherin expression, and discusses other related molecules and phenomena, including EpCAM and the development of the cancer stem cell phenotype. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Occupation and cancer in London: an investigation into nasal and bladder cancer using the Cancer Atlas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P J; McDowall, M E

    1986-01-01

    The Atlas of Cancer Mortality for England and Wales showed pronounced excesses of male mortality from nasal and bladder cancer in certain London boroughs. These excesses were investigated by case-referent studies using death certificate data for male deaths, 1968-78. Nasal cancer was found to be significantly associated with occupations involving heavy exposure to wood dust. Bladder cancer was significantly associated with occupations in road transport driving and in the handling of leather, whereas consistently raised relative risk ratios were also found for wood-workers, engineering fitters, printers, machinists, plumbers, and motor mechanics. These findings highlight the potential role of occupational factors in cancer causation in London.

  11. MicroRNA-186 regulates the invasion and metastasis of bladder cancer via vascular endothelial growth factor C.

    PubMed

    He, Xuefeng; Ping, Jigen; Wen, Duangai

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of microRNA (miRNA or miR)-186 in tumor tissue, blood and urine from patients with bladder cancer. The mechanism by which miR-186 regulates the invasion and metastasis of bladder cancer was also assessed. A total of 76 patients who underwent surgical resection of bladder cancer tissues between August 2012 and January 2016 were included in the present study. Blood and urine samples were also collected from the 76 patients and another 66 healthy subjects. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) mRNA and miR-186 was measured using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis was performed to assess VEGF-C protein expression in tumor tissues. The content of VEGF-C protein in blood and urine samples was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To identify the direct interaction between miR-186 and VEGF-C mRNA, a dual luciferase reporter assay was performed. The present findings demonstrated that VEGF-C mRNA expression in tumor tissues, blood and urine of bladder cancer patients was upregulated. VEGF-C protein expression in bladder cancer tissues was also enhanced. VEGF-C protein content in blood and urine from bladder cancer patients was elevated, consistent with the results for VEGF-C mRNA. Expression of miR-186 was reduced in tumor tissues, blood and urine. Dual luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-186 regulated the expression of VEGF-C by binding with its 3'-untranslated region. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that the expression of VEGF-C mRNA and protein is upregulated in tumor tissues, blood and urine from patients with bladder cancer, while that of miR-186 is downregulated in these samples. miR-186 potentially regulates the invasion and metastasis of bladder cancer via VEGF-C, and may become a gene marker for bladder cancer in the future.

  12. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and subsequent risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, D; Chokkalingam, A P; Gridley, G; Nyren, O; Johansson, J E; Adami, H O; Silverman, D; Hsing, A W

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort of 79 280 Swedish men hospitalised for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register between 1964 and 1983 and followed until 1989 via multiple record linkages with nationwide data on cancer registry, death and emigration. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), the ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of incident bladder cancers, were used to calculate the risk associated with BPH. The expected number was calculated by multiplying the number of person-years by the age-specific cancer incidence rates in Sweden for each 5-year age group and calendar year of observation. Analyses were stratified by BPH treatment, latency, calendar year and presence of genitourinary (GU) comorbid conditions. After excluding the first 3 years of follow-up after the index hospitalisation, we observed 506 incident bladder cancer cases during follow-up in the cohort. No overall increased risk of bladder cancer was apparent in our main analysis involving the entire BPH cohort. However, among BPH patients with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), there was an increased risk in all follow-up periods; SIRs of bladder cancer during years 4–6 of follow-up was 1.22 (95% confidence interval=1.02–1.46), 1.32 for 7–9 years of follow-up, and 1.47 for 10–26 years of follow-up. SIRs of bladder cancer among TURP-treated BPH patients were particularly elevated among those with comorbid conditions of the GU tract (e.g., stone, infection, etc.); 1.72, 1.74 and 2.01 for 4–6, 7–9, 10–26 years of follow-up, respectively, and also for those whose diagnoses occurred before 1975, when TURP was more likely to be performed by a urologist than a general practitioner: 1.87, 1.90 and 1.74, respectively. These findings suggest that BPH overall is not associated with bladder cancer risk. However, among men treated with TURP, particularly those with other comorbid GU tract conditions, risk of

  13. Aberrant expression of KPNA2 is associated with a poor prognosis and contributes to OCT4 nuclear transportation in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingcheng; Dong, Daoquan; Cheng, Ran; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Shuqi; Zhu, Yuhong; Fan, Longlong; Mao, Xiangming; Gui, Yaoting; Li, Zesong; Li, Xianxin; Shi, Bentao

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show that Karyopherin alpha 2 (KPNA2) is up-regulated in quite a number of cancers and associated with poor prognosis. Here, we found that expression levels of KPNA2 and OCT4 are up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues and significantly associated with primary tumor stage and bladder cancer patients' poorer prognosis. Our data also showed decreased cell proliferation and migration rates of bladder cancer cell lines when the expression of KPNA2 and OCT4 was silenced. Meanwhile, cell apoptosis rate was increased. Furthermore, Co-IP and immunofluorescence assay showed the KPNA2 interacts with OCT4 and inhibits OCT4 nuclear transportation when KPNA2 was silenced. Thus, we confirmed that up-regulated KPNA2 and OCT4 expression is a common feature of bladder cancer that is correlated with increased aggressive tumor behavior. Also, we propose that KPNA2 regulates the process of OCT4 nuclear transportation in bladder cancer. PMID:27611951

  14. Tissue-mimicking bladder wall phantoms for evaluating acoustic radiation force-optical coherence elastography systems.

    PubMed

    Ejofodomi, O'tega A; Zderic, Vesna; Zara, Jason M

    2010-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force-optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) systems are novel imaging systems that have the potential to simultaneously quantify and characterize the optical and mechanical properties of in vivo tissues. This article presents the construction of bladder wall phantoms for use in ARF-OCE systems. Mechanical, acoustic, and optical properties are reported and compared to published values for the urinary bladder. The phantom consisted of 0.2000 +/- 0.0089 and 6.0000 +/- 0.2830 microm polystyrene microspheres (Polysciences Inc., Warrington, PA, Catalog Nos. 07304 and 07312), 7.5 +/- 1.5 microm copolymer microspheres composed of acrylonitrile and vinylidene chloride, (Expancel, Duluth, GA, Catalog No. 461 DU 20), and bovine serum albumin within a gelatin matrix. Young's modulus was measured by successive compression of the phantom and obtaining the slope of the resulting force-displacement data. Acoustic measurements were performed using the transmission method. The phantoms were submerged in a water bath and placed between transmitting and receiving 13 mm diameter unfocused transducers operating at a frequency of 3.5 MHz. A MATLAB algorithm to extract the optical scattering coefficient from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the phantom was used. The phantoms possess a Young's modulus of 17.12 +/- 2.72 kPa, a mass density of 1.05 +/- 0.02 g/cm3, an acoustic attenuation coefficient of 0.66 +/- 0.08 dB/cm/MHz, a speed of sound of 1591 +/- 8.76 m/s, and an optical scattering coefficient of 1.80 +/- 0.23 mm(-1). Ultrasound and OCT images of the bladder wall phantom are presented. A material that mimics the mechanical, optical, and acoustic properties of healthy bladder wall has been developed. This tissue-mimicking bladder wall phantom was developed as a control tool to investigate the feasibility of using ARF-OCE to detect the mechanical and optical changes that may be indicative of the onset or development of cancer in the urinary bladder

  15. miR‑485‑5p inhibits bladder cancer metastasis by targeting HMGA2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijun; Li, Qingwen; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Jiajun

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR)‑485 is a functional miRNA which has received much attention in recent years. However, little is known about the expression of miR‑485 or the role it plays in bladder cancer [namely in metastasis and epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT)]. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to detect the expression of miR‑485 in human bladder cancer tissues and bladder cancer cell lines, and to examine the effects of miR‑485‑5p on bladder cancer cell metastasis and EMT. We found that the expression of miR‑485‑5p was downregulated in the human bladder cancer tissues and different bladder cancer cell lines compared with the normal tissues and cell lines, as demonstrated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). We enforced the expression of miR‑485‑5p in T24 cells and inhibited the expression of miR‑485‑5p in SW780 cells by transfection with miR‑485‑5p mimic or miR‑485‑5p inhibitor, respectively. The ectopic expression of miR‑485‑5p was shown to inhibit cell metastasis and EMT, whereas the inhibition of miR‑485‑5p expression promoted cell metastasis and EMT, as shown by transwell‑matrigel assay, cell adhesion assay and western blot analysis. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter assay revealed that high mobility group AT‑hook 2 (HMGA2) was a direct target of miR‑485‑5p and that the overexpression of HMGA2 reversed the effects of miR‑485‑5p on cell metastasis and EMT. In conclusion and to the very best of our knowledge, the present study, for the first time, identified miR‑485‑5p as a suppressive miRNA in human bladder cancer, and demonstrated that miR‑485‑5p inhibits cell metastasis and EMT at least partly through the suppression of HMGA2 expression.

  16. Inhibition of Lon blocks cell proliferation, enhances chemosensitivity by promoting apoptosis and decreases cellular bioenergetics of bladder cancer: potential roles of Lon as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in baldder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongrong; Xu, Cuicui; Shi, Yang; Wu, Xiaoyi; Wu, Zhi; Zhang, Jiliang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Haibo; Lu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    ATP-dependent Lon protease within mitochondrial matrix contributes to the degradation of abnormal proteins. The oxidative or hypoxic stress which represents the stress phenotype of cancer leads to up-regulation of Lon. However, the role of Lon in bladder cancer remains undefined. Here, we found that Lon expression in bladder cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in noncancerous tissues; down-regulation of Lon in bladder cancer cells significantly blocked cancer cell proliferation via suppression c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation due to decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting apoptosis. We further found that Lon down-regulation in bladder cancer cells decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using extracellular flux analyzer. The tissue microarray (TMA) results showed that high expression of Lon was related to the T and TNM stage, as well as histological grade of bladder cancer patients. We also demonstrated that Lon was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of bladder cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that Lon could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for treatment of bladder cancer, as well as for prediction of the effectiveness of chemotherapy. PMID:25526030

  17. [Radical treatment of invasive bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Lopatkin, N A; Darenkov, S P; Chernyshev, N V; Sokolov, A E; Gorilovskiĭ, M L; Akmatov, N A; Samsonov, Iu V

    2003-01-01

    We have conducted a retrospective analysis of radical cystectomy in 53 patients (45 males and 8 females, 85 and 15%, respectively) with invasive bladder cancer (BC) treated in the Research Institute of Urology in 1997-2002. Stages T2N0M0, pT3aN0M0, T3bN0M0, pT4aN0M0, pT4aN1-2M0 were in 4 (7.5%), 13 (25%), 21 (40%), 7 (12.5%), 8 (15%) cases, respectively. Well differentiated transitional cell BC (G1) was detected in 1 (2%) patient, moderately differentiated (G2) in 16 (30%) cases, poorly differentiated (G3) in 36 (68%) patients. The following methods of urine derivation were used: orthotopic plastic surgery (n = 3, 6%), ureterocutaneostomy (n = 4, 8%), Mainz pouch II operation (n = 16, 30%), Hassan operation (n = 5, 9%), Bricker procedure (n = 22, 44%), transureteroanastomosis (n = 3, 6%). In the postoperative period there was one lethal outcome, early complications in 5 (9%) patients, late complications in 9 (17%) patients. Distant metastases to the lungs, bones and iliac lymph nodes after treatment were detected in 3, 2 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had a local pelvic recurrence. For 53 patients 2-year corrected survival was 68 +/- 12.0%. We have come to the conclusion that the only radical surgical treatment of invasive BC is cystectomy, limitations to which are connected only with complexity of subsequent urine derivation.

  18. Does mechanical stimulation have any role in urinary bladder tissue engineering?

    PubMed

    Farhat, Walid A; Yeger, Herman

    2008-08-01

    Tissue engineering of the urinary bladder currently relies on biocompatible scaffolds that deliver biological and physical functionality with negligible risks of immunogenic or tumorigenic potential. Recent research suggests that autologous cells that are propagated in culture and seeded on scaffolds prior to implantation improve clinical outcomes. For example, normal urinary bladder development in utero requires regular filling and emptying, and current research suggests that bladders constructed in vitro may also benefit from regular mechanical stimulation. Such stimulation appears to induce favorable cellular changes, proliferation, and production of structurally suitable extracellular matrix (ECM) components essential for the normal function of hollow dynamic organs. To mimic in vivo urinary bladder dynamics, tissue bioreactors that imitate the filling and emptying of a normal bladder have been devised. A "urinary bladder tissue bioreactor" that is able to recapitulate these dynamics while providing a cellular environment that facilitates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions normally seen in-vivo may be necessary to successfully engineer bladder tissue. The validation of a urinary bladder tissue bioreactor that permits careful control of physiological conditions will generate a broad interest from researchers interested in urinary bladder physiology and tissue engineering.

  19. Immunological Basis in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Siref, Larry E.; Feloney, Michael P.; Hauke, Ralph J.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis and transition of normal urothelium into bladder carcinoma are multifactorial processes. Chronic inflammation causes initiation and progression of the underlying pathophysiology of invasive and metastatic cancer. A dichotomy is observed in the role of immune cells in bladder cancer. While the immune response defends the host by suppressing neoplastic growth, several immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, and T-lymphocytes, promote tumor development and progression. The levels of human neutrophil peptide-1, -2, and -3, produced by neutrophils, increase in bladder cancer and might promote tumor angiogenesis and growth. The effect of macrophages is primarily mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. Additionally, the underlying immunological mechanisms of two treatments, BCG and cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccines, and future directions are critically discussed. PMID:25391391

  20. Trimodality therapy in bladder cancer: Who, what and when?

    PubMed Central

    Premo, Christopher; Apolo, Andrea B.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Radical cystectomy is a standard treatment for non-metastatic, muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Treatment with trimodality therapy consisting of maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation has emerged as a method to preserve the native bladder in highly motivated patients. A number of factors can impact the likelihood of long term bladder preservation after trimodality therapy, and therefore should be taken into account when selecting patients. New radiation techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided radiation therapy may decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy in this setting, but remain an area of active study. Novel chemotherapy regimens may improve response rates and minimize toxicity. PMID:25882559

  1. Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy Paradigms for Bladder Cancer: Results from the National Cancer Center Institute Forum

    PubMed Central

    Dinney, Colin P.N.; Hansel, Donna; McConkey, David; Shipley, William; Hagan, Michael; Dreicer, Robert; Lerner, Seth; Czerniak, Bogdan; Waldman, Fred; Groshen, Susan; True, Lawrence D.; Petricoin, Emanuel; Theodorescu, Dan; Hruszkewycz, Andrew; Bajorin, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Although bladder cancer (BC) is a significant health threat to the US population, integrated clinical and laboratory investigations of this disease lag behind those of other types of cancer. Advances in BC are especially challenged due in part to a general decreased level of funding over the past 5 years. It is ironic that despite the awareness that BC is the 5th most commonly diagnosed solid malignancy in the United States, and one of the most costly to treat, funding for this organ site lags far behind that of other less common malignancies. Moreover, BC offers several unique opportunities for translational research that make it an ideal candidate for investigation. One distinct advantage over other solid tumor sites is that urine and tissue are readily available for translational studies that can direct the development of novel therapy for this disease. The NCI sponsored “Novel Neoadjuvant Therapy for Bladder Cancer” forum held in brought leading clinical and laboratory-based scientists together with the advocacy community to lay the groundwork for collaborative discovery and translation. The goal of the meeting was to bridge the gaps in translational science and develop the concepts for two novel biomarker-driven clinical trials, one in the neoadjuvant presurgical setting and the other in the setting of bladder preservation with chemoradiation. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to launch a collective effort to establish molecular-based therapy for UC. Herein, we summarize the proceedings of this meeting, and the future plans resulting from this forum. PMID:25443274

  2. Nanostructured polyurethane-poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffolds increase bladder tissue regeneration: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chang; Hedrick, Matt; Pareek, Gyan; Renzulli, Joseph; Haleblian, George; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although showing much promise for numerous tissue engineering applications, polyurethane and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) have suffered from a lack of cytocompatibility, sometimes leading to poor tissue integration. Nanotechnology (or the use of materials with surface features or constituent dimensions less than 100 nm in at least one direction) has started to transform currently implanted materials (such as polyurethane and PLGA) to promote tissue regeneration. This is because nanostructured surface features can be used to change medical device surface energy to alter initial protein adsorption events important for promoting tissue-forming cell functions. Thus, due to their altered surface energetics, the objective of the present in vivo study was to create nanoscale surface features on a new polyurethane and PLGA composite scaffold (by soaking the polyurethane side and PLGA side in HNO₃ and NaOH, respectively) and determine bladder tissue regeneration using a minipig model. The novel nanostructured scaffolds were further functionalized with IKVAV and YIGSR peptides to improve cellular responses. Results provided the first evidence of increased in vivo bladder tissue regeneration when using a composite of nanostructured polyurethane and PLGA compared with control ileal segments. Due to additional surgery, extended potentially problematic healing times, metabolic complications, donor site morbidity, and sometimes limited availability, ileal segment repair of a bladder defect is not optimal and, thus, a synthetic analog is highly desirable. In summary, this study indicates significant promise for the use of nanostructured polyurethane and PLGA composites to increase bladder tissue repair for a wide range of regenerative medicine applications, such as regenerating bladder tissue after removal of cancerous tissue, disease, or other trauma.

  3. FGF2-mediated reciprocal tumor cell-endothelial cell interplay contributes to the growth of chemoresistant cells: a potential mechanism for superficial bladder cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yule; Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Kaijie; Gao, Yang; Zeng, Jin; Shi, Qi; Guo, Peng; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; Li, Lei; He, Dalin

    2016-04-01

    Patients with superficial bladder cancer can be definitively cured by one single transurethral resection (TUR) with additional intravesical chemotherapy; however, up to 75 % of cases display frequent and multiple recurrences. One of the major causes of recurrence is that chemotherapeutic drugs used in intravesical regimens may induce chemoresistance. However, the mechanisms by which these chemoresistant cells develop into recurrent tumors remain unclear. Recent clinical evidence revealed that the expression of pro-angiogenic factor FGF2 was associated with early local relapse in patients with superficial bladder cancer. In this study, we conducted a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of chemoresistant cells mediated bladder cancer recurrence, focusing on FGF2-initiated tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction on chemoresistant cancer cell growth. We found that the expression of FGF2 was increased in chemoresistant bladder cell lines and in bladder tissues after intravesical chemotherapy. Although chemoresistant bladder cells grow slower than parental cells, chemoresistant bladder cancer cells had stronger ability than parental cells to stimulate endothelial cell migration, growth, and tube formation by producing FGF2. Inversely, endothelial cells significantly promoted chemoresistant bladder cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, targeting chemotherapy-induced FGF2 upregulation may provide a promising approach to manage the recurrence of superficial bladder cancer.

  4. Bladder injury secondary to obturator reflex is more common with plasmakinetic transurethral resection than monopolar transurethral resection of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Kutan; Gorgel, Sacit Nuri; Ozbek, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transurethral resection (TUR) is the most common surgical technique for the diagnosis and initial treatment of bladder cancer. In this study, we evaluated two surgical techniques in terms of bladder injury due to obturator reflex in patients that underwent TUR for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Material and methods 93 patients who underwent TUR for bladder cancer were analyzed. Fifty patients underwent monopolar resection and 43 patients underwent plasmakinetic resection. Standard TUR were performed with conventional Storz monopolar resection using a U-shaped cutting loop, 120V cutting/80 V coagulation settings, 5% mannitol fluid was used for irrigation. For bipolar resection, an Olympus ESG-400 plasmakinetic loop bipolar device using a U-shaped cutting loop, 160V cutting/80V coagulation settings and normal saline for irrigation was used. Results In the monopolar resection group; obturator reflex was seen in 4 (8%) patients. Bladder perforation caused by the obturator reflex was seen in 4 (8%) patients, but hemorrhage and other major complications were not seen in this group. In the bipolar resection group; obturator reflex was seen in 15 (34%) patients. Bladder perforation caused by the obturator reflex was seen in 10 (23%) patients. Conclusions Bipolar transurethral resection of bladder tumor was not superior to monopolar resection with respect to obturator reflex and bladder perforation. We conclude that we do not yet have enough experience concerning the long-term complications and major complications associated with bipolar resection of bladder cancer. PMID:26568867

  5. Diagnostic and Prognostic Significance of Serum and Tissue Galectin 3 Expression in Patients with Carcinoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Gendy, Hoda El; Madkour, Bothina; Abdelaty, Sara; Essawy, Fayza; Khattab, Dina; Hammam, Olfat; Nour, Hani H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectins are group of proteins found in the cytoplasm, nucleus, cell surface and extracellular matrix. Galectin 3 (Gal-3) displays pathological expression in a variety of processes such as tumorigenesis. Patients and Method 70 patients classified into the control group, cystitis group, transitional cell carcinoma group, and squamous cell carcinoma group were enrolled in this study which aimed to detect the serum level and the intensity of tissue expression of Gal-3. Results Both serum level and tissue expression of Gal-3 were statistically higher in bladder cancer patients compared to the other groups. Gal-3 level expression increased from low to high grade urothelial tumors, with a statistically significant increase of its level and expression between muscle invasive and non-muscle invasive Ta urothelial tumors. Conclusion The serum Gal-3 level is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. The prognostic significance of tissue expression is to be confirmed. PMID:26195948

  6. Why is perioperative chemotherapy for bladder cancer underutilized?

    PubMed

    Patafio, Francis M; Mackillop, William J; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Siemens, David Robert; Booth, Christopher M

    2014-05-01

    Despite clinical evidence and recommendations from international treatment guidelines, the use of perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in routine practice remains low. Although multiple studies have described underutilization, there is an urgent need to better understand the elements contributing to the observed gaps in care. In this commentary, we explore what is known about the factors contributing to underutilization of perioperative chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We also propose a framework to guide future knowledge translation activities in an effort to improve the care and outcomes of patients with this disease.

  7. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: a primer on immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maruf, Mahir; Brancato, Sam J.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has long been the gold standard treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Recently, there has been an emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents, which have shown promise in the treatment of urothelial cell carcinoma. These agents aim to augment, modify, or enhance the immune response. Such strategies include recombinant BCG, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Here, we review the emerging immunotherapeutics in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27458527

  8. Emerging Endoscopic Imaging Technologies for Bladder Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Aristeo; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern urologic endoscopy is the result of continuous innovations since early 19th century. White light cystoscopy is the primary strategy for identification, resection, and local staging of bladder cancer. While highly effective, white light cystoscopy has several well-recognized shortcomings. Recent advances in optical imaging technologies and device miniaturization hold the potential to improve bladder cancer diagnosis and resection. Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging are the first to enter the clinical arena. Confocal laser endomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy, UV autofluorescence, and others have shown promising clinical and pre-clinical feasibility. We review their mechanisms of action, highlight their respective advantages, and propose future directions. PMID:24658832

  9. [New approaches for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Sager, Caroline Carera; Benamran, Daniel A; Wirth, Gregory; Iselin, Christophe E

    2015-12-02

    Extending up to the submucosa, superficial bladder tumours (pTis, pTa et pTi) are initially treated by transurethral resection. According to their risk of recurrence and progression, this frequent cancer subsequently benefits from intra-vesical instillations of cytotoxic agents and immunomodulators. Several new treatments are currently being evaluated, namely new genetically modified BCG strains, so as novel means to administrate intravesical chemotherapy, which seam to improve prognosis. Owing to the significant prevalence of superficial bladder cancer and its morbidity, these new therapeutic means will probably be increasingly used.

  10. DAPK Promoter Methylation and Bladder Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhensheng; Zeng, Shuxiong; Liu, Anwei; Tang, Shijie; Ren, Qian; Sun, Yinghao; Xu, Chuanliang

    2016-01-01

    Background Methylation of tumor suppressor gene promoter leads to transcription inactivation and is involved in tumorigenesis. Several studies demonstrate a potential association between the Death-Associated Protein Kinase (DAPK) gene promoter methylation and bladder cancer risk, tumor stage and histological grade. Due to inconsistent results of these studies, we performed this meta-analysis to ascertain the association. Methods Studies were retrieved from the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases. Study selection and data extraction were executed by two reviewers independently. Meta-analysis was performed using Stata 13.0 and Review Manager 5.3 software. Results A total of 21 articles involving 15 case control and 8 case series studies were included in this meta-analysis. DAPK promoter methylation was associated with bladder cancer risk (OR: 5.81; 95%CI = 3.83–8.82, P<0.00001). The frequency of DAPK promoter methylation was equal in bladder cancer tissue and paired adjacent normal tissue (OR: 0.87; 95%CI = 0.31–2.48, P = 0.794). Furthermore, DAPK promoter methylation was associated with higher histological grade (OR: 1.52; 95%CI = 1.10–2.09, P = 0.011) but not associated with tumor stage (OR: 1.12; 95%CI = 0.67–1.87, P = 0.668). Conclusions The result suggests that DAPK promoter methylation is significantly increased in bladder cancer patients compared to normal controls. DAPK promoter methylation could serve as a biomarker for bladder cancer detection and management. PMID:27907054

  11. SETD6 regulates NF-κB signaling in urothelial cell survival: Implications for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Neelam; Cardenas, Eduardo; Bedolla, Roble; Ghosh, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate of 45-70%, progressing to muscle invasive disease in about 15% of those patients over a 5-year period. Administration of the mycobacterium, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) that induces local inflammation resulting in tumor remission in responsive patients is frequently used for treatment. BCG-treated patients with NF-κB del/del genotype have an increased risk of recurrence suggesting an important role of NF-κB in bladder cancer. Since protein methyltransferases play critical roles in modulating chromatin structure and gene expression, we screened a focused array of epigenetic modification genes to identify differential expression between normal urothelial and bladder cancer cells. We found and validated high expression of the SET-domain-containing protein methyltransferase, SETD6. SETD6 monomethylates NF-κB-p65 at lysine 310. Our results show that primary urothelial cells and normal bladder tissue have nearly undetectable message and protein level of SETD6 that increases in transformed urothelial cells and is further increased in bladder cancer cells and tissues. Overexpression of SETD6 in transformed urothelial cells increased cell survival and colony formation while knockdown in cancer cells decreased both parameters. Luciferase reporter assays showed that SETD6 induced the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Further, the use of catalytic SETD6 and IκBα mutant shows that SETD6 positively regulates survival by affecting p65 message, protein level and its function as determined by increased expression of NF-κB target genes. Our findings suggest that SETD6 plays an important role in NF-κB regulation and may have an important role in NF-κB-mediated local inflammatory response following BCG treatment. PMID:28122346

  12. Early detection of dysplasia in colon and bladder tissue using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rava, Richard P.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Cothren, Robert M., Jr.; Petras, Robert; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Levine, Howard H.

    1991-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been explored as an early detection scheme for two clinically important examples of neoplasia: colorectal dysplasia and transitional cell carcinoma in the urinary bladder. In both, it is desirable to detect microscopic and biochemical changes of pre-cancer in order to identify patients at risk for developing invasive carcinoma. This paper will compare the fluorescence obtained from these two pre-cancerous conditions, and discuss the connection between the fluorescence and the morphological/molecular changes occurring in the tissue. The similarities and differences in the fluorescence will be compared to determine the general features of pre-cancerous changes that might be utilized for detection of the disease.

  13. In vivo fluorescence imaging of an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model indicates differential uptake of intravesically instilled near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose analog by neoplastic urinary bladder tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most expensive cancers to manage due to frequent recurrences requiring life-long surveillance and treatment. A near-infrared labeled 2-deoxy-d-glucose probe IRDye800CW-DG targeting glucose metabolism pathway has shown to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosing several types of cancers as tested on tumor models not including bladder tumor. This pilot study has explored differential uptake of intravesically administered IRDye800CW-DG in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Twenty-five female Fischer rats were randomly grouped to four conditions: no-tumor-control (n=3), no-tumor-control intravesically instilled with IRDye800CWDG (n=6), rats bearing GFP-labeled AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma cells and washed with saline (n=5), and rats bearing AY-27 tumors and intravesically instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=11). Near-infrared fluorescence was measured from the opened bladder wall of anesthetized rat at an excitation wavelength of 750nm and an emission wavelength of 776nm, by using an in-house fluorescence imaging system. There is no statistically significant difference of the peak fluorescence intensity among the no-tumor-control bladders (n=3), the no-tumorcontrol bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), and the GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders washed by saline (n=5). When compared to that of the no-tumor-control bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), the fluorescence intensity of GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG and with histology confirmed neoplastic bladder tissue (n=11) was remarkably more intense (3.34 fold of over the former) and was also statistically significant (p<0.0001). The differential uptake of IRDye800CW-DG by the neoplastic urinary bladder tissues suggests the potential for cystoscopy-adaptation to enhance diagnosis and guiding surgical management of flat urinary bladder cancer.

  14. Serum vitamin D and risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Männistö, Satu; Snyder, Kirk; Horst, Ronald L; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2010-11-15

    Vitamin D may protect against several cancers, but data about the association between circulating vitamin D and bladder cancer are limited. Within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study, a randomized controlled trial conducted to determine the effects of α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplements on cancer incidence in male smokers, 250 bladder cancer cases were randomly sampled by month of blood collection. Controls were matched 1:1 to cases on age at randomization and date of blood collection. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of bladder cancer by a priori categories of baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D; i.e., <25, 25 to <37.5, 37.5 to <50, ≥50 nmol/L] and by season-specific quartiles. After multivariable adjustment, we found that lower 25(OH)D was associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of bladder cancer (versus ≥50 nmol/L; <25 nmol/L: OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.03-2.91; 25 to <37.5 nmol/L: OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.05-3.14; 37.5 to <50 nmol/L: OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.02-3.02; P trend=0.04). Similarly, increased risks for the lowest vitamin D category were observed when season-specific quartiles were used (Q1 versus Q4: OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 0.96-2.75; P trend=0.03). In this prospective study of male smokers, lower serum 25(OH)D was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Future studies should examine the association in other populations, especially nonsmokers and women. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  15. Is gall bladder cancer a bad cancer per se?

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2015-07-27

    Gall bladder cancer (GBC) has one of the poorest outcomes of all cancers. Early GBC is difficult to diagnose on even computed tomography. GB has no submucosa and the cancer infiltrates directly into the muscularis propria. GB wall is thin and important adjacent organs viz. liver, duodenum and pancreas get easily infiltrated. Tumor in the GB neck often needs extended right hepatectomy. Infiltration of duodenum/pancreas may necessitate pancreato-duodenectomy or even hepato-pancreato-duodenectomy. Mortality of surgical procedures, when performed for GBC, is higher than when performed for other cancers. Survival in GBC, even after R0 resection, is poor. There is no proven role of neo-adjuvant or adjuvant therapy for loco-regionally advanced GBC. There is no role of palliative surgery in metastatic GBC. Early GBC is diagnosed incidentally after cholecystectomy for stones and requires reoperation for completion extended cholecystectomy but unfortunately, most surgeons are not aware of this. GBC has a peculiar epidemiology and is uncommon in the West and has, therefore, not received much attention. Preventive cholecystectomy for asymptomatic stones is not recommended and there is no serum marker for screening. With all factors pitched against it, it does appear that GBC is a bad cancer per se!

  16. Is gall bladder cancer a bad cancer per se?

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vinay K

    2015-01-01

    Gall bladder cancer (GBC) has one of the poorest outcomes of all cancers. Early GBC is difficult to diagnose on even computed tomography. GB has no submucosa and the cancer infiltrates directly into the muscularis propria. GB wall is thin and important adjacent organs viz. liver, duodenum and pancreas get easily infiltrated. Tumor in the GB neck often needs extended right hepatectomy. Infiltration of duodenum/pancreas may necessitate pancreato-duodenectomy or even hepato-pancreato-duodenectomy. Mortality of surgical procedures, when performed for GBC, is higher than when performed for other cancers. Survival in GBC, even after R0 resection, is poor. There is no proven role of neo-adjuvant or adjuvant therapy for loco-regionally advanced GBC. There is no role of palliative surgery in metastatic GBC. Early GBC is diagnosed incidentally after cholecystectomy for stones and requires reoperation for completion extended cholecystectomy but unfortunately, most surgeons are not aware of this. GBC has a peculiar epidemiology and is uncommon in the West and has, therefore, not received much attention. Preventive cholecystectomy for asymptomatic stones is not recommended and there is no serum marker for screening. With all factors pitched against it, it does appear that GBC is a bad cancer per se! PMID:26225192

  17. Physical activity in the prevention and management of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to examine the role of physical activity in reducing the risk of bladder cancer, and in managing established disease. A systematic search of Ovid/Medline from 1996 to June 2016 coupled the term urinary bladder neoplasms (25,061 hits) with markers of physical activity (exercise, physical activity, physical education/training, athletes, and physical fitness, a total of 246,683 unique entries). Of 42 titles identified, 18 relevant abstracts were supplemented by reviewing reference lists and personal files to yield 21 articles on prevention of bladder cancer, and 8 on physical activity in disease management. Three cohort and 3 case-control studies examined occupational activity. One report found a statistically significant 40% increase in bladder cancers with a sedentary job, and 2 of 5 other reports found a non-significant trend to decreased risk with physically demanding work. Of 9 cohort and 2 case-control leisure analyses, 1 found significant benefit from physical activity, and 6 others trended to a 11-34% reduction of risk, with adverse effects in only 2 studies. After development of bladder cancer, physical activity was commonly low. However, greater physical activity decreased the risks of cystectomy and increased the quality of life following surgery. Better categorization of lifetime activity and fuller allowance for co-variates seems needed to establish conclusively that greater habitual physical activity will reduce the risk of bladder cancer. Nevertheless, an active lifestyle should be encouraged pending definitive information, because of positive trends and the more general health advantages of regular exercise.

  18. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  19. Neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development: an ideal model in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chism, David D; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been shown to confer a survival advantage in two randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis. Despite level 1 evidence supporting its benefit, utilization remains dismal with nearly one-half of patients ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy because of renal dysfunction, impaired performance status, and/or coexisting medical problems. This situation highlights the need for the development of novel therapies for the management of MIBC, a disease with a lethal phenotype. The neoadjuvant paradigm in bladder cancer offers many advantages for accelerated drug development. First, there is a greater likelihood of successful therapy at an earlier disease state that may be characterized by less genomic instability compared with the metastatic setting, with an early readout of activity with results determined in months rather than years. Second, pre- and post-treatment tumor tissue collection in patients with MIBC is performed as the standard of care without the need for research-directed biopsies, allowing for the ability to perform important correlative studies and to monitor tumor response to therapy in "real time." Third, pathological complete response (pT0) predicts for improved outcome in patients with MIBC. Fourth, there is a strong biological rationale with rapidly accumulating evidence for actionable targets in bladder cancer. This review focuses on the neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development using bladder cancer as the ideal model.

  20. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Piyush; Roy, Soumyajit; Tiwari, Vivek; Mohanti, Bidhu K

    2014-01-01

    To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 * 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  1. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (p<0.001). The expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA in BC patients was also significantly higher than that in noncancer patient controls and hematuria patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). High expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA was also detected in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  2. Urothelial cancer stem cells and epithelial plasticity: current concepts and therapeutic implications in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Minal

    2015-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is a highly heterogeneous disease that develops along two distinct biological tracks as evident by candidate gene analysis and genome-wide screening and therefore, offers different challenges for clinical management. Tumors representing the truly distinct molecular entities express molecular markers characteristic of a developmental process and a major mechanism of cancer metastasis, known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently identified subset of cells known as urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs) in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have self-renewal properties, ability to generate cellular tumor heterogeneity via differentiation and are ultimately responsible for tumor growth and viability. In this review paper, PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases were searched for original research papers and review articles to extract relevant information on the molecular mechanisms delineating the relationship between EMT and cancer stemness and their clinical implications for different subsets of urothelial cell carcinomas. Experimental and clinical studies over the past few years in bladder cancer cell lines and tumor tissues of different cancer subtypes provide evidences and new insights for mechanistic complexity for induction of EMT, tumorigenicity, and cancer stemness in malignant transformation of urothelial cell carcinomas. Differentiation and elimination therapies targeting EMT-cancer stemness pathway have been proposed as cynosure in the molecular biology of urothelial cell carcinomas and could prove to be clinically beneficial in an ability to reverse the EMT phenotype of tumor cells, suppress the properties of UroCSCs, inhibit bladder cancer progression and tumor relapse, and provide rationale in the treatment and clinical management of urothelial cancer.

  3. The natural history of bladder cancer. Implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Droller, M J

    2000-02-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is comprised of a variety of cancer diatheses that manifest a spectrum of distinct biologic potentials. Although these diseases have traditionally been classified as "superficial" and "muscle invasive" on the basis of their histologic appearance (depth of penetration of the "bladder wall" and corresponding prognosis) the pathways presumably followed by the various forms of these cancers imply an even greater complexity. These disparate pathways may reflect different events in carcinogenesis, which may determine subsequent development and risk for either recurrence or progression. In addition, biologic activity and malignant potential for each type of cancer may be associated with distinctive molecular and genetic alterations. These considerations may provide an opportunity to expand traditional staging systems in creating molecular profiles that may more precisely characterize the biologic potential of these tumor diatheses. Although there are far more questions than answers concerning how these alterations may effect the natural history of bladder cancer, molecular-based identification of bladder cancer patients at greatest risk for progression may ultimately improve clinical management.

  4. Bladder cancer in Native Americans and Alaskan Natives.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Sidor, Monika

    2008-07-01

    The prevalence of bladder cancer among Native Americans/Alaskan Natives (NAs/ANs) is generally considered to be low. However, the relative morbidity and mortality seem high. We have undertaken this survey of the published data to explore and document this observation. An extensive survey of the published data was undertaken. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data in particular were assessed. The incidence of bladder cancer among the NA/AN peoples is inexplicably low. This low incidence is more remarkable, given the widespread use of tobacco products and the disproportionately high incidence of kidney cancer in this same population. Despite this low incidence, NA/AN men and women seem to be at a relatively greater risk of dying of bladder cancer, once it has been diagnosed. More and larger studies are needed to clarify and update the incidence, cell type, and clinical outcomes of bladder cancer among NA/AN men and women. Social, economic, and political barriers to treatment also need to be addressed. Effective steps need to be undertaken to ensure more timely diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  5. Deciphering the Roles of Thiazolidinediones and PPARγ in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Melody; McBeth, Lucien; Sindhwani, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    The use of thiazolidinedione (TZD) therapy in type II diabetic patients has proven useful in the lowering of blood glucose levels. However, recent investigations have shown that there may be potential health concerns associated, including the risk of developing bladder cancer as well as complications in the cardiovasculature. TZDs are ligands for the nuclear receptor PPARγ, and activation causes lipid uptake and insulin sensitization, both of which are critical processes for diabetic patients whose bodies are unable to utilize insulin effectively. Several studies have shown that PPARγ/TZDs decrease IGF-1 levels and, thus, reduce cancer growth in carcinomas such as the pancreas, colon, liver, and prostate. However, other studies have shed light on the potential of the receptor as a biomarker for uroepithelial carcinomas, particularly due to its stimulatory effect on migration of bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, PPARγ may provide the tumor-promoting microenvironment by de novo synthesis of nutrients that are needed for bladder cancer development. In this review, we closely examine the TZD class of drugs and their effects on PPARγ in patient studies along with additional molecular factors that are positive modulators, such as protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), which may have considerable implications for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:28348577

  6. Automatic staging of bladder cancer on CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapati, Sankeerth S.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Cha, Kenny H.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Weizer, Alon; Alva, Ajjai; Paramagul, Chintana; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Correct staging of bladder cancer is crucial for the decision of neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment and minimizing the risk of under- or over-treatment. Subjectivity and variability of clinicians in utilizing available diagnostic information may lead to inaccuracy in staging bladder cancer. An objective decision support system that merges the information in a predictive model based on statistical outcomes of previous cases and machine learning may assist clinicians in making more accurate and consistent staging assessments. In this study, we developed a preliminary method to stage bladder cancer. With IRB approval, 42 bladder cancer cases with CTU scans were collected from patient files. The cases were classified into two classes based on pathological stage T2, which is the decision threshold for neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment (i.e. for stage >=T2) clinically. There were 21 cancers below stage T2 and 21 cancers at stage T2 or above. All 42 lesions were automatically segmented using our auto-initialized cascaded level sets (AI-CALS) method. Morphological features were extracted, which were selected and merged by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. A leave-one-case-out resampling scheme was used to train and test the classifier using the 42 lesions. The classification accuracy was quantified using the area under the ROC curve (Az). The average training Az was 0.97 and the test Az was 0.85. The classifier consistently selected the lesion volume, a gray level feature and a contrast feature. This predictive model shows promise for assisting in assessing the bladder cancer stage.

  7. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H; Efstathiou, Jason A; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E

    2016-04-27

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts.

  8. De novo reconstitution of a functional mammalian urinary bladder by tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Oberpenning, F; Meng, J; Yoo, J J; Atala, A

    1999-02-01

    Human organ replacement is limited by a donor shortage, problems with tissue compatibility, and rejection. Creation of an organ with autologous tissue would be advantageous. In this study, transplantable urinary bladder neo-organs were reproducibly created in vitro from urothelial and smooth muscle cells grown in culture from canine native bladder biopsies and seeded onto preformed bladder-shaped polymers. The native bladders were subsequently excised from canine donors and replaced with the tissue-engineered neo-organs. In functional evaluations for up to 11 months, the bladder neo-organs demonstrated a normal capacity to retain urine, normal elastic properties, and histologic architecture. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that successful reconstitution of an autonomous hollow organ is possible using tissue-engineering methods.

  9. Expression of Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) Positively Correlates with Survival of Urothelial Bladder Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Brożyna, Anna A.; Siekiera, Jerzy; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 shows tumoristatic and anticancer effects by acting through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), while hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 at position 1α by CYP27B1 is an essential step in its activation. The expression of both the VDR and CYP27B1 has been found in many normal and cancer tissues, but there is a lack of information about its expression in human bladder cancers. The aim of the present research was to examine whether the expression of the VDR and CYP27B1 in bladder cancer was related to the prognostic markers and disease outcome. We analyzed VDR and CYP27B1 in samples of tumor and normal tissues obtained from 71 urinary bladder cancer patients. The highest VDR immunostaining was found in normal epithelium and was significantly lower in bladder cancer cells (p < 0.001 with Mann–Whitney U test). VDR expression was lowest in more advanced (pT2b–pT4) (p = 0.005 with Mann–Whitney U test) and metastasizing cancers (p < 0.05 and p = 0.004 with Mann–Whitney U test for nuclear and cytoplasmic VDR immunostaining, respectively). The lack of cytoplasmic and nuclear VDR was also related to shorter overall survival (for cytoplasmic VDR immunolocalization 13.3 vs. 55.3 months of survival, HR = 1.92, p = 0.04 and for nuclear VDR immunostaining 13.5 vs. 55.3 months of survival, HR = 2.47, p = 0.002 with Mantel-Cox test). In cases with the lack of high cytoplasmic VDR staining the non-classic differentiations (NDs) was observed in higher percentage of tumor area. CYP27B1 expression was lower in cancer cells than in normal epithelial cells (p = 0.03 with Mann–Whitney U test), but its expression did not correlate with tumor stage (pT), metastasizing, grade, mitotic activity or overall survival. In conclusion, expression of the VDR and CYP27B1 are deregulated in urothelial bladder cancers. Although our results showing a relationship between the decreased VDR expression and prognostic markers and survival time indicate potential usefulness of VDR as a new

  10. Adaptive radiation therapy for bladder cancer: a review of adaptive techniques used in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kibrom, Awet Z; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-12-01

    Significant changes in the shape, size and position of the bladder during radiotherapy (RT) treatment for bladder cancer have been correlated with high local failure rates; typically due to geographical misses. To account for this, large margins are added around the target volumes in conventional RT; however, this increases the volume of healthy tissue irradiation. The availability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has not only allowed in-room volumetric imaging of the bladder, but also the development of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for modification of plans to patient-specific changes. The aim of this review is to: (1) identify and explain the different ART techniques being used in clinical practice and (2) compare and contrast these different ART techniques to conventional RT in terms of target coverage and dose to healthy tissue: A literature search was conducted using EMBASE, MEDLINE and Scopus with the key words 'bladder, adaptive, radiotherapy/radiation therapy'. 11 studies were obtained that compared different adaptive RT techniques to conventional RT in terms of target volume coverage and healthy tissue sparing. All studies showed superior target volume coverage and/or healthy tissue sparing in adaptive RT compared to conventional RT. Cross-study comparison between different adaptive techniques could not be made due to the difference in protocols used in different studies. However, one study found daily re-optimisation of plans to be superior to plan of the day technique. The use of adaptive RT for bladder cancer is promising. Further study is required to assess adaptive RT versus conventional RT in terms of local control and long-term toxicity.

  11. Bladder tissue diagnostics utilizing Protoporphyrin IX fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert G.; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Beyer, Wolfgang; Knuechel, Ruth; Rick, Kai; Steinbach, Pia; Kriegmair, M.

    1995-01-01

    Instillation of a solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) into the urinary bladder leads to a tumorselective accumulation of fluorescing Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) within hours. Upon fluorescence excitation using a Kr+- laser, cystoscopy provides high contrast images even of early stage tumors, that are invisible or hardly detectable by routine white light cystoscopy. Fluorescence can simply be judged by naked eyes or recorded with a target integrating camera in real color. Histological and fluorescence data of 91 patients were evaluated statistically, showing a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 68% for the detection of dysplastic lesions or malignant tumors. The detectability of a sufficient fluorescence contrast of suspicious versus normal tissue is not affected significantly by either short incubation times of less than 1 hour or prolonged retention times without 5-ALA in the instillation liquid of up to about 6 hours. The fluorescence intensity detected from the tissue surface is not only dependent on PpIX concentration. The additional influence of optical parameters of tissue and fluorochrome distribution on the fluorescence signal was determined using Monte Carlo computer simulations. Results show that 5-ALA induced fluorochrome detection is superior to the detection of fluorochromes that do not exclusively stain the epithelium. Using the ratio of fluorescence intensity to backscattered excitation light corrects for geometrical and absorption effects but would introduce a dependence on the scattering coefficient.

  12. Prognostic significance of selected lifestyle factors in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Wakai, K; Ohno, Y; Obata, K; Aoki, K

    1993-12-01

    To examine the prognostic significance of lifestyle factors in urinary bladder cancer, we conducted a follow-up study of 258 incident bladder cancer patients, who were originally recruited in a case-control study in metropolitan Nagoya. Information on individual survivals was obtained from the computer data-file of the tumor registry of the Nagoya Bladder Cancer Research Group. Univariate analyses revealed significant associations of 5-year survivorship with educational attainment, marital status, drinking habits and consumption of green tea in males, and age at first consultation, histological type and grade of tumor, stage and distant metastasis in both sexes. After adjustment for age, stage, histology (histological type and grade) and distant metastasis by means of a proportional hazards model, drinking of alcoholic beverages was significantly associated with the prognosis of bladder cancer in males. Its adjusted hazard ratio was 0.46 (95% confidence interval: 0.26-0.79), favoring patients who had taken alcoholic beverages. In detailed analysis, ex-drinkers and all levels of current drinkers demonstrated hazard ratios smaller than unity, although no clear dose-response relationship was detected. No prognostic significance was found for such lifestyle factors as smoking habit, uses of artificial sweeteners and hairdye, and consumption of coffee, black tea, matcha (powdered green tea) and cola.

  13. Chemotherapeutic potential of quercetin on human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oršolić, Nada; Karač, Ivo; Sirovina, Damir; Kukolj, Marina; Kunštić, Martina; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Štajcar, Damir

    2016-07-28

    In an effort to improve local bladder cancer control, we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of quercetin on human bladder cancer T24 cells. The cytotoxic effect of quercetin against T24 cells was examined by MTT test, clonogenic assay as well as DNA damaging effect by comet assay. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of quercetin on the primary culture of papillary urothelial carcinoma (PUC), histopathological stage T1 of low- or high-grade tumours, was investigated. Our analysis demonstrated a high correlation between reduced number of colony and cell viability and an increase in DNA damage of T24 cells incubated with quercetin at doses of 1 and 50 µM during short term incubation (2 h). At all exposure times (24, 48 and 72 h), the efficacy of quercetin, administered at a 10× higher dose compared to T24 cells, was statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the primary culture of PUC. In conclusion, our study suggests that quercetin could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation of human bladder cancer cells by inducing DNA damage and that quercetin may be an effective chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for papillary urothelial bladder cancer after transurethral resection.

  14. Status of integrated irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, W F; Batata, M

    1984-11-01

    The rationale and representative results of integrated irradiation and cystectomy for bladder cancer are reviewed and an hypothesis regarding the mechanism and benefits of such treatment formulated. The basis for uncertainty regarding the value of preoperative irradiation is outlined and a perspective on the resolution of this uncertainty provided.

  15. Personalized medicine for targeted and platinum-based chemotherapy of lung and bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, George D; Pan, Chong-xian; Henderson, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    The personalized medicine revolution is occurring for cancer chemotherapy. Biomarkers are increasingly capable of distinguishing genotypic or phenotypic traits of individual tumors, and are being linked to the selection of treatment protocols. This review covers the molecular basis for biomarkers of response to targeted and cytotoxic lung and bladder cancer treatment with an emphasis on platinum-based chemotherapy. Platinum derivatives are a class of drugs commonly employed against solid tumors that kill cells by covalent attachment to DNA. Platinum–DNA adduct levels in patient tissues have been correlated to response and survival. The sensitivity and precision of adduct detection has increased to the point of enabling subtherapeutic dosing for diagnostics applications, termed diagnostic microdosing, prior to the initiation of full-dose therapy. The clinical status of this unique phenotypic marker for lung and bladder cancer applications is detailed along with discussion of future applications. PMID:23394702

  16. Molecular targets in urothelial cancer: detection, treatment, and animal models of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Dmitriy; Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer remains one of the most expensive cancers to treat in the United States due to the length of required treatment and degree of recurrence. In order to treat bladder cancer more effectively, targeted therapies are being investigated. In order to use targeted therapy in a patient, it is important to provide a genetic background of the patient. Recent advances in genome sequencing, as well as transcriptome analysis, have identified major pathway components altered in bladder cancer. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad background on bladder cancer, including its causes, diagnosis, stages, treatments, animal models, as well as signaling pathways in bladder cancer. The major focus is given to the PI3K/AKT pathway, p53/pRb signaling pathways, and the histone modification machinery. Because several promising immunological therapies are also emerging in the treatment of bladder cancer, focus is also given on general activation of the immune system for the treatment of bladder cancer. PMID:27784990

  17. Treatment of bladder dysfunction using stem cell or tissue engineering technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-04-01

    Tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation are two important options that may help overcome limitations in the current treatment strategy for bladder dysfunction. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for treating pathophysiology, as well as for urological tissue engineering and regeneration. To date, stem cell therapy in urology has mainly focused on oncology and erectile dysfunction. The therapeutic potency of stem cells (SCs) was originally thought to derive from their ability to differentiate into various cell types including smooth muscle. The main mechanisms of SCs in reconstituting or restoring bladder function are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. Nowadays, paracrine effects of stem cells are thought to be more prominent because of their stimulating effects on stem cells and adjacent cells. Studies of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to experimental models and have been less focused on tissue engineering for bladder regeneration. Bladder outlet obstruction is a representative model. Adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle-derived stem cells or muscle precursor cells are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The aim of this study is to review stem cell therapy and updated tissue regeneration as treatments for bladder dysfunction and to provide the current status of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for bladder dysfunction including its mechanisms and limitations.

  18. Optical assessment of tissue anisotropy in ex vivo distended rat bladders.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Aitken, Karen J; Schröder, Annette; Shröder, Annette; Bagli, Darius J; Alex Vitkin, I

    2012-08-01

    Microstructural remodelling in epithelial layers of various hollow organs, including changes in tissue anisotropy, are known to occur under mechanical distension and during disease processes. In this paper, we analyze how bladder distension alters wall anisotropy using polarized light imaging (followed by Mueller matrix decomposition). Optical retardance values of different regions of normal rat bladders under different distension pressures are derived. Then optical coherence tomography is used to measure local bladder wall thicknesses, enabling the calculation of the tissue birefringence maps as a measure of the tissue anisotropy. Selected two-photon microscopy is also performed to better understand the compositional origins of the obtained anisotropy results. The dome region of the bladder shows maximum birefringence when the bladder is distended to high pressures, whereas the ventral remains roughly isotropic during distension. In addition, the average anisotropy direction is longitudinal, along the urethra to dome. The derived wall anisotropy trends are based on birefringence as an intrinsic property of the tissue organization independent of its thickness, to aid in understanding the structure-functions relation in healthy bladders. These new insights into the wall microstructure of ex vivo distending bladders may help improve the functionality of the artificially engineered bladder tissues.

  19. Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction Using Stem Cell or Tissue Engineering Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation are two important options that may help overcome limitations in the current treatment strategy for bladder dysfunction. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for treating pathophysiology, as well as for urological tissue engineering and regeneration. To date, stem cell therapy in urology has mainly focused on oncology and erectile dysfunction. The therapeutic potency of stem cells (SCs) was originally thought to derive from their ability to differentiate into various cell types including smooth muscle. The main mechanisms of SCs in reconstituting or restoring bladder function are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. Nowadays, paracrine effects of stem cells are thought to be more prominent because of their stimulating effects on stem cells and adjacent cells. Studies of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to experimental models and have been less focused on tissue engineering for bladder regeneration. Bladder outlet obstruction is a representative model. Adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle-derived stem cells or muscle precursor cells are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The aim of this study is to review stem cell therapy and updated tissue regeneration as treatments for bladder dysfunction and to provide the current status of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for bladder dysfunction including its mechanisms and limitations. PMID:24741410

  20. Pathway analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association study identifies novel pathways involved in bladder cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Scheet, Paul A.; Huang, Maosheng; Chang, David W.; Dinney, Colin P.; Silverman, Debra T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are designed to identify individual regions associated with cancer risk, but only explain a small fraction of the inherited variability. Alternative approach analyzing genetic variants within biological pathways has been proposed to discover networks of susceptibility genes with additional effects. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) may complement and expand traditional GWAS analysis to identify novel genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer risk. We selected three GSEA methods: Gen-Gen, Aligator, and the SNP Ratio Test to evaluate cellular signaling pathways involved in bladder cancer susceptibility in a Texas GWAS population. The candidate genetic polymorphisms from the significant pathway selected by GSEA were validated in an independent NCI GWAS. We identified 18 novel pathways (P < 0.05) significantly associated with bladder cancer risk. Five of the most promising pathways (P ≤ 0.001 in any of the three GSEA methods) among the 18 pathways included two cell cycle pathways and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and unfolded protein response pathways. We validated the candidate polymorphisms in the NCI GWAS and found variants of RAPGEF1, SKP1, HERPUD1, CACNB2, CACNA1C, CACNA1S, COL4A2, SRC, and CACNA1C were associated with bladder cancer risk. Two CCNE1 variants, rs8102137 and rs997669, from cell cycle pathways showed the strongest associations; the CCNE1 signal at 19q12 has already been reported in previous GWAS. These findings offer additional etiologic insights highlighting the specific genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer development. GSEA may be a complementary tool to GWAS to identify additional loci of cancer susceptibility. PMID:27738493

  1. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer That is Advanced or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-22

    Metastatic Ureteral Neoplasm; Metastatic Urethral Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Ureter Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ureter Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Urothelial Carcinoma; Urethral Urothelial Carcinoma

  2. Bladder cancer in Spain 2011: population based study.

    PubMed

    Miñana, B; Cózar, J M; Palou, J; Unda Urzaiz, M; Medina-Lopez, R A; Subirá Ríos, Jorge; de la Rosa-Kehrmann, F; Chantada-Abal, V; Lozano, F; Ribal, Maria J; Rodríguez Fernández, E; Castiñeiras Fernández, J; Concepción Masip, Tomás; Requena-Tapia, M J; Moreno-Sierra, J; Hevia, M; Gómez Rodríguez, A; Martínez-Ballesteros, C; Ramos, M; Amón Sesmero, José H; Pizá Reus, P; Bohorquez Barrientos, A; Rioja Sanz, Carlos; Gomez-Pascual, J Angel; Hidalgo Zabala, E; Parra Escobar, J L; Serrano, O

    2014-02-01

    We estimate the annual incidence of bladder cancer in Spain and describe the clinical profile of patients with bladder cancer enrolled in a population based study. Using the structure of the Spanish National Health System as a basis, in 2011 the AEU (Spanish Association of Urology) conducted this study with a representative sample from 26 public hospitals and a reference population of 10,146,534 inhabitants, comprising 21.5% of the Spanish population. A total of 4,285 episodes of bladder cancer were diagnosed, of which 2,476 (57.8%) were new cases and 1,809 (42.2%) were cases of recurrence, representing an estimated 11,539 new diagnoses annually in Spain. The incidence of bladder cancer in Spain, age adjusted to the standard European population, was 20.08 cases per 100,000 inhabitants (95% CI 13.9, 26.3). Of patients diagnosed with a first episode of bladder cancer 84.3% were male, generally older than 59 years (81.7%) with a mean ± SD age of 70.5 ± 11.4 years. Of these patients 87.5% presented with some type of clinical symptom, with macroscopic hematuria (90.8%) being the most commonly detected. The majority of primary tumors were nonmuscle invasive (76.7%) but included a high proportion of high grade tumors (43.7%). According to the ISUP (International Society of Urologic Pathology)/WHO (2004) classification 51.1% was papillary high grade carcinoma. Carcinoma in situ was found in 2.2% of primary and 5.8% of recurrent cases. The incidence of bladder cancer in Spain, age adjusted to the standard European population, confirms that Spain has one of the highest incidences in Europe. Most primary nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer corresponded to high risk patients but with a low detected incidence of carcinoma in situ. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of increasing carbon nanofiber density in polyurethane composites for inhibiting bladder cancer cell functions.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Melissa; Chun, Young Wook; Im, Yeon Min; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    their decreased expression of NMP-22, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and VEGF. Moreover, the adhesion of HUC increased on composites containing more CNF than PU. Overall levels of NMP-22 were significantly lower in HUC than in cancerous UMUC and SCaBER cells on PU:CNF composites. Thus, this study provided a novel nanocomposite consisting of CNF and PU that should be further studied for inhibiting the return of cancerous bladder tissue and for promoting normal non-cancerous bladder tissue formation.

  4. Alterations in transcription clusters underlie development of bladder cancer along papillary and nonpapillary pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jai-Hyun; Tuziak, Tomasz; Hu, Limei; Wang, Zhi; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Kim, Misook; Fuller, Gregory; Dinney, Colin; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Baggerly, Keith; Zhang, Wei; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2005-04-01

    Bladder cancer develops in the urothelial lining from intraurothelial preneoplasia via two pathways, papillary and nonpapillary, which correspond to nonaggressive and aggressive forms of the disease. Because these two forms of cancer may develop via distinct molecular events, we examined the gene expression patterns in the development of bladder cancer from preneoplasia along papillary and nonpapillary pathways. The expression profiles of 19 pairs of RNA samples from adjacent urothelium and tumors were analyzed using cDNA microarrays. For selected genes their expressions were verified on a cohort of 251 bladder cancer patients using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry and were related to clinicopathological parameters including follow-up data. We identified alterations in seven gene clusters controlling proliferation, differentiation, and programmed cell death that were common for papillary and nonpapillary cancer. In contrast, genes controlling cellular and stromal interactions were altered in the nonpapillary cancer. The expression levels of only two genes from this group could be used to define an aggressive form of the disease. Tumors characterized by the low expression of e-cadherin and the high expression of DNA alpha-topoisomerase II had a high propensity for distant metastasis and were associated with poor survival.

  5. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yaoyao; Wang, Long; Li, Yuan; Chen, Minfeng; He, Wei; Qi, Lin

    2017-08-31

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA's target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR) is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells' proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3'UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Effective combination of hydrostatic pressure and aligned nanofibrous scaffolds on human bladder smooth muscle cells: implication for bladder tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ahvaz, Hana Hanaee; Soleimani, Masoud; Mobasheri, Hamid; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Shakhssalim, Naser; Soudi, Sara; Hafizi, Maryam; Vasei, Mohammad; Dodel, Masumeh

    2012-09-01

    Bladder tissue engineering has been the focus of many studies due to its highly therapeutic potential. In this regard many aspects such as biochemical and biomechanical factors need to be studied extensively. Mechanical stimulations such as hydrostatic pressure and topology of the matrices are critical features which affect the normal functions of cells involved in bladder regeneration. In this study, hydrostatic pressure (10 cm H(2)O) and stretch forces were exerted on human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMCs) seeded on aligned nanofibrous polycaprolactone/PLLA scaffolds, and the alterations in gene and protein expressions were studied. The gene transcription patterns for collagen type I, III, IV, elastin, α-SMA, calponin and caldesmon were monitored on days 3 and 5 quantitatively. Changes in the expressions of α-SMA, desmin, collagen type I and III were quantified by Enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. The scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscope, contact angle measurement and tensile testing. The positive effect of mechanical forces on the functional improvement of the engineered tissue was supported by translational down-regulation of α-SMA and VWF, up-regulation of desmin and improvement of collagen type III:I ratio. Altogether, our study reveals that proper hydrostatic pressure in combination with appropriate surface stimulation on hBSMCs causes a tissue-specific phenotype that needs to be considered in bladder tissue engineering.

  7. Urinary pH, cigarette smoking and bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Alguacil, Juan; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra T.; Malats, Núria; Real, Francisco X.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Tardón, Adonina; Rivas, Manuel; Torà, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Fortuny, Joan; Samanic, Claudine; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2011-01-01

    Glucuronide conjugates of 4-aminobiphenyl and its N-hydroxy metabolite can be rapidly hydrolyzed in acidic urine to undergo further metabolic activation and form DNA adducts in the urothelium. We conducted a large multicenter case–control study in Spain to explore the etiology of bladder cancer and evaluated the association between urine pH and bladder cancer risk, alone and in combination with cigarette smoking. In total, 712 incident urothelial cell carcinoma cases and 611 hospital controls directly measured their urine pH with dipsticks twice a day (first void in the morning and early in the evening) during four consecutive days 2 weeks after hospital discharge. We found that a consistently acidic urine pH ≤6.0 was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–1.9] compared with all other subjects. Furthermore, risk estimates for smoking intensity and risk of bladder cancer among current smokers tended to be higher for those with a consistently acidic urine (OR = 8.8, 11.5 and 23.8) compared with those without (OR = 4.3, 7.7 and 5.8, respectively, for 1–19, 20–29 and 30+ cigarettes per day; Pinteraction for 30+ cigarettes per day = 0.024). These results suggest that urine pH, which is determined primarily by diet and body surface area, may be an important modifier of smoking and risk of bladder cancer. PMID:21402590

  8. Bladder cancer among hairdressers: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Harling, Melanie; Schablon, Anja; Schedlbauer, Grita; Dulon, Madeleine; Nienhaus, Albert

    2010-05-01

    Occupational risks for bladder cancer in hairdressers by using hair products have been examined in many epidemiological studies. But owing to small sample sizes of the studies and the resulting lack of statistical power, the results of these studies have been inconsistent and significant associations have rarely been found. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine summary risk ratios (SRRs) for the risk of bladder cancer among hairdressers. Studies were identified by a MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL search and by the reference lists of articles/relevant reviews. Statistical tests for publication bias and for heterogeneity as well as sensitivity analysis were applied. In addition, the study quality and the risk of bias were assessed using six criteria. 42 studies were included and statistically significantly increased risks around 1.3-1.7 were found for all but one analysis. The SRR increased with duration of employment from 1.30 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.48) for 'ever registered as hairdresser' to 1.70 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.88) for 'job held > or = 10 years'. No difference was found between the risk for smoking-adjusted data (SRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.61) and no adjustment (SRR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.50). Studies assessed as being of high quality (n=11) and of moderate quality (n=31) showed similar SRRs. There was no evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity in all analyses. In summary, our results showed an increased and statistically significant risk for bladder cancer among hairdressers, in particular for hairdressers in jobs held > or = 10 years. Residual confounding by smoking cannot be totally ruled out. Because of the long latency times of bladder cancer it remains an open question whether hairdressers working prior to 1980 and after 1980, when some aromatic amines were banned as hair dye ingredients, have the same risk for bladder cancer.

  9. Role of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) Signaling in Bladder Cancer Stemness and Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Syed, Islam S; Pedram, Akbari; Farhat, Walid A

    2016-02-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has emerged as a critical component of bladder development, cancer initiation, and progression. While the role of Shh signaling in bladder development is well documented, its role in bladder cancer progression is uncertain. Additionally, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been identified to promote bladder cancer progression in the initial stages and also contribute to drug resistance in the later stage and ultimately metastasis. We speculate that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and Shh fuel the carcinogenesis process. This review presents the most recent studies focusing on the role of Shh signaling in bladder cancer progression.

  10. Micro-RNA profiling in kidney and bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Fedra; Liu, Chang Gong; Ferracin, Manuela; Calin, George A; Fassan, Matteo; Bassi, Pierfrancesco; Sevignani, Cinzia; Byrne, Dolores; Negrini, Massimo; Pagano, Francesco; Gomella, Leonard G; Croce, Carlo M; Baffa, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are a group of small noncoding RNAs with modulator activity of gene expression. Recently, micro-RNA genes were found abnormally expressed in several types of cancers. To study the role of the micro-RNAs in human kidney and bladder cancer, we analyzed the expression profile of 245 micro-RNAs in kidney and bladder primary tumors. A total of 27 kidney specimens (20 carcinomas, 4 benign renal tumors, and 3 normal parenchyma) and 27 bladder specimens (25 urothelial carcinomas and 2 normal mucosa) were included in the study. Total RNA was used for hybridization on an oligonucleotide microchip for micro-RNA profiling developed in our laboratories. This microchip contains 368 probes in triplicate, corresponding to 245 human and mouse micro-RNA genes. A set of 4 human micro-RNAs (miR-28, miR-185, miR-27, and let-7f-2) were found significantly up-regulated in renal cell carcinoma (P < 0.05) compared to normal kidney. Human micro-RNAs miR-223, miR-26b, miR-221, miR-103-1, miR-185, miR-23b, miR-203, miR-17-5p, miR-23a, and miR-205 were significantly up-regulated in bladder cancers (P < 0.05) compared to normal bladder mucosa. Of the kidney cancers studied, there was no differential micro-RNA expression across various stages, whereas with increasing tumor-nodes-metastasis staging in bladder cancer, miR-26b showed a moderate decreasing trend (P = 0.082). Our results show that different micro-RNAs are deregulated in kidney and bladder cancer, suggesting the involvement of these genes in the development and progression of these malignancies. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of micro-RNAs in neoplastic transformation and to test the potential clinical usefulness of micro-RNAs microarrays as diagnostic and prognostic tool.

  11. Transurethral marking incision of the bladder neck: a helpful technique in robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy involving post-transurethral resection of the prostate and cancers protruding into the bladder neck.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoshi; Tozawa, Keiichi; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Yasui, Takahiro; Mizuno, Kentaro; Okada, Atsushi; Kawai, Noriyasu; Hayashi, Yutaro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2013-08-17

    Bladder neck transection is one of the most difficult procedures for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP), particularly in patients who have undergone previous transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P), and in those with large median lobes or prostate cancer protruding into the bladder neck. To ensure negative surgical margins and safely preserve the ureteral orifices during bladder neck transection, we propose the use of the transurethral resectoscope for making the incision in the bladder neck before initiating RALP. Thus, we developed a technique for bladder neck transection to facilitate this operation in such patients. Two Japanese men, aged 61 and 63 years, who were diagnosed with prostate cancer, received a transurethral marking incision of the bladder neck before starting RALP; prostate cancer developed in one patient after TUR-P and the other patient had cancer protruding into the bladder neck. A transurethral resectoscope was used to closely observe the ureteral orifices and bladder necks; the bladder necks were marked to indicate the depth from the mucosa to the muscular layer. During the RALP, the bladder necks were dissected to indicate the depth of the marking incision. The surgical margins were negative and perioperative complications did not occur. The Foley catheters were removed on postoperative day 6, according to the usual protocol. No urinary leakage from the anastomosis sites was observed. This technique, involving the use of an ordinary transurethral resectoscope, may be an easy procedure to ensure negative surgical margins, safely preserve the ureteral orifices, avoid increasing the bladder neck diameter, and achieve a good quality vesicourethral anastomosis that prevents the risk of suture-related tissue tears.

  12. How to optimally manage elderly bladder cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Soria, Francesco; Moschini, Marco; Korn, Stephan; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is a disease of the elderly and as the population is aging, BCa will become an even bigger public health challenge in the future. Nowadays the correct management of BCa in the elderly remains controversial. The purpose of this article was to review the previous literature to summarize the current knowledge. Using Medline, a non-systematic review was performed including articles between January 2000 and February 2016 in order to describe the management of BCa in the elderly in all its aspects. English language original articles, reviews and editorials were selected based on their clinical relevance. In the literature, the definition of elderly is variable and based on chronological, not biological, age. BCa seems to be more aggressive in the elderly. The management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) does not strongly differ from younger patients, except for the role of adjuvant immunotherapy. In patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) the role of a multidisciplinary geriatric evaluation is potentially beneficial. The curative treatment in MIBC remains radical cystectomy (RC) and elderly patients should not be withheld a potentially life-saving intervention only based on chronological age. Patients unsuitable to a major surgical approach may be eligible for bladder-sparing techniques. Geriatric assessment could help identify the frail elderly and customize their perioperative care (i.e., pre and re habilitation). In conclusion the treatment of BCa in the elderly has to be patient-centered and focused on biological age and functional reserves.

  13. How to optimally manage elderly bladder cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Francesco; Moschini, Marco; Korn, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is a disease of the elderly and as the population is aging, BCa will become an even bigger public health challenge in the future. Nowadays the correct management of BCa in the elderly remains controversial. The purpose of this article was to review the previous literature to summarize the current knowledge. Using Medline, a non-systematic review was performed including articles between January 2000 and February 2016 in order to describe the management of BCa in the elderly in all its aspects. English language original articles, reviews and editorials were selected based on their clinical relevance. In the literature, the definition of elderly is variable and based on chronological, not biological, age. BCa seems to be more aggressive in the elderly. The management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) does not strongly differ from younger patients, except for the role of adjuvant immunotherapy. In patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) the role of a multidisciplinary geriatric evaluation is potentially beneficial. The curative treatment in MIBC remains radical cystectomy (RC) and elderly patients should not be withheld a potentially life-saving intervention only based on chronological age. Patients unsuitable to a major surgical approach may be eligible for bladder-sparing techniques. Geriatric assessment could help identify the frail elderly and customize their perioperative care (i.e., pre and re habilitation). In conclusion the treatment of BCa in the elderly has to be patient-centered and focused on biological age and functional reserves. PMID:27785425

  14. Multiplex PCR and Next Generation Sequencing for the Non-Invasive Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward, Douglas G; Baxter, Laura; Gordon, Naheema S; Ott, Sascha; Savage, Richard S; Beggs, Andrew D; James, Jonathan D; Lickiss, Jennifer; Green, Shaun; Wallis, Yvonne; Wei, Wenbin; James, Nicholas D; Zeegers, Maurice P; Cheng, K K; Mathews, Glenn M; Patel, Prashant; Griffiths, Michael; Bryan, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive and specific urine-based tests to detect either primary or recurrent bladder cancer have proved elusive to date. Our ever increasing knowledge of the genomic aberrations in bladder cancer should enable the development of such tests based on urinary DNA. DNA was extracted from urine cell pellets and PCR used to amplify the regions of the TERT promoter and coding regions of FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, HRAS, KDM6A and RXRA which are frequently mutated in bladder cancer. The PCR products were barcoded, pooled and paired-end 2 x 250 bp sequencing performed on an Illumina MiSeq. Urinary DNA was analysed from 20 non-cancer controls, 120 primary bladder cancer patients (41 pTa, 40 pT1, 39 pT2+) and 91 bladder cancer patients post-TURBT (89 cancer-free). Despite the small quantities of DNA extracted from some urine cell pellets, 96% of the samples yielded mean read depths >500. Analysing only previously reported point mutations, TERT mutations were found in 55% of patients with bladder cancer (independent of stage), FGFR3 mutations in 30% of patients with bladder cancer, PIK3CA in 14% and TP53 mutations in 12% of patients with bladder cancer. Overall, these previously reported bladder cancer mutations were detected in 86 out of 122 bladder cancer patients (70% sensitivity) and in only 3 out of 109 patients with no detectable bladder cancer (97% specificity). This simple, cost-effective approach could be used for the non-invasive surveillance of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers harbouring these mutations. The method has a low DNA input requirement and can detect low levels of mutant DNA in a large excess of normal DNA. These genes represent a minimal biomarker panel to which extra markers could be added to develop a highly sensitive diagnostic test for bladder cancer.

  15. Intraoperative radiotherapy in gynaecological and genito-urinary malignancies: focus on endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Krengli, Marco; Pisani, Carla; Deantonio, Letizia; Surico, Daniela; Volpe, Alessandro; Surico, Nicola; Terrone, Carlo

    2017-01-19

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) refers to the delivery of a single radiation dose to a limited volume of tissue during a surgical procedure. A literature review was performed to analyze the role of IORT in gynaecological and genito-urinary cancer including endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.Literature search was performed by Pubmed and Scopus, using the words "intraoperative radiotherapy/IORT", "gynaecological cancer", "uterine/endometrial cancer", "cervical/cervix cancer", "renal/kidney cancer", "bladder cancer" and "prostate cancer". Forty-seven articles were selected from the search databases, analyzed and briefly described.Literature data show that IORT has been used to optimize local control rate in genito-urinary tumours mainly in retrospective studies. The results suggest that IORT could be advantageous in the setting of locally advanced and recurrent disease although further prospective trials are needed to confirm this findings.

  16. Controversies and challenges in research on urogenital schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Honeycutt, Jared; Hammam, Olfat; Fu, Chi-Ling; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Urogenital schistosomiasis, infection with Schistosoma haematobium, is linked to increased risk for the development of bladder cancer, but the importance of various mechanisms responsible for this association remains unclear, in part due to lack of sufficient and appropriate animal models. New advances in the study of this parasite, bladder regenerative processes, and human schistosomal bladder cancers may shed new light on the complex biological processes that connect S. haematobium infection to bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24913983

  17. Accuracy and Readability of Websites on Kidney and Bladder Cancers.

    PubMed

    Azer, Samy A; Alghofaili, Maha M; Alsultan, Rana M; Alrumaih, Najla S

    2017-03-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the scientific accuracy and the readability level of websites on kidney and bladder cancers. The search engines Google™, Yahoo™ and Bing™ were searched independently by assessors in November 2014 using the following keywords: "bladder cancer", "kidney cancer", "patient bladder cancer", "patient kidney cancer" and "bladder and kidney cancer". Only English-language websites were selected on the bases of predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Assessors independently reviewed the findings and evaluated the accuracy and quality of each website by using the DISCERN and the LIDA instruments. The readability of the websites was calculated using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index and the Coleman-Liau Readability Index. Sixty-two websites were finally included in the study. The overall accuracy scores varied; for the DISCERN, the range was 28 to 76; out of 80 (mean ± SD, 47.1 ± 12.1; median = 46.0, interquartile range (IQR) = 19.2), and for the LIDA, the range was 52 to 125; out of 144 (mean ± SD, 101.9 ± 15.2; median, 103; IQR, 16.5). The creators of these websites were universities and research centres (n = 25, 40%), foundations and associations (n = 10, 16%), commercial and pharmaceutical companies (n = 13, 21%), charities and volunteer work (n = 4, 6%) and non-university educational bodies (n = 10, 16%). The readability scores (mean ± SD) were 11.2 ± 2.2 for the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Index and 11.2 ± 1.6 for the Coleman-Liau Readability Index. The accuracy and the quality of the websites on kidney and bladder cancers varied. In most websites, there were deficiencies in clarity of aims, presenting symptoms, investigations and treatment options. The readability matched grades 10-11 literacy levels-a level above the public readability level. The study highlights the needs for further improvement of the online information created for public and patients with kidney and bladder

  18. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; De Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 +- 1.1 cm{sup 3}. The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  19. Partial allelotype of schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaw, M E; Elder, P A; Abbas, A; Knowles, M A

    1999-03-01

    In Egypt and other regions of the Middle East where the trematode Schistosoma haematobium is endemic, bladder cancer is the most common adult cancer. Unlike bladder cancers in Western countries, which are predominantly transitional-cell carcinoma (TCC), these schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancers are predominantly squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC). Our aim was to assess a large series of schistosomiasis-associated bladder tumours for genetic alterations commonly found in TCC in the United Kingdom and the United States. We have carried out a partial allelotype of 70 tumours from patients with schistosomiasis. LOH was found on all chromosome arms studied (3p, 4p, 4q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 11q, 13q, 14q, 17p, 18q). The most frequent regions of LOH were 9p (65%), 17p (58%), 3p (40%), 9q (39%) and 8p (37%). LOH on 17p, where the TP53 gene is located, was more common in Egyptian TCC than in SCC. Similarly, 8p LOH was more common in TCC than SCC. The most striking difference between this group of tumours and TCCs from the United Kingdom and the United States was the high frequency of 9p LOH in the region of the CDKN2 gene (65%) and the relatively low frequency of 9q LOH (39%); 15 of 43 tumours with LOH of at least one marker on chromosome 9 showed LOH of 9p only. This suggests that a 9p gene, possibly CDKN2, may contribute to the development of the majority of schistosomiasis-associated bladder tumours but that genes on 9q play a much less important role.

  20. Antitumor effects of exogenous ganglioside GM3 on bladder cancer in an orthotopic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Isaji, Tomoya; Satoh, Makoto; Li, Dechuan; Arai, Yoichi; Gu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of exogenous gangliosides GM3 on human bladder cancer cell lines and the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of orthotopic bladder cancer. Human bladder cancer cell lines YTS-1, T24, 5637, and KK47 were used in the study. In vitro cytotoxicity of GM3 was assessed using the cell counting kit-8. Cell adhesion was determined using a spreading assay. Phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor was determined by Western blotting. In vivo, the orthotopic bladder cancer model was established using severe combined immunodeficiency mice and GM3 was administered intravesically by way of a transurethral catheter. GM3 inhibited the proliferation of all the bladder cancer cell lines tested. The addition of GM3 decreased cell adhesion and epidermal growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor. Direct instillation of GM3 into the bladder of the orthotopic model significantly inhibited tumor growth. Our results suggest exogenous GM3 as a potential therapeutic agent for treating bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. International pooled study on diet and bladder cancer: the bladder cancer, epidemiology and nutritional determinants (BLEND) study: design and baseline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Maria E; Isa, Fatima; Brinkman, Maree; Mak, David; Reulen, Raoul; Wesselius, Anke; Benhamou, Simone; Bosetti, Cristina; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Carta, Angela; Allam, Md Farouk; Golka, Klaus; Grant, Eric J; Jiang, Xuejuan; Johnson, Kenneth C; Karagas, Margaret R; Kellen, Eliane; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lu, Chih-Ming; Marshall, James; Moysich, Kirsten; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Porru, Stefano; Steineck, Gunnar; Stern, Marianne C; Tang, Li; Taylor, Jack A; van den Brandt, Piet; Villeneuve, Paul J; Wakai, Kenji; Weiderpass, Elisabete; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Buntinx, Frank; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, more than 400,000 urinary bladder cancer cases occurred worldwide, making it the 7(th) most common type of cancer. Although many previous studies focused on the relationship between diet and bladder cancer, the evidence related to specific food items or nutrients that could be involved in the development of bladder cancer remains inconclusive. Dietary components can either be, or be activated into, potential carcinogens through metabolism, or act to prevent carcinogen damage. The BLadder cancer, Epidemiology and Nutritional Determinants (BLEND) study was set up with the purpose of collecting individual patient data from observational studies on diet and bladder cancer. In total, data from 11,261 bladder cancer cases and 675,532 non-cases from 18 case-control and 6 cohort studies from all over the world were included with the aim to investigate the association between individual food items, nutrients and dietary patterns and risk of developing bladder cancer. The substantial number of cases included in this study will enable us to provide evidence with large statistical power, for dietary recommendations on the prevention of bladder cancer.

  2. Trends in the incidence of bladder cancer in Nova Scotia: a twenty-year perspective.

    PubMed

    McLellan, R A; French, C G; Bell, D G

    2003-06-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignant tumor of the urinary system. Tobacco smoking has been implicated as a major risk factor for the development of bladder cancer and Nova Scotia has some of the highest smoking rates in Canada. We examined trends in the incidence of bladder cancer in Nova Scotia between 1980 and 1999. Data on incident cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Nova Scotia over a twenty-year period (1980 - 1999) were obtained from the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry. The age- standardized incidence and mortality due to bladder cancer was calculated for both genders. Trends in the incidence of bladder cancer during the study period were analyzed for three different age groups in each gender as an estimate of birth cohort. The average annual percent change (AAPC) in incidence of bladder cancer was calculated. Between 1980 and 1999, 3569 cases of bladder cancer were reported (male: female = 2.9:1). The overall incidence of bladder cancer increased in both males (27.5 to 39.5 cases per 100 000) and females (7.0 to 10.7 cases per 100 000). Mortality rates were stable. There was a trend towards an increase in bladder cancer rates for all age groups analyzed, with a substantial rise occurring in females less than 65 years of age. The AAPC in incidence of bladder cancer was +1.5 for males and +2.6 for females. We hypothesize that the rising incidence of bladder cancer in Nova Scotia, particularly in individuals less than 65 years of age, is related to changes in cigarette smoking practices during the past century. As the population ages, we are likely to see an increased incidence of bladder cancer in females.

  3. Cross-species comparison of orthologous gene expression in human bladder cancer and carcinogen-induced rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Wen, Weidong; Grubbs, Clinton J; Townsend, Reid R; Malone, James P; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Genes differentially expressed by tumor cells represent promising drug targets for anti-cancer therapy. Such candidate genes need to be validated in appropriate animal models. This study examined the suitability of rodent models of bladder cancer in B6D2F1 mice and Fischer-344 rats to model clinical bladder cancer specimens in humans. Using a global gene expression approach cross-species analysis showed that 13-34% of total genes in the genome were differentially expressed between tumor and normal tissues in each of five datasets from humans, rats, and mice. About 20% of these differentially expressed genes overlapped among species, corresponding to 2.6 to 4.8% of total genes in the genome. Several genes were consistently dysregulated in bladder tumors in both humans and rodents. Notably, CNN1, MYL9, PDLIM3, ITIH5, MYH11, PCP4 and FM05 were found to commonly down-regulated; while T0P2A, CCNB2, KIF20A and RRM2 were up-regulated. These genes are likely to have conserved functions contributing to bladder carcinogenesis. Gene set enrichment analysis detected a number of molecular pathways commonly activated in both humans and rodent bladder cancer. These pathways affect the cell cycle, HIF-1 and MYC expression, and regulation of apoptosis. We also compared expression changes at mRNA and protein levels in the rat model and identified several genes/proteins exhibiting concordant changes in bladder tumors, including ANXA1, ANXA2, CA2, KRT14, LDHA, LGALS4, SERPINA1, KRT18 and LDHB. In general, rodent models of bladder cancer represent the clinical disease to an extent that will allow successful mining of target genes and permit studies on the molecular mechanisms of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:21139803

  4. Expression of RFC/SLC19A1 is associated with tumor type in bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M; El-Zeiry, Maha I; Mahran, Laila G; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Rady, Mona H; Rohde, Jan; Mostageer, Marwa; Spahn-Langguth, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer (UBC) ranks ninth in worldwide cancer. In Egypt, the pattern of bladder cancer is unique in that both the transitional and squamous cell types prevail. Despite much research on the topic, it is still difficult to predict tumor progression, optimal therapy and clinical outcome. The reduced folate carrier (RFC/SLC19A1) is the major transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. RFC is also the primary means of cellular uptake for antifolate cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, however, membrane transport of antifolates by RFC is considered as limiting to antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression level of RFC/SLC19A1 in urothelial and non-urothelial variants of bladder carcinomas. Quantification of RFC mRNA in the mucosa of 41 untreated bladder cancer patients was performed using RT-qPCR. RFC mRNA steady-state levels were ∼9-fold higher (N = 39; P<0.0001) in bladder tumor specimens relative to normal bladder mRNA. RFC upregulation was strongly correlated with tumor type (urothelial vs. non-urothelial; p<0.05) where median RFC mRNA expression was significantly (p<0.05) higher in the urothelial (∼14-fold) compared to the non-urothelial (∼4-fold) variant. This may account for the variation in response to antifolate-containing regimens used in the treatment of either type. RFC mRNA levels were not associated with tumor grade (I, II and III) or stage (muscle-invasive vs. non-muscle invasive) implying that RFC cannot be used for prognostic purposes in bladder carcinomas and its increased expression is an early event in human bladder tumors pathogenesis. Further, RFC can be considered as a potential marker for predicting response to antifolate chemotherapy in urothelial carcinomas.

  5. Long Noncoding RNA Cancer Susceptibility Candidate 8 Suppresses the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells via Regulating Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Renguang; Zhong, Peng; Xiong, Lu; Duan, Liangbin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the critical regulatory role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in carcinogenesis. Bladder cancer has become the most prevalent urologic malignancy, which is commonly diagnosed among adults. In this study, we showed that the lncRNA cancer susceptibility candidate 8 (CASC8) is significantly downregulated in bladder cancers and associated with the advanced stage of bladder cancer patients. Overexpression of CASC8 remarkably suppressed the bladder cancer cell proliferation. Mechanistically, we illustrated that CASC8 reduced the glycolysis of bladder cancer cells via interacting with the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). The binding of CASC8 with FGFR1 inhibits FGFR1-mediated lactate dehydrogenase A phosphorylation, which attenuates the conversion of pyruvate into lactate. Collectively, our findings uncovered the pivotal role of CASC8 in bladder tumorigenesis and suggested that CASC8 may function as a candidate biomarker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  6. Biomarkers for detection and surveillance of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Budman, Lorne I; Kassouf, Wassim; Steinberg, Jordan R

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and the ninth most common cancer in women in Canada. Early detection of tumours is essential for improved prognosis and long-term survival. The standard method for detection and surveillance is cystoscopy together with urine cytology. Cystoscopy is relatively sensitive but is expensive and invasive. Urinary cytology is a noninvasive method that has poor sensitivity but high specificity; it is relied on for the detection of carcinoma in situ. Currently, several urinary-based bladder tumour biomarkers with USFDA/Health Canada approval are available commercially, but none have been widely adopted by urologists despite their offering high sensitivity and/or specificity. We present here a review of recent studies evaluating 7 commercial biomarker assays for the detection and/or surveillance of bladder cancer. Results Sensitivity and specificity ranges, respectively, for each marker were reported as follows: BTA Stat (Polymedco), 52.5%–78.0% and 69.0%–87.1%; BTA Trak (Polymedco), 51%–100% and 73%–92.5%; cytology, 12.1%–84.6% and 78.0%–100%; hematuria dipstick, 47.0%–92.6% and 51.0%–84.0%; NMP22 Bladder Cancer Test (Matritech), 34.6%–100% and 60.0%–95.0%; NMP22 BladderChek (Matritech), 49.5%–65.0% and 40.0%–89.8%; ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ (DiagnoCure), 63.3%–84.9% and 62.0%–78.1%; ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and cytology, 81.0%–89.3% and 61.0%–77.7%; and UroVysion (Abbott Molecular)/florescence in situ hybridization, 68.6%–100% and 65.0%–96.0%. Conclusion We find that no currently available bladder cancer urinary marker is sensitive enough to eliminate the need for cystoscopy. In addition, cytology remains integral to the detection of occult cancer. However, owing to their relatively high sensitivities, these markers may be used to extend the period between cystoscopies in the surveillance of patients with transitional cell carcinoma. Further study is required to determine which markers

  7. Tissue engineering of the bladder--reality or myth? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sloff, Marije; Simaioforidis, Vasileios; de Vries, Rob; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Feitz, Wout

    2014-10-01

    We systematically reviewed preclinical studies in the literature to evaluate the potential of tissue engineering of the bladder. Study outcomes were compared to the available clinical evidence to assess the feasibility of tissue engineering for future clinical use. Preclinical studies of tissue engineering for bladder augmentation were identified through a systematic search of PubMed and Embase™ from January 1, 1980 to January 1, 2014. Primary studies in English were included if bladder reconstruction after partial cystectomy was performed using a tissue engineered biomaterial in any animal species, with cystometric bladder capacity as an outcome measure. Outcomes were compared to clinical studies available at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov and published clinical studies. A total of 28 preclinical studies are included, demonstrating remarkable heterogeneity in study characteristics and design. Studies in which preoperative bladder volumes were compared to postoperative volumes were considered the most clinically relevant (18 studies). Bladder augmentation through tissue engineering resulted in a normal bladder volume in healthy animals, with the influence of a cellular component being negligible. Furthermore, experiments in large animal models (pigs and dogs) approximated the desired bladder volume more accurately than in smaller species. The initial clinical experience was based on seemingly predictive healthy animal models with a promising outcome. Unfortunately these results were not substantiated in all clinical trials, revealing dissimilar outcomes in different clinical/disease backgrounds. Thus, the translational predictability of a model using healthy animals might be questioned. Through this systematic approach we present an unbiased overview of all published preclinical studies investigating the effect of bladder tissue engineering on cystometric bladder capacity. Preclinical research in healthy animals appears to show the feasibility of bladder

  8. Tetracycline-inducible shRNA targeting antisense long non-coding RNA HIF1A-AS2 represses the malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingwei; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa; Dai, Fen; Xia, Ming; Zhan, Yonghao; Lin, Junhao; Chen, Zhicong; He, Anbang; Xu, Wen; Zhao, Guoping; Guo, Yinglu; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-06-28

    Various studies have indicated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in the cancer development and progression. LncRNA hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha antisense RNA-2 (HIF1A-AS2) is upregulated in gastric carcinomas and knockdown of HIF1A-AS2 expression by siRNA could inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Inspired by these observations, we hypothesized that HIF1A-AS2 possibly plays the analogous roles in bladder cancer. In our study, we first reported that HIF1A-AS2 was up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues and cells, and HIF1A-AS2 expression level in bladder cancer tissues is positively associated with advanced clinical pathologic grade and TNM phase. Cell proliferation inhibition, cell migration suppression and apoptosis induction were observed by silencing HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Overexpression of HIF1A-AS2 in SV-HUC-1 cells could promote cell proliferation, cell migration and anti-apoptosis. Besides, we utilized the emerging technology of medical synthetic biology to design tetracycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector which specifically silenced HIF1A-AS2 in a dosage-dependent manner to inhibit the progression of human bladder cancer. In conclusion, our data suggested that HIF1A-AS2 plays oncogenic roles and can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer. Synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system that quantitatively controlled the expression of HIF1A-AS2 in bladder cancer can inhibit the progression of bladder cancer cells in a dosage-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insights into the role of the lncRNA HIF1A-AS2 in the bladder cancer.

  9. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  10. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  11. Defining the Clinical Target Volume for Bladder Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Anjarwalla, Salim; Gilbert, Hugh; Kinder, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: There are currently no data for the expansion margin required to define the clinical target volume (CTV) around bladder tumors. This information is particularly relevant when perivesical soft tissue changes are seen on the planning scan. While this appearance may reflect extravesical extension (EVE), it may also be an artifact of previous transurethral resection (TUR). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy were studied. All patients underwent preoperative TUR and staging computed tomography (CT) scans. The presence and extent of tumor growth beyond the outer bladder wall was measured radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Forty one (51%) patients had histologically confirmed tumor extension into perivesical fat. The median and mean extensions beyond the outer bladder wall were 1.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. Thirty five (44%) patients had EVE, as seen on CT scans. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for EVE were 56% and 79%, respectively. False-positive results were infrequent and not affected by either the timing or the amount of tissue resected at TUR. CT scans consistently tended to overestimate the extent of EVE. Tumor size and the presence of either lymphovascular invasion or squamoid differentiation predict a greater extent of EVE. Conclusions: In patients with radiological evidence of extravesical disease, the CTV should comprise the outer bladder wall plus a 10-mm margin. In patients with no evidence of extravesical disease on CT scans, the CTV should be restricted to the outer bladder wall plus a 6-mm margin. These recommendations would encompass microscopic disease extension in 90% of cases.

  12. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Tomokazu; Koga, Fumitaka; Migita, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC), the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory. PMID:26729098

  13. E-cadherin gene promoter hypermethylation may contribute to the risk of bladder cancer among Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Liu, Yili; Yin, Huming; Zhang, Xuefeng; Mo, Xiaodong; Tang, Jing; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-01-15

    There are increasing scientific evidences suggesting that E-cadherin gene promoter hypermethylation may contribute to the development and progression of bladder cancer, but existing studies have yielded inconclusive results. This meta-analysis aims to assess the role of E-cadherin promoter hypermethylation in bladder carcinogenesis. We conducted an extensive literature search for relevant studies on PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases from their inception through May 1st, 2013. This meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 12.0 software. Crude risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Ten clinical studies were included in this meta-analysis with a total of 620 bladder cancer samples,199 normal adjacent samples and 131 normal urothelium tissue. Our meta-analysis revealed that the methylation frequencies in bladder cancer tissues were obviously higher than those in normal control tissues (RR = 2.02, 95%CI: 1.00–4.12, P = 0.050). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity indicated that higher methylation frequencies were observed in bladder cancer tissues among Asian populations (RR = 2.35, 95%CI: 1.11–4.95, P = 0.025), but not among Caucasian populations (RR = 1.62, 95%CI: 0.48–5.53, P = 0.439). Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses showed that ethnicity may be the major source of heterogeneity (Pb0.05).No publication bias was detected in this meta-analysis (P=0.358). The present meta-analysis indicates that E-cadherin gene promoter hypermethylation may contribute to increased risk of bladder cancer among Asian populations.

  14. Pioglitazone does not increase the risk of type II diabetes in patients with bladder cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youhong; Wang, Anping

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to analyze the effect of pioglitazone on the expression of tumor tissue inflammation factor interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of type II diabetes in bladder cancer patients. In addition, whether there was a correlation between pioglitazone and the occurrence of male bladder cancer was also investigated. In total, 42 male cases diagnosed with type II diabetes secondary to bladder cancer were selected. Forty male cases, with simplex type II diabetes but not with bladder cancer, served as the control. Tumor biopsy specimens were collected to detect the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF. The results showed that the expression of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF of the simplex diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the secondary to tumor group (P<0.05). The comparison of the two groups in terms of daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone, duration of diabetes, average fasting blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin levels, was not statistically significant. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF were independent risk factors for the occurrence of bladder cancer (P<0.05), but were not associated with daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone (P>0.05). In conclusion, oral pioglitazone may not increase the risk of type II diabetes patients with bladder cancer. However, the occurrence of bladder cancer be associated with the increasing expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF.

  15. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: findings from the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Mariana C.; Lin, Jie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kiltie, Anne E.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Tony; Benhamou, Simone; Taylor, Jack A.; Placidi, Donatella; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Steineck, Gunnar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Nuria; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Xifeng; Karagas, Margaret R.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Barrett, Jennifer H; Elliot, Faye; Corral, Román; Joshi, Amit D.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Vineis, Paolo; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Park, SungShim Lani; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important and well-established bladder cancer risk factor, and a rich source of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen species that can induce damage to DNA in urothelial cells. Therefore, common variation in DNA repair genes might modify bladder cancer risk. In this study we present results from meta- and pooled analyses conducted as part of the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer. We included data on 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms corresponding to 7 DNA repair genes from 13 studies. Pooled- and meta-analyses included 5,282 cases and 5,954 controls of non-Latino white origin. We found evidence for weak but consistent associations with ERCC2 D312N (rs1799793) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01–1.19; p = 0.021), NBN E185Q (rs1805794) (per allele OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.01–1.18; p = 0.028), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00–1.21, p = 0.044). The association with NBN E185Q was limited to ever smokers (interaction p = 0.002), and was strongest for the highest levels of smoking dose and smoking duration. Overall, our study provides the strongest evidence to date for a role of common variants in DNA repair genes in bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:19706757

  16. Urinary bladder preservation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a survey among radiation oncologists of Lombardy, Italy.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Colombo, Renzo; Magnani, Tiziana; Fodor, Cristiana; Gerardi, Marianna Alessandra; Antognoni, Paolo; Barsacchi, Lucia; Bedini, Nice; Bracelli, Stefano; Buffoli, Alberto; Cagna, Emanuela; Catalano, Gianpiero; Gottardo, Stefania; Italia, Corrado; Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista; Masciullo, Stefano; Merlotti, Anna; Sarti, Enrico; Scorsetti, Marta; Serafini, Flavia; Toninelli, Mariasole; Vitali, Elisabetta; Valdagni, Riccardo; Villa, Elisa; Zerini, Dario; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Bladder preservation is a treatment option in muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma. The most investigated approach is a trimodality schedule including maximum transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by chemoradiotherapy. Our aim was to evaluate the use of bladder preservation by radiation oncologists of the Lombardy region in Italy. A survey with 13 items regarding data of 2012 was sent to all 32 radiotherapy centers within the collaboration between the Lombardy Oncological Network and the Lombardy Section of the Italian Society of Oncological Radiotherapy. Thirteen centers (41%) answered the survey; the presented data come from 11 active centers. In these centers, 11,748 patients were treated with external-beam radiotherapy in 2012, 100 of whom having bladder cancer (0.9%). 74/100 patients received radiotherapy as palliative treatment for T, N or M lesions. A further 9 and 5 patients received radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease (ablative doses to small volumes) and postoperatively, respectively. Bladder preservation was performed in 12 cases and included trimodality and other strategies (mainly TURBT followed by radiotherapy). A multidisciplinary urology tumor board met regularly in 5 of 11 centers. All responders declared their interest in the Lombardy multicenter collaboration on bladder preservation. Our survey showed that bladder preservation is rarely used in Lombardy despite the availability of the latest radiotherapy technologies and the presence of an urology tumor board in half of the centers. The initiative of multicenter and multidisciplinary collaboration was undertaken to prepare the platform for bladder preservation as a treatment option in selected patients.

  17. Quantitative diagnosis of bladder cancer by morphometric analysis of HE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Nebylitsa, Samantha V.; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2015-02-01

    In clinical practice, histopathological analysis of biopsied tissue is the main method for bladder cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The diagnosis is performed by a pathologist based on the morphological features in the image of a hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stained tissue sample. This manuscript proposes algorithms to perform morphometric analysis on the HE images, quantify the features in the images, and discriminate bladder cancers with different grades, i.e. high grade and low grade. The nuclei are separated from the background and other types of cells such as red blood cells (RBCs) and immune cells using manual outlining, color deconvolution and image segmentation. A mask of nuclei is generated for each image for quantitative morphometric analysis. The features of the nuclei in the mask image including size, shape, orientation, and their spatial distributions are measured. To quantify local clustering and alignment of nuclei, we propose a 1-nearest-neighbor (1-NN) algorithm which measures nearest neighbor distance and nearest neighbor parallelism. The global distributions of the features are measured using statistics of the proposed parameters. A linear support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is used to classify the high grade and low grade bladder cancers. The results show using a particular group of nuclei such as large ones, and combining multiple parameters can achieve better discrimination. This study shows the proposed approach can potentially help expedite pathological diagnosis by triaging potentially suspicious biopsies.

  18. Ten genetic polymorphisms in bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R A; Adib, R; Appleyard, I; Coxon, J G; Glashan, R W; Richards, B; Robinson, M R; Sunderland, E; Barham-Hall, D

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented on a group of cases of primary carcinoma of the bladder, detailing red cell surface blood group antigenic phenotypes, serum haptoglobin phenotypes, and some red cell isoenzyme phenotypes. Account is taken of the stage of the disease at presentation. The results are compared with corresponding phenotype frequencies in groups of presumed healthy persons originating either in Yorkshire or County Durham. Differences in relative incidences were found in the haptoglobin, phosphoglucomutase (PGM), and some other systems. These are both differences between all cases and controls and between particular stages at presentation and controls. PMID:6221102

  19. Effect of urinary excretion on the bladder tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones in rats.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Makiko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate which of blood or urine has the greater effect on bladder tissue concentrations of fluoroquinolones important for the treatment of urinary tract infections by measuring concentrations of fluoroquinolones in the vesical tissue (chemically and immunohistochemically) and intravesical space (chemically). Thirty-minute incubation of isolated rat bladders with fluoroquinolones showed only a 1.9-fold difference in transferability among norfloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and sparfloxacin. Intravesical instillation of norfloxacin and sparfloxacin in rats yielded similar vesical tissue distributions. Thus, there were no large differences in vesical tissue transfer among the four fluoroquinolones. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin (high urinary excretion-type) and sparfloxacin (low urinary excretion-type) at 1 h after a single oral dose (10 mg/kg) to rats were 15.4 and 1.3, respectively. The bladder tissue/plasma concentration ratios of norfloxacin after an intravenous injection (10 mg/kg) to ureter-catheterized and sham-operated rats were 1.36 and 57.8. Thus the bladder tissue distribution was significantly higher in the urine-exposed bladder. Immunohistochemical examination of the vesical tissue localization of norfloxacin in rats given a single intravenous dose revealed the presence of the drug-positive image in the cytoplasm of surface layer cells (both in umbrella and cover cells) of the bladder transitional epithelium. In conclusion, the results suggest that norfloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are excreted into urine and then transferred to the surface layer of the bladder transitional epithelium. Therefore, the urine levels have a greater effect on the vesicle tissue distribution of fluoroquinolones than the plasma levels in rats. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic cation secretion by Cancer borealis urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.; Holliday, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    In the crab, Cancer borealis, initial clearance studies showed a potent renal excretory system for the model organic cation, tetraethylammonium (TEA). (/sup 14/C)-TEA clearance averaged 145 +/- 32 ml/day, which was 18 times the paired polyethylene glycol clearance. TEA uptake by slices of urinary bladder was concentrative, saturable, inhibitable by N/sup 1/-methylnicotinamide chloride, and dependent on glycolytic, but not oxidative, metabolism. When mounted in flux chambers, bladders exhibited a large net secretory flux. For 0.1 mM TEA, the ratio of secretory to reabsorptive fluxes was 65. Urinary bladders from another crab, Cancer irroratus, and a lobster, Homarus americanus, also exhibited net TEA secretion. In C. borealis bladder, secretory transport was concentrative, saturable, and nearly abolished by addition of 1 mM quinine to the serosol bath. Reabsorptive transport was not concentrative and was not reduced by luminal quinine. The data are consistent with a secretory pathway that is transcellular and mediated by carriers at both the serosal and luminal membranes.

  1. Alternating chemo-radiotherapy in bladder cancer: A conservative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Orsatti, M.; Franzone, P.; Giudici, S.

    1995-08-30

    The aim of this Phase II study was to determine a bladder-sparing treatment in patients with invasive bladder cancer, allowing a better quality of life. Objectives were to test toxicity and disease-free and overall survival of patients given an alternated chemo-radiotherapy definitive treatment. Seventy-six patients with bladder cancer Stage T1G3 through T4 N0 M0 were entered in the same chemotherapy regimen (Cisplatin 20 mg/mq and 5-Fluorouracil 200 mg/mq daily for 5 days) alternated with different radiotherapy scheduling, the first 18 patients received two cycles of 20 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each; the second group of 58 patients received two cycles of 25 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each (the last 21 patients received Methotrexate 40 mg/mq instead of 5-Fluorouracil). A clinical complete response was observed in 57 patients (81%), partial response in 7 patients (10%), and a nonresponse in 6 patients (9%). At a median follow-up of 45 months, 33 patients (47%) were alive and free of tumor. The 6-year overall survival and progression-free survival was 42% and 40%, respectively. Systemic side effects were mild, while a moderate or severe local toxicity was observed in 14 patients and 13 patients (about 20%), respectively. Our conservative combination treatment allowed bladder-sparing in a high rate of patients and resulted in a survival comparable to that reported after radical cystectomy. 34 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. New Optical Imaging Technologies for Bladder Cancer: Considerations and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jen-Jane; Droller, Michael J.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bladder cancer presents as a spectrum of different diatheses. Accurate assessment for individualized treatment depends on initial diagnostic accuracy. Detection relies on white light cystoscopy accuracy and comprehensiveness. Aside from invasiveness and potential risks, white light cystoscopy shortcomings include difficult flat lesion detection, precise tumor delineation to enable complete resection, inflammation and malignancy differentiation, and grade and stage determination. Each shortcoming depends on surgeon ability and experience with the technology available for visualization and resection. Fluorescence cystoscopy/photodynamic diagnosis, narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography address the limitations and have in vivo feasibility. They detect suspicious lesions (photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging) and further characterize lesions (optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy). We analyzed the added value of each technology beyond white light cystoscopy and evaluated their maturity to alter the cancer course. Materials and Methods Detailed PubMed® searches were done using the terms “fluorescence cystoscopy,” “photodynamic diagnosis,” “narrow band imaging,” “optical coherence tomography” and “confocal laser endomicroscopy” with “optical imaging,” “bladder cancer” and “urothelial carcinoma.” Diagnostic accuracy reports and all prospective studies were selected for analysis. We explored technological principles, preclinical and clinical evidence supporting nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer detection and characterization, and whether improved sensitivity vs specificity translates into improved correlation of diagnostic accuracy with recurrence and progression. Emerging preclinical technologies with potential application were reviewed. Results Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging improve nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer detection, including

  3. Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tunio, Mutahir A.; Hashmi, Altaf; Qayyum, Abdul; Mohsin, Rehan; Zaeem, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2-T4, N-) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3-6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node-negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

  4. Quercetin induces bladder cancer cells apoptosis by activation of AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiongli; Peng, Mei; Zhang, Yuqing; Xu, Wanjun; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Tao, Ting; Huang, Yanjun; Tao, Xiaojun; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a natural existing polyphenol compound, has shown anticancer capacity for liver, breast, nasopharyngeal and prostate carcinoma but has not been clinically approved yet. This might be due to lack of clear mechanistic picture. Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of the urinary tract in the world. In China, bladder cancer has the highest rate of incidence out of all malignancies of the urinary system. The anticancer application of quercetin on bladder cancer has not been investigated either. This study was aimed to examine the mechanisms of quercetin on inhibition of bladder cancer. First, two human and one murine bladder cancer cell lines were tested in vitro for inhibitory sensitivity by MTT and cologenic assays. Second, AMPK pathway including 4E-BP1 and S6K were examined by western blot. Quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits migration. We are the first to show that quercetin displays potent inhibition on bladder cancer cells via activation of AMPK pathway.

  5. Jarid2 is essential for the maintenance of tumor initiating cells in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chun-Zhi; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Niu, Min; Wang, Xiang-Zhen; Zhong, Gen-Shen; Lu, Xi-Feng; Xue, Yu; Tian, Shaoqi; Li, Guangyao; Tang, Shaojun; Jiang, Yi-Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common urologic malignancy in China, with an increase of the incidence and mortality rates over past decades. Recent studies suggest that bladder tumors are maintained by a rare fraction of cells with stem cell proprieties. Targeting these bladder tumor initiating cell (TICs) population can overcome the drug-resistance of bladder cancer. However, the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating TICs in bladder cancer remain poorly defined. Jarid2 is implicated in signaling pathways regulating cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stem cell maintenance. The goal of our study was to examine whether Jarid2 plays a role in the regulation of TICs in bladder cancer. We found that knockdown of Jarid2 was able to inhibit the invasive ability and sphere-forming capacity in bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of Jarid2 reduced the proportion of TICs and impaired the tumorigenicity of bladder cancer TICs in vivo. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of Jarid2 promoted the invasive ability and sphere-forming capacity in bladder cancer cells. Mechanistically, reduced Jarid2 expression led to the upregulation of p16 and H3K27me3 level at p16 promoter region. Collectively, we provided evidence that Jarid2 via modulation of p16 is a putative novel therapeutic target for treating malignant bladder cancer. PMID:28445934

  6. Characterization of Uptake and Internalization of Exosomes by Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Carrie A.; Simms, Patricia E.; Van Huis, Adam F.; Foreman, Kimberly E.; Kuo, Paul C.; Gupta, Gopal N.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder tumors represent a special therapeutic challenge as they have a high recurrence rate requiring repeated interventions and may progress to invasive or metastatic disease. Exosomes carry proteins implicated in bladder cancer progression and have been implicated in bladder cancer cell survival. Here, we characterized exosome uptake and internalization by human bladder cancer cells using Amnis ImageStreamX, an image cytometer. Exosomes were isolated by ultracentrifugation from bladder cancer culture conditioned supernatant, labeled with PKH-26, and analyzed on the ImageStreamX with an internal standard added to determine concentration. Exosomes were cocultured with bladder cancer cells and analyzed for internalization. Using the IDEAS software, we determined exosome uptake based on the number of PKH-26+ spots and overall PKH-26 fluorescence intensity. Using unlabeled beads of a known concentration and size, we were able to determine concentrations of exosomes isolated from bladder cancer cells. We measured exosome uptake by recipient bladder cancer cells, and we demonstrated that uptake is dose and time dependent. Finally, we found that uptake is active and specific, which can be partially blocked by heparin treatment. The characterization of cellular uptake and internalization by bladder cancer cells may shed light on the role of exosomes on bladder cancer recurrence and progression. PMID:24575409

  7. Occupation and cancer in London: an investigation into nasal and bladder cancer using the Cancer Atlas.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, P J; McDowall, M E

    1986-01-01

    The Atlas of Cancer Mortality for England and Wales showed pronounced excesses of male mortality from nasal and bladder cancer in certain London boroughs. These excesses were investigated by case-referent studies using death certificate data for male deaths, 1968-78. Nasal cancer was found to be significantly associated with occupations involving heavy exposure to wood dust. Bladder cancer was significantly associated with occupations in road transport driving and in the handling of leather, whereas consistently raised relative risk ratios were also found for wood-workers, engineering fitters, printers, machinists, plumbers, and motor mechanics. These findings highlight the potential role of occupational factors in cancer causation in London. Images PMID:3947560

  8. mTOR inhibitors in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Leite, R; Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, P A; Santos, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the great scientific advances that have been made in cancer treatment, there is still much to do, particularly with regard to urinary bladder cancer. Some of the drugs used in urinary bladder cancer treatment have been in use for more than 30 years and show reduced effectiveness and high recurrence rates. There have been several attempts to find new and more effective drugs, to be used alone or in combination with the drugs already in use, in order to overcome this situation.The biologically important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is altered in cancer and mTOR inhibitors have raised many expectations as potentially important anticancer drugs. In this article, the authors will review the mTOR pathway and present their experiences of the use of some mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, in isolation and in conjunction with non-mTOR inhibitors cisplatin and gemcitabine, on urinary bladder tumour cell lines. The non-muscle-invasive cell line, 5637, is the only one that exhibits a small alteration in the mTOR and AKT phosphorylation after rapalogs exposure. Also, there was a small inhibition of cell proliferation. With gemcitabine plus everolimus or temsirolimus, the results were encouraging as a more effective response was noticed with both combinations, especially in the 5637 and T24 cell lines. Cisplatin associated with everolimus or temsirolimus also gave promising results, as an antiproliferative effect was observed when the drugs were associated, in particular on the 5637 and HT1376 cell lines. Everolimus or temsirolimus in conjunction with gemcitabine or cisplatin could have an important role to play in urinary bladder cancer treatment, depending on the tumour grading.

  9. Chemotherapy in advanced bladder cancer: current status and future

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer occurs in the majority of cases in males. It represents the seventh most common cancer and the ninth most common cause of cancer deaths for men. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most predominant histological type. Bladder cancer is highly chemosensitive. In metastatic setting, chemotherapy based on cisplatin should be considered as standard treatment of choice for patients with good performance status (0-1) and good renal function-glomerular filtration rate (GFR) > 60 mL/min. The standard treatment is based on cisplatin chemotherapy regimens type MVAC, HD-MVAC, gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) or dose dense GC. In unfit patients, carboplatin based regimes; gemcitabine plus carboplatin or methotrexate plus carboplatin plus vinblastine (MCAVI) are reasonable options. The role of targeted therapies when used alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, or in maintenance, was evaluated; targeting angiogenesis seem to be very promising. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. PMID:21906310

  10. Micropapillary Bladder Cancer: Insights from the National Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Wilson; Matulay, Justin T.; James, Maxwell B.; Onyeji, Ifeanyi C.; Theofanides, Marissa C.; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; DeCastro, G. Joel; Wenske, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Micropapillary bladder cancer (MPBC) is a variant histology of urothelial carcinoma (UC) that is associated with poor outcomes however given its rarity, little is known outside of institutional reports. We sought to use a population-level cancer database to assess survival outcomes in patients treated with surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: The National Cancer Database (NCDB) was queried for all cases of MPBC and UC using International Classification of Disease-O-3 morphologic codes between 2004–2014. Primary outcome was survival outcomes stratified by treatment modality. Treatments included radical cystectomy (RC) with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) or adjuvant chemotherapy (AC). Results: Overall 869 patients with MPBC and 389,603 patients with UC met the inclusion criteria. Median age of the MPBC cohort was 69.9 years (58.9–80.9) with the majority of the cohort presenting with high-grade (89.3%) and muscle invasive or locally advanced disease (47.6%). For cT1 MPBC, outcomes of RC and BPS were not statistically different. For≥cT2 disease, NAC showed a survival benefit compared with RC alone for UC but not for MPBC. On multivariable analysis, MPBC histology independently predicted worse increased risk of death. On subanalysis of the MPBC RC patients, NAC did not improve survival outcomes compared with RC alone. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy utilization and early cystectomy did not show a survival benefit in patients with MPBC. This histology independently predicts decreased survival and prognosis is poor regardless of treatment modality. Further research should focus on developing better treatment options for this rare disease. PMID:28035322

  11. Nuclear matrix protein 22 for bladder cancer detection: comparative analysis of the BladderChek® and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Hatzichristodoulou, Georgios; Kübler, Hubert; Schwaibold, Hartwig; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Eibauer, Cornelia; Hofer, Christian; Gschwend, Jürgen; Treiber, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    To compare nuclear matrix protein 22 expression by BladderChek® and ELISA, as urine-based assays for bladder cancer (BC) detection. Urine samples of 100 BC patients and 100 controls were analyzed. Comparative statistical evaluations were based on sensitivity and specificity. Seventy-one patients had primary and 29 recurrent BC. The sensitivity of BladderChek® was significantly higher compared to ELISA in the overall cancer cohort and in patients with primary BC (p<0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). Both tests demonstrated significant correlation of sensitivities and tumor stage/grade for the overall cancer cohort and for patients with primary BC. Both tests had specificity values of 100% in healthy individuals. Specificity was 93% for BladderChek® and 99% for ELISA in patients with benign diseases (p=0.048). BladderChek® may be clinically more useful for BC detection. Due to high specificity, BladderChek® could be used for high-risk screening. However, due to its low sensitivity, BladderChek® cannot replace but only complement cystoscopy for BC detection.

  12. Long noncoding RNA in prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Martens-Uzunova, Elena S; Böttcher, René; Croce, Carlo M; Jenster, Guido; Visakorpi, Tapio; Calin, George A

    2014-06-01

    Genomic regions without protein-coding potential give rise to millions of protein-noncoding RNA transcripts (noncoding RNA) that participate in virtually all cellular processes. Research over the last 10 yr has accumulated evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in human urologic cancers. To review current progress in the biology and implication of lncRNAs associated with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. The PubMed database was searched for articles in the English language with combinations of the Medical Subject Headings terms long non coding RNA, long noncoding RNA, long untranslated RNA, cancer, neoplasms, prostate, bladder, and kidney. We summarise existing knowledge on the systematics, biology, and function of lncRNAs, particularly these involved in prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer. We also discuss the possible utilisation of lncRNAs as novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in urologic malignancies and portray the major challenges and future perspectives of ongoing lncRNA research. LncRNAs are important regulators of gene expression interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Alterations in the function of lncRNAs promote tumour formation, progression, and metastasis of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. LncRNAs can be used as noninvasive tumour markers in urologic malignancies. Increased knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs perform their function in the normal and malignant cell will lead to a better understanding of tumour biology and could provide novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of urologic cancers. In this paper we reviewed current knowledge of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) for the detection and treatment of urologic cancers. We conclude that lncRNAs can be used as novel biomarkers in prostate, kidney, or bladder cancer. LncRNAs hold promise as future therapeutic targets, but more research is needed to gain a better

  13. Ten Years of Proteomics in Bladder Cancer: Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Frantzi, Maria; Vlahou, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Research efforts targeting the identification of bladder cancer biomarkers have been extensive during the past decade. Investigations have been performed at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome levels and outputs have started appearing including the sketching of disease molecular subtypes. Proteins are directly linked to cell phenotype hence they accumulate special interest as both biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Multiple technical challenges exist, of the main, being the protein concentration vast dynamic range and presence of proteins in modified forms. The scope of this review is to summarize the contribution of proteomics research in this quest of bladder cancer biomarkers. To obtain an unbiased and comprehensive overview, the scientific literature was searched for manuscripts describing proteomic studies on urothelial cancer from the last ten years and those including independent verification studies in urine, tissue and blood are briefly presented. General observations include: a) in most cases, suboptimal experimental design including healthy controls in biomarker discovery and frequently biomarker verification, is followed; b) variability in protein findings between studies can be observed, to some extent reflecting complexity of experimental approaches and proteome itself; c) consistently reported biomarkers include mainly plasma proteins and d) compilation of protein markers into diagnostic panels appears the most promising way forward. Two main avenues of research can now be foreseen: targeting integration of the existing disparate data with proteomic findings being placed in the context of existing knowledge on bladder cancer subtypes and in parallel, accumulation of clinical samples to support proper validation studies of promising marker combinations. PMID:28149930

  14. Responses to hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in rat bladder cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Gederas, Odrun; Larsen, Eivind; Randeberg, Lise; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2010-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we evaluated histologically the effects of hexyl 5-aminolevulinateinduced photodynamic treatment in the AY-27 tumor cell induced rat bladder cancer model. MATERIAL & METHODS: The animals (fischer-344 female rats) were divided into 2 groups, half of which were orthotopically implanted with 400,000 syngeniec AY-27 urothelia1 rat bladder cancer cells and half sham implanted. 14 days post implantation 6 rats from each group were treated with hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment (8mM HAL and light fluence of 20 J/cm2). Additional groups of animals were only given HAL instillation, only light treatment, or no treatment. All animals were sacrificed 7 days after the PDT/only HAL/only light or no treatment. Each bladder was removed, embedded in paraffin and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and saferin for histological evaluation at high magnification for features of tissue damage by a pathologist blinded to the sample source. RESULTS: In all animals that were AY-27 implanted and not given complete PDT treatment, viable tumors were found in the bladder mucosa and wall. In the animals treated with complete HAL-PDT only 3 of 6 animals had viable tumor. In the 3 animals with viable tumor it was significantly reduced in volume compared to the untreated animals. It was also noted that in the PDT treated animals there was a significantly increased inflammatory response (lymphocytic and mononuclear cell infiltration) in the peri-tumor area compared to implanted animals without complete HAL-PDT. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that hexyl 5-aminolevulinate-induced photodynamic treatment in a rat bladder cancer model involves both direct effects on cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) and indirect effects to evoke the host immune-response, together contributing to tumor eradication.

  15. Screening for Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  16. Development of a Bladder Bioreactor for Tissue Engineering in Urology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Niall F; Callanan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    A urinary bladder bioreactor was constructed to replicate physiological bladder dynamics. A cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator mimicked filling pressures of the human bladder. Cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds (ECMs) in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. UC proliferation was compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining.

  17. Patterns of Bladder Preservation Therapy Utilization for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Deal, Allison M; Ladoire, Sylvain; Créhange, Gilles; Galsky, Matthew D; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Wimalasingham, Akhila; Wong, Yu-Ning; Harshman, Lauren C; Chowdhury, Simon; Niegisch, Guenter; Liontos, Michalis; Yu, Evan Y; Pal, Sumanta K; Chen, Ronald C; Wang, Andrew Z; Nielsen, Matthew E; Smith, Angela B; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-10-27

    Background: Trimodality bladder preservation therapy (BPT) in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) includes a maximal transurethral resection followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy as an alternative to radical cystectomy (RC) in appropriately selected patients, or as a treatment option in non-cystectomy candidates. Several chemotherapy regimens can be used in BPT, but little is known about current practice patterns. Objective: To describe utilization patterns of BPT and associated survival outcomes in MIBC. Methods: Data were collected from the Retrospective International Study of Cancers of the Urothelial Tract (RISC), a database of 3,024 consecutive patients from 29 international academic centers from 2005 to 2013. Patients with clinical T2-T4aN0M0 urothelial cancer of the bladder were included. Results: 265 patients received BPT. Compared with the 1,447 patients who received RC, BPT patients were older, had poorer performance status, and had more comorbidities (p < 0.01 for all). Median overall survival (OS) was similar for patients treated with curative radiation doses in BPT and patients treated with RC (41 vs 46 months, p = 0.33, respectively). 45% of BPT patients received concurrent chemotherapy with radiation. The most common regimens included cisplatin alone (23%), carboplatin alone (22%), gemcitabine alone (10%), paclitaxel alone (9%), and 5-FU+mitomycin (5%). There were no significant differences in survival among chemotherapy regimens. Only 10 patients (4% of BPT patients) underwent salvage cystectomy. Conclusions: In clinical practice, BPT patients have similar survival to RC patients when treated with curative radiotherapy doses. Choice of concurrent chemotherapy regimen varied widely with no clear standard. Salvage cystectomy is rarely performed. Continued research is needed on the comparative effectiveness among BPT and RC, and among chemotherapy regimens in BPT.

  18. Patterns of Bladder Preservation Therapy Utilization for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Tracy L.; Deal, Allison M.; Ladoire, Sylvain; Créhange, Gilles; Galsky, Matthew D.; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Wimalasingham, Akhila; Wong, Yu-Ning; Harshman, Lauren C.; Chowdhury, Simon; Niegisch, Guenter; Liontos, Michalis; Yu, Evan Y.; Pal, Sumanta K.; Chen, Ronald C.; Wang, Andrew Z.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Smith, Angela B.; Milowsky, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trimodality bladder preservation therapy (BPT) in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) includes a maximal transurethral resection followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy as an alternative to radical cystectomy (RC) in appropriately selected patients, or as a treatment option in non-cystectomy candidates. Several chemotherapy regimens can be used in BPT, but little is known about current practice patterns. Objective: To describe utilization patterns of BPT and associated survival outcomes in MIBC. Methods: Data were collected from the Retrospective International Study of Cancers of the Urothelial Tract (RISC), a database of 3,024 consecutive patients from 29 international academic centers from 2005 to 2013. Patients with clinical T2-T4aN0M0 urothelial cancer of the bladder were included. Results: 265 patients received BPT. Compared with the 1,447 patients who received RC, BPT patients were older, had poorer performance status, and had more comorbidities (p < 0.01 for all). Median overall survival (OS) was similar for patients treated with curative radiation doses in BPT and patients treated with RC (41 vs 46 months, p = 0.33, respectively). 45% of BPT patients received concurrent chemotherapy with radiation. The most common regimens included cisplatin alone (23%), carboplatin alone (22%), gemcitabine alone (10%), paclitaxel alone (9%), and 5-FU+mitomycin (5%). There were no significant differences in survival among chemotherapy regimens. Only 10 patients (4% of BPT patients) underwent salvage cystectomy. Conclusions: In clinical practice, BPT patients have similar survival to RC patients when treated with curative radiotherapy doses. Choice of concurrent chemotherapy regimen varied widely with no clear standard. Salvage cystectomy is rarely performed. Continued research is needed on the comparative effectiveness among BPT and RC, and among chemotherapy regimens in BPT. PMID:28035321

  19. Reducing aluminum: an occupation possibly associated with bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Thériault, G; De Guire, L; Cordier, S

    1981-01-01

    A case-control study, undertaken to identify reasons for the exceptionally high incidence of bladder cancer among men in the Chicoutimi census division of the province of Quebec, revealed an increased risk associated with employment in the electrolysis department of an aluminum reduction plant. The estimated relative risk was 2.83 (95% confidence interval; 1.06 to 7.54). An interaction was found between such employment and cigarette smoking, resulting in a combined relative risk of 5.70 (95% confidence interval: 2.00 to 12.30). These findings suggest that employment in an aluminum reduction plant accounts for part of the excess of bladder cancer in the region studied. PMID:7214271

  20. Bladder cancer: a review of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Metts, M. C.; Metts, J. C.; Milito, S. J.; Thomas, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and the eighth most common in women. It represents a spectrum of disease, ranging from superficial, well-differentiated disease, which does not significantly impact survival, to highly malignant tumors for which long term survival may be dismal. Transitional-cell carcinoma, which constitutes the vast majority of bladder cancers in the United States, may develop as carcinoma in situ or as invasive carcinoma. This article focuses on transitional-cell carcinoma with a review of the major aspects of the disease, including the epidemiology, diagnosis and staging, and management (including organ preservation). Therapeutic options are explored, including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and combined modality therapy. PMID:10918764

  1. Surgical correction of bladder neck contracture following prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bugeja, Simon; Andrich, Daniela E; Mundy, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The surgical and non-surgical treatment of localised prostate cancer may be complicated by bladder neck contractures, prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures. In general, such complications following radical prostatectomy are less extensive, easier to treat and associated with a better outcome and more rapid recovery than the same complications following radiotherapy, high-intensity focussed ultrasound and cryotherapy. Treatment options range from minimally invasive endoscopic procedures to more complex and specialised open surgical reconstruction.In this chapter the surgical management of bladder neck contractures following the treatment of prostate cancer is described together with the management of prostatic urethral stenoses and bulbomembranous urethral strictures, given the difficulty in distinguishing them from one another clinically.

  2. The peritoneal cavity as a bioreactor for tissue engineering visceral organs: bladder, uterus and vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gordon R; Turnbull, Geoffrey; Xiang, Lina; Haines, Michael; Armstrong, Shannon; Rolfe, Barbara E; Campbell, Julie H

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to produce avascular, myofibroblast-rich tissue capsules for use as autologous grafts for hollow, smooth muscle-walled visceral organs-bladder, uterus and vas deferens. To produce tissue for grafting, templates of the appropriate shape were implanted in the peritoneal cavities of rats or rabbits. After 2-3 weeks, the templates were removed, the encapsulating myofibroblast-rich tissue harvested and grafted to replace resected segments of bladder, vas deferens or uterus of the same animals in which the tissue was grown. Bladder grafts showed 100% patency after 14 months and had developed a morphology similar to normal bladder. Tubes of myofibroblast tissue grafted unilaterally into resected rabbit vasa deferentia developed a morphology resembling native tissue, with sperm in the ejaculate indicative of normal function. At 12 weeks after grafting, uterine graft tissue had increased in thickness and developed the morphology of normal uterus, with endometrium overlying several layers of smooth muscle cells (myometrium-like) which were interspersed with collagen fibrils; grafted uterine horns supported embryos to the late stages of gestation. This study shows that myofibroblast tissue produced in the peritoneal cavity is sufficiently plastic to permit differentiation of cells into bladder, vas deferens or uterine smooth muscle. As a method for producing autologous graft material for repair/replacement of these organs, this approach has many benefits over conventional and current tissue-engineering strategies.

  3. shRNA targeting long non-coding RNA CCAT2 controlled by tetracycline-inducible system inhibits progression of bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfa; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Yuchen; Chen, Mingwei; Zhou, Qing; Chen, Zhicong; He, Anbang; Zhao, Guoping; Guo, Yinglu; Wu, Hanwei; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-05-17

    Recent reports show that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as significant functional regulators in the development of tumors, including bladder cancer. Here, we found that CCAT2 was upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. Through the statistical analyses, we also found that the high expression level of CCAT2 was positively correlated with histological grade and TNM stage of bladder cancer. Further experimental results revealed that knockdown of CCAT2 could decrease cell proliferation and migration as well as induce apoptosis in bladder cancer cells. Besides, using the post-transcriptional device of synthetic biology, we create the tetracycline-inducible double small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) vector to control the expression level of CCAT2 which was induced by doxycycline in a dosage-dependent manner. In summary, our data indicated that CCAT2 may be an oncogene and a therapeutic target in bladder cancer. The expression of CCAT2 can be quantitatively controlled by the synthetic "tetracycline-on" switch system in bladder cancer in response to different concentrations of doxycycline to inhibit the development of bladder cancer cells.

  4. [Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer?].

    PubMed

    Hupe, M C; Kramer, M W; Kuczyk, M A; Merseburger, A S

    2015-05-01

    Advanced urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is associated with a high metastatic potential. Life expectancy for metastatic patients is poor and rarely exceeds more than one year without further therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can decrease the tumour burden while reducing the risk of death. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been discussed controversially. Patients with lymph node-positive metastases seem to benefit the most from adjuvant chemotherapy. In selected patients, metastasectomy can prolong survival. In metastastic patients, the combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin has become the new standard regimen due to a lower toxicity in comparison to the combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (MVAC). For second-line treatment, vinflunine is the only approved therapeutic agent.

  5. Arthritis and iritis after BCG therapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Price, G E

    1994-03-01

    A patient with preexisting inactive ankylosing spondylitis experienced a recurrence of back pain and his first episode of acute peripheral arthritis and iritis after a second course of treatment with BCG for bladder cancer. The occurrence of iritis after BCG therapy has not been reported. The recurrence of spondyloarthropathy and the new appearance of iritis may have been part of a generalized enhancement of immunological reactivity produced by the BCG.

  6. Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Eila C

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in older patients is challenging. Definitive therapy of localized disease requires either surgery or radiation therapy, ideally combined with systemic chemotherapy. However, current population data suggest that less than half of patients older than age 70 are offered such treatments. We will review tools available to assess the fitness of older patients for surgery, alternatives, and tips for perioperative patient treatment.

  7. Intrinsic subtypes of high-grade bladder cancer reflect the hallmarks of breast cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Damrauer, Jeffrey S; Hoadley, Katherine A; Chism, David D; Fan, Cheng; Tiganelli, Christopher J; Wobker, Sara E; Yeh, Jen Jen; Milowsky, Matthew I; Iyer, Gopa; Parker, Joel S; Kim, William Y

    2014-02-25

    We sought to define whether there are intrinsic molecular subtypes of high-grade bladder cancer. Consensus clustering performed on gene expression data from a meta-dataset of high-grade, muscle-invasive bladder tumors identified two intrinsic, molecular subsets of high-grade bladder cancer, termed "luminal" and "basal-like," which have characteristics of different stages of urothelial differentiation, reflect the luminal and basal-like molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and have clinically meaningful differences in outcome. A gene set predictor, bladder cancer analysis of subtypes by gene expression (BASE47) was defined by prediction analysis of microarrays (PAM) and accurately classifies the subtypes. Our data demonstrate that there are at least two molecularly and clinically distinct subtypes of high-grade bladder cancer and validate the BASE47 as a subtype predictor. Future studies exploring the predictive value of the BASE47 subtypes for standard of care bladder cancer therapies, as well as novel subtype-specific therapies, will be of interest.

  8. Family history of cancer and the risk of bladder cancer: A case-control study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Turati, Federica; Bosetti, Cristina; Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo; Facchini, Gaetano; Ferraroni, Monica; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva

    2017-06-01

    A family history of bladder cancer has been associated with the risk of bladder cancer, but quantification of the excess risk in different populations is still a relevant issue. Further, the role of a family history of other cancers on the risk of bladder cancer remains unclear. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study, including 690 bladder cancer cases and 665 hospital controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated through unconditional logistic regression models, adjusted for sex, age, study center, year of interview and further for education, smoking and sibling's number. The OR for family history of bladder cancer was 2.13 (95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) 1.02-4.49) from the model with partial adjustment, and 1.99 (95%CI 0.91-4.32) after additional adjustment for smoking and siblings' number, based on 23 cases (3.3%) and 11 controls (1.7%) with a family history of bladder cancer. The fully adjusted OR was 3.77 when the relative was diagnosed at age below 65years. Smokers with a family history of bladder cancer had a four-fold increased risk compared to non-smokers without a family history. Bladder cancer risk was significantly increased among subjects with a family history of hemolymphopoietic cancers (OR=2.97, 95%CI 1.35-6.55). Family history of cancer at other sites showed no significant association with bladder cancer risk. This study confirms an approximately two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer for family history of bladder cancer, and indicates a possible familial clustering of bladder cancer with cancers of the hemolymphopoietic system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells protect against the tissue fibrosis of ketamine-induced cystitis in rat bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Aram; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Heo, Jinbeom; Song, Miho; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Jisun; Yoon, Soo-Jung; Kim, YongHwan; Lee, Seungun; Kim, Seong Who; Oh, Wonil; Choi, Soo Jin; Shin, Dong-Myung; Choo, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abuse of the hallucinogenic drug ketamine promotes the development of lower urinary tract symptoms that resemble interstitial cystitis. The pathophysiology of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) is largely unknown and effective therapies are lacking. Here, using a KC rat model, we show the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord-blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Daily injection of ketamine to Sprague-Dawley rats for 2-weeks resulted in defective bladder function, indicated by irregular voiding frequency, increased maximum contraction pressure, and decreased intercontraction intervals and bladder capacity. KC bladders were characterized by severe mast-cell infiltration, tissue fibrosis, apoptosis, upregulation of transforming growth factor-β signaling related genes, and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 proteins. A single administration of MSCs (1 × 106) into bladder tissue not only significantly ameliorated the aforementioned bladder voiding parameters, but also reversed the characteristic histological and gene-expression alterations of KC bladder. Treatment with the antifibrotic compound N-acetylcysteine also alleviated the symptoms and pathological characteristics of KC bladder, indicating that the antifibrotic capacity of MSC therapy underlies its benefits. Thus, this study for the first-time shows that MSC therapy might help to cure KC by protecting against tissue fibrosis in a KC animal model and provides a foundation for clinical trials of MSC therapy. PMID:27481042

  10. Neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy approaches for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Derek; Burgess, Earle; Gaston, Kris E; Haake, Michael R; Riggs, Steven B

    2012-10-01

    Deeply invasive bladder cancer, representing approximately 20% of incident cases, is cured by radical cystectomy or radiotherapy in less than 50% of cases. In an effort to improve cure rates, based on objective response rates in metastatic disease of 40%-70% from combination chemotherapy regimens, systemic chemotherapy has been incorporated into programs of definitive treatment for this disease. Several randomized trials and a meta-analysis have confirmed a survival benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by definitive local treatment, reflecting both median survival figures and cure rates. Despite several promising phase II trials, no randomized trial of classical adjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer has demonstrated an overall survival benefit, despite increments in disease-free survival. Molecular prognostication has been studied in an effort to improve the utility of systemic therapy for invasive non-metastatic bladder cancer, but randomized trials have not shown associated survival benefit. Despite level 1 evidence of a survival benefit from neoadjuvant MVAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin [Adriamycin], cisplatin) or cisplatin, methotrexate, and vinblastine (CMV) chemotherapy, more than 50% of incident cases do not receive such treatment.

  11. Pesticide, Gene Polymorphisms and Bladder Cancer among Egyptian Agricultural Workers

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Sania; Dawson, Rebecca; Saleh, Doa’a A.; Magder, Laurence S.; St. George, Diane Marie; El-Daly, Mai; Squibb, Katherine; Mikhail, Nabiel N.; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Khaled, Hussein; Loffredo, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the associations between pesticide exposure, genetic polymorphisms for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase I (NQO1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and urinary bladder cancer risk among male agricultural workers in Egypt. We used logistic regression to analyze data from a multi-center case-control study and estimate adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI (confidence interval) Exposure to pesticides was associated with increased bladder cancer risk (1.68 (1.23–2.29)) in a dose-dependent manner. The association was slightly stronger for urothelial (1.79 (1.25–2.56) than for squamous cell carcinoma (1.55 (1.03–2.31)), and among participants with combined genotypes for low NQO1 and high SOD2 (2.14 (1.19–3.85) activities as compared to those with high NQO1 and low SOD2 genotypes (1.53 (0.73–3.25)). In conclusion, among male agricultural workers in Egypt, pesticide exposure is associated with bladder cancer risk and possibly modulated by genetic polymorphism. PMID:24219772

  12. Pioglitazone use and the risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Ho, Shu-Chen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to identify the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. A nested case-control study was performed using a representative database randomly sampled from National Health Insurance enrollees. The source cohort consisted of newly diagnosed diabetic patients from 1997 to 2009. Cases were identified as those with a diagnosis of bladder cancer from 2002 to 2009. For each case, four matched control individuals were randomly selected. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate the relative magnitude of risk in relation to the use of pioglitazone. In total, 259 cases and 1036 controls were identified. The prevalent use of pioglitazone is similar in cases and controls (adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-2.49). Compared to nonusers, these values were 1.08 (0.41-2.88) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use ≤ 8268 mg and 1.35 (0.48-3.79) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use > 8268 mg. This study does not provide support for the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. Further confirmation is needed due to the limitation of small case number with relatively shorter exposure duration and lower cumulative dose.

  13. Larger core size has superior technical and analytical accuracy in bladder tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Eskaros, Adel Rh; Egloff, Shanna A Arnold; Boyd, Kelli L; Richardson, Joyce E; Hyndman, M Eric; Zijlstra, Andries

    2017-03-01

    The construction of tissue microarrays (TMAs) with cores from a large number of paraffin-embedded tissues (donors) into a single paraffin block (recipient) is an effective method of analyzing samples from many patient specimens simultaneously. For the TMA to be successful, the cores within it must capture the correct histologic areas from the donor blocks (technical accuracy) and maintain concordance with the tissue of origin (analytical accuracy). This can be particularly challenging for tissues with small histological features such as small islands of carcinoma in situ (CIS), thin layers of normal urothelial lining of the bladder, or cancers that exhibit intratumor heterogeneity. In an effort to create a comprehensive TMA of a bladder cancer patient cohort that accurately represents the tumor heterogeneity and captures the small features of normal and CIS, we determined how core size (0.6 vs 1.0 mm) impacted the technical and analytical accuracy of the TMA. The larger 1.0 mm core exhibited better technical accuracy for all tissue types at 80.9% (normal), 94.2% (tumor), and 71.4% (CIS) compared with 58.6%, 85.9%, and 63.8% for 0.6 mm cores. Although the 1.0 mm core provided better tissue capture, increasing the number of replicates from two to three allowed with the 0.6 mm core compensated for this reduced technical accuracy. However, quantitative image analysis of proliferation using both Ki67+ immunofluorescence counts and manual mitotic counts demonstrated that the 1.0 mm core size also exhibited significantly greater analytical accuracy (P=0.004 and 0.035, respectively, r(2)=0.979 and 0.669, respectively). Ultimately, our findings demonstrate that capturing two or more 1.0 mm cores for TMA construction provides superior technical and analytical accuracy over the smaller 0.6 mm cores, especially for tissues harboring small histological features or substantial heterogeneity.

  14. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kaufman, Donald S.; Heney, Niall M.; Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  15. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  16. Intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with bladder cancer. A review of techniques allowing improved tumor doses and providing high cure rates without loss of bladder function

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, W.U.; Kaufman, S.D.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    Conventional external beam irradiation, using modern megavoltage techniques and doses that do not harm bladder function, will permanently eradicate local bladder cancer in 30% to 50% of patients, compared with 70% to 90% with cystectomy. In appropriately chosen patients, open surgery can safely provide excellent exposure for the selective delivery of more radiant energy directly to the tumor and less to the uninvolved portion of the bladder. Intraoperative radiation therapy, by either a removable radium or iridium implant or a large single dose of electrons, has been reported to be safe and can permanently cure the bladder of cancer and also preserve bladder function in more than 75% of patients with solitary tumors that invade into but not beyond the bladder muscle. With the increasing interest in and availability of intraoperative radiation therapy in the US, this curative and bladder-sparing treatment for operable patients with bladder cancer invading the trigone is appropriate for careful clinical trial. 13 references.

  17. Failure of ascorbic acid to inhibit FANFT-induced bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, M S; Cohen, S M; Dekernion, J B; Persky, L

    1975-04-01

    L-ascorbic acid has been shown to reduce the elevated level of urinary chemiluminescence found in patients with bladder cancer. Thus, it has been suggested that vitamin C might be efficacious in bladder tumor prophylaxis. However, there is no clinical evidence to support this thesis. We evaluated whether L-ascorbic acid given concomitantly with the urinary carcinogen FANFT was capable of reducing the incidence of subsequent bladder tumors. No inhibitory effect was observed. Unless evidence is obtained demonstrating bladder tumor prevention by L-ascorbic acid its routine administration to patients with bladder cancer is not indicated.

  18. Mouse Models of Human Bladder Cancer as a Tool for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Seager, Catherine; Puzio-Kuter, Anna M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; McKiernan, James; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a deadly condition in dire need of effective new treatments. This unit contains a description of mouse models suitable for the evaluation of potential new therapies. Included is a genetically engineered mouse model of bladder cancer generated by the delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase into the bladder lumen. Also described is an orthotopic mouse model created by the instillation of human bladder tumor cells into the bladder lumen of immune deficient mice. Protocols are also provided on the use of these models for the preclinical evaluation of new chemical entities, with mTOR inhibitors shown as an example. PMID:22294368

  19. Abnormal c-myc oncogene DNA methylation in human bladder cancer: possible role in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Sardi, I; Dal Canto, M; Bartoletti, R; Montali, E

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that the hypermethylation of normally unmethylated DNA sequences plays a critical role in the genesis and progression of human tumors. Although the molecular bases of this mechanism have not been completely explained, the altered methylation pattern of the c-myc oncogene is supposed to represent an important step in tumor development. We have analyzed tissue samples from 47 urinary bladder tumors (43 primary transitional and 4 squamous cell carcinomas) and the respective blood with HpaII methyl-sensitive endonuclease digestion and the Southern blotting technique to detect the methylation pattern in a widespread area in and around the c-myc oncogene. Data presented in this study showed significant differences between the c-myc methylation pattern and pathological grade (p < 0.05). On the other hand, we did not find a significant correlation between the c-myc methylation pattern and clinical stage. However, a variable covalent alteration of c-myc DNA existed in bladder cancer as compared to normal tissue. Although the correlation between superficial and infiltrating forms was not statistically significant, we did, however, find differences in aggressive neoplastic behavior. This suggested that local hypermethylation may be considered as one potential mechanism for increasing genetic alterations in bladder cancer formation.

  20. Schistosoma haematobium Infection That Mimics Bladder Cancer in a 66-Year-Old Ethnic Egyptian Man.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Celenne Morfin; Coffey, Kristen H

    2015-01-01

    66-year-old ethnic Egyptian man. Hematuria. The patient had a history of multiple episodes of gross hematuria for the past 5 years. Because the hematuria usually resolved on its own, he did not seek medical attention during that time. Bladder cancer was suspected. The patient had a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, congestive heart failure, lifelong smoking, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. He has been taking the anticoagulants clopidogrel (Plavix) and warfarin (Coumadin). The patient is originally from Egypt and has been living in the United States for the past 10 years. A complete blood count showed a hemoglobin of 13.0 g per dL (reference range, 14.0 to 18.0 g per dL), hematocrit 40% (40% to 54%), red blood cell count (RBC) 4.65 × 10(9) per L (4.60 to 6.00), and platelet count 179 × 10(9) per L (150 to 450). The urinalysis results showed 3+ protein, 4+ blood, and urine RBC of greater than 100 per high power field (hpf). The urinalysis results did not indicate the presence of parasitic ova or adult parasites. Based on these results, the physician ordered cystoscopic testing, suspecting bladder cancer. Analysis of the bladder tissue showed inflammation (Image 1) and several ova that were consistent with developing Schistosoma (Image 2). Many of the ova were calcified and surrounded by severely inflamed tissue (Image 3). Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  1. Interobserver Agreement of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Timothy C.; Liu, Jen-Jane; Hsiao, Shelly T.; Pan, Ying; Mach, Kathleen E.; Leppert, John T.; McKenney, Jesse K.; Rouse, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Emerging optical imaging technologies such as confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) hold promise in improving bladder cancer diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the interobserver agreement of image interpretation using CLE for bladder cancer. Methods Experienced CLE urologists (n=2), novice CLE urologists (n=6), pathologists (n=4), and nonclinical researchers (n=5) were recruited to participate in a 2-hour computer-based training consisting of a teaching and validation set of intraoperative white light cystoscopy (WLC) and CLE video sequences from patients undergoing transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Interobserver agreement was determined using the κ statistic. Results Of the 31 bladder regions analyzed, 19 were cancer and 12 were benign. For cancer diagnosis, experienced CLE urologists had substantial agreement for both CLE and WLC+CLE (90%, κ 0.80) compared with moderate agreement for WLC alone (74%, κ 0.46), while novice CLE urologists had moderate agreement for CLE (77%, κ 0.55), WLC (78%, κ 0.54), and WLC+CLE (80%, κ 0.59). Pathologists had substantial agreement for CLE (81%, κ 0.61), and nonclinical researchers had moderate agreement (77%, κ 0.49) in cancer diagnosis. For cancer grading, experienced CLE urologists had fair to moderate agreement for CLE (68%, κ 0.64), WLC (74%, κ 0.67), and WLC+CLE (53%, κ 0.33), as did novice CLE urologists for CLE (53%, κ 0.39), WLC (66%, κ 0.50), and WLC+CLE (61%, κ 0.49). Pathologists (65%, κ 0.55) and nonclinical researchers (61%, κ 0.56) both had moderate agreement for CLE in cancer grading. Conclusions CLE is an adoptable technology for cancer diagnosis in novice CLE observers after a short training with moderate interobserver agreement and diagnostic accuracy similar to WLC alone. Experienced CLE observers may be capable of achieving substantial levels of agreement for cancer diagnosis that is higher than with WLC alone. PMID:23072435

  2. B7-H3 Promotes the Migration and Invasion of Human Bladder Cancer Cells via the PI3K/Akt/STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuchao; Guo, Guoning; Song, Jie; Cai, Zhiping; Yang, Jin; Chen, Zhiwen; Wang, Yun; Huang, Yaqin; Gao, Qiangguo

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of most common malignant cancer. Although previous studies have found abnormal expression of B7-H3 in human bladder cancer tissues, the exact role and molecular mechanism of B7-H3 in bladder cancer remain unknown. In this study, we first detected the expression of B7-H3 in human bladder cancer samples and cell lines, and analyzed its correlations with clinicopathological pathological parameters. Next, siRNAs or overexpression plasmids of B7-H3 were transfected into T24 or 5637 cells, and cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion were analyzed via CCK-8, colony formation, flow cytometry and transwell assays, protein expression levels were determined by western blotting. The results presented here showed B7-H3 was upregulated in bladder cancer samples compared with normal tissues, and the expression level was correlated with local invasion status. B7-H3 did not affect cell proliferation and apoptosis, but cell migration and invasion were changed through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2/9. Knockdown of B7-H3 resulted in decreased activity of the STAT3 and PI3K/Akt pathways, and the Akt served as an upstream regulator of the STAT3. Our results suggest that the overexpression of B7-H3 promotes the migration and invasion of human bladder cancer cells through the PI3K/Akt/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:28382144

  3. [Cancer procoagulant and cathepsin D activity in blood serum in patients with bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Darewicz, Barbara; Kudelski, Jacek; Chlabicz, Marcin; Domel, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Skrzydlewski, Zdzisław

    2005-06-01

    The increasing morbidity and mortality rates of bladder cancer forced the scientists to search for new unfailing diagnostic and therapeutic methods that will improve treatment effects. There are biochemical cancer markers as cancer procoagulant (CP) and cathepsin D which may be used to this end. The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity of the cancer procoagulant and cathepsin D in the blood serum in patients with superficial bladder cancer. The venous blood samples were from 15 patients with microscopically proved superficial bladder carcinoma (i.e. study group) and 15 normal volunteers as a control group. The serum blood CP activity was determined by the Gordon-Benson's coagulation method and expressed by the clotting time in seconds (s) while the cathepsin D activity was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau's method and expressed by a quantity of released tyrosine in nmol/ml per 4 hours. The CP activity in serum of patients with superficial bladder cancer was increased in statistically way as compared to the non-cancer controls (p<0.0001). The cathepsin D activity in blood serum of the study group was also enhanced as compared to the control group and the said values differed statistically (p<0.0351). It appears to be justifiable to apply the determination of the CP and cathepsin D activity in blood serum for the diagnostics of superficial bladder cancer.

  4. Cross-species analysis of the canine and human bladder cancer transcriptome and exome.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Stephen A; Xu, Tanjin; Goodall, Cheri; Rhodes, Adelaide C; Kashyap, Amita; He, Jun; Bracha, Shay

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the correspondence between transcriptome and exome alterations in canine bladder cancer and the correspondence between these alterations and cancer-driving genes and transcriptional alterations in human bladder cancer. We profiled canine bladder tumors using mRNA-seq and exome-seq in order to investigate the similarity of transcriptional alterations in bladder cancer, in humans and canines, at the levels of gene functions, pathways, and cytogenetic regions. We found that the transcriptomes of canine and human bladder cancer are remarkably similar at the functional and pathway levels. We demonstrated that canine bladder cancer involves coordinated differential expression of genes within cytogenetic bands, and that these patterns are consistent with those seen in human bladder cancer. We found that genes that are mutated in canine bladder cancer are more likely to be transcriptionally downregulated than non-mutated genes, in the tumor. Finally we report three novel mutations (FAM133B, RAB3GAP2, and ANKRD52) for canine bladder cancer.

  5. Possible link of pioglitazone with bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kanta; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Honjo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Yukiko; Mori, Kanako; Tatsuoka, Hisato; Matsuoka, Atsuko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Hiroki; Fujikawa, Jun; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    We retrospectively examined the frequency of bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes in relation to use of pioglitazone. Among a total of 663 patients identified to be taking pioglitazone, 9 had bladder cancer (1.36%). Overall the hazard ratio of 1.75 [95% CI: 0.89-3.45] for pioglitazone for bladder cancer was not significant. However the prevalence of bladder cancer was 2.10% in patients taking pioglitazone for less than 24 months which was significant increased (HR 2.73 [95% CI: 1.11-6.72]).

  6. The expression of p63 in bladder cancer vs. chronic bilharzial bladder.

    PubMed

    Mursi, Khaled; Agag, Ayman; Hammam, Olfat; Riad, Mahmoud; Daw, Mahmoud

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p63 in bladder cancer and the variation of expression in relation to histological type, grade and stage of the tumour, and whether bilharziasis (endemic in Egypt) has an effect on its expression, in an attempt to better understand the tumour behaviour and the possibility of using p63 as a prognostic marker. In a prospective study, biopsies were taken from the bladders of 70 patients, who were divided into three groups; group A comprised 10 with a normal urothelium, group B comprised 20 with chronic cystitis (bilharzial and non-bilharzial) and group C contained 40 with bladder cancer. The biopsies were examined for the expression of p63, using immunohistochemical techniques. The mean (SD) ages of groups A, B and C were 45.2 (9.5), 50.5 (11.7) and 60.5 (9.9) years, respectively. There was a statistically significant decrease in the expression and immunoreactivity in group C (P < 0.05), and a significant decrease with advancing tumour stage and grade (P < 0.01). In cases of squamous cell carcinoma there was a statistically significant lower immunoreactivity than in transitional cell carcinoma (P < 0.05). There was a tendency for a statistically significant decrease in the immunoreactivity in bilharzial cystitis (P < 0.05), but in the malignant group, bilharziasis had no apparent effect on the pattern of expression. p63 might be a helpful biomarker and adjunct in predicting the biological behaviour and progression of tumours. Further studies are recommended to elucidate more clearly its role as a prognostic indicator and its utility as a tumour marker.

  7. TERT Core Promotor Mutations in Early-Onset Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giedl, Johannes; Rogler, Anja; Wild, Andreas; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Filbeck, Thomas; Burger, Maximilian; Rümmele, Petra; Hurst, Carolyn; Knowles, Margaret; Hartmann, Arndt; Zinnall, Ulrike; Stoehr, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Activating mutations in the core promoter of the TERT gene have been described in many different tumor entities. In vitro models showed a two- to fourfold increase in transcriptional activity of the TERT promoter through creation of a consensus binding motif for Ets/TCF transcription factors caused by these mutations. TERT core promoter mutations are the most common mutations in bladder cancer with a frequency between 55.6% and 82.8% described so far, and are independent of stage and grade. Since limited data on molecular alterations of early-onset bladder tumors exists, we assessed the frequency of TERT core promoter mutations in early-onset bladder cancer. Two cohorts of bladder tumors (early-onset patient group; n=144 (age of onset of disease ≤45 years); unselected, consecutive group; n=125) were examined for TERT core promoter mutations. After microdissection and extraction of DNA the corresponding hotspot regions in the TERT core promoter were examined by Sanger-sequencing or a SNaPshot approach. A significantly lower frequency of TERT core promoter mutations was found in tumors from the early-onset cohort compared to the consecutive cohort (57.6% vs. 84.8%, p<0.001). Among the early-onset cohort cases younger than the cohort's median age of 39 years at disease onset showed a significantly reduced number of TERT promoter mutations (31/67, 46,3%) than cases aged between 39 and 45 years (52/77, 67.5%; p=0.012). This association was not found in the consecutive cases. Mutation status was independent of tumor stage and grade. We conclude that in tumors from early-onset bladder cancer patients TERT core promoter mutations are not as frequent as in bladder tumors from consecutive cases, but seem to play an important role there as well. In patients below 39 years of age TERT core promoter mutations are a more infrequent event, suggesting different mechanisms of tumorigenesis in these young patients. PMID:27313781

  8. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. Methods From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field "box" pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. Results The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). Conclusion IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate. PMID:21679408

  9. Inhibition of Bladder Cancer by Broccoli Isothiocyanates Sulforaphane and Erucin: Characterization, Metabolism and Interconversion

    PubMed Central

    Abbaoui, Besma; Riedl, Kenneth M; Ralston, Robin A; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Steven J; Clinton, Steven K; Mortazavi, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli, are associated with lower bladder cancer risk. Our objectives are to investigate these observations and determine the role of isothiocyanates in primary or secondary bladder cancer prevention. We initially investigate the mechanisms whereby broccoli and broccoli sprout extracts and pure isothiocyanates inhibit normal, non-invasive (RT4) and invasive (J82, UMUC3) human urothelial cell viability. Sulforaphane (IC50= 5.66±1.2μM) and erucin (IC50= 8.79±1.3μM) are found to be the most potent inhibitors and normal cells are least sensitive. This observation is associated with downregulation of survivin, EGFR and HER2/neu, G2/M cell cycle accumulation and apoptosis. In a murine UMUC3 xenograft model, we fed semipurified diets containing 4% broccoli sprouts, or 2% broccoli sprout isothiocyanate extract; or gavaged pure sulforaphane or erucin (each at 295 μmol/kg, similar to dietary exposure); and report tumor weight reduction of 42% (p=0.02), 42% (p=0.04), 33% (p=0.04) and 58% (p<0.0001), respectively. Sulforaphane and erucin metabolites are present in mouse plasma (micromolar range) and tumor tissue, with N-acetyl cysteine conjugates as the most abundant. Interconversion of sulforaphane and erucin metabolites was observed. This work supports development of fully characterized, novel food products for phase I/II human studies targeting bladder cancer prevention. PMID:23038615

  10. PTPD1 Supports Receptor Stability and Mitogenic Signaling in Bladder Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Porpora, Monia; Garbi, Corrado; Galgani, Mario; Santoriello, Margherita; Mascolo, Massimo; di Lorenzo, Domenico; Altieri, Vincenzo; Quarto, Maria; Terracciano, Luigi; Gottesman, Max E.; Insabato, Luigi; Feliciello, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    PTPD1, a cytosolic non-receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase, stimulates the Src-EGF transduction pathway. Localization of PTPD1 at actin cytoskeleton and adhesion sites is required for cell scattering and migration. Here, we show that during EGF stimulation, PTPD1 is rapidly recruited to endocytic vesicles containing the EGF receptor. Endosomal localization of PTPD1 is mediated by interaction with KIF16B, an endosomal kinesin that modulates receptor recycling at the plasma membrane. Silencing of PTPD1 promotes degradation of EGF receptor and inhibits downstream ERK signaling. We also found that PTPD1 is markedly increased in bladder cancer tissue samples. PTPD1 levels positively correlated with the grading and invasiveness potential of these tumors. Transgenic expression of an inactive PTPD1 mutant or genetic knockdown of the endogenous PTPD1 severely inhibited both growth and motility of human bladder cancer cells. These findings identify PTPD1 as a novel component of the endocytic machinery that impacts on EGF receptor stability and on growth and motility of bladder cancer cells. PMID:20923765

  11. Nitrate in drinking water and bladder cancer risk in Spain.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Herrera, Nadia; Cantor, Kenneth P; Malats, Nuria; Silverman, Debra T; Tardón, Adonina; García-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2015-02-01

    Nitrate is a widespread contaminant in drinking water and ingested nitrate under conditions resulting in endogenous nitrosation is suspected to be carcinogenic. However, the suggested association between nitrate in drinking water and bladder cancer remains inconsistent. We evaluated the long-term exposure to drinking water nitrate as a risk factor for bladder cancer, considering endogenous nitrosation modifiers and other covariables. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study of bladder cancer in Spain (1998-2001). Residential histories and water consumption information were ascertained through personal interviews. Historical nitrate levels (1940-2000) were estimated in study municipalities based on monitoring records and water source. Residential histories of study subjects were linked with nitrate estimates by year and municipality to calculate individual exposure from age 18 to recruitment. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for bladder cancer among 531 cases and 556 controls with reliable interviews and nitrate exposure information covering at least 70% of years from age 18 to interview. Average residential levels ranged from 2.1mg/L to 12.0mg/L among regions. Adjusted OR (95%CI) for average residential levels relative to ≤ 5 mg/L were 1.2 (0.7-2.0) for >5-10mg/L and 1.1 (0.6-1.9) for >10mg/L. The OR for subjects with longest exposure duration (>20 years) to highest levels (>9.5mg/L) was 1.4 (0.9-2.3). Stratification by intake of vitamin C, vitamin E, meat, and gastric ulcer diagnosis did not modify these results. A non-significant negative association was found with waterborne ingested nitrate with an OR of 0.7 (0.4-1.0) for >8 vs. ≤ 4 mg/day. Adjustment for several covariables showed similar results to crude analyses. Bladder cancer risk was inconsistently associated with chronic exposure to drinking water nitrate at levels below the current regulatory limit. Elevated risk is suggested only among subjects with longest

  12. Bladder cancer among hairdressers: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schablon, Anja; Schedlbauer, Grita; Dulon, Madeleine; Nienhaus, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Background Occupational risks for bladder cancer in hairdressers by using hair products have been examined in many epidemiological studies. But owing to small sample sizes of the studies and the resulting lack of statistical power, the results of these studies have been inconsistent and significant associations have rarely been found. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis to determine summary risk ratios (SRRs) for the risk of bladder cancer among hairdressers. Studies were identified by a MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL search and by the reference lists of articles/relevant reviews. Statistical tests for publication bias and for heterogeneity as well as sensitivity analysis were applied. In addition, the study quality and the risk of bias were assessed using six criteria. Results 42 studies were included and statistically significantly increased risks around 1.3–1.7 were found for all but one analysis. The SRR increased with duration of employment from 1.30 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.48) for ‘ever registered as hairdresser’ to 1.70 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.88) for ‘job held ≥10 years’. No difference was found between the risk for smoking-adjusted data (SRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.61) and no adjustment (SRR 1.33, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.50). Studies assessed as being of high quality (n=11) and of moderate quality (n=31) showed similar SRRs. There was no evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity in all analyses. Conclusion In summary, our results showed an increased and statistically significant risk for bladder cancer among hairdressers, in particular for hairdressers in jobs held ≥10 years. Residual confounding by smoking cannot be totally ruled out. Because of the long latency times of bladder cancer it remains an open question whether hairdressers working prior to 1980 and after 1980, when some aromatic amines were banned as hair dye ingredients, have the same risk for bladder cancer. PMID:20447989

  13. Knockdown of Regulator of Cullins-1 (ROC1) Expression Induces Bladder Cancer Cell Cycle Arrest at the G2 Phase and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Zhihong; Qu, Ping; Zhou, Zhengdong; Zeng, Yigang; Fan, Jie; Liu, Yong; Guo, Yifeng; Qiu, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Regulator of Cullins-1 (ROC1) is a key subunit in the Cullin-RING ligase (CRL) protein complex. Overexpression of ROC1 protein is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis of non-muscle invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (NMIBC). This study was designed to assess the effects of ROC1 knockdown in bladder cancer cells and to determine the potential mechanisms involved. A total of 112 bladder cancer tissue specimens were recruited for immunohistochemical analyses of ROC1 overexpression. Bladder cancer cell lines were used to knockdown ROC1 expression using ROC1 siRNA. Our data showed that ROC1 knockdown remarkably inhibited bladder cancer cell growth, arrested cells at the G2 phase of the cell cycle, and induced the p53-dependent cell senescence. Molecularly, G2 arrest was associated with upregulation of p21, p27, cyclin B1, and Cdc2 proteins. ROC1 knockdown induced-senescence functioned through p53/p21 pathway. Knockdown of p21 expression partially rescued ROC1 knockdown-induced growth inhibition in cancer cells. Furthermore, nude mouse xenograft analyses confirmed these in vitro data. In conclusion, data from the current study indicate that ROC1 plays an essential role in bladder cancer progression and could serve as a novel anticancer target for bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC). PMID:23667514

  14. Biodistribution of Evans blue in an orthotopic AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma model: implication for the improved diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) using dye-guided white-light cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Elsen, Sanne; Lerut, Evelyne; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; van der Aa, Frank; van Poppel, Hein; de Witte, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    expression of desmoglein-1 in tumour samples, together with the reduced presence of desmosomes seen with TEM, likely imply that desmosomes play an important role in the ultrastructural differences between healthy rat urothelium and tumour tissue, and secondary to that, to the differential uptake of EB in both tissues. We consider that our findings could be useful for future clinical developments in the field of diagnostics for bladder cancer. © 2015 The Authors. BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Tissue engineering of bladder using vascular endothelial growth factor gene-modified endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bai-Song; Xie, Hua; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Geng, Hong-Quan; Zhou, Jun-Mei; Pan, Jun; Chen, Fang

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene-modified endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seeded onto bladder acellular matrix grafts (BAMGs), to enhance the blood supply in tissue-engineered bladders in a porcine model. Autologous porcine peripheral EPCs were isolated, cultured, expanded, characterized, and modified with the VEGF gene using an adenovirus vector. The expression of VEGF was examined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). VEGF gene modified EPCs were seeded onto BAMG and cultured for 3 days before implantation into pigs for bladder tissue engineering. A partial bladder cystectomy was performed in 12 pigs. The experimental group (6 pigs) received VEGF gene-modified EPC-seeded BAMG. The control group (6 pigs) received BAMG without seeded EPCs. The resulting tissue-engineered bladders were subject to a general and histological analysis. Microvessel density (MVD) was assessed using immunohistochemistry. The ex vivo transfection efficiency of EPCs was greater than 60%-70% when concentrated adenovirus was used. The genetically modified cells expressed both VEGF and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Masson's trichrome staining of cross sections of the cultured cells seeded to BAMG showed cell attachment and proliferation on the surface of the BAMG. Histological examination revealed bladder regeneration in a time-dependent fashion. Significant increases in MVD were observed in the experimental group, in comparison with the control group. VEGF-modified EPCs significantly enhanced neovascularization, compared with BAMG alone. These results indicate that EPCs, combined with VEGF gene therapy, may be a suitable approach for increasing blood supply in the tissue engineering of bladders. Thus, a useful strategy to achieve a tissue-engineered bladder is indicated.

  16. Residual tumor micro-foci and overwhelming regulatory T lymphocyte infiltration are the causes of bladder cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kalli, Francesca; Conteduca, Giuseppina; Tardito, Samuele; Curto, Monica; Grillo, Federica; Mastracci, Luca; Bernardi, Cinzia; Nasi, Giorgia; Minaglia, Francesco; Simonato, Alchiede; Carmignani, Giorgio; Ferrera, Francesca; Fenoglio, Daniela; Filaci, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer has an unexplained, high recurrence rate. Causes of recurrence might include the presence of sporadic tumor micro-foci in the residual urothelial tissue after surgery associated with an inverted ratio between intratumoral effector and regulatory T cell subsets. Hence, surgical specimens of both tumors and autologous, macroscopically/histologically free-of-tumor tissues were collected from 28 and 20 patients affected by bladder or renal cancer, respectively. The frequencies of effector (IFNγ+ and IL17+ T cells) and regulatory (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo and CD8+CD28-CD127loCD39+ Treg) T cell subpopulations among tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were analyzed by immunofluorescence, while the gene expression of MAGE-A1 and MAGE-A2 tumor-associated antigens was studied by RT-PCR. The results show that both the T cell infiltrate and the frequency of MAGE-A1/A2 gene expression were comparable in tumors and in autologous free-of-tumor tissues in bladder cancer, while the autologous free-of-tumor renal tissues showed reduced T cell infiltrate and frequency of MAGE gene expression as compared to the autologous tumors. Importantly, the intra-tumor T effector/Treg cell ratio was consistently <1 in bladder cancer patients (n. 7) who relapsed within two years, while it was always >1 in patients (n. 6) without recurrence (regardless of tumor stage) (P = 0.0006, Odds ratio = 195). These unprecedented findings clarify the pathogenic mechanism of bladder cancer recurrence and suggest that microscopically undetectable micro-foci of tumor may predispose to recurrence when associated with an inverted intratumoral T effector/Treg cell ratio. PMID:26824503

  17. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  18. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  19. Comprehensive analysis of aberrantly expressed profiles of lncRNAs and miRNAs with associated ceRNA network in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaobo; Zhai, Jing; Wang, Ping; Kong, Feng; Jin, Xunbo

    2016-01-01

    Although initially thought to be transcriptional noise, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are gaining increased attention in human cancers as its diversity function. At present, lncRNAs are regarded as the main part of competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network due to its regulation on protein-coding gene expression by acting as miRNA sponges. However, functional roles of lncRNA-mediated ceRNAs in muscle-invasive bladder cancer remain unclear. To clarify relevant potential mechanisms, here we comprehensively compared the expression profiles of mRNAs, lncRNAs and miRNAs between 322 muscle-invasive bladder cancer tissues and 19 non-tumor bladder tissues, based on the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 22 lncRNAs were identified as aberrantly expressed and had correlations with tumorigenesis and/or progression of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (|log2FoldChange| > 1.5, corrected P value < 0.01). 6 out of the 22 dysregulated lncRNAs functioned as prognostic biomarkers for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer according to the overall survival analysis (P value < 0.05). Finally, a dysregulated lncRNA-associated ceRNA network was successfully constructed, which inculdes five muscle-invasive bladder cancer-specific lncRNAs, nine miRNAs and 32 mRNAs. In summary, our study identified novel lncRNAs as candidate prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, based on large-scale sample size. More importantly, the newly identified ceRNA network will be beneficial for improving the understanding of lncRNA-mediated ceRNA regulatory mechanisms in the pathogenesis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27863388

  20. Fluid intake and risk of bladder cancer in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiachen; Kelsey, Karl T; Giovannucci, Edward; Michaud, Dominique S

    2014-09-01

    Increase in fluid intake may reduce bladder cancer risk by decreasing the contact time between carcinogens in urine and bladder epithelium. However, this association has not been examined in a large cohort of women. The association between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk in two large prospective women's cohorts with 427 incident bladder cancer cases was examined. Detailed information on total fluid intake was collected by repeated food frequency questionnaires over time. Multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results from the two cohorts were pooled together using the random-effects model. Using the average values from the earliest two dietary assessments and lowest quartile as reference, a suggestive inverse association was observed between total fluid intake and overall bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.61-1.12, p-value for trend: 0.08), and invasive bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.97, p-value for trend: 0.04). Among heavy cigarette smokers, women with the highest quartile of total fluid intake had a 38% decrease in bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41-0.93, p-value for trend: 0.02). The findings suggested that total fluid intake may reduce bladder cancer risk for female smokers, as well as reduce the risk of invasive bladder cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  1. Fluid intake and risk of bladder cancer in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiachen; Kelsey, Karl T.; Giovannucci, Edward; Michaud, Dominique S.

    2014-01-01

    Increase in fluid intake may reduce bladder cancer risk by decreasing the contact time between carcinogens in urine and bladder epithelium. However, this association has not been examined in a large cohort of women. We examined the association between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk in two large prospective women's cohorts with 427 incident bladder cancer cases. Detailed information on total fluid intake was collected by repeated food frequency questionnaires over time. Multivariable relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results from the two cohorts were pooled together using the random-effects model. Using the average values from the earliest two dietary assessments and lowest quartile as reference, a suggestive inverse association was observed between total fluid intake and overall bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.61-1.12, p-value for trend: 0.08), and invasive bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.23-0.97, p-value for trend: 0.04). Among heavy cigarette smokers, women with the highest quartile of total fluid intake had a 38% decrease in bladder cancer risk (RR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41-0.93, p-value for trend: 0.02). Our findings suggest that total fluid intake may reduce bladder cancer risk for female smokers, as well as reduce the risk of invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24500943

  2. Expression of RCAS1 Correlates with Urothelial Bladder Cancer Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Brożyna, Anna A.; Siekiera, Jerzy; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    RCAS1 is a protein that participates in regulation of the tumor microenvironment and its immune responses, all in order to evade the immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze RCAS1 expression in urothelial bladder cancer cells (and in fibroblasts and macrophages of the tumor stroma) and its relationship with the histological pattern of malignancy. Eighty-three postcystectomy patients were enrolled. We analyzed the histological maturity (grade), progress (pT stage), tissue invasion type (TIT), nonclassic differentiation number (NDN), and the ability to metastasize (pN). The expression of RCAS1 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Indicators of histological malignancy were observed solely in association with the RCAS1 expression in cells in the border parts (BPs) of the tumor. Histological malignancy of the tumor, indicated by the pT and pN, and metastasis-free survival time, correlated significantly with RCAS1 expression in tumor neoplastic cells, whereas malignancy determined by grade, TIT, and NDN correlated with RCAS1 expression in fibroblasts and macrophages in the tumor microenvironment. These findings suggest that the increased RCAS1 expression depends on its cellular source and that RCAS1 expression itself is a component of various signaling pathways. The immune escape occurs within the tumor BPs, where the increase in the RCAS1 expression occurs within tumor cells and stromal cells in its microenvironment. We conclude that the histological pattern of tumor malignancy, indicated by grade, TIT, NDN, pT, and pN is a morphological indicator of immune escape. PMID:25674852

  3. Profilin 1 is a Potential Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Zoidakis, Jerome; Makridakis, Manousos; Zerefos, Panagiotis G.; Bitsika, Vasiliki; Esteban, Sergio; Frantzi, Maria; Stravodimos, Konstantinos; Anagnou, Nikolaos P.; Roubelakis, Maria G.; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Vlahou, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Of the most important clinical needs for bladder cancer (BC) management is the identification of biomarkers for disease aggressiveness. Urine is a “gold mine” for biomarker discovery, nevertheless, with multiple proteins being in low amounts, urine proteomics becomes challenging. In the present study we applied a fractionation strategy of urinary proteins based on the use of immobilized metal affinity chromatography for the discovery of biomarkers for aggressive BC. Urine samples from patients with non invasive (two pools) and invasive (two pools) BC were subjected to immobilized metal affinity chromatography fractionation and eluted proteins analyzed by 1D-SDS-PAGE, band excision and liquid chromatography tandem MS. Among the identified proteins, multiple corresponded to proteins with affinity for metals and/or reported to be phosphorylated and included proteins with demonstrated association with BC such as MMP9, fibrinogen forms, and clusterin. In agreement to the immobilized metal affinity chromatography results, aminopeptidase N, profilin 1, and myeloblastin were further found to be differentially expressed in urine from patients with invasive compared with non invasive BC and benign controls, by Western blot or Elisa analysis, nevertheless exhibiting high interindividual variability. By tissue microarray analysis, profilin 1 was found to have a marked decrease of expression in the epithelial cells of the invasive (T2+) versus high risk non invasive (T1G3) tumors with occasional expression in stroma; importantly, this pattern strongly correlated with poor prognosis and increased mortality. The functional relevance of profilin 1 was investigated in the T24 BC cells where blockage of the protein by the use of antibodies resulted in decreased cell motility with concomitant decrease in actin polymerization. Collectively, our study involves the application of a fractionation method of urinary proteins and as one main result of this analysis reveals the

  4. Bladder cancer diagnosis from bladder wash by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as a novel test for tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gok, Seher; Aydin, Ozge Z; Sural, Yavuz S; Zorlu, Ferruh; Bayol, Umit; Severcan, Feride

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a more sensitive, rapid, non-destructive and operator-independent analytical diagnostic method for bladder cancer recurrence from bladder wash than other routinely used urine cytology and cystoscopy methods. A total of 136 patients were recruited. FTIR spectroscopic experiments were carried out as a blind study, the classification results of which were then compared with those of cytology and cystoscopy. Firstly, 71 samples (n = 37; bladder cancer and n = 34; control) were studied with transmittance FTIR spectroscopy. After achieving successful differentiation of the groups, to develop a more rapid diagnostic tool and check the reproducibility of the results, the work was continued with different samples (n = 65 as n = 44; bladder cancer and n = 21; control), using the reflection mode (ATR) of FTIR spectroscopy by a different operator. The results revealed significant alterations in moleculer content in the cancer group. Based on the spectral differences, using transmittance FTIR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics, the diseased group was successfully differentiated from the control. When only carcinoma group was taken into consideration a sensitivity value of 100% was achieved. Similar results were also obtained by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study shows the power of infrared spectroscopy in the diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  5. Blocking PGE2-induced tumour repopulation abrogates bladder cancer chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Kurtova, Antonina V.; Xiao, Jing; Mo, Qianxing; Pazhanisamy, Senthil; Krasnow, Ross; Lerner, Seth P.; Chen, Fengju; Roh, Terrence T.; Lay, Erica; Ho, Philip Levy; Chan, Keith Syson

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy is effective in debulking tumour masses initially; however, in some patients tumours become progressively unresponsive after multiple treatment cycles. Previous studies have demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are selectively enriched after chemotherapy through enhanced survival1–3. Here we reveal a new mechanism by which bladder CSCs actively contribute to therapeutic resistance via an unexpected proliferative response to re-populate residual tumours between chemotherapy cycles, using human bladder cancer xenograft