Science.gov

Sample records for bladder outflow obstruction

  1. Sham versus transurethral microwave thermotherapy in patients with symptoms of benign prostatic bladder outflow obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, C.W.; Reddy, P.; Johnson, H.; Ramsay, J.W.; Carter, S.C. . Dept. of Urology)

    1993-01-02

    Transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT) is a single-session, minimally invasive outpatient treatment for patients with symptoms of benign prostatic bladder outflow obstruction. The authors designed a prospective randomized trial to identify any placebo response. Patients with a Madsen symptom score over 8 for at least 6 months were eligible for study. Patients with renal dysfunction, upper urinary tract disease, co-existing bladder disease and malignant prostatic change were excluded. 43 patients were studied: 21 were randomized to receive a sham treatment and 22 to thermotherapy. The thermotherapy group showed a 70% decrease in the mean Madsen score, a 53% increase in flow-rate, and 92% decrease in residual urine volume. No Significant change was seen in these mean indices in the sham group. There was no difference in the main complication of transient hematuria between the two groups. However, there was a 22% frequency of acute retention in the TUMT group. The results show a little significant placebo component to the subjective and objective improvement that occurs in patients who have received TUMT.

  2. Beta adrenergic modulation of spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field-stimulated contractions in isolated strips of rat urinary bladder from normal animals and animals with partial bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J I; Rouget, C; Palea, S; Granato, C; Korstanje, C

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions in isolated rat bladder strips from normal and from 6 weeks partial bladder outflow obstruction (pBOO) animals were studied to identify the potential site of action for the β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist mirabegron in detrusor overactivity in rats. For this, effects of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline and mirabegron were tested in presence or absence of selective antagonists for β-AR subtypes, namely CGP-20712A for β1-AR, ICI-118,551 for β2-AR, and L-748,337 for β3-AR. In detrusor strips from both normal and obstructed animals, EFS-induced contractions were weakly affected by isoprenaline and even less so by mirabegron. In contrast, microcontraction activity was more potently reduced by isoprenaline (pIC50 7.3; Emax ±85 %), whereas mirabegron showed a small effect. In pBOO strips, concentration response curves for isoprenaline and mirabegron at inhibition of EFS and spontaneous microcontractions were similar to those in normal strips. Isoprenaline-induced inhibition of microcontractions and EFS was antagonized by the β1-AR antagonist, but not by the β2- and β3-AR antagonists. In the context of β3-AR-mediated bladder functions for mirabegron in other experiments, the current data question a role for effects at spontaneous microcontractions, or neurogenic detrusor stimulation in the mode of action for mirabegron in vivo, since functional bladder effects for mirabegron are reported to occur at much lower concentrations.

  3. Bladder outlet obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowing of the urethra Tests to determine how fast urine flows out of the body ( uroflowmetry ) Tests to see how much the urine flow is blocked and how well the bladder contracts (urodynamic testing) Ultrasound to locate the blockage of urine and find ...

  4. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in men Scarring of the urinary channel (urethra) or bladder neck, as a result of injury or surgery Use of certain medications, including antihistamines, decongestants ... of bladder outlet obstruction is important to prevent serious problems caused by ...

  5. Left ventricular outflow obstruction and necrotizing enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H.A.; Haney, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Two neonates had unusually rapid development of necrotizing enterocolitis within 24 hours of birth. Both patients had decreased systemic perfusion secondary to aortic atresia. Onset of either clinical or radiographic manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis in the first day of life should alert one to the possible presence of severe left ventricular outflow obstruction.

  6. Murine bladder wall biomechanics following partial bladder obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph; Drzewiecki, Beth A; Merryman, W David; Pope, John C

    2013-10-18

    Evaluation of bladder wall mechanical behavior is important in understanding the functional changes that occur in response to pathologic processes such as partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO). In the murine model, the traditional approach of cystometry to describe bladder compliance can prove difficult secondary to small bladder capacity and surgical exposure of the bladder. Here, we explore an alternative technique to characterize murine mechanical properties by applying biaxial mechanical stretch to murine bladders that had undergone pBOO. 5-6 week old female C57/Bl6 mice were ovariectomized and subjected to pBOO via an open surgical urethral ligation and sacrificed after 4 weeks (n=12). Age matched controls (n=6) were also analyzed. Bladders were separated based on phenotype of fibrotic (n=6) or distended (n=6) at the time of harvest. Biaxial testing was performed in modified Kreb's solution at 37°C. Tissue was preconditioned to 10 cycles and mechanical response was evaluated by comparing axial strain at 50kPa. The normal murine bladders exhibited anisotropy and were stiffer in the longitudinal direction. All mice showed a loss of anisotropy after 4 weeks of pBOO. The two phenotypes observed after pBOO, fibrotic and distended, exhibited less and more extensibility, respectively. These proof-of-principle data demonstrate that pBOO creates quantifiable changes in the mechanics of the murine bladder that can be effectively quantified with biaxial testing.

  7. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  8. Distended Bladder Presenting with Altered Mental Status and Venous Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Washco, Vaughan; Engel, Lee; Smith, David L.; McCarron, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background New onset or acute worsening of bilateral lower extremity swelling is commonly caused by venous congestion from decompensated heart failure, pulmonary disease, liver dysfunction, or kidney insufficiency. A thromboembolic event, lymphatic obstruction, or even external compression of venous flow can also be the culprit. Case Report We report the case of an 83-year-old male with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome that progressed to acute myeloid leukemia, bipolar disorder, and benign prostatic hypertrophy. He presented with altered mental status and new onset lower extremity edema caused by acute bladder outflow obstruction. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed the patient's distended bladder compressing bilateral external iliac veins. Conclusion Insertion of a Foley catheter resulted in several liters of urine output and marked improvement in his lower extremity edema and mental status a few hours later. Our extensive workup failed to reveal a cause of the patient's acute change in mental status, and we attributed it to a concept known as cystocerebral syndrome. PMID:25829883

  9. Primary bladder neck obstruction may be determined by postural imbalances.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Tommaso Ciro; Zago, Matteo; Pisu, Stefano; Ciprandi, Daniela; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-12-01

    Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a frequent under-investigated urological condition in which the bladder neck fails to open adequately during voiding. In the majority of cases no known etiological factor can be found. In this study we propose a new hypothesis to explain the origin of the disease in young male patients with no neurological disorders. We suggest a possible role of an unbalanced biomechanics of the pelvis on urethral sphincters activity and on functional bladder capacity. To support the proposed hypothesis, we present pilot gait analysis data of young male patients with primary bladder neck obstruction.

  10. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy. PMID:27127361

  11. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy.

  12. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction: underestimated cause of hypotension and hemodynamic instability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, which is typically associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the third most frequent cause of unexplained hypotension. This underestimated problem may temporarily accompany various diseases (it is found in even <1% of patients with no tangible cardiac disease) and clinical situations (hypovolemia, general anesthesia). It is currently assumed that left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is a dynamic phenomenon, the occurrence of which requires the coexistence of predisposing anatomic factors and a physiological condition that induces it. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction should entail immediate implementation of the therapy to eliminate the factors that can potentially intensify the obstruction. Echocardiography is the basic modality in the diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. This paper presents four patients in whom the immediate implementation of bedside echocardiography enabled a rapid diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and implementation of proper treatment. PMID:26674265

  13. Right ventricular outflow obstruction with intact ventricular septum in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, A M; Darrell, J C; Pallegrini, R V; Woelfel, G F; Grant, K; Marrangoni, A G

    1997-01-01

    Cardiothoracic surgeons whose practice is limited to adults rarely see patients with right ventricular outflow obstruction and an intact ventricular septum. Of more than 10,000 open-heart procedures performed at our institution from 1983 to 1993 (in patients 18 to 75 years old), only 5 procedures were for correction of this problem. Both the pulmonary valve and the subvalvular area were abnormal in these 5 patients, and 4 of the 5 had subvalvular stenosis. The gradient across the right ventricular outflow tract was measured by cardiac catheterization before repair in all patients and averaged 118 mmHg. Various surgical approaches were used for repair. In the 2 patients whose pressures were measured postoperatively, the gradients were 25 mmHg and 45 mmHg, respectively. There were no operative deaths. At follow-up (range, 2 months to 5 years after surgery), all patients were in New York Heart Association functional class I and all had murmurs. Those who underwent echocardiography were found to have minimal gradients across the right ventricular outflow tract. Images PMID:9205983

  14. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (P<0.05). Mean IPP was significantly greater in obstructed patients (P<0.001). Area under ROC curve was 0.700 for PV and 0.821 for IPP. Prostate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  15. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Piva e Mattos, Beatriz; Torres, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Rebelatto, Taiane Francieli; Loreto, Melina Silva de; Scolari, Fernando Luís

    2012-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a prevalent genetic disease characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy, presenting dynamic obstruction of outflow tract with subaortic gradient happening at rest in 30% of the cases. It is attributed to the intricate interaction between the anterior mitral leaflet, the interventricular septum and altered flow vectors generated in left ventricle along with changes in outflow tract geometry. Mitral regurgitation in varying degrees is found with or without association with structural deformities of the valve apparatus. The exercise echocardiogram evidences latent obstruction easily induced by exercise in 60 to 75% of non-obstructive forms. The determination of the gradient under this condition must be considered in routine investigation of patients with mild or no obstruction at rest. The evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy incorporates methods based on the ultrasound image, which, along with MRI, allow recognizing ventricular obstruction generating mechanisms, thus facilitating the diagnosis and management of obstructive and latent obstructive forms.

  16. Bladder outlet obstruction treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    Fifty-nine males with bladder outlet obstruction were treated with transurethral ultrasonic aspiration of the prostate. Utilizing a 26.5 French urethral sheath, surgery was accomplished with a 10 French, 0-700 micron vibration level ultrasonic tip with an excursion rate of 39 kHz. Complete removal of the adenoma was accomplished, followed by transurethral electrocautery biopsies of both lateral lobes to compare pathologic specimens. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory voiding patterns in 57 of 59 men (96%). Two men developed bladder neck contractures. Pathologic comparisons showed 100% correlation between aspirated and TUR specimens (56 BPH, 3 adeno-carcinoma). Forty-sevel men were active sexually preoperatively (6 with inflatable penile prostheses). Post ultrasonic aspiration, 46 men had erectile function similar to preoperative levels with one patient suffering erectile dysfunction. Forty men (85%) had antegrade ejaculation while 7 (15%) experienced retrograde or retarded ejaculation. No patients were incontinent.

  17. Dynamic obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract in four young dogs.

    PubMed

    Connolly, D J; Boswood, A

    2003-07-01

    Four young dogs presented for evaluation of left-sided systolic heart murmurs all showed echocardiographic changes consistent with dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction and subjective evidence of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. In three of the dogs, abnormal mitral valve apparatus and systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral valve leaflet with associated mitral insufficiency were also detected. All dogs were medicated with a beta1-adrenergic antagonist. Subsequent examinations showed that the dynamic LVOT obstruction and left ventricular concentric hypertrophy had almost completely resolved. Dynamic LVOT obstruction is a rare condition of young dogs of different breeds. The precise aetiology of the condition remains uncertain. Whether resolution of the outflow obstruction in these four cases was a consequence of treatment or due to changes in ventricular architecture brought about by ageing cannot be established.

  18. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male.

  19. Giant Urinary Bladder and Bilateral Giant Hydronephrosis due to Bladder Neck Obstruction: One Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Mohammed Fadl; Riyach, Omar; Ahallal, Youness; Mellas, Soufiane; Khallouk, Abdelhak; El Fassi, Mohammed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral hydronephrosis secondary to urinary obstruction leads to a buildup of back pressure in the urinary tract and may lead to impairment of renal function. Cases of giant hydronephrosis are rare and usually contain no more than 1-2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. Here, we report a rarely seen case with giant urinary bladder and bilateral giant hydronephrosis due to bladder neck obstruction which contains 4000 mL fluid in the collecting system of the kidney mimicking an ascites in an adult male. PMID:22606637

  20. Deletion of neuropilin 2 enhances detrusor contractility following bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Evalynn; Cristofaro, Vivian; Lukianov, Stefan; Burkhard, Fiona C.; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Bielenberg, Diane R.; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic urethral obstruction and the ensuing bladder wall remodeling can lead to diminished bladder smooth muscle (BSM) contractility and debilitating lower urinary tract symptoms. No effective pharmacotherapy exists to restore BSM contractile function. Neuropilin 2 (Nrp2) is a transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in BSM. Nrp2 deletion in mice leads to increased BSM contraction. We determined whether genetic ablation of Nrp2 could restore BSM contractility following obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) was created by urethral occlusion in mice with either constitutive and ubiquitous, or inducible smooth muscle–specific deletion of Nrp2, and Nrp2-intact littermates. Mice without obstruction served as additional controls. Contractility was measured by isometric tension testing. Nrp2 deletion prior to pBOO increased force generation in BSM 4 weeks following surgery. Deletion of Nrp2 in mice already subjected to pBOO for 4 weeks showed increased contractility of tissues tested 6 weeks after surgery compared with nondeleted controls. Assessment of tissues from patients with urodynamically defined bladder outlet obstruction revealed reduced NRP2 levels in obstructed bladders with compensated compared with decompensated function, relative to asymptomatic controls. We conclude that downregulation of Nrp2 promotes BSM force generation. Neuropilin 2 may represent a novel target to restore contractility following obstruction. PMID:28194441

  1. Deletion of neuropilin 2 enhances detrusor contractility following bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Evalynn; Cristofaro, Vivian; Lukianov, Stefan; Burkhard, Fiona C; Gheinani, Ali Hashemi; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Bielenberg, Diane R; Sullivan, Maryrose P; Adam, Rosalyn M

    2017-02-09

    Chronic urethral obstruction and the ensuing bladder wall remodeling can lead to diminished bladder smooth muscle (BSM) contractility and debilitating lower urinary tract symptoms. No effective pharmacotherapy exists to restore BSM contractile function. Neuropilin 2 (Nrp2) is a transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in BSM. Nrp2 deletion in mice leads to increased BSM contraction. We determined whether genetic ablation of Nrp2 could restore BSM contractility following obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) was created by urethral occlusion in mice with either constitutive and ubiquitous, or inducible smooth muscle-specific deletion of Nrp2, and Nrp2-intact littermates. Mice without obstruction served as additional controls. Contractility was measured by isometric tension testing. Nrp2 deletion prior to pBOO increased force generation in BSM 4 weeks following surgery. Deletion of Nrp2 in mice already subjected to pBOO for 4 weeks showed increased contractility of tissues tested 6 weeks after surgery compared with nondeleted controls. Assessment of tissues from patients with urodynamically defined bladder outlet obstruction revealed reduced NRP2 levels in obstructed bladders with compensated compared with decompensated function, relative to asymptomatic controls. We conclude that downregulation of Nrp2 promotes BSM force generation. Neuropilin 2 may represent a novel target to restore contractility following obstruction.

  2. Intestinal obstruction due to migration of a thermometer from bladder to abdominal cavity: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Duan, Yan-Chao; Hu, Yue-Hua; Gao, Xin-Ying; Gong, Jian; Cheng, Ming; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal foreign bodies such as retained surgical instruments can cause intestinal obstruction. However, intestinal obstruction due to transmural migration of foreign bodies has rarely been reported. Here, we report a case of intestinal obstruction due to a clinical thermometer which migrated from the bladder into the abdominal cavity. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year history of recurrent lower abdominal cramps. Two days before admission, the abdominal cramps aggravated. Intestinal obstruction was confirmed with upright abdominal radiography and computerized tomography scan which showed dilation of the small intestines and a thermometer in the abdominal cavity. Then laparotomy was performed. A scar was observed at the fundus of the bladder and a thermometer was adhering to the small bowels and mesentery which resulted in intestinal obstruction. Abdominal cramps were eliminated and defecation and flatus recovered soon after removal of the thermometer. PMID:24605042

  3. Intestinal obstruction due to migration of a thermometer from bladder to abdominal cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Duan, Yan-Chao; Hu, Yue-Hua; Gao, Xin-Ying; Gong, Jian; Cheng, Ming; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-03-07

    Intraperitoneal foreign bodies such as retained surgical instruments can cause intestinal obstruction. However, intestinal obstruction due to transmural migration of foreign bodies has rarely been reported. Here, we report a case of intestinal obstruction due to a clinical thermometer which migrated from the bladder into the abdominal cavity. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a one-year history of recurrent lower abdominal cramps. Two days before admission, the abdominal cramps aggravated. Intestinal obstruction was confirmed with upright abdominal radiography and computerized tomography scan which showed dilation of the small intestines and a thermometer in the abdominal cavity. Then laparotomy was performed. A scar was observed at the fundus of the bladder and a thermometer was adhering to the small bowels and mesentery which resulted in intestinal obstruction. Abdominal cramps were eliminated and defecation and flatus recovered soon after removal of the thermometer.

  4. Manifestation of Latent Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in the Acute Phase of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kazuyuki; Okubo, Takeshi; Tanaka, Komei; Hosaka, Yukio; Tsuchida, Keiichi; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi; Oda, Hirotaka; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is a complication in 15-25% of patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sometimes leads to catastrophic outcomes, such as cardiogenic shock or cardiac rupture. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. Methods and Results We experienced 22 cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy during 3 years, and 4 of these 22 cases were complicated with LVOT obstruction in the acute phase (mean age 79±5 years, 1 man, 21 women). The LVOT pressure gradient in the acute phase was 100±17 mmHg. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) revealed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in one case and sigmoid-shaped septum without LVH in three cases. The complete resolution of the LVOT obstruction was achieved in a few days with normalization of the left ventricular wall motion following administration of beta-blockers. A dobutamine provocation test after normalization of the left ventricular wall motion reproduced the LVOT obstruction in all cases and revealed the presence of latent LVOT obstruction. Conclusion The manifestation of latent LVOT obstruction in the acute phase of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is one potential reason for the complication of LVOT obstruction with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27904102

  5. Obstruction of left ventricular outflow tract by vegetation and periaortic abscess.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, A J; Ducharme, A; Ugolini, P; Petitclerc, R; Leung, T K; Tardif, J C

    2000-09-01

    Echocardiography is the modality of choice for the noninvasive recognition of vegetations and abscesses that complicate endocarditis. Vegetation size is highly variable, and it has been suggested that large vegetations are related to a more complicated course. The case we present is unusual in that the echocardiographically detected vegetation was very large, highly mobile, and caused severe obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract, which led to impaction and cardiac arrest.

  6. Septoplasty for left ventricular outflow obstruction without aortic valve replacement: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Cooley, D A; Garrett, J R

    1986-10-01

    A new technique is described for relief of diffuse obstruction in the left ventricular outflow tract without aortic valve replacement. Left ventricular septoplasty was performed, preserving the aortic valve. The supra-valve stenosis was repaired using a Y-shaped extension of the aortotomy proximally and a pantaloon-shaped patch of woven Dacron fabric. A 10-year-old girl with "tunnel" or diffuse stenosis obtained striking relief of left ventricular hypertension by this technique.

  7. Unusual appearance for urinary bladder obstruction detected with 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chadwick L; Sharma, Akash

    2015-12-01

    Unanticipated but clinically significant nonosseous findings can be detected during routine bone scintigraphy. We present a case of an 83-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture of the right femur. Whole-body bone scintigraphy for osseous staging revealed intense radiotracer accumulation in the kidneys and ureters but no activity within the urinary bladder. The patient had not voided for 14 hours. A Foley catheter was inserted, and more than 2000 mL of urine was drained, most consistent with urinary bladder obstruction. Subsequent repeat images demonstrated marked reduction of the renal and ureteral activity with trace activity in the urinary bladder.

  8. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynne K.; Chan, Raymond H.; Carasso, Shemy; Durand, Miranda; Misurka, Jimmy; Crean, Andrew M.; Ralph-Edwards, Anthony; Gruner, Christiane; Woo, Anna; Lesser, John R.; Maron, Barry J.; Maron, Martin S.; Rakowski, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation) on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive) were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function. PMID:26788503

  9. [Interrelation of hyperactivity of bladder and infravesical obstruction in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Bablumyan, A

    2010-12-01

    The analysis of the data presented in the review convincingly shows the correlation between infravesical obstruction (IVO), caused by pressing of urethra by enlarged prostate, and the development of detrusor hyperactivity. The clinical importance of correlation between IVO and hyperactivity of the detrusor is convincingly illustrated by different results of effectiveness of surgical treatment of patients with benigh prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with and without hyperactivity of bladder. In patients with BPH and hyperactivity of bladder the probability of irritative symptoms is high. This data proves the necessity of the further study of the pathogenesis of development of bladder hyperactivity in patients with BPH, and the importance of a preoperative estimation of functional frustration of the bladder.

  10. Late renal failure due to prostatic outflow obstruction: a preventable disease.

    PubMed

    Sacks, S H; Aparicio, S A; Bevan, A; Oliver, D O; Will, E J; Davison, A M

    1989-01-21

    Nineteen patients presenting with late renal failure due to prostatic outflow obstruction (mean age 68.7 years; mean serum creatinine concentration 1158 mumol/l) were identified from the admission records of two renal units. As late renal failure secondary to prostatic enlargement is preventable case records were analysed retrospectively in an attempt to identify aspects of management in which preventive efforts might be of value. Delays in referral were common, with a mean of 2.8 years between the onset of prostatic symptoms and time of referral, six patients being referred who had had symptoms for more than three years. Four of five patients who had had a prostatectomy were known to be in renal failure at the time of operation but were not referred until 2-13 years later, when prostatic symptoms had recurred and there was evidence of progressive nephropathy with dilatation of the upper urinary tract. Two patients died on admission and eight (47% of survivors) required long term dialysis, most patients (80%) requiring some dialysis support during the initial period. These findings suggest that progressive nephropathy caused by prostatic outflow obstruction might, in part, be averted by more adequate screening of renal function in men with untreated prostatism and closer follow up of patients with uraemia at the time of prostatectomy.

  11. [Female urethral obstruction and bladder neck stenosis - fact or myth - how to proceed].

    PubMed

    Gunnemann, A; Liedl, B; Palma, P C R; Yoshimura, Y; Muctar, S

    2015-09-01

    The female urethra is probably the most neglected organ in women. Female urethral stricture and primary bladder neck obstruction are rare clinical entities. Traditional and new surgical techniques have been described for the treatment of female urethral stricture. However, they are based on limited data. There is no consensus on best management. The techniques of urethroplasty all have a higher mean success rate (80-94%) than urethral dilatation (< 50%), albeit with shorter mean follow-up. Urethroplasty performed by experienced surgeons appears to be a feasible option in women who have failed urethral dilatation, although there is a lack of high-level evidence to recommend one technique over another.Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a condition in which the bladder neck fails to open adequately during voiding. This leads to increased striated sphincter activity or obstruction of urinary flow without another anatomic cause being present, for example an obstruction caused by genitourinary prolapse in women. Watchful waiting, pharmacotherapy and surgical intervention are possible treatments.

  12. Combined usage of Ho:YAG laser with monopolar resectoscope in the treatment of bladder stone and bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian Hui; Yang, Kuo; Liu, Qian; Yang, Shi Qiang; Xu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bladder stones in elderly men are commonly associated with bladder outlet obstruction, and many different treatment modalities have been presented for both these conditions. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a novel method concerning spontaneous usage of both monopoplar transurethral resection of the prostate and Holmium Laser cystolithotripsy, we compared the transurethral use of resectoscope and cystoscope lithotripsy approaches retrospectively. Methods: Patients data of one hundred and nine male patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and bladder stone(s) were analyzed retrospectively. Two groups of patients were compared: Group I was treated with combination of transurethral holmium laser cystolithotripsy (HLC) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) using the 24F resectoscope, and group II used 22F cystoscope and 24F resectoscope for treating both these conditions. Result: We reviewed the records of 109 patients undergoing transurethral cystolithotripsy with holmium laser and simultaneous TURP. The mean bladder stone size were 3.6±1.5 cm in Group-I and 3.7±1.1 cm (mean 3.8) in Group-II (p>0.05). The mean operation time of Group-I and Group-II was 49.0±22.5 minutes and 79.0±28.5 minutes, respectively (p<0.05). Stone fragments were removed completely and TURP procedures were done successfully in all of the patients. Mild hematuria was found more frequently in Group-II (22.2%), and four (7.4%) patients had urethral stricture in the same group during the late follow-up. Conclusion: Combination of transurethral laser cystolithotripsy and TURP using the same 24F resectooscope is an effective, safe and economical treatment for bladder stones in BPH patients. It is minimally invasive and involves and has lower complication rates and shorter hospital stay. However, this combined approach should be taken in the treatment of calculus within 4 or 5 centimeters. PMID:25097543

  13. Case of duplication of the urethra in an adult male, presenting with symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Chavdar; Donkov, Ivo; Popov, Elenko

    2007-10-01

    Duplication of the urethra is a rare congenital anomaly, usually found in children and adolescents. The authors present a rare case of urethral duplication, presenting in a 58-yr-old man, with symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction.

  14. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Bladder Dysfunction through Activation of the Nrf2-ARE Pathway in a Rat Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Cai, Zhikang; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the effect of sulforaphane (SFN) treatment on the function and changes of expression of Nrf2-ARE pathway in the bladder of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Materials and Methods. A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats at age of 8 weeks were divided into 3 groups (6 of each): the sham operated group, the BOO group, and the BOO+SFN group. We examined histological alterations and the changes of oxidative stress markers and the protein expression of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Results. We found that SFN treatment could prolong micturition interval and increase bladder capacity and bladder compliance. However, the peak voiding pressure was lower than BOO group. SFN treatment can ameliorate the increase of collagen fibers induced by obstruction. SFN treatment also increased the activity of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT compared to the other groups. The level of bladder cell apoptosis was decreased in BOO rats with SFN treatment. Moreover, SFN could reduce the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, SFN could activate the Nrf2 expression with elevation of its target antioxidant proteins. Conclusions. The sulforaphane-mediated decrease of oxidative stress and activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway may ameliorate bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:27433291

  15. Guinea worm infection of urinary bladder manifesting as obstructive uropathy in rural Maharashtra.

    PubMed

    Birare, Shivaji D; Kamble, M H; Lanjewar, D N; Parija, S C; Girji, D D; Kulkarni, P V; Gupta, Rashmi S; Abdul Jabbar, A M

    2005-10-01

    Guinea worm or Dracunculus medinensis is a well-documented helminthic infestation in many areas of Asia. In this report, we describe a rare case of guinea worm infestation in a 25-year-old woman who had developed symptoms of obstructive uropathy, in whom fragments of guinea worm were removed after urethral catheterization. To the best of our knowledge, adult guinea worm occurring in the urinary bladder has not been previously described.

  16. Refractory Hypotension after Liver Allograft Reperfusion: A Case of Dynamic Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Essandoh, Michael; Otey, Andrew Joseph; Dalia, Adam; Dewhirst, Elisabeth; Springer, Andrew; Henry, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Hypotension after reperfusion is a common occurrence during liver transplantation following the systemic release of cold, hyperkalemic, and acidic contents of the liver allograft. Moreover, the release of vasoactive metabolites such as inflammatory cytokines and free radicals from the liver and mesentery, compounded by the hepatic uptake of blood, may also cause a decrement in systemic perfusion pressures. Thus, the postreperfusion syndrome (PRS) can materialize if hypotension and fibrinolysis occur concomitantly within 5 min of reperfusion. Treatment of the PRS may require the administration of inotropes, vasopressors, and intravenous fluids to maintain hemodynamic stability. However, the occurrence of the PRS and its treatment with inotropes and calcium chloride may lead to dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (DLVOTO) precipitating refractory hypotension. Expedient diagnosis of DLVOTO with transesophageal echocardiography is extremely vital in order to avoid potential cardiovascular collapse during this critical period. PMID:26909349

  17. Isolated Left Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia with Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction: A Rare Combination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonghui; Zhang, Jiaying; Zhang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Isolated left ventricular (LV) apical hypoplasia is a unusual and recently recognized congenital cardiac anomaly. A 19-year-old man was found to have an abnormal ECG and cardiac murmur identified during a routine health check since joining work. His ECG revealed normal sinus rhythm, right-axis deviation, poor R wave progression, and T wave abnormalities. On physical examination, a 2/6~3/6 systolic murmur was heard at the second intercostal space along the left sternal border. Subsequent echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the LV apical hypoplasia. Of note, we first found that LV apical hypoplasia was accompanied by RV outflow tract obstruction due to exaggerated rightward bulging of the basal-anterior septum during systole. A close follow-up was performed for the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and potentially tachyarrhythmia.

  18. AB283. SPR-10 Down-regulation of ryanodine receptor gene expression in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle following partial bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Javed, Elham; Addya, Shankar; Fortina, Paolo; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan; Chacko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) displays spontaneous action potentials and this potential is related to the phasic nature of spontaneous contractions in this tissue. The amplitude of a phasic contraction depends on the increase in Ca2+ entry caused by membrane depolarization. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in UBSM decreases the force production by decreasing the frequency of phasic contractions through interactions with large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Microarray and network analysis were employed to determine the changes in mRNA in 14-day obstructed murine bladders. We found that obstruction significantly down-regulated the RyRs in bladder smooth muscle (BSM). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were surgically obstructed and kept for 14 days. Sham-operated mice served as a control. Bladders were excised; urothelium scraped off with a scalpel, and the serosa was removed. BSM obtained from PBOO and sham control animals were used for microarray and western blotting Results Pathway-based analysis of these gene signatures showed significant number of under-expressed genes in obstructed bladder and they were mapped to proteins involved in calcium signaling. We focused our work on RyR protein expression in BSM. There was a four-fold reduction of RyR3 in BSM in 14-day obstructed groups as shown by microarray and immunoblotting compared to that of sham-operated animals. Conclusions These results confirm that the RyR gene expression is down-regulated in obstructed murine bladder smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) None

  19. The hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter: a motility disorder with manometric features of outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Lord, Reginald V N; Bremner, Cedric G; Crookes, Peter F; Hamrah, Pedram; DeMeester, Tom R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical presentation, motility characteristics, and prevalence and patterns of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES). HTLES was defined by a resting pressure measured at the respiratory inversion point on stationary manometry of greater than 26 mm Hg (ninety-fifth percentile of normal). One hundred consecutive patients (80 women, 20 men; mean age 54.7 years, range 23 to 89 years), diagnosed with HTLES at our institution between September 1996 and October 1999, were studied. Patients with achalasia or other named esophageal motility disorders or history of foregut surgery were excluded, but patients with both HTLES and "nutcracker esophagus" were included. The most common symptoms in patients with HTLES were regurgitation (75%), heartburn (71%), dysphagia (71%), and chest pain (49%). The most common primary presenting symptoms were heartburn and dysphagia. The intrabolus pressure, which is a manometric measure of outflow obstruction, was significantly higher in patients with HTLES compared to normal volunteers. The residual pressure measured during LES relaxation induced by a water swallow was also significantly higher than in normal persons. There were no significant associations between any of the relaxation parameters studied (residual pressure, nadir pressure, duration of relaxation, time to residual pressure) and either the presence or severity of any symptoms or the presence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure. Seventy-three patients underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 26% had increased distal esophageal acid exposure. Compared to a cohort of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease but no HTLES (n=300), the total and supine periods of distal esophageal acid exposure were significantly lower in the patients with HTLES and abnormal acid exposure. Patients with HTLES frequently present with moderately severe dysphagia and typical reflux symptoms. Approximately one

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Transgenic Male Mice Overexpressing Aromatase (Cyp19a1)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Rahman, Nafis A.; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Hua; Gou, Kemian; Yu, Wanpeng; Zhu, Dahai; Li, Ning; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Li, Xiangdong

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the etiology and molecular mechanisms of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Transgenic (Tg) male mice overexpressing aromatase (Cyp19a1) under the ubiquitin C promoter in the estrogen-susceptible C57Bl/6J genetic background (AROM+/6J) developed inguinal hernia by 2 months and severe BOO by 9 to 10 months, with 100% penetrance. These mice gradually developed uremia, renal failure, renal retention, and finally died. The BOO bladders were threefold larger than in age-matched wild-type (WT) males and were filled with urine on necropsy. Hypotrophic smooth muscle cells formed the thin detrusor urinae muscle, and collagen III accumulation contributed to the reduced compliance of the bladder. p-AKT and ERα expression were up-regulated and Pten expression was down-regulated in the BOO bladder urothelium. Expression of only ERα in the intradetrusor fibroblasts suggests a specific role of this estrogen receptor form in urothelial proliferation. Inactivation of Pten, which in turn activated the p-AKT pathway, was strictly related to the activation of the ERα pathway in the BOO bladders. Human relevance for these findings was provided by increased expression of p-AKT, PCNA, and ERα and decreased expression of PTEN in severe human BOO samples, compared with subnormal to mild samples. These findings clarify the involvement of estrogen excess and/or imbalance of the androgen/estrogen ratio in the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms of BOO and provide a novel lead into potential treatment strategies for BOO. PMID:21356374

  1. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  2. Transcatheter stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract augments pulmonary arterial growth in symptomatic infants with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction and hypercyanotic spells.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eimear; Morgan, Conall T; Oslizlok, Paul; Kenny, Damien; Walsh, Kevin P; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed all the children with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, hypoplastic pulmonary annulus, and pulmonary arteries who underwent stenting of the right ventricular outflow tract for hypercyanotic spells at our institution between January, 2008 and December, 2013; nine patients who underwent cardiac catheterisation at a median age of 39 days (range 12-60 days) and weight of 3.6 kg (range 2.6-4.3 kg) were identified. The median number of stents placed was one stent (range 1-4). The median oxygen saturation increased from 60% to 96%. The median right pulmonary artery size increased from 3.3 to 5.5 mm (-2.68 to -0.92 Z-score), and the median left pulmonary artery size increased from 3.4 to 5.5 mm (-1.93 to 0 Z-scores). Among all, one patient developed transient pulmonary haemorrhage, and one patient had pericardial tamponade requiring drainage. Complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot +/- atrioventricular septal defect or double-outlet right ventricle was achieved in all nine patients. Transcatheter stent alleviation of the right ventricular outflow tract obstruction resolves hypercyanotic spells and allows reasonable growth of the pulmonary arteries to facilitate successful surgical repair. This represents a viable alternative to placement of a systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunt, particularly in small neonates.

  3. Urethrolysis with Martius labial fat pad graft for iatrogenic bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Carey, Jeffrey M; Chon, Joanna K; Leach, Gary E

    2003-04-01

    This article evaluates treatment outcomes of urethrolysis with the Martius labial fat pad graft for patients with outlet obstruction after incontinence surgery. A total of 23 women were diagnosed with iatrogenic bladder outlet obstruction by urinary retention, urodynamic criteria, physical examination findings, and/or temporal relation of voiding dysfunction to anti-incontinence surgery. The urodynamic definition of female outlet obstruction was a maximum flow rate <12 mL/sec and a detrusor pressure at maximum flow >20 cm of water. Surgical treatment consisted of urethrolysis with complete circumferential urethral mobilization. A Martius labial fat pad graft was used to circumferentially wrap the urethra. No concurrent resuspension procedures were performed. Procedure efficacy was determined by retrospective review and phone interview. Mean patient age was 55 years (range, 37 to 85 years). Mean postoperative follow-up time was 15 months (maximum, 44 months). All patients related voiding dysfunction symptoms to their anti-incontinence surgery. In all, 17 of 23 (74%) patients had preoperative urinary retention requiring catheterization, and 63% of patients met urodynamic criteria for obstruction. After urethrolysis with a Martius labial fat pad graft, 20 of 23 (87%) patients had complete resolution of their obstruction; 3 patients required persistent catheterization. Postoperative stress incontinence was reported by 6 of 23 (13%) patients. Urodynamically documented detrusor instability occurred in 6 of 23 (26%) patients with de novo detrusor instability occurring in 3 of 15 (20%) patients.

  4. Impaired adrenergic- and corticotropic-axis outflow during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Ali; Rochester, Dudley F; Liu, Jing; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2011-11-01

    Exercise stimulates coordinated release of the sympathoadrenal hormones adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (Epi). The study hypothesis was that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is marked by heightened sympathoadrenal outflow at comparable relative workloads. The location of the study was at a clinical research unit. Eight healthy men and 9 men with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume at 1 second <75% predicted) were studied. Volunteers rested (baseline) or exercised at individual submaximal (35% ± 5%) or maximal oxygen consumption. Blood was sampled every 2 minutes for 40 minutes concurrently. Two-way analysis of covariance was applied to examine group (healthy/COPD) and exercise (3 levels) effects on ACTH, cortisol, NE, and Epi release and regularity (estimable by approximate entropy). The timing of peak hormone concentrations was Epi, 14 minutes; NE, 16 minutes; ACTH, 22 minutes; and cortisol, 34 minutes in both cohorts. Type of exercise regimen influenced all 4 hormones (each P < .001), and subject group (control vs COPD) affected cortisol (P < .001) and Epi (P = .048) responses. Exercise regimen and group together controlled ACTH, cortisol, and Epi (each P < .001), but not NE, responses. In particular, endocrine responses were attenuated in COPD compared with control subjects. Approximate entropy analysis also identified loss of maximal exercise-induced ACTH-secretory regularity in COPD patients (P = .042). These outcomes demonstrate impaired rather than augmented exercise-associated sympathocorticotropic-axis outflow in patients with COPD even when outcomes are normalized to maximal oxygen consumption, suggesting that factors other than fitness are at work.

  5. Effect of Doxazosin on Autonomic Nervous Control and Urodynamics of Rat Urinary Bladder during Modeled Infravesical Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kirpatovskii, V I; Mudraya, I S; Revenko, S V; Bablumyan, A Yu; Adamyan, N K; Ivanov, V P

    2016-09-01

    The therapeutic effect of doxazosin (40 μg/kg/day over one month) on urinary bladder was examined in female rats with modeled chronic infravesical obstruction (IVO) produced by graduated mechanical constriction of the proximal urethral segment. In one month, IVO induced a pronounced vesical hypertrophy both in treated and untreated rats that manifested in increased bladder weight and capacity, the latter increment being pronouncedly greater in treated rats. In untreated IVO rats, infusion cystometry revealed elevated basal intravesical pressure of void bladder P0, markedly increased maximal (premicturitional) pressure Pmax, and increased amplitude of spontaneous oscillations of intravesical pressure ΔPdet in filled bladder. Doxazosin produced no significant effect on Pmax rise during IVO, but prevented elevation of P0 and increment of ΔPdet in filled bladder. During gradual filling of urinary bladder in control (intact) rats, the parasympathetic vesical influences increased progressively, while in untreated IVO rats, the adrenergic influences prevailed even at maximal filling of the bladder. In IVO rats, doxazosin prevented the bias of the sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the filled bladder in favor of sympathetic influences, but did not prevent this bias in a void bladder. It is hypothesized that α-adrenoblockers improve micturition during IVO caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia not only by decreasing the urethral resistance to urine flow due to down-regulation of prostate smooth muscle tone, but also by a direct action of these blockers on detrusor adrenergic receptors and central structures involved in urinary bladder control.

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma of prostate presenting as bladder outlet obstruction in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Pranab; Sanjayan, Rajitha; Somanathan, Thara; Narayanan, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    A 19-year-old boy presented with bladder outlet obstruction and on evaluation was found to have prostatomegaly, which on biopsy was diagnostic of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). He had pulmonary metastasis and received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, actinomycin D, and radical radiotherapy. At one year, his prostatic tumour has resolved completely. Embryonal RMS of prostate occurs more commonly in infancy and childhood, so occurrence in young adults is rare, and a high index of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24143154

  7. Rhabdomyosarcoma of prostate presenting as bladder outlet obstruction in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Pranab; Sanjayan, Rajitha; Somanathan, Thara; Narayanan, Geetha

    2013-01-01

    A 19-year-old boy presented with bladder outlet obstruction and on evaluation was found to have prostatomegaly, which on biopsy was diagnostic of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). He had pulmonary metastasis and received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, actinomycin D, and radical radiotherapy. At one year, his prostatic tumour has resolved completely. Embryonal RMS of prostate occurs more commonly in infancy and childhood, so occurrence in young adults is rare, and a high index of suspicion is essential for early diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction following an uncomplicated primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a recognized but rare cause of cardiogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S; Ripley, DP; de Belder, MA; Goodwin, AT; Barham, N

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is a rare but important complication of myocardial infarction. It occurs acutely and may mimic the presentation of papillary muscle rupture or acquired ventricular septal defect. Unlike these mechanical complications, it does not require circulatory support or cardiac surgical intervention. Recognition is critical because it typically responds to volume loading and beta blockade. We report a case who displayed many classical features of this condition. PMID:24062935

  9. Surgery for infants with a hypoplastic systemic ventricle and severe outflow obstruction: early results with a modified Norwood procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Bu'Lock, F. A.; Stümper, O.; Jagtap, R.; Silove, E. D.; De Giovanni, J. V.; Wright, J. G.; Sethia, B.; Brawn, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--Prospective audit of the first year of implementation of a modified approach to palliation for infants with hypoplastic systemic ventricle and severe systemic outflow obstruction. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre for neonatal and infant cardiac surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS--17 of 19 infants (aged < 35 days) presenting to Birmingham Children's Hospital in 1993 with hypoplastic systemic ventricle and severe outflow obstruction underwent surgery. This was performed using a new modification of the Norwood-type arch repair, without the use of exogenous material, and a 3.5 mm Gore-tex shunt between the innominate and right pulmonary arteries. The Gore-tex shunt was replaced by a cavopulmonary shunt between 3 and 5 months later. Clinical, morphological, and functional determinants of outcome were examined. RESULTS--10 (59%) infants survived initial surgery. All proceeded to cavopulmonary shunt without further loss. Significant atrioventricular valve regurgitation seemed to be the main risk factor for poor outcome. If this was excluded, the morphology of the dominant ventricle seemed to have little effect on the outcome of initial surgery. CONCLUSIONS--Early survival was achieved in 59% of patients in the first year of implementation of a protocol for surgery in infants with hypoplastic systemic ventricle and severe outflow obstruction. The construction of a neoaorta without the use of exogenous material may allow improved later growth of the neoaorta. Early cavopulmonary shunt can be performed safely and should reduce mid-term complications from cyanosis and systemic ventricular volume loading. PMID:7540406

  10. Bladder outlet obstruction triggers neural plasticity in sensory pathways and contributes to impaired sensitivity in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Malykhina, Anna P; Lei, Qi; Chang, Shaohua; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Villamor, Antonio N; Smith, Ariana L; Seftel, Allen D

    2013-05-15

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are common problems in aging males worldwide. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of bladder neck nerve damage induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) on sensory innervation of the corpus cavernosum (CC) and CC smooth muscle (CCSM) using a rat model of PBOO induced by a partial ligation of the bladder neck. Retrograde labeling technique was used to label dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that innervate the urinary bladder and CC. Contractility and relaxation of the CCSM was studied in vitro, and expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was evaluated by Western blotting. Concentration of the sensory neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide was measured by ELISA. Partial obstruction of the bladder neck caused a significant hypertrophy of the urinary bladders (2.5-fold increase at 2 wk). Analysis of L6-S2 DRG sections determined that sensory ganglia received input from both the urinary bladder and CC with 5-7% of all neurons double labeled from both organs. The contractile responses of CC muscle strips to KCl and phenylephrine were decreased after PBOO, followed by a reduced relaxation response to nitroprusside. A significant decrease in neuronal NOS expression, but not in endothelial NOS or protein kinase G (PKG-1), was detected in the CCSM of the obstructed animals. Additionally, PBOO caused some impairment to sensory nerves as evidenced by a fivefold downregulation of SP in the CC (P ≤ 0.001). Our results provide evidence that PBOO leads to the impairment of bladder neck afferent innervation followed by a decrease in CCSM relaxation, downregulation of nNOS expression, and reduced content of sensory neuropeptides in the CC smooth muscle. These results suggest that nerve damage in PBOO may contribute to LUTS-ED comorbidity and trigger secondary changes in the contraction/relaxation mechanisms of CCSM.

  11. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Sarcomere Contractility Acutely Relieves Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joshua A.; Markova, Svetlana; Ueda, Yu; Kim, Jae B.; Pascoe, Peter J.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Green, Eric M.; Harris, Samantha P.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of the heart muscle characterized by otherwise unexplained thickening of the left ventricle. Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is present in approximately two-thirds of patients and substantially increases the risk of disease complications. Invasive treatment with septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation can improve symptoms and functional status, but currently available drugs for reducing obstruction have pleiotropic effects and variable therapeutic responses. New medical treatments with more targeted pharmacology are needed, but the lack of preclinical animal models for HCM with LVOT obstruction has limited their development. HCM is a common cause of heart failure in cats, and a subset exhibit systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to LVOT obstruction. MYK-461 is a recently-described, mechanistically novel small molecule that acts at the sarcomere to specifically inhibit contractility that has been proposed as a treatment for HCM. Here, we use MYK-461 to test whether direct reduction in contractility is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction in feline HCM. We evaluated mixed-breed cats in a research colony derived from a Maine Coon/mixed-breed founder with naturally-occurring HCM. By echocardiography, we identified five cats that developed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and LVOT obstruction both at rest and under anesthesia when provoked with an adrenergic agonist. An IV MYK-461 infusion and echocardiography protocol was developed to serially assess contractility and LVOT gradient at multiple MYK-461 concentrations. Treatment with MYK-461 reduced contractility, eliminated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and relieved LVOT pressure gradients in an exposure-dependent manner. Our findings provide proof of principle that acute reduction in contractility with MYK-461 is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction. Further, these studies suggest that feline

  12. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Sarcomere Contractility Acutely Relieves Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua A; Markova, Svetlana; Ueda, Yu; Kim, Jae B; Pascoe, Peter J; Evanchik, Marc J; Green, Eric M; Harris, Samantha P

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of the heart muscle characterized by otherwise unexplained thickening of the left ventricle. Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction is present in approximately two-thirds of patients and substantially increases the risk of disease complications. Invasive treatment with septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation can improve symptoms and functional status, but currently available drugs for reducing obstruction have pleiotropic effects and variable therapeutic responses. New medical treatments with more targeted pharmacology are needed, but the lack of preclinical animal models for HCM with LVOT obstruction has limited their development. HCM is a common cause of heart failure in cats, and a subset exhibit systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to LVOT obstruction. MYK-461 is a recently-described, mechanistically novel small molecule that acts at the sarcomere to specifically inhibit contractility that has been proposed as a treatment for HCM. Here, we use MYK-461 to test whether direct reduction in contractility is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction in feline HCM. We evaluated mixed-breed cats in a research colony derived from a Maine Coon/mixed-breed founder with naturally-occurring HCM. By echocardiography, we identified five cats that developed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and LVOT obstruction both at rest and under anesthesia when provoked with an adrenergic agonist. An IV MYK-461 infusion and echocardiography protocol was developed to serially assess contractility and LVOT gradient at multiple MYK-461 concentrations. Treatment with MYK-461 reduced contractility, eliminated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and relieved LVOT pressure gradients in an exposure-dependent manner. Our findings provide proof of principle that acute reduction in contractility with MYK-461 is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction. Further, these studies suggest that feline

  13. Detection of Subpubic Tumor Causing Bladder Outlet Obstruction by 3D Perineal Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Albrich, S; Steetskamp, J; Rommens, K; Porta, S; Battista, M; Hoffmann, G; Skala, C

    2015-07-01

    This case report shows that 3D perineal ultrasound can be superior to clinical examination and routine 2D perineal ultrasound in the detection of an unusual subpubic tumor. A 73-year-old female patient was referred to our urogynecological outpatient unit complaining of over-active bladder symptoms and voiding dysfunction for 3 years. Gynecological examination found no signs of pelvic organ prolapse or abnormality in the vaginal cavity. Routine 2D perineal ultrasound showed substantial residual urine (ca. 300 ml on catheter) and limited bladder neck mobility, but no signs of pelvic organ prolapse. Use of standardized 3D perineal ultrasound revealed a 24 × 26 × 32 mm spherical, hypoechoic tumor below the pubic symphysis between the distal urethra and the pubic bones. This structure was mistaken for the pubic symphysis in the midline on 2D ultrasound performed earlier. At surgery, the tumor was completely excised through a vaginal incision between the urethra and the pubic symphysis. After an uneventful postoperative recovery the patient developed de-novo stress urinary incontinence, which was corrected successfully by the insertion of a retropubic tension-free suburethral sling after an interval of 8 weeks. After a further follow-up of 8 weeks the patient reported well-being, urinary continence and no voiding dysfunction; no abnormalities were found on examination. In conclusion, 3D perineal ultrasound is a useful additional tool for the diagnostic workup of bladder outlet obstruction.

  14. Effect of silodosin, a selective α(1A)-adrenoceptor antagonist, on voiding behavior and bladder blood flow in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Goi, Yoshiaki; Tomiyama, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Ayaka; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2015-10-05

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of silodosin (selective α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist) on bladder blood flow (BBF) and bladder function in a rat model of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and to determine the expression of α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNA in human and rat bladder microvessels. BOO was produced by partial ligature of the proximal urethra, which was maintained for 2 weeks. The BOO rats received either silodosin at a rate of 0.3mg/kg/day or vehicle subcutaneously via an osmotic pump for 2 weeks after BOO surgery. A metabolic cage study was performed in conscious animals. BBF was measured using a Laser Speckle Blood Flow Imager. Urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and nerve growth factor (NGF) were measured. Immunohistological examinations of nerve distribution and NGF expression in the rat bladder were conducted. The expression of each α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNA in human and rat bladder microvessels was determined by in situ hybridization. Silodosin ameliorated the increase in voiding frequency and decrease in mean voided volume in BOO rats in the metabolic cage study. Silodosin also abrogated the decrease in BBF in BOO rats. The levels of 8-OHdG and NGF in BOO rats were significantly decreased by administration of silodosin. Silodosin prevented the decrease in nerve distribution and increase in NGF expression. Human and rat bladder microvessels showed expression of all α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs. The results presented here suggest that silodosin improves voiding behavior in rat models with BOO by inducing recovery of BBF.

  15. Increased susceptibility of estrogen-induced bladder outlet obstruction in a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tam, Neville Ngai-Chung; Zhang, Xiang; Xiao, Hong; Song, Dan; Levin, Linda; Meller, Jarek; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2015-05-01

    Disorders of the prostate and lower urinary tract are common in elderly men. We investigated the role of metallothionein-1 (MT1) in prostate carcinogenesis by generating a prostate-specific, MT1-expressing mouse. Unexpectedly, genomic analyses revealed that a 12.1-kb genomic region harboring several conserved noncoding elements was unintentionally deleted, upstream of the transgene integration site in the mouse, which we named it 12.1ΔMT1. Male 12.1ΔMT1 mice chronically treated with testosterone (T) plus 17β-estradiol (E2) to induce prostate cancer exhibited no evidence of precancerous or cancerous lesions. Instead, most of them exhibited a bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) phenotype not observed in treated wild-type (WT) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that 12.1ΔMT1 is a novel model for studying the hormonal requirement for BOO induction. Adult male 12.1ΔMT1 and WT mice were treated with T, E2, bisphenol A (BPA), T+E2, or T+BPA for up to 6 months. Histologic and immunohistochemical analysis of the prostate, bladder, and urethra were performed. No significant prostate pathologies were observed in WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice treated with any of the hormone regimens. As expected, prostatic regression occurred in all E2-treated animals (WT and 12.1ΔMT1). Of great interest, despite a small prostate, 100% of E2-treated 12.1ΔMT1 mice, but only 40% of E2-treated WT mice, developed severe BOO (P<0.01). In contrast, T+E2 treatment was less effective than E2 treatment in inducing severe BOO in 12.1ΔMT1 mice (68%, P<0.05) and was completely ineffective in WT animals. Similarly, T, BPA, and T+BPA treatments did not induce BOO in either WT or 12.1ΔMT1 mice. The BOO pathology includes a thinner detrusor wall, narrowing of bladder neck and urethral lumen, and basal cell hyperplasia in the bladder body and urethra. These findings indicate that 12.1ΔMT1 mice exhibit enhanced susceptibility to E2-induced BOO that is independent of prostate enlargement but that is attenuated by the

  16. Papillary muscle insertion directly into the anterior mitral leaflet in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, its identification and cause of outflow obstruction by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and its surgical management.

    PubMed

    Rowin, Ethan J; Maron, Barry J; Lesser, John R; Rastegar, Hassan; Maron, Martin S

    2013-06-01

    This case presents an uncommon but important mechanism of muscular left ventricular outflow obstruction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to anomalous and direct papillary muscle insertion into the anterior mitral leaflet, a finding reliably identified clinically by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. The identification of this left ventricular outflow tract morphology is important before invasive ventricular septal reduction therapy because it dictates a specific surgical strategy. These findings further support the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the early evaluation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients.

  17. Review of invasive urodynamics and progress towards non-invasive measurements in the assessment of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, C. J.; Pickard, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This article defines the need for objective measurements to help diagnose the cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). It describes the conventional techniques available, mainly invasive, and then summarizes the emerging range of non-invasive measurement techniques. Methods: This is a narrative review derived form the clinical and scientific knowledge of the authors together with consideration of selected literature. Results: Consideration of measured bladder pressure urinary flow rate during voiding in an invasive pressure flow study is considered the gold standard for categorization of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). The diagnosis is currently made by plotting the detrusor pressure at maximum flow (pdetQmax) and maximum flow rate (Qmax) on the nomogram approved by the International Continence Society. This plot will categorize the void as obstructed, equivocal or unobstructed. The invasive and relatively complex nature of this investigation has led to a number of inventive techniques to categorize BOO either by measuring bladder pressure non-invasively or by providing a proxy measure such as bladder weight. Conclusion: Non-invasive methods of diagnosing BOO show great promise and a few have reached the stage of being commercially available. Further studies are however needed to validate the measurement technique and assess their worth in the assessment of men with LUTS. PMID:19468436

  18. A Novel Intraurethral Device Diagnostic Index to Classify Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo O.; Barreiro, Guilherme C.; Prudente, Alessandro; Silva, Cleide M.; Bassani, José W. M.; D'Ancona, Carlos A. L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Using a urethral device at the fossa navicularis, bladder pressure during voiding can be estimated by a minimal invasive technique. This study purposes a new diagnostic index for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs). Methods. Fifty one patients presenting with LUTSs were submitted to a conventional urodynamic and a minimal invasive study. The results obtained through the urethral device and invasive classic urodynamics were compared. The existing bladder outlet obstruction index (BOOI) equation that classifies men with LUTSs was modified to allow minimal invasive measurement of isovolumetric bladder pressure in place of detrusor pressure at maximum urine flow. Accuracy of the new equation for classifying obstruction was then tested in this group of men. Results. The modified equation identified men with obstruction with a positive predictive value of 68% and a negative predictive value of 70%, with an overall accuracy of 70%. Conclusions. The proposed equation can accurately classify over 70% of men without resorting to invasive pressure flow studies. We must now evaluate the usefulness of this classification for the surgical treatment of men with LUTSs. PMID:19125194

  19. Does uroflowmetry parameter facilitate discrimination between detrusor underactivity and bladder outlet obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Soo; Song, Phil Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Though urodynamic study (UDS) is the current established standard to distinguish between detrusor underactivity (DU) and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), concerns of patient discomfort and potential complications of catheterization deters its use. We inspected clinical variables to discriminate between DU and BOO in uroflowmetry, which can be more easily performed in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Total 240 men who both underwent UDS and uroflowmetry were reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups by a single experienced urologist based on UDS outcome; DU (n=111) and BOO (n=129). From uroflowmetry, 5 variables including maximal flow rate (Qmax), average flow rate (Qave), voiding volume (VV), postvoid residual urine (PVR), and value of Qmax minus Qave (DeltaQ) was obtained. Multivariable analysis including receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to identify the important diagnostic predictors. Results The mean age (±standard deviation) was 65.3±9.2 years. Except Qave, all uroflowmetry components were significantly different between DU and BOO groups. DeltaQ was smaller in DU group (8.71 mL/s vs. 5.26 mL/s, p<0.001). By logistic regression analysis, DeltaQ (Exp(B)=0.648, p<0.001) and PVR (Exp(B)=1.009, p<0.001) significantly discriminate DU and BOO diagnosis. In diagnosing DU using a single variable, the area under the curve of ROC from DeltaQ (0.806) was significantly higher than that from Qmax (0.763, p=0.0126) and Qave (0.574, p<0.0001). Conclusions Our findings suggest that DeltaQ is a novel predictor capable of discriminating DU from BOO in men with obstructive lower urinary tract symptom. PMID:27847918

  20. Characterization of miRNA-regulated networks, hubs of signaling, and biomarkers in obstruction-induced bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Bernhard; Moltzahn, Felix; Keller, Irene; Rehrauer, Hubert; Fournier, Catharine Aquino; Burkhard, Fiona C.

    2017-01-01

    Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) induces significant organ remodeling, leading to lower urinary tract symptoms accompanied by urodynamic changes in bladder function. Here, we report mRNA and miRNA transcriptome sequencing of bladder samples from human patients with different urodynamically defined states of BOO. Patients’ miRNA and mRNA expression profiles correlated with urodynamic findings. Validation of RNA sequencing results in an independent patient cohort identified combinations of 3 mRNAs (NRXN3, BMP7, UPK1A) and 3 miRNAs (miR-103a-3p, miR-10a-5p, miR-199a-3p) sufficient to discriminate between bladder functional states. All BOO patients shared cytokine and immune response pathways, TGF-β and NO signaling pathways, and hypertrophic PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. AP-1 and NFkB were dominant transcription factors, and TNF-α was the top upstream regulator. Integrated miRNA-mRNA expression analysis identified pathways and molecules targeted by differentially expressed miRNAs. Molecular changes in BOO suggest an increasing involvement of miRNAs in the control of bladder function from the overactive to underactive/acontractile states. PMID:28138557

  1. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction secondary to hypovolemia in a German Shepard dog with splenic hemangiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; NEO, Sakurako; FUJII, Yoko; WAKAO, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (DLVOTO) is a common condition in cats and humans. In this case report, a dog is described with DLVOTO secondary to severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage caused by a hemangiosarcoma. The dog was a 9-year-old, 35.7-kg, spayed female German Shepard dog that presented with a history of tachypnea and collapse. A Levine II/VI systolic murmur was present at the heart base. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic mass and a large amount of ascites. Echocardiography showed a reduced left ventricular diameter and an increased aortic velocity caused by systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve apparatus. The heart murmur and the SAM were resolved after treatment including a splenectomy and a blood transfusion. PMID:25924797

  2. Bidirectional Glenn shunt as an adjunct to surgical repair of congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary outflow obstruction: relevance of the fluid pressure drop-flow relationship.

    PubMed

    Ascuitto, Robert; Ross-Ascuitto, Nancy; Wiesman, Joshua; Deleon, Serafin

    2008-09-01

    A bidirectional Glenn shunt (BGS) was successfully incorporated into a two-ventricle repair for 10 patients (age, 3-17 years) who had congenital heart disease associated with severe pulmonary outflow obstruction. The BGS was used to volume-unload the pulmonary ventricle faced with residual outflow obstruction, thereby avoiding the need for insertion of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit. Transthoracic Doppler flow velocity analysis was used to determine transpulmonary peak systolic pressure drops as a measure of obstruction. Preoperative values ranged from 70 to 100 mmHg, and postoperative values ranged from less than 10 to 16 mmHg. At this writing, all patients are doing well 15 to 52 months after surgery. To gain further insight into the reduced pressure drop that may be achieved by decreasing flow rate across obstruction, a computer-based description of fluid flow was used to simulate blood traversing circumferentially narrowed passages. Overall pressure drops and associated flow energy losses were determined from numeric solutions (using finite-element analysis) to the Navier-Stokes equations for the proposed fluid reactions. Pressure drops and flow energy losses were found to decrease dramatically as flow rate was progressively reduced. For selected patients, a BGS can be an effective adjunct to the surgical treatment of pulmonary outflow obstruction. This approach avoids the use of a ventricle-to-pulmonary artery conduit, and thus the inevitable need in most patients for reoperations because of somatic growth, conduit failure, or both.

  3. An evaluation of range gated pulsed Doppler echocardiography for detecting pulmonary outflow tract obstruction in d-transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Areias, J C; Goldberg, S J; Spitaels, S E; de Villeneuve, V H

    1978-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of range gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) echocardiography for detecting obstruction to the pulmonary outflow tract in children with d-transposition of the great vessels (d-TGV). Twenty-one children were randomly selected for those available with d-TGV and were studied by precordial and suprasternal RGPD echocardiography. Three were excluded, leaving a population of 18 subjects. The exclusive criterion used to judge the RGPD results was the output of the time interval histogram (TIH). Coherence of the TIH was considered to represent laminar flow. Dispersion of the TIH was considered evidence of flow disturbance and obstruction to the outflow tract. With the range gating feature, the first site of disturbance could be localized. Information was handled by a technique that decreased bias. RGPD results were then compared to diagnoses of the outflow tract established at cardiac catheterization or operation. Comparison of these results indicated that all seven children with obstruction were correctly identified by RGPD study, and the level of the first obstruction was correctly identified. With one exception, all children without pulmonary obstruction were correctly identified by the examination.

  4. APICAL LEFT VENTRICULAR-ABDOMINAL AORTIC COMPOSITE CONDUITS FOR LEFT VENTRICULAR OUTFLOW OBSTRUCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Certain problems related to the left ventricular outflow tract are not amenable to conventional surgical methods, but may be solved with the creation of a double outlet left ventricle by using a composite rigid pyrolite left ventricular apex outlet prosthesis and a fabric valve-containing conduit. Low porosity woven Dacron tube grafts are used for the conduit. Twenty-three patients who have undergone apico-aortic bypass with this conduit are reported here, with gratifying results in eighteen. PMID:15216062

  5. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Due to Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaru; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Ai; Ueno, Takayoshi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-03-01

    A 64-year-old man with extensive tumorous infiltration of the pulmonary valve underwent partial resection of a tumor of the right ventricular outflow tract and replacement of the affected valve. A diagnosis of immunoglobulin-G4 related disease of the heart was made based on the immunohistologic findings. One year after the surgical resection, growth of the tumorous mass was observed, and steroid therapy was initiated. He had no sign of tumor progression four years after the steroid therapy.

  6. AB298. SPR-25 NLRP3/IL-1β mediates denervation during bladder outlet obstruction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lutolf, Robin; Hughes, Francis M.; Purves, J. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a common condition resulting from benign prostatic hyperplasia, neurologic pathology, organ prolapse, etc. Long-term, obstruction is well-established to evoke denervation in the bladder which causes the detrusor to become hypocontractile, resulting in inefficient bladder emptying and consequent infections, continence issues or even renal failure. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to a role for inflammation in bladder deterioration during BOO and we have shown a central role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in triggering this inflammation. In the present study we explore a possible connection between this NLRP3-induced inflammation and bladder denervation. Methods Rats were divided into five groups: (I) control; (II) sham operated; (III) BOO + vehicle (1 mL, 40% ethanol in PBS, p.o.); (IV) BOO + glyburide (Gly, NLRP3 inhibitor; 10 mg/kg, p.o.); (V) BOO + anakinra (Ana, IL-1 receptor antagonist; 25 mg/kg, i.p.). BOO is constructed in female rats by inserting a 1 mm outer diameter transurethral catheter, tying a silk ligature around the urethra and removing the catheter. Medications were administered prior to surgery and once daily. At 12 days animals were sacrificed and the bladders processed for histological analysis. Transverse sections (5 µm) were stained for PGP9.5 expression (a pan-neuronal marker) using standard immunohistochemistry techniques. Entire sections were scanned, using a 10× objective, into TIFF files using Zen software (Zeiss Inc.). Images were imported into Elements software (Nikon Inc.) and the area of individual neurons designated as well as total bladder area (exclusive of the urothelium and lumen). The number of neurons and respective areas were used to calculate nerve density. Results Denervation in the bladder wall during BOO was significant, as measured by nerve density. This effect was attenuated by either preventing NLRP3 activation with Gly or blocking IL-1β’s action at its

  7. Accessory Mitral Valve Leaflet Causing Severe Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in a Preterm Neonate with a Partial Atrioventricular Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Charles D.; Seery, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects represent a class of congenital cardiac malformations that vary in presentation and management strategy depending upon the severity of the particular lesions present. We present the case of a premature neonate who had a partial atrioventricular septal defect and an accessory mitral (or left atrioventricular) valve leaflet. The latter caused severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and severely depressed left ventricular function. We found only one other report of this atrioventricular valve abnormality in association with atrioventricular septal defect. To our knowledge, our patient (at a body weight of 1,800 g) is the smallest to survive corrective surgery of an accessory mitral valve leaflet with severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. In addition to our patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:28100980

  8. Dissimilar Effects of Tolterodine on Detrusor Overactivity in Awake Rats with Chemical Cystitis and Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Long-Hu; Park, Chang-Shin; Shin, Hwa-Yeon; Yoon, Sang-Min

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We investigated bladder function, with a special focus on nonvoiding contractions (NVCs), in awake rats with chronic chemical cystitis and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) by use of simultaneous registrations of intravesical and intraabdominal pressures. In addition, we tested the effects of tolterodine on the NVCs in these models. Methods A total of 20 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. In eight rats, chemical cystitis was induced by intravesical instillation of HCl. Twelve rats were subjected to sham instillations or partial BOO. Four weeks after intravesical instillation or 2 weeks after partial BOO, cystometrograms were obtained by use of simultaneous recording of intravesical and intraabdominal pressure in all unanesthetized, unrestrained rats in metabolic cages. Results A total of 17 rats survived. In the rats with acute injury by HCl, 50% showed detrusor overactivity (DO), which was not seen in the sham group. The cystitis group had lower DO pressure without a difference in DO frequency compared with the BOO group. After the administration of tolterodine, the cystitis group showed no difference in DO frequency or pressure, whereas the BOO group showed decreased values for both parameters. Conclusions Our study showed that toleterodine produced no effect on DO during the filling phase in rats with chronic chemical cystitisbut decreased the frequency and pressure of DO in rats with BOO. Clinically, studies are needed to improve the treatment effect of anticholinergic drugs ininterstitial cystitis patients with overactive bladder. PMID:22087420

  9. Aspergillus endocarditis: a case of near complete left ventricular outflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Nowell, Justin L.; Roxburgh, James C.

    2012-01-01

    A 60-year old woman presented with dyspnoea and fatigue. She was frail and cachectic (BMI 17.5) with a pancytopenia. Previously she had received chemotherapy for chronic lymphatic leukaemia. She relapsed one year ago necessitating a reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Subsequently, graft versus host disease required high-dose immunosuppressants. Computerized tomography on admission showed bilateral lung nodules and a suspicious cardiac mass. Bronchial biopsies demonstrated abundant hypae consistent with Aspergillus fumigatus infection. Echocardiography demonstrated a large fungus ball attached to the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve with near complete obliteration of the left ventricular outflow tract. Due to the high risk of embolization this was resected under cardiopulmonary bypass. The mass was attached subvalvularly to the ventricular septal free wall and eroding through it. It peeled off leaving intact aortic leaflets. Unresectable fungal deposits were discovered on the interventricular septum, the left ventricle free wall and posterior aortic wall. High-dose systemic antifungal therapy (Voriconazole and Amphoteracin B) was given for 4 months. After discharge she remained well till a 4-month follow-up, after which she eventually succumbed to her disease. We discuss the clinical difficulties in managing patients with fungal infective endocarditis and present a brief review of cardiac aspergillosis management. PMID:22374293

  10. Flat carcinoma in Situ of bladder.

    PubMed

    Riddle, P R; Chisholm, G D; Trott, P A; Pugh, R C

    1975-01-01

    36 patients with flat carcinoma in situ of the bladder have been reviewed. Those with widespread disease usually presented with dysuria or obstructive outflow tract symptoms and radical surgery appeared to give better results than radiotherapy. However, when the lesion was confined to small areas of the bladder mucosa, haematuria or pain were the main presenting symptoms and a conservative approach seemed justified. It is suggested that the term flat carcinoma in situ be used for this lesion whose behavior differs significantly from that of the commoner papillary or invasive tumours. The pathological appearances are to be reported elsewhere in full.

  11. MiR-133 modulates TGF-β1-induced bladder smooth muscle cell hypertrophic and fibrotic response: implication for a role of microRNA in bladder wall remodeling caused by bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liu Jian; Qi, Jun; Kong, Xiang Jie; Huang, Tao; Qian, Xiao Qiang; Xu, Ding; Liang, Jun Hao; Kang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) evokes urinary bladder wall remodeling significantly, including the phenotype shift of bladder smooth muscle cells (BSMCs) where transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) plays a pivotal role given the emerging function of modulating cellular phenotype. miR-133 plays a role in cardiac and muscle remodeling, however, little is known about its roles in TGF-β1-induced BSMC hypertrophic and fibrotic response. Here, we verified BOO induced bladder wall remodeling and TGF-β1 expression mainly located in bladder endothelium. Furthermore, we uncovered miR-133a/b expression profile in BOO rats, and then explored its regulated effects on BSMCs' phenotypic shift. Our study found that miR-133 became down-regulated during rat bladder remodeling. Next, we sought to examine whether the expression of miR-133 was down-regulated in primary BSMCs in response to TGF-β1 stimulation and whether forced overexpression of miR-133 could regulate profibrotic TGF-β signaling. We found that stimulation of BSMCs with exogenous TGF-β1 of increasing concentrations resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of miR-133a/b levels and transfection with miR-133 mimics attenuated TGF-β1-induced α-smooth muscle actin, extracellular matrix subtypes and fibrotic growth factor expression, whereas it upregulated high molecular weight caldesmon expression compared with the negative control. Also, downregulation of p-Smad3, not p-Smad2 by miR-133 was detected. Additionally, miR-133 overexpression suppressed TGF-β1-induced BSMC hypertrophy and proliferation through influencing cell cycle distribution. Bioinformatics analyses predicted that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) was the potential target of miR-133, and then binding to the 3'-untranslated region of CTGF was validated by luciferase reporter assay. These results reveal a novel regulator for miR-133 to modulate TGF-β1-induced BSMC phenotypic changes by targeting CTGF through the TGF-β-Smad3 signaling pathway

  12. Effects of Spinal and Peripheral Injection of α1A or α1D Adrenoceptor Antagonists on Bladder Activity in Rat Models with or without Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Shim, Ji Sung; Kang, Seung Chul; Shim, Kang Soo; Park, Jae Young; Moon, Du Geon; Lee, Jeong Gu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antagonists of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1ARs) relax prostate smooth muscle and relieve voiding and storage symptoms. Recently, increased expression of α1ARs with change of its subtype expression has been proved in bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). To search for the evidence of changes in α1ARs subtype expression and activity in the peripheral and spinal routes, the effects of spinal and peripheral administration of tamsulosin (an α1A/D-selective AR), naftopidil (an α1A/D-selective AR), and doxazosin (non-selective AR) on bladder activity were investigated in a rat model with or without BOO. Methods A total of 65 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the BOO surgery group (n=47) and the sham surgery group (n=18). After 6 weeks, cystometry was assessed before and after intrathecal and intra-arterial administrations of tamsulosin, naftopidil, and doxazosin. Results After intra-arterial administrations of all three drugs, bladder capacity (BC) was increased and maximal intravesical pressure (Pmax) was decreased in both BOO and the sham rat models (P<0.05). After intrathecal administration of all three drugs, BC was increased and Pmax was decreased in only the BOO group. The episodes of involuntary contraction in the BOO rat models were decreased by intra-arterial administration (P=0.031). The increase of BC after intrathercal and intra-arterial administrations of α1ARs was significantly greater in the BOO group than in the sham group (P=0.023, P=0.041). In the BOO group, the increase of BC and decrease in Pmax were greater by intra-arterial administration than by intrathecal administration (P=0.035). There were no significant differences of the degrees of changes in the cystometric parameters among the three different α1ARs. Conclusions Up-regulations of the α1ARs in BOO were observed by the greater increases of BC after α1AR antagonist administrations in the BOO group than in the sham group. However, there were no subtype differences of the

  13. Inheritance Analysis of Congenital Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Malformations: Segregation, Multiplex Relative Risk, and Heritability

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Kim L.; Pignatelli, Ricardo; Lewin, Mark; Ho, Trang; Fernbach, Susan; Menesses, Andres; Lam, Wilbur; Leal, Suzanne M.; Kaplan, Norman; Schliekelman, Paul; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Belmont, John W.

    2006-01-01

    The left ventricular outflow tract (LVOTO) malformations, aortic valve stenosis (AVS), coarctation of the aorta (COA), and hypoplastic left heart (HLH) constitute a mechanistically defined subgroup of congenital heart defects that have substantial evidence for a genetic component. Evidence from echocardiography studies has shown that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is found frequently in relatives of children with LVOTO defects. However, formal inheritance analysis has not been performed. We ascertained 124 families by an index case with AVS, COA, or HLH. A total of 413 relatives were enrolled in the study, of which 351 had detailed echocardiography exams for structural heart defects and measurements of a variety of aortic arch, left ventricle, and valve structures. LVOTO malformations were noted in 30 relatives (18 BAV, 5 HLH, 3 COA, and 3 AVS), along with significant congenital heart defects (CHD) in 2 others (32/413; 7.7%). Relative risk for first-degree relatives in this group was 36.9, with a heritability of 0.71–0.90. Formal segregation analysis suggests that one or more minor loci with rare dominant alleles may be operative in a subset of families. Multiplex relative risk analysis, which estimates number of loci, had the highest maximum likelihood score in a model with 2 loci (range of 1–6 in the lod-1 support interval). Heritability of several aortic arch measurements and aortic valve was significant. These data support a complex but most likely oligogenic pattern of inheritance. A combination of linkage and association study designs is likely to enable LVOTO risk gene identification. This data can also provide families with important information for screening asymptomatic relatives for potentially harmful cardiac defects. PMID:15690347

  14. Inheritance analysis of congenital left ventricular outflow tract obstruction malformations: Segregation, multiplex relative risk, and heritability.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kim L; Pignatelli, Ricardo; Lewin, Mark; Ho, Trang; Fernbach, Susan; Menesses, Andres; Lam, Wilbur; Leal, Suzanne M; Kaplan, Norman; Schliekelman, Paul; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Belmont, John W

    2005-04-15

    The left ventricular outflow tract (LVOTO) malformations, aortic valve stenosis (AVS), coarctation of the aorta (COA), and hypoplastic left heart (HLH) constitute a mechanistically defined subgroup of congenital heart defects that have substantial evidence for a genetic component. Evidence from echocardiography studies has shown that bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is found frequently in relatives of children with LVOTO defects. However, formal inheritance analysis has not been performed. We ascertained 124 families by an index case with AVS, COA, or HLH. A total of 413 relatives were enrolled in the study, of which 351 had detailed echocardiography exams for structural heart defects and measurements of a variety of aortic arch, left ventricle, and valve structures. LVOTO malformations were noted in 30 relatives (18 BAV, 5 HLH, 3 COA, and 3 AVS), along with significant congenital heart defects (CHD) in 2 others (32/413; 7.7%). Relative risk for first-degree relatives in this group was 36.9, with a heritability of 0.71-0.90. Formal segregation analysis suggests that one or more minor loci with rare dominant alleles may be operative in a subset of families. Multiplex relative risk analysis, which estimates number of loci, had the highest maximum likelihood score in a model with 2 loci (range of 1-6 in the lod-1 support interval). Heritability of several aortic arch measurements and aortic valve was significant. These data support a complex but most likely oligogenic pattern of inheritance. A combination of linkage and association study designs is likely to enable LVOTO risk gene identification. This data can also provide families with important information for screening asymptomatic relatives for potentially harmful cardiac defects.

  15. Testosterone and 17β-estradiol induce glandular prostatic growth, bladder outlet obstruction, and voiding dysfunction in male mice.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Ricke, Emily A; Marker, Paul C; Miano, Joseph M; Mayer, Robert D; Timms, Barry G; vom Saal, Frederick S; Wood, Ronald W; Ricke, William A

    2012-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) are common in older men and can contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms that significantly impact quality of life. Few existing models of BOO and BPH use physiological levels of hormones associated with disease progression in humans in a genetically manipulable organism. We present a model of BPH and BOO induced in mice with testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E(2)). Male mice were surgically implanted with slow-releasing sc pellets containing 25 mg T and 2.5 mg E(2) (T+E(2)). After 2 and 4 months of hormone treatment, we evaluated voiding patterns and examined the gross morphology and histology of the bladder, urethra, and prostate. Mice treated with T+E(2) developed significantly larger bladders than untreated mice, consistent with BOO. Some mice treated with T+E(2) had complications in the form of bladder hypertrophy, diverticula, calculi, and eventual decompensation with hydronephrosis. Hormone treatment caused a significant decrease in the size of the urethral lumen, increased prostate mass, and increased number of prostatic ducts associated with the prostatic urethra, compared with untreated mice. Voiding dysfunction was observed in mice treated with T+E(2), who exhibited droplet voiding pattern with significantly decreased void mass, shorter void duration, and fewer sustained voids. The constellation of lower urinary tract abnormalities, including BOO, enlarged prostates, and voiding dysfunction seen in male mice treated with T+E(2) is consistent with BPH in men. This model is suitable for better understanding molecular mechanisms and for developing novel strategies to address BPH and BOO.

  16. Assessing the contribution of thrombospondin-4 induction and ATF6α activation to endoplasmic reticulum expansion and phenotypic modulation in bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Ekman, Mari; Rippe, Catarina; Grossi, Mario; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of disease. The associated expansion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) volume remains unexplained. Thrombospondin-4 was recently found to promote ATF6α activation leading to ER expansion. Using bladder outlet obstruction as a paradigm for phenotypic modulation, we tested if thrombospondin-4 is induced in association with ATF6α activation and ER expansion. Thrombospondin-4 was induced and ATF6α was activated after outlet obstruction in rodents. Increased abundance of spliced of Xbp1, another ER-stress sensor, and induction of Atf4 and Creb3l2 was also seen. Downstream of ATF6α, Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi increased as did ER size, whereas contractile markers were reduced. Overexpression of ATF6α, but not of thrombospondin-4, increased Calr, Manf, Sdf2l1 and Pdi and caused ER expansion, but the contractile markers were inert. Knockout of thrombospondin-4 neither affected bladder growth nor expression of ATF6α target genes, and repression of contractile markers was the same, even if ATF6α activation was curtailed. Increases of Xbp1s, Atf4 and Creb3l2 were similar. Our findings demonstrate reciprocal regulation of the unfolded protein response, including ATF6α activation and ER expansion, and reduced contractile differentiation in bladder outlet obstruction occurring independently of thrombospondin-4, which however is a sensitive indicator of obstruction. PMID:27581066

  17. Obstructive Form of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Gradient: Novel Methods of Provocation, Monitoring of Biomarkers, and Recent Advances in the Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrow, Pawel Petkow; Rajtar-Salwa, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic (latent or/and labile) obstruction of left ventricular outflow (LVOT) was recognized from the earliest clinical descriptions of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and has proved to be a complex phenomenon, as well as arguably the most audible (“visible”) pathophysiological hallmark of this heterogeneous disease. The aim of the current review is focused on two novel issues in a subgroup of obstructive HCM. Firstly, the important methodological problem in HCM is the examination of a subgroup of patients with nonobstructive hypertrophy in resting conditions and hard, but possible provoking obstruction. Recently, investigators have proposed physiological stress test (with double combined stimuli) to disclose such type of patients. The upright exercise is described in the ESC guideline on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from 2014 and may appear as a candidate for gold standard provocation test. The second novel area of interest is associated with elevated level of signaling biomarkers: hypercoagulation, hemolysis, acquired von Willebrand 2A disease, and enhanced oxidative stress. The accelerated and turbulent flow within narrow LVOT may be responsible for these biochemical disturbances. The most recent advances in the treatment of obstructive HCM are related to nonpharmacological methods of LVOT gradient reduction. This report extensively discusses novel methods. PMID:27247935

  18. Evaluation of the effects of omega-3 & interferon alpha-2b administration on partial bladder outlet obstruction in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Firat, Fatih; Uluocak, Nihat; Erdemir, Fikret; Atilgan, Dogan; Markoc, Fatma; Parlaktas, Bekir Suha; Yasar, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: In bladder outlet obstruction-induced rat models, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and collagen ratios have been shown to be increased. Increased TGF-β leads to fibrosis. In this study, the effect of omega-3 and interferon alpha-2b (IFN α-2b) was investigated on oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis in bladder structure in a partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) rat model. Methods: A total of 35 male Wistar albino rats, weighing 300-350 g, were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into five groups. At the end of the experimental period, bladders were harvested from all the rats, and pathological analysis of the rat bladder tissues was performed. In addition, investigations were carried out with enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems to study the antioxidant properties of omega-3 fatty acid and IFN alpha-2b. Results: Increased bladder weight in the PBOO group, in comparison to the control group, was decreased by the administration of omega-3 and IFN α-2b (P=0.002). Significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were detected in group 2 in comparison to the control group. It was also detected that serum SOD, glutathione peroxidase and nitric oxide (NO) levels were significantly higher in group 2 when compared to the control group (P<0.05). In the pathologic evaluation, group 2 showed significantly increased inflammation and fibrosis compared to the control group. Omega-3 treatment significantly decreased inflammation. It was shown that IFN α-2b application partially decreased inflammation. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study showed that in addition to the standard primary approaches to prevent the damage to the upper urinary tract secondary to PBOO, omega-3 fatty acid and IFN α-2b could be beneficial as adjunct treatment in clinical practice. However, this needs to be further investigated with prospective, randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes

  19. The midterm and long-term results of the Mustard operation in patients with transposition of the great vessels and dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S; Harris, P J; Manning, J

    1986-03-01

    Eight of 43 patients with transposition of the great vessels (TGV) and either an intact ventricular septum or very small ventricular septal defect were found to have dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO). The preoperative left ventricle-pulmonary artery (LV-PA) pressure gradient ranged between 14 and 60 mm Hg. In 3 patients the pulmonary artery could not be catheterized. They had a left ventricular pressure of 43, 45, and 62 mm Hg, respectively, no evidence of pulmonary vascular disease, and either echocardiographic or angiocardiographic demonstration of LVOTO. The outflow tract was explored in 3 patients at the time of the Mustard operation. Exposure of the LVOT was difficult, particularly in patients less than 6 months of age. A shallow septal myectomy was performed in 1 patient; a thin fibrous endocardial scar was resected in 2; and no procedure was performed in the third. All 8 patients survived and remain asymptomatic 1 to 11 years (mean, 5 years) after operation. The LV-PA pressure gradient has either remained the same or has increased in every patient except 1 in whom there was a slight reduction in the gradient. We conclude that dynamic LVOTO persists after the Mustard operation and is not amenable to direct surgical relief. However, an excellent clinical result can be obtained for up to 11 years after operation.

  20. Non-Invasive Clinical Parameters for the Prediction of Urodynamic Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Analysis Using Causal Bayesian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Cheeti, Abhilash; Yoo, Changwon; Choo, Minsoo; Paick, Jae-Seung; Oh, Seung-June

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify non-invasive clinical parameters to predict urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) using causal Bayesian networks (CBN). Subjects and Methods From October 2004 to August 2013, 1,381 eligible BPH patients with complete data were selected for analysis. The following clinical variables were considered: age, total prostate volume (TPV), transition zone volume (TZV), prostate specific antigen (PSA), maximum flow rate (Qmax), and post-void residual volume (PVR) on uroflowmetry, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Among these variables, the independent predictors of BOO were selected using the CBN model. The predictive performance of the CBN model using the selected variables was verified through a logistic regression (LR) model with the same dataset. Results Mean age, TPV, and IPSS were 6.2 (±7.3, SD) years, 48.5 (±25.9) ml, and 17.9 (±7.9), respectively. The mean BOO index was 35.1 (±25.2) and 477 patients (34.5%) had urodynamic BOO (BOO index ≥40). By using the CBN model, we identified TPV, Qmax, and PVR as independent predictors of BOO. With these three variables, the BOO prediction accuracy was 73.5%. The LR model showed a similar accuracy (77.0%). However, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the CBN model was statistically smaller than that of the LR model (0.772 vs. 0.798, p = 0.020). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that TPV, Qmax, and PVR are independent predictors of urodynamic BOO. PMID:25397903

  1. Diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction to select patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Oh, Seung-June

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in the selection of patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate. Materials and methods We systematically searched online PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases from January 1989 to June 2014. Results A total of 19 articles met the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. The eligible studies included a total of 2321 patients with a median number of 92 patients per study (range: 12–437). Of the 19 studies, 15 conducted conventional transurethral prostatectomy (TURP), and 7 used other or multiple modalities. In urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) positive patients, the pooled mean difference (MD) was significant for better improvement of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) (pooled MD, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72–5.24; p < 0.01; studies, 16; participants, 1726), quality of life score (QoL) (pooled MD, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.14–1.02; p = 0.010; studies, 9; participants, 1052), maximal flow rate (Qmax) (pooled MD, 3.86; 95% CI, 2.17–5.54; p < 0.01; studies, 17; participants, 1852), and post-void residual volume (PVR) (pooled MD, 32.46; 95% CI, 23.34–41.58; p < 0.01; studies, 10; participants, 1219) compared with that in non-BOO patients. Some comparisons showed between-study heterogeneity despite the strict selection criteria of the included studies. However, there was no clear evidence of publication bias in this meta-analysis. Conclusions Our meta-analysis results showed a significant association between urodynamic BOO and better improvements in all treatment outcome parameters. Preoperative UDS may add insight into postoperative outcomes after surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:28241023

  2. Impact of partial urethral obstruction on bladder function: time-dependent changes and functional correlates of altered expression of Ca²⁺ signaling regulators.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, David; AbouShwareb, Tamer; D'Agostino, Ralph; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Christ, George J

    2012-06-15

    In animal models of partial urethral obstruction (PUO), altered smooth muscle function/contractility may be linked to changes in molecules that regulate calcium signaling/sensitization. PUO was created in male rats, and urodynamic studies were conducted 2 and 6 wk post-PUO. Cystometric recordings were analyzed for the presence or absence of nonvoiding contractions [i.e., detrusor overactivity (DO)]. RT-PCR and Western blots were performed on a subpopulation of rats to study the relationship between the expression of RhoA, L-type Ca(2+) channels, Rho kinase-1, Rho kinase-2, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, ryanodine receptor, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 and protein kinase C (PKC)-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kDa, and urodynamic findings in the same animal. Animals displayed DO at 2 (38%) and 6 wk (43%) post-PUO, increases were seen in in vivo pressures at 2 wk, and residual volume at 6 wk. Statistical analysis of RT-PCR and Western blot data at 2 wk, during the compensatory phase of detrusor hypertrophy, documented that expression of molecules that regulate calcium signaling and sensitization was consistently lower in obstructed rats without DO than those with DO or control rats. Among rats with DO at 2 wk, linear regression analysis revealed positive correlations between in vivo pressures and protein and mRNA expression of several regulatory molecules. At 6 wk, in the presence of overt signs of bladder decompensation, no clear or consistent alterations in expression of these same targets were observed at the protein level. These data extend prior work to suggest that molecular profiling of key regulatory molecules during the progression of PUO-mediated bladder dysfunction may shed new light on potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets.

  3. Risk factors in the origin of congenital left-ventricular outflow-tract obstruction defects of the heart: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Csáky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Vereczkey, Attila; Kósa, Zsolt; Gerencsér, Balázs; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our project was to study possible etiological factors in the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs) because in the majority of patients the underlying causes are unclear. Cases with different CHD entities as homogeneously as possible were planned for evaluation in the population-based large data set of the Hungarian Case Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. Dead or surgically corrected 302 live-born cases with different types of left-ventricular outflow tract obstructive defects (LVOT, i.e., valvular aortic stenosis 76, hypoplastic left heart syndrome 76, coarctation of the aorta 113, and other congenital anomalies of aorta 32) were compared with 469 matched controls, 38,151 controls without any defects, and 20,750 malformed controls with other isolated defects. Medically recorded pregnancy complications and chronic diseases were evaluated based on prenatal maternity logbooks, whereas acute diseases, drug treatments, and folic acid/multivitamin supplementation were analyzed both on the basis of retrospective maternal information and medical records. The results of the study showed the role of maternal diabetes in the origin of LVOT in general, while panic disorder was associated with a higher risk of hypoplastic left heart syndrome and ampicillin treatment with a higher risk of coarctation of the aorta (COA). High doses of folic acid had a protective effect regarding the manifestation of LVOT, particularly COA. In conclusion, only a minor portion of causes was shown in our study; thus, further studies are needed to understand better the underlying causal factors in the origin of LVOT.

  4. Detrusor induction of miR-132/212 following bladder outlet obstruction: association with MeCP2 repression and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Mardjaneh Karbalaei; Ekman, Mari; Krawczyk, Katarzyna; Svensson, Daniel; Göransson, Olga; Dahan, Diana; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof; Albinsson, Sebastian; Uvelius, Bengt; Swärd, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-132 and miR-212 have been found to regulate synaptic plasticity and cholinergic signaling and recent work has demonstrated roles outside of the CNS, including in smooth muscle. Here, we examined if miR-132 and miR-212 are induced in the urinary bladder following outlet obstruction and whether this correlates with effects on gene expression and cell growth. Three to seven-fold induction of miR-132/212 was found at 10 days of obstruction and this was selective for the detrusor layer. We cross-referenced putative binding sites in the miR-132/212 promoter with transcription factors that were predicted to be active in the obstruction model. This suggested involvement of Creb and Ahr in miR-132/212 induction. Creb phosphorylation (S-133) was not increased, but the number of Ahr positive nuclei increased. Moreover, we found that serum stimulation and protein kinase C activation induced miR-132/212 in human detrusor cells. To identify miR-132/212 targets, we correlated the mRNA levels of validated targets with the miRNA levels. Significant correlations between miR-132/212 and MeCP2, Ep300, Pnkd and Jarid1a were observed, and the protein levels of MeCP2, Pnkd and Ache were reduced after obstruction. Reduction of Ache however closely matched a 90% reduction of synapse density arguing that its repression was unrelated to miR-132/212 induction. Importantly, transfection of antimirs and mimics in cultured detrusor cells increased and decreased, respectively, the number of cells and led to changes in MeCP2 expression. In all, these findings show that obstruction of the urethra increases miR-132 and miR-212 in the detrusor and suggests that this influences gene expression and limits cell growth.

  5. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part II of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and bicuspid aortic valve disease, coarctation of the aorta, right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan’s syndrome. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352138

  7. AB279. SPR-06 Fibrosis in the bladder in response to outlet obstruction is triggered through the NLRP3 inflammasome and the production of IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Francis M.; Govada, Vihasa; Sexton, Stephanie; Purves, J. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), most commonly created by benign prostatic hyperplasia, promotes an inflammatory state that produces voiding dysfunction. Recently, we have shown that the NLRP3 inflammasome triggers this inflammation. Over time, inflammation promotes fibrosis. In this study we explore the role of NLRP3 (and IL-1β produced by activated NLRP3) in BOO-induced fibrosis. Methods Rats were divided into 5 groups: (I) control, (II) sham, (III) BOO + Vehicle (Veh; 1 mL, 40% EtOH, p.o.), (IV) BOO + glyburide (Gly; NLRP3 inhibitor; 10 mg/kg, p.o.) or (V) BOO + Anakinra (Ana; IL-1 receptor antagonist; 25 mg/kg, i.p.). BOO is constructed by inserting a 1-mm transurethral catheter, tying a suture around the urethra and removing the catheter. Medications were given prior to surgery and once daily for 12 days. Hypertrophy was assessed by bladder weight, fibrosis by collagen staining (Masson’s Trichrome Stain), IL-1 receptor 1 (IL-1R1), prolyl 4-hydroylase (P4H) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) localization by immunofluorescence and collagen secretion by Sirius Red. Results BOO increased production of collagen in the bladder which was blocked by either preventing NLRP3 activation with glyburide or blocking IL-1β’s action at its receptor, clearly implicating the NLRP3/IL-1β pathway in fibrosis during BOO. IL-1β directly triggers collagen synthesis in other tissues and we found that recombinant IL-1β stimulated pro-collagen production in control urothelial cells placed in culture. Consistent with urothelia as a source of pro-collagen production, isolated urothelial cells from BOO rats secreted significantly more IL-1β than control cells. In control rats, the IL-1β receptor, IL-1R1, was highly expressed in the basal layer of the urothelia with less staining in the umbrella cells and detrusor and no staining in the interstitium. P4H (a marker of pro-collagen synthesis) exhibited similar staining, although enhanced expression in the basal urothelia was not

  8. Protostellar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2016-09-01

    Outflows from accreting, rotating, and magnetized systems are ubiquitous. Protostellar outflows can be observed from radio to X-ray wavelengths in the continuum and a multitude of spectral lines that probe a wide range of physical conditions, chemical phases, radial velocities, and proper motions. Wide-field visual and near-IR data, mid-IR observations from space, and aperture synthesis with centimeter- and millimeterwave interferometers are revolutionizing outflow studies. Many outflows originate in multiple systems and clusters. Although most flows are bipolar and some contain highly collimated jets, others are wide-angle winds, and a few are nearly isotropic and exhibit explosive behavior. Morphologies and velocity fields indicate variations in ejection velocity, mass-loss rate, and in some cases, flow orientation and degree of collimation. These trends indicate that stellar accretion is episodic and often occurs in a complex dynamical environment. Outflow power increases with source luminosity but decreases with evolutionary stage. The youngest outflows are small and best traced by molecules such as CO, SiO, H2O, and H2. Older outflows can grow to parsec scales and are best traced by shock-excited atoms and ions such as hydrogen-recombination lines, [Sii], and [Oii]. Outflows inject momentum and energy into their surroundings and provide an important mechanism in the self-regulation of star formation. However, momentum injection rates remain uncertain with estimates providing lower bounds.

  9. Impact of Venous Thromboembolism, Venous Stasis Syndrome, Venous Outflow Obstruction and Venous Valvular Incompetence on Quality of Life and Activities of Daily Living: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashrani, Aneel A.; Silverstein, Marc D.; Rooke, Thom W.; Lahr, Brian D.; Petterson, Tanya M.; Bailey, Kent R.; Melton, L. Joseph; Heit, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The role of venous stasis syndrome (VSS) mechanisms (i.e. venous outflow obstruction [VOO] and venous valvular incompetence [VVI]) on quality of life (QoL) and activities of daily living (ADL) is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that venous thromboembolism (VTE), VSS, VOO and VVI are associated with reduced QoL and ADL. This study is a follow-up of an incident VTE case–control study nested within a population-based inception cohort of incident residents from Olmsted County, MN, USA, between 1966 and 1990. The study comprised 232 Olmsted County residents with a first lifetime VTE and 133 residents without VTE. Methods included a questionnaire and physical examination for VSS; vascular laboratory testing for VOO and VVI; assessment of QoL by SF36 and of ADL by pertinent sections from the Older Americans Resources and Services (OARS) and Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS2) questionnaires. Of the 365 study participants, 232 (64%), 161 (44%), 43 (12%) and 136 (37%) had VTE, VSS, VOO and VVI, respectively. Prior VTE was associated with reduced ADL and increased pain, VSS with reduced physical QoL and increased pain, and VOO with reduced physical QoL and ADL. VVI was not associated with QoL or ADL. In conclusion, VSS and VOO are associated with worse physical QoL and increased pain. VOO and VTE are associated with impaired ADL. We hypothesize that rapid clearance of venous outflow obstruction in individuals with acute VTE will improve their QoL and ADL. PMID:20926498

  10. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ, much like a balloon, that stores urine. Pelvic floor muscles help hold urine in the bladder. The ... the bathroom more often. The bladder wall and pelvic floor muscles may weaken. Weak bladder wall muscles may ...

  11. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  12. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SB. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 55. Sharma R, ...

  13. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... workers, aluminum workers, leather workers, truck drivers, and pesticide applicators are at the highest risk. Chemotherapy: The ... Avoid exposure to chemicals linked to bladder cancer. Alternative Names Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial ...

  14. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  15. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  16. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  17. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  18. The Effects of Acupuncture on Bladder Interstitial Cells of Cajal Excitability in Rats with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qi-fan; Hou, Yuen-hao; Hou, Wen-guang; Lin, Zhi-xian; Tang, Kang-min; Chen, Yue-lai

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture treatment has an effect on patients with an overactive bladder, but the mechanism of its action remains to be clarified. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on bladder overactivity, and the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal of the bladder in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 30 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to stimulate the Ciliao point (BL32) and the Huiyang point (BL35) of rats for 20 min, 3 days. Results showed that acupuncture suppressed detrusor unstable contraction frequency and decreased detrusor maximum pressure in the bladder filling period. Compared with the normal control rats, HCN2 mRNA and protein expression within the bladder were upregulated and were reversed by electroacupuncture in overactive bladder rats as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, in-vitro cell-cultured OAB rats bladder interstitial cells of Cajal intracellular Ca2+ concentration were higher than normal control rats, which were lowered after acupuncture treatment. These findings suggest that acupuncture stimulation can suppress bladder overactivity, and regulate the excitability of bladder interstitial cells of Cajal in treatment of overactive bladder myogenic mechanism. PMID:24194780

  19. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause skin to break down and lead to pressure sores Kidney damage if the bladder becomes too full, ... More Tumor Patient Instructions Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Review Date 5/30/2016 Updated by: Amit ...

  20. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

  1. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  2. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented.

  3. FOREIGN BODY IN URINARY BLADDER: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Saadat-Hassan; Khan, Ikramullah

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder functions for the storage and expulsion of urine. Foreign bodies in male urinary bladder are rare due to lengthy urethra, especially when they are rounded in shape and difficult to be introduced into urinary bladder. This is a case report of a middle age male with thin body habitus and slightly disturbed psychiatric status. He presented with both irritative and obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). He was investigated and found to have an intact bangle in the urinary bladder. The patient was planned for surgery, and the foreign body was removed endoscopically with the help of cystoscope. Later on the patient was referred to a psychiatrist for psychological management.

  4. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  5. Bilateral Ureteral Obstruction in Children after Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grande, M.; Lisi, G.; Bianchi, D.; Bove, P.; Miano, R.; Esser, A.; De Sanctis, F.; Neri, A.; Grande, S.; Villa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute renal failure due to bilateral ureteral obstruction is a rare complication after appendectomy in children. We report a case of bilateral ureteric obstruction in a 14-year-old boy nine days after surgery for an acute appendicitis. After saline-filling of the urinary bladder, transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis of moderate degree. No abscess was found with CT but presence of millimetric stones on both distal ureters was shown, with bilateral calyceal dilatation. Cystoscopy revealed inflammatory changes in the bladder base. Following introduction of bilateral ureteric stents, there was rapid normalisation of urinary output and serum creatinine. PMID:26295001

  6. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    ... urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... bladder wall. Less than 1 in 10 pelvic fractures lead to bladder injury. Other causes of bladder ...

  7. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  8. [Disorders of bladder compliance and neurogenic bladder].

    PubMed

    Chartier-Kastler, E; Comperat, E; Ruffion, A

    2007-05-01

    Bladder compliance is defined as the relationship between change in bladder volume and change in detrusor pressure (DV/DP). The pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance is still poorly understood. Experimental reduction of blood flow in the bladder wall, bilateral hypogastric nerve section in rats, the study of spinalized rat bladders, and reduction of oestrogen impregnation show that these conditions induce loss of the viscoelastic properties of the bladder. With the arrival of new treatments active on afferent and/or efferent pathways or on the central nervous system, it is very important to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance. The reversibility of these disorders constitutes a major therapeutic challenge and their functional consequences constitute a crucial prognostic element of neurogenic bladder. Disorders of bladder compliance can be assessed clinically from two points of view: 1) The natural history of onset of these disorders in neurogenic bladder. Clinical experience demonstrates certain risk factors for the development of these disorders, such as the voiding mode (intermittent self-catheterization or by a carer versus indwelling catheter), the level of the spinal cord lesion (suprasacral versus sacral, incomplete versus complete, and cauda equina lesions), and the presence of myelomeningocele. 2) Data derived from conservative management of these disorders in patients with neurogenic bladder: urethral dilatation, various types of sphincterotomy, vesical denervation, alpha-blockers, sympatholytics, vanilloids (resiniferatoxin and capsaicin), intra-detrusor botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen have been shown to improve disorders of compliance of neurogenic bladder.

  9. An unusual cause of death: spontaneous urinary bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Unluer, Erden Erol; Unay, Fulya Cakalagaoglu; Oyar, Orhan; Sener, Aslı

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare and life-threatening condition similar to traumatic and iatrogenic perforation. The connection with the underlying bladder damage due to previous radiotherapy, inflammation, malignancy, obstruction, or other causes can be found in almost all cases. The symptoms are often nonspecific, and misdiagnosis is common. Here, we present a case of spontaneous urinary bladder perforation due to bladder necrosis in a diabetic woman. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy was performed by surgeons and revealed necrosis of the anterior and lateral walls of the urinary bladder. Microscopic examination revealed necrotic changes throughout the bladder wall. Ghost-like cellular outlines were compatible with coagulative necrosis. Clusters of bacteria were also present in some necrobiotic tissues. Malignant cells were not present. It appears probable that the infection was due to local interference with the blood supply (arterial, capillary, or venous) combined with the systemic metabolic upset that led to the bladder condition. In our case, we observed partial necrosis of the bladder rather than distortion of the entire blood supply to the bladder as consequences of the microvascular effects of diabetes. Urinary bladder perforation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with free fluid in the abdomen/peritonitis, decreased urine output, and hematuria, and in whom increased levels of urea/creatinine are detected in serum and/ or peritoneal fluid aspirate.

  10. UPJ obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of urinary tract obstruction. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ... of urinary tract obstruction. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  11. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  12. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  13. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as “urinary bladder neck obstruction”, “urinary bladder, overactive”, and “urinary bladder, neurogenic”. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  15. Directly Driven Ion Outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.; Moore, T. E.; Russell, C. T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examine ionospheric outflows in the high altitude magnetospheric polar cap during the POLAR satellite's apogee on April 19, 1996 using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) instrument. The elevated levels of O(+) observed in this pass may be due to the geophysical conditions during and prior to the apogee pass. In addition to the high abundance of O(+) relative to H(+), several other aspects of this data are noteworthy. We observe relationships between the density, velocity, and temperature which appear to be associated with perpendicular heating and the mirror force, rather than adiabatic expansion. The H(+) outflow is at a fairly constant flux which is consistent with being source limited by charge exchange at lower altitudes. Local centrifugal acceleration in the polar cap is found to be insufficient to account for the main variations we observe in the outflow velocity. The solar wind speed is high during this pass approximately 700 kilometers per second, and there are Alfve'n waves present in the solar wind such that the solar wind speed and IMF Bx are correlated. In this pass both the H(+) and O(+) outflow velocities correlate with both the solar wind speed and IMF fluctuations. Polar cap magnetometer and Hydra electron data show the same long period wave structure as found in the solar wind and polar cap ion outflow. In addition, the polar cap Poynting flux along the magnetic field direction correlates well with the H(+) temperature (R=0.84). We conclude that the solar wind can drive polar cap ion outflow particularly during polar squalls by setting up a parallel drop that is tens of eV which then causes the ion outflow velocity of O(+) and H(+), the electrons, and magnetic perturbations to vary in a similar fashion.

  16. Isolated bladder aspergillosis as the primary presentation of non-oliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Dikmen, Emre; Filinte, Deniz; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with acute obstructive non-oliguric renal failure. Abdominal CT revealed obstructive hydronephrosis and irregular thickening of the bladder wall. Upon cystoscopy, samples of tissue were taken and found to be positive for Aspergillus spp. on histology, indicating infection of the bladder wall. The patient was treated successfully by means of a percutaneous nephrostomy and a 30-day course of caspofungin.

  17. The concept of peripheral modulation of bladder sensation.

    PubMed

    Eastham, Jane E; Gillespie, James I

    2013-01-01

    It is recognized that, as the bladder fills, there is a corresponding increase in sensation. This awareness of the volume in the bladder is then used in a complex decision making process to determine if there is a need to void. It is also part of everyday experience that, when the bladder is full and sensations strong, these sensations can be suppressed and the desire to void postponed. The obvious explanation for such altered perceptions is that they occur centrally. However, this may not be the only mechanism. There are data to suggest that descending neural influences and local factors might regulate the sensitivity of the systems within the bladder wall generating afferent activity. Specifically, evidence is accumulating to suggest that the motor-sensory system within the bladder wall is influenced in this way. The motor-sensory system, first described over 100 years ago, appears to be a key component in the afferent outflow, the afferent "noise," generated within the bladder wall. However, the presence and possible importance of this complex system in the generation of bladder sensation has been overlooked in recent years. As the bladder fills the motor activity increases, driven by cholinergic inputs and modulated, possibly, by sympathetic inputs. In this way information on bladder volume can be transmitted to the CNS. It can be argued that the ability to alter the sensitivity of the mechanisms generating the motor component of this motor-sensory system represents a possible indirect way to influence afferent activity and so the perception of bladder volume centrally. Furthermore, it is emerging that the apparent modulation of sensation by drugs to alleviate the symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB), the anti-cholinergics and the new generation of drugs the β 3 sympathomimetics, may be the result of their ability to modulate the motor component of the motor sensory system. The possibility of controlling sensation, physiologically and pharmacologically, by

  18. Multiple Uric Acid Bladder Stones: Clinical Presentation and Endoscopic Management

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Shen, Shujane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bladder urinary calculi occur in 3%–8% of men with bladder outlet obstruction, and although most of them are composed of calcium, in a few cases uric acid bladder stones are diagnosed. Case Presentation: We present clinical images and therapeutic management of a 65-year-old diabetic man with significant prostate enlargement and >30 bladder stones, the largest being 17 mm. Despite the large stone burden, the patient was managed by cystolithotripsy. Remarkably, stone composition analysis revealed 100% uric acid stone. Intraoperative and postoperative course were uneventfully. Conclusion: Uric acid bladder stone pathogenesis seems to be multifactorial with local and systemic factors contributing in different manners and even large stone burdens may be cystoscopically managed. PMID:28265592

  19. Studies of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arav, Nahum

    2002-01-01

    The main aim of this research program is to determine the ionization equilibrium and abundances in quasar outflows. Especially in the broad absorption line QSO PG 0946+301. We find that the outflow's metalicity is consistent with being solar, while the abundance ratio of phosphorus to other metals is at least ten times solar. These findings are based on diagnostics that are not sensitive to saturation and partial covering effects in the BALs (Broad Adsorption Lines), which considerably weakened previous claims for enhanced metalicity. Ample evidence for these effects is seen in the spectrum.

  20. Obstructive uropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 123. Read More Acute Bladder stones Cervical cancer Chronic Colon cancer Cystinuria Endometrial cancer Enlarged prostate Hydronephrosis of one kidney Renal Retroperitoneal fibrosis Review Date 3/28/2016 Updated ...

  1. METALLICITY AND QUASAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui; Yuan, Weimin

    2012-06-01

    Correlations of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the C IV line, with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are investigated. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to C IV increase prominently with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of the dominant coolant, C IV line, decreases, and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using Si IV+O IV]/C IV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicity and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7-6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely by affecting outflow acceleration. This effect may have a profound impact on galaxy evolution via momentum feedback and chemical enrichment.

  2. GALAXY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: sharanya.sur@asu.edu

    2016-02-10

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50–100 km s{sup −1} line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s{sup −1}, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  3. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sexuality Life after Radical Cystectomy Women and Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy To watch the recordings and download the transcripts, click here! Look for more topics coming this spring! Bladder cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer in ...

  4. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  5. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  6. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  7. Variations in active outflow along the trabecular outflow pathway.

    PubMed

    Cha, Elliott D K; Xu, Jia; Gong, Lihua; Gong, Haiyan

    2016-05-01

    Previous tracer studies have shown segmental outflow in the trabecular meshwork (TM) and along the inner wall (IW) of Schlemm's canal (SC). Whether segmental outflow is conserved distal to SC has not yet been investigated. This study aims to investigate whether the segmented pattern of outflow is conserved in distal outflow pathways by using a newly developed global imaging method and to evaluate variations of active outflow in three distinct regions along trabecular outflow pathway. Six normal whole globe human eyes were first perfused at 15 mmHg to establish a stable baseline outflow facility. The anterior chamber was then exchanged (5 mL) and perfused with fluorescent microspheres (0.002% v/v, 200 μL) to label areas of active outflow. All eyes were perfusion fixed and dissected into anterior segments. The TM and scleral surface were en face imaged globally. Effective filtration area (EFA) and fluorescent tracer distribution and intensity were analyzed in global images for both the TM and episcleral veins (EPVs). Anterior segments were further dissected into a minimum of 16 radial wedges, from which frontal sections were cut, stained, and imaged, using confocal microscopy. EFA from all three locations along the trabecular outflow pathway were measured and compared. Additionally, TM thickness, SC height, and total number of collector channels (CC) were analyzed and compared between active and inactive areas of outflow. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank test with a required significance of p ≤ 0.05. All three locations showed a segmental outflow pattern. The TM had a significantly higher mean EFA (86.3 ± 3.5%) compared to both the IW (34.7 ± 2.9%; p ≤ 0.01) and EPVs (41.1 ± 3.8%; p ≤ 0.01). No significant difference in mean EFA was found between IW and EPVs. Preferential active outflow was observed in the nasal and inferior quadrants. TM thickness was significantly larger in areas of active

  8. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  9. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K N; Karakos, C D

    2010-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  10. Chryse Outflow Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of the south Chryse basin Valles Marineris outflow channels on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows on the southwest corner the chaotic terrain of the east part of Valles Marineris and two of its related canyons: Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north). Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southern part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander.

    This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 53 degrees; Mercator projection.

    The south Chryse outflow channels are cut an average of 1 km into the cratered highland terrain. This terrain is about 9 km above datum near Valles Marineris and steadily decreases in elevation to 1 km below datum in the Chryse basin. Shalbatana is relatively narrow (10 km wide) but can reach 3 km in depth. The channel begins at a 2- to 3-km-deep circular depression within a large impact crater, whose floor is partly covered by a chaotic material, and ends in Simud Valles. Tiu and Simud Valles consist of a complex of connected channel floors and chaotic terrain and extend as far south as and connect to eastern Valles Marineris. Ares Vallis originates from discontinuous patches of chaotic terrain within large craters. In the Chryse basin the Ares channel forks; one branch continues northwest into central Chryse Planitia (Latin for plain) and the other extends north into eastern Chryse Planitia.

  11. Biomatrices for bladder reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Madihally, Sundar V; Palmer, Blake; Frimberger, Dominic; Fung, Kar-Ming; Kropp, Bradley P

    2015-03-01

    There is a demand for tissue engineering of the bladder needed by patients who experience a neurogenic bladder or idiopathic detrusor overactivity. To avoid complications from augmentation cystoplasty, the field of tissue engineering seeks optimal scaffolds for bladder reconstruction. Naturally derived biomaterials as well as synthetic and natural polymers have been explored as bladder substitutes. To improve regenerative properties, these biomaterials have been conjugated with functional molecules, combined with nanotechology, or seeded with exogenous cells. Although most studies reported complete and functional bladder regeneration in small-animal models, results from large-animal models and human clinical trials varied. For functional bladder regeneration, procedures for biomaterial fabrication, incorporation of biologically active agents, introduction of nanotechnology, and application of stem-cell technology need to be standardized. Advanced molecular and medical technologies such as next generation sequencing and magnetic resonance imaging can be introduced for mechanistic understanding and non-invasive monitoring of regeneration processes, respectively.

  12. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  13. Bladder leiomyoma: Presentation, evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Nazih; Sakr, Ghazi

    2012-01-01

    Background Bladder leiomyomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms and very rare urinary tumours that represent <0.5% of all bladder tumours, with only 250 cases reported worldwide to date. The importance of recognising their characteristic features, leading to their correct treatment, is fundamental. Therefore, we reviewed reports of leiomyomas of the urinary bladder, their causes, clinical presentations, imaging methods and surgical management, updated to 2012. Methods We retrospectively reviewed articles published in the USA, Europe and Asia, from 1953 to date, using PubMed, Medscape, Medline and the several major journals. We report areas of controversies and well-established guidelines. Results We reviewed 36 articles that confirmed, with a high level of evidence-based medicine, that the male to female ratio is equal, the cause of bladder leiomyomas remains unknown, and their most common presentation is obstructive uropathy; endovesical tumours are the most common. Their radiological diagnosis can be made by ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Complete surgical resection is a very effective treatment, associated with almost no recurrence. Conclusion In symptomatic patients a complete surgical resection can give a very good outcome, with almost no recurrence. PMID:26579246

  14. Unilateral ureteral obstruction: beyond obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Izquierdo, Maria C; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D; Sanz, Ana B; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction is a popular experimental model of renal injury. However, the study of the kidney response to urinary tract obstruction is only one of several advantages of this model. Unilateral ureteral obstruction causes subacute renal injury characterized by tubular cell injury, interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. For this reason, it serves as a model both of irreversible acute kidney injury and of events taking place during human chronic kidney disease. Being a unilateral disease, it is not useful to study changes in global kidney function, but has the advantage of a low mortality and the availability of an internal control (the non-obstructed kidney). Experimental unilateral ureteral obstruction has illustrated the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, all three key processes in kidney injury of any cause, thus providing information beyond obstruction. Recently this model has supported key concepts on the role in kidney fibrosis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tubular epithelial cell G2/M arrest, the anti-aging hormone Klotho and renal innervation. We now review the experimental model and its contribution to identifying novel therapeutic targets in kidney injury and fibrosis, independently of the noxa.

  15. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  16. Mechanical stretch upregulates proteins involved in Ca2+ sensitization in urinary bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano; Zderic, Stephen A; Malkowicz, Bruce; Chakrabarti, Ranjita; Patel, Darshan P; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2014-09-15

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO)-induced remodeling of bladder detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is associated with the modulation of cell signals regulating contraction. We analyzed the DSM from obstructed murine urinary bladders for the temporal regulation of RhoA GTPase and Rho-activated kinase (ROCK), which are linked to Ca(2+) sensitization. In addition, the effects of equibiaxial cell stretch, a condition thought to be associated with pBOO-induced bladder wall smooth muscle hypertrophy and voiding frequency, on the expression of RhoA, ROCK, and C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase I inhibitor (CPI-17) were investigated. DSM from 1-, 3-, 7-, and 14-day obstructed male mice bladders and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-induced obstructed human bladders revealed overexpression of RhoA and ROCK-β at the mRNA and protein levels compared with control. Primary human bladder myocytes seeded onto type I collagen-coated elastic silicone membranes were subjected to cyclic equibiaxial stretch, mimicking the cellular mechanical stretch in the bladder in vivo, and analyzed for the expression of RhoA, ROCK-β, and CPI-17. Stretch caused a significant increase of RhoA, ROCKβ, and CPI-17 expression. The stretch-induced increase in CPI-17 expression occurs at the transcriptional level and is associated with CPI-17 promoter binding by GATA-6 and NF-κB, the transcription factors responsible for CPI-17 gene transcription. Cell stretch caused by bladder overdistension in pBOO is the likely mechanism for initiating overexpression of the signaling proteins regulating DSM tone.

  17. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  18. Venous outflow obstruction and portopulmonary hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe; Covarrubias-Velasco, Marco Antonio; Rojas-Sánchez, Antonio Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 54 Final Diagnosis: Suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomosis stricture Symptoms: Ascites • fatigue • lower limb edema • hepatomegaly Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Transplantology • Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomosis stricture is an unusual vascular complication after orthotopic liver transplantation with the “piggyback” technique. Clinical manifestations are dependent upon the severity of the stenosis. Portopulmonary hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation is a complication that carries high mortality due to cardiopulmonary dysfunction. The pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disorders after orthotopic liver transplantation remains uncertain. Case Report: We report a case of acute right heart pressure overload after surgical correction of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomotic stricture in a 54-year-old woman who had preexisting pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with portal hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation. Twenty months posttransplantation, she developed fatigue and progressive ascites. On admission, the patient had hepatomegaly, ascites, and lower limb edema. Symptoms in the patient developed gradually over time. Conclusions: Recurrent portal hypertension by vascular complications is a cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical manifestations of suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomotic stenosis are dependent upon their severity. Sildenafil is an effective drug for treatment of pulmonary arterial hyper-tension after portal hypertension by vascular complications. PMID:24046802

  19. Zephyria Outflow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    1 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows streamlined islands and a small cataract in an outflow channel system in the Zephyria region of Mars, south of Cerberus. The fluids responsible for creating these landforms flowed from the lower left (southwest) toward upper right (northeast). The fluids may have been water and mud or, some Mars scientists have argued, extremely fluid lava. The presence of a small cataract probably argues more strongly for a water and mud origin. This image is located near 3.8oN, 204.7oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from upper left.

  20. Addressing ketamine bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    The rise in ketamine misuse means more health professionals will need to diagnose, refer and treat ketamine bladder syndrome. Prevention and raising awareness of the problem among multidisciplinary teams will help limit damage to the bladder as well as making treatment and management more effective.

  1. Positional Right Ventricular Obstruction in Pectus Excavatum.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Katherine; Vorsanger, Matthew; Saric, Muhamed; Skolnick, Adam H

    2017-04-15

    Pectus excavatum is one of the most common congenital chest wall deformities. The degree of sternal depression, which may result in compression of the right heart by the chest wall, is variable. While typically asymptomatic, there are various symptoms that can result from severe pectus excavatum. We report on a patient with severe pectus excavatum leading to dynamic obstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract in the seated position.

  2. Inflammasomes are important mediators of cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Vivar, Nivardo P; Kennis, James G; Pratt-Thomas, Jeffery D; Lowe, Danielle W; Shaner, Brooke E; Nietert, Paul J; Spruill, Laura S; Purves, J Todd

    2014-02-01

    Bladder inflammation (cystitis) underlies numerous bladder pathologies and is elicited by a plethora of agents such as urinary tract infections, bladder outlet obstruction, chemotherapies, and catheters. Pattern recognition receptors [Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nod-like receptors (NLRs)] that recognize pathogen- and/or damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and/or DAMPs, respectively) are key components of the innate immune system that coordinates the production (TLRs) and maturation (NLRs) of proinflammatory IL-1β. Despite multiple studies of TLRs in the bladder, none have investigated NLRs beyond one small survey. We now demonstrate that NLRP3 and NLRC4, and their binding partners apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a COOH-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP), are expressed in the bladder and localized predominantly to the urothelia. Activated NLRs form inflammasomes that activate caspase-1. Placement of a NLRP3- or NLRC4-activating PAMP or NLRP3-activating DAMPs into the lumen of the bladder stimulated caspase-1 activity. To investigate inflammasomes in vivo, we induced cystitis with cyclophosphamide (CP, 150 mg/kg ip) in the presence or absence of the inflammasome inhibitor glyburide. Glyburide completely blocked CP-induced activation of caspase-1 and the production of IL-1β at 4 h. At 24 h, glyburide reduced two markers of inflammation by 30-50% and reversed much of the inflammatory morphology. Furthermore, glyburide reversed changes in bladder physiology (cystometry) induced by CP. In conclusion, NLRs/inflammasomes are present in the bladder urothelia and respond to DAMPs and PAMPs, whereas NLRP3 inhibition blocks bladder dysfunction in the CP model. The coordinated response of NLRs and TLRs in the urothelia represents a first-line innate defense that may provide an important target for pharmacological intervention.

  3. Development of a CFD urethral model to study flow-generated vortices under different conditions of prostatic obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pel, Johan J M; van Mastrigt, Ron

    2007-01-01

    A novel, non-invasive method to diagnose bladder outlet obstruction involves the recording of noise with a contact microphone pressed against the perineum (between anus and scrotum). This noise results from flow-generated vortices caused by prostatic obstruction. We developed a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) urethral model including urethral geometry to study the relation between generated noise and the degree of obstruction. This model comprised a bladder, bladder neck, prostate and urethra. Calculations were carried out at four bladder pressures, five degrees of obstruction and three obstruction shapes. For each of the sixty simulations, the velocity and pressure distributions along the urethra were calculated including wall shear stresses to localize flow transition from disturbed to normal. Negative pressures at the obstruction outlet induced recirculation of flow. The location of transition was independent of the applied bladder pressure, but it depended primarily on the degree and secondarily on the shape of the obstruction. Based on the presented results, we hypothesize that the location of the maximum amplitude of perineal noise mainly depends on the degree and shape of the prostatic obstruction. Our future aim is to test our hypothesis in male patients and to extend the presented model to 3D with a viscoelastic urethral wall to calculate the fluid-wall interaction.

  4. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy.

  5. Energy exchanges in reconnection outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin V.; Newman, David L.; Markidis, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Reconnection outflows are highly energetic directed flows that interact with the ambient plasma or with flows from other reconnection regions. Under these conditions the flow becomes highly unstable and chaotic, as any flow jets interacting with a medium. We report here massively parallel simulations of the two cases of interaction between outflow jets and between a single outflow with an ambient plasma. We find in both case the development of a chaotic magnetic field, subject to secondary reconnection events that further complicate the topology of the field lines. The focus of the present analysis is on the energy balance. We compute each energy channel (electromagnetic, bulk, thermal, for each species) and find where the most energy is exchanged and in what form. The main finding is that the largest energy exchange is not at the reconnection site proper but in the regions where the outflowing jets are destabilized.

  6. Obstructed uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.W.; Rosenshein, N.B.; Siegelman, S.S.; Sanders, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Eleven patients with an obstructed, fluid-filled uterus, due to carcinoma of the uterus or to its treatment by radiation therapy, were examined with computed tomography (CT) and/or ultrasound. It is important to recognize this abnormality to differentiate it from other causes of pelvic mass and to ensure prompt treatment of pyometra, should it develop. Both CT and ultrasound reliably identified this condition and differentiated it from other pelvic masses.

  7. ["Pathophysiology and treatment of the overactive bladder"].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    The International Continence Society (ICS) recently derived a consensus symptomatic definition of overactive bladder (OAB) as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. These symptom combinations are suggestive of urodynamically demonstrable detrusor overactivity. The etiology of OAB falls into two broad categories: neurogenic and nonneurogenic. It is not easy to confirm the etiology of OAB in patients with bladder outlet obstruction and neurological disease. This debate has attempted to examine the pathophysiology of OAB and to determine the optimal treatment strategy in a patient with two diseases possibly causing OAB. A 75-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of OAB (urgency, nocturia, and urge incontinence) occurring after cerebrovascular accidents. Urge incontinence worsened concomitantly with the appearance of turbid urine. Urinary tract infection was accompanied by 84 ml of post-void residual. The prostate volume and PSA value were 28 ml and 1.2 ng/ml, respectively. The total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Quality of Life (QOL) Index were 23 and 5, respectively. IPSS for storage symptoms was higher than that for obstructive symptoms. The maximum flow rate, measured after treatment for UTI, was 9.4 ml/s. Two debaters discuss the treament modality, TURP, or pharmacotherapy.

  8. Shining a light on galactic outflows: photoionized outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei; Wofford, Aida

    2016-04-01

    We study the ionization structure of galactic outflows in 37 nearby, star-forming galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the O I, Si II, Si III, and Si IV ultraviolet absorption lines to characterize the different ionization states of outflowing gas. We measure the equivalent widths, line widths, and outflow velocities of the four transitions, and find shallow scaling relations between them and galactic stellar mass and star formation rate. Regardless of the ionization potential, lines of similar strength have similar velocities and line widths, indicating that the four transitions can be modelled as a comoving phase. The Si equivalent width ratios (e.g. Si IV/Si II) have low dispersion, and little variation with stellar mass; while ratios with O I and Si vary by a factor of 2 for a given stellar mass. Photoionization models reproduce these equivalent width ratios, while shock models under predict the relative amount of high ionization gas. The photoionization models constrain the ionization parameter (U) between -2.25 < log (U) < -1.5, and require that the outflow metallicities are greater than 0.5 Z⊙. We derive ionization fractions for the transitions, and show that the range of ionization parameters and stellar metallicities leads to a factor of 1.15-10 variation in the ionization fractions. Historically, mass outflow rates are calculated by converting a column density measurement from a single metal ion into a total hydrogen column density using an ionization fraction, thus mass outflow rates are sensitive to the assumed ionization structure of the outflow.

  9. Microtomographic analysis of lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Joseph R; Smith, Kenneth J; Cox, Liza L; Glass, Ian A; Cox, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal obstruction of the lower urinary tract may result in megacystis, with subsequent development of hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and renal damage. Oligo- or anhydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, and prune belly syndrome are lethal consequences. Causes and mechanisms responsible for obstruction remain unclear but might be clarified by anatomic study at autopsy. To this end, we employed 2 methods of tomographic imaging-optical projection tomography and contrast-enhanced microCT scanning-to elucidate the anatomy of the intact urinary bladder and urethra in 10 male fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Images were compared with those from 9 age-matched controls. Three-dimensional images, rotated and sectioned digitally in multiple planes, permitted thorough examination while preserving specimens for later study. Both external and internal features of the bladder and urethra were demonstrated; small structures (ie, urethral crest, verumontanum, prostatic utricle, ejaculatory ducts) were seen in detail. Types of obstruction consisted of urethral atresia (n  =  5), severe urethral stenosis (n  =  2), urethral diaphragm (n  =  2), or physical kinking (n  =  1); classic (Young type I) posterior urethral valves were not encountered. Traditional light microscopy was then used to verify tomographic findings. The prostate gland was hypoplastic or absent in all cases; in 1, prostatic tissue was displaced inferior to the verumontanum. Findings support previous views that dissection may produce valve-like artifacts (eg, bisection of an obstructing diaphragm) and that deformation of an otherwise normal urethra may result in megacystis. The designation "posterior urethral valves" should not be used as a generic expression of urethral obstruction unless actual valves are demonstrated.

  10. Bowel Obstruction: Sonographic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hollerweger, A; Wüstner, M; Dirks, K

    2015-06-01

    Learning objectives: Sonographic examination concept in the case of suspicion of bowel obstruction. Recognition of the sonographic criteria of a bowel obstruction. Ability to detect the level of a bowel obstruction. Sonographic detection of typical causes of bowel obstruction. Detection of sonographic signs of complicated bowel obstruction. Ability to sonographically define important differential diagnoses. Further diagnostic procedures in unclear situations.

  11. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Infections and Related Conditions Urinary Tract Infections Bedwetting Kidneys and Urinary Tract Urine Tests X-Ray ... Bladder) Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) Your Urinary System Bedwetting Urinary Tract Infections Kidneys and Urinary Tract Bedwetting ( ...

  12. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder, which is called the urothelium or transitional epithelium . As the cancer grows into or through the ... in the inner layer of cells (the transitional epithelium) but have not grown into the deeper layers. ...

  13. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  14. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  15. Intravesical therapy for overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Overactive bladder and urgency incontinence are common conditions generally treated with oral anticholinergic therapy. Despite the development of new antimuscarinic agents, many patients do not tolerate or fail to respond to oral therapy. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative method of managing bladder overactivity. Intravesical instillation of anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and atropine can achieve cholinergic blockade without producing systemic side effects. Botulinum A toxin injected directly into the detrusor has been shown in preliminary studies to increase bladder capacity and decrease uncontrolled bladder contractility for up to 6 months. Intravesical local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine block the conduction of unmyelinated C fibers and when administered into the bladder, lead to an increase in functional bladder capacity. Intravesical capsaicin and resiniferatoxin also affect afferent innervation by blocking C-fiber afferents, leading to decreased bladder contractility and increased bladder capacity. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative treatment for the management of overactive bladder.

  16. Mediterranean outflow mixing and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Price, J F; Baringer, M O; Lueck, R G; Johnson, G C; Ambar, I; Parrilla, G; Cantos, A; Kennelly, M A; Sanford, T B

    1993-02-26

    The Mediterranean Sea produces a salty, dense outflow that is strongly modified by entrainment as it first begins to descend the continental slope in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz. The current accelerates to 1.3 meters per second, which raises the internal Froude number above 1, and is intensely turbulent through its full thickness. The outflow loses about half of its density anomaly and roughly doubles its volume transport as it entrains less saline North Atlantic Central water. Within 100 kilometers downstream, the current is turned by the Coriolis force until it flows nearly parallel to topography in a damped geostrophic balance. The mixed Mediterranean outflow continues westward, slowly descending the continental slope until it becomes neutrally buoyant in the thermocline where it becomes an important water mass.

  17. Molecular Outflows: Explosive versus Protostellar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Schmid-Burgk, Johannes; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Loinard, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    With the recent recognition of a second, distinctive class of molecular outflows, namely the explosive ones not directly connected to the accretion–ejection process in star formation, a juxtaposition of the morphological and kinematic properties of both classes is warranted. By applying the same method used in Zapata et al., and using 12CO(J = 2-1) archival data from the Submillimeter Array, we contrast two well-known explosive objects, Orion KL and DR21, to HH 211 and DG Tau B, two flows representative of classical low-mass protostellar outflows. At the moment, there are only two well-established cases of explosive outflows, but with the full availability of ALMA we expect that more examples will be found in the near future. The main results are the largely different spatial distributions of the explosive flows, consisting of numerous narrow straight filament-like ejections with different orientations and in almost an isotropic configuration, the redshifted with respect to the blueshifted components of the flows (maximally separated in protostellar, largely overlapping in explosive outflows), the very-well-defined Hubble flow-like increase of velocity with distance from the origin in the explosive filaments versus the mostly non-organized CO velocity field in protostellar objects, and huge inequalities in mass, momentum, and energy of the two classes, at least for the case of low-mass flows. Finally, all the molecular filaments in the explosive outflows point back to approximately a central position (i.e., the place where its “exciting source” was located), contrary to the bulk of the molecular material within the protostellar outflows.

  18. Role of the pelvic floor in bladder neck opening and closure I: muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the striated muscle forces hypothesized to assist bladder neck opening and closure in females. Cadaveric dissection was used to identify the levator plate (LP), the anterior portion of pubococcygeus muscle (PCM), the longitudinal muscle of the anus (LMA), and their relation to the bladder, vagina and rectum. X-ray video recordings were made during coughing, straining, squeezing and micturition in a group of 20 incontinent patients and 4 controls, along with surface EMG, urethral pressure and digital palpation studies. During effort, urethral closure appeared to be activated by a forward muscle force corresponding to PCM, and bladder neck closure by backward muscle forces corresponding to LP and LMA. During micturition the PCM force appeared to relax, allowing LP and LMA to pull open the outflow tract. The data appear to support the hypothesis of specific directional muscle forces stretching the vagina to assist bladder neck opening and closure.

  19. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sphincter muscles relax to allow urine to pass through the urethra as the bladder contracts to ... contract at the same time, so urine cannot pass easily. Drug therapy for an uncoordinated bladder and ...

  20. Outflow from a Nocturnal Thunderstorm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    P AD-A093 796 ILLINOIS STATE WATER SURVEY URBANAF/ .2 OUTFLOW FROM A NOCTURNAL THUNDERSTORM. (U) NOV a0 R W SCOTT NSF-ATHN78-0a865 UNCLASSIFIED SWS...CR-242 ARO-15529.5-6S N I muuuuuuuuuuuu iDA0937 9 6 State Water Survey Division k istitute of METEOROLOGY SECTION 0 uJD AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS...SWS Contract Report 242 / F OUTFLOW FROM A NOCTURNAL THUNDERSTORM Robert W. Scott Meteorology Section Illinois State Water Survey -- DTIC ELECTE CD

  1. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  2. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  3. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  4. Echocardiographic features of subpulmonic obstruction in dextro-transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Nanda, N C; Gramiak, R; Manning, J A; Lipchik, E O

    1975-03-01

    Eleven patients with dextro-transposition of the great vessels (TGV) and subpulmonic (left ventriclar outflow) obstruction documented by cardiac catheterization and angiography were studied by echocardiography. Echocardiographic features were which characterized the outflow obstruction included a) prolonged diastolic apposition of the mitral valve with the ventricular septum (10 patients), b) smaller width of the pulmonary artery as compared to the aortic root (10 cases), and c) narrowing of the subpulmonic area demonstrated by beam anglation studies through the planes of the mitral valve and the pulmonary artery (five cases). In addition, four patients showed abnormal systolic anterior movements (SAMs) of the anterior mitral leaflet resembling those observed in idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. The SAM'S WERE LARGE IN THREE PATIENTS AND MAY HAVE ACCENTUATED THE OUTFLOW OBSTRUCTION. Additional evidence for this was provided by the movement of the pulmonary valve towards closure with the onset of the mitral SAM'S. These features were uncommon or absent in a comparison group of 17 patients with TGV and no outflow obstruction. Echocardiography appears to be useful in the diagnosis of subpulmonic muscular obstruction in TGV. Demonstration of definite mitral SAM'S IN SOME PATIENTS SUGGEST THE PRESSENCE OF ASSOCIATED FUNCTIONAL OBSTRUCTION OF THE TYPE SEEN IN IDIOPATHIC HYPERTROPHIC SUBAORTIC STENOSIS.

  5. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disc with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scaleheight z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that an SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  6. Treatment of Bladder Dysfunction Using Stem Cell or Tissue Engineering Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and stem cell transplantation are two important options that may help overcome limitations in the current treatment strategy for bladder dysfunction. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for treating pathophysiology, as well as for urological tissue engineering and regeneration. To date, stem cell therapy in urology has mainly focused on oncology and erectile dysfunction. The therapeutic potency of stem cells (SCs) was originally thought to derive from their ability to differentiate into various cell types including smooth muscle. The main mechanisms of SCs in reconstituting or restoring bladder function are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. Nowadays, paracrine effects of stem cells are thought to be more prominent because of their stimulating effects on stem cells and adjacent cells. Studies of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to experimental models and have been less focused on tissue engineering for bladder regeneration. Bladder outlet obstruction is a representative model. Adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle-derived stem cells or muscle precursor cells are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The aim of this study is to review stem cell therapy and updated tissue regeneration as treatments for bladder dysfunction and to provide the current status of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for bladder dysfunction including its mechanisms and limitations. PMID:24741410

  7. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  8. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  9. Rapidly Growing Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Mass in Patient with Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jongmin; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jeong Su; Hwang, Ki Won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chon, Min Ku; Lee, Soo Yong; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) without inferior vena cava (IVC) involvements is extremely rare with few reported cases. Sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature is a rare pathologic type of RCC having aggressive behavior due to great metastatic potential. Here, we report a case of rapidly growing cardiac metastasis of RCC which brought on right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction without IVC and right atrial involvement in a 61-year-old woman. Cardiac arrest occurred during radical nephrectomy and echocardiography revealed mass nearly obstructing the RVOT which was not recognized by preoperative echocardiography 1 month ago. Postoperative immunohistochemical evaluation of renal mass revealed sarcomatoid RCC with rhabdoid feature. PMID:28090262

  10. Urinary bladder xanthomatous cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shrenik J.; Ajitsaria, Vineet; Singh, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Xanthoma cystitis of urinary bladder is a rare entity and may present as an intravesical mass. A 38-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and imaging was done which was suggestive of a malignant mass with surrounding tissue infiltration. Partial cystectomy was performed, and histological examination of the mass showed xanthomatous cystitis. PMID:28197037

  11. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  12. THE COMPLETE SURVEY OF OUTFLOWS IN PERSEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Arce, Hector G.; Borkin, Michelle A.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Halle, Michael W.

    2010-06-01

    We present a study on the impact of molecular outflows in the Perseus molecular cloud complex using the COMPLETE Survey large-scale {sup 12}CO(1-0) and {sup 13}CO(1-0) maps. We used three-dimensional isosurface models generated in right ascension-declination-velocity space to visualize the maps. This rendering of the molecular line data allowed for a rapid and efficient way to search for molecular outflows over a large ({approx}16 deg{sup 2}) area. Our outflow-searching technique detected previously known molecular outflows as well as new candidate outflows. Most of these new outflow-related high-velocity features lie in regions that have been poorly studied before. These new outflow candidates more than double the amount of outflow mass, momentum, and kinetic energy in the Perseus cloud complex. Our results indicate that outflows have significant impact on the environment immediately surrounding localized regions of active star formation, but lack the energy needed to feed the observed turbulence in the entire Perseus complex. This implies that other energy sources, in addition to protostellar outflows, are responsible for turbulence on a global cloud scale in Perseus. We studied the impact of outflows in six regions with active star formation within Perseus of sizes in the range of 1-4 pc. We find that outflows have enough power to maintain the turbulence in these regions and enough momentum to disperse and unbind some mass from them. We found no correlation between outflow strength and star formation efficiency (SFE) for the six different regions we studied, contrary to results of recent numerical simulations. The low fraction of gas that potentially could be ejected due to outflows suggests that additional mechanisms other than cloud dispersal by outflows are needed to explain low SFEs in clusters.

  13. Narrow UV Absorption Line Outflows from Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F.; Simon, L.; Rodriguez Hidalgo, P.; Capellupo, D.

    2012-08-01

    Narrow absorption line (NAL) outflows are an important yet poorly understood part of the quasar outflow phenomenon. We discuss one particular NAL outflow that has high speeds, time variability, and moderate ionizations like typical BAL flows, at an estimated location just ˜5 pc from the quasar. It also has a total column density and line widths (internal velocity dispersions) ˜100 times smaller than BALs, with no substantial X-ray absorption. We argue that radiative shielding (in the form of an X-ray/warm absorber) is not critical for the outflow acceleration and that the moderate ionizations occur in dense substructures that have an overall small volume filling factor in the flow. We also present new estimates of the overall incidence of quasar outflow lines; e.g., ˜43% of bright quasars have a C IV NAL outflow while ˜68% have a C IV outflow line of any variety (NAL, BAL, or mini-BAL).

  14. Massive obstructive urolithiasis in a bull used for artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Ogaa, J S; Agumbah, G J; Patel, J H; Kiere, S; Mwangi, J L

    A seven-year-old Jersey bull used for artificial insemination showed clinical signs of obstructive urolithiasis. This was confirmed by catheterisation and subsequent urethrotomy over the site of obstruction distal to the sigmoid flexure. Although urine flow was elicited after removal of the calculi, this was only temporary and the animal had to be killed 24 hours later. On post mortem examination about 2 kg of round, smooth, pearl-like calculi were found in the urinary bladder and the urethra of the sigmoid flexure was studded with similar calculi. It was concluded that urethrotomy at the sigmoid flexure or penectomy post scrotally would not have alleviated this condition.

  15. Delayed complication of pelvic lymphocele: Ileal conduit obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket S; Bakshi, Ganesh K; Prakash, Gagan; Sable, Nilesh P

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Lymphocele is a common sequalae of pelvic lymphadenectomy. We report an unusual presentation of pelvic lymphocele developing after radical cystectomy reconstructed with an ileal conduit where the patient developed obstruction of the ileal conduit loop due to external pressure of the lymphocele. Catheter drainage of the conduit relieved the symptoms and a computerized tomography scan showed a large lymphocele causing acute angulation and resultant obstruction of the ileal conduit. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage of the lymphocele and remains symptom-free on follow-up at 1 year.

  16. The relationship between pressure flow studies and ultrasound-estimated bladder wall mass.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christopher E

    2005-01-01

    The basic evaluation of suspected voiding dysfunction involves fundamental objective tools such as the pressure-flow study. Although accurate, the several drawbacks to this invasive study of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) are discussed and evaluated. Other non-invasive and/or minimally invasive ways of diagnosing BOO continue to be the subject of investigation. The ultrasound-estimated bladder wall thickness and bladder wall mass indices are 2 parameters that may be useful for screening and diagnosing BOO. Preliminary results are presented from the prospective clinical trial comparing the diagnosing capabilities and results obtained with pressure-flow studies (the historic gold standard for BOO diagnosing) with that of ultrasound-estimated bladder weight.

  17. Inguinal Herniation Containing Bladder, Causing Contralateral Allograft Hydroureteronephrosis-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    du Toit, T; Kaestner, L; Muller, E; Kahn, D

    2017-02-01

    We report the first documented case of an inguinal hernia containing bladder, resulting in contralateral allograft hydroureteronephrosis. A 39-year-old male patient presented with allograft dysfunction, a contralateral inguinoscrotal hernia, and marked hydroureteronephrosis on ultrasound (US). Percutaneous nephrostogram and a retrograde cystogram suggested bladder herniation with incorporation of the contralateral ureteroneocystostomy into the hernia. Paraperitoneal bladder herniation was confirmed at surgery and hernioplasty was performed. Six-week follow-up revealed normal renal function with no sign of hernia recurrence. Despite occurring rarely, transplant ureter or bladder herniation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. This case illustrates that the contralateral position of hernia to allograft does not necessarily preclude the hernia as the source of ureteric obstruction.

  18. Surgical Myectomy after Failed Ablation for Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bougioukas, Ioannis; Hoppe, Uta; Danner, Bernhard; Schoendube, Friedrich A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a genetic disease of the myocardial sarcolemma characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy. When obstruction to the left ventricular outflow tract is present and symptoms are refractory to medication, surgical myectomy or alcohol septal ablation is indicated. Case Description We report a case of a patient presented for myectomy due to recurrence only 1 year after alcohol ablation. Interesting findings were a firm subaortic membrane and a direct insertion of the papillary muscle into the mitral valve. Conclusion After myectomy and extensive papillary muscle mobilization, a significant relief of obstruction was achieved. PMID:28018818

  19. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  20. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  1. Metastatic tumors to the urinary bladder: clinicopathologic study of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Chow, Jonathan; Unger, Pamela D

    2012-08-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the urinary bladder are uncommon, with metastatic tumors being an even rarer event. The authors studied the clinicopathology of 11 cases of metastatic tumors to bladder, which were collected from their archives between 1995 and 2010. The most common metastases in this series were breast. Some unusual metastases, including several not being previously reported, were also presented, namely, ileal carcinoid tumor, ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor, ovarian squamous carcinoma, pancreatic gastrinoma, and renal collecting duct carcinoma. Vast majority of these patients (10/11, 91%) were female. Ninety percent of the patients presented with hematuria and/or obstructive urinary symptom as well as bladder lesions in the area of trigone, posterior wall, and/or bladder neck. Seven of the 11 patients had a known history of other metastases besides the bladder. Most of the patients (4/7, 57%) died within 1 year after diagnosis of bladder metastasis. Metastasis must be distinguished from a primary bladder neoplasm. Morphology and clinical correlation supplemented with immunohistochemical study is critical for the correct diagnosis.

  2. Aqueous outflow: Segmental and distal flow

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Swarup S.; Oh, Dong-Jin; Kang, Min Hyung; Rhee, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    A prominent risk factor of primary open-angle glaucoma is ocular hypertension, a pathologic state caused by impaired outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork within the iridocorneal angle. The juxtacanalicular region of the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of Schlemm canal have been identified as the main contributors to aqueous outflow resistance, and both extracellular matrix within the trabecular meshwork and trabecular meshwork cell shape have been shown to affect outflow. Overexpression of multiple ECM proteins in perfused cadaveric human eyes has led to increased outflow resistance and elevated IOP. Pharmacologic agents targeting trabecular meshwork cytoskeletal arrangements have been developed after multiple studies demonstrated the importance of cell shape on outflow. Several groups have shown that aqueous outflow occurs only at certain segments of the trabecular meshwork circumferentially, a concept known as segmental flow. This is based on the theory that aqueous outflow is dependent on the presence of discrete pores within the Schlemm canal. Segmental flow has been described in the eyes of multiple species, including primate, bovine, mouse, and human samples. While the trabecular meshwork appears to be the major source of resistance, trabecular meshwork bypass procedures have been unable to achieve the degree of IOP reduction observed with trabeculectomy, reflecting the potential impact of distal flow, or flow through Schlemm canal and collector channels, on outflow. Multiple studies have demonstrated that outflow occurs preferentially near collector channels, suggesting that these distal structures may be more important to aqueous outflow than previously believed. PMID:25088623

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  4. Effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on the bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li-Ping; Fan, Fan; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a common complication of spinal cord injury and results in urinary bladder dysfunction through lost control of micturition, or urination. Although several treatment options exist, the efficacies of many of these treatments are unknown. In particular, electroacupuncture and bladder training have had some success as individual treatments. The aim of this study was to explore effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury (SCI) above the sacral segment. Forty-two patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI were evenly divided into two groups (n=21) and given only bladder function training (control group) or electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training (treatment group). Urodynamic changes, IPSS score, and therapeutic efficacy were compared between groups pre- and post-treatment. After either treatment, patients had higher bladder volume and bladder compliance, but lower residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure, compared to pre-treatment (P<0.05). Compared to controls, treatment group patients had significantly increased bladder volume and bladder compliance, but significantly decreased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure (P<0.05). Treatment group patients had lower IPSS scores post-treatment (P<0.05) and better therapeutic efficacy (P<0.05) than control group patients. Altogether, our results suggest that electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training can clinically improve bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI above the sacral segment. PMID:24995093

  5. Age-Related Alterations in Regeneration of the Urinary Bladder after Subtotal Cystectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    collection began at the start of the diurnal dark cycle and continued for 20 hours. Before and after urine collection, weights were recorded for all animals...Studies Animals were sacrificed with CO2 inhalation and bilateral thoracotomy. The bladders were harvested and immediately placed in ice-cold Krebs ...reduction in maximum pressures generated during the voiding cycle . Although the cause is unclear, possibilities include reduced outflow resistance in the

  6. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure.

  7. Differential Canalograms Detect Outflow Changes from Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stents and Ab Interno Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Hardik A.; Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Roy, Pritha; Schuman, Joel S.; Lathrop, Kira L.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced microincisional glaucoma surgeries that enhance conventional outflow offer a favorable risk profile over traditional surgeries, but can be unpredictable. Two paramount challenges are the lack of an adequate training model for angle surgeries and the absence of an intraoperative quantification of surgical success. To address both, we developed an ex vivo training system and a differential, quantitative canalography method that uses slope-adjusted fluorescence intensities of two different chromophores to avoid quenching. We assessed outflow enhancement by trabecular micro-bypass (TMB) implantation or by ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT). In this porcine model, TMB resulted in an insignificant (p > 0.05) outflow increase of 13 ± 5%, 14 ± 8%, 9 ± 3%, and 24 ± 9% in the inferonasal, superonasal, superotemporal, and inferotemporal quadrant, respectively. AIT caused a 100 ± 50% (p = 0.002), 75 ± 28% (p = 0.002), 19 ± 8%, and 40 ± 21% increase in those quadrants. The direct gonioscopy and tactile feedback provided a surgical experience that was very similar to that in human patients. Despite the more narrow and discontinuous circumferential drainage elements in the pig with potential for underperformance or partial stent obstruction, unequivocal patterns of focal outflow enhancement by TMB were seen in this training model. AIT achieved extensive access to outflow pathways beyond the surgical site itself. PMID:27811973

  8. Percutaneous Transhepatic Venous Angioplasty and Stenting in a 9-Month-Old Patient with Hepatic Vein Obstruction After Partial Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasekhi, A. R.; Nabavizadeh, S. A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.; Varedi, P.; Naderifar, M.; Soltani, S.

    2008-09-15

    Hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a rare but serious complication after liver transplantation. We report ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic stent placement in a 9-month-old infant with a left lateral split liver transplantation with near-complete hepatic vein obstruction.

  9. Mixing and Dynamics of the Mediterranean Outflow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    geostrophic current. A simple geostrophic adjustment model is used to show that in the absence of frictional stresses, the outflow would very quickly...A simple numerical model that uses a Froude number dependent entrain- ment and a quadratic bottom friction law is used to simulate the outflow (Price...initially as high as 0.6), are simulated rather well, though the model overestimates the magnitude of the outflow current. We suspect that this is a

  10. Pyloric obstruction secondary to epicardial pacemaker implantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bedoya Nader, G; Kellihan, H B; Bjorling, D E; McAnulty, J

    2017-02-01

    A 10-year old Lhasa Apso dog was presented for an acute history of exercise intolerance and hind limb weakness. High grade second degree atrioventricular block with an atrial rate of 200 beats per minute, ventricular rate of 40 beats per minute and an intermittent ventricular escape rhythm, was diagnosed on electrocardiograph. A transdiaphragmatic, unipolar, epicardial pacemaker was implanted without immediate surgical complications. Severe vomiting was noted 12 h post-operatively. Abdominal ultrasound and a barium study supported a diagnosis of pyloric outflow obstruction and exploratory abdominal surgery was performed. The pyloric outflow tract appeared normal and no other causes of an outflow obstruction were identified. The epicardial generator was repositioned from the right to the left abdominal wall. Pyloric cell pacing was presumed to be the cause for the pyloric obstruction and severe vomiting, and this was thought to be due to close proximity of the pacemaker generator to the pylorus situated in the right abdominal wall. Repositioning of the pulse generator to the left abdominal wall resulted in resolution of vomiting.

  11. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia.

  12. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  13. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  14. OUTFLOWS IN SODIUM EXCESS OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jongwon; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2015-08-10

    Van Dokkum and Conroy revisited the unexpectedly strong Na i lines at 8200 Å found in some giant elliptical galaxies and interpreted them as evidence for an unusually bottom-heavy initial mass function. Jeong et al. later found a large population of galaxies showing equally extraordinary Na D doublet absorption lines at 5900 Å (Na D excess objects: NEOs) and showed that their origins can be different for different types of galaxies. While a Na D excess seems to be related to the interstellar medium (ISM) in late-type galaxies, smooth-looking early-type NEOs show little or no dust extinction and hence no compelling signs of ISM contributions. To further test this finding, we measured the Doppler components in the Na D lines. We hypothesized that the ISM would have a better (albeit not definite) chance of showing a blueshift Doppler departure from the bulk of the stellar population due to outflow caused by either star formation or AGN activities. Many of the late-type NEOs clearly show blueshift in their Na D lines, which is consistent with the former interpretation that the Na D excess found in them is related to gas outflow caused by star formation. On the contrary, smooth-looking early-type NEOs do not show any notable Doppler components, which is also consistent with the interpretation of Jeong et al. that the Na D excess in early-type NEOs is likely not related to ISM activities but is purely stellar in origin.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 1. BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95(4): ... SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 2. BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95(4): ...

  16. Assessment of right ventricular outflow tract in children by two-dimensional echocardiography using a new subcostal view. Angiocardiographic and morphologic correlative study.

    PubMed

    Isaaz, K; Cloez, J L; Danchin, N; Marçon, F; Worms, A M; Pernot, C

    1985-09-15

    Evaluation of the right ventricular (RV) outflow tract in congenital heart disease is extremely important for surgical management. Therefore, the value of 2-dimensional echocardiography (2-D echo) to assess the RV outflow tract was studied using a new approach: the subcostal elongated right oblique view. Twenty normal children and 49 children with congenital heart disease, aged 1 day to 11 years, were studied. Significant pulmonary infundibular obstruction was present in 22 patients with conotruncal malformations. To obtain the subcostal elongated right oblique view from the short-axis view at the aortic valve level, the transducer was slightly rotated clockwise with an anterior angulation of about 30 degrees so that the ascending aorta was seen in its long axis, providing an image similar to that obtained by a right ventriculogram in the elongated right anterior oblique view. The deviation of infundibular septum was appreciated by measurement of the angle alpha, defined by the long axis of the infundibular septum and the plane of aortic cusps. This view could be obtained in 64 patients (92%). In correlation with angiographic or anatomic data, the subcostal elongated right oblique view permitted recognition of several types of RV outflow tract: type I--normally formed RV outflow tract; type II--disorganized RV outflow tract with obstruction (alpha less than 90 degrees); type III and IV--disorganized RV outflow tract with obstruction (alpha greater than 90 degrees). This view could visualize the crista supraventricularis in type I, but also the anatomic components of RV outflow tract that may contribute to obstruction in the other types: infundibular septum, septoparietal trabeculations and trabecula septomarginalis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Bladder Cancer Cell Transitional; Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Urinary Bladder; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urinary Bladder Diseases; Urologic Diseases

  18. Star formation inside a galactic outflow.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Carniani, S; Gallagher, R; Cazzoli, S; Arribas, S; Belfiore, F; Bellocchi, E; Colina, L; Cresci, G; Ishibashi, W; Marconi, A; Mannucci, F; Oliva, E; Sturm, E

    2017-04-13

    Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have the physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict it to contribute substantially to the star-formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star-formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 solar masses per year. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.

  19. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  20. Magnetospheric Sawtooth Oscillations Induced by Ionospheric Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambles, O. J.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims to address why sawtooth oscillations occur and what factors affect their periodicity. We use a multifluid version of the LFM global simulation model, driven by a steady solar wind to examine the effects of ion outflow on convection in the magnetosphere. In the simulation model, the properties of cusp and auroral region O+ outflow are causally regulated by electron precipitation and electromagnetic power flowing into the ionosphere. It is found that when ion outflow is included in the simulation, the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction can generate periodic substorms which appear as sawtooth-like oscillations in the geostationary magnetic field. The ion outflow enhances plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere and the associated diamagnetic ring current stretches the field lines throughout the nightside, essentially from dawn to dusk. If the field lines are sufficiently stretched they reconnect and dipolarize, ejecting a plasmoid downtail. This cycle repeats forming multiple sawtooth oscillations. The periodicity of the sawtooth oscillation depends largely upon the strength of the outflow. The strength of outflow is varied in the simulation by changing both the driving conditions (which affects the power flowing into the ionosphere) and through direct modification of the constants in the empirical relationships. Higher outflow fluences produce oscillations with shorter periods. The period of the oscillation is found to vary in the simulations from approximately 2 hours to 6 hours depending upon the strength of the outflow. For a smaller solar wind electric field the outflow fluence is not large enough to stretch the nightside field lines enough for sawtooth oscillations to form and the magnetosphere goes into a steady magnetosphere convection (SMC) mode. As the solar wind electric field increases the outflow fluence becomes sufficiently large to affect the convection in the magnetosphere and generate sawtooth oscillations. The strength

  1. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  2. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies.

  3. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  4. Leiomyomas of the female urethra and bladder: a report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sang Wook; Jung, Hyun Joo; Jeon, Myung Jae; Jung, Da Jung; Kim, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jae Wook

    2007-08-01

    Through the experience of five cases of leiomyoma developed in the female bladder and urethra with a review of the literature, we have made an effort to characterize the association of symptom with the size and location of the tumor and demonstrate an appropriate treatment. The study population was composed of patients who underwent surgery for bladder or urethral leiomyoma in our hospital from March 1990 to April 2005. Their medical records were reviewed retrospectively concerning the symptom, size and location of leiomyoma, the result of cystoscope and radiological examination, surgical method, pathologic report, complications, and recurrence. Four cases were diagnosed as urethral leiomyoma and one case as bladder leiomyoma. All patients with urethral leiomyoma were admitted for the chief complaint of a palpable tumor. When the tumor size was small, if it was located on the lateral side of the urethra, it was asymptomatic, but if located in the midline, it presented irritative or obstructive symptom. When it was big, if located on the lateral side, it presented irritative rather than obstructive symptom, and if located in the midline, it presented obstructive symptom. One case of bladder leiomyoma was discovered incidentally during ultrasonic exam. In all five cases, surgical removal was performed and complications or recurrence were not detected afterwards. Bladder and urethral leiomyomas are very rare and cause diverse manifestations from asymptomatic to irritative or obstructive symptom. It is presumed that the location and size of the tumor are associated with symptom. Unless it is the case with severe hemorrhage or obstructive acute renal failure, immediate surgery is not required. However, it is desirable to distinguish leiomyoma from malignant or other benign tumors by surgical biopsy or removal.

  5. Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy Masked by Tako-Tsubo Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daralammori, Y.; El Garhy, M.; Gayed, M. R.; Farah, A.; Lauer, B.; Secknus, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Left ventricular outflow obstruction might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy. This obstruction can be masked by Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and diagnosed only by followup. Case Presentation. A 70-year-old female presented with Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy and masked obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at presentation. Conclusion. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy typically presents like an acute MI and is characterized by severe, but transient, regional left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Prompt evaluation of the coronary status is, therefore, mandatory. The prognosis under medical treatment of heart failure symptoms and watchful waiting is favourable. Previous studies showed that LVOT obstruction might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism of TCM. This paper supports this theory. However, TCM may also mask any preexisting LVOT obstruction. PMID:24826256

  6. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  7. The resolved outflow from 3C 48

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2014-10-20

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, the mass is ∼6 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow.

  8. Use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter for management of obstructive urolithiasis in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs: 69 cases (2000-2014).

    PubMed

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Heller, Meera C; Balcomb, Christie C; Angelos, John A

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter (PTC) for urinary bladder drainage in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 43 goats, 10 sheep, and 16 potbellied pigs (all males) with obstructive urolithiasis evaluated at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. PROCEDURES Medical records of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs examined because of obstructive urolithiasis from January 2000 through December 2014 were reviewed. Records of animals for which a standard PTC had been placed into the urinary bladder as part of disease management were selected. Data were collected regarding signalment, complications associated with PTC placement, and duration of PTC placement prior to removal. RESULTS 42 of 43 goats, 5 of 10 sheep, and all potbellied pigs were castrated. Median (range) duration of PTC placement was 2 (1 to 4) days for goats, 1 (1 to 4) day for sheep, and 1 (1 to 3) day for potbellied pigs. Complications associated with PTC placement included blockage of the catheter by urine sediment, perforation of the cecum, and migration of the catheter out of the urinary bladder. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of a PTC into the urinary bladder allowed for effective stabilization of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis while acid-base and electrolyte imbalances were corrected. Use of a PTC should be considered for urinary bladder drainage during medical management or prior to surgical management of obstructive urolithiasis for these species.

  9. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir.

  10. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  12. Increased residual urine in patients with bladder neuropathy secondary to suprasacral spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Mayo, M E; Kiviat, M D

    1980-05-01

    Multichannel urodynamic studies were done on 30 patients with incomplete bladder emptying secondary to suprasacral spinal cord lesions. In 11 patients fluoroscopy was done simultaneously. A single most important factor accounting for the increased residual urine was present in 21 cases: inadequate detrusor contraction in 10, sphincter dyssynergia in 6 and bladder neck obstruction in 5. A combination of 2 of these factors was present in 3 patients. Although the initial residual urine volume was high in 6 patients voiding during the urodynamic study was efficient and no residual urine was demonstrated at that time. Urethral pressure profiles were variable, depending on whether a spastic external sphincter contraction was present during the procedure. It is concluded that bladder pressure and sphincter electromyographic measurement during voiding, combined with fluoroscopy, are ideal methods to identify the factors responsible for incomplete emptying in problem cases. The urethral pressure profile is of limited value in the initial assessment of these patients.

  13. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Adraktas, Dionesia; Caserta, Melanie; Tchelepi, Hisham

    2014-09-01

    Extra-adrenal paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Typically, patients present with symptoms related to catecholamine hypersecretion or mass effect, but these tumors can also be encountered incidentally on imaging studies obtained for a different purpose. It is important to recognize the key imaging features of this entity so that it may be suggested as a possible differential diagnosis in the setting of a newly identified bladder mass.

  14. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  15. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  16. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  17. Bladder cancer epidemiology and genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system. The incidence of bladder cancer of men is higher than that of women (approximately 4:1). Here, we summarize the bladder cancer-related risk factors, including environmental and genetic factors. In recent years, although the mortality rate induced by bladder cancer has been stable or decreased gradually, the public health effect may be pronounced. The well-established risk factors for bladder cancer are cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. Genetic factors also play important roles in the susceptibility to bladder cancer. A recent study demonstrated that hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. Since 2008, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to identify the susceptibility loci for bladder cancer. Further gene-gene or gene-environment interaction studies need to be conducted to provide more information for the etiology of bladder cancer. PMID:23720672

  18. Magnetosphere sawtooth oscillations induced by ionospheric outflow.

    PubMed

    Brambles, O J; Lotko, W; Zhang, B; Wiltberger, M; Lyon, J; Strangeway, R J

    2011-06-03

    The sawtooth mode of convection of Earth's magnetosphere is a 2- to 4-hour planetary-scale oscillation powered by the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (SW-M-I) interaction. Using global simulations of geospace, we have shown that ionospheric O(+) outflows can generate sawtooth oscillations. As the outflowing ions fill the inner magnetosphere, their pressure distends the nightside magnetic field. When the outflow fluence exceeds a threshold, magnetic field tension cannot confine the accumulating fluid; an O(+)-rich plasmoid is ejected, and the field dipolarizes. Below the threshold, the magnetosphere undergoes quasi-steady convection. Repetition and the sawtooth period are controlled by the strength of the SW-M-I interaction, which regulates the outflow fluence.

  19. Comparative study of obstructive urolithiasis and its sequelae in buffalo calves

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumi, Yasmin H.; Attia, Noura E.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present work was designed to study the incidence of obstructive urolithiasis and to apply comparative diagnosis to urine retention cases. Materials and Methods: A total of 78 non-castrated buffalo calves aging 3-11 months were included in this study, 68 calves were admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Zagazig University, Egypt, during the study period with a history of anuria, and they were classified into three groups; intact bladder group (19 calves), uroperitoneum group (45 calves), and ruptured urethra group (4 calves). 10 apparently healthy calves were used for comparison. On the basis of history, clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonographic findings diagnosis was achieved. Results: There was a marked increase in the incidence of obstructive urolithiasis in winter season, especially in winter months of 2016. Calves within the age of 3-4 months and 6-8 months were mostly affected. Inappetence to anorexia, restlessness or depression, and abdominal distension were the most observed signs in the diseased calves. Laboratory findings revealed hemoconcentration and a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels in all diseased groups. Hyperproteinemia, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia with electrolytes imbalance were recorded in the uroperitoneum group. Ultrasonographically, distended urinary bladder with distal acoustic enhancement revealed obstructive urolithiasis with intact bladder while anechoic fluid in abdominal cavity indicates uroperitoneum. Conclusion: On the basis of all findings, calves with intact bladder were in superior condition than those with a ruptured urethra and both were better than those with uroperitoneum. PMID:28344397

  20. Urinary Obstruction in Prostate Cancer Patients From the Dutch Trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy): Relationships With Local Dose, Acute Effects, and Baseline Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Witte, Marnix G.; Herk, Marcel van; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between late urinary obstruction and the details of the dose distribution of irradiated prostate cancer patients, taking into account their baseline symptoms and acute complaints. Patients and Methods: We selected patients from the Dutch multicenter trial randomized between 68 Gy and 78 Gy, for whom toxicity data and dose data were available (n = 557). The absolute dose surface parameters of the delineated bladder were calculated. Next, we constructed three-dimensional dose maps of the area around the prostate, providing an approximate identification of the corresponding anatomic locations. The dose difference maps were constructed by subtracting the mean dose maps of the patients with and without late urinary obstruction. Selected local dose points were analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Results: Urinary obstruction was scored for 40 patients, including 19 of 296 patients who received 68-72 Gy and 21 of 261 patients who received 76-78 Gy. A total of 19 events occurred within 2 years after irradiation and 21 events after 2 years. The bladder surface receiving {>=}80 Gy predicted (p <.01) the occurrence of obstruction within 2 years. The dose difference map indicated highly significant differences in the bladder neck situated in the trigonal region (p < .001) that were especially predictive of obstruction after 2 years and of the diagnosis of bladder neck obstruction. Baseline complaints and transurethral resection of the prostate and acute complaints were mainly predictive for obstruction within 2 years. Conclusion: Relatively early events of urinary obstruction were associated with urinary problems existing before RT, acute toxicity, previous transurethral resection of the prostate, and hotspots in the bladder. Events after 2 years were associated with the local dose in the trigonal area.

  1. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-10-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars are radiatively driven. In all of these cases, the magnetic field influences matter flow from the stars and determines many observational properties. In this chapter we review recent studies of accretion, outflows, and winds of magnetized stars with a focus on three main topics: (1) accretion onto magnetized stars; (2) outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary; and (3) winds from isolated massive magnetized stars. We show results obtained from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations and, in a number of cases compare global simulations with observations.

  2. Amitriptyline aggravates the fibrosis process in a rat model of infravesical obstruction

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Prado, Patrícia S; Soares, Maria Fernanda; Lima, Flávio O; Schor, Nestor; Teixeira, Vicente PC

    2012-01-01

    Summary Infravesical obstruction (IVO) secondary to benign prostatic hypertrophy can affect up to 50% of men over 50 years old and may cause serious and irreversible alterations throughout the urinary tract, especially in the bladder. Therapeutic approaches are currently limited. Amitriptyline has recently been described as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and myorelaxant in some experimental models. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of amitriptyline hydrochloride on the process of fibrosis in a bladder outlet obstruction model in rats. Male Wistar rats were subjected to IVO and studied at intervals of 1 and 14 days postprocedure. The rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham, IVO1-T, IVO1-NT, IVO14-T and IVO14-NT. Bladder tissue was processed for histopathology, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The IVO14 groups presented bladder fibrosis, smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and bladder wall thickening. The IVO14-T group demonstrated a higher intensity of fibrosis, higher macrophage infiltration rate and higher gene expression of Transforming growth factor (TGF) Tgf-β1. Thus this data shows that in this experimental mode amitriptyline had an amplifying effect on the process of fibrosis as a whole. PMID:22563623

  3. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; Macdiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-10-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, 'healthy' bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  4. Chronic deep venous obstruction: definition, prevalence, diagnosis, management.

    PubMed

    Neglén, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ilio-caval venous obstruction has an important role in the expression of symptomatic chronic venous disease regardless of aetiology. The presence of obstruction has been more or less previously ignored and emphasis placed on reflux alone. Stenting of the ilio-femoral veins guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can now be performed with low morbidity and mortality using appropriate technique. Current diagnostic modalities do not allow a definitive assessment of haemodynamically critical venous obstruction, which hampers selection of limbs for treatment. The diagnosis must be based on morphological studies (preferably IVUS) in patient selected with specific history, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion and generous use of morphological investigations are critical in the initial recognition of venous outflow obstruction. Stenting of the ilio-femoral vein appears to be durable with a substantial improvement in limb pain and swelling, high rate of ulcer healing, enhanced quality of life and decreased disability. The beneficial clinical outcome occurs regardless of the presence of remaining reflux, adjunct saphenous procedures or aetiology of obstruction.

  5. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes.

  6. Overactive bladder in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Sophie; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This condition is especially troublesome for pediatric patients and their families when associated with incontinence, since it negatively affects self-esteem and impairs children’s development. From the patient’s perspective, urgency and urge incontinence can have a significant impact, negatively affecting their quality of life. For a therapy to have true benefit, changes must not only be statistically significant, but must also be perceived as meaningful by the patient. A stepwise approach is favoured to treat this pathology, starting with behavioural therapy, followed by medical management, and eventually more invasive procedures. Antimuscarinic agents are the mainstay of medical treatment for OAB. Oxybutynin is the most commonly used antimuscarinic in the pediatric population. However, some patients have a suboptimal response to antimuscarinics and many experience bothersome side effects, which have been documented with all antimuscarinics to a significantly higher degree than placebo. Although there have been reports about the use of tolterodine, fesoterodine, trospium, propiverine, and solifenacin in children, to date, only oxybutynin has been officially approved for pediatric use by medical authorities in North America. This review will address alternative treatment options for pediatric patients presenting with OAB, from conservative measures to more invasive therapies. PMID:28265325

  7. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction.

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  9. A robust measurement of the mass outflow rate of the galactic outflow from NGC 6090

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti Christy, A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of stellar feedback, it is critical to estimate the mass outflow rates of galaxies. Past estimates have been plagued by uncertain assumptions about the outflow geometry, metallicity, and ionization fraction. Here we use Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of the nearby starburst NGC 6090 to demonstrate that many of these quantities can be constrained by the data. We use the Si IV absorption lines to calculate the scaling of velocity (v), covering fraction (Cf), and density with distance from the starburst (r), assuming the Sobolev optical depth and a velocity law of the form: v ∝ (1 - Ri/r)β (where Ri is the inner outflow radius). We find that the velocity (β = 0.43) is consistent with an outflow driven by an r-2 force with the outflow radially accelerated, while the scaling of the covering fraction (Cf ∝ r-0.82) suggests that cool clouds in the outflow are in pressure equilibrium with an adiabatically expanding medium. We use the column densities of four weak metal lines and CLOUDY photoionization models to determine the outflow metallicity, the ionization correction, and the initial density of the outflow. Combining these values with the profile fitting, we find Ri = 63 pc, with most of the mass within 300 pc of the starburst. Finally, we find that the maximum mass outflow rate is 2.3 M⊙ yr-1 and the mass-loading factor (outflow divided by the star formation rate) is 0.09, a factor of 10 lower than the value calculated using common assumptions for the geometry, metallicity, and ionization structure of the outflow.

  10. Nicotine interferes with purinergic signaling in smooth muscle cells isolated from urinary bladders of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jenes, Agnes; Szigeti, Gyula P; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Varga, Attila; Lorincz, Laszlo; Csernoch, Laszlo

    2013-09-01

    In patients with outlet obstruction, the contraction of the base is reduced compared to that of healthy individuals, while the contraction of the dome is not affected. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms that might be responsible for cholinergic effects blocking non-adrenergic non-cholinergic contractions in the base of the urinary bladder. Smooth muscle cells either from the base or from the dome of human urinary bladders were cultured to determine the contribution of cholinergic and purinergic mechanisms to their Ca2+ homeostasis. While ATP evoked Ca2+ transients in all the cells, nicotine and carbachol induced Ca2+ transients only in 56% and 44% of the cells, respectively. When ATP was administered together with nicotine or carbachol, the amplitudes of the Ca2+ transients recorded from cells prepared from the base of bladders were significantly smaller (42 ± 6% with nicotine and 56 ± 9% with carbachol) than those evoked by ATP alone. This inhibition was much less apparent in the dome of bladders. The inhibition between the cholinergic and purinergic signaling pathways reported in this work may decrease the strength of the contraction of the base of the urinary bladder in patients with outlet obstruction during voiding.

  11. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Bladder & Bowel Function Problems with bladder and bowel function are common but distressing for ... embarrassed by – these issues.  Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association.  Visit www. stroke. org ...

  12. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a high rate of recurrence and poor outcomes as a result of relapse. Bladder cancer patients require lifelong invasive monitoring and treatment, making bladder cancer one of the most expensive malignancies. Lines of evidence increasingly point to distinct genetic and epigenetic alteration patterns in bladder cancer, even between the different stages and grades of disease. In addition, genetic and epigenetic alterations have been demonstrated to play important roles during bladder tumorigenesis. This review will focus on bladder cancer-associated genomic and epigenomic alterations, which are common in bladder cancer and provide potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27915480

  13. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  14. Surgical treatment of urethral obstruction due to urolithiasis in male cattle: a review of 85 cases.

    PubMed

    Gasthuys, F; Steenhaut, M; De Moor, A; Sercu, K

    1993-11-20

    Eighty-five male cattle with urethral obstruction due to urolithiasis were treated by surgery. In most cases local anaesthetic techniques combined with sedation were applied to the dorsally recumbent animals. The penis was transected and transposed in animals with a ruptured urethra. A ruptured bladder was repaired by a paramedian abdominal approach. The bladder was fistulated through the ventral abdominal wall when no alternative treatment was possible. Complications related to the different surgical interventions are described. Only 35.3 per cent of the animals recovered satisfactorily.

  15. Acute Urinary Obstruction in a Tetraplegic Patient from Misplacement of Catheter in Urethra.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M

    2016-01-01

    A male tetraplegic patient attended accident and emergency with a blocked catheter; on removing the catheter, he passed bloody urine. After three unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a catheter by nursing staff, a junior doctor inserted a three-way Foley catheter with a 30-mL balloon but inflated the balloon with 10 mL of water to commence the bladder irrigation. The creatinine level was mostly 19 µmol/L (range: 0-135 µmol/L) but increased to 46 µmol/L on day 7. Computerized tomography urogram revealed that the bilateral hydronephrosis with hydroureter was extended down to urinary bladder, the bladder was distended, prostatic urethra was dilated and filled with urine, and although the balloon of Foley catheter was not seen in the bladder, the tip of the catheter was seen lying in the urethra. Following the re-catheterization, the creatinine level decreased to 21 µmol/L. A follow-up ultrasound scan revealed no evidence of hydronephrosis in both kidneys. Flexible cystoscopy revealed inflamed bladder mucosa, catheter reaction, and tiny stones. There was no bladder tumor. This case report concludes that the cause of bilateral hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and distended bladder was inadequate drainage of urinary bladder as the Foley balloon that was under-filled slipped into the urethra resulting in an obstruction to urine flow. Urethral catheterization in tetraplegic patients should be performed by senior, experienced staff in order to avoid trauma and incorrect positioning. Tetraplegic subjects with decreased muscle mass have low creatinine level. Increase in creatinine level (>1.5 times the basal level) indicates acute kidney injury, although peak creatinine level may still be within laboratory reference range. While scanning the urinary tract of spinal cord injury patients with indwelling urinary catheter, if Foley balloon is not seen within the bladder, urethra should be scanned to locate the Foley balloon.

  16. Bursty star formation feedback and cooling outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Teresita; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slyz, Adrianne; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-10-01

    We study how outflows of gas launched from a central galaxy undergoing repeated starbursts propagate through the circum-galactic medium (CGM), using the simulation code RAMSES. We assume that the outflow from the disc can be modelled as a rapidly moving bubble of hot gas at ˜1 kpc above disc, then ask what happens as it moves out further into the halo around the galaxy on ˜100 kpc scales. To do this, we run 60 two-dimensional simulations scanning over parameters of the outflow. Each of these is repeated with and without radiative cooling, assuming a primordial gas composition to give a lower bound on the importance of cooling. In a large fraction of radiative-cooling cases we are able to form rapidly outflowing cool gas from in situ cooling of the flow. We show that the amount of cool gas formed depends strongly on the `burstiness' of energy injection; sharper, stronger bursts typically lead to a larger fraction of cool gas forming in the outflow. The abundance ratio of ions in the CGM may therefore change in response to the detailed historical pattern of star formation. For instance, outflows generated by star formation with short, intense bursts contain up to 60 per cent of their gas mass at temperatures <5 × 104 K; for near-continuous star formation, the figure is ≲5 per cent. Further study of cosmological simulations, and of idealized simulations with e.g. metal-cooling, magnetic fields and/or thermal conduction, will help to understand the precise signature of bursty outflows on observed ion abundances.

  17. Powerful Quasar Outflows at High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljanahi, Sara; Robert Scott Barrows

    2017-01-01

    Powerful quasar outflows can be driven by radiation pressure or radio jets, and they are capable of effecting the evolution of their host galaxies, particularly at high-redshifts (z~2)) when the quasar density peaks. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 131 quasar outflows at high-redshifts (0.8outflows, their impact on the host galaxies, and their environments. We find that a subsample of 32 are detected by FIRST with 21 of them showing evidence for extended radio emission that suggests the outflows may be driven by the mechanical energy of radio jets in up to one-third of the sample. For the remaining two thirds of the sample, radiation pressure from the accretion disk is likely the driving mechanism. For those sources, we use the spatial information from long-slit spectra to estimate the energy of the outflowing gas, finding that one hundredth of the quasar energy is coupled with the energy being emitted by the radiation pressure from the accretion disk. Three of the quasars are found in the Hubble Space Telescope archives, with two of them showing clear signs of galaxy interactions/mergers, and a fraction of 0.4 show evidence of interactions from SDSS imaging. These combined results suggests that galaxy interactions may be the triggers of enhanced accretion onto the nuclear supermassive black holes of this sample, with the corresponding enhanced radiation pressure driving the outflows. Furthermore, the high-redshift nature of this sample has pushed the systematic study of quasar outflows closer to the epoch in which quasar feedback is likely to have been important in galaxy evolution.

  18. Molecular pathology and biomarkers of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer originates in the epithelial lining of the bladder's mucosa and develops in association with several habitual, industrial, and environmental risk factors via papillary and non-papillary pathways. In this chapter we review novel concepts concerning the molecular mechanisms of early field change in bladder neoplasia stemming from whole-organ genomic mapping studies. These mechanisms are discussed in the context of molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer and in relation to treatment and biomarker-based detection strategies.

  19. [Non obstructive retrocaval ureter].

    PubMed

    Cao Avellaneda, E; Server Pastor, G; López López, A I; Maluff Torres, A; López Cubillana, P; Rigabert Montiel, M; Pérez Albacete, M

    2005-01-01

    We report a case on circumcavum ureter without obstruction or type two, according the Batenson and Atkinson's classification, in a forty-nine year old man. It was diagnosticated for a gross haematuria and renoureteral pain, because of a simultaneous urinary tract infection. We emphasize its absence of the typical morphology and obstruction signs. After twelve months the patient is still asymptomatic, without any medical or surgical treatment.

  20. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor.

  1. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  2. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  3. [Occupational hazards and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nizamova, R S

    1991-01-01

    Occupational exposure to health hazards was studied in 258 industrial workers who had developed cancer of the bladder against 454 matched controls. All the test subjects and controls were residents of the Tambov Province centers of chemical industry. Statistical significance (relative risk-4.7) was established for exposure to aromatic amines. For those contacting with aniline dyes the relative risk (RR) made up 2.4. The risk to develop bladder cancer in powder shops (RR-3.2) was attributed to the hazards of dyes and diphenylamine. In leather-shoe and textile industry the exposure to dyes was not safe (RR-6.1), neither was it to chemicals, oil products, pesticides, overheating (RR-3.2, 1.6, 3.2 and 2.9, respectively). It is stated that in line with a significant risk to develop bladder cancer at exposure to aromatic amines there exist a number of occupational factors contributing to this risk.

  4. Circulating Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Lakshminarayanan; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple unmet needs in the realm of diagnosis, clinical staging, monitoring and therapy. There is an urgent need to develop precision medicine for advanced urothelial carcinoma. Given the difficulty of serial analyses of metastatic tumor tissue to identify resistance and new therapeutic targets, development of non-invasive monitoring using circulating molecular biomarkers is critically important. Although the development of circulating biomarkers for the management of bladder cancer is in its infancy and may currently suffer from lower sensitivity of detection, they have inherent advantages owing to non-invasiveness. Additionally, circulating molecular alterations may capture tumor heterogeneity without the sampling bias of tissue biopsy. This review describes the accumulating data to support further development of circulating biomarkers including circulating tumor cells, cell-free circulating tumor (ct)-DNA, RNA, micro-RNA and proteomics to improve the management of bladder cancer. PMID:28035318

  5. Widening of Protostellar Outflows: An Infrared Outflow Survey in Low-luminosity Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud

    2017-04-01

    We present an outflow survey toward 20 low-luminosity objects (LLOs), namely, protostars with an internal luminosity lower than 0.2 {L}ȯ . Although a number of studies have reported the properties of individual LLOs, the reasons for their low luminosity remain uncertain. To answer this question, we need to know the evolutionary status of LLOs. Protostellar outflows are found to widen as their parent cores evolve, and therefore the outflow opening angle could be used as an evolutionary indicator. The infrared scattered light escapes out through the outflow cavity and highlights the cavity wall, giving us the opportunity to measure the outflow opening angle. Using the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope, we detected outflows toward eight LLOs out of 20 at Ks band, and based on archival Spitzer IRAC1 images, we added four outflow-driving sources from the remaining 12 sources. By fitting these images with radiative transfer models, we derive the outflow opening angles and inclination angles. To study the widening of outflow cavities, we compare our sample with the young stellar objects from Arce & Sargent and Velusamy et al. in a plot of opening angle versus bolometric temperature taken as an evolutionary indicator. Our LLO targets match well the trend of increasing opening angle with bolometric temperature reported by Arce & Sargent and are broadly consistent with that reported by Velusamy et al., suggesting that the opening angle could be a good evolutionary indicator for LLOs. Accordingly, we conclude that at least 40% of the outflow-driving LLOs in our sample are young Class 0 objects.

  6. Northwestern Tharsis Latent Outflow Activity Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Baker, V. R.; Ferris, J. C.; Hare, T. M.; Strom, R. G.; Rudd, L.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Scott, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Previously defined outflow channels, which are indicated by relict landforms similar to those observed on Earth, signify ancient catastrophic flood events on Mars. These conspicuous geomorphic features are some of the most remarkable yet profound discoveries made by geologists to date. These outflow channels, which debouched tremendous volumes of water into topographic lows such as Chryse, Utopia, Elysium, and Hellas Planitiae, may represent the beginning of warmer and wetter climatic periods unlike the present-day cold and dry Mars. In addition to the previously identified outflow channels, observations permitted by the newly acquired Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data have revealed a system of gigantic valleys, referred to as the northwestern slope valleys (NSV), that are located to the northwest of a huge shield volcano, Arsia Mons, western hemisphere of Mars. These features generally correspond spatially to gravity lows similar to the easternmost, circum-Chryse outflow channel systems. Geologic investigations of the Tharsis region suggest that the large valley system pre-dates the construction of Arsia Mons and its extensive associated lava flows of mainly Late Hesperian and Amazonian age and coincides stratigraphically with the early development of the circum-Chryse outflow channel systems that debouch into Chryse Planitia. This newly identified system, the NSV, potentially signifies the largest flood event(s) ever recorded for the solar system. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  7. LVAD Outflow Graft Angle and Thrombosis Risk.

    PubMed

    Aliseda, Alberto; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Mcgah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony R; Beckman, Jennifer A; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Mokadam, Nahush A; Mahr, Claudius

    This study quantifies thrombogenic potential (TP) of a wide range of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) outflow graft anastomosis angles through state-of-the-art techniques: 3D imaged-based patient-specific models created via virtual surgery and unsteady computational fluid dynamics with Lagrangian particle tracking. This study aims at clarifying the influence of a single parameter (outflow graft angle) on the thrombogenesis associated with flow patterns in the aortic root after LVAD implantation. This is an important and poorly-understood aspect of LVAD therapy, because several studies have shown strong inter and intrapatient thrombogenic variability and current LVAD implantation strategies do not incorporate outflow graft angle optimization. Accurate platelet-level investigation, enabled by statistical treatment of outliers in Lagrangian particle tracking, demonstrates a strong influence of outflow graft anastomoses angle on thrombogenicity (platelet residence times and activation state characterized by shear stress accumulation) with significantly reduced TP for acutely-angled anastomosed outflow grafts. The methodology presented in this study provides a device-neutral platform for conducting comprehensive thrombogenicity evaluation of LVAD surgical configurations, empowering optimal patient-focused surgical strategies for long-term treatment and care for advanced heart failure patients.

  8. Azoospermia in an 8-month-old boar due to bilateral obstruction at the testis/epididymis interface

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Kristin M.; Shipley, Clifford F.; Coleman, David A.; Ehrhart, Eugene J.; Haschek, Wanda M.; Clark, Sherrie G.

    2010-01-01

    An 8-month-old Yorkshire boar was presented for apparent azoospermia. Two semen collections also revealed azoospermia. Ultrasonographic examination of the gonads revealed bilateral caput epididymal dilatation and anechoic fluid within the tubules. Because a testicular biopsy revealed normal spermatogenesis, an outflow tract obstruction was suspected. Multiple sperm granulomas were found within the parenchyma of both testes at necropsy. PMID:21197205

  9. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  10. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  11. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function.

  12. Calcium carbonate obstructive urolithiasis in a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Dana M; Gamble, Kathryn C; Corner, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    A 6-yr-old male red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented for a history of inappetance, abnormal behavior, and unconfirmed elimination for 6 hr prior to presentation. Based on abdominal ultrasound, abdominocentesis, and cystocentesis, a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction with uroabdomen and hydronephrosis was reached. Abdominal radiographs did not assist in reaching an antemortem diagnosis. Postmortem examination confirmed a urinary bladder rupture secondary to urethral obstruction by a single urethrolith. Bilateral hydronephrosis and hydroureter were identified and determined to be a result of bilateral ureteroliths. Urolith analysis revealed a composition of 100% calcium carbonate. A dietary analysis was performed, implicating an increased Ca:P ratio from a food preparation miscommunication as a contributing factor. Appropriate husbandry changes were made, and mob surveillance procedures were performed, which resolved the urolithiasis risk for the remaining five animals.

  13. Obstructive acute renal failure related to amantadine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kentaro; Takeda, Kazuhito; Kimura, Hiroshi; Miura, Shuhei; Maeda, Atsuhiro

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old woman with seizures and acute renal failure with hyperkalemia. She presented with bladder turgescence and hydronephrosis on admission and was diagnosed as obstructive acute renal failure. Urethral catheterization was performed after a single-session hemodialysis. It resulted in immediate improvement of renal function and consciousness, and subsequent disappearance of seizures. Improvement of serum creatinine level to 0.7 from 10.6 mg/dL was associated with a fall in blood level of amantadine hydrochloride from 4.40 to 0.47 microg/mL. Physicians should be aware of urinary retention in patients treated with amantadine as a first sign of intoxication that could lead if untreated to obstructive acute renal failure. And we recommend to check the overdose symptoms, even those with normal renal function, treated with amantadine.

  14. Zooplankton in the Arctic outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, K. A.; Dritz, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Climate changes in the Arctic cause the changes in the current system that may have cascading effect on the structure of plankton community and consequently on the interlinked and delicately balanced food web. Zooplankton species are by definition incapable to perform horizontal moving. Their transport is connected with flowing water. There are zooplankton species specific for the definite water masses and they can be used as markers for the different currents. That allows us to consider zooplankton community composition as a result of water mixing in the studied area. Little is known however about the mechanisms by which spatial and temporal variability in advection affect dynamics of local populations. Ice conditions are also very important in the function of pelagic communities. Melting time is the trigger to all "plankton blooming" processes, and the duration of ice-free conditions determines the food web development in the future. Fram Strait is one of the key regions for the Arctic: the cold water outflow comes through it with the East Greenland Current and meets warm Atlantic water, the West Spitsbergen Current, producing complicated hydrological situation. During 2007 and 2008 we investigated the structure functional characteristics of zooplankton community in the Fram Strait region onboard KV "Svalbard" (April 2007, April and May 2008) and RV "Jan Mayen" (May 2007, August 2008). This study was conducted in frame of iAOOS Norway project "Closing the loop", which, in turn, was a part of IPY. During this cruises multidisciplinary investigations were performed, including sea-ice observations, CTD and ADCP profiling, carbon flux, nutrients and primary production measurements, phytoplankton sampling. Zooplankton was collected with the Hydro-Bios WP2 net and MultiNet Zooplankton Sampler, (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 180 um).Samples were taken from the depth strata of 2000-1500, 1500-1000, 1000-500,500-200, 200-100, 100-60, 60-30, 30-0 m. Gut fluorescence

  15. Molecular Outflows from Newly Formed Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kee-Tae; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2015-12-01

    We map 6 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the CO J=2-1 line and survey 18 massive YSOs, including the six, in the hcopj, sioj, water 6_{16}-5_{23} maser, and methanol 7_{0}-6_{1} A^{+} maser lines. We detect CO bipolar outflows in all the six mapped sources. Four of them are newly discovered (ifive, ieight, inine, iten), while itwo is mapped in the CO J=2-1 line for the first time. The detected outflows are much more massive and energetic than outflows from low-mass YSOs with masses >20 M_⊙ and momenta >300 M_⊙ km/s. They have mass outflow rates (3-6)×10^{-4} M_⊙ yr^{-1}, which are at least one order of magnitude greater than those observed in low-mass YSOs. We detect hcop and SiO line emission in 18 (100%) and 4 (22%) sources, respectively. The hcop spectra show high-velocity wings in 11 (61%) sources. We detect water maser emission in 13 (72%) sources and 44 GHz methanol maser emission in 8 (44%) sources. Of the detected sources, 5 water and 6 methanol maser sources are new discoveries. iseven shows high-velocity (>30 kms) water maser lines. We find good correlations of the bolometric luminosity of the central (proto)star with the mechanical force, mechanical luminosity, and mass outflow rate of molecular outflow %L_{bol} with F_{m}, L_{m}, and dot{M}_{out} in the bolometric luminosity range of 10^{-1}-10^6 lsol, and identified 3 intermediate- or high-mass counterparts of Class O objects.

  16. [Obstructive uropathy in childhood].

    PubMed

    Balster, S; Schiborr, M; Brinkmann, O A; Hertle, L

    2005-08-01

    "Obstructive uropathy" is a generic term which combines different diseases in infants and childhood. Both the upper and lower urinary tract may be affected. Diseases of the urinary tract can cause an intrinsic obstruction. Sometimes tumours may cause a compression and as secondary effect an obstruction (extrinsic). Ultrasound is the key diagnostic tool and shows dilatation of the obstructed urinary tract. But for the functional exploration of babies and toddlers, renal scanning and X-ray examinations are necessary. These examinations lead to an exposure to radiation which necessitates careful indication. Some of the congenital diseases (for example ureteropelvic junction obstruction, megaureter) show a maturation without any intervention. So one has to decide whether to wait and see or to operate. A percutaneous nephrostomy or a DJ-catheter is not often used in the treatment of obstruction in general. These forms of drainage are more often used in the treatment of stones or of extrinsic obstruction. A pyelocutaneostomy or ureterocutaneostomy is a special surgical procedure in pediatric urology for transient drainage of the upper urinary tract (megaureter). The operation of a seriously ill new-born should be done in a centre for pediatric urology and pediatric nephrology. When the upper urinary tract is dilated, patients may need an antibiotic prophylaxis, because the dilatation of the upper urinary tract increases the risk of urinary tract infections (UTI). The indication for antibiotic prophylaxis should by guided by the criteria of the APN-Consensus Paper. Long-term follow-up is necessary and should comprise ultrasound, physical examination, controlling the blood pressure, urine analysis and blood tests. The aims of diagnostics, treatment and long-term follow-up are the preservation of renal function and to protect the children from UTI. This goal must be reached under conditions that are appropriate for children and their parents.

  17. Episodic High-velocity Outflows from V899 Mon: A Constraint On The Outflow Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Philip, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the detection of large variations in the outflow wind velocity from a young eruptive star, V899 Mon, during its ongoing high accretion outburst phase. Such large variations in the outflow velocity (from -722 to -425 km s-1) have never been reported previously in this family of objects. Our continuous monitoring of this source shows that the multi-component, clumpy, and episodic high velocity outflows are stable in the timescale of a few days, and vary over the timescale of a few weeks to months. We detect significant decoupling in the instantaneous outflow strength to accretion rate. From the comparison of various possible outflow mechanisms in magnetospheric accretion of young stellar objects, we conclude magnetically driven polar winds to be the most consistent mechanism for the outflows seen in V899 Mon. The large scale fluctuations in outflow over the short period makes V899 Mon the most ideal source to constrain various magnetohydrodynamics simulations of magnetospheric accretion. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT).

  18. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  19. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal.

  20. Rethinking the process of detrainment: jets in obstructed natural flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossa, Michele; de Serio, Francesca

    2016-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the mixing and diffusion of turbulent jets released in porous obstructions is still lacking in literature. This issue is undoubtedly of interest because it is not strictly limited to vegetated flows, but also includes outflows which come from different sources and which spread among oyster or wind farms, as well as aerial pesticide treatments sprayed onto orchards. The aim of the present research is to analyze this process from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, by examining the entrainment coefficient, it is deduced that the presence of a canopy prevents a momentum jet from having an entrainment process, but rather promotes its detrainment. In nature, detrainment is usually associated with buoyancy-driven flows, such as plumes or density currents flowing in a stratified environment. The present study proves that detrainment occurs also when a momentum-driven jet is issued in a not-stratified obstructed current, such as a vegetated flow.

  1. Morphology of aortic arch obstruction with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bruno; Chiariello, Luigi; Mercanti, Corrado; Bosman, Cesare; Colloridi, Vicenzo; Reale, Attilio; Marino, Benedetto

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one hearts with aortic arch obstruction and patent ductus arteriosus were examined with special reference to associated cardiac anomalies. Six presented with complete interruption of the aortic arch, four with atretic isthmus, twelve with coarctation, and three with tubular hypoplasia. Associated cardiac anomalies were divided into two main groups: (1) septal defect with left-to-right shunt, and (2) left ventricular inflow and/or outflow obstruction. A high incidence (9/19=47.4%) of ventriculo-infundibular malalignment type of ventricular septal defect with subaortic stenosis was observed. Associated cardiac lesions that reduce blood flow in the aortic arch during fetal life may be responsible for poor development of this structure. Images PMID:15216214

  2. Rethinking the process of detrainment: jets in obstructed natural flows

    PubMed Central

    Mossa, Michele; De Serio, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the mixing and diffusion of turbulent jets released in porous obstructions is still lacking in literature. This issue is undoubtedly of interest because it is not strictly limited to vegetated flows, but also includes outflows which come from different sources and which spread among oyster or wind farms, as well as aerial pesticide treatments sprayed onto orchards. The aim of the present research is to analyze this process from a theoretical point of view. Specifically, by examining the entrainment coefficient, it is deduced that the presence of a canopy prevents a momentum jet from having an entrainment process, but rather promotes its detrainment. In nature, detrainment is usually associated with buoyancy-driven flows, such as plumes or density currents flowing in a stratified environment. The present study proves that detrainment occurs also when a momentum-driven jet is issued in a not-stratified obstructed current, such as a vegetated flow. PMID:27974835

  3. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall. PMID:27781020

  4. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  5. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  6. Ultrasonic lithotripsy of bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Cetin, S; Ozgür, S; Yazicioğlu, A; Unsal, K; Ilker, Y

    1988-01-01

    In the second half of 1985, 15 patients with 25 bladder stones were treated with Lutzeyer's Ultrasonic Lithotriptor. Of the patients 13 underwent additional operations, mostly transurethral resection of the prostate. The average duration of lithotripsy was 30.5 minutes. Some difficulties were experienced especially when drilling hard stones and as a complication late urethral bleeding occurred in one patient.

  7. Simulating Galaxy Outflows Driven by Supersonic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannapieco, Evan

    Feedback from supernova-driven galaxy outflows plays a crucial role in setting the properties and assembly history of low-mass galaxies. Yet, numerically modeling such outflows has been by plagued by the fact that the underlying supernovae are much too small to be directly resolved, but have cooling times that are much too short to be modeled as thermal input. Here I will present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations that overcome this problem using a subgrid model to deposit supernovae energy directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much smaller than the simulation grid spacing, but much larger than the particle mean free path. In this way, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, including realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Unlike in previous approaches, pockets of supernova-driven gas sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability, and the overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow as observed in NGC 1569 and other outflowing starbursts. Such models will be directly comparable to a host of new observational constraints.

  8. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  9. A SPECTACULAR OUTFLOW IN AN OBSCURED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Smith, Paul S.

    2012-02-10

    SDSS J1356+1026 is a pair of interacting galaxies at redshift z = 0.123 that hosts a luminous obscured quasar in its northern nucleus. Here we present two long-slit Magellan LDSS-3 spectra that reveal a pair of symmetric {approx}10 kpc size outflows emerging from this nucleus, with observed expansion velocities of {approx}250 km s{sup -1} in projection. We present a kinematic model of these outflows and argue that the deprojected physical velocities of expansion are likely {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} and that the kinetic energy of the expanding shells is likely 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1}, with an absolute minimum of >10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. Although a radio counterpart is detected at 1.4 GHz, it is faint enough that the quasar is considered to be radio quiet by all standard criteria, and there is no evidence of extended emission due to radio lobes, whether aged or continuously powered by an ongoing jet. We argue that the likely level of star formation is insufficient to power the observed energetic outflow and that SDSS J1356+1026 is a good case for radio-quiet quasar feedback. In further support of this hypothesis, polarimetric observations show that the direction of quasar illumination is coincident with the direction of the outflow.

  10. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward five low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  11. Where is the oxygen in protostellar outflows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars

    Oxygen (O) is the third-most abundant element in the Universe after hydrogen and helium. Despite its high elemental abundance, a good picture of where oxygen is located in low-mass protostellar outflows and jets is missing: we cannot account for > 60% of the oxygen budget in these objects. This hole in our picture means that we currently do not have a good understanding of the dominant cooling processes in outflows jets, despite the fact that [O I] emission at 63 micron is one of the dominant cooling lines, nor how cooling processes evolve with protostellar evolution. To shed light on these processes, we propose to observe the [O I] 63 micron line with SOFIA-GREAT toward seven low-mass protostars. As a first step, the velocity-resolved line profile will be decomposed into its constituent components to isolate the relative contributions from the jet and the irradiated outflow. Second, the [O I] line profile will be compared to those of H2O, OH and CO to obtain the relative atomic O abundance with respect to CO, H2O, and OH. Third, the effects of evolution will be examined by observing protostars at different evolutionary stages. These three approaches will allow us to quantify: the oxygen chemistry in warm and hot gas, the relative amounts of material in the outflow and the jet, and finally to start tracing the evolutionary sequence of how feedback evolves with time.

  12. A Well-Defined Bipolar Outflow Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Taoling; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Patel, Nimesh

    1992-12-01

    A well-defined "eggplant-shaped" thin shell is revealed in the Mon R2 central core region by CO and (13) CO J=1-0 maps obtained with QUARRY. This thin shell outlines the extended blue lobe of the massive bipolar outflow. The projected length and width of the shell are about 5.7 pc and 2.5 pc respectively, and the averaged projected thickness of the shell is ~ 0.3 pc. The shape of this shell can be satisfactorily accounted for quantitatively in terms of limb-brightening within the framework of the Shu et al shell model with radially directed wind, although the model seems to be oversimplified with respect to the complexity that our data reveal. The outflow shell's symmetry axis is estimated to be inclined by ~ 70(deg) with respect to the line of sight. We suggest that the coincident blue- and red-shifted emission and the bending of the red-shifted lobe are the result of the red-shifted shell being compressed, rather than having a second bipolar outflow aligned roughly perpendicular to the axis of the first bipolar outflow.

  13. Botulinum Toxin A Injection in the Bladder Neck: A Promising Treatment for Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Marianne; Zgheib, Joseph; El Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to failure of optimal medical therapy and the high morbidity that accompanies surgical techniques in high risk patients, the use of de novo treatments including botulinum toxin A is emerging in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, the treatment of urinary retention secondary to BPH via injecting botulinum toxin into the bladder neck is not well established in the literature. This case report describes the case of a 75-year-old male patient with a chronic history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and multiple comorbidities who was admitted to the hospital for management of recurrent urinary retention. The patient was not a surgical candidate for transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Botulinum toxin injection into the bladder neck was performed with very satisfying results. Botulinum toxin injection in the bladder neck presents a promising minimally invasive, tolerated, and cost-effective approach for the treatment of urinary retention in patients with benign prostatic obstruction who are not candidates for surgery or in whom medical treatment has failed. More research is needed to identify the efficacy of this novel approach. PMID:27088032

  14. The Resolved Outflow from 3C 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the properties of the high-velocity outflow driven by the young radio jet of 3C 48, a compact-steep-spectrum source. We use the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telecope to obtain (1) low-resolution UV and optical spectra and (2) multi-slit medium-resolution spectra of the ionized outflow. With supporting data from ground-based spectrographs, we are able to accurately measure the ratios of diagnostic emission lines such as [O III] λ5007, [O III] λ3727, [N II] λ6548, Hα, Hβ, [Ne V] λ3425, and [Ne III] λ3869. We fit the observed emission-line ratios using a range of ionization models, powered by active galactic nucleus (AGN) radiation and shocks, produced by the MAPPINGS code. We have determined that AGN radiation is likely the dominant ionization source. The outflow's density is estimated to be in the range n = 103-104 cm-3, the mass is ~6 × 106 M ⊙, and the metallicity is likely equal to or higher than solar. Compared with the typical outflows associated with more evolved radio jets, this young outflow is denser, less massive, and more metal rich. Multi-slit observations allow us to construct a two-dimensional velocity map of the outflow that shows a wide range of velocities with distinct velocity components, suggesting a wide-angle clumpy outflow. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11574. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Some of the

  15. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  16. Urogynecological conditions associated with overactive bladder symptoms in women

    PubMed Central

    Forde, James C.; Davila, Jonathan L.; Marks, Brian K.; Epstein, Matthew; Tsui, Johnson F.; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Blaivas, Jerry G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder symptoms (OAB) affect 9–43% of women and are associated with underlying disorders, including pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The aim of this study is to identify urogynecological conditions associated with OAB symptoms. Methods This prospective, institutional review board-approved study included women referred to a tertiary centre with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). All women completed the self-administered OAB questionnaire (OABSS). Those with an OABSS ≥8, the cutoff, were considered to have OAB symptoms. Patients underwent a history and physical examination (including Baden-Walker prolapse grading and stress test), 24-hour voiding diary, pad test (for urinary incontinence), urinalysis, and uroflow with post-void residual volume. Patients were classified clinically into the following: idiopathic OAB, SUI, POP, bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) neurogenic bladder (NGB), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and miscellaneous. Results In total, 148 women met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 67 years. Only 27% had no comorbid conditions and were considered idiopathic OAB. Associated urogynecological conditions included SUI in 37%, POP in 26%, miscellaneous conditions in 18%, recurrent UTI in 11%, NGB in 9%, and BOO in 8%. Some patients met criteria for more than one category, thus the total is greater than 100%. Conclusions In a tertiary care setting, a significant proportion of women with OAB symptoms have underlying conditions that may cause or contribute to their symptoms. Appropriate evaluation is desirable to enhance our understanding of the relationship of these conditions to the diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and pathophysiology of OAB. PMID:28360952

  17. Contractile properties of human prostate adenomas and the development of infravesical obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gup, D I; Shapiro, E; Baumann, M; Lepor, H

    1989-01-01

    The contractile response of human prostate adenomas to KCl, phenylephrine (alpha 1 adrenergic agonist), UK 14304 (alpha 2 adrenergic agonist), and carbachol (muscarinic cholinergic agonist) was evaluated in tissue specimens obtained from men with symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. Prostate specimens were obtained from 5 men with asymptomatic BPH undergoing cystoprostatectomy, 11 men with symptomatic BPH undergoing open prostatectomy, and 11 men with symptomatic BPH undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Quantitative symptom score analysis and urinary flow rate determination documented the absence of bladder outlet obstruction in men undergoing cystoprostatectomy and confirmed the presence of bladder outlet obstruction in men undergoing prostatectomy. The magnitude of the contractile response (Emax) and the potency of phenylephrine-induced contractions (EC50) in prostatic preparations obtained from men with symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH were similar. The IC50 for the inhibition of phenylephrine-induced contractions by prazosin was 3.2 nM, confirming that phenylephrine-induced contraction in the human prostate is mediated by the alpha 1 adrenoceptor. The contractile responses of prostate adenomas to muscarinic cholinergic and alpha 2 agonists were negligible. This study demonstrates that the development of bladder outlet obstruction in men with BPH is not related to alterations in the functional response of the smooth muscle component of the prostate adenoma.

  18. Tolerance of the canine bladder to intraoperative radiation therapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Tochner, Z.; Mixon, A.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-05-01

    An experimental study of bladder tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was designed using a large animal model (adult American Foxhounds, weight 25-30 kg) to access acute and late radiation effects. Dogs were subjected to laparotomy where the bladder was mobilized and IORT was delivered using a 5 cm circular cone through a cystotomy incision with 12 MeV electrons. The bladder trigone including both ureteral orifices and the proximal urethra was irradiated in groups of 3 dogs with doses of 0, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy. Dogs were followed clinically with repeat urinalysis, intravenous pyelogram (IVP), and cystometrogram at 1 month and then Q6 months for up to 4 years. One dog from each dose group was sacrificed electively at 1 and 2 years, whereas the other dog is being followed clinically for a minimum of 4 years. Complete autopsies were performed with particular attention to genitourinary and pelvic structures. No clinically detectable acute toxicity resulted from IORT to the bladder. Three of 15 IORT dogs (1 each at 25, 35, and 40 Gy) showed obstruction of a ureteral orifice with 2 dogs dying of renal failure secondary to bilateral hydronephrosis within 1-2 years of treatment. The remaining 12 IORT dogs and 3 control dogs have normal repeat IVP's and renal function with up to 4 years of follow-up. Serial cystometry demonstrates no major loss of bladder contractility or volume. At autopsy, histological changes of mucosal thinning and telangiectasia with submucosal fibrosis were confined to the IORT field and appeared dose-related. However, the bladder epithelium remained intact at all doses. The ureterovesical junction in animals receiving 20 Gy showed mild fibrosis of the lamina propria and moderate chronic inflammation. Above 20 Gy, these histological changes at the U-V junction were more pronounced with gross stenosis in 3 animals as predicted by the IVP.

  19. THE CIRCUMBINARY OUTFLOW: A PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW DRIVEN BY A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tomoaki E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.j

    2009-10-10

    Protostellar outflow is a star's first cry at the moment of birth. The outflows have an indispensable role in the formation of single stars because they carry off the excess angular momentum from the center of the shrinking gas cloud, and permit further collapse to form a star. On the other hand, a significant fraction of stars is supposedly born as binaries with circumbinary disks that are frequently observed. Here, we investigate the evolution of a magnetized rotating cloud using a three-dimensional resistive MHD nested-grid code, and show that the outflow is driven by the circumbinary disk and has an important role even in the binary formation. After the adiabatic core formation in the collapsing cloud core, the magnetic flux is significantly removed from the center of the cloud by the Ohmic dissipation. Since this removal makes the magnetic braking ineffective, the adiabatic core continuously acquires the angular momentum to induce fragmentation and subsequent binary formation. The magnetic field accumulates in the circumbinary disk where the removal and accretion of magnetic field are balanced, and finally drives the circumbinary outflow. This result explains the spectacular morphology of some specific young stellar objects such as L1551 IRS5. We can infer that most of the bipolar molecular outflows observed by low density tracers (i.e., CO) would correspond to circumbinary or circum-multiple outflows found in this Letter, since most of the young stellar objects are supposed to be binaries or multiples.

  20. Nasal obstruction and human communication.

    PubMed

    Malinoff, R; Moreno, C

    1989-04-01

    Nasal obstruction may cause a variety of communication disorders, particularly in children. The effects of nasal obstruction on hearing, speech, language, and voice are examined. Methods for assessing the effects of nasal obstruction are delineated, and recommendations for therapeutic interventions are described.

  1. OBSTRUCTION LIGHT SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report describes the design, development and fabrication of a prototype high intensity obstruction lighting system. A detailed light source ... study was made which indicated a newly developed lamp consisting of a quartz-iodide lamp sealed in a parabolic envelope, was the most advantageous type

  2. Biliary obstruction - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100199.htm Biliary obstruction - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  3. A model to predict bladder shapes from changes in bladder and rectal filling.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Heidi T; Remeijer, Peter; van Herk, Marcel; Lebesque, Joos V; de Bois, Josien A; Zijp, Lambert J; Moonen, Luc M

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model that quantifies in three dimensions changes in bladder shape due to changes in bladder and/or rectal volume. The new technique enables us to predict changes in bladder shape over a short period of time, based on known urinary inflow. Shortly prior to the treatment, the patient will be scanned using a cone beam CT scanner (x-ray volume imager) that is integrated with the linear accelerator. After (automated) delineation of the bladder, the model will be used to predict the short-term shape changes of the bladder for the time interval between image acquisition and dose delivery. The model was developed using multiple daily CT scans of the pelvic area of 19 patients. For each patient, the rigid bony structure in follow-up scans was matched to that of the planning CT scan, and the outer bladder and rectal wall were delineated. Each bladder wall was subdivided in 2500 domains. A fixed reference point inside the bladder was used to calculate for each bladder structure a "Mercator-like" 2D scalar map (similar to a height map of the globe), containing the distances from this reference point to each domain on the bladder wall. Subsequently, for all bladder shapes of a patient and for all domains on the wall individually, the distance to the reference point was fitted by a linear function of both bladder and rectal volume. The model uses an existing bladder structure to create a new structure via expansion (or contraction), until the expressed volume is reached. To evaluate the predictive power of the model, the jack-knife method was used. The errors in the fitting procedure depended on the part of the bladder and range from 0 to 0.5 cm (0.2 cm on average). It was found that a volume increase of 150 cc can lead to a displacement up to about 2.5 cm of the cranial part of the bladder. With the model, the uncertainty in the position of the bladder wall can be reduced down to a maximum value of about 0.5 cm in case the bladder

  4. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  5. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  6. Role of angiogenesis in urothelial bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Górnicka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder cancer is the most common urinary tract malignancy in western countries. In recent years, extensive research has suggested that angiogenesis plays an important role in bladder cancer biology, contributing to tumor growth and progression. Material and methods In this review, we discuss general mechanisms of angiogenesis and highlight the influence of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and cancer stem cells on bladder cancer biology, their relation to disease progression, and potential use in novel targeted therapies. Results Expression of a number of proangiogenic factors, including HIF-1, VEGF, bFGF, IL-8 and MMPs, as well as anti-angiogenic factor TSP-1, was found to be altered in bladder tumors. Involvement of cancer stem cells in bladder cancer development was also proposed. Conclusions High expression of most pro-angiogenic factors correlated with disease progression and shorter patient survival, but discrepancies between studies urge us to continue evaluating the significance of angiogenesis in bladder cancer. PMID:27729991

  7. Bladder tear during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Jonathan N; Halim, Andrea; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2014-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and revision total hip arthroplasty are among the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. There are many reported complications of THA, but intrapelvic complications are a rare subset. Bladder injuries have infrequently been described in association with this common procedure. We present an unusual case of a bladder tear occurring intraoperatively during a revision THA. It is suspected that the patient's history of multiple prior hip procedures caused adhesions of the bladder to the pelvic floor and predisposed the bladder to injury during acetabular revision. Previous reports of bladder injury relating to THA have described thermal necrosis, component migration, and occasional direct perforation. There are no prior case reports describing bladder tears related to adhesions occurring intraoperatively during revision THA. This case report highlights the importance of surgeon awareness of an unusual complication. In this case, intraoperative and postoperative recognition of a hematuria diagnosis led to the appropriate treatment, and this patient had an acceptable outcome.

  8. Retrograde catheterization of the urinary bladder in healthy male goats by use of angiographic catheters.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Emily J; Streeter, Robert N; Simpson, Katharine M; Taylor, Jared D

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify and evaluate 3 types of angiographic catheters for retrograde urinary bladder catheterization in healthy male goats. ANIMALS 12 sexually intact yearling Alpine-cross bucks. PROCEDURES Three 5F angiographic catheters of the same length (100 cm) and diameter (0.17 cm) but differing in curvature at the tip were labeled A (straight tip), B (tip bent in 1 place), and C (tip bent in 2 places). During a single anesthetic episode, attempts were made to blindly pass each catheter into the urinary bladder of each goat. Order of catheters used was randomized, and the veterinarian passing the catheter was blinded as to catheter identity. The total number of attempts at catheter passage and the total number of successful attempts were recorded. RESULTS Catheter A was unsuccessfully passed in all 12 goats, catheter B was successfully passed in 8 goats, and catheter C was successfully passed in 4 goats. The success rate for catheter B was significantly greater than that for catheter A; however, no significant difference was identified between catheters B and C or catheters A and C. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE 2 angiographic catheters were identified that could be successfully, blindly advanced in a retrograde direction into the urinary bladder of healthy sexually intact male goats. Such catheters may be useful for determining urethral patency, emptying the urinary bladder, and instilling chemolysing agents in goats with clinical obstructive urolithiasis.

  9. Using transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Juanjie; Dai, Shengguo; Huang, Xuyuan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Huiguo; Shi, Hongmin

    2005-07-01

    Objective: Ho:YAG laser had been used to treat the common diseases of urinary system such as bladder cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia in our hospital. This study is to assess the efficacy and safety of transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection to treat the urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. Methods: From May 1997 to August 2004, 26 cases of urethral stricture and 33 cases of bladder neck contracture were treated by transurethral Ho:YAG-laser resection. These patients were followed up at regular intervals after operation. The uroflow rate of these patients was detected before and one-month after operation. The blood loss and the energy consumption of holmium-laser during the operation as well as the complications and curative effect after operation were observed. Results: The therapeutic effects were considered successful, with less bleeding and no severe complications. The Qmax of one month postoperation increased obviously than that of preoperation. Of the 59 cases, restenosis appeared in 11 cases (19%) with the symptoms of dysuria and weak urinary stream in 3-24 months respectively. Conclusions: The Ho:YAG-laser demonstrated good effect to treat the obstructive diseases of lower urinary tract such as urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture. It was safe, minimal invasive and easy to operate.

  10. [The latest news on bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Retz, M; Lehmann, J; Nawroth, R; Gschwend, J E

    2007-07-01

    A review of the current literature provides new scientific insights into the diagnosis, prognosis and novel molecular targets for bladder cancer. The new WHO classification refines our staging system and influences treatment options. International clinical databases provide new tools for calculating the individual risk for bladder cancer recurrence and progression. Systematic gene cluster analysis defines multimarker panels that can serve as robust predictors of outcome. Discoveries of new signaling pathways in bladder cancer are leading to novel molecular targets for innovative therapies.

  11. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis of bladder].

    PubMed

    Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cystoscopic and pathologic patterns in 190 patients hospitalized for differential diagnosis or treatment of genitourinary tuberculosis in 2008-2011 was performed. All patients underwent polyfocal biopsy followed by pathologic examination of biopsy specimens. Furthermore, a comparison of results ofpathomorphological studies of tissue obtained by biopsy and after cystectomy was conducted. Cystoscopy in all patients with tuberculosis of the bladder (TB) revealed the reduced bladder capacity in contrast to patients with other urological diseases. Deformation of orifices, trabecularity and contact bleeding were observed in 66.7 to 94.4% of cases in patients with TB, which were significantly more common than in other diseases. Polymorphism of pathological pattern and the lack of specific changes in the majority of patients with TB were noted; multinucleated Pirogov-Langhans cells were found only in 11.8% of cases, and only in biopsies, whereas in the tissues obtained after cystectomy in same patients, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were observed. The algorithm of diagnosis of tuberculosis of the bladder is suggested.

  12. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  13. Ruptured urinary bladder in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J; Ward, D S

    1985-06-15

    A yearling Holstein heifer was admitted with abdominal pain and bilateral, ventral abdominal distention. Bladder rupture was diagnosed by abdominocentesis and endoscopy. Correction of metabolic derangements was accomplished by volume diuresis, with maintenance of a urethral catheter before surgical repair of the bladder. The cause of the bladder rupture was believed to be related to adhesions resulting from previous surgery for urachal abscessation. Bladder rupture, which usually occurs in bulls or steers secondary to urolithiasis or in cows after dystocia, also should be considered in prepartum heifers with dehydration, abdominal pain, and abdominal distention.

  14. Example of reduced turbulence during thunderstorm outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.

    1996-06-01

    This research note describes the effects of a gust front passage resulting from a thunderstorm outflow on wind, turbulence, and other basic meteorological variables in northern Mew Mexico. The purpose of this note is to explain how a thunderstorm outflow can greatly reduce horizontal and vertical turbulence and produce strong winds, thereby promoting the rapid transport of elevated pollutant concentrations. Another goal is to demonstrate the usefulness of a sodar in combination with a tower to provide data for dispersion and transport calculations during an emergency response. Hopefully, this note will motivate other researchers to analyze and document the effects of thunderstorms on turbulence and dispersion by routine monitoring or by experimentation. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Eddy Generation by a Steady Poleward Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durland, T. S.; Pedlosky, J.; Spall, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    The energetic eddy field coincident with the South Equatorial Current (SEC) in the eastern Indian Ocean has been variously attributed to baroclinic instability of the SEC, barotropic instability of the SEC and shedding of eddies by the branch of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) entering the basin through Timor Passage. We present an additional mechanism by demonstrating that in an idealized numerical model, a steady poleward outflow (meant to simulate the Lombok Strait branch of the ITF) can generate an eddy field with spatial and temporal patterns that bear a remarkable resemblance to observations of sea surface height varibility in the region. A simple conceptual model will be presented which links the nonlinear, eddy-generating dynamics to linear dynamics, thus making possible the prediction of eddy amplitudes and periodicity for a wide range of outflow latitudes and volume fluxes.

  16. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Nayakshin, Sergei; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as follows: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's Mσ mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hypervelocity stars out of their hosts, giving rise to Type II supernovae on galactic outskirts, and contributing to reionization and metal enrichment of the Universe; (iv) bulge erosion and even complete destruction in extreme cases resulting in overweight or bulgeless SMBHs.

  17. Density distributions of outflow-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraghan, Anthony; Kim, Jongsoo; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2013-05-01

    Protostellar jets and outflows are signatures of star formation and promising mechanisms for driving supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. We quantify outflow-driven turbulence through three-dimensional numerical simulations using an isothermal version of the robust total variation diminishing code. We drive turbulence in real space using a simplified spherical outflow model, analyse the data through density probability distribution functions (PDFs), and investigate the core formation rate per free-fall time (CFRff). The real-space turbulence-driving method produces a negatively skewed density PDF possessing an enhanced tail on the low-density side. It deviates from the log-normal distributions typically obtained from Fourier-space turbulence driving at low densities, but can provide a good fit at high densities, particularly in terms of mass-weighted rather than volume-weighted density PDF. Due to this fact, we suggest that the CFRff determined from a Fourier-driven turbulence model could be comparable to that of our particular real-space-driving model, which has a ratio of solenoidal to compressional components from the resulting turbulence velocity fields of ˜0.6.

  18. Magnetospheric imaging of high latitude ion outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrido, D. E.; Robinson, R. M.; Chiu, Y. T.; Collin, H. L.; Smith, R. W.; Swift, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    High latitude ion outflows mostly consist of upward streaming O(+) and He(+) emanating from the ionosphere. At heights above 1000 km, these flows consist of cold and hot components which resonantly scatter solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light, however, the ion populations respond differently to Doppler shifting resulting from the large relative velocities between the ions and the Sun. The possibility of optical detection of the Doppler effect on the scattering rate will be discussed for the O(+) (83.4 nm) ions. We have contrasted the EUV solar resonance images of these outflows by simulations of the 30.4 nm He(+) and 83.4 nm O(+) emissions for both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Input data for the 1000 km level has been obtained from the EICS instrument aboard the Dynamics Explorer (DE) satellite. Our results show emission rates of 50 and 56 milli-Rayleighs at 30.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions and 65 and 75 milli-Rayleighs at 83.4 nm for quiet and disturbed conditions, respectively, obtained for a polar orbiting satellite and viewing radially outward. We also find that an imager at an equatorial distance of 9 R(sub E) or more is in a favorable position for detecting ion outflows, particularly when the plasmapause is depressed in latitude. However, an occultation disk is necessary to obscure the bright plasmaspheric emissions.

  19. CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, Adele L.; Arce, Hector G.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Mardones, Diego; Sargent, Anneila I.; Schnee, Scott L.

    2013-09-01

    We present observations of outflows in the star-forming region NGC 1333 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA). We combined the {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO (1-0) CARMA mosaics with data from the 14 m Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory to probe the central, most dense, and active region of this protostellar cluster at scales from 5'' to 7' (or 1000 AU to 0.5 pc at a distance of 235 pc). We map and identify {sup 12}CO outflows, and along with {sup 13}CO data we estimate their mass, momentum, and energy. Within the 7' Multiplication-Sign 7' map, the 5'' resolution allows for a detailed study of morphology and kinematics of outflows and outflow candidates, some of which were previously confused with other outflow emission in the region. In total, we identify 22 outflow lobes, as well as 9 dense circumstellar envelopes marked by continuum emission, of which 6 drive outflows. We calculate a total outflow mass, momentum, and energy within the mapped region of 6 M{sub Sun }, 19 M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1}, and 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg, respectively. Within this same region, we compare outflow kinematics with turbulence and gravitational energy, and we suggest that outflows are likely important agents for the maintenance of turbulence in this region. In the earliest stages of star formation, outflows do not yet contribute enough energy to totally disrupt the clustered region where most star formation is happening, but have the potential to do so as the protostellar sources evolve. Our results can be used to constrain outflow properties, such as outflow strength, in numerical simulations of outflow-driven turbulence in clusters.

  20. Ileal bladder substitute: antireflux nipple or afferent tubular segment?

    PubMed

    Studer, U E; Spiegel, T; Casanova, G A; Springer, J; Gerber, E; Ackermann, D K; Gurtner, F; Zingg, E J

    1991-01-01

    Spheroidal bladder substitutes made from double-folded ileal segments, similar to Goodwin's cup-patch technique, are devoid of major coordinated wall contractions. This, together with the reservoir's direct anastomosis to the membranous urethra, prevents major intraluminal pressure peaks and assures a residue-free voiding of sterile urine. In order to determine whether, under these conditions, an afferent tubular isoperistaltic ileal segment of 20-cm length protects the upper urinary tract as efficiently as an antireflux nipple, 60 male patients who were subjected to radical cystectomy were prospectively randomised to groups in which a bladder substitute was formed together with either of these 2 antireflux devices. An analysis of the results obtained in 20 patients from each group who could be followed for more than 1 year (median observation time 30 and 36 months) showed no differences between the groups in metabolic disturbances, kidney size, reservoir capacity, diurnal and nocturnal urinary continence, the incidence of urinary tract infection or episodes of acute pyelonephritis. Later than 1 year postoperatively, intravenous urograms of the renoureteral units of 25% of the patients with antireflux nipples showed persistent but generally slight dilatation of the upper urinary tracts. This observation was significantly more frequent than it was in patients with afferent tubular segments. Urodynamic and radiographic studies showed that the competence of the antireflux nipples was secured by the raised surrounding intravesical pressure. This, however, also resulted in a transient functional obstruction, and a gradual rise of the basal pressure in the upper urinary tracts was recorded. In patients with afferent ileal tubular segments, contrast medium could be forced upwards into the renal pelvis when the bladder substitutes were overfilled. However, despite raised intravesical pressures, peristalsis in the isoperistaltic afferent tubular segment gradually returned

  1. Urinary tract ultrasonography in normal rams and in rams with obstructive urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ueli; Schefer, Ursula; Föhn, Josef

    1992-01-01

    We determined the position, dimensions, and structure of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra in 20 healthy, adult rams by use of ultrasonography. The findings were compared with those of seven rams with obstructive urolithiasis, thus establishing criteria for the diagnosis of urolithiasis via ultrasonography. A 5.0 MHz convex transducer was placed over the right paralumbar fossa to examine the kidneys, and a 5.0 MHz linear rectal transducer was used to examine the bladder and urethra transrectally. All examinations were performed on standing rams. The left kidney had a length of 8.4 ± 0.3 cm (mean ± SD), a width of 4.7 ± 0.3 cm, and a depth of 4.4 ± 0.3 cm. The diameter of the renal sinus of the left kidney was 1.5 ± 0.2 cm. The circumference of the medullary pyramids measured 2.8 ± 0.3 cm. Similar ultrasonographic measurements were obtained for the right kidney. The mean diameter of the bladder of 12 rams was 7.5 ± 2.8 cm. The diameter of the bladder could not be determined in the remaining eight rams because it was greater than 10 cm and therefore beyond the penetration depth of the scanner. The only part of the urethra which could be visualized ultrasonographically was the internal urethral orifice. It had a diameter of 0.2 ± 0.1 cm. Ultrasonographic examination of seven rams with obstructive urolithiasis revealed a markedly dilated urethra and urinary bladder. Due to severe cystitis, the contents of the urinary bladder appeared as multiple, tiny, uniformly distributed echoes. The renal pelvis and medullary pyramids of both kidneys were dilated in four rams. In two rams, uroperitoneum and accumulation of urine in the abdomen were diagnosed via ultrasonography. In one ram this was due to a ruptured ureter and in one to a ruptured bladder. The results of this study indicate that ultrasonography is a useful aid in the diagnosis of obstructive urolithiasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:17424090

  2. BAL OUTFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO AGN FEEDBACK: FREQUENCY OF S IV OUTFLOWS IN THE SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jay P.; Arav, Nahum; Laughlin, Courtney; Edmonds, Doug; Aoki, Kentaro; Wilkins, Ashlee; Bautista, Manuel E-mail: arav@vt.edu E-mail: kentaro.aoki@hawaiiantel.net E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu

    2012-05-10

    We present a study of broad absorption line (BAL) quasar outflows that show S IV {lambda}1063 and S IV* {lambda}1073 troughs. The fractional abundances of S IV and C IV peak at similar value of the ionization parameter, implying that they arise from the same physical component of the outflow. Detection of the S IV* troughs will allow us to determine the distance to this gas with higher resolution and higher signal-to-noise spectra, therefore providing the distance and energetics of the ubiquitous C IV BAL outflows. In our bright sample of 156 SDSS quasars, 14% show C IV and 1.9% S IV troughs, which are consistent with a fainter magnitude sample with twice as many objects. One object in the fainter sample shows evidence of a broad S IV trough without any significant trough present from the excited state line, which implies that this outflow could be at a distance of several kpc. Given the fractions of C IV and S IV, we establish firm limits on the global covering factor on S IV that ranges from 2.8% to 21% (allowing for the k-correction). Comparison of the expected optical depth for these ions with their detected percentage suggests that these species arise from common outflows with a covering factor closer to the latter.

  3. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, C.; Maiolino, R.; Piconcelli, E.; Menci, N.; Aussel, H.; Lamastra, A.; Fiore, F.

    2010-07-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution young star-forming galaxies transform into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched. To explain this transformation, a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole is often invoked. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead the black hole to “suicide” by starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, because outflows previously observed in quasars are generally associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occurrs in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdB Interferometer to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. Thanks to the wide band we detected broad wings of the CO line, with velocities of up to 750 km s-1 and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. These broad CO wings trace a giant molecular outflow of about 700 M_⊙/year, far larger than the ongoing star-formation rate (~200 M_⊙/year) observed in the host galaxy. This wind will totally expel the cold gas reservoir in Mrk 231 in about 107 yrs, therefore halting the star-formation activity on the same timescale. The inferred kinetic energy in the molecular outflow is ~1.2 × 1044 erg/s, corresponding to a few percent of the AGN bolometric luminosity, which is very close to the fraction expected by models ascribing quasar feedback to highly supersonic shocks generated by radiatively accelerated nuclear winds. Instead, the contribution by the SNe associated with the starburst fall short by several orders of magnitude to account for the kinetic energy observed in the outflow. The direct observational evidence for quasar feedback reported here provides solid support to the scenarios ascribing the observed properties of local massive

  4. Regulation of Breathing and Autonomic Outflows by Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung ventilation fluctuates widely with behavior but arterial PCO2 remains stable. Under normal conditions, the chemoreflexes contribute to PaCO2 stability by producing small corrective cardiorespiratory adjustments mediated by lower brainstem circuits. Carotid body (CB) information reaches the respiratory pattern generator (RPG) via nucleus solitarius (NTS) glutamatergic neurons which also target rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) presympathetic neurons thereby raising sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chemoreceptors also regulate presympathetic neurons and cardiovagal preganglionic neurons indirectly via inputs from the RPG. Secondary effects of chemoreceptors on the autonomic outflows result from changes in lung stretch afferent and baroreceptor activity. Central respiratory chemosensitivity is caused by direct effects of acid on neurons and indirect effects of CO2 via astrocytes. Central respiratory chemoreceptors are not definitively identified but the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a particularly strong candidate. The absence of RTN likely causes severe central apneas in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Like other stressors, intense chemosensory stimuli produce arousal and activate circuits that are wake- or attention-promoting. Such pathways (e.g., locus coeruleus, raphe, and orexin system) modulate the chemoreflexes in a state-dependent manner and their activation by strong chemosensory stimuli intensifies these reflexes. In essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and congestive heart failure, chronically elevated CB afferent activity contributes to raising SNA but breathing is unchanged or becomes periodic (severe CHF). Extreme CNS hypoxia produces a stereotyped cardiorespiratory response (gasping, increased SNA). The effects of these various pathologies on brainstem cardiorespiratory networks are discussed, special consideration being given to the interactions between central and peripheral chemoreflexes. PMID:25428853

  5. Adult obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; McSharry, David G.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is an increasingly common disorder of repeated upper airway collapse during sleep, which leads to oxygen desaturation and disrupted sleep. Symptoms include snoring, witnessed apnoeas, and sleepiness. Pathogenesis varies; predisposing factors include small upper airway lumen, unstable respiratory control, low arousal threshold, small lung volume, and dysfunctional upper airway dilator muscles. Risk factors include obesity, male sex, age, menopause, fluid retention, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and smoking. Obstructive sleep apnoea causes sleepiness, road traffic accidents, and probably systemic hypertension. It has also been linked to myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, stroke, and diabetes mellitus though not definitively. Continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice, with adherence of 60–70%. Bi-level positive airway pressure or adaptive servo-ventilation can be used for patients who are intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure. Other treatments include dental devices, surgery, and weight loss. PMID:23910433

  6. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lange, Peter

    2013-04-15

    The new version of the GOLD document on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), introduces a profound change in the stratification of the patients. In addition to the level of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the new stratification also includes the level of daily symptoms, in particular dyspnoea, and the history of exacerbations. This review describes this stratification and the treatment of stable COPD according to the GOLD document. It focuses on early diagnosis, smoking cessation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

  7. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    Snoring and excessive sleepiness are the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but other clinical manifestations are present and a precise assessment of the disease involves clear definitions of the various kinds of apnea. Several pathogenetic factors (functional, anatomical, neurological, genetical) are still being discussed. However new insights of the pathophysiology of apneas allow more reliable treatments. Central nervous and cardiovascular complications as well as the traumatic morbidity, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, make it a major public health problem.

  8. Obstructive Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas Taylor

    1982-01-01

    The techniques that have come into general use for diagnosing problems of obstructive jaundice, particularly in the past ten years, have been ultrasonography, computerized tomography, radionuclide imaging, transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography using a long thin needle, transhepatic percutaneous drainage for obstructive jaundice due to malignancy, endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the papilla (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy and choledochoscopy. It is helpful to review obstructive jaundice due to gallstones from a clinical point of view and the use of the directable stone basket for the retrieval of retained stones, choledochoscopy for the same purpose using the rigid versus flexible choledochoscopes and dissolution of stones using various fluids through a T tube. The use of dilation of the sphincter for the treatment of stenosis or stricture of the bile duct is now frowned on; rather, treatment choices are between the use of sphincteroplasty versus choledochoduodenostomy and choledochojejunostomy. Any patient with obstructive jaundice or anyone undergoing manipulation of the bile ducts should have prophylactic antibiotic therapy. The current literature regarding treatment of cancer of the bile ducts is principally devoted to the new ideas relative to treatment of tumors of the upper third, especially the bifurcation tumors that are now being resected rather than bypassed. Tumors of the distal bile duct are still being resected by focal operations. Finally, it is now felt that early operation for congenital biliary atresia and choledochal cysts gives the best prognosis, with preoperative diagnosis now possible with the use of ultrasonography and ERCP. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:7051569

  9. Molecular Outflows in Massive Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nichol

    2015-11-01

    This thesis presents millimetre continuum and molecular line observations exploring the properties of molecular outflows towards massive star forming regions. Massive stars produce some of the most energetic phenomena in the Galaxy, yet we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of how they actually form. Outflows are known to play a key role in this formation process and their properties, particularly how they change depending on the mass, luminosity and evolution of the driving source can shed light on how massive stars actually form. This thesis presents observations at both high (SMA 3 arcsecond) and low (JCMT 15 arcsecond) spatial resolution of the known jet/outflow tracers, SiO and 12CO, towards a sample massive star forming region drawn from the RMS survey. Furthermore, the presence of infall signatures is explored through observations of HCO+ and H13CO+, and the hot core nature of the regions is probed using tracers such as CH3CN, HC3N and CH3OH. SiO is detected towards approximately 50% of the massive young stellar objects and HII regions in the JCMT sample. The detection of SiO appears to be linked to the age of the RMS source, with the likely younger sources showing a stronger dependence with SiO. The presence of SiO also appears to be linked to the CO velocity, with SiO more efficiently tracing sources with higher velocity dispersions. In the MOPRA observations towards a sample of 33 RMS sources, CH3CN is detected towards 66% of the sources, with the redder likely younger sources having the largest rotational temperatures. This thesis presents the first interferometric SiO (5-4) and 12CO (2-1) observations, taken with the SMA, towards the massive star forming region G203.3166/NGC 2264-C. In this intermediate/massive star forming cluster, SiO is again tracing the youngest sources. Both the SiO and 12CO emission trace two bipolar, high velocity outflows towards the mm brightest, IR-dark, likely youngest sources in this reg! ion. In contrast the IR

  10. Airflow obstruction and exercise.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher B

    2009-03-01

    The primary abnormality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic airway inflammation which results in airflow limitation. Disease progression is usually depicted as an accelerated decline in FEV(1) over time. However, COPD patients also manifest progressive static hyperinflation due to the combined effects of reduced lung elastic recoil and increased airway resistance. Superimposed on static hyperinflation are further increases in operational lung volumes (dynamic hyperinflation) brought on during exercise, exacerbations or tachypnea. An important consequence of exertional dyspnea is activity limitation. COPD patients have been shown to spend only a third of the day walking or standing compared with age-matched healthy individuals who spend more than half of their time in these activities. Furthermore, the degree of activity limitation measured by an accelerometer worsens with disease progression. COPD patients have been shown to have an accelerated loss of aerobic capacity (VO(2)max) and this correlates with mortality just as is seen with hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Thus physical inactivity is an important therapeutic target in COPD. Summarizing; airflow obstruction leads to progressive hyperinflation, activity limitation, physical deconditioning and other comorbidities that characterize the COPD phenotype. Targeting the airflow obstruction with long-acting bronchodilator therapy in conjunction with a supervised exercise prescription is currently the most effective therapeutic intervention in earlier COPD. Other important manifestations of skeletal muscle dysfunction include muscle atrophy and weakness. These specific problems are best addressed with resistance training with consideration of anabolic supplementation.

  11. Fetal Intervention in Right Outflow Tract Obstructive Disease: Selection of Candidates and Results

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Montes, E.; Herraiz, I.; Mendoza, A.; Galindo, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To describe the process of selection of candidates for fetal cardiac intervention (FCI) in fetuses diagnosed with pulmonary atresia-critical stenosis with intact ventricular septum (PA/CS-IVS) and report our own experience with FCI for such disease. Methods. We searched our database for cases of PA/CS-IVS prenatally diagnosed in 2003–2012. Data of 38 fetuses were retrieved and analyzed. FCI were offered to 6 patients (2 refused). In the remaining it was not offered due to the presence of either favourable prognostic echocardiographic markers (n = 20) or poor prognostic indicators (n = 12). Results. The outcome of fetuses with PA/CS-IVS was accurately predicted with multiparametric scoring systems. Pulmonary valvuloplasty was technically successful in all 4 fetuses. The growth of the fetal right heart and hemodynamic parameters showed a Gaussian-like behaviour with an improvement in the first weeks and slow worsening as pregnancy advanced, probably indicating a restenosis. Conclusions. The most likely type of circulation after birth may be predicted in the second trimester of pregnancy by means of combining cardiac dimensions and functional parameters. Fetal pulmonary valvuloplasty in midgestation is technically feasible and in well-selected cases may improve right heart growth, fetal hemodynamics, and postnatal outcome. PMID:22928144

  12. The Prevalence of Gas Outflows in Type 2 AGNs. II. 3D Biconical Outflow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Hyun-Jin; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D models of biconical outflows combined with a thin dust plane for investigating the physical properties of the ionized gas outflows and their effect on the observed gas kinematics in type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using a set of input parameters, we construct a number of models in 3D and calculate the spatially integrated velocity and velocity dispersion for each model. We find that three primary parameters, i.e., intrinsic velocity, bicone inclination, and the amount of dust extinction, mainly determine the simulated velocity and velocity dispersion. Velocity dispersion increases as the intrinsic velocity or the bicone inclination increases, while velocity (i.e., velocity shifts with respect to systemic velocity) increases as the amount of dust extinction increases. Simulated emission-line profiles well reproduce the observed [O iii] line profiles, e.g., narrow core and broad wing components. By comparing model grids and Monte Carlo simulations with the observed [O iii] velocity-velocity dispersion distribution of ˜39,000 type 2 AGNs, we constrain the intrinsic velocity of gas outflows ranging from ˜500 to ˜1000 km s-1 for the majority of AGNs, and up to ˜1500-2000 km s-1 for extreme cases. The Monte Carlo simulations show that the number ratio of AGNs with negative [O iii] velocity to AGNs with positive [O iii] velocity correlates with the outflow opening angle, suggesting that outflows with higher intrinsic velocity tend to have wider opening angles. These results demonstrate the potential of our 3D models for studying the physical properties of gas outflows, applicable to various observations, including spatially integrated and resolved gas kinematics.

  13. Bladder aspergillosis detected by urine cytology.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Martínez-Torre, Santiago; Mosquera-Martínez, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    Bladder aspergillosis is an unusual infection. We report the case of a 79-year-old man with clinical records of transitional cell carcinoma diagnosed 5 years ago. The presence of a fruiting body and septate hyphae in urine cytological smears were the key for a final diagnosis of fungal bladder infection caused by Aspergillus niger.

  14. Kidney pathology in non-obstructive urolithiasis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, O

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the gross and histopathological findings in non-obstructive urolithiasis. Pathological examinations were carried out on 102 cattle kidneys with non-obstructive urolithiasis. The common gross lesions were cyst formations in the kidney lobes, hyperaemia and haemorrhage. The weight of the stones differed from 0.02 to 237.44 g and the colour changed brown to white. The calculi had different shapes. At histopathological examination of the kidneys slight to severe mononuclear cell infiltrations were commonly observed. Haemorrhage and connective tissue proliferations were also seen. Neutrophil leucocyte infiltrations caused by pyelonephritis were observed in some cases and multiple stone formations were found in these cases. Widening of the Bowman's space was a common histopathological finding especially when the stones were big or the inflammatory reaction was severe. Calcium deposits and eosinophylic material were found in the medullary tubules and pelvis renalis lumens in some kidneys. Giant cell formations around the stone reactions were rarely observed. Hyperplasia of the pelvis renalis and tubulus epithelium was another finding which occurred seldom. Whereas sand-like material accumulation seen in urinary bladders in some cases, no obstruction was observed in the urinary canal in this study.

  15. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  16. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  17. [Allergic inflammation as one of the factors of pathogenesis of overactive urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Pisarev, S A; Kleĭmenova, N V; Sukhorukov, V S

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is still a serious problem because of its high prevalence in men and women. Endoscopic or open detrusor biopsies were obtained from 28 (24 male and 4 female) patients of 52 to 75 years of age with obstructive or idiopathic OAB of 1 to 10 year duration. The control group included 6 males and 2 females without OAB symptoms. Allergic inflammation with involvement of mast cells, parasympathetic element hyperplasia, ultrastructural changes of myocytes with structural damage to mitochondria were detected in the detrusor of patients with both obstructive and idiopathic OAB. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was low but lactate dehydrogenase activity was enhanced in lymphocytes of peripheral blood. Severity of these changes correlated with morphological features of decreased tissue respiration in the detrusor muscles. In view of the detected inflammatory pathogenetic aspects it is recommended to add antiallergic drugs improving detrusor bioenergetics to combined treatment of OAB.

  18. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  19. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  20. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-06-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc.

  1. Pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) is a common non-motor disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, bladder dysfunction is sometimes non-responsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine basal ganglia-frontal circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. The pathophysiology of the bladder dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  2. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  3. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on contractility and citrate synthase activity of the rabbit urinary bladder in the presence and absence of resveratrol and a whole-grape suspension.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johdi-Ann; Leggett, Robert E; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    One etiology related directly to obstructive urinary bladder dysfunction is ischemia/reperfusion resulting in significant oxidative stress to the bladder. Grapes, a natural source of antioxidants, have been proven effective in preventing obstructive and ischemic bladder dysfunction. Many investigators believe that resveratrol is the primary active antioxidant ingredient in grapes. We compared the ability of a whole-grape suspension with pure resveratrol in their ability to protect the bladder from in vitro oxidative stress mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Four male rabbit bladders were used. Two strips from each bladder were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL grape suspension for 30 min, another two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL resveratrol solution, and the last two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL sucrose/and fructose as controls. The rest of the bladder was separated into muscle and mucosa, frozen and stored for biochemical evaluation. (1) Chemically, resveratrol has about 20 times the antioxidant capacity of the grape suspension. (2) The grape suspension had significant protective effects when the rate of tension was quantitated at all concentrations of H2O2, while the resveratrol had no effect. (3) Citrate synthase activities of the muscle and mucosa were significantly protected by the grape suspension but not by resveratrol. These data demonstrate that the grape suspension protects the mitochondria to a significantly greater degree than resveratrol, which suggests that the antioxidant activities are due to the combination of active components found in the grape suspension and not just resveratrol.

  4. Subaortic and midventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with extreme segmental hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Georgios K; Giannakoulas, Georgios; Parcharidou, Despina G; Ziakas, Antonios G; Papadopoulos, Christodoulos E; Karoulas, Takis; Pliakos, Christodoulos; Parcharidis, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    Background Subaortic and midventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with extreme segmental hypertrophy exceeding the usual maximum wall thickness reported in the literature is a rare phenomenon. Case Presentation A 19-year-old man with recently diagnosed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was referred for sudden death risk assessment. The patient had mild exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association functional class II), but without syncope or chest pain. There was no family history of HCM or sudden death. A two dimensional echocardiogram revealed an asymmetric type of LV hypertrophy; anterior ventricular septum = 49 mm; posterior ventricular septum = 20 mm; anterolateral free wall = 12 mm; and posterior free wall = 6 mm. The patient had 2 types of obstruction; a LV outflow obstruction due to systolic anterior motion of both mitral leaflets (Doppler-estimated 38 mm Hg gradient at rest); and a midventricular obstruction (Doppler-estimated 43 mm Hg gradient), but without apical aneurysm or dyskinesia. The patient had a normal blood pressure response on exercise test and no episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 24-h ECG recording. Cardiac MRI showed a gross late enhancement at the hypertrophied septum. Based on the extreme degree of LV hypertrophy and the myocardial hyperenhancement, an implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator was recommended prophylactically for primary prevention of sudden death. Conclusion Midventricular HCM is an infrequent phenotype, but may be associated with an apical aneurysm and progression to systolic dysfunction (end-stage HCM). PMID:17349063

  5. Gall bladder and extrahepatic bile duct lymphomas: clinicopathological observations and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Mani, Haresh; Climent, Fina; Colomo, Lluís; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2010-09-01

    Lymphomas of the gall bladder and extrahepatic bile ducts are exceedingly rare. We present the clinicopathological features of 19 cases from our files; 14 patients had primary lymphoma (13 involving gall bladder and 1 involving common hepatic duct), while 5 had systemic lymphoma on further work-up. Most patients presented with symptoms mimicking cholecystitis. The most common primary lymphoma types were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma, B-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. Two cases had features of lymphomatous polyposis, one a case of follicular lymphoma and the second a case of mantle cell lymphoma, with disease limited to the mantle zones, so-called in situ mantle cell lymphoma. Other rare lymphoma subtypes not described earlier in this site included the extracavitary variant of primary effusion lymphoma and plasmablastic lymphoma. Patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma were older (mean age 75.8 y) than those with other subtypes (mean age 47 y) and more likely to have gallstones (60% vs. 12.5%). A comprehensive literature review revealed 36 primary gall bladder and 16 primary extrahepatic bile duct lymphomas. When compared with primary gall bladder lymphomas, those involving the extrahepatic bile ducts present at a younger age (47 y vs. 63 y) usually with obstructive jaundice, and are less often associated with gallstones (17% vs. 50%) or regional lymph node involvement (6% vs. 31%). In conclusion, primary lymphomas of the gall bladder and extrahepatic bile ducts show a broad spectrum of disease types, but in many respects mirror the spectrum of primary lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. [Neuroblastoma presenting as obstructive jaundice].

    PubMed

    García de Andoin Barandiaran, N; Lassaletta Atienza, A; Scaglione Ríos, C; Contra Martín, T; Madero López, L

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice as a presentation of abdominal tumors in childhood is extremely rare. To date, only 4 cases of neuroblastoma causing obstructive jaundice at diagnosis have been reported in children. We report a 4-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain, jaundice, choluria and acholia. A diagnosis of unresectable, nonmetastatic neuroblastoma was made. Chemotherapy reduced the size of the tumor and relieved the symptoms of obstructive jaundice without the need for decompressive surgery. Abdominal tumors should be included in the differential diagnoses of obstructive jaundice in childhood.

  7. A resolved outflow of matter from a brown dwarf.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Emma T; Ray, Thomas P; Bacciotti, Francesca; Natta, Antonella; Testi, Leonardo; Randich, Sofia

    2005-06-02

    The birth of stars involves not only accretion but also, counter-intuitively, the expulsion of matter in the form of highly supersonic outflows. Although this phenomenon has been seen in young stars, a fundamental question is whether it also occurs among newborn brown dwarfs: these are the so-called 'failed stars', with masses between stars and planets, that never manage to reach temperatures high enough for normal hydrogen fusion to occur. Recently, evidence for accretion in young brown dwarfs has mounted, and their spectra show lines that are suggestive of outflows. Here we report spectro-astrometric data that spatially resolve an outflow from a brown dwarf. The outflow's characteristics appear similar to, but on a smaller scale than, outflows from normal young stars. This result suggests that the outflow mechanism is universal, and perhaps relevant even to the formation of planets.

  8. Right ventricular outflow tract aneurysm with thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Syed Murfad; Bhat, P.S. Seetharama; Furtado, Arul Dominic; Chikkatur, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) aneurysm is a known complication of tetralogy of Fallot repair when a ventriculotomy is done. It leads to RV dysfunction and may require re-operation. We describe a rare instance of a patient who developed an RVOT aneurysm after trans-ventricular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, which was complicated with the formation of a thrombus in the aneurysm sac. The patient underwent re-operation with thrombectomy, excision of the RVOT aneurysm and pulmonary valve replacement. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of this combination and its implications have not been reported. PMID:22232231

  9. Interferometric Mapping of Perseus Outflows with MASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ian; Dunham, Michael; Myers, Philip C.; MASSES Team

    2017-01-01

    The MASSES (Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA) survey, a Submillimeter Array (SMA) large-scale program, is mapping molecular lines and continuum emission about the 75 known Class 0/I sources in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. In this talk, I present some of the key results of this project, with a focus on the CO(2-1) maps of the molecular outflows. In particular, I investigate how protostars inherit their rotation axes from large-scale magnetic fields and filamentary structure.

  10. Functional Anatomy of the Outflow Facilities.

    PubMed

    Pizzirani, Stefano; Gong, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the pathophysiology, select optimal therapeutic options for patients and provide clients with honest expectations for cases of canine glaucoma, clinicians should be familiar with a rational understanding of the functional anatomy of the ocular structures involved in this group of diseases. The topographical extension and the structural and humoral complexity of the regions involved with the production and the outflow of aqueous humor undergo numerous changes with aging and disease. Therefore, the anatomy relative to the fluid dynamics of aqueous has become a pivotal yet flexible concept to interpret the different phenotypes of glaucoma.

  11. Atomic Hydrogen in a Galactic Center Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Green, J. A.; Hill, A. S.; Lockman, F. J.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Green, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a population of small, high-velocity, atomic hydrogen clouds, loops, and filaments found above and below the disk near the Galactic center. The objects have a mean radius of 15 pc, velocity widths of ~14 km s-1, and are observed at |z| heights up to 700 pc. The velocity distribution of the clouds shows no signature of Galactic rotation. We propose a scenario where the clouds are associated with an outflow from a central star-forming region at the Galactic center. We discuss the clouds as entrained material traveling at ~200 km s-1 in a Galactic wind.

  12. Valles Marineris and Chryse Outflow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of Valles Marineris, the great canyon and the south Chryse basin-Valles Marineris outflow channels of Mars; north toward top. The scene shows the entire Valles Marineris canyon system, over 3,000 km long and averaging 8 km deep, extending from Noctis Labyrinthus, the arcuate system of graben to the west, to the chaotic terrain to the east and related outflow canyons that drain toward the Chryse basin. Eos and Capri Chasmata (south to north) are two canyons connected to Valles Marineris. Ganges Chasma lies directly north. The chaos in the southeast part of the image gives rise to several outflow channels, Shalbatana, Simud, Tiu, and Ares Valles (left to right), that drained north into the Chryse basin. The mouth of Ares Valles is the site of the Mars Pathfinder lander.

    This image is a composite of Viking medium-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color; Mercator projection. The image roughly extends from latitude 20 degrees S. to 20 degrees N. and from longitude 15 degrees to 102.5 degrees.

    The connected chasma or valleys of Valles Marineris may have formed from a combination of erosional collapse and structural activity. Layers of material in the eastern canyons might consist of carbonates deposited in ancient lakes, eolian deposits, or volcanic materials. Huge ancient river channels began from Valles Marineris and from adjacent canyons and ran north. Many of the channels flowed north into Chryse Basin.

    The south Chryse outflow channels are cut an average of 1 km into the cratered highland terrain. This terrain is about 9 km above datum near Valles Marineris and steadily decreases in elevation to 1 km below datum in the Chryse basin. Shalbatana is relatively narrow (10 km wide) but can reach 3 km in depth. The channel begins at a 2- to 3-km-deep circular depression within a large impact crater, whose floor is partly covered by chaotic material, and ends in Simud Valles. Tiu and Simud Valles consist of a

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  14. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE HH 46/47 MOLECULAR OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Arce, Hector G.; Mardones, Diego; Garay, Guido; Corder, Stuartt A.; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Raga, Alejandro C.

    2013-09-01

    The morphology, kinematics, and entrainment mechanism of the HH 46/47 molecular outflow were studied using new ALMA Cycle 0 observations. Results show that the blue and red lobes are strikingly different. We argue that these differences are partly due to contrasting ambient densities that result in different wind components having a distinct effect on the entrained gas in each lobe. A 29 point mosaic, covering the two lobes at an angular resolution of about 3'', detected outflow emission at much higher velocities than previous observations, resulting in significantly higher estimates of the outflow momentum and kinetic energy than previous studies of this source, using the CO(1-0) line. The morphology and the kinematics of the gas in the blue lobe are consistent with models of outflow entrainment by a wide-angle wind, and a simple model describes the observed structures in the position-velocity diagram and the velocity-integrated intensity maps. The red lobe exhibits a more complex structure, and there is evidence that this lobe is entrained by a wide-angle wind and a collimated episodic wind. Three major clumps along the outflow axis show velocity distribution consistent with prompt entrainment by different bow shocks formed by periodic mass ejection episodes which take place every few hundred years. Position-velocity cuts perpendicular to the outflow cavity show gradients where the velocity increases toward the outflow axis, inconsistent with outflow rotation. Additionally, we find evidence for the existence of a small outflow driven by a binary companion.

  15. Nest of Molecular Outflows in the Circinus Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Kazuhito; Sato, Fumio; Mizuno, Akira

    1998-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a large and bright molecular outflow associated with an intense CO clump in the Circinus cloud, which was detected with the CO (J=1--0) emission line using the new Nagoya 4 meter radio telescope ``Nanten'' installed at Las Campanas Observatory (Chile). The outflow is quite large, extending over an area of 10'times20 ' ( ~ 4times8 pc at its distance of 1.26 kpc) that covers most of the clump surface, and having very high radio brightness; actually, the CO brightness of the high velocity wings integrated over the outflow lobes amounts to as high as 1.5*E(-1) K km s(-1) deg(2) , which makes this CO outflow one of the brightest reported so far. The outflow is also massive ( ~ 50 MO ) and energetic ( ~ 4300 MO km(2) s(-2) ). The outflow exhibits a complex morphology, having 2 local peaks at each of the red- and blue-shifted lobes. Comparing the outflow morphology with the locations of the protostellar candidates selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog, we conclude that the detected outflow is most likely to be driven by at least 4 distinct protostars forming in the clump, namely, IRAS 14562-6248, 14563-6301, 14564-6254, and 14568-6304. Thereby, we suggest to designate the CO clump as the ``Nest of Molecular Outflows'' in the Circinus cloud.

  16. Our Understanding of Ion Outflows from Earth and Remaining Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of energetic ion beams and conics by Shelley et al. and transversely accelerated ions by Klumpar in the 1970's heralded the extensive satellite, rocket, and radar observations of ion outflows over the past four decades. This body of observation has shaped our contemporary view on ion outflows and their important role in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The variety of ion outflows may be categorized into thermal and suprathermal outflows. Both categories of outflows are strongly influenced by solar EUV irradiance and solar wind energy input, and the state of the magnetosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere, and (at times) plasmasphere. Several important challenges remain in our quest for a fully quantitative, multi-scale understanding of ion outflows. These include the detection of the lowest-energy ions in the tenuous sunlit magnetosphere; the influence of these hidden ions in the magnetosphere; ion transit between low and high altitudes at quiet times; the role of microscale processes; the simultaneous monitoring of different outflow populations and their circulation and redistributions in the magnetosphere; the influence of solar energy input, the thermosphere and the plasmasphere on outflow composition, characteristics, and variability; and the effects of this variability on the coupling between thermal and suprathermal outflows and on the overall magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  17. Airflow obstruction and mining

    SciTech Connect

    Stenton, S.C.; Hendrick, D.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Bronchitis and emphysema have long been described as diseases of miners, but the precise contribution of occupational exposures to coal and other mine dusts in causing these disorders, as opposed to cofactors such as social class, environmental pollution, and cigarette smoking, has not been fully defined. Epidemiologic studies have attempted, with varying degrees of success, to determine the incidence and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases in miners as compared to the general population. The results from these studies, and those in other nonmining industries with dust exposures, are examined. 98 refs.

  18. Shining a light on star formation driven outflows: the physical conditions within galactic outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John P.; Tremonti, Christina A.; Leitherer, Claus; Wofford, Aida; Chen, Yanmei

    2016-01-01

    Stellar feedback drives energy and momentum into the surrounding gas, which drives gas and metals out of galaxies through a galactic outflow. Unfortunately, galactic outflows are difficult to observe and characterize because they are extremely diffuse, and contain gas at many different temperatures. Here we present results from a sample of 37 nearby (z < 0.27) star forming galaxies observed in the ultraviolet with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample covers over three decades in stellar mass and star formation rate, probing different morphologies such as dwarf irregulars and high-mass merging systems. Using four different UV absorption lines (O I, Si II, Si III and Si IV) that trace a wide range of temperatures (ionization potentials between 13.6 eV and 45 eV), we find shallow correlations between the outflow velocity or the equivalent width of absorption lines with stellar mass or star formation rate. Absorption lines probing different temperature phases have similar centroid velocities and line widths, indicating that they are comoving. Using the equivalent width ratios of the four different transitions, we find the ratios to be consistent with photo-ionized outflows, with moderately strong ionization parameters. By constraining the ionization mechanism we model the ionization fractions for each transition, but find the ionization fractions depend crucially on input model parameters. The shallow velocity scalings imply that low-mass galaxies launch outflows capable of escaping their galactic potential, while higher mass galaxies retain all of their gas, unless they undergo a merger.

  19. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  20. Influence of behavior modification on overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Kathryn L

    2002-11-01

    Behavioral interventions have been used for decades to treat urge incontinence and other symptoms of overactive bladder. Perhaps the earliest form of treatment was the bladder drill, an intensive intervention designed to increase the interval between voids to establish a normal frequency of urination and normalization of bladder function. Bladder training is a modification of bladder drill that is conducted more gradually on an outpatient basis and has resulted in significant reduction of incontinence in older, community-dwelling women. Multicomponent behavioral training is another form of behavioral treatment that includes pelvic floor muscle training and exercise. This intervention focuses less on voiding habits and more on altering the physiologic responses of the bladder and pelvic floor muscles. Using biofeedback or other teaching methods, patients learn strategies to inhibit bladder contraction using pelvic floor muscle contraction and other urge suppression strategies. Although behavioral and drug therapies are known to be highly effective for reducing urge incontinence, few patients are cured with either treatment alone. Thus, future research should explore ways to enhance the effectiveness of these conservative therapies. Although the mechanisms by which behavioral treatments work have not been established, there is some evidence that behavioral and drug interventions may operate by different mechanisms, suggesting that they may have additive effects and that combining them may result in better outcomes. Future research needs to examine the mechanisms by which these therapies reduce incontinence and whether combining behavioral and drug treatment will result in better outcomes than either therapy alone.

  1. IONIZED OUTFLOWS FROM COMPACT STEEP SPECTRUM SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan; Kewley, Lisa E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Massive outflows are known to exist, in the form of extended emission-line regions (EELRs), around about one-third of powerful FR II radio sources. We investigate the origin of these EELRs by studying the emission-line regions around compact-steep-spectrum (CSS) radio galaxies that are younger (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} yr old) versions of the FR II radio galaxies. We have searched for and analyzed the emission-line regions around 11 CSS sources by taking integral field spectra using Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on Gemini North. We fit the [O III] {lambda}5007 line and present the velocity maps for each detected emission-line region. We find, in most cases, that the emission-line regions have multi-component velocity structures with different velocity dispersions and/or flux distributions for each component. The velocity gradients of the emission-line gas are mostly well aligned with the radio axis, suggesting a direct causal link between the outflowing gas and the radio jets. The complex velocity structure may be a result of different driving mechanisms related to the onset of the radio jets. We also present the results from the line-ratio diagnostics we used to analyze the ionization mechanism of the extended gas, which supports the scenario where the emission-line regions are ionized by a combination of active galactic nucleus radiation and shock excitation.

  2. Magnetospheric and Thermospheric Influence on Ionospheric Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sage, K.; Moore, T. E.; Mitchell, E. J.; Olson, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST) small explorer has been used extensively to study ionospheric outflow. Past research has used particle and field data to examine the contemporaneous transfer of electromagnetic energy and particle flow downward from the magnetosphere and upward from the ionosphere. Single event studies published by Strangeway et al. [2005] and Brambles et al. [2011, Supporting Online Material] showed that downward electromagnetic energy and particle flow into the ionosphere are correlated with the upward flow of ions out of the ionosphere. It is expected, however, that this correlation will be affected by circumstances that are unique to each specific event, including but not limited to the outflow location (cusp or nightside), preconditioning due to prior geomagnetic activity, and thermospheric neutral densities. Although knowledge of the thermospheric neutral density is usually unavailable, data from the CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) is able to provide insight into thermospheric populations at altitudes of about 400 km for a few select events. We expand on the previously-mentioned studies by looking at FAST particle and field data for additional events, and we further examine the influence of thermospheric neutral populations, based on CHAMP data.

  3. Treatment for chronic ischaemia-induced bladder detrusor dysfunction using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Ning; Li, Wei-Hong; Shan, Hui; Liu, Ke; Yang, Yong

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of ischaemia-induced bladder dysfunction is not entirely clear, but is thought to be a result of the ischaemia-related M-receptor hypersensitivity to acetylcholine. In addition to nerve injury, ischaemia may cause bladder detrusor fibrosis and urethra de-epithelialization. Bladder dysfunctions caused by bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and aging detrusor were considered to be associated with chronic ischaemia. To date, there has been no effective treatment for the histological and functional changes of the bladder caused by bladder ischaemia. The present study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic ischaemia-induced bladder detrusor dysfunction in an experimental model. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were injected into the common iliac artery of experimental animals, then bilateral iliac arteries were ligated and doxazosin mesylate was intragastrically administered. Eight weeks later, urodynamic examination and intravesical pressure measurements were performed on experimental animals. Histological changes of the taken bladder from sacrificed SD rats were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and trichrome staining and the images captured were analyzed by a software program. The average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the ischaemia group was 16.21±5.26 and 17.26±5.72; those of the experimental group were 24.02±10.06 and 25.84±11.99; the average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the control group was 28.56±4.48 and 29.57±5.01. The average intravesical pressure and detrusor contraction power of the ischaemia group were significantly lower than those of the experimental and control group, while no significant difference was shown between the experimental and control groups. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining for the experimental group was positive. The percentage of the smooth muscle content in

  4. Accretion Disk Outflows from Compact Object Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian

    Nuclear reactions play a key role in the accretion disks and outflows associated with the merger of binary compact objects and the central engines of gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. The proposed research program will investigate the impact of nucleosynthesis on these events and their observable signatures by means of analytic calculations and numerical simulations. One focus of this research is rapid accretion following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a neutron star (NS) or black hole (BH) binary companion. Tidal disruption shreds the WD into a massive torus composed of C, O, and/or He, which undergoes nuclear reactions and burns to increasingly heavier elements as it flows to smaller radii towards the central compact object. The nuclear energy so released is comparable to that released gravitationally, suggesting that burning could drastically alter the structure and stability of the accretion flow. Axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of the torus including nuclear burning will be performed to explore issues such as the mass budget of the flow (accretion vs. outflows) and its thermal stability (steady burning and accretion vs. runaway explosion). The mass, velocity, and composition of outflows from the disk will be used in separate radiative transfer calculations to predict the lightcurves and spectra of the 56Ni-decay powered optical transients from WD-NS/WD-BH mergers. The possible connection of such events to recently discovered classes of sub-luminous Type I supernovae will be assessed. The coalescence of NS-NS/NS-BH binaries also results in the formation of a massive torus surrounding a central compact object. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of such accretion disks will be performed, which for the first time follow the effects of weak interactions and the nuclear energy released by Helium recombination. The nucleosynthetic yield of disk outflows will be calculated using a detailed

  5. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sala Walther, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by an intermittent and repetitive obstruction of the upper respiratory tract during sleep, which leads to a complete (apnea) or partial (hypopnea) block of air flow. It is quite prevalent, being seen in 4-6% of males and 2% of females. Structural abnormalities present in the upper respiratory tract and obesity are the fundamental etiological factors. Clinical manifestations are due to sleep fragmentation and oxygen desaturation which cause the apnea. Day hypersomnia, snoring and episodes of apnea described by the spouse are the three basic symptoms. The diagnosis is based on polysomnography, which can be substituted for a night cardiorespiratory polygraphy. It has an important morbimortality rate, mainly due to traffic and labor accidents, ischemic heart disease and chronic respiratory failure. The treatment is multifactorial. First, eliminating alcohol and hypnotic drugs. Obesity, which is almost always present, must also be corrected. Structural abnormalities of the upper respiratory tract may require a surgical solution. The treatment preferred nowadays is the application of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) while the patient is asleep. It should be considered for those symptomatic patients with an apnea-hypopnea index over 30, or if the index is below 30, than when a respiratory insufficiency or cardiovascular risk factors are present. In some cases surgical procedures may be considered, such as uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

  6. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  7. [Placenta percreta with bladder invasion. Case report].

    PubMed

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Torres Farías, Emigdio; Rodríguez Sandoval, Rosa María

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman, who had two previous caesarean sections, attended for the first time at 18 weeks of gestation. Pelvic ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging showed a placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. A caesarean section was carried out at 27th week of gestation for preterm premature rupture of membranes. Placental tissue was firmly attached to the anterior surface of the bladder. A cesarean hysterectomy was performed with bilateral anterior internal iliac artery ligation before hysterectomy was finished. The bladder was repaired, leaving a suprapubic catheter.

  8. Neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2001-11-01

    Children with a neurological defect have a clear cause for their bladder dysfunction; however, in neurologically normal children the cause of their incontinence is usually unclear. When no anatomical abnormalities seem to be present a functional problem is generally the cause. This type of incontinence is referred to as 'functional incontinence'. The different forms of bladder and sphincter dysfunction will be discussed and treatment modalities described. As the treatment modalities in children with neuropathic bladders focus on medical and especially surgical options, special attention is paid to new developments in surgical treatment. For those with functional incontinence treatment options are more variable and the new developments are described.

  9. Common femoral endovenectomy in conjunction with iliac vein stenting to improve venous inflow in severe post-thrombotic obstruction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Himanshu; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2017-01-01

    Post-thrombotic syndrome secondary to iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis is a significant contributor to advanced chronic venous insufficiency. Iliac vein stenting is a standard procedure to treat iliocaval obstruction. In cases with obstruction extending across the groin, venous inflow for an iliac vein stent may be poor and compromise results of iliac vein stenting. Treatment options include extension of stents across the inguinal ligament that may have limitations in improving inflow only from only one vessel. Endovenectomy in this scenario becomes an attractive option with or without iliac vein stenting to provide outflow to the profunda vein, which otherwise is "axially transformed" in chronic iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. We describe a technique of endovenectomy in combination with iliac vein stenting to establish a patent outflow tract for profunda and femoral veins. Accompanying also is a video demonstration of endovenectomy that will help viewers understand more technical aspects of the procedure.

  10. Ionised outflows in z ~ 2.4 quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: Outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are invoked by galaxy evolutionary models to quench star formation and to explain the origin of the relations observed locally between super-massive black holes and their host galaxies. We here aim to detect extended ionised outflows in luminous quasars, where we expect the highest activity both in star formation and in black-hole accretion. Currently, there are only a few studies based on spatially resolved observations of outflows at high redshift, z > 2. Methods: We analysed a sample of six luminous (L > 1047 erg/s) quasars at z ~ 2.4, observed in H-band using the near-IR integral field spectrometer SINFONI at the VLT. We performed a kinematic analysis of the [Oiii] emission line at λ = 5007 Å. Results: We detect fast, spatially extended outflows in five out of six targets. [Oiii]λ5007 has a complex gas kinematic, with blue-shifted velocities of a few hundreds of km s-1 and line widths up to 1500 km s-1. Using the spectroastrometric method, we infer a size of the ionised outflows of up to ~2 kpc. The properties of the ionised outflows, mass outflow rate, momentum rate, and kinetic power, are correlated with the AGN luminosity. The increase in outflow rate with increasing AGN luminosity is consistent with the idea that a luminous AGN pushes away the surrounding gas through fast outflows that are driven by radiation pressure, which depends on the emitted luminosity. Conclusions: We derive mass outflow rates of about 6-700 M⊙ yr-1 for our sample, which are lower than those observed in molecular outflows. The physical properties of ionised outflows show dependences on AGN luminosity that are similar to those of molecular outflows, but indicate that the mass of ionised gas is lower than that of molecular outflows. Alternatively, this discrepancy between ionised and molecular outflows could be explained with different acceleration mechanisms. Based on Observations collected at the European Organisation for

  11. Measurement of Outflow Facility Using iPerfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Reina-Torres, Ester; Bertrand, Jacques A.; Rowe, Barnaby; Overby, Darryl R.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the predominant risk factor for glaucoma, and reducing IOP is the only successful strategy to prevent further glaucomatous vision loss. IOP is determined by the balance between the rates of aqueous humour secretion and outflow, and a pathological reduction in the hydraulic conductance of outflow, known as outflow facility, is responsible for IOP elevation in glaucoma. Mouse models are often used to investigate the mechanisms controlling outflow facility, but the diminutive size of the mouse eye makes measurement of outflow technically challenging. In this study, we present a new approach to measure and analyse outflow facility using iPerfusion™, which incorporates an actuated pressure reservoir, thermal flow sensor, differential pressure measurement and an automated computerised interface. In enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice, the flow-pressure relationship is highly non-linear and is well represented by an empirical power law model that describes the pressure dependence of outflow facility. At zero pressure, the measured flow is indistinguishable from zero, confirming the absence of any significant pressure independent flow in enucleated eyes. Comparison with the commonly used 2-parameter linear outflow model reveals that inappropriate application of a linear fit to a non-linear flow-pressure relationship introduces considerable errors in the estimation of outflow facility and leads to the false impression of pressure-independent outflow. Data from a population of enucleated eyes from C57BL/6J mice show that outflow facility is best described by a lognormal distribution, with 6-fold variability between individuals, but with relatively tight correlation of facility between fellow eyes. iPerfusion represents a platform technology to accurately and robustly characterise the flow-pressure relationship in enucleated mouse eyes for the purpose of glaucoma research and with minor modifications, may be applied in vivo to mice, as

  12. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  13. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  14. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  15. Differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using 3D textural features: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaopan; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Tian, Qiang; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating bladder tumors from wall tissues is of critical importance for the detection of invasion depth and cancer staging. The textural features embedded in bladder images have demonstrated their potentials in carcinomas detection and classification. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using three-dimensional (3D) textural features extracted from MR bladder images. The widely used 2D Tamura features were firstly wholly extended to 3D, and then different types of 3D textural features including 3D features derived from gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and grey level-gradient co-occurrence matrix (GLGCM), as well as 3D Tamura features, were extracted from 23 volumes of interest (VOIs) of bladder tumors and 23 VOIs of patients' bladder wall. Statistical results show that 30 out of 47 features are significantly different between cancer tissues and wall tissues. Using these features with significant differences between these two types of tissues, classification performance with a supported vector machine (SVM) classifier demonstrates that the combination of three types of selected 3D features outperform that of using only one type of features. All the observations demonstrate that significant textural differences exist between carcinomatous tissues and bladder wall, and 3D textural analysis may be an effective way for noninvasive staging of bladder cancer.

  16. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi; Nørgaard, Mette; Thind, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. Study population All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47%) patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC) and 512 (53%) were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC). A total of 300 (31%) patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50%) received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5) in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31) in 2013. Conclusion This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and monitor treatment and mortality. In the future, DaBlaCa-data will be a valuable data source and expansive observational studies on BC will be available. PMID:27822081

  17. Management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in dogs: a review.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, Christopher M; Knapp, Deborah W

    2015-08-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), also referred to as urothelial carcinoma, is the most common form of urinary bladder cancer in dogs, affecting tens of thousands of dogs worldwide each year. Canine TCC is usually a high grade invasive cancer. Problems associated with TCC include urinary tract obstruction, distant metastases in >50% of affected dogs, and clinical signs that are troubling both to the dogs and to their owners. Risk factors for TCC include exposure to older types of flea control products and lawn chemicals, obesity, female sex, and a very strong breed-associated risk. This knowledge is allowing pet owners to take steps to reduce the risk of TCC in their dog. The diagnosis of TCC is made by histopathology of tissue biopsies obtained by cystoscopy, surgery, or catheter. Percutaneous aspirates and biopsies should be avoided due to the risk of tumor seeding. TCC is most commonly located in the trigone region of the bladder precluding complete surgical resection. Medical treatment is the mainstay for TCC therapy in dogs. Although TCC is not usually curable in dogs, multiple drugs have activity against it. Approximately 75% of dogs respond favorably to TCC treatment and can enjoy several months to a year or more of good quality life. Many promising new therapies for TCC are emerging and with the close similarity between TCC in dogs and high grade invasive bladder cancer in humans, new treatment strategies found to be successful in canine studies are expected to help dogs and to be subsequently translated to humans.

  18. Clouds, Cap, and Consequences: Outflow Events and Mars Hesperian Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, D. L.; Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.; Sloan, L. C.; Asphaug, E.

    2006-03-01

    We focus on how outflows relate to past climate using a MGCM with cloud scheme. Early runs show water goes to the poles with current orbital configurations. We run the model for five years with a northern water ice cap then release the outflow, and will present these results.

  19. Collective outflow from a small multiple stellar system

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klaassen, Pamela D.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Schrön, Martin; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-06-10

    The formation of high-mass stars is usually accompanied by powerful protostellar outflows. Such high-mass outflows are not simply scaled-up versions of their lower-mass counterparts, since observations suggest that the collimation degree degrades with stellar mass. Theoretically, the origins of massive outflows remain open to question because radiative feedback and fragmentation of the accretion flow around the most massive stars, with M > 15 M {sub ☉}, may impede the driving of magnetic disk winds. We here present a three-dimensional simulation of the early stages of core fragmentation and massive star formation that includes a subgrid-scale model for protostellar outflows. We find that stars that form in a common accretion flow tend to have aligned outflow axes, so that the individual jets of multiple stars can combine to form a collective outflow. We compare our simulation to observations with synthetic H{sub 2} and CO observations and find that the morphology and kinematics of such a collective outflow resembles some observed massive outflows, such as Cepheus A and DR 21. We finally compare physical quantities derived from simulated observations of our models to the actual values in the models to examine the reliability of standard methods for deriving physical quantities, demonstrating that those methods indeed recover the actual values to within a factor of two to three.

  20. Fetoscopic laser surgery to decompress distal urethral obstruction caused by prolapsed ureterocele.

    PubMed

    Torres Montebruno, X; Martinez, J M; Eixarch, E; Gómez, O; García Aparicio, L; Castañón, M; Gratacos, E

    2015-11-01

    We report on the successful use of fetoscopic surgery to treat a case of prolapsed ureterocele in a female fetus. At 21 weeks' gestation, a double renal system with an intravesical ureterocele obstructing the bladder outlet was diagnosed, causing severe megacystis, bilateral hydronephrosis and progressive oligohydramnios. Ultrasound evaluation following referral to our center confirmed severe bilateral hydronephrosis with pelvic and calyceal dilatation, but amniotic fluid volume was normal and the ureterocele was not visualized in the bladder. Instead, a cystic mass within the external genitalia was observed, suggestive of a prolapsed ureterocele, causing intermittently severe obstruction of the urethra. The parents were counseled about the uncertain prognosis and fetal surgery to decompress the urinary system was proposed. The procedure involved firing a contact diode laser until perforation of the ureterocele was achieved. Following laser surgery, resolution of megacystis, reduction of hydronephrosis and normalization of amniotic fluid volume were observed. Our report demonstrates that fetoscopic decompression of a distal urethral obstruction is feasible in the rare event of congenital prolapsed ureterocele.

  1. Bladder and bowel dysfunction in children: An update on the diagnosis and treatment of a common, but underdiagnosed pediatric problem

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana Dos; Lopes, Roberto I.; Koyle, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) describes a spectrum of lower urinary symptoms (LUTS) accompanied by fecal elimination issues that manifest primarily by constipation and/or encopresis. This increasingly common entity is a potential cause of significant physical and psychosocial burden for children and families. BBD is commonly associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), which at its extreme may lead to renal scarring and kidney failure. Additionally, BBD is frequently seen in children diagnosed with behavioural and neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Patients with concomitant BBD and neuropsychiatric disorders have less favourable treatment outcomes. Early diagnosis and treatment of BBD are critical to avoid secondary comorbidities that can adversely impact children’s kidney and bladder function, and psychosocial well-being. The majority of patients will improve with urotherapy, adequate fluid intake, and constipation treatment. Pharmacological treatment must only be considered if no improvement occurs after intensive adherence to at least six months of urotherapy ± biofeedback and constipation treatment. Anticholinergics remain the mainstay of medical treatment. Selective alpha-blockers appear to be effective for improving bladder emptying in children with non-neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO), incontinence, recurrent UTIs, and increased post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes. Alpha-1 blockers can also be used in combination with anticholinergics when overactive bladder (OAB) coexists with functional bladder outlet obstruction. Minimally invasive treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA bladder injections, and recently neurostimulation, are promising alternatives for the management of BBD refractory to behavioural and pharmacological treatment. In this review, we discuss clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and indications

  2. FIRE simulations: galactic outflows and their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2016-06-01

    We study gaseous outflows and their consequences in high-resolution galaxy formation simulations with explicit stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. Collective, galaxy scale, effect of stellar feedback results in episodic ejections of large amount of gas and heavy elements into the circum-galactic medium. Gas ejection episodes follow strong bursts of star formation. Properties of galactic star formation and ejection episodes depend on galaxy mass and redshift and, together with gas infall and recycling, shape the evolution of the circum-galactic medium and galaxies. As a consequence, our simulated galaxies have masses, star formation histories and heavy element content in good agreement with the observed population of galaxies.

  3. Ice sculpture in the Martian outflow channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Viking Orbiter and terrestrial satellite images are examined at similar resolution to compare features of the Martian outflow channels with features produced by the movement of ice on earth, and many resemblances are found. These include the anastomoses, sinuosities, and U-shaped cross profiles of valleys; hanging valleys; linear scour marks on valley walls; grooves and ridges on valley floors; and the streamlining of bedrock highs. Attention is given to the question whether ice could have moved in the Martian environment. It is envisaged that springs or small catastrophic outbursts discharged fluids from structural outlets or chaotic terrains. These fluids built icings that may have grown into substantial masses and eventually flowed like glaciers down preexisting valleys. An alternative is that the fluids formed rivers or floods that in turn formed ice jams and consolidated into icy masses in places where obstacles blocked their flow.

  4. Functional Anatomy of the Outflow Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Pizzirani, Stefano; Gong, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The aqueous humor (AH) is the fluid that fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. Its main roles are to provide nourishment and metabolic waste removal to active metabolic ocular structures that are avascular and to contribute maintaining a normal intraocular pressure (IOP) without altering the refractive status of the eye. Its composition and the fluid dynamics associated with its flow are voluble and undergo changes associated with age and disease. Of particular importance is that the resistance to the outflow of AH from the anterior chamber is influenced by morphologic, physiologic, and biochemical dynamic factors.1 Beside aqueous nutritional importance, its solutes also participate in establishing the anterior chamber associate immune deviation, and carry and distribute the different proteins and molecules that promote and direct tissue remodeling and changes in the anterior segment that are associated with both age and disease. PMID:26337760

  5. What controls aqueous humour outflow resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The bulk of aqueous humour outflow resistance is generated in or near the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm's canal in normal eyes, and probably also in glaucomatous eyes. Fluid flow through this region is controlled by the location of the giant vacuoles and pores found in cells of the endothelium of Schlemm's canal, but the flow resistance itself is more likely generated either in the extracellular matrix of the juxtacanalicular connective tissue or the basement membrane of Schlemm's canal. Future studies utilizing in vitro perfusion studies of inner wall endothelial cells may give insights into the process by which vacuoles and pores form in this unique endothelium and why inner wall pore density is greatly reduced in glaucoma. PMID:16386733

  6. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from nonrelativistic quasar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiawei; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that nonrelativistic outflows from quasars can naturally account for the missing component of the extragalactic γ -ray background and explain the cumulative neutrino background through pion decay in collisions between protons accelerated by the outflow shock and interstellar protons. Here, we show that the same quasar outflows are capable of accelerating protons to energies of ˜1020 eV during the early phase of their propagation. The overall quasar population is expected to produce a cumulative ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray flux of ˜10-7 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 at ECR≳1018 eV . The spectral shape and amplitude are consistent with recent observations for outflow parameters constrained to fit secondary γ rays and neutrinos without any additional parameter tuning. This indicates that quasar outflows simultaneously account for all three messengers at their observed levels.

  7. Cystometric analysis of the transplanted bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Cystometric evaluation of the bladder after autotransplant and isogeneic transplant in female rats. Material and Methods Two groups were constituted: (A) bladder autotransplant with two subgroups: R1 – (control) and R2 – (bladder transplant); (B) isogeneic bladder transplant with three subgroups; T1 – (control); T2–T3, two subgroups observed for 30 and 60 days after transplant, respectively. All animals underwent cystometric evaluation. Afterwards, the bladders were removed for histological study. Results The transplanted bladders did not show significant changes in filling/storage and emptying/micturition functions after 30 and 60 days of evolution. Upon macroscopical evaluation, there was good revascularization and the tissue was well preserved. Cystometry results: Did not show significant differences in the micturition pressure in subgroups T2-T3, but did between subgroups R1−R2, T1−T2, and T1−T3. Significant differences were verified in the micturition interval between T1−T3, T2−T3, but not between R1−R2, T1−T2. There was significant difference in the micturition duration between T1−T3 but not between R1−R2, T1−T2 and T2−T3. No fistula was noted on the suture site nor leakage of urine in the abdominal cavity or signs of necrosis or retraction were observed. Conclusions Transplant of the bladder was shown to be a viable procedure. The results indicate that there was structural and functional regeneration of transplanted bladders, and these results indicate that it is possible that vascular endothelium growth and neurogenesis factors are involved and activated in the process of the preservation or survival of the transplanted organ. PMID:28124533

  8. [Management of neuropathic bladder in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, A; Patti, F; Reggio, A

    2004-05-01

    It is estimated that almost 70% of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from urinary symptoms, with devastant impact on Quality of Life (QoL). The major aims of management should be to ameliorate the patients quality of life and to prevent the frequent complications of bladder dysfunction such as infention and renal damage. Therapy can usually eliminate or reduce the symptoms of neuropathic bladder. In the following pages is discussed the complex management of urinary symptoms in MS patients.

  9. Optically thick outflows in ultraluminous supersoft sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, R.; Soria, R.

    2016-02-01

    Ultraluminous supersoft sources (ULSs) are defined by a thermal spectrum with colour temperatures ˜0.1 keV, bolometric luminosities ˜ a few 1039 erg s-1, and almost no emission above 1 keV. It has never been clear how they fit into the general scheme of accreting compact objects. To address this problem, we studied a sample of seven ULSs with extensive Chandra and XMM-Newton coverage. We find an anticorrelation between fitted temperatures and radii of the thermal emitter, and no correlation between bolometric luminosity and radius or temperature. We compare the physical parameters of ULSs with those of classical supersoft sources, thought to be surface-nuclear-burning white dwarfs, and of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), thought to be super-Eddington stellar-mass black holes. We argue that ULSs are the sub-class of ULXs seen through the densest wind, perhaps an extension of the soft-ultraluminous regime. We suggest that in ULSs, the massive disc outflow becomes effectively optically thick and forms a large photosphere, shrouding the inner regions from our view. Our model predicts that when the photosphere expands to ≳ 105 km and the temperature decreases below ≈50 eV, ULSs become brighter in the far-UV but undetectable in X-rays. Conversely, we find that harder emission components begin to appear in ULSs when the fitted size of the thermal emitter is smallest (interpreted as a shrinking of the photosphere). The observed short-term variability and absorption edges are also consistent with clumpy outflows. We suggest that the transition between ULXs (with a harder tail) and ULSs (with only a soft thermal component) occurs at blackbody temperatures of ≈150 eV.

  10. Outflow Collimation in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Frank, A.

    1993-05-01

    Recent results of long-slit spectroscopy of the forbidden lines of the outflow in the young star DG Tau [7] suggest that its wind is well collimated very close to it, leading to the formation of its jet. The analysis of the width of stellar jets, on the other hand, seems to indicate that the collimation of the jets takes place at larger scales [5]. In other to understand this discrepancy, we are studying by means of a two dimensional hydrodynamical code [1][3], the collimation driven by the interaction of the stellar wind with the surrounding density structure left by the star formation process [8][9]. We have found in our adiabatic outflow simulations (using physical parameters similar to those for the HH 34 bipolar stellar jet [2]) that a spherical wind is well collimated near the source resembling a de Laval Nozzle [4][6]. ANC research is supported by NSF grant AST-91-14888. \\ References [1] Frank, A. 1992, PhD Thesis, University of Washington. [2] Heathcote, S. & Reipurth, B. 1992, AJ 104, 2193. [3] Icke, V., 1988 A&A 202, 177. [4] Konigl, A. 1982, ApJ 261, 115. [5] Mundt, R., Ray, T.P., & Raga, A.C. 1991, A&A 252, 740. [6] Raga A.C., & Canto, J. 1989, ApJ 344, 404. [7] Solf, J., & Bohm, K.H. 1993, ApJL (in press). [8] Terebey, S., Shu, F.H., & Cassen, P. 1984, ApJ 286, 529. [9] Yorke, H.W., Bodenheimer, P., & Laughlin, G. 1993, ApJ (in press).

  11. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  12. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  14. [Intravesical treatment of overactive bladder syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, A; Hohenfellner, M

    2006-10-01

    Overactive bladder and urgency incontinence are common conditions generally treated with oral anticholinergic medication. Despite the development of new antimuscarinic substances, many patients are refractory to or cannot tolerate the oral therapy due to severe side effects. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative method to manage detrusor overactivity. Intravesical instillation of anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trospium chloride can achieve cholinergic blockade without producing systemic side effects. Botulinum toxin type A injections into the detrusor have been shown to increase bladder capacity and to decrease detrusor overactivity for 6 or more months. Intravesical local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine block the conduction of unmyelinated C fibers which results in an increase of functional bladder capacity. Intravesical capsaicin and resiniferatoxin also affect the afferent C fiber innervation of the bladder, leading to a decrease in detrusor overactivity and also an increased bladder capacity. The use of intravesical anticholinergics and of local anesthetic medications, both known for their short-term efficacy, is limited due to the necessity of daily intermittent catheterization. In conclusion, intravesical therapies can provide an alternative treatment for the management of overactive bladder.

  15. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E.; Brown, Nigel A.; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  16. A distance-limited sample of massive molecular outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maud, L. T.; Moore, T. J. T.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Hoare, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    We have observed 99 mid-infrared-bright, massive young stellar objects and compact H II regions drawn from the Red MSX source survey in the J = 3-2 transition of 12CO and 13CO, using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. 89 targets are within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a representative range of luminosities and core masses. These constitute a relatively unbiased sample of bipolar molecular outflows associated with massive star formation. Of these, 59, 17 and 13 sources (66, 19 and 15 per cent) are found to have outflows, show some evidence of outflow, and have no evidence of outflow, respectively. The time-dependent parameters of the high-velocity molecular flows are calculated using a spatially variable dynamic time-scale. The canonical correlations between the outflow parameters and source luminosity are recovered and shown to scale with those of low-mass sources. For coeval star formation, we find the scaling is consistent with all the protostars in an embedded cluster providing the outflow force, with massive stars up to ˜30 M⊙ generating outflows. Taken at face value, the results support the model of a scaled-up version of the accretion-related outflow-generation mechanism associated with discs and jets in low-mass objects with time-averaged accretion rates of ˜10-3 M⊙ yr-1 on to the cores. However, we also suggest an alternative model, in which the molecular outflow dynamics are dominated by the entrained mass and are unrelated to the details of the acceleration mechanism. We find no evidence that outflows contribute significantly to the turbulent kinetic energy of the surrounding dense cores.

  17. Evolution of active region outflows throughout an active region lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrilli, L.; Poletto, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have shown previously that SOHO/UVCS data allow us to detect active region (AR) outflows at coronal altitudes higher than those reached by other instrumentation. These outflows are thought to be a component of the slow solar wind. Aims: Our purpose is to study the evolution of the outflows in the intermediate corona from AR 8100, from the time the AR first forms until it dissolves, after several transits at the solar limb. Methods: Data acquired by SOHO/UVCS at the time of the AR limb transits, at medium latitudes and at altitudes ranging from 1.5 to 2.3 R⊙, were used to infer the physical properties of the outflows through the AR evolution. To this end, we applied the Doppler dimming technique to UVCS spectra. These spectra include the H i Lyα line and the O vi doublet lines at 1031.9 and 1037.6 Å. Results: Plasma speeds and electron densities of the outflows were inferred over several rotations of the Sun. AR outflows are present in the newly born AR and persist throughout the entire AR life. Moreover, we found two types of outflows at different latitudes, both possibly originating in the same negative polarity area of the AR. We also analyzed the behavior of the Si xii 520 Å line along the UVCS slit in an attempt to reveal changes in the Si abundance when different regions are traversed. Although we found some evidence for a Si enrichment in the AR outflows, alternative interpretations are also plausible. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that outflows from ARs are detectable in the intermediate corona throughout the whole AR lifetime. This confirms that outflows contribute to the slow wind.

  18. Modeling the Causal Regulation of Transversely Accelerated Ion (TAI) Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Zhang, B.; Schmitt, P.; Lotko, W.

    2013-12-01

    TAIs are generated by wave particle interactions driven by waves at temporal and spatial scales which are inaccessible in global coupled geospace models. So far attempts to include TAI outflows in global models have focused on the use of empirical correlations between observed outflow fluxes and various inputs such as DC Poynting flux, Alfvénic Poynting flux, and electron precipitation fluxes. These treatments ignore feedbacks between the outflow and the state of the ionosphere and assume the spatial and temporal distributions of the outflows are identical to those of their drivers. This work presents an alternative approach which can overcome these deficiencies while still being sufficiently computationally efficient to couple into a global modeling framework. TAIs are incorporated into a 3-D fluid model of the ionosphere and polar wind by modeling them as a separate fluid which obeys transport equations appropriate for monoenergetic conic distributions. The characteristics of the TAI outflow produced depend on the assumed transverse heating rates and the 'promotion rate' which connects the TAI fluid to the thermal O+ fluid. Using drivers extracted from runs of the Coupled Magnetosphere Ionosphere Thermosphere (CMIT) model, different strategies for causally regulating these free parameters are explored. The model can reproduce many of the observed features of TAI outflows but also exhibits physical attributes that empirical relationships alone miss. These characteristics include flux limiting of the outflow from below when intense outflow creates high-altitude cavities, time delays between the onset of transverse heating and the appearance of outflow, and spatial distributions of outflow which are different from the spatial distributions of the applied transverse heating and which depend on the ionospheric convection pattern.

  19. Impact of left ventricular outflow tract area on systolic outflow velocity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a real-time three-dimensional echocardiographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jian Xin; Shiota, Takahiro; Lever, Harry M.; Rubin, David N.; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Sitges, Marta; Greenberg, Neil L.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Martin, Maureen; Agler, Deborah A.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to use real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) to investigate the quantitative relation between minimal left ventricular (LV) outflow tract area (A(LVOT)) and maximal LV outflow tract (LVOT) velocity in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HCM). BACKGROUND: In patients with HCM, LVOT velocity should change inversely with minimal A(LVOT) unless LVOT obstruction reduces the pumping capacity of the ventricle. METHODS: A total of 25 patients with HCM with systolic anterior motion (SAM) of the mitral valve leaflets underwent real-time 3DE. The smallest A(LVOT) during systole was measured using anatomically oriented two-dimensional "C-planes" within the pyramidal 3DE volume. Maximal velocity across LVOT was evaluated by two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography (2DE). For comparison with 3DE A(LVOT), the SAM-septal distance was determined by 2DE. RESULTS: Real-time 3DE provided unique information about the dynamic SAM-septal relation during systole, with A(LVOT) ranging from 0.6 to 5.2 cm(2) (mean: 2.2 +/- 1.4 cm(2)). Maximal velocity (v) correlated inversely with A(LVOT) (v = 496 A(LVOT)(-0.80), r = -0.95, p < 0.001), but the exponent (-0.80) was significantly different from -1.0 (95% confidence interval: -0.67 to -0.92), indicating a significant impact of small A(LVOT) on the peak LVOT flow rate. By comparison, the best correlation between velocity and 2DE SAM-septal distance was significantly (p < 0.01) poorer at -0.83, indicating the superiority of 3DE for assessing A(LVOT). CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional echocardiography-measured A(LVOT) provides an assessment of HCM geometry that is superior to 2DE methods. These data indicate that the peak LVOT flow rate appears to be significantly decreased by reduced A(LVOT). Real-time 3DE is a potentially valuable clinical tool for assessing patients with HCM.

  20. Spectrum of MDCT Findings in Bowel Obstruction in a Tertiary Care Rural Hospital in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranjana; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Sharad; Mittal, Kapish; Taneja, Arpit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) provides clinically and surgically important information in bowel obstruction. It can depict the severity, level and cause of obstruction. Aim To depict the spectrum of MDCT findings in cases of small and large bowel obstruction. Materials and Methods Contrast enhanced MDCT examination of 50 patients were retrospectively included in the study who had evidence of clinical as well as MDCT evidence of bowel obstruction and in whom surgical/clinical follow-up for final diagnosis was available. CT scan was done in all the patients with Ingenuity CT (128 slice MDCT, Philips Medical Systems). The axial sections were reconstructed in coronal and sagital planes to determine site and cause of bowel obstruction. Results There were 34 males and 16 females patients in this study with mean age of 28.4 years. The level of obstruction was in small bowel in 39 patients (76.67%) and large bowel in 11 patients (23.33%). Adhesive bands were the cause of Small Bowel Obstruction (SBO) in 17 patients (43.5% of SBO patients). The most common CT signs in adhesive band SBO were beak sign (seen in 70.6% patients) and fat notch sign (52.9% patients). Five cases of SBO were secondary to benign stricture. Matted adhesions were the cause of obstruction in 3 patients. All these patients showed transition zone in pelvis with positive small bowel faeces sign. Two patients with SBO due to adhesive band had evidence of closed loop obstruction with evidence of gangrenous gut on surgery. Large Bowel Obstruction (LBO) was seen in 11 patients. Most common cause of LBO was primary colonic malignancy, accounting for 7 patients (63.6%). In one patient, the cause was direct invasion of hepatic flexure by carcinoma of gall bladder. Other causes of LBO were pelvic adhesions, faecal impaction and ischaemic stricture. Conclusion SBO is more common than LBO with adhesive bands being the most common cause of SBO. MDCT is very useful for depicting site and cause

  1. Influence of ion outflow in coupled geospace simulations: 2. Sawtooth oscillations driven by physics-based ion outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M.; Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Lyon, J.

    2016-10-01

    We present the first simulations of magnetospheric sawtooth oscillations under steady solar wind conditions that are driven internally by heavy ion outflow from a physics-based model. The simulations presented use the multifluid Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamics model two-way coupled to the ionosphere/polar wind model (IPWM). Depending on the type of wave-particle interactions utilized within IPWM, the coupled simulations exhibit either sawtooth oscillations or steady magnetospheric convection. Contrasting the simulations that do and do not develop sawtooth oscillations yields insights into the relationship between outflow and sawtooth oscillations. The total outflow rate is not an adequate predictor of the convection mode that will emerge. The simulations that develop sawtooth oscillations are characterized by intense outflow concentrated in the midnight auroral region. This outflow distribution mass loads the tail reconnection region without excessively mass loading the dayside reconnection region and leads to an imbalance between the dayside and nightside reconnection rates.

  2. Bladder explosion during transurethral resection of prostate: Bladder diverticula as an additional risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, D. Paul

    2017-01-01

    Vesical explosion during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is a very rare occurrence. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. The literature was reviewed pertaining to the etiology of bladder explosion during transurethral resection. The underlying mechanism for intravesical explosion is the generation and trapping of explosive gasses under the dome of the bladder which eventually detonates when it comes into contact with the cautery electrode during TURP. Various techniques have been suggested to prevent this dreaded complication. A 75-year-old male with chronic retention of urine underwent TURP. There was Grade 2 trilobar enlargement of the prostate. There were multiple diverticula with one large diverticulum in the dome of the bladder. During hemostasis, there was a loud pop sound and the bladder exploded. Lower midline laparotomy was performed and the intraperitoneal bladder rupture was repaired. He had an uneventful postoperative recovery, and he is asymptomatic at 6 months of follow-up. Even though all the precautions were taken to avoid this complication, bladder rupture was encountered. The presence of multiple diverticula is being suggested as an additional risk factor for this complication as the bladder is thinned out and also possibly due to trapping of air bubble within the diverticulum. In such cases where there are multiple bladder diverticula, the employment of a suprapubic trocar for continuous drainage of the air bubble, could well be a practical consideration. PMID:28216933

  3. Treatment of ureteral calculus obstruction with laser lithotripsy in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Todd L; Sur, Roger L

    2012-03-01

    An adult female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) presented with acute anorexia secondary to progressive azotemia (blood urea nitrogen = 213 mg/dl, creatinine [Cr] = 9.5 mg/dl) and electrolyte abnormalities (K = 7.4 mEq/L). It was later diagnosed with postrenal obstruction secondary to bilaterally obstructing ureteral calculi seen on ultrasound. Treatment of the obstruction required two endoscopic procedures, cystoscopy for ureteral stent placement and ureteroscopy to perform intracorporeal lithotripsy on the obstructing calculi. Before the first procedure, the dolphin's azotemia was stabilized with aggressive fluid therapy, peritoneal dialysis, and treatment for acidosis. Diuresis subsequent to the fluid therapy enabled passage of the right obstructing urolith. For both endoscopic procedures, the dolphin was placed in left lateral recumbency due to the peritoneal dialysis catheter in the right retroperitoneal region. For the first procedure, a 12-French (Fr) flexible cystoscope was inserted retrograde into the bladder via the urethra, whereupon a calculus was seen obstructing the left ureteral orifice. A 4.8-Fr, 26-cm double-pigtail ureteral stent was placed up the left ureter to relieve the postrenal obstruction. Inadvertent proximal migration of the left ureteral stent occurred during the procedure. However, renal parameters (serum Cr = 5.8, K = 5.4) improved significantly by the next day. For the second procedure, 28 hr later, ureteroscopy was performed to treat the calculus and replace the existing stent with a longer stent. The left ureteral calculus was pulverized into tiny fragments by using a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through a 6.9-Fr semirigid ureteroscope. The migrated stent was visualized in the distal left ureter and replaced with a 90-cm single-pigtail ureteral stent that was sutured exterior to the urogenital slit and removed 3 days later. Renal function normalized over the next several days, and the dolphin recovered over

  4. Molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars. I. Correcting for underestimates when measuring outflow masses and dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Héctor G.; Mardones, Diego; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Matthews, Brenda C.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a survey of 28 molecular outflows driven by low-mass protostars, all of which are sufficiently isolated spatially and/or kinematically to fully separate into individual outflows. Using a combination of new and archival data from several single-dish telescopes, 17 outflows are mapped in {sup 12}CO (2-1) and 17 are mapped in {sup 12}CO (3-2), with 6 mapped in both transitions. For each outflow, we calculate and tabulate the mass (M {sub flow}), momentum (P {sub flow}), kinetic energy (E {sub flow}), mechanical luminosity (L {sub flow}), and force (F {sub flow}) assuming optically thin emission in LTE at an excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, of 50 K. We show that all of the calculated properties are underestimated when calculated under these assumptions. Taken together, the effects of opacity, outflow emission at low velocities confused with ambient cloud emission, and emission below the sensitivities of the observations increase outflow masses and dynamical properties by an order of magnitude, on average, and factors of 50-90 in the most extreme cases. Different (and non-uniform) excitation temperatures, inclination effects, and dissociation of molecular gas will all work to further increase outflow properties. Molecular outflows are thus almost certainly more massive and energetic than commonly reported. Additionally, outflow properties are lower, on average, by almost an order of magnitude when calculated from the {sup 12}CO (3-2) maps compared to the {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps, even after accounting for different opacities, map sensitivities, and possible excitation temperature variations. It has recently been argued in the literature that the {sup 12}CO (3-2) line is subthermally excited in outflows, and our results support this finding.

  5. CT of gastro-duodenal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Millet, I; Doyon, F Curros; Pages, E; Faget, C; Zins, M; Taourel, P

    2015-10-01

    Gastro-duodenal obstruction encompasses a spectrum of benign and malignant disease. Historically, chronic peptic ulcer disease was the main cause of gastro-duodenal obstruction, whereas now malignant cause with gastric carcinomas for gastric obstruction and pancreatic tumors for duodenal obstruction predominate. This paper reviews the role of CT in diagnosing gastro-duodenal obstruction, its level, its cause by identifying intraluminal, parietal, or extrinsic process, and the presence of complication.

  6. Aquaporin-1 Expression and Conventional Aqueous Outflow in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, W. Daniel; Chan, Darren W.H.; Conley, Shannon M.; Coons, Serena; Ethier, C. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin channels facilitate the enhanced permeability of secretory and absorptive tissues to water. In the conventional drainage tract, aquaporin-1 is expressed but its contribution to outflow facility is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of elevated aquaporin-1 expression by cells of the human conventional drainage pathway on outflow facility. Using thirteen pairs of human anterior segments in organ culture, we modified aquaporin-1 protein expression in outflow cells using adenovirus encoding human aquaporin-1. Contralateral anterior segments served as controls and were transduced with adenovirus encoding beta galactosidase. By confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that inner trabecular meshwork cells from anterior segments exposed to adenovirus (via injection into the inlet tubing during perfusion) had increased aquaporin-1 protein expression compared to endogenous levels. In contrast, elevation of aquaporin-1 protein in outer meshwork cells (juxtacanalicular region) and Schlemm’s canal required transduction of adenovirus into anterior segments using retroperfusion via episcleral veins. Regardless of exposure route, outflow facility of experimental segments was not different than control. Specifically, overexpression of aquaporin-1 in the inner meshwork resulted in an average facility change of −2.0 ± 9.2 %, while overexpression of aquaporin-1 in the resistance-generating region changed outflow facility by −3.2 ± 11.2 %. Taken together, these results indicate that a transcellular pathway, mediated by aquaporin-1, does not contribute significantly to bulk outflow through the conventional aqueous outflow tract of human eyes. PMID:18657536

  7. Scaling Relations Between Warm Galactic Outflows and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei; Wofford, Aida; Lundgren, Britt

    2015-10-01

    We report on a sample of 48 nearby, star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We measure the kinematics of warm gas in galactic outflows using a combination of four Si ii absorption lines. We use multi-wavelength ancillary data to estimate stellar masses (M*), star formation rates (SFR), circular velocities (vcirc), and morphologies. The galaxies cover four orders of magnitude in M* and SFR, and sample a wide range of morphologies from starbursting mergers to normal star-forming galaxies. We derive 3.0-3.5σ relations between outflow velocity and SFR, M*, and vcirc. The outflow velocities scale as SFR0.08-0.22, {M}*0.12-0.20 and {v}{circ}0.44-0.87, with the range depending on whether we use a maximum or a central velocity to quantify the outflow velocity. After accounting for their increased SFR, mergers drive 32% faster outflows than non-merging galaxies, with all of the highest velocity outflows arising from mergers. Low-mass galaxies (log(M*/ M⊙) < 10.5) lose some low-ionization gas through galactic outflows, while more massive galaxies retain all of their low-ionization gas, unless they undergo a merger.

  8. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOWS AND RADIATIVE FEEDBACK FROM MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, Rolf; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J. E-mail: Harold.W.Yorke@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-02-20

    We carry out radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the formation of massive stars in the super-Eddington regime including both their radiative feedback and protostellar outflows. The calculations start from a prestellar core of dusty gas and continue until the star stops growing. The accretion ends when the remnants of the core are ejected, mostly by the force of the direct stellar radiation in the polar direction and elsewhere by the reradiated thermal infrared radiation. How long the accretion persists depends on whether the protostellar outflows are present. We set the mass outflow rate to 1% of the stellar sink particle's accretion rate. The outflows open a bipolar cavity extending to the core's outer edge, through which the thermal radiation readily escapes. The radiative flux is funneled into the polar directions while the core's collapse proceeds near the equator. The outflow thus extends the ''flashlight effect'', or anisotropic radiation field, found in previous studies from the few hundred AU scale of the circumstellar disk up to the 0.1 parsec scale of the core. The core's flashlight effect allows core gas to accrete on the disk for longer, in the same way that the disk's flashlight effect allows disk gas to accrete on the star for longer. Thus although the protostellar outflows remove material near the core's poles, causing slower stellar growth over the first few free-fall times, they also enable accretion to go on longer in our calculations. The outflows ultimately lead to stars of somewhat higher mass.

  9. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ∼270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (∼100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (≲ 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  10. The link between vascular dysfunction, bladder ischemia, and aging bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Boedtkjer, Donna B.; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vascular supply to the human bladder is derived mainly from the superior and inferior vesical arteries, the latter being directly connected to the internal iliac artery. Aging is associated with an impairment of blood vessel function and changes may occur in the vasculature at the molecular, cellular and functional level. Pelvic arterial insufficiency may play an important role in the development of bladder dysfunctions such as detrusor overactivity (DO) and the overactive bladder syndrome. Chronic ischemia-related bladder dysfunction may progress to bladder underactivity and it would be desirable to treat not only lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) induced by chronic ischemia, but also the progression of the morphological bladder changes. Studies in experimental models in rabbits and rats have shown that pelvic arterial insufficiency may result in significant bladder ischemia with reduced bladder wall oxygen tension. In turn, this will lead to oxidative stress associated with upregulation of oxidative stress-sensitive genes, increased muscarinic receptor activity, ultrastructural damage, and neurodegeneration. The phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor tadalafil, the α1-adrenoceptor (AR) blocker silodosin, the β3-AR agonist mirabegron, and the free radical scavenger melatonin, exerted a protecting effect on urodynamic parameters, and on functional and morphological changes of the bladder demonstrable in vitro. Since the agents tested are used clinically for relieving LUTS, the results from the animal models seem to have translational value, and may be of relevance for designing clinical studies to demonstrate if the drugs may prevent progression of ischemia-related functional and morphological bladder changes. PMID:28042309

  11. Transcriptional and translational plasticity in rodent urinary bladder TRP channels with urinary bladder inflammation, bladder dysfunction, or postnatal maturation.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Liana; Girard, Beatrice M; May, Victor; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2012-11-01

    These studies examined the transcriptional and translational plasticity of three transient receptor potential (TRP) channels (TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4) with established neuronal and non-neuronal expression and functional roles in the lower urinary tract. Mechanosensor and nociceptor roles in either physiological or pathological lower urinary tract states have been suggested for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4. We have previously demonstrated the neurochemical, organizational, and functional plasticity in micturition reflex pathways following induction of urinary bladder inflammation using the antineoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide. More recently, we have characterized similar plasticity in micturition reflex pathways in a transgenic mouse model with chronic urothelial overexpression (OE) of nerve growth factor (NGF) and in a transgenic mouse model with deletion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). In addition, the micturition reflex undergoes postnatal maturation that may also reflect plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression. Thus, we examined plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression in diverse contexts using a combination of quantitative, real-time PCR and western blotting approaches. We demonstrate transcriptional and translational plasticity of urinary bladder TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRVP4 expression. Although the functional significance of urinary bladder TRP channel plasticity awaits further investigation, these studies demonstrate context- (inflammation, postnatal development, NGF-OE, VIP deletion) and tissue-dependent (urothelium + suburothelium, detrusor) plasticity.

  12. Large rhinolith causing nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dincer Kose, Onur; Kose, Taha Emre; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2015-01-01

    Rhinoliths are calcified masses located in the nasal cavity and may cause symptoms such as nasal obstruction, fetid odour and facial pain. They are usually diagnosed incidentally on radiographic examinations or depending on the symptoms. In this paper we report a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a calcified mass in the right nasal cavity causing nasal obstruction, anosmia and facial pain. The calcified mass was removed by endonasal approach. PMID:25759270

  13. Obstructive sleep apnoea and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, T.; Sengupta, S.; Maitra, G.; Kumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) correlates positively with obesity and age, both of which are becoming increasingly prevalent. Obstructive sleep apnoea occurs much more frequently in clinical practice than formerly diagnosed, and that this condition represents complex challenges for difficulty in mask ventilation, laryngoscopic intubation, accelerated arterial desaturation, postoperative monitoring and discharge status. In this review article pathophysiology, diagnosis, and perioperative management of this group of patients have been discussed in detail. PMID:19742249

  14. Relationship between Schistosomiasis and Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, M. H.; Sheweita, S. A.; O’Connor, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma of the urinary bladder is the most common malignancy in the Middle East and parts of Africa where schistosomiasis is a widespread problem. Much evidence supports the association between schistosomiasis and bladder cancer: this includes the geographical correlation between the two conditions, the distinctive patterns of gender and age at diagnosis, the clinicopathological identity of schistosome-associated bladder cancer, and extensive evidence in experimentally infected animals. Multiple factors have been suggested as causative agents in schistosome-associated bladder carcinogenesis. Of these, N-nitroso compounds appear to be of particular importance since they were found at high levels in the urine of patients with schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Various strains of bacteria that can mediate nitrosation reactions leading to the formation of N-nitrosamines have been identified in the urine of subjects with schistosomiasis at higher intensities of infection than in normal subjects. In experimental schistosomiasis, the activities of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes are increased soon after infection but are reduced again during the later chronic stages of the disease. Not only could this prolong the period of exposure to activated N-nitrosamines, but also inflammatory cells, sitmulated as a result of the infection, may induce the endogenous synthesis of N-nitrosamines as well as generating oxygen radicals. Higher than normal levels of host cell DNA damage are therefore anticipated, and they have indeed been observed in the case of alkylation damage, together with an inefficiency in the capacity of relevant enzymes to repair this damaged DNA. In experimental schistosomiasis, it was also found that endogenous levels of host cell DNA damage were related to the intensity of infection. All of these factors could contribute to an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients with schistosomiasis, and in particular, the gene changes observed may have

  15. Contribution of alluvial groundwater to the outflow of mountainous catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käser, Daniel; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Alluvial aquifers in mountainous regions cover typically a limited area. Their contribution to catchment storage and outflow is rarely isolated; alluvial groundwater discharge under gauging stations is generally assumed negligible; and hydrological models tend to lump alluvial storage with other units. The role of alluvial aquifers remains therefore unclear: can they contribute significantly to outflow when they cover a few percent of catchment area? Should they be considered a dynamic storage unit or merely a transmission zone? We address these issues based on the continuous monitoring of groundwater discharge, river discharge (one year), and aquifer storage (6 months) in the 6 km2 alluvial system of a 194 km2 catchment. River and groundwater outflow were measured jointly through "coupled gauging stations." The contribution of alluvial groundwater to outflow was highest at the outlet of a subcatchment (52 km2), where subsurface discharge amounted to 15% of mean annual outflow, and 85% of outflow during the last week of a drought. In this period, alluvial-aquifer depletion supported 75% of the subcatchment outflow and 35% of catchment outflow—thus 3% of the entire catchment supported a third of the outflow. Storage fluctuations occurred predominantly in the aquifer's upstream part, where heads varied over 6 m. Not only does this section act as a significant water source, but storage recovers also rapidly at the onset of precipitation. Storage dynamics were best conceptualized along the valley axis, rather than across the more conventional riparian-channel transect. Overall the contribution of alluvial aquifers to catchment outflow deserves more attention.

  16. The trabecular meshwork outflow pathways: structural and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Ernst R

    2009-04-01

    The major drainage structures for aqueous humor (AH) are the conventional or trabecular outflow pathways, which are comprised of the trabecular meshwork (made up by the uveal and corneoscleral meshworks), the juxtacanalicular connective tissue (JCT), the endothelial lining of Schlemm's canal (SC), the collecting channels and the aqueous veins. The trabecular meshwork (TM) outflow pathways are critical in providing resistance to AH outflow and in generating intraocular pressure (IOP). Outflow resistance in the TM outflow pathways increases with age and primary open-angle glaucoma. Uveal and corneoscleral meshworks form connective tissue lamellae or beams that are covered by flat TM cells which rest on a basal lamina. TM cells in the JCT are surrounded by fibrillar elements of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to form a loose connective tissue. In contrast to the other parts of the TM, JCT cells and ECM fibrils do not form lamellae, but are arranged more irregularly. SC inner wall endothelial cells form giant vacuoles in response to AH flow, as well as intracellular and paracellular pores. In addition, minipores that are covered with a diaphragm are observed. There is considerable evidence that normal AH outflow resistance resides in the inner wall region of SC, which is formed by the JCT and SC inner wall endothelium. Modulation of TM cell tone by the action of their actomyosin system affects TM outflow resistance. In addition, the architecture of the TM outflow pathways and consequently outflow resistance appear to be modulated by contraction of ciliary muscle and scleral spur cells. The scleral spur contains axons that innervate scleral spur cells or that have the ultrastructural characteristics of mechanosensory nerve endings.

  17. Outflow and hot dust emission in broad absorption line quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shaohua; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Tinggui; Xing, Feijun; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Kai E-mail: whywang@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated a sample of 2099 broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with z = 1.7-2.2 built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Seven and the Wide-field Infrared Survey. This sample is collected from two BAL quasar samples in the literature and is refined by our new algorithm. Correlations of outflow velocity and strength with a hot dust indicator (β{sub NIR}) and other quasar physical parameters—such as an Eddington ratio, luminosity, and a UV continuum slope—are explored in order to figure out which parameters drive outflows. Here β{sub NIR} is the near-infrared continuum slope, which is a good indicator of the amount of hot dust emission relative to the accretion disk emission. We confirm previous findings that outflow properties moderately or weakly depend on the Eddington ratio, UV slope, and luminosity. For the first time, we report moderate and significant correlations of outflow strength and velocity with β{sub NIR} in BAL quasars. It is consistent with the behavior of blueshifted broad emission lines in non-BAL quasars. The statistical analysis and composite spectra study both reveal that outflow strength and velocity are more strongly correlated with β{sub NIR} than the Eddington ratio, luminosity, and UV slope. In particular, the composites show that the entire C IV absorption profile shifts blueward and broadens as β{sub NIR} increases, while the Eddington ratio and UV slope only affect the high and low velocity part of outflows, respectively. We discuss several potential processes and suggest that the dusty outflow scenario, i.e., that dust is intrinsic to outflows and may contribute to the outflow acceleration, is most likely.

  18. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gabbard, Scott L; Lacy, Brian E

    2013-06-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a rare and serious disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized as a motility disorder with the primary defect of impaired peristalsis; symptoms are consistent with a bowel obstruction, although mechanical obstruction cannot be identified. CIP is classified as a neuropathy, myopathy, or mesenchymopathy; it is a neuropathic process in the majority of patients. The natural history of CIP is generally that of a progressive disorder, although occasional patients with secondary CIP note significant symptomatic improvement when the underlying disorder is identified and treated. Symptoms vary from patient to patient depending on the location of the luminal GI tract involved and the degree of involvement; however, the small intestine is nearly always involved. Common symptoms include dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal distension, constipation or diarrhea, and involuntary weight loss. Unfortunately, these symptoms are nonspecific, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Since many of the symptoms and signs suggest a mechanical bowel obstruction, diagnostic tests typically focus on uncovering a mechanical obstruction, although routine tests do not identify an obstructive process. Nutrition supplementation is required for many patients with CIP due to symptoms of dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. This review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with CIP, with an emphasis on nutrition assessment and treatment options for patients with nutrition compromise.

  19. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  20. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  1. A Doppler dimming determination of coronal outflow velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Kohl, John L.; Weiser, Heinz; Withbroe, George L.; Munro, Richard H.

    1993-01-01

    Outflow velocities in a polar coronal hole are derived from observations made during a 1982 sounding rocket flight. The velocity results are derived from a Doppler dimming analysis of resonantly scattered H I Ly-alpha. This analysis indicates radial outflow velocities of 217 km/s at 2 solar radii from sun-center with an uncertainty range of 153 to 251 km/s at a confidence level of 67 percent. These results are best characterized as strong evidence for supersonic outflow within 2 solar radii of sun-center in a polar coronal hole. Several means for obtaining improved accuracy in future observations are discussed.

  2. Molecular outflows in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, Michael; Lada, Charles J.; Snell, Ronald L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of J = 1-0 emission from CO in nine suspected molecular outflows in the Monoceros OB1 molecular cloud are presented. It is found that, if the five sources which are confirmed to be outflows conserve momentum as they evolve, they will sweep up at least 0.6 percent of the mass of the entire cloud before coming into pressure equilibrium with the ambient gas. This number indicates that it should take at most 160 episodes of similar outflow activity in order to sweep up the bulk of the Mon OB1 cloud to highly supersonic speeds.

  3. Magnified Views of Relativistic Outflows in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, G.; Cappi, M.; Hamann, F.; Eracleous, M.; Strickland, S.; Vignali, C.; Dadina, M.; Giustini, M.; Saez, C.; Misawa, T.

    2016-06-01

    We presents results from X-ray observations of relativistic outflows in lensed quasars. The lensing magnification of the observed objects provides high signal-to-noise X-ray spectra of quasars showing the absorption signatures of relativistic outflows at redshifts near a crucial phase of black hole growth and the peak of cosmic AGN activity. We summarise the properties of the wide-angle relativistic outflow of the z = 1.51 NAL quasar HS 0810 detected in recent deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of this object. We also present preliminary results from a mini-survey of gravitationally lensed mini-BAL quasars performed with XMM-Newton.

  4. Physics and structure of photoionised outflows in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, Jelle

    2012-07-01

    I discuss the recent progress in the study of outflows from active galactic nuclei. Using long and deep monitoring observations, it is now possible to get a detailed view on the structure and location of the outflow, as well as its impact on the environment of the AGN. Focus will be on the nature of the outflow components in terms of number of components, and on time-dependent photoionisation modeling as a tool to constrain the location of these components. I will illustrate this using the results of a large monitoring campaign on Mrk 509 with XMM-Newton, Integral, Chandra, HST, Swift and ground-based observatories.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew L.; Brass, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances. PMID:22368774

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ho, Matthew L; Brass, Steven D

    2011-11-29

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  7. Influence of ion outflow in coupled geospace simulations: 1. Physics-based ion outflow model development and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varney, R. H.; Wiltberger, M.; Zhang, B.; Lotko, W.; Lyon, J.

    2016-10-01

    We describe a coupled geospace model that includes causally regulated ion outflow from a physics-based ionosphere/polar wind model. The model two-way couples the multifluid Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to the ionosphere/polar wind model (IPWM). IPWM includes the H+ and O+ polar wind as well as a phenomenological treatment of energetic O+ accelerated by wave-particle interactions (WPI). Alfvénic Poynting flux from the MHD simulation causally regulates the ion acceleration. The wave-particle interactions (WPI) model has been tuned and validated with comparisons to particle-in-cell simulations and empirical relationships derived from Fast Auroral Snapshot satellite data. IPWM captures many aspects of the ion outflow that empirical relationships miss. First, the entire coupled model conserves mass between the ionospheric and magnetospheric portions, meaning the amount of outflow produced is limited by realistic photochemistry in the ionosphere. Second, under intense driving conditions, the outflow becomes flux limited by what the ionosphere is capable of providing. Furthermore, the outflows produced exhibit realistic temporal and spatial delays relative to the magnetospheric energy inputs. The coupled model provides a flexible way to explore the impacts of dynamic heavy ion outflow on the coupled geospace system. Some of the example simulations presented exhibit internally driven sawtooth oscillations associated with the outflow, and the properties of these oscillations are analyzed further in a companion paper.

  8. Hydrocephalus due to Membranous Obstruction of Magendie's Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Varthalitis, Dimitrios; Georgakoulias, Nikolaos; Orphanidis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of non communicating hydrocephalus due to membranous obstruction of Magendie's foramen. A 37-year-old woman presented with intracranial hypertension symptoms caused by the occlusion of Magendie's foramen by a membrane probably due to arachnoiditis. As far as the patient's past medical history is concerned, an Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis was described. Fundoscopic examination revealed bilateral papilledema. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant ventricular dilatation of all ventricles and turbulent flow of cerebelospinal fluid (CSF) in the fourth ventricle as well as back flow of CSF through the Monro's foramen to the lateral ventricles. The patient underwent a suboccipital craniotomy with C1 laminectomy. An occlusion of Magendie's foramen by a thickened membrane was recognized and it was incised and removed. We confirm the existence of hydrocephalus caused by fourth ventricle outflow obstruction by a membrane. The nature of this rare entity is difficult to demonstrate because of the complex morphology of the fourth ventricle. Treatment with surgical exploration and incision of the thickened membrane proved to be a reliable method of treatment without the necessity of endoscopic third ventriculostomy or catheter placement. PMID:25674349

  9. Bladder Control Problems in Women: Lifestyle Strategies for Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some foods and beverages can irritate your bladder. Caffeine and alcohol both increase urine production. This can lead to increased frequency and urgency of urination. Caffeine can also cause bladder spasms. Certain acidic fruits — ...

  10. Noninvasive Electromagnetic Detection of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Vedruccio, Clarbruno; Leucci, Giorgio; Massenio, Paolo; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Vincenzo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Normal and neoplastic human tissues have different electromagnetic properties. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive electromagnetic detection of bladder cancer (BC) by the tissue-resonance interaction method (TRIM-prob). Patients and Methods. Consecutive patients were referred for cystoscopy because of (i) microscopic or gross hematuria and/or irritative voiding symptoms and (ii) bladder ultrasounds and urinary cytology findings negative or just suspicious of malignancy. Patients were first submitted to TRIM-prob bladder scanning by a single investigator and then to cystoscopy by another investigator blind to TRIM-prob data. Results. In 125 evaluated patients cystoscopy was positive for BC in 47 and negative in the remaining 78; conversely, TRIM-prob bladder scanning was positive for BC in 53 and negative in 72. In particular, TRIM-prob scanning yielded 7 false positives and only one false negative; therefore, its overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 97.9%, 89.9%, 86.8%, 98.6%, and 93.6%, respectively. Conclusions. TRIM-prob bladder scanning was a simple and quite accurate method for non-invasive electromagnetic detection of BC. If the elevated positive and negative predictive values will be replicated in further well-designed studies, it could be used to screen asymptomatic patients at high risk of BC. PMID:24563795

  11. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part I.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals - including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  12. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  13. Diagnosis of kidney transplant obstruction using Mag3 diuretic renography.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, B J; Cohn, D A; Spicer, S T; Evans, S G; Chapman, J R; Gruenewald, S M

    2001-02-01

    Kidney transplant obstruction (KTO) following renal transplantation remains an important reversible cause of allograft dysfunction, requiring prompt diagnosis to prevent long-term graft damage. Although ultrasound can accurately diagnose renal transplant hydronephrosis, it cannot be used to assess its functional significance. We prospectively assessed the utility of technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (Tc99m MAG3) diuretic renography for the diagnosis of allograft KTO, using standard visual and quantitative parameters, as well as calculated renal output efficiency (OE), which has been postulated to improve diagnostic yield. From a cohort of 45 renal transplant patients, two subgroups were formed. The first group of transplant recipients (n = 21) with stable function and no obstruction was used to derive normal values for Tc99m MAG3 scans. A second group of transplant recipients with acute renal dysfunction in whom KTO was clinically suspected was used to test the diagnostic utility of these derived values (n = 43 scans). KTO was diagnosed independently of the MAG3 scans by a fall in the serum creatinine in response to renal pelvis urinary drainage. OE in 12 renal allografts with KTO was significantly reduced compared with 31 Tc99m MAG3 scans without KTO (59.6 +/- 18.9 vs. 81.6 +/- 5.4%, p < 0.001). In KTO, the mean time of isotope appearance in the bladder (time to bladder [TTB]) was extended compared with unobstructed allografts (7.9 +/- 4.1 vs. 3.6 +/- 1.5 min, p < 0.001). Measurement of OE significantly improved the accuracy of diuretic MAG3 renography in the diagnosis of renal allograft KTO, especially when supplemented by the TTB, parenchymal transit time and shape of the renogram curve. Ureteric obstruction of the kidney transplant can be diagnosed with an OE reduced to < 75% (sensitivity 92%, specificity 87%) and confirmed by isotope hold-up in the pelvicalyceal system. A normal or slowly declining renogram curve effectively excluded KTO (sensitivity of

  14. Outflows from Supersonically-Moving Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Noel; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George

    2015-08-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are sources of nonthermal X-ray emission and prominent sites of particle acceleration. Among other parameters, the PWN appearance depends on the pulsar velocity. If a pulsar moves with a supersonic speed, the ram pressure exceeds the ambient medium pressure, resulting in a bow shock PWN with a tail behind the pulsar. We report on Chandra observations of extended pulsar tails behind PSR J1509-5850 and J1747-2958 ("the Mouse"), and the discovery of a puzzling outflow (in the J1509-5850 PWN) strongly misaligned with the pulsar's direction of motion. We resolve the structures of the heads of the two PWNe and interpret them in light of pulsar wind models. We perform spatially resolved spectral measurements and find only marginal evidence of cooling in the long tail of PSR J1509-5850. The morphologies of the PWN heads and the extended tails are discussed and compared with those of other bow shock PWNe detected by Chandra. A possible unifying scheme will be discussed.

  15. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  16. Hydrothermal outflow plume of Valles caldera, New Mexico, and a comparison with other outflow plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.; Gardner, J.N.; Vuataz, F.; Grigsby, C.O.

    1988-06-10

    Stratigraphic, temperature gradient, hydrogeochemical, and hydrologic data have been integrated with geologic data from previous studies to show the structural configuration of the Valles caldera hydrothermal outflow plume. Hydrologic data suggest that 25--50% of the discharge of the Valles outflow is confined to the Jemez fault zone, which predates caldera formation. Thermal gradient data from bores penetrating the plume show that shallow gradients are highest in the vicinity of the Jemez fault zone (up to 190 /sup 0/C/km). Shallow heat flow above the hydrothermal plume is as high as 500 mW m/sup -2/ near core hole VC-1 (Jemez fault zone) to 200 mW m/sup -2/ at Fenton Hill (Jemez Plateau). Chemical and isotopic data indicate that two source reservoirs within the caldera (Redondo Creek and Sulphur Springs reservoirs) are parents to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at major hot springs indicate that no single reservoir fluid and no single diluting fluid are involved in mixing. The Valles caldera hydrothermal plume is structurally dominated by lateral flow through a belt of vertical conduits (Jemez fault zone) that strike away from the source reservoir. Stratigraphically confined flow is present but dispersed over a wide area in relatively impermeable rocks. The Valles configuration is contrasted with the configuration of the hydrothermal plume at Roosevelt Hot Springs, which is dominated by lateral flow through a near-surface, widespread, permeable aquifer. Data from 12 other representative geothermal systems show that outflow plumes occur in a variety of magmatic and tectonic settings, have varying reservoir compositions, and have different flow characteristics.

  17. Indirect measurement of Delta outflow using ultrasonic velocity meters and comparison with mass-balance calculated outflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    A measurement of the quantity of water flowing from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta into Suisun Bay (Delta outflow) has been desired by those studying and managing the San Francisco Bay/Delta estuary since the 1920s.  Historically, Delta outflow has been estimated using a mass-balance calculation that uses measured Delta inflows and exports, and imprecise estimates of consumptive use for the approximately 2,000 small agricultural diversions with the Delta.  The DWR has estimated Delta outflow for 1929 to present using the computer program DAYFLOW.

  18. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates. PMID:27747129

  19. Effects of Tamsulosin on Urinary Bladder Function and Neuronal Activity in the Voiding Centers of Rats with Cyclophosphamide-induced Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Chung, Kyung-Jin; Jung, Han; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Lee, Jung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is characterized by urgency usually with frequency and nocturia. Tamsulosin, α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, is widely used to reduce symptoms of urinary obstruction and prostatic hyperplasia. Tamsulosin can across the blood-brain barrier. We investigated the effects of tamsulosin on the symptoms of OAB in relation to neuronal activity using rats. Methods Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 250±10 g (9 weeks old), were used in this study. The animals were divided into five groups (n=8 in each group): control group, OAB-induced group, OAB-induced and 0.01 mg/kg tamsulosin-treated group, OAB-induced and 0.1 mg/kg tamsulosin-treated group, and OAB-induced and 1 mg/kg tamsulosin-treated group. OAB was induced by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg) every third day for 10 days. The rats in the tamsulosin-treated groups orally received tamsulosin once a day for 14 consecutive days at the respective dose of the groups, starting 1 day after the induction of OAB. Cystometry for bladder pressure determination, immunohistochemistry for c-Fos, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the neuronal voiding centers and western blot for inducible NOS in the bladder were conducted. Results Cyclophosphamide injection enhanced contraction pressure and time, representing the induction of OAB. Contraction pressure and time were significantly suppressed by tamsulosin treatment. c-Fos and NOS expressions in the neuronal voiding centers were enhanced by induction of OAB. OAB-induced c-Fos and NOS expressions were suppressed by tamsulosin treatment. Conclusions Tamsulosin exerts inhibitory effect on neuronal activation in the neuronal voiding centers of OAB. The present results suggest the possibility that tamsulosin is effective therapeutic modality for ameliorating the symptoms of OAB. PMID:22500249

  20. Formation of Intense Plasma Outflows from Laboratory Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. K. P.

    2005-10-01

    Solar prominences have been simulated in a laboratory experiment using a four-electrode magnetized plasma source [1]. An ultra-high speed intensified CCD camera records visual images of the laboratory prominence evolution and a magnetic probe array measures internal magnetic fields. Laboratory prominences produced using low pressure argon and krypton form localized outflow from the main structure. These outflows appear immediately after Ar and Kr prominences become unstable and contact surrounding metal structures. Within a few microseconds after this event, the main structure disappears and the outflow becomes extremely intense and elongated. An analytic model based on Hamiltonian formalism predicts the existence of a critical parameter below which ions lose confinement in a force-free magnetic field and subsequently form intense outflows. This escape of ions from force-free magnetic fields has been verified in numerical computations of ion trajectories.[1] J. F. Hansen, S. K. P. Tripathi, and P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 11(6), 3177 (2004)

  1. Topographic vorticity waves forced by Antarctic dense shelf water outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Gustavo M.; Padman, Laurie; Springer, Scott R.; Howard, Susan L.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2014-02-01

    We use numerical simulations to investigate excitation of topographic vorticity waves (TVWs) along the Antarctic continental slope by outflows of dense shelf water through troughs. Idealized models show that wave frequency depends on the amount of stretching in the ambient fluid over the outflow and on background along-slope mean flow. Frequency is higher for steeper bottom slope, larger outflow density anomaly, and stronger westward mean flow. For weak stratification and weak westward along-slope flows typical of the Antarctic slope, wave energy propagates eastward, in the opposite direction from phase velocity. Our results are consistent with recent observations of TVWs in the southern Weddell Sea. In a realistic simulation of the Ross Sea, TVW properties are modulated on seasonal and shorter time scales as background ocean state varies. We expect these waves to affect mixing, cross-slope exchanges, and sea ice concentration in the vicinity of sources of dense water outflows.

  2. Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Jain, Meera G.

    1974-01-01

    A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners. There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer. PMID:4429932

  3. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Piyush; Roy, Soumyajit; Tiwari, Vivek; Mohanti, Bidhu K

    2014-01-01

    To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 * 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  4. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the "underactive bladder" (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration.

  5. Bladder carcinoma: MDCT cystography and virtual cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Di Martino, Michele; Bernardo, Silvia; Vergari, Valeria; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the most common tumor among the low urinary tract, accounting for 90% of cancer cases. Conventional cystoscopy represents the gold standard for diagnosis and local management of bladder carcinoma. As the prevalence of transitional cell carcinoma is four-fold greater in men than in women, the endoscopic procedure presents objective difficulties related to the length and bending of male urethra. The most important problems are represented by intense discomfort for the patient and bleeding; furthermore, the high cost, invasivity, and local complications such as infections and mechanical lesions are well-known drawbacks. Additionally, conventional cystoscopy does not provide information about extravescical extensions of the tumor. CT cystography, combined with virtual cystoscopy, is mandatory for TNM staging of the tumor and also is useful when conventional cystoscopy is inconclusive or cannot be performed. We presents the CT cystography findings with virtual endoscopy correlation and bladder carcinoma appearance.

  6. A flowgraph model for bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superficial bladder cancer has been the subject of numerous studies for many years, but the evolution of the disease still remains not well understood. After the tumor has been surgically removed, it may reappear at a similar level of malignancy or progress to a higher level. The process may be reasonably modeled by means of a Markov process. However, in order to more completely model the evolution of the disease, this approach is insufficient. The semi-Markov framework allows a more realistic approach, but calculations become frequently intractable. In this context, flowgraph models provide an efficient approach to successfully manage the evolution of superficial bladder carcinoma. Our aim is to test this methodology in this particular case. Results We have built a successful model for a simple but representative case. Conclusion The flowgraph approach is suitable for modeling of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:25080066

  7. Laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty for tuberculous contracted bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Manickam; Senthil, Kallappan; Balashanmugam, T. S.

    2017-01-01

    The stomach is the preferred augmentation option for a contracted bladder in a patient with renal failure. A 49-year-old female presented with right solitary functioning kidney with tuberculous lower ureteric stricture and contracted bladder. Her creatinine was 2.8 mg%. By laparoscopic approach, right gastroepiploic artery based gastric flap was isolated using staplers and used for augmentation and ureteric replacement. At 6-month follow-up, her creatinine was 1.9 mg%, and bladder capacity was 250 ml. She had mild hematuria, which settled with proton pump inhibitors. Laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty is feasible and effective augmentation option in those with renal failure, giving the benefits of minimally invasive approach. PMID:28197034

  8. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  9. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Jinbo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging preclinical findings have indicated that steroid hormone receptor signaling plays an important role in bladder cancer outgrowth. In particular, androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals have been shown to correlate with the promotion of tumor development and progression, which may clearly explain some sex-specific differences in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses the available data, suggesting the involvement of androgens and/or the androgen receptor pathways in urothelial carcinogenesis as well as tumor growth. While the precise mechanisms of the functions of the androgen receptor in urothelial cells remain far from being fully understood, current evidence may offer chemopreventive or therapeutic options, using androgen deprivation therapy, in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28241422

  10. Bladder exstrophy from childhood into adult life.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, J; Docimo, S G; Jeffs, R D; Gearhart, J P

    1996-01-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is rare and the incidence of bladder exstrophy is calculated to be from 1 per 30,000 to 50,000 live births with male to female ratio ranging from 1.5-5 to 1(1-4). It was found that persistence or overgrowth of the cloacal membrane on the lower anterior abdominal area, prevents normal mesenchymal ingrowth. This causes divergence of the lower abdominal muscular structures and forces the genital ridges to fuse caudal to the cloacal membrane. The stage of ingrowth of the urorectal septum at the time of rupture determines whether one will produce an exstrophic urinary tract alone (classic bladder exstrophy or epispadias) or cloacal exstrophy with the hindgut interposed between the hemibladders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8709084

  11. Use of triamcinolone acetonide particles to visualize aqueous outflow.

    PubMed

    Devgan, Uday

    2007-01-01

    Using triamcinolone acetonide suspension within the anterior chamber allows visualization of fluid outflow for glaucoma surgeries where aqueous egress from the eye is desired for pressure control. Dilute non-preserved triamcinolone acetonide particles can be injected into the anterior chamber at the end of intraocular surgeries to assess fluid outflow and to provide an anti-inflammatory effect at the end-target tissue.

  12. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappi, M.; Tombesi, F.; Giustini, M.

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  13. Characterization of molecular outflows in the substellar domain

    SciTech Connect

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Dang-Duc, Cuong; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Li, Di E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-11-01

    We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M {sub J}, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36°. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9 × 10{sup –6} M {sub ☉} to 2.9 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} to 4.1 × 10{sup –8} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M {sub J} in ρ Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M {sub J} in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with a duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.

  14. Physical Factors Affecting Outflow Facility Measurements in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boussommier-Calleja, Alexandra; Li, Guorong; Wilson, Amanda; Ziskind, Tal; Scinteie, Oana Elena; Ashpole, Nicole E.; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Farsiu, Sina; Challa, Pratap; Gonzalez, Pedro; Downs, J. Crawford; Ethier, C. Ross; Stamer, W. Daniel; Overby, Darryl R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mice are commonly used to study conventional outflow physiology. This study examined how physical factors (hydration, temperature, and anterior chamber [AC] deepening) influence ocular perfusion measurements in mice. Methods Outflow facility (C) and pressure-independent outflow (Fu) were assessed by multilevel constant pressure perfusion of enucleated eyes from C57BL/6 mice. To examine the effect of hydration, seven eyes were perfused at room temperature, either immersed to the limbus in saline and covered with wet tissue paper or exposed to room air. Temperature effects were examined in 12 eyes immersed in saline at 20°C or 35°C. Anterior chamber deepening was examined in 10 eyes with the cannula tip placed in the anterior versus posterior chamber (PC). Posterior bowing of the iris (AC deepening) was visualized by three-dimensional histology in perfusion-fixed C57BL/6 eyes and by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in living CD1 mice. Results Exposure to room air did not significantly affect C, but led to a nonzero Fu that was significantly reduced upon immersion in saline. Increasing temperature from 20°C to 35°C increased C by 2.5-fold, more than could be explained by viscosity changes alone (1.4-fold). Perfusion via the AC, but not the PC, led to posterior iris bowing and increased outflow. Conclusions Insufficient hydration contributes to the appearance of pressure-independent outflow in enucleated mouse eyes. Despite the large lens, AC deepening may artifactually increase outflow in mice. Temperature-dependent metabolic processes appear to influence conventional outflow regulation. Physical factors should be carefully controlled in any outflow studies involving mice. PMID:26720486

  15. Recurrent pulmonary intimal sarcoma involving the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dipesh K; Joyce, Lyle D; Grogan, Martha; Aubry, Marie Christine; Miller, John A; Ding, Wei; Haddock, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is commonly misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary embolism. Rarely, it can involve the right ventricular outflow tract and the pulmonary valve. We report a patient who was treated surgically for an intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery involving the right ventricular outflow tract and the pulmonary valve. The sarcoma recurred in about 8 weeks. It responded favorably to chemoradiation therapy and shows some signs of regression.

  16. The Implications of Extreme Outflows from Extreme Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar ultraviolet absorption lines provide crucial information about the properties of galactic outflows. In this paper, we augment our previous analysis of the systematic properties of starburst-driven galactic outflows by expanding our sample to include a rare population of starbursts with exceptionally high outflow velocities. In principle, these could be a qualitatively different phenomenon from more typical outflows. However, we find that instead these starbursts lie on, or along the extrapolation of, the trends defined by the more typical systems studied previously by us. We exploit the wide dynamic range provided by this new sample to determine scaling relations of outflow velocity with galaxy stellar mass (M *), circular velocity, star formation rate (SFR), SFR/M *, and SFR/area. We argue that these results can be accommodated within the general interpretational framework we previously advocated, in which a population of ambient interstellar or circumgalactic clouds is accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst. We show that this simple physical picture is consistent with both the strong cosmological evolution of galactic outflows in typical star-forming galaxies and the paucity of such galaxies with spectra showing inflows. We also present simple parameterizations of these results that can be implemented in theoretical models and numerical simulations of galaxy evolution.

  17. MOS Mapping of the NIR Outflow HH 223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Estalella, R.; Gómez, G.; García-Lorenzo, B.

    2016-10-01

    The Multi-Object-Spectroscopy (MOS) mode of LIRIS was used to map the near-IR stellar outflow HH 223, in the dark cloud Lynds 723 (L723). HH 223 spatially coincides with the east-west component of the L723 quadrupolar CO outflow. The radio continuum source SMA2, towards the center of the quadrupolar CO outflow, hides the YSO that seems to power both the near-IR and the CO outflows. To map the S-shaped, near-IR emission of HH 223, extending ˜ 5', an appropriate mask was designed, with 16 rectangular slitlets. J, H and K-band spectra (R ˜eq 2500) were obtained through the mask. The kinematics of the neutral (H2) and ionized ([FeII]) gas outflow was derived from these data. The results confirm that both the near-IR and the CO outflows have a common driving source. To our knowledge, this is the first use of the MOS-LIRIS observing mode with the mask designed ad hoc to fit several extended, nonaligned targets.

  18. Radiation pressure confinement - IV. Application to broad absorption line outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Alexei; Laor, Ari; Stern, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    A fraction of quasars present broad absorption lines, produced by outflowing gas with typical velocities of 3000-10 000 km s-1. If the outflowing gas fills a significant fraction of the volume where it resides, then it will be highly ionized by the quasar due to its low density, and will not produce the observed UV absorption. The suggestion that the outflow is shielded from the ionizing radiation was excluded by recent observations. The remaining solution is a dense outflow with a filling factor f < 10-3. What produces such a small f? Here, we point out that radiation pressure confinement (RPC) inevitably leads to gas compression and the formation of dense thin gas sheets/filaments, with a large gradient in density and ionization along the line of sight. The total column of ionized dustless gas is a few times 1022 cm-2, consistent with the observed X-ray absorption and detectable P V absorption. The predicted maximal columns of various ions show a small dependence on the system parameters, and can be used to test the validity of RPC as a solution for the overionization problem. The ionization structure of the outflow implies that if the outflow is radiatively driven, then broad absorption line quasars should have L/L_Eddgtrsim 0.1.

  19. Determining the Spatially Resolved Mass Outflow Rate in Markarian 573

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R.

    2017-01-01

    We report on current progress in calculating the narrow line region (NLR) mass outflow rate in the Seyfert 2 galaxy Markarian 573. Our goal is to determine the mass outflow rate as a function of distance from the nucleus in 10 nearby Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) with spatially resolved NLRs. These nearby AGN allow us to study the feeding and feedback of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that may play an important role in understanding large scale structure, enrichment of the interstellar medium, and coevolution of SMBHs with their host galaxies. Utilizing archival spectra from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we measured emission line ratios from a wide range of ionized species. Next we used the line ratios to find a reddening correction and determined the physical conditions in the ionized gas using the photoionization code Cloudy. Specifically, we derived the mass of the ionized gas and then estimate the total mass outside of the spectral slit using HST [O III] images. Combined with kinematic models of the outflows we will determine the mass outflow rate and kinetic luminosity as a function of distance from the central AGN. Ultimately, we aim to determine if NLR outflows are effective in regulating AGN feedback by comparing our observed outflow rates with theoretical models.

  20. Quantification of Focal Outflow Enhancement Using Differential Canalograms

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, Ralitsa T.; Brown, Eric N.; Scott, Gordon; Parikh, Hardik; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify regional changes of conventional outflow caused by ab interno trabeculectomy (AIT). Methods Gonioscopic, plasma-mediated AIT was established in enucleated pig eyes. We developed a program to automatically quantify outflow changes (R, package eye-canalogram, github.com) using a fluorescent tracer reperfusion technique. Trabecular meshwork (TM) ablation was demonstrated with fluorescent spheres in six eyes before formal outflow quantification with two-dye reperfusion canalograms in six additional eyes. Eyes were perfused with a central, intracameral needle at 15 mm Hg. Canalograms and histology were correlated for each eye. Results The pig eye provided a model with high similarity to AIT in human patients. Histology indicated ablation of TM and unroofing of most Schlemm's canal segments. Spheres highlighted additional circumferential and radial outflow beyond the immediate area of ablation. Differential canalograms showed that AIT caused an increase of outflow of 17 ± 5-fold inferonasally, 14 ± 3-fold superonasally, and also an increase in the opposite quadrants with a 2 ± 1-fold increase superotemporally, and 3 ± 3 inferotemporally. Perilimbal specific flow image analysis showed an accelerated nasal filling with an additional perilimbal flow direction into adjacent quadrants. Conclusions A quantitative, differential canalography technique was developed that allows us to quantify supraphysiological outflow enhancement by AIT. PMID:27227352

  1. Ionospheric Plasma Outflow Under High Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malingre, M.; Bouhram, M.; Dubouloz, N.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Berthomier, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    The polar cusp is well-known to be one of the most intense source regions of iono- spheric outflow. Since this region is of direct access for solar wind plasma, changes in the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind dynamic pressure are expected to influence the ion outflow. We report combined observations from the Interball- Auroral in the high-altitude range (10,000-20,000km) and the FAST satellite in the mid-altitude range (4000 km) revealing enhanced ion outflows in association with the passage of an interplanetary shock and CME. Several case studies based on the anal- ysis of ion data recorded from several orbits before and after the pressure impulse are made to investigate how the dynamic pressure affects the amount of outflowing ions. We found a clear relationship between the ion outflow variations and the dy- namic pressure changes when choosing average ion flux and average ion energy flux, inferred from global conservation laws, as parameters to characterize the ion outflow.

  2. Darifenacin in the treatment of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M; Robinson, D; Cardozo, L

    2005-07-01

    Antimuscarinic drug therapy has been shown to be effective in the management of patients with symptoms of the overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), but the bothersome antimuscarinic adverse effects of dry mouth, constipation, somnolence and blurred vision often affect compliance with medication. The development of bladder selective M3 specific antagonists offers the possibility of increasing efficacy whilst minimising adverse effects. The M3 specific antagonist solifenacin has recently been marketed, and darifenacin will soon be available. The purpose of this article is to review the pharmacology and clinical trial data available for darifenacin, in addition to examining its role in the treatment of the OBS.

  3. Perioperative management of classic bladder exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Massanyi, Eric Z; Gearhart, John P; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The exstrophy-epispadias complex is a rare congenital malformation of the genitourinary system, abdominal wall muscles, and pelvic structures. Modern surgical repairs focus on reconstruction of the bladder and its adjacent structures, with the goal of achieving urinary continence, a satisfactory cosmetic result, and a high quality of life. Complex surgery in neonates and young children, as well as a prolonged postoperative course require close collaboration between surgeons, anesthesiologists, intensivists, pediatricians, and an experienced nursing staff. This article will review the spectrum of bladder exstrophy anomalies, the surgical repair, and the perioperative interdisciplinary management. PMID:24400236

  4. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  5. [Secretory eosinophilia and obstructive rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Rouvier, P; Mondain, M; Elkhoury, J

    1992-01-01

    Detecting eosinophilia in the nasal secretions of patients complaining of nasal obstruction makes it possible to identify a group of high risk patients. Hosty use of surgery in these patients carries a high risk of iatrogenic complications and little potential for improvement. The 2 most frequently used methods of obtaining cytologic specimens (swabbing versus washing) were compared in 37 patients with obstructive rhinitis (early stage polyposis and nonallergic rhinitis with eosinophilia syndrome, NARES). Swabbing gave reliable results. Eosinophilia was negligible in a group of 25 control subjects. The mean eosinophil count was 2.5% and only 1 patient had a positive cystogram. The 220 patients which nasal obstruction were classed in 5 groups according to the severity of clinical signs and symptoms. The mean eosinophil count and the percentage of patients with positive cystogram increased with increased severity of the clinical syndrome. 28 patients had uncomplicated obstructive rhinitis, 10 had NARES, 43 had allergic rhinitis, 52 had chronic obstructive rhinitis, and 87 had nasosinal polyposis. The respective mean eosinophil counts were 6.42%, 10.3%, 13.8% 16.8% and 31.4%. The percentage of patients with positive cytograms was respectively, 10.8%, 20%, 23.3%, 28.8% and 54%.

  6. Quasar Outflows and Black Hole Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coatman, Liam; Hewett, Paul; Banerji, Manda; Richards, Gordon; Hennawi, Joseph; Prochaska, Jason X.

    2016-08-01

    Black-hole masses are crucial to understanding the physics of the connection between quasars and their host galaxies and measuring cosmic black hole-growth. At high redshift, z > 2, black hole masses are normally derived using the velocity-width of the CIV broad emission line, based on the assumption that the observed velocity-widths arise from virial-induced motions. In many quasars, the CIV-emission line exhibits significant blue asymmetries ('blueshifts') with the line centroid displaced by up to thousands of km/s to the blue. These blueshifts almost certainly signal the presence of strong outflows, most likely originating in a disc wind. Using both archival data and new observations, we have obtained near-infrared spectra, including the Ha and/or Hb emission lines, for ~400 luminous (L_Bol = 45.5-48.5 erg/s) SDSS quasars, at redshifts 1.5 < z < 4, with CIV emission lines spanning the full-range of blueshifts present in the population. A strong correlation between CIV-velocity width and blueshift is found and, at large blueshifts, >2000 km/s, the velocity-widths appear to be dominated by non-virial motions. Using the Ha/Hb emission to provide black hole masses free from non-virial contributions, we are able to derive a quantitative correction to the CIV-based black-hole masses as a function of blueshift. This correction reduces the scatter between Ha/Hb and CIV velocity widths to just ~0.1 dex. Without the correction, black hole masses would be overestimated by a factor of nine at the largest blueshifts. With a suitable systemic redshift-estimation algorithm, this correction can be straightforwardly applied based only on information contained in the rest-frame UV spectra.

  7. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Van Rossum, Daniel R. E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ∼10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  8. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  9. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star-formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Rolf; Turner, Neal J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2016-11-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, and to determine the ratio of ejection to accretion rates and the strength of the wide-angle disk wind component. The star-formation efficiency, i.e., the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects. First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow become larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star-formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very weak outflows to as low as 20% for very strong outflows. At latitudes between the low-density bipolar cavity and the high-density accretion disk, wide-angle disk winds remove some of the gas, which otherwise would be part of the accretion flow onto the disk; varying the strength of these wide-angle disk winds, however, alters the final star-formation efficiency by only ±6%. For all cases, the opening angle of the bipolar outflow cavity remains below 20° during early protostellar accretion phases, increasing rapidly up to 65° at the onset of radiation pressure feedback.

  10. FEEDBACK FROM MASS OUTFLOWS IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. OUTFLOWS IN THE NARROW-LINE REGION OF NGC 4151

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R. E-mail: fischer@astro.gsu.edu E-mail: schmitt.henrique@gmail.com

    2015-01-20

    We present a detailed study of active galactic nucleus feedback in the narrow-line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. We illustrate the data and techniques needed to determine the mass outflow rate ( M-dot {sub out}) and kinetic luminosity (L {sub KE}) of the outflowing ionized gas as a function of position in the NLR. We find that M-dot {sub out} peaks at a value of 3.0 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at a distance of 70 pc from the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), which is about 10 times the outflow rate coming from inside 13 pc, and 230 times the mass accretion rate inferred from the bolometric luminosity of NGC 4151. Thus, most of the outflow must arise from in situ acceleration of ambient gas throughout the NLR. L {sub KE} peaks at 90 pc and drops rapidly thereafter, indicating that most of the kinetic energy is deposited within about 100 pc from the SMBH. Both values exceed the M-dot {sub out} and L {sub KE} determined for the UV/X-ray absorber outflows in NGC 4151, indicating the importance of NLR outflows in providing feedback on scales where circumnuclear star formation and bulge growth occur.

  11. Role of nitric oxide in murine conventional outflow physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason Y. H.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Bertrand, Jacques; Read, A. Thomas; Marando, Catherine M.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for glaucoma. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) decreases IOP by increasing outflow facility, but whether endogenous NO production contributes to the physiological regulation of outflow facility is unclear. Outflow facility was measured by pressure-controlled perfusion in ex vivo eyes from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or transgenic mice expressing human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) superimposed on the endogenously expressed murine eNOS (eNOS-GFPtg). In WT mice, exogenous NO delivered by 100 μM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) increased outflow facility by 62 ± 28% (SD) relative to control eyes perfused with the inactive SNAP analog N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP; n = 5, P = 0.016). In contrast, in eyes from eNOS-GFPtg mice, SNAP had no effect on outflow facility relative to NAP (−9 ± 4%, P = 0.40). In WT mice, the nonselective NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10 μM) decreased outflow facility by 36 ± 13% (n = 5 each, P = 0.012), but 100 μM l-NAME had no detectable effect on outflow facility (−16 ± 5%, P = 0.22). An eNOS-selective inhibitor (cavtratin, 50 μM) decreased outflow facility by 19 ± 12% in WT (P = 0.011) and 39 ± 25% in eNOS-GFPtg (P = 0.014) mice. In the conventional outflow pathway of eNOS-GFPtg mice, eNOS-GFP expression was localized to endothelial cells lining Schlemm's canal and the downstream vessels, with no apparent expression in the trabecular meshwork. These results suggest that endogenous NO production by eNOS within endothelial cells of Schlemm's canal or downstream vessels contributes to the physiological regulation of aqueous humor outflow facility in mice, representing a viable strategy to more successfully lower IOP in glaucoma. PMID:26040898

  12. Quasars Outflows As A Function of SED - An Empirical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Joseph M.; Ganguly, Rajib

    2015-08-01

    Feedback from quasars (jets, outflows, and luminosity) is now recognized as a vital phase in describing galaxy evolution, growth, and star formation efficiency. Regarding outflows, roughly 60% are observed to have outflowing gas appearing at large velocities and with a variety of velocity dispersions. The most extreme observed form of these outflows appears in the ultraviolet spectrum of 15-20% of objects. Understanding the physics of these outflows is important for both astrophysical and cosmological reasons. Establishing empirical relationships to test the theoretical models of how these outflows are driven (and hence, how they impact their surroundings) is currently plagued by having too few objects, where other parameters like the black hole mass or accretion rate, may add to the scatter. We aim to fix this by using a systematic study of a large sample of objects. As a follow up to a previous study, we have identified a sample of nearly 11000 z=1.7-2 quasars using archived data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data Release 7), of which roughly 4400 appear to show outflows according to the visual inspection. The specific redshift range is chosen to feature both the Mg II 2800 emission line as well as wavelengths extending to nearly 20,000 km/s blueward of the C IV 1549 emission line. Our goals for this study are: (1) To temper our visual inspection schemes with a more automated, computer-driven scheme; (2) To measure the properties of the outflows (velocity, velocity dispersion, equivalent width, ionization); (3) To supplement the SDSS spectra with photometric measurements from GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE to further characterize the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and dust content; (4) To form spectral composites to investigate possible SED changes with outflow properties; and (5) To use published estimates of the quasar physical properties (black hole mass, accretion rate, etc.) to fully establish in an empirical way the complex dependencies between the

  13. Evidence for a chemically differentiated outflow in Mrk 231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Muller, S.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Falstad, N.; Costagliola, F.; Henkel, C.; van der Werf, P.; García-Burillo, S.; González-Alfonso, E.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Our goal is to study the chemical composition of the outflows of active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies. Methods: We obtained high-resolution interferometric observations of HCN and HCO+J = 1 → 0 and J = 2 → 1 of the ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Mrk 231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We also use previously published observations of HCN and HCO+J = 1 → 0 and J = 3 → 2, and HNC J = 1 → 0 in the same source. Results: In the line wings of the HCN, HCO+, and HNC emission, we find that these three molecular species exhibit features at distinct velocities which differ between the species. The features are not consistent with emission lines of other molecular species. Through radiative transfer modelling of the HCN and HCO+ outflow emission we find an average abundance ratio X(HCN) /X(HCO+) ≳ 1000. Assuming a clumpy outflow, modelling of the HCN and HCO+ emission produces strongly inconsistent outflow masses. Conclusions: Both the anti-correlated outflow features of HCN and HCO+ and the different outflow masses calculated from the radiative transfer models of the HCN and HCO+ emission suggest that the outflow is chemically differentiated. The separation between HCN and HCO+ could be an indicator of shock fronts present in the outflow, since the HCN/HCO+ ratio is expected to be elevated in shocked regions. Our result shows that studies of the chemistry in large-scale galactic outflows can be used to better understand the physical properties of these outflows and their effects on the interstellar medium in the galaxy. Based on observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).Reduced datacubes as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A15

  14. Molecular Outflows in Local ULIRGs: Energetics from Multitransition OH Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Alfonso, E.; Fischer, J.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Stewart, K. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Veilleux, S.; Smith, H. A.; Sturm, E.; Farrah, D.; Falstad, N.; Meléndez, M.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Janssen, A. W.; Lebouteiller, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the energetics of molecular outflows in 14 local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) that show unambiguous outflow signatures (P Cygni profiles or high-velocity absorption wings) in the far-infrared lines of OH measured with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer. All sample galaxies are gas-rich mergers at various stages of the merging process. Detection of both ground-state (at 119 and 79 μm) and one or more radiatively excited (at 65 and 84 μm) lines allows us to model the nuclear gas (≲300 pc) and the more extended components using spherically symmetric radiative transfer models. Reliable models and the corresponding energetics are found in 12 of the 14 sources. The highest molecular outflow velocities are found in buried sources, in which slower but massive expansion of the nuclear gas is also observed. With the exception of a few outliers, the outflows have momentum fluxes of (2–5) × L IR/c and mechanical luminosities of (0.1–0.3)% of L IR. The moderate momentum boosts in these sources (≲3) suggest that the outflows are mostly momentum driven by the combined effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and nuclear starbursts, as a result of radiation pressure, winds, and supernova remnants. In some sources (∼20%), however, powerful (1010.5–11 L ⊙) AGN feedback and (partially) energy-conserving phases are required, with momentum boosts in the range of 3–20. These outflows appear to be stochastic, strong AGN feedback events that occur throughout the merging process. In a few sources, the outflow activity in the innermost regions has subsided in the past ∼1 Myr. While OH traces the molecular outflows at subkiloparsec scales, comparison of the masses traced by OH with those previously inferred from tracers of more extended outflowing gas suggests that most mass is loaded (with loading factors of \\dot{M}/{SFR}=1{--}10) from the central galactic cores (a few × 100 pc), qualitatively consistent with an ongoing inside-out quenching of

  15. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  16. Recurrent airway obstruction: a review.

    PubMed

    Pirie, R S

    2014-05-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction is a widely recognised airway disorder, characterised by hypersensitivity-mediated neutrophilic airway inflammation and lower airway obstruction in a subpopulation of horses when exposed to suboptimal environments high in airborne organic dust. Over the past decade, numerous studies have further advanced our understanding of different aspects of the disease. These include clarification of the important inhaled airborne agents responsible for disease induction, improving our understanding of the underlying genetic basis of disease susceptibility and unveiling the fundamental immunological mechanisms leading to establishment of the classic disease phenotype. This review, as well as giving a clinical overview of recurrent airway obstruction, summarises much of the work in these areas that have culminated in a more thorough understanding of this debilitating disease.

  17. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  18. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  19. Double gall-bladder--two pathologies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, M; Papanas, N; Polychronidis, A; Maltezos, E; Prassopoulos, P; Simopoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    True gall-bladder duplication is a rare biliary anomaly, which is usually discovered as an incidental finding. There are reports of double gall-bladders missed during the first operation. We present the case of a double gall-bladder which, albeit suspected during the operation, was confirmed post-operatively. The patient underwent successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the examination of the resected gall-bladder revealed two chambers, only one containing stones. Predisposing factors for the development of gall-stones in one gall-bladder only, as well as surgical options, are briefly discussed.

  20. New discoveries in the molecular landscape of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Roger; Choi, Woonyoung; Ferguson 3rd, J.E.; Metcalfe, Michael J.; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    We are currently on the cusp of exponential growth in the understanding of the molecular landscape of bladder cancer. Emerging data regarding the mutational burden and targetable genomic and protein alterations in bladder cancer have allowed us to tap into treatments directed toward specific molecular characteristics of bladder cancer. In parallel, these developments will enable us to better select patients for existing treatments of bladder cancer in a step toward personalized therapy. The present article reviews select discoveries that have advanced our understanding of bladder cancer and gives a glimpse of the exciting opportunities on the not-so-distant horizon. PMID:28105319

  1. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  2. The Dynamics of Outflows from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridge, Naomi A.

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of CO outflows around young stellar objects (YSOs) suggests that mass-loss is a necessary ingredient of the star-formation process, and they are thought to provide a means to remove angular momentum from the accreting matter. Our understanding of molecular outflows from low-mass YSOs has come from a large number of studies performed during the last decade. However there have been relatively few similar detailed studies of high-mass YSO outflows, and it is still not clear whether outflows from high-mass YSOs are generated and entrained by the same mechanism as those from their low-mass counterparts. Studies of high-mass star-formation which attempt to extend the established correlations between outflow momentum-flux and source bolometric luminosity into the high-mass regime are further hindered by the problem of Malmquist bias, which we show to be prevalent in the existing studies of high-mass YSOs. We therefore selected a sample of known intermediate to high-mass YSOs with outflows with a range of luminosities but all located at a distance of 2 +/- 0.3 kpc. With this sample we are able to test the correlations between outflow dynamical properties and source properties free from biases due to source distance, and to investigate whether the other phenomena associated with low-mass YSO outflows are also common in high-mass flows. We present high-sensitivity 12CO maps of the 11 outflows from intermediate to high-mass YSOs, and discuss their morphology and dynamics. These data were also used to re-investigate the uncertainties involved in using spectral-line data to derive flow properties, particularly the importance of variations in optical depth and the problem of separating ambient cloud emssion from flow emission. We also present 13CO and C18O observations of the ``cores'' surrounding each YSO and discuss how the cloud core and outflow may be related. The primary conclusions of this work are: The correlation between outflow momentum flux (FrmCO ) and

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  4. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Impaired Bladder Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    Although much attention is paid to urinary incontinence, the condition of incomplete bladder emptying is becoming more common with the aging of the US population and the widespread use of anticholinergic drugs to treat overactive bladder. This disorder can often be silent until end-stage presentation of overflow incontinence. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic conditions of the bladder and urethra that can cause impaired bladder emptying and discuss how to evaluate and screen the patient with a bladder that does not empty. In addition, we provide an overview of treatment options available for impaired bladder emptying and consider the research that is under way to find the best therapies for the failing bladder. PMID:16985851

  5. Migrated Mesh Plug Masquerading as a Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Daoud; Aron, Monish

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose of this case presentation is to demonstrate how erosion of mesh into the bladder can initially present with the same symptoms as bladder malignancy. Case Presentation: A 62-year-old Hispanic male presented with 2 years of hematuria along with imaging concerning for a bladder tumor. The patient underwent cystoscopy with biopsy of a lesion at the anterior bladder. It was ultimately determined that a mesh plug from a prior hernia repair had migrated into the bladder. The mesh plug was excised using the Da Vinci Si robot, which allowed for efficient mobilization of the bladder and other anatomic structures, as well as rapid recovery. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates the need to consider mesh erosion as a cause of hematuria and, furthermore, shows how the robotic approach can help facilitate excision of migrated mesh into the bladder. PMID:28164159

  6. Impact of behaviour and lifestyle on bladder health.

    PubMed

    Burgio, K L; Newman, D K; Rosenberg, M T; Sampselle, C

    2013-06-01

    Bladder conditions, including UTI, UI, and bladder cancer, are highly prevalent and affect a wide range of populations. There are a variety of modifiable behavioral and lifestyle factors that influence bladder health. Some factors, such as smoking and obesity, increase the risk or severity of bladder conditions, whereas other factors, such as pelvic floor muscle exercise, are protective. Although clinical practice may be assumed to be the most appropriate ground for education on behavioral and lifestyle factors that influence bladder health, it is also crucial to extend these messages into the general population through public health interventions to reach those who have not yet developed bladder conditions and to maximize the prevention impact of these behaviors. Appropriate changes in these factors have the potential for an enormous impact on bladder health if implemented on a population-based level.

  7. OUTFLOW AND HOT DUST EMISSION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Xing, Feijun; Wang, Tinggui; Zhou, Hongyan; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Shaohua

    2013-10-10

    Correlations of hot dust emission with outflow properties are investigated, based on a large z ∼ 2 non-broad absorption line quasar sample built from the Wide-field Infrared Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases. We use the near-infrared slope and the infrared to UV luminosity ratio to indicate the hot dust emission relative to the emission from the accretion disk. In our luminous quasars, these hot dust emission indicators are almost independent of the fundamental parameters, such as luminosity, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, but moderately dependent on the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) and FWHM of C IV lines. Interestingly, the latter two correlations dramatically strengthen with increasing Eddington ratio. We suggest that, in high Eddington ratio quasars, C IV regions are dominated by outflows so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) can reliably reflect the general properties and velocity of outflows, respectively. In low Eddington ratio quasars, on the other hand, C IV lines are primarily emitted by virialized gas so the BAI and FWHM (C IV) become less sensitive to outflows. Therefore, the correlations for the highest Eddington ratio quasars are more likely to represent the true dependence of hot dust emission on outflows and the correlations for the entire sample are significantly diluted by the low Eddington ratio quasars. Our results show that an outflow with a large BAI or velocity can double the hot dust emission on average. We suggest that outflows either contain hot dust in themselves or interact with the dusty interstellar medium or torus.

  8. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  9. Low Altitude Initiation of Ionospheric Upflow and Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, M.; Zettergren, M. D.; Rowland, D. E.; Klenzing, J.

    2015-12-01

    Significant amounts of ionospheric plasma can be transported to high altitudes (above 1000 km) in response to a variety of plasma heating and uplifting processes. Soft electron precipitation heats ambient, F-region ionospheric electrons creating electron pressure increases and upflows. Strong DC electric fields frictionally heat the ion population also resulting in ion upflows. Lastly, field-aligned thermospheric winds can contribute to ion motion at lower altitudes, while geomagnetically perpendicular winds may affect frictional heating. Once ions have been lifted to high altitudes, transverse ion acceleration by broadband ELF waves can give the upflowing ions sufficient energy to escape into the magnetosphere (ionospheric outflow). This study examines the thermospheric wind regulation of ionospheric upflow and outflow with a focus on how lower ionosphere dynamics feed source populations for transverse energization and determine the types, and amounts, of outflowing ions. The model used here for this study is a 2D ionospheric model based on a modified 16-moment transport description. It solves conservation of mass, momentum, and parallel and perpendicular energy for all relevant ionospheric species. This model encapsulates ionospheric upflow and outflow processes through the inclusion of DC electric fields, and empirical descriptions of heating by soft electron precipitation and BBELF waves. This model is used to conduct a parametric study of neutral wind effects on upflow and outflow and highlights how low-altitude processes affect ion outflow through the regulation of source plasma available to higher altitudes. This model is also used to construct a case study of ion outflows at the nightside polar cap boundary using data from the VISIONS sounding rocket campaign.

  10. Intrarenal Doppler Indices in Acute Ureteric Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Context: Urolithiasis remains a major health problem despite advances in therapy. Obstruction results in an increase in pressure within the urinary tract, causing structural and physiologic changes. This study aimed to calculate the intra renal Resistivity Index (RI) of acutely obstructed kidney, to determine the significance of Resistivity Index Ratio (RIR) and difference in Resistivity Index of obstructed and contralateral non obstructed kidney. Materials and Methods: Prospective study with renal Doppler for patients presenting with acute unilateral ureteric obstruction. Seventy two patients between the age group 20-45 y presenting to the Department of Radiodiagnosis, between January – December 2006 with acute unilateral ureteric obstruction were included in the study. Gray scale and Doppler evaluation of the kidneys done; with assessment of the ureteric calculus. Renal Doppler indices calculated and follow up of the same done after relief of obstruction. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS Software V13 and p-value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Forty two patients (58.33%) had mild, 28 (38.89%) moderate and 2 (2.78%) severe hydronephrosis. The mean RI of the obstructed kidney was 0.66±0.88 and that of contralateral non obstructed kidney was 0.569±0.05. Delta RI between the obstructed and contralateral non obstructed kidney was 0.08±0.03. The mean RIR between the obstructed and non obstructed kidney was 1.12±0.04 and the same after relief of obstruction was 1.03±0.06. Conclusion: The intrarenal Resistivity indices are less sensitive indicators in predicting the diagnosis of acute ureteric obstruction, although Resistivity Index Ratio appears to be a better parameter. The indices within the normal range do not rule out the absence of obstruction. Hence these parameters should not be interpreted in isolation. PMID:25654006

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of an intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hor, Thévy; Paye, François

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction, revealed by obstruction syndrome, is defined by the cessation of the bowel function whatever the cause. Bowel obstructions are one of the most frequent reasons for hospitalisation in digestive system surgery. They represent a surgical emergency. Diagnosis must enable the obstruction to be confirmed and its mechanisms and location to be specified. The treatment must always include restoring water-electrolyte balance, particularly in elderly people.

  12. Pseudosarcomatous and sarcomatous proliferations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Philippe E; Tuziak, Tomasz; Tibbs, Rita F; Bassett, Roland; Tamboli, Pheroze; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Ayala, Alberto G; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2007-05-01

    Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor (PFT), postoperative spindle cell nodule (PSN), sarcoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the bladder are frequently difficult to distinguish histopathologically with significant differences in disease-related outcomes. A retrospective review of our pathology registry over the last 25 years identified 7 PFT, 10 PSN, 18 primary bladder sarcomas, and 17 sarcomatoid carcinomas. Most patients with PFT, PSN, sarcoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma were diagnosed between the ages of 50 to 60 years with PFT and PSN most commonly detected in women. A previous history of urological instrumentation and bladder cancer was present in all patients with PSN but none of the patients with PFT. Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumors were characterized by a tissue culture-like proliferation of myofibroblastic cells with focal atypia and overall cytoarchitectural features mimicking nodular fasciitis. Sarcomas and sarcomatoid carcinomas exhibited cellular atypia, mitotic activity with atypical mitosis, and the presence of necrosis. Transurethral resection was sufficient to control all PFT and PSN with no evidence of distant metastatic spread. In contrast, local recurrences and distant metastases frequently occurred in patients with primary sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma despite aggressive surgical management, which was often combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (50% and 65% disease-specific mortality, respectively). Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor and PSN have unique clinical and pathologic features that allow their distinction from primary bladder sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.

  13. Gall stones and carcinoma gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S C; Misra, V; Singh, P A; Roy, A; Misra, S P; Gupta, A K

    2000-04-01

    One hundred and fifty surgically resected gall bladder specimens were included in the study to evaluate the relationship between the prevalence of gall stones and histochemical alteration in sequential changes of metaplasia, dysplasia and neoplasia in gall bladder epithelium. Multiple sections were processed and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Periodic acid Schiff's stain, Alcian blue (pH 2.5)/Periodic acid, Orcein/Alcian blue (pH 2.5) and Alcian Blue/Periodic acid/Potassium borohydride saponifications stains. Details of gall stones present were also noted. Prevalence of gall stones in gall bladders with metaplastic, dysplastic and neoplastic mucosal changes was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those gall bladders which had no epithelial changes. Increase in sialomucin with a corresponding decrease in sulphomucin was observed from metaplasia to malignancy. Neutral mucin increased in metaplastic cells but was significantly reduced in neoplastic cells. Loss of O-acylation in sialmucin was also present in neoplastic cells. The histochemical changes suggest that chronic injury due to cholelithiasis induces appearance of neutral mucin positive metaplastic cells, which may further dedifferentiate to sialomucin containing dysplastic or neoplastic cells if the stimulation persists.

  14. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  15. Embryogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Chaudhari, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To postulate a hypothesis to explain the embryogenesis of exstrophy bladder based on our clinical observations. Materials and Methods: In 27 cases of exstrophy, we measured the distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease to the root of the penis (clitoris) (B) and the distance between the penis (clitoris) and the scrotum (labia majora) (C). These were compared with age, height and XP distance (distance between xiphisternum and symphysis pubis) matched control group of normal children. The distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease and the penis (clitoris) (A) was measured in control group. Results: The observation was A = B + C. This implies that in exstrophy bladder, the position of the penis (clitoris) has moved cephalad from the lower border of A to the junction of B and C. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we postulate that abnormal origin of genital tubercle may be the cause of exstrophy bladder. The abnormal origin of primordia of the genital tubercle in more cephalad direction than normal causes wedge effect, which will interfere with the medial migration of the mesoderm as well as the midline approximation of mesodermal structures in the lower abdominal wall, thereby resulting in the exstrophy of bladder. PMID:20011468

  16. Bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

    PubMed

    De Alwis, A C D; Senaratne, A M R D; De Silva, S M P D; Rodrigo, V S D

    2006-09-01

    Masturbation in childhood is a normal behaviour which most commonly begins at 2 months of age, and peaks at 4 years and in adolescence. However excessive masturbation causes anxiety in parents. We describe a boy with a bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

  17. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  18. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  19. Application of bladder acellular matrix in urinary bladder regeneration: the state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Gubanska, Iga; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the "holy grail" of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  20. Dust outflows from quiescent spiral disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, P. B.; Rand, R. J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Bevan, S.; Ferguson, A. M.; Davies, J. I.; Bianchi, S.

    2000-07-01

    We have conducted a search for ``dust chimneys'' in a sample of 10 highly-inclined spiral galaxies (i=86-90deg) which we had previously observed in the Hα emission line (Rand 1996). We have procured B-band CCD images for this purpose and employed unsharp-masking techniques to accentuate the structure of the dust lane. A scattering+absorption radiation transfer model enabled us to separate 5 galaxies from the sample which are sufficiently inclined (i>87deg) for us to reliably identify and quantify dust clouds residing at over 2 scale-heights above the disk. Three of these galaxies possess numerous curvi-linear chimney structures stretching up to 2 kpc from the midplane and the fraction of total galactic dust contained in such structures is of order 1%. Optical extinction offers a lower limit to the amount of dust contained in the extraplanar layer but, by examining the transparent submm thermal emission from NGC 891, we fix an upper limit of 5%. Our results are consistent with a similar recent study by Howk & Savage (1999) which indicates that about half of quiescent spiral disks possess detectable dust chimneys. We have compared our optical images with the corresponding Hα emission-line radiation. We do not find a detailed spatial correspondance between dust chimneys and either sites of recent star-formation or the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas. This is somewhat surprising given that FIR-bright galaxies, such as M 82, are known to entrain dust at the working surface of the starburst-driven outflow (traced in Hα ). It is possible a global correlation exists, with disks experiencing overall higher rates of star-formation also possessing the greatest number of chimneys. This may indicate a timescale difference between the two phenomena with the Hα phase lasting ~ 106 yr but chimneys requiring ~ 107 yr to form. Additionally, we have investigated the edge-on disk NGC 55 which, being ten times closer than galaxies in our main sample, allows us to examine in greater

  1. Gastric bezoar with small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Urgancı, Ayvaz Ulaş; Akıncılar, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    In the operation performed on a patient with a history of abdominal surgery, a gastric bezoar and a small bowel bezoar were detected. Adhesive bowel obstruction was suspected; however, the patient was diagnosed with mechanical intestinal obstruction. Small bowel bezoar has resulted in intestinal obstruction. This case was discussed in accordance with the literature. PMID:28149129

  2. Sapanisertib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer With TSC1 and/or TSC2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; TSC1 Gene Mutation; TSC2 Gene Mutation

  3. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  4. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  5. Intestinal obstruction and pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zapatier, Jorge A; Ukleja, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a known complication of patients with systemic sclerosis, manifested as nausea, vomiting, constipation, abdominal distension and pain. We report a series of cases with systemic sclerosis that presented with signs of intestinal obstruction. In all cases, the differentiation between a pseudo-obstruction and true mechanical obstruction remained a formidable challenge. Our goal was to present different scenarios of patients with systemic sclerosis and features of intestinal obstruction, with a review on its clinical approach.

  6. Characterizing the Cep E protostellar outflow: the oxygen chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2015-10-01

    With this proposal we aim at observing two positions in the Cep E protostellar outflow in OI and OH emission lines with the GREAT receiver. It is associated with another proposal by the same team to map the CII emission in this outflow associated to an intermediate mass protostar. These observations will be combined with Herschel observations of water line emission, and with previous CO data from various telescopes (IRAM 30m, PdBI, JCMT, Herschel, and most importantly, SOFIA). Their analysis will benefit from the important work initiated since the Cycle 0 of SOFIA, which has enabled our team to accurately link spatial structures (the jet, the outflow cavity, the terminal bowshock in the southern outflow lobe) to spectral components seen in the CO line profiles, and to precisely constrain the associated physical conditions by means of LVG methods or shock models. The goal is to precisely understand the water chemistry and to characterize the energetic impacts of the outflow based on a self-consistent and unique dataset that will allow us to fully characterize the associated shocks. Such a work is necessary also to understand the processes of formation of stars of intermediate mass with respect to their low-mass counterparts.

  7. Asymmetric ionospheric outflow observed at the dayside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Zhang, H.; Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, Y.; Otto, A.; Rème, H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2015-05-01

    An important source of the terrestrial magnetospheric plasma is the Earth's ionospheric outflows from the high-latitude regions of both hemispheres. The ionospheric ion outflows have rarely been observed at the dayside magnetopause. We report Cluster observations of the ionospheric ion outflows observed at the dayside magnetopause. The low-energy (up to 1.5 keV) electrons are detected with bidirectional pitch angle distributions indicating that the magnetic field lines are closed. The unidirectional cold ions (< 200 eV) are observed in the magnetosphere by both C1 and C3. The pitch angle distributions (0∘-75∘) of the cold ions (< 1 keV) at the dayside magnetopause indicate that these cold ions are the ionospheric outflows coming only from the Southern Hemisphere. The cold ions (< 200 eV) fluxes are modulated by the ULF wave electric field. Two different species (possibly H+ and He+) are observed in the magnetosphere. Our results suggest that the ionospheric outflows can directly reach the dayside magnetopause region and may participate in the reconnection process.

  8. Left ventricular assist device outflow graft: alternative sites.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M; Aftab, Muhammad; Singh, Steve K; Mallidi, Hari R; Frazier, Oscar H

    2014-09-01

    We describe three alternative approaches for the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) outflow graft during implantation of the LVAD. The supraceliac abdominal aorta, innominate artery and left axillary artery were employed as alternative sites for the LVAD outflow graft in the setting of a heavily calcified ascending aorta or a hostile chest wall and mediastinum. The first approach involved the use of the supraceliac abdominal aorta. Given that the patient had a history of multiple previous breast surgeries and chest wall radiation for breast cancer treatment, a left subcostal incision was employed as a sternotomy-sparing approach. The second approach was the use of the innominate artery in a patient with a porcelain ascending aorta. The patient underwent pulmonary valve replacement, right ventricle outflow tract reconstruction and tricuspid valve annuloplasty in addition to the LVAD implantation. The third approach was the use of the left axillary artery. This patient had a history of LVAD implantation and subsequently developed infection with pseudoaneurysm formation at the aortic anastomosis of the outflow graft. We conclude that the supraceliac abdominal aorta, the innominate artery and the left axillary artery are potential alternative routes for the LVAD outflow graft in the settings of heavily calcified ascending aorta or a hostile chest wall and mediastinum. Although the described alternative approaches are safe and viable options, we highly recommend utilizing these approaches only in selected patients with significantly higher risks and hazards to the standard surgical approach.

  9. The Molecular Gas Outflow of NGC 1068 Imaged by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Burillo, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have used the ALMA array to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), and CS(7-6)) in the central r˜2 kpc of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with spatial resolutions ˜0.3″-0.5″ (˜20-35 pc). The sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA give a detailed view of the distribution and kinematics of the dense molecular gas. The gas kinematics from r˜50 pc out to r˜400 pc reveal a massive outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet, and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN driven. The outflow rate estimated in the CND, M/dt˜63+21-37 M⊙ yr-1, is an order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate at these radii. The molecular outflow could quench star formation in the inner r˜400 pc of the galaxy on short timescales of ≤1 Myr and regulate gas accretion in the CND.

  10. VEGF as a Paracrine Regulator of Conventional Outflow Facility

    PubMed Central

    Reina-Torres, Ester; Wen, Joanne C.; Liu, Katy C.; Li, Guorong; Sherwood, Joseph M.; Chang, Jason Y. H.; Challa, Pratap; Flügel-Koch, Cassandra M.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Allingham, R. Rand; Overby, Darryl R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates microvascular endothelial permeability, and the permeability of Schlemm's canal (SC) endothelium influences conventional aqueous humor outflow. We hypothesize that VEGF signaling regulates outflow facility. Methods We measured outflow facility (C) in enucleated mouse eyes perfused with VEGF-A164a, VEGF-A165b, VEGF-D, or inhibitors to VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). We monitored VEGF-A secretion from human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells by ELISA after 24 hours of static culture or cyclic stretch. We used immunofluorescence microscopy to localize VEGF-A protein within the TM of mice. Results VEGF-A164a increased C in enucleated mouse eyes. Cyclic stretch increased VEGF-A secretion by human TM cells, which corresponded to VEGF-A localization in the TM of mice. Blockade of VEGFR-2 decreased C, using either of the inhibitors SU5416 or Ki8751 or the inactive splice variant VEGF-A165b. VEGF-D increased C, which could be blocked by Ki8751. Conclusions VEGF is a paracrine regulator of conventional outflow facility that is secreted by TM cells in response to mechanical stress. VEGF affects facility via VEGFR-2 likely at the level of SC endothelium. Disruption of VEGF signaling in the TM may explain why anti-VEGF therapy is associated with decreased outflow facility and sustained ocular hypertension. PMID:28358962

  11. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, Amélie; Ishola, David A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Van der Giezen, Dionne M; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the factors contributing to the pathophysiology of UUO, highlighting the role of oxidative stress.

  12. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dendooven, Amélie; Ishola, David A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Van der Giezen, Dionne M; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A

    2011-01-01

    Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the factors contributing to the pathophysiology of UUO, highlighting the role of oxidative stress. PMID:20804541

  13. Electrochemical Machining Removes Deep Obstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catania, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical machining (ECM) is effective way of removing obstructing material between two deep holes supposed to intersect but do not because of misalignment of drilling tools. ECM makes it possible to rework costly castings otherwise scrapped. Method fast even for tough or hard alloys and complicated three-dimensional shapes.

  14. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  15. Virtual Cardiac Surgery Using CFD: Application to Septal Myectomy in Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Mittal, Rajat; Abraham, Theodore

    2011-11-01

    Obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is characterized by ventricular wall thickening, diastolic dysfunction, and dynamic outflow tract obstruction, all of which strongly influence the vortex dynamics and pressure distribution in the left ventricle (LV). Severe cases of HCM are usually managed through septal myectomy where the surgeon resects the hypertrophic mass. Surgeons currently try to remove as much tissue as possible in order to optimize the post surgical result. However, excessive debulking increases the chance of ventricular septal defects, bundle branch block or complete heart block, and aneurysmal septal thinning. On the other hand, insufficient tissue removal also leads to unsatisfactory outcomes in terms of reduction of outflow tract pressure gradient. Knowing how much muscle to remove and where to remove it from could reduce the likelihood of complications and suboptimal outcomes. In the present study, we employ an immersed boundary solver to model the effect of septal myectomy for ventricles with HOCM and demonstrate the potential of such an approach for surgical planning. Computational resources were provided by the National Institute of Computational Science under Tergrid grant number TG-CTS100002.

  16. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  17. Xq28 duplication presenting with intestinal and bladder dysfunction and a distinctive facial appearance

    PubMed Central

    Clayton-Smith, Jill; Walters, Sarah; Hobson, Emma; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Smith, Rupert; Toutain, Annick; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Mansour, Sahar; Fitzpatrick, David; Ciccone, Roberto; Ricca, Ivana; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Donnai, Dian

    2009-01-01

    Xq28 duplications encompassing MECP2 have been described in male patients with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypotonia and spasticity, severe learning disability and recurrent pneumonia. We identified an Xq28 duplication in three families where several male patients had presented with intestinal pseudo-obstruction or bladder distension. The affected boys had similar dysmorphic facial appearances. Subsequently, we ascertained seven further families where the proband presented with similar features. We demonstrated duplications of the Xq28 region in five of these additional families. In addition to MECP2, these duplications encompassed several other genes already known to be associated with diseases including SLC6A8, L1CAM and Filamin A (FLNA). The two remaining families were shown to have intragenic duplications of FLNA only. We discuss which elements of the Xq28 duplication phenotype may be associated with the various genes in the duplication. We propose that duplication of FLNA may contribute to the bowel and bladder phenotype seen in these seven families. PMID:18854860

  18. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations.

  19. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nagendra Nath

    2015-10-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner's lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion-starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation.

  20. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner’s lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion—starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation. PMID:26816851