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Sample records for blank continuous casting

  1. Steps toward 8m honeycomb mirror blanks. III - 1.8m honeycomb sandwich blanks cast from borosilicate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The design, fabrication techniques, and equipment used for producing two 1.8-m honeycomb sandwich blanks, eventually leading to production of 8-m blanks, are reported. The procedure employed 85 cast hexagonal tiles at the bottom section, affixed against flotation by SiC bolts. The two plano concave mirrors are 1.83 m thick, weight 500 kg, and are each designed for 19 supports of astatic-lever type. Both blanks are of high quality and with an adequately low bubble content; one is to be figured to high-precision 0.25-arcsecond images, and is to be tested on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Construction of a spin-casting facility based on the same principle is being planned for test-fabricating spin-cast mirrors on a smaller scale.

  2. A Comparative Study of Hot Deformation Behaviors for Sand Casting and Centrifugal Casting Q235B Flange Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fangcheng; Li, Yongtang; Ju, Li

    2017-03-01

    Hot compression tests of sand casting and centrifugal casting Q235B flange blanks were performed at strain rate range of 0.01-5 s-1 and temperature range of 850-1,150 °C. The evolutions of microstructure and texture were revealed. The constitutive models based on Arrhenius constitutive modeling were proposed by considering the effects of strain on material constants. The results show that recrystallization in centrifugal casting Q235B is more apparent than that in sand casting, resulting in the finer grains and lower flow stress for centrifugal casting Q235B. The intensities of textures slightly weaken with the increase of temperature. At 1,050 °C and 5 s-1, the textures of sand casting are characterized by strong {001}<100> and {001}<110>, which are related with severe deformation, while the textures of centrifugal casting are composed of {110}<110> and {111}<112>, which are related with dynamic recovery and shear deformation. A good agreement between the predicted and experimental flow stress is achieved and demonstrates that the proposed constitutive models are reliable.

  3. Technology and experiments of 42CrMo bearing ring forming based on casting ring blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongtang; Ju, Li; Qi, Huiping; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Guozhen; Wang, Mingli

    2014-03-01

    Bearing ring is the crucial component of bearing. With regard to such problems as material waste, low efficiency and high energy consumption in current process of producing large bearing ring, a new process named "casting-rolling compound forming technology" is researched by taking the typical 42CrMo slew bearing as object. Through theoretical analysis, the design criteria of the main casting-rolling forming parameters are put forward at first. Then the constitutive relationship model of as-cast 42CrMo steel and its mathematical model of dynamic recrystallization are obtained according to the results of the hot compression experiment. By a coupled thermal-mechanical finite element model for radial-axial rolling of bearing ring, the fraction of dynamic recrystallization is calculated and recrystallized grains size are predicated. Meanwhile, the effects of the initial rolling temperature and feed rate of idle roll on material microstructure evolution are analyzed. Finally, the industrial rolling experiment is designed and performed, based on the simulation results. In addition, mechanical and metallographic tests are conducted on rolled bearing ring to get the mechanical parameters and metallographic structure. The experimental data and results show that the mechanical properties of bearing ring produced by casting-rolling compound forming technology are up to industrial standard, and a qualified bearing ring can be successfully formed by employing this new technology. Through the study, a process of forming large bearing ring directly by using casting ring blank is obtained, which could provide an effective theoretical guidance for manufacturing large ring parts. It also has an edge in saving material, lowering energy and improving efficiency.

  4. Microstructure-Texture-Mechanical Properties in Hot Rolling of a Centrifugal Casting Ring Blank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fang-cheng; Li, Yong-tang; Qi, Hui-ping; Ju, Li

    2016-03-01

    Deformation characteristic of centrifugal casting 25Mn steel was investigated by compression tests, and then processing maps were established. According to the deformation parameters identified from the established processing maps and hot ring rolling (HRR) process, the industrial test for the 25Mn ring blank was performed. Optical microscope (OM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used for detecting grain boundary features and textures of deformation structures. The morphologies and mechanisms of tensile and impact fracture were revealed. The results show that softening effect plays a dominant role in higher temperatures of 1050-1150 °C and strain rates lower than 0.1 s-1. The average grain size of the rolled 25Mn ring is about 28 μm, but the grains are more coarse and inhomogeneous on the middle layer than that on rest of the areas. The texture on the outer layer is characterized by strong {110} <112> and weak {112} <111>, followed by {001} <100> and {001} <110> on the inner layer and {110} <110> on the center layer, which is mainly associated with the shear deformation. The rolled ring with precise geometrical dimensions and sound mechanical properties is fabricated by HRR. Tensile fracture is composed of clear river-shaped pattern and a little dimple near the inner layer and outer layer, and the fracture mechanism is mainly quasi-cleavage fracture, accompanied by dimple fracture. The morphologies of impact fracture consist of tear ridge and cleavage platform.

  5. Iron/Phosphorus Alloys for Continuous Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous casting becomes practicable because of reduced eutectic temperature. Experimental ferrous alloy has melting point about 350 degrees C lower than conventional steels, making possible to cast structural members and eliminating need for hot rolling. Product has normal metal structure and good physical properties. Process used to make rails, beams, slabs, channels, and pipes.

  6. The continuous production of stir cast material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoen, A.

    1986-06-01

    The production of AlSi8 extrusion billets using a semicontinuous caster is described. The continuous casting process and the process parameters are outlined. The mathematical model, developed to calculate the temperature distribution within the billet during casting as a function of the process parameters, is explained. Quality control focussed on inversion segregation which causes the formation of a surface layer with a different structure and composition, imposing peeling of billets. Product development focussed on the production of stir-cast material of the same AlSi8 alloy. The use of AlSi8 as a wrought alloy by modification of the structure by stirring is discussed.

  7. The optimisation of the viscosity of lubricating slags used in the continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Csaba Attila; Hepuť, Teodor; Popa, Erika

    2016-06-01

    In the steel continuous casting process, the mould lubrication has a very important technological role, with direct effects on the continuous cast blank quality. The lubrication process is directly influenced by the synthetic flux viscosity (slag thickness), which is determined on its turn by the chemical composition and the temperature. The researches made aimed to establish some correlation relationships between the viscosity, chemical composition and temperature, analytically and graphically expressed, by processing the data in the Matlab program. Based on these correlations the best chemical compositions of the lubrication fluxes are established.

  8. Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2012-03-31

    This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

  9. Multiphysics modeling of the steel continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbeler, Lance C.

    This work develops a macroscale, multiphysics model of the continuous casting of steel. The complete model accounts for the turbulent flow and nonuniform distribution of superheat in the molten steel, the elastic-viscoplastic thermal shrinkage of the solidifying shell, the heat transfer through the shell-mold interface with variable gap size, and the thermal distortion of the mold. These models are coupled together with carefully constructed boundary conditions with the aid of reduced-order models into a single tool to investigate behavior in the mold region, for practical applications such as predicting ideal tapers for a beam-blank mold. The thermal and mechanical behaviors of the mold are explored as part of the overall modeling effort, for funnel molds and for beam-blank molds. These models include high geometric detail and reveal temperature variations on the mold-shell interface that may be responsible for cracks in the shell. Specifically, the funnel mold has a column of mold bolts in the middle of the inside-curve region of the funnel that disturbs the uniformity of the hot face temperatures, which combined with the bending effect of the mold on the shell, can lead to longitudinal facial cracks. The shoulder region of the beam-blank mold shows a local hot spot that can be reduced with additional cooling in this region. The distorted shape of the funnel mold narrow face is validated with recent inclinometer measurements from an operating caster. The calculated hot face temperatures and distorted shapes of the mold are transferred into the multiphysics model of the solidifying shell. The boundary conditions for the first iteration of the multiphysics model come from reduced-order models of the process; one such model is derived in this work for mold heat transfer. The reduced-order model relies on the physics of the solution to the one-dimensional heat-conduction equation to maintain the relationships between inputs and outputs of the model. The geometric

  10. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  11. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  12. Electromagnetic continuous casting project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Rote, D.M.; Misra, B.; Praeg, W.F.; Hull, J.R.; Turner, L.R.; Shah, V.L.; Lari, R.J.; Gopalsami, N.; Wiencek, T.

    1988-10-01

    This report describes the work on development of an electromagnetic casting process for steel, which was carried out at Argonne National Laboratory between January 1985 and December 1987. This effort was concerned principally with analysis and design work on magnet technology, liquid metal feed system, coolant system, and sensors and process controllers. Experimentation primarily involved (1) electromagnetic studies to determine the conditions and controlling parameters for stable levitation and (2) feed-system studies to establish important parameters that control and influence fluid flow from the liquid metal source to the caster. 73 refs., 91 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Sumpman, Wayne C.; Baker, Robert J.; Williams, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles 19 against the inner surface of rim 13 at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers 30 through return pipes 25 distributed interstitially among the nozzles.

  14. Cooling system for continuous metal casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Sumpman, W.C.; Baker, R.J.; Williams, R.S.

    1988-06-07

    A continuous metal caster cooling system is provided in which water is supplied in jets from a large number of small nozzles against the inner surface of rim at a temperature and with sufficient pressure that the velocity of the jets is sufficiently high that the mode of heat transfer is substantially by forced convection, the liquid being returned from the cooling chambers through return pipes distributed interstitially among the nozzles. 9 figs.

  15. 40 CFR 420.60 - Applicability; description of the continuous casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous casting subcategory. 420.60 Section 420.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Continuous Casting Subcategory § 420.60 Applicability; description of the continuous casting subcategory....

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-cast 42CrMo Ring Blank During Hot Rolling and Subsequent Quenching and Tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fangcheng; Li, Yongtang; Qi, Huiping; Wei, Xiaojian

    2017-01-01

    The hot rolling of as-cast 42CrMo ring blank and its subsequent quenching and tempering were conducted based on the casting-rolling compound forming technique. The effects of feed rate and tempering temperature on the microstructure were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the rolled rings were examined. The results show that when the feed rate of the idle roll increases, the degree of grain refinement becomes slightly smaller and the average grain size is approximately 44 μm through the whole thickness of the rolled ring. The microstructure is inhomogeneous near the center-layer and minimum spread region, which is characterized by a small amount of irregular and coarse grain. The strength and hardness of the hot-rolled rings are high, and the plasticity and toughness are relatively low. The depth and diameter of the dimples in the fracture of the ring fabricated with a low feed rate are larger than those of the ring fabricated with a high feed rate. The carbide particles cannot be observed in the rolled rings after the rings are quenched and tempered at 803 K, but the fine and dispersed particles are precipitated by tempering at 863 K. As a result, the mechanical properties are significantly improved and satisfy the technical demands after quenching and tempering. The fractures of both tensile and impact specimens are characterized by regular and fine dimples at a higher tempering temperature, which indicates that a dimple fracture and an excellent combination of strength, plasticity and toughness are obtained.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of As-cast 42CrMo Ring Blank During Hot Rolling and Subsequent Quenching and Tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fangcheng; Li, Yongtang; Qi, Huiping; Wei, Xiaojian

    2017-03-01

    The hot rolling of as-cast 42CrMo ring blank and its subsequent quenching and tempering were conducted based on the casting-rolling compound forming technique. The effects of feed rate and tempering temperature on the microstructure were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the rolled rings were examined. The results show that when the feed rate of the idle roll increases, the degree of grain refinement becomes slightly smaller and the average grain size is approximately 44 μm through the whole thickness of the rolled ring. The microstructure is inhomogeneous near the center-layer and minimum spread region, which is characterized by a small amount of irregular and coarse grain. The strength and hardness of the hot-rolled rings are high, and the plasticity and toughness are relatively low. The depth and diameter of the dimples in the fracture of the ring fabricated with a low feed rate are larger than those of the ring fabricated with a high feed rate. The carbide particles cannot be observed in the rolled rings after the rings are quenched and tempered at 803 K, but the fine and dispersed particles are precipitated by tempering at 863 K. As a result, the mechanical properties are significantly improved and satisfy the technical demands after quenching and tempering. The fractures of both tensile and impact specimens are characterized by regular and fine dimples at a higher tempering temperature, which indicates that a dimple fracture and an excellent combination of strength, plasticity and toughness are obtained.

  18. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  19. Free boundary problems in electromagnetic levitation melting and continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnoud, A.; Leclercq, I.

    1988-01-01

    Two applications of the melting in cold crucibles are presented: continuous casting and levitation melting. These processes are typical examples of coupled phenomena. A free boundary problem has to be solved to determine the equilibrium shape of molten metal with respect to the electrical and geometrical parameters of the system. The magnetic field distribution is calculated by using a boundary integral method. The free surface can be deduced from a global analysis, that is based on the minimization of the total energy of the system. The derivation with respect to the domain leads to a rapid convergence toward the solution.

  20. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guojie, Huang; Shuisheng, Xie; Lei, Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 K˜1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/h˜10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/s˜4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  1. Metallographic problems of the production of parts from continuously cast high-speed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supov, A. V.; Aleksandrova, N. M.; Paren'kov, S. A.; Kakabadze, R. V.; Pavlov, V. P.

    1998-09-01

    It has been assumed until recently that high-speed steels cannot be produced by the method of continuous casting. Numerous attempts to use this highly efficient technology for manufacturing such steels have failed because of breakage of the cast preforms. A solution was sought in improving the design of the continuous-casting machines (CCM), increasing the level of their automation, and using rational compositions of slag-forming mixtures (SFM). The idea was that a high-speed steel can be cast only in vertical CCM. The present work concerns regimes of secondary cooling under which the structures formed in high-speed steels provide a ductility sufficient for bending the continuously cast preform without failure. Steel R6M5 cast continuously in such a machine can easily be machined into hot-rolled preforms for sheets, wire, silver-steel rods, and other final products without a forging stage.

  2. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  3. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  4. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  5. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  6. 7 CFR 201.35 - Blank spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Blank spaces. 201.35 Section 201.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS Labeling in General § 201.35 Blank spaces. Blank spaces on the label shall be deemed to imply...

  7. Structural Factors Affecting Formability of Continuous Cast Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This research will focus on determining the influence of the cast microstructure and the spatial distribution of the intermetallic constituents and dispersion phases of the microtexture during deformation and recrystallization.

  8. Numerical simulation of the solidification processes of copper during vacuum continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, D. C.; Hwang, W. S.

    2012-03-01

    A numerical simulation method is used to analyze the microstructure evolution of 8-mm-diameter copper rods during the vacuum continuous casting (VCC) process. The macro-microscopic coupling method is adopted to develop a temperature field model and a microstructure prediction model. The effects of casting parameters, including casting speed, pouring temperature, cooling rate, and casting dimension on the location and shape of the solid-liquid (S/L) interface and solidified microstructure are considered. Simulation results show that the casting speed has a large effect on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology. With an increase of casting speed, the shape of the S/L interface changes from a planar shape into an elliptical shape or a narrow, pear shape, and the grain morphology indicates a change from axial growth to axial-radial growth or completely radial growth. The simulation predictions agree well with the microstructure observations of cast specimens. Further analysis of the effects of other casting parameters on the position and shape of the S/L interface reveals that the casting dimension has more influence on the position and shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology than do pouring temperature and cooling rate. The simulation results can be summarized to obtain a discriminant of shape factor (η), which defines the shape of the S/L interface and grain morphology.

  9. Macrosegregation Improvement by Swirling Flow Nozzle for Bloom Continuous Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2014-06-01

    Based on mathematical model coupling electromagnetism, fluid flow, heat transfer, and solute transport, the metallurgical performances of conventional straight nozzle, swirling flow nozzle (SFN), and M-EMS have been evaluated and compared. The soundness improvement of bloom castings has been investigated by casting tests of adopting the newly designed SFN. As compared to the normal nozzle, center porosity has been eliminated along with the popular center radial crack, and a better chemical homogeneity was obtained by employing the SFN accordingly, where the maximum segregation degree of C and S at the strand cross section is decreased from 1.28 to 1.02 and from 1.32 to 1.06, respectively. Combined with the results of numerical simulation, the positive effect obtained can be attributed to the remarkable superheat dissipation under the implementation of SFN, where, compared with the normal nozzle, the melt superheat degree at the mold exit is reduced by 15.5 K, 9.8 K, and 17.3 K (15.5 °C, 9.8 °C, and 17.3 °C) under the other three casting measures of SFN, normal nozzle with M-EMS, and SFN with M-EMS, respectively.

  10. Modeling on Fluid Flow and Inclusion Motion in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2016-08-01

    During the centrifugal continuous casting process, unreasonable casting parameters can cause violent level fluctuation, serious gas entrainment, and formation of frozen shell pieces at the meniscus. Thus, in the current study, a three-dimensional multiphase turbulent model was established to study the transport phenomena during centrifugal continuous casting process. The effects of nozzle position, casting and rotational speed on the flow pattern, centrifugal force acting on the molten steel, level fluctuation, gas entrainment, shear stress on mold wall, and motion of inclusions during centrifugal continuous casting process were investigated. Volume of Fluid model was used to simulate the molten steel-air two-phase. The level fluctuation and the gas entrainment during casting were calculated by user-developed subroutines. The trajectory of inclusions in the rotating system was calculated using the Lagrangian approach. The results show that during centrifugal continuous casting, a large amount of gas was entrained into the molten steel, and broken into bubbles of various sizes. The greater the distance to the mold wall, the smaller the centrifugal force. Rotation speed had the most important influence on the centrifugal force distribution at the side region. Angular moving angle of the nozzle with 8° and keeping the rotation speed with 60 revolutions per minute can somehow stabilize the level fluctuation. The increase of angular angle of nozzle from 8 to 18 deg and rotation speed from 40 to 80 revolutions per minute favored to decrease the total volume of entrained bubbles, while the increase of distance of nozzle moving left and casting speed had reverse effects. The trajectories of inclusions in the mold were irregular, and then rotated along the strand length. After penetrating a certain distance, the inclusions gradually moved to the center of billet and gathered there. More work, such as the heat transfer, the solidification, and the inclusions entrapment

  11. A Thermal Simulation Method for Solidification Process of Steel Slab in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Honggang; Chen, Xiangru; Han, Qingyou; Han, Ke; Zhai, Qijie

    2016-10-01

    Eighty years after the invention of continuous cast of steels, reproducibility from few mm3 samples in the laboratory to m3 product in plants is still a challenge. We have engineered a thermal simulation method to simulate the continuous casting process. The temperature gradient ( G L ) and dendritic growth rate ( v) of the slab were reproduced by controlling temperature and cooling intensity at hot and chill end, respectively, in our simulation samples. To verify that our samples can simulate the cast slab in continuous casting process, the heat transfer, solidification structure, and macrosegregation of the simulating sample were compared to those of a much larger continuous casting slab. The morphology of solid/liquid interface, solidified shell thickness, and dendritic growth rate were also investigated by in situ quenching the solidifying sample. Shell thickness ( δ) determined by our quenching experiment was related to solidification time ( τ) by equation: δ = 4.27 × τ 0.38. The results indicated that our method closely simulated the solidification process of continuous casting.

  12. Niobium carbide and tin precipitation in continuously cast microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Julian

    With high yield strength, toughness and good weldability, microalloyed steels are widely used in the automotive, pipeline and transportation industries. Microalloying elements such as niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V) in concentrations of less than 0.1 wt. pct. are typical. For optimal benefits in the final product, it is usually desired for Ti to form fine precipitates during and after solidification and for Nb to be in solution prior to hot-rolling. Vanadium precipitates at lower temperatures and is less involved in the solidification/casting process. In one aspect of the investigation, the effects of cooling rate on the titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation size distribution were investigated in a Ti-added low-carbon steel. Prior research reported an inverse relationship between the average TiN precipitation size and the post-solidification cooling rate and the present work was undertaken to examine this behavior over a wider range of cooling rates. Using the GleebleRTM 3500's casting simulation capabilities along with controlled cooling rates, the TiN precipitation behavior in thick-slab, thin-slab and thin-strip material was simulated using a commercially produced 0.04C, 1.23Mn steel with near-stoichiometric Ti and N levels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of carbon extraction replicas was carried out to characterize the influence of cooling rates on precipitate size distributions. Decreasing particle sizes with increasing cooling rates were found. Average particle sizes as low as 6.7 nm were present in thin-strip simulations and might be of interest, as fine particles could contribute to strengthening of rapidly cooled steels. In a second aspect of the investigation, niobium carbide (NbC) precipitation during the compact strip production (CSP) process was investigated in two Nb-added low-carbon steels. Instead of industrial sampling, the GleebleRTM was used for casting simulations using two CMn(Nb) steels with high and low- Nb

  13. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    DOEpatents

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  14. Empowerment with knowledge— toward the intelligent mold for the continuous casting of steel billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J. K.

    1993-12-01

    A never-ending challenge to the competitiveness of the steel industry is the application of knowledge on the shop floor where, finally, productivity and quality are realized. The impedi-ments to the effective implementation of knowledge are largely people related and range from the level of education of the work force to entrenched attitudes of management. The develop-ment of the continuous-casting process for the production of steel billets, upon which this lecture focuses, is but one example. Looking back over 20 years, it is clear that the billet industry, in its infancy, was in a state of confusion, operating without casting standards coupled to quality, such that individual companies had developed very different practices. Research over 2 decades has established the knowledge base for the continuous casting of quality billets and set much needed standards for the design, operation, and maintenance of casting machines. The challenge now is in knowledge transfer and implementation with the aid of expert systems. Thus, the expert system for continuous casting and the concept of the intelligent billet casting mold have evolved to transcend other forms of knowledge transfer like publications and short courses. The intelligent mold effectively transfers knowledge on line to the shop floor through the combi-nation of sensors (thermocouples and load cells), signal recognition based on years of research, mathematical models of heat flow in the solidifying shell and mold, understanding of the mech-anisms of quality problems, and the formulation of a response to a given set of casting con-ditions, all controlled by an expert system. In this lecture, the drive to develop, transfer, and implement knowledge on the continuous casting of quality billets is explored. Lessons for the future are drawn from successes, failures, and frustrations in the past.

  15. Solidification Microstructure of AISI M2 High Speed Steel Manufactured by the Horizontal Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. F.; Fang, F.; Jiang, J. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, AISI M2 high speed steel is produced by the horizontal continuous casting process. The difference of solidification microstructure in ingots by mould casting and continuous casting has been examined by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution electron microscope (HREM). The results show that the as-cast structure consists of iron matrix and networks of M2C eutectic carbides, which are greatly refined in the continuous casting ingot compared to the case of ingot by mould casting. Meanwhile, the morphology of M2C eutectic carbides changes from the plate-like shape into the fibrous one. Micro-twining and stacking faults are observed in the plate-like M2C, whereas they are rarely identified in the fibrous M2C. Based on the characteristic of morphology and microstructure, it is expected that the plate-like M2C is a faceted phase while the fibrous M2C is a non-faceted phase.

  16. 40 CFR 420.60 - Applicability; description of the continuous casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the continuous casting subcategory. 420.60 Section 420.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE...

  17. Effect of the defect initial shape on the fatigue lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasniy, Oleh P.; Lapusta, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the influence of the defect initial shape on the residual lifetime of a continuous casting machine roll made of 25Cr1MoV steel. Based on this approach, previously proposed by some authors, the growth of the surface fatigue crack was modeled in a roll under loading and temperature conditions that are close to operational ones, taking into account the statistical distribution of the C parameter of Paris' equation. Dependencies of the continuous casting machines roll fatigue lifetime on the initial defect shape and critical defect sizes are obtained.

  18. A Study of the Oscillation Marks' Characteristics of Continuously Cast Incoloy Alloy 825 Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental study of oscillation mark (OM) formation and its characteristics during the solidification of Incoloy alloy 825 in the continuous casting of blooms is investigated by plant trials and metallographic study. The experiments involved two heats with the same casting and mold conditions and sampling at different locations across the strand. The metallographic study combined macro/micro-examinations of OMs and segregation analysis of Cr, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Si by microprobe analysis. The results show that OMs have widely different characteristics, such as mark type, depth, segregation, and accompanying microstructure. Furthermore, the mark pitch can vary considerably even for the similar casting conditions, leading to different conditions for the marks' formation in relation to the mold's cyclic movement. Finally, a mechanism for the OM formation is discussed and proposed. Possible solutions for minimizing the observed defects by optimizing the mold conditions are suggested.

  19. Infiltration of Slag Film into the Grooves on a Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Wook; Jeong, Hee-Tae

    2013-02-01

    An analytical model is developed to clarify the slag film infiltration into grooves on a copper mold during the continuous casting of steel slabs. A grooved-type casting mold was applied to investigate the infiltration of slag film into the grooves of a pitch of 0.8 mm, width of 0.7 mm, and depth of 0.6 mm at the vicinity of a meniscus. The plant trial tests were carried out at a casting speed of 5.5 m min-1. The slag film captured at a commercial thin slab casting plant showed that both the overall and the liquid film thickness were decreased exponentially as the distance from the meniscus increases. In contrast, the infiltration of slag film into the grooves had been increased with increasing distance from the meniscus. A theoretic model has been derived based on the measured profile of slag film thickness to calculate the infiltration of slag film into the grooves. It successfully reproduces the empirical observation that infiltration ratio increased sharply along casting direction, about 80 pct at 50 mm and 95 pct at 150 mm below the meniscus. In the model calculation, the infiltration of slag film increases with increasing groove width and/or surface tension of the slag. The effect of groove depth is negligible when the width to depth ratio of the groove is larger than unity. It is expected that the developed model for slag film infiltration in this study will be widely utilized to optimize the design of groove dimensions in continuous casting molds.

  20. Differences in microstructure and texture of Al-Mg sheets produced by twin-roll continuous casting and by direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Slamova, M.; Karlik, M.; Robaut, F.; Slama, P.; Veron, M

    2002-10-15

    Over the last two decades, the use of aluminum sheets in automotive applications has increased. Aluminum sheets are currently produced from direct-chill (DC) cast plates. The need for low-cost aluminum sheets is a challenge for the development of new materials produced by twin-roll continuous (TRC) casting and cold rolling. It is expected that the sheets produced from these different casting procedures can differ in their microstructure. Therefore, they can exhibit different formability behavior. The paper presents the results of the microstructural characterization and texture evaluation of aluminum sheets produced by both technologies. Sheets produced from twin-roll cast materials have much finer and more numerous second-phase particles, the grain structures of both types of materials are similar. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for texture evaluation and both confirmed the presence of stronger cube texture in the strips produced from DC-cast plates.

  1. Evaluation and Characterization of In-Line Annealed Continuous Cast Aluminum Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Subodh K. Das

    2006-01-17

    This R&D program will develop optimized, energy-efficient thermo-mechanical processing procedures for in-line annealing of continuously cast hot bands of two 5000 series aluminum alloys (5754 and 5052). The implementation of the R&D will result in the production of sheet with improved formability at high levels of productivity consistency and quality. The proposed R&D involves the following efforts: (1) Design and build continuous in-line annealing equipment for plant-scale trials; (2) Carry out plant-scale trials at Commonwealth Aluminum Corp.'s (CAC) plant in Carson; (3) Optimize the processing variables utilizing a metallurgical model for the kinetics of microstructure and texture evolution during thermo-mechanical processing; (4) Determine the effects of processing variables on the microstructure, texture, mechanical properties, and formability of aluminum sheet; (5) Develop design parameters for commercial implementation; and (6) Conduct techno-economic studies of the recommended process equipment to identify impacts on production costs. The research and development is appropriate for the domestic industry as it will result in improved aluminum processing capabilities and thus lead to greater application of aluminum in various industries including the automotive market. A teaming approach is critical to the success of this effort as no single company alone possesses the breadth of technical and financial resources for successfully carrying out the effort. This program will enable more energy efficient aluminum sheet production technology, produce consistent high quality product, and have The proposal addresses the needs of the aluminum industry as stated in the aluminum industry roadmap by developing new and improved aluminum processes utilizing energy efficient techniques. The effort is primarily related to the subsection on Rolling and Extrusion with the R&D to address energy and environmental efficiencies in aluminum manufacturing and will provide

  2. Online Measurement for Transient Mold Friction Based on the Hydraulic Oscillators of Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Yao, Man

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of the strand shell surface and mold copper plates has significant effects on the slab surface quality and casting productivity. This article focuses on developing a reliable approach to measure the transient friction force between the slab and the mold for the purpose of the investigation of lubrication and friction behavior inside a mold. This method is presented to monitor transient mold frictions for the slab continuous caster equipped with hydraulic oscillators. A mathematical model is also developed to calculate the empty working force of the no casting state, and a new algorithm, based on the particle swarm optimization, is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristic parameters of mold oscillation. The results have shown that the method has a sufficient sensitivity to variation, especially to the periodical variation of the mold friction, and it has been identified that the transient mold friction can be used as an effective index with regard to detecting mold oscillation and optimizing the casting parameters for process control. It may lay the practical foundation for the online detection of powder lubrication and the visualization of the continuous-casting mold process.

  3. Argon bubble behavior in slide-gate tundish nozzles during continuous casting of steel slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hua

    2000-10-01

    Argon injection into a tundish nozzle is an efficient and widely employed method to reduce nozzle clogging in the continuous casting process. It also affects casting operation and product quality by changing the flow pattern in the nozzle and mold. The current work combines mathematical modeling and experiments to investigate the argon bubble behavior in slide-gate nozzles and to analyze phenomena related to product defects and operational problems during the continuous casting of steel slabs. Water model experiments are performed to study bubble formation behavior, including bubble size, frequency, mode and effects of variables such as liquid velocity, gas injection flow rate, gas injection hole size and gas density. An analytical model is developed to predict the average bubble size. Argon gas bubbles are predicted to be 1--5mm. This is larger than air bubbles in water, especially at low speed. A three-dimensional finite difference model is developed to study the turbulent flow of liquid steel and argon bubble in the slide-gate nozzles. Experiments are performed on a 0.4-scale "water caster" to verify the model by comparing the model prediction with the measurements using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technology. A weighted average scheme for the overall outflow is developed to quantify jet characteristics such as jet angle, jet speed, back flow zone fraction, turbulence and biased mass flow. Swirl is generated at nozzle ports. The validated model is employed to perform extensive parametric studies to investigate the effects of casting operation conditions such as gas injection, slide-gate orientation, casting speed, gate opening and bubble size and nozzle port design including port angle and port shape. The interrelated effects of nozzle clogging, argon injection, tundish bath depth, slide gate opening and nozzle bore diameter on the flow rate and pressure in tundish nozzles are quantified using an inverse model, based on interpolation of the numerical

  4. Improvement of Castability and Surface Quality of Continuously Cast TWIP Slabs by Molten Mold Flux Feeding Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Wook; Yoo, Shin; Park, Min-Seok; Park, Joong-Kil; Moon, Ki-Hyeon

    2017-02-01

    An innovative continuous casting process named POCAST (POSCO's advanced CASting Technology) was developed based on molten mold flux feeding technology to improve both the productivity and the surface quality of cast slabs. In this process, molten mold flux is fed into the casting mold to enhance the thermal insulation of the meniscus and, hence, the lubrication between the solidifying steel shell and the copper mold. Enhancement of both the castability and the surface quality of high-aluminum advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) slabs is one of the most important advantages when the new process has been applied into the commercial continuous casting process. A trial cast of TWIP steel has been carried out using a 10-ton scale pilot caster and 100-ton scale and 250-ton scale commercial casters. The amount of mold flux consumption was more than 0.2 kg/m2 in the new process, which is much larger than that in the conventional powder casting. Trial TWIP castings at both the pilot and the plant caster showed stable mold performances such as mold heat transfer. Also, cast slabs showed periodic/sound oscillation marks and little defects. The successful casting of TWIP steel has been attributed to the following characteristics of POCAST: dilution of the reactant by increasing the slag pool depth, enlargement of channel for slag film infiltration at meniscus by elimination of the slag bear, and decrease of apparent viscosity of the mold slag at meniscus by increasing the slag temperature.

  5. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Continuous Casting Bloom in the Heavy Reduction Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Cheng; Wu, Chen-hui; Zhu, Miao-yong

    2016-12-01

    A two-stage sequential heavy reduction (HR) method, in which the reduction amount was increased both before and after the solidification end, is presented to simultaneously improve the homogeneity and compactness of the continuous casting bloom. With bearing steel GCr15 chosen as the specific research steel, a three-dimensional thermal-mechanical finite element model was developed to simulate and analyze the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the continuous casting bloom during the HR process. In order to ensure the accuracy of the simulation, the constitutive model parameters were derived from the experimental results. The predicted temperature distribution and shell thickness were verified using a thermal infrared camera and nail shooting results, respectively. The real measured relationship between the HR pressure and amount were applied to verify the mechanical model. The explorative application results showed that the quality of the bloom center and compactness of rolled bars have both been significantly improved after the HR was applied.

  6. Control of solidification boundary in continuous casting by asymmetric cooling and mold offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution, developed to obtain solidification-interface shapes for complex situations in which both the ingot cooling and mold geometry are asymmetric, is analyzed. The effect of mold offsett and of unequal ingot side temperatures on the interface shapes is illustrated in graphs. The results of the analysis show how the solidification interface in continuous casting can be controlled by asymmetries in both mold geometry and cooling of the ingot sides.

  7. Analysis of Mold Friction in a Continuous Casting Using Wavelet Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Ma; Fangyin, Wang; Cheng, Peng; Wei, Gui; Bohan, Fang

    2016-06-01

    By studying mold friction (MDF), we observed that monitoring and controlling of the friction between the strand and the mold is very important for continuous casting to improve lubrication and prevent breakout. However, existing analysis technologies of MDF do not support the continuous casting very well. In addition, we found that the wavelet entropy has multiscale and statistical properties. Informed by these observations, in this article, we use wavelet entropy to judge the lubrication state between the strand and the mold. First, we demonstrate the implementation and superiority of wavelet entropy and how it helps in efficient evaluation of the lubrication state in mold. A study of wavelet entropy of MDF, which is obtained from the abnormal continuous casting production, such as level fluctuation, submerged entry nozzle broken, and breakout, has been performed to achieve relevant conclusions. The results indicate that the information of MDF in time and frequency domains could be obtained simultaneously by the application of wavelet entropy and that the wavelet entropy has a good sensibility for the study of disorder of MDF, which could further reveal the nature of MDF.

  8. Simulation of macrosegregation in a large vertical continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Wu, M.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-07-01

    A three-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model considering fluid flow, heat and solute transport is applied to simulate the solidification in a vertical continuous casting. The key features of solidification phenomena in this process, such as evolution of columnar phase, evolution and floatation/sedimentation of equi- axed crystals, thermal solutal convection of the melt and the flow caused by crystal sedimentation, development of as-cast structure, the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET), and formation of macrosegregation, are simulated. It is predicted that there is an equiaxed zone in the central part of the strand, and the rest section is filled with columnar phase (or dominant with columnar phase). A relatively strong negative segregation in the equiaxed zone and a mostly neutral concentration in the columnar region are found. Near the CET, there is a so-called middle radius positive segregation band. Formation mechanisms of this segregation pattern are discussed.

  9. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, D.W.; King, E.L.; Schneider, K.C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points. 8 figures.

  10. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  11. A Framework for Soft Sensing of Liquid Pool Length of Continuous Casting Round Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Ning, Jing; Liu, Wenhong; Ji, Zhenping

    2014-08-01

    Liquid pool length is a vital parameter for solidification control of continuous casting round bloom but it is difficult to be measured by direct hardware measurement. So in this paper, a framework based on heat transfer model for soft sensing of the liquid pool length has been presented. In the framework, the heat transfer model is the kernel and it has been calibrated for its machine-dependent parameters by solving the inverse heat transfer problem with the surface temperature measurements using a color pyrometer. The inverse heat transfer problem has been solved by the optimizer using chaos particle swarm optimization algorithm. After the calibration, the liquid pool lengths were predicted under different casting conditions. Finally, the predictions were validated by shell-thickness measurements using nail-shooting, as the measurements and calculations showed good agreement with the relative errors less than 1.5 pct. And the application of the framework for final electromagnetic stirring has also been presented.

  12. Selective video blanking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saboe, M. M.; Treude, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    Adverse viewing effects caused by faulty photosensitive elements are eliminated. A linear maximal /or nonmaximal/ sequence generator gives a pseudorandom pulse train to selectively blank the display monitor during specified mosaic interrogation times. The outputs minimize the length of the required shift register generator.

  13. In-depth study of mold heat transfer for the high speed continuous casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heetae; Hwang, Jong-Yeon; Cho, Jung-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Mold heat transfer during the commercial high speed continuous casting up to 7 m/min was investigated in order to clarify the influence of various operating conditions such as casting speed, mold flux, mold thickness, thickness and height of mold coated layer and so on. A simple, but practical formula of heat flux has been derived in terms of those operating conditions by analyzing the heat flux data obtained in CEM® (Compact Endless Casting and Rolling Mill) caster based on simplified one dimensional heat transfer model. Especially, impact of mold parameters such as mold thickness, mold coated layer thickness and its height on the heat flux can be linearly expressed in the empirical formula derived. Heat flux ratio (HR), the ratio of the narrow face heat flux to the wide face one, is one of the important indicators to evaluate whether the solidified shell is evenly robust or not. Averaged HR in CEM® caster is around 0.87, which varies according to the caster specifications and operating conditions. It is suggested that the mold taper should be adjusted to maintain the HR as close to 0.87 as possible.

  14. Novel Approach for Modeling of Nonuniform Slag Layers and Air Gap in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Kong, Lingwei; Yao, Man; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of surface defects on the continuous casting slab usually originate from nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behavior, especially during the initial solidification inside the mold. In this article, a model-coupled inverse heat transfer problem incorporating the effect of slag layers and air gap is developed to study the nonuniform distribution of liquid slag, solid slag, and air gap layers. The model considers not only the formation and evolution of slag layers and air gap but also the temperatures in the mold copper as measured by thermocouples. The simulation results from the model and the measured temperatures from experiments are shown to be in good agreement with each other. At the casting speed of 0.65 m/min, the liquid slag film disappears and transforms into solid slag entirely at about 400 mm away from meniscus, and an air gap begins to form. Until the mold exit, the maximum thickness of the solid slag layer and air gap gradually increases to 1.34 and 0.056 mm, respectively. The results illustrate that the magnitude and nonuniform distribution of the slag layers and air gap along the cross direction, correlating with heat flux between the shell and mold, eventually determine the temperature profiles of the mold hot face and slab surface. The proposed model may provide a convenient approach for analyzing nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behaviors between the mold and slab in the real casting process.

  15. Monitoring of solidification in the continuous casting mold by temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszko, René; Příhoda, Miroslav; Čarnogurská, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Defects of continuously cast strand, such as unevenness of shell thickness or cracks as well as unstable casting parameters result in changes of strand surface temperature which affect heat flux and temperature field in the mold wall. Methods based on the principle of measurement and mathematical processing of temperatures in the mold wall are used for the purposes of diagnostics of the shell formation process, prediction of surface and subsurface quality and breakout danger, adjustment of the casting axis or condition monitoring of the oscillating mechanism. Measured values of temperatures in the wall depend on the exact position of the sensor in the wall, especially in the normal direction to the mold working surface. Ensuring the accurate and constant distance between the sensor and the mold surface is technically demanding; therefore it is necessary to correct the measured temperatures mathematically. The article describes two methods for correcting the measured temperatures, based on physical and statistical principles that have been developed and used in a real diagnostics system. Practical applications of the methods for diagnostics of strand surface quality and breakout prediction are presented.

  16. Transient Thermo-fluid Model of Meniscus Behavior and Slag Consumption in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonayat, A. S. M.; Thomas, Brian G.

    2014-10-01

    The behavior of the slag layer between the oscillating mold wall, the slag rim, the slag/liquid steel interface, and the solidifying steel shell, is of immense importance for the surface quality of continuous-cast steel. A computational model of the meniscus region has been developed, that includes transient heat transfer, multi-phase fluid flow, solidification of the slag, and movement of the mold during an oscillation cycle. First, the model is applied to a lab experiment done with a "mold simulator" to verify the transient temperature-field predictions. Next, the model is verified by matching with available literature and plant measurements of slag consumption. A reasonable agreement has been observed for both temperature and flow-field. The predictions show that transient temperature behavior depends on the location of the thermocouple during the oscillation relative to the meniscus. During an oscillation cycle, heat transfer variations in a laboratory frame of reference are more severe than experienced by the moving mold thermocouples, and the local heat transfer rate is increased greatly when steel overflows the meniscus. Finally, the model is applied to conduct a parametric study on the effect of casting speed, stroke, frequency, and modification ratio on slag consumption. Slag consumption per unit area increases with increase of stroke and modification ratio, and decreases with increase of casting speed while the relation with frequency is not straightforward. The match between model predictions and literature trends suggests that this methodology can be used for further investigations.

  17. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Percent Reduction Limit on a Per Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  18. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Percent Reduction Limit on a Per Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  19. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Percent Reduction Limit on a Per Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  20. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Percent Reduction Limit on a Per Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  1. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines Complying With a Percent Reduction Limit on a Per Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  2. Solidification interface shape for continuous casting in an offset mold - Two analytical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1984-01-01

    A solution method for finding the unknown solidification interface in manufacturing slab ingots as a continuous casting is presented, which involves a product solution in the potential plane and the use of conjugate harmonic functions. It is argued that the method may be more direct for some geometries than the Cauchy boundary value method. Moreover, the usefulness of the Cauchy boundary value method is demonstrated through the example of a nonsymmetric horizontal mold where the walls are offset to support the lower ingot boundary.

  3. Use of NH4Cl-H2O Analogue Castings to Model Aspects of Continuous Casting. Part 1; Asymmetry in Inclined Moulds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, J.; Hellawell, A.

    1991-01-01

    Crystallisation of NH4Cl from aqueous solutions has been used to examine grain formation in a configuration similar to that existing in the curved mould of a continuous, steel casting machine. The observations show how falling equiaxed crystals accumulate at the lower (outer) columnar front earlier than at the upper (inner) front and, thus, lead to an asymmetric grain structure. The usefulness of the aqueous system as a realistic model for steel casting is discussed in terms of relative temperature profiles, materials properties, and observed columnar and eutectic growth rates.

  4. Center crack detection during continuous casting of aluminum by laser ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Hubert; Mitter, Thomas; Roither, Jürgen; Betz, Andreas; Bozorgi, Salar; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Crack detection during continuous direct chill casting of aluminum is a matter of economics. Determining cracks during production process saves money, energy and raw material. Of course, a non-destructive method is required for this evaluation. Because of temperature concerns conventional ultrasound is not applicable. One non-contact alternative is laser ultrasonics. In laser ultrasonics short laser pulses illuminate the sample. The electromagnetic energy gets absorbed at the surface of the sample and results in local heating followed by expansion. Thereby broadband ultrasonic waves are launched which propagate through the sample and get back reflected or scattered at interfaces (cracks, blowholes,…) like conventional ultrasonic waves. Therefore laser ultrasonics is an alternative thermal infrared technology. By using an interferometer also the detection of the ultrasonic waves at the sample surface is done in a remote manner. During preliminary examinations in the lab by scanning different aluminum studs it was able to distinguish between studs with and without cracks. The prediction of the dimension of the crack by evaluation of the damping of the broadband ultrasonic waves was possible. With simple image reconstruction methods one can localize the crack and give an estimation of its extent and even its shape. Subsequent first measurements using this laser ultrasonic setup during the continuous casting of aluminum were carried out and showed the proof of principle in an industrial environment with elevated temperatures, dust, cooling water and vibrations.

  5. Influence of FC-Mold on the Full Solidification of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional model coupling fluid flow, heat transfer, solidification for slab continuous casting process with flow control mold (FC-Mold) was constructed. The full solidification process from the meniscus to the solidification end of slab was obtained for the first time. The calculation domain was designed according to the actual dimension of the continuous caster. The main results show that the calculated flow speed on the meniscus at different casting speeds and the calculated shell profile had a good agreement with the measured flow speed using nail board measurement and the shell with breakout. The application of FC-Mold could improve the symmetry of flow in width, and suppress the formation of vortices on the meniscus. The decrease of upper magnetic field intensity of FC-Mold reduced the washing effect on the solidifying front, and favored the shell growth in the mold region. In the secondary cooling zone, the shell thickness increased gradually, and the shell grew quickly at the final stage of solidification for the whole mushy form of steel. In addition, FC-Mold had an effect on the shape and position of the solidification end.

  6. Coupled turbulent flow, heat, and solute transport in continuous casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebi, M. Reza; Hasan, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1995-08-01

    A fully coupled fluid flow, heat, and solute transport model was developed to analyze turbulent flow, solidification, and evolution of macrosegregation in a continuous billet caster. Transport equations of total mass, momentum, energy, and species for a binary iron-carbon alloy system were solved using a continuum model, wherein the equations are valid for the solid, liquid, and mushy zones in the casting. A modified version of the low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model was adopted to incorporate turbulence effects on transport processes in the system. A control-volume-based finite-difference procedure was employed to solve the conservation equations associated with appropriate boundary conditions. Because of high nonlinearity in the system of equations, a number of techniques were used to accelerate the convergence process. The effects of the parameters such as casting speed, steel grade, nozzle configuration on flow pattern, solidification profile, and carbon segregation were investigated. From the computed flow pattern, the trajectory of inclusion particles, as well as the density distribution of the particles, was calculated. Some of the computed results were compared with available experimental measurements, and reasonable agreements were obtained.

  7. Contactless inductive flow tomography: basic principles and first applications in the experimental modelling of continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Eckert, S.; Ratajczak, M.; Timmel, K.; Wondrak, T.

    2016-07-01

    Contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT) aims at reconstructing the flow structure of a liquid metal from the magnetic fields measured at various positions outside the fluid body which are induced by the flow under the influence of one or multiple applied magnetic fields. We recap the basic mathematical principles of CIFT and the results of an experiment in which the propeller-driven three-dimensional flow in a cylindrical had been reconstructed. We also summarize the recent activities to utilize CIFT in various problems connected with the experimental simulation of the continuous casting process. These include flow reconstructions in single-phase and two-phase flow problems in the Mini-LIMMCAST model of slab-casting, studies of the specific effects of an electromagnetic stirrer attached to the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN), as well as first successful applications of CIFT on the background of a strong electromagnetic brake field. We conclude by discussing some remaining obstacles for the deployment of CIFT in a real caster.

  8. Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate

    DOEpatents

    King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle.

  9. Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate

    DOEpatents

    King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.; Sussman, R.C.

    1991-08-20

    The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle. 4 figures.

  10. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  11. On the Formation of Macrosegregation and Interdendritic Cracks During Dendritic Solidification of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current article is to elucidate the significant effects of macrosegregation distribution and its level on the different stages of interdendritic crack formation during dendritic solidification in continuously cast steel slabs. Couple formations of macrosegregation and interdendritic crack phenomena during dendritic solidification of peritectic carbon steels have been investigated by metallographic study of collected slab samples and by performing a set of mathematical analyses. The metallographic study involved plant trails to measure slab surface temperature of different secondary spray cooling conditions. Also, macro-microexaminations, measurements of dendrite arm spacing, macrosegregation analysis, and interdendritic distance between the dendrites of collected samples from plant trials have been performed. The experimental results show a fluctuation of carbon segregation with respect to distance from slab surface. These results also reveal that the interdendritic cracks vary with this fluctuation in various nano, macro, and microscales based on the cooling conditions. A mathematical model of heat transfer, solidification, structure evolution, interdendritic strain, macrosegregation, and elementary interdendritic area "EIA" has been developed. This model takes also into account the calculating of interdendritic distance between the dendrites "IDD" to evaluate the interdendritic crack width. The model predictions of different thermal and solidification phenomena show a good agreement with measurements. The results pointed out also that the coupled effect of interdendritic strain and macrosegregation phenomena and their distributions can be considered as the most important tools to evaluate the surface and internal interdendritic cracks in continuously cast steel slabs. The formation mechanisms of different types of interdendritic crack with interdendritic strain patterns and fluctuation of macrosegregation levels during various cooling zones have

  12. Center Segregation with Final Electromagnetic Stirring in Billet Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongbin; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-02-01

    With a multiphase solidification model built, the effect of F-EMS parameters on center segregation was investigated in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting process. In the model, the initial growth of equiaxed grains which could move freely with liquid was treated as slurry, while the coherent equiaxed zone was regarded as porous media. The results show that the stirring velocity is not the main factor influencing center segregation improvement, which is more affected by current intensity and stirring pool width. Because solute transport is controlled by solidification rate as stirring pool width is 73 mm, center segregation declines continuously with current intensity increasing. As liquid pool width decreases to 61 mm and less latent heat needs to dissipate in the later solidification, the center segregation could be improved more obviously by F-EMS. Due to center liquid solute enrichment and liquid phase accumulation in the stirring zone, center segregation turns to rise reversely with higher current intensity and becomes more serious with stirring pool width further decreasing to 43 mm. As the stirring pool width is 25 mm, the positive segregation has already formed and solute could still concentrate with weak stirring, leading to center segregation deterioration. With the optimized current intensity (400 A) and stirring pool width (61 mm) set for continuous mode, center segregation improvement is better than that of alternative mode.

  13. Simulation of low carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization in continuous casting using a multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Choi, Joo; Park, Jun-Yong; Sohn, Il

    2014-01-01

    An inverted water-cooled multi-mold continuous casting simulator was used to investigate initial solidification of low-carbon steels and crystallization of mold flux. Embedded mold thermocouples showed characteristic temperature profiles dependent on parameters including casting speed, oscillation frequency, and stroke. Higher maximum temperatures for thermocouples at higher casting speeds, higher frequencies, and lower stroke lengths were observed. The surface of the as-cast steel strips showed oscillation marks similar to those of industrially cast slabs and higher casting speeds resulted in shallower oscillation marks. The measured pitch agreed well with the theoretical pitch suggesting the multi-mold simulator to be a cost-effective alternative to pursue fundamental studies on initial solidification in the mold. Analysis of the mold flux taken between the copper mold and solidified steel shell showed highly dendritic uni-directional crystallization occurring within the flux film suggesting that the heat transfer direction is dominantly horizontal towards the water-cooled copper mold. In addition, the solidified flux located at the upper to lower part of the mold suggested morphological differences in the size and shape of the crystalline phases indicating that crystallization ratio can increase depending upon the retention in the mold and subsequently decrease radiative heat transfer as the flux traverses down the mold.

  14. Model Investigations on the Stability of the Steel-Slag Interface in Continuous-Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, René; Schwarze, Rüdiger; Heller, Hans P.; Scheller, Piotr R.

    2013-02-01

    In the continuous-casting mold, the mold powder in contact with the liquid steel surface forms a liquid slag layer. The flow along the steel-slag interface generates shear stress at the interface, waves, and leads to fingerlike protrusions of liquid slag into steel. Reaching a critical flow velocity and thereby shear stress, the protrusions can disintegrate into slag droplets following the flow in the liquid steel pool. These entrained droplets can form finally nonmetallic inclusions in steel material, cause defects in the final product, and therefore, should be avoided. In the current work, the stability of a liquid-liquid interface without mass transfer between phases was investigated in cold model study using a single-roller driven flow in oil-water systems with various oil properties. Applying the similarity theory, two dimensionless numbers were identified, viz. capillary number Ca and the ratio of kinematic viscosities ν 1/ ν 2, which are suitable to describe the force balance for the problem treated. The critical values of the dimensionless capillary number Ca* marking the start of lighter phase entrainment into the heavier fluid, are determined over a wide range of fluid properties. The dimensionless number ν 1/ ν 2 was defined as the ratio of kinematic viscosities of the lighter phase ν 1 and heavier phase ν 2. The ratios of kinematic viscosities of different steel-slag systems were calculated using measured thermophysical properties. With the knowledge of thermophysical properties of steel-slag systems, Ca* for slag entrainment as a function of v 1/ v 2 is derived. Assuming no reaction between the phases and no interfacial flow, slag entrainment should not occur under the usual casting conditions.

  15. Transient Asymmetric Flow and Bubble Transport Inside a Slab Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-04-01

    A one third scale water model experiment was conducted to observe the asymmetric flow and vortexing flow inside a slab continuous-casting mold. Dye-injection experiment was used to show the evolution of the transient flow pattern in the liquid pool without and with gas injection. The spread of the dye was not symmetric about the central plane. The flow pattern inside the mold was not stationary. The black sesames were injected into water to visualize the vortexing flow pattern on the top surface. The changes of shape and location of single vortex and two vortices with time had been observed during experiments. Plant ultrasonic testing (UT) of slabs was used to analyze the slab defects distribution, which indicated that the defects are intermittent and asymmetric. A mathematical model has been developed to analyze the time-dependent flow using the realistic geometries, which includes the submerged entry nozzle (SEN), actual mold, and part of the secondary cooling zone. The transient turbulent flow of molten steel inside the mold has been simulated using the large eddy simulation computational approach. Simulation results agree acceptably well with the water model experimentally observed and plant UT results. The oscillating motions of jet and the turbulence naturally promote the asymmetric flow even without the effects of slide gate nozzle or the existence of clogs inside the SEN. The periodic behavior of transient fluid flow in the mold is identified and characterized. The vortexing flow is resulted from asymmetric flow in the liquid pool. The vortices are located at the low-velocity side adjacent to the SEN, and the positions and sizes are different. Finally, the model is applied to investigate the influence of bubble size and casting speed on the time-dependent bubble distribution and removal fraction from the top surface inside the mold.

  16. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characteristics of Cast Mg-9 pctAl-1 pctZn Alloys Produced by a Heated-Mold Continuous Casting Process: Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Ohfuji, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties and failure characteristics of a cast Mg alloy (AZ91: Mg-Al8.9-Zn0.6-Mn0.2) produced by a heated-mold continuous casting process (HMC) are investigated. In a modification of the original HMC process, the cooling of the liquid alloy by direct water spray is carried out in an atmosphere of high-purity argon gas. The HMC-AZ91 alloy exhibits excellent mechanical properties (high strength and high ductility) that are about twice as high as those for the same alloy produced by conventional gravity casting. The increased material strength and ductility of the HMC sample are attributed to nanoscale and microscale microstructural characteristics. The fine grains and tiny spherical eutectic structures ( e.g., Mg17Al12 and Al6Mn) distributed randomly in the matrix of the HMC alloy result in resistance to dislocation movement, leading to high tensile strength. Basal slip on (0001) planes in the relatively organized crystal orientation of the HMC alloy, as well as grain boundary sliding through tiny spherical eutectic structures, results in high ductility. Details of the failure mechanism under static loading in the HMC alloy are also discussed using failure models.

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow, Solidification, and Particle Transport Processes in Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2014-07-01

    The current study developed a coupled computational model to simulate the transient fluid flow, solidification, and particle transport processes in a slab continuous-casting mold. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated using the large eddy simulation. An enthalpy-porosity approach is used for the analysis of solidification processes. The transport of bubble and non-metallic inclusion inside the liquid pool is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. A criterion of particle entrapment in the solidified shell is developed using the user-defined functions of FLUENT software (ANSYS, Inc., Canonsburg, PA). The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern inside the liquid pool exhibits quite satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. The predicted complex instantaneous velocity field is composed of various small recirculation zones and multiple vortices. The transport of particles inside the liquid pool and the entrapment of particles in the solidified shell are not symmetric. The Magnus force can reduce the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell, especially for smaller particles, but the effect is not obvious. The Marangoni force can play an important role in controlling the motion of particles, which increases the entrapment ratio of particles in the solidified shell obviously.

  18. Analysis of Internal Cracks in Continuous Casting Slabs with Soft Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Jiongming; Xiao, Chao; Wang, Shunxi; Song, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The formation of internal cracks in continuous casting slabs is mainly attributed to the strain status and microsegregation near the solidifying front of the slabs. By analyzing the internal cracks of medium carbon microalloy steel, the obtained conclusions are that C, P, S, etc. enrich in dendrites and exist in grain boundaries, but these are just the internal causes, and the root cracking causes the tensile stress of solidification front. When the slab passes through the straightening segments, the liquid core thickness is large, and the liquid steel in the space of columnar crystals is not completely frozen. Therefore, the reduction effect of rollers results in the strain of solidification front exceeding the critical value. However, the corresponding strain in the arc and horizontal segments does not exceed this critical value, so the solidification front in the straightening segments would be much easy to crack. The statistics analysis shows that after soft reduction and straightening process are separately carried out, the occurrence rate of intermediate cracks is reduced by 41.3%.

  19. Real-Time, Model-Based Spray-Cooling Control System for Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Bryan; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, X.; Thomas, Brian G.; Bentsman, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a new system to control secondary cooling water sprays in continuous casting of thin steel slabs (CONONLINE). It uses real-time numerical simulation of heat transfer and solidification within the strand as a software sensor in place of unreliable temperature measurements. The one-dimensional finite-difference model, CON1D, is adapted to create the real-time predictor of the slab temperature and solidification state. During operation, the model is updated with data collected by the caster automation systems. A decentralized controller configuration based on a bank of proportional-integral controllers with antiwindup is developed to maintain the shell surface-temperature profile at a desired set point. A new method of set-point generation is proposed to account for measured mold heat flux variations. A user-friendly monitor visualizes the results and accepts set-point changes from the caster operator. Example simulations demonstrate how a significantly better shell surface-temperature control is achieved.

  20. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Turbulent Flow in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik; Vanka, Pratap; Thomas, Brian G.

    2012-11-01

    Electromagnetic Braking (EMBr) fields are applied to control the turbulent mold flow for defect reduction in continuous steel casting. The effect of EMBr depends on the path of induced electric current which is modified by presence of the highly conducting solidifying shell. The mold geometry is complex involving flow in a high-aspect ratio closed channel with bifurcated jet impinging obliquely on the side walls. The extremely transient nature and the anisotropic behavior of turbulence under the EMBr field make numerical studies challenging. We use large eddy simulations to study effects of EMBr with electrically insulating and conducting boundary conditions. Magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved using a fractional step method with second order spatial and temporal accuracy. The electric potential method is used as magnetic Reynolds number is low for liquid metal flows. The solver was first validated with measurements from scaled GaInSn model and simulations were then performed to study real casters at industrial conditions. Time averaged and transient behaviors of the flow were studied by collecting distributions of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations and vorticity. The simulations reveal that the electrical boundary conditions have a major effect on the flow structure. National Science Foundation Grant CMMI 11-30882.

  1. Quantitative Characterization of Inclusions in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Masoumeh; Wilcox, David P.; Thackray, Richard; Howe, Andrew A.; Todd, Iain; Tsakiropoulos, Panos

    2015-12-01

    Existing standards for the characterization of the size, morphology, chemistry, and distribution of inclusions in steels using different techniques are briefly reviewed in this work. Strengths and shortfalls of different methods are discussed, and a combination of different criteria is used to quantitatively characterize the inclusions in a continuously cast high-carbon steel. It is shown that the main elements in the inclusions for the studied steel were Mn, S, Ti, Al, and oxygen and that alongside MnS and some Al2O3 inclusions many non-metallic inclusions appeared in complex forms, consisting of silicates, sulfides, and different types of oxides. Duplex inclusions, mainly cores of Al2O3, or SiO2 surrounded by MnS were the most common complex multiphase inclusions in this steel. An industrial approach was used to classify the inclusions into thirteen different oxide types. Based upon this approach, data are presented according to the chemistry of inclusions using diagrams featuring different quantitative parameters. Furthermore, it is shown that the number of oxides per unit area and the size of oxides, respectively, decreased and increased with increasing distance from the surface of the bloom which had solidified at the highest cooling rate.

  2. Characterization and formability of continuous-cast AZ31B magnesium alloy sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Aashish; Herling, Darrell R; Nyberg, Eric A

    2009-09-24

    The goal of this work is to understand the inter-relationship between the initial properties of continuous-cast magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheets and their subsequent formability and post-formed mechanical performance for use in cost-effective, lightweight, automotive body panels. As-received sheets, provided by the Automotive Metals Division (AMD-602) team, were characterized by surface roughness measurements using mechanical profilometry. The arithmetic mean deviation of profile (Ra) and the maximum two-point height of profile (Ry) of the as-received sheets ranged from ~0.2-2 μm and ~2-15 μm, respectively. Several commercial lubricants were evaluated by thermal analysis and the liquid phase of the lubricants was found to evaporate/decompose upon heating leaving behind a solid residue upon heating to temperatures exceeding ~125-150°C. Elevated temperature bending-under-tension (BUT) friction tests were conducted at 350°C and the coefficient-of-friction values ranged from a minimum of ~0.1 (for tungsten disulfide lubricant) to ~0.7 when no lubricant was used. These results, in conjunction with those from the forming trials conducted by the AMD-602 team, will be eventually used to determine the role of sheet-die friction in determining the formability of AZ31B sheets.

  3. Fabrication of Lotus-Type Porous Al-Si Alloys Using the Continuous Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Hyun, S. K.; Suzuki, S.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-02-01

    Lotus-type porous Al-Si (4, 8, 12, 14, and 18 wt pct) alloys were fabricated using the continuous casting technique under a hydrogen gas pressure of 0.1 MPa at various transference velocities, and the effects of the silicon content level and transference velocity on the pore morphology and porosity were investigated. Both the porosity and the average pore diameter increase as the silicon content level increases and decrease as the transference velocity increases. In particular, the velocity dependence is obviously exhibited at a silicon content level higher than 12 wt pct. The pore shape is changed from irregular in the higher-dendrite fraction to nearly circular in the lower-dendrite fraction. The porosity and the pore morphology are influenced by the silicon content level and transference velocity. In the model, these results can be understood with the explanation that the pores, which contribute to the increase in porosity, are generated at the eutectic fronts. This indicated that the porosity and the pore size in lotus-type porous Al-Si alloys can be well controlled by varying the silicon content level and the transference velocity.

  4. Fabrication of Al-Cu alloy with elongated pores by continuous casting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Kim, T.-B.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-05-01

    A1-4.5wt%Cu was unidirectionally solidified by continuous casting technique under hydrogen pressure of 0.1MPa at the transference velocities ranging from 1 to 50 mmmidmin-1. The fabricated slabs have microstructures of columnar α-dendrite and eutectic, which are typical for hypo-eutectic Al-Cu alloys. Elongated pores are observed in the eutectic region surrounded by several columnar α-dendrites. The shapes of the pores are affected by that of the surrounding α-dendrites. The average pores diameter is several ten μm smaller than the average dendrite arm spacing, which decreases with increasing solidification rate. Therefore, the pore diameter varies from about 200 μm to 30 μm with increasing transference velocity from 1 to 50 mmmidmin-1. The porosity of the fabricated samples is in the range between 2 ~ 6 %. There is not significant dependence of the porosity on the transference velocity in the range of the present study. The porosity is similar to the reported value of Al-Si, where the area fraction of eutectic region is smaller than that of α-dendrite.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Dendritic Growth of Continuously Cast High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiling; Luo, Sen; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2015-01-01

    Considering the influence of the latent heat released during the solidification of high carbon liquid steel, a cellular automaton (CA) model coupled with the heat transfer was developed to investigate the growth of equiaxed dendrites which is controlled by the solute diffusion during the continuous casting process. Additionally, the growth of columnar dendrites and primary dendrite arm spacings were predicted and measured. The results show that the CA model is able to describe the growth behavior of equiaxed dendrites, especially at 5 K to 7 K melt undercoolings, and the approach adjusting the cooling medium temperature is reliable to keep the undercooling condition stable for equiaxed dendrites although its hysteresis is reinforced as the pre-set undercooling increases. With the increase of the melt undercooling, the growth of equiaxed dendrites becomes faster, and the thickness of dendritic arms increases slightly, however, the thickness of the diffusion layer in front of dendritic tips keeps constant. The growth of thin and tiny columnar dendrites will be confined due to the competition and absorbed by neighboring strong columnar dendrites, giving rise to the coarsening of columnar dendrites, which is observed both from the experimental observation and the numerical simulation. With the decrease of the cooling intensity, columnar dendrites get sparser, primary dendrite arm spacings increase, and secondary dendritic arms become undeveloped.

  6. Mathematical Modelling of Solidification in a Curved Strand During Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Ambrish; Jha, Pradeep Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A two dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification model has been developed for a curved shape continuous steel slab caster. The strand has been divided in various sections depending upon cooling conditions in the mold and Secondary Cooling Zone (SCZ). The model was validated against the experimental results reported in the literature for solid shell thickness in the mold. CFD software ANSYS Fluent has been used for solving the differential equations of heat transfer and fluid flow. Surface temperature distribution has been predicted while; the thickness of solid shell formed in the mold and SCZ has been calculated by finding the liquid fraction of steel within the domain. Process parameters such as, casting speed and cooling rate has been varied to analyse their effects on metallurgical length and solid shell thickness at the mold exit. The analysis was based on keeping the shell thickness between 10 and 14 mm at mold exit and metallurgical length less than the cut-off length but having complete solidification after the straightening zone.

  7. Comparison of CFD Simulations with Experimental Measurements of Nozzle Clogging in Continuous Casting of Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of clog deposit thickness on the interior surfaces of a commercial continuous casting nozzle are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of melt flow patterns and particle-wall interactions to identify the mechanisms of nozzle clogging. A submerged entry nozzle received from industry was encased in epoxy and carefully sectioned to allow measurement of the deposit thickness on the internal surfaces of the nozzle. CFD simulations of melt flow patterns and particle behavior inside the nozzle were performed by combining the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and detached eddy simulation turbulent model, matching the geometry and operating conditions of the industrial test. The CFD results indicated that convergent areas of the interior cross section of the nozzle increased the velocity and turbulence of the flowing steel inside the nozzle and decreased the clog deposit thickness locally in these areas. CFD simulations also predicted a higher rate of attachment of particles in the divergent area between two convergent sections of the nozzle, which matched the observations made in the industrial nozzle measurements.

  8. Effect of an Electromagnetic Brake on the Turbulent Melt Flow in a Continuous-Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xincheng; Timmel, Klaus; Lucas, Dirk; Ren, Zhongmin; Eckert, Sven; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2012-08-01

    This article presents numerical and experimental investigations with respect to the fluid flow in the continuous-casting process under the influence of an external direct current (DC) magnetic field. Numerical calculations were performed by means of the software package CFX (Ansys, Inc., Canonsburg, PA) with an implemented Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-SST turbulence model. The nonisotropic nature of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence was taken into account by specific modifications of the turbulence model. The numerical results were validated by flow measurements carried out in a small-scale mockup using the eutectic alloy GaInSn. The jet flow discharging from the submerged entry nozzle was exposed to a level magnetic field spanning across the entire wide side of the mold. The comparison between our numerical calculations and the experimental results displays a good agreement; in particular, we reconstructed the peculiar phenomenon of an excitation of nonsteady, nonisotropic, large-scale flow perturbations caused by the application of the DC magnetic field. Another important result of our study is the feature that the electrical boundary conditions, namely the wall conductivity ratio, have a serious influence on the mold flow while it is exposed to an external magnetic field.

  9. Simulation of transient fluid flow in mold region during steel continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Thomas, B. G.; Sengupta, J.

    2012-07-01

    A system of models has been developed to study transient flow during continuous casting and applied to simulate an event of multiple stopper-rod movements. It includes four sub-models to incorporate different aspects in this transient event. A three-dimensional (3-D) porous-flow model of the nozzle wall calculates the rate argon gas flow into the liquid steel, and the initial mean bubble size is estimated. Transient CFD models simulate multiphase flow of steel and gas bubbles in the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) and mold and have been validated with experimental data from both nail dipping and Sub-meniscus Velocity Control (SVC) measurements. To obtain the transient inlet boundary conditions for the simulation, two semi-empirical models, a stopper-rod-position based model and a metal-level-based model, predict the liquid steel flow rate through the SEN based on recorded plant data. Finally the model system was applied to study the effects of stopper rod movements on SEN/mold flow patterns. Meniscus level fluctuations were calculated using a simple pressure method and compared well with plant measurements. Insights were gained from the simulation results to explain the cause of meniscus level fluctuations and the formation of sliver defects during stopper rod movements.

  10. Transient Simulation of Mold Heat Transfer and Solidification Phenomena of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive model of heat transfer and solidification phenomena has been developed including microstructure evolution and fluctuation macrosegregation in continuously cast steel slabs with an objective of evaluation of various mold cooling conditions. The study contains plant trials, metallographic examinations, and formulation of mathematical modeling. The plant trials involved sample collection from three slab casters in use at two different steel plants. The metallographic study combined measurements of dendrite arm spacings and macrosegregation analysis of collected samples. A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to characterize the thermal, solidification phases, microstructure evolution, interdendritic strain, and therefore, the macrosegregation distributions. Two cooling approaches were proposed in this study to evaluate the Newtonian heat transfer coefficient in various mold regions. The first approach is a direct estimation approach (DEA), whereas the second one is a coupled approach of the interfacial resistor model and direct estimation approach (CIR/DEA). The model predictions and standard analytical models as well as the previous measurements were compared to verify and to calibrate the model where good agreements were obtained. The comparison between the model predictions and the measurements of dendrite arm spacings and fluctuated carbon concentration profiles were performed to determine the model accuracy level with different cooling approaches. Good agreements were obtained by different accuracy levels with different cooling approaches. The model predictions of thermal parameters and isotherms were analyzed and discussed.

  11. The Influence of Peritectic Reaction/Transformation on Crack Susceptibility in the Continuous Casting of Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Saud; Vynnycky, Michael; Fredriksson, Hasse

    2017-02-01

    The work presented here examines the surface cracks that can form during the continuous casting of near peritectic steels due to the volume changes during the peritectic reaction/transformation. The investigated samples were collected during plant trials from two different steel grades. The role and mode of the peritectic reaction/transformation are found to depend on the composition of the alloy, resulting in different types of surface cracks. The effect of the local variation in the cooling rate on the formation of the different types of cracks present in each steel grade, which can be due, for example, to the formation of oscillation marks, is demonstrated. The enhanced severity of the surface and internal oxidation, both of which depend on the alloy composition and consequent peritectic reaction, is highlighted. Experimental and theoretical studies show that different types of surface cracks can occur in peritectic steels depending upon the alloy composition and cooling rate, both of which define the fraction of the remaining liquid upon completion of the peritectic reaction/transformation.

  12. Machinability of Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) Produced by Integrated Green Technology of Continuous Casting-Heat Treatment Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.

    2011-01-17

    This study presents the novel processing technique known as continuous casting-heat treatment processes to produce Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) which is a new class of ductile iron. ADI is characterized by improved mechanical properties but has low machinability as compared to other cast irons and steel of similar strength. The novel technique is developed by the integration of casting (in die casting) and heat treatment processes in foundry to save cost energy and time. Specimens just after casting were austenitized at 930 deg. C for 90 min and then austempered in fluidized bed at 380 deg. C for 90 and 120 min. Hence, the effect of austempering time on the morphology of retained austenite and mechanical properties of the material were examined and compared with conventionally produced ADI. Drilling tests were then carried out to evaluate the machinability of ADI in terms of cutting forces, chip micro-hardness, chip morphology and surface roughness. The mechanical properties of ADI austempered for 120 min have found to be better as compare to the ADI austempered for 90 min.

  13. Modeling and Measurements of Multiphase Flow and Bubble Entrapment in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kai; Thomas, Brian G.; Ruan, Xiaoming

    2016-02-01

    In steel continuous casting, argon gas is usually injected to prevent clogging, but the bubbles also affect the flow pattern, and may become entrapped to form defects in the final product. To investigate this behavior, plant measurements were conducted, and a computational model was applied to simulate turbulent flow of the molten steel and the transport and capture of argon gas bubbles into the solidifying shell in a continuous slab caster. First, the flow field was solved with an Eulerian k- ɛ model of the steel, which was two-way coupled with a Lagrangian model of the large bubbles using a discrete random walk method to simulate their turbulent dispersion. The flow predicted on the top surface agreed well with nailboard measurements and indicated strong cross flow caused by biased flow of Ar gas due to the slide-gate orientation. Then, the trajectories and capture of over two million bubbles (25 μm to 5 mm diameter range) were simulated using two different capture criteria (simple and advanced). Results with the advanced capture criterion agreed well with measurements of the number, locations, and sizes of captured bubbles, especially for larger bubbles. The relative capture fraction of 0.3 pct was close to the measured 0.4 pct for 1 mm bubbles and occurred mainly near the top surface. About 85 pct of smaller bubbles were captured, mostly deeper down in the caster. Due to the biased flow, more bubbles were captured on the inner radius, especially near the nozzle. On the outer radius, more bubbles were captured near to narrow face. The model presented here is an efficient tool to study the capture of bubbles and inclusion particles in solidification processes.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of scaled steel samples taken from continuous casting blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhardt, Christoph; Sturm, Volker; Fleige, Rüdiger; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    To analyse continuous casting steel blooms a removal of non-representative surface layers is required prior to the analysis. In this work, an optimized process is developed to ablate such layers and to analyse the bulk material underneath with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A high ablation rate is crucial since the time slot for an inline analysis is limited, e.g. to <1 min. To get a deeper understanding of the material structure between bulk material and surface, samples are sawed out of steel blooms. The samples are analysed in lab scale experiments including LIBS measurements and cross-section polish methods. These studies show that the surface layers may consist both of oxides and metallic layers and typically have thicknesses from 200 μm to 600 μm each. The ablation behaviour of the oxide differs significantly from that of the metallic layers. An operation scheme for inline material identification is worked out to perform ablation and analysis with a single laser source. During the ablation phase and the subsequent measurement phase the laser source is operated with individually tailored parameters. A total penetration depth exceeding 1 mm in steel can be achieved within 20 s of ablation. Thereby the influence of non-representative surface layers on the following LIBS measurement can be suppressed to a large extent. For chromium, relative root mean square errors of predictions of less than 13% were achieved on high alloy samples with up to 16 m.-% Cr and on low alloy samples with Cr contents below 2 m.-%.

  15. Oscillation-Mark Formation and Liquid-Slag Consumption in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Meng, Xiangning; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-12-01

    Traditional understanding on the complex multiphysics phenomenon of the meniscus in the oscillating mold for continuously cast steel, including oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption, has never considered the shape influence of the flux channel between the mold wall and the solidifying shell surface. Based on the reciprocating oscillation of mold, this study was carried out to calculate theoretically the periodic pressure and the liquid-slag layer thickness in the flux channel for the upper and the lower meniscus that possess different shapes in combination with a transient equilibrium profile of the flux channel as well as the sinusoidal and the nonsinusoidal oscillation modes of mold. The effect of flux channel shape on the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus was determined by the physical oscillation simulation by using an experimental cold model mold. The results show that the shape difference between the upper and the lower meniscus leads to the opposite direction of pressure in the flux channel. The pressure in the opposite direction plays a respective role in oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption in an oscillation cycle of mold, and thus, it makes a new mechanism for explaining the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus. The oscillation mark is initially formed by the rapid increase of positive channel pressure in the upper meniscus, and most of the liquid slag is infiltrated into the flux channel by the negative channel pressure in the lower meniscus from the end of a positive strip time to the beginning of the next positive strip time, including the negative strip time in between. Furthermore, the physical characteristics of the lubrication behavior in the meniscus are summarized, including liquid-slag infiltration, solidifying shell deformation, and the thickness change of the liquid-slag layer.

  16. Comparison of different Methods to model Transient Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in Continuous Casting Molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schwarze, R.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of the processes in the continuous casting mold engaged many scientists once the computer-technology was able to accomplish that task. Despite that, CFD modeling of the fluid flow is still challenging. The methods allow deeper and deeper inside views into transient flow processes. Mostly two kinds of methods are applied for this purpose. URANS simulations are used for a coarse overview of the transient behavior on scales determined by the big rollers inside the mold. Besides, LES were done to study the processes on smaller scales. Unfortunately, the effort to set up a LES is orders of magnitude higher in time and space compared to URANS. Often, the flow determining processes take place in small areas inside the flow domain. Hence, scale resolving methods (SRS) came up, which resolve the turbulence in some amount in these regions, whereas they go back to URANS in the regions of less importance. It becomes more complex when dealing with magnetic fields in terms of EMBr devices. The impact of electro magnetically forces changes the flow structure remarkably. Many important effects occur, e.g. MHD turbulence, which are attributable to processes on large turbulent scales. To understand the underlying phenomena in detail, SRS allows a good inside view by resolving these processes partially. This study compares two of these methods, namely the Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) and the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES), with respect to rendition of the results known from experiments and URANS simulation. The results show, that the SAS as well as the DDES are able to deliver good results with higher mesh resolutions in important regions in the flow domain

  17. Detection of Non-metallic Inclusions in Centrifugal Continuous Casting Steel Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Seetharaman, Sridhar; Yang, Shufeng; Yang, Wen; Wang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, automated particle analysis was employed to detect non-metallic inclusions in steel during a centrifugal continuous casting process of a high-strength low alloy steel. The morphology, composition, size, area fraction, amount, and spatial distribution of inclusions in steel were obtained. Etching experiment was performed to reveal the dendrite structure of the billet and to discuss the effect of centrifugal force on the distribution of oxide inclusions in the final solidified steel by comparing the solidification velocity with the critical velocity reported in literature. It was found that the amount of inclusions was highest in samples from the tundish (~250 per mm2), followed by samples from the mold (~200 per mm2), and lowest in billet samples (~86 per mm2). In all samples, over 90 pct of the inclusions were smaller than 2μm. In steel billets, the content of oxides, dual-phase oxide-sulfides, and sulfides in inclusions were found to be 10, 30, and 60 pct, respectively. The dual-phase inclusions were oxides with sulfides precipitated on the outer surface. Oxide inclusions consisted of high Al2O3 and high MnO which were solid at the molten steel temperature, implying that the calcium treatment was insufficient. Small oxide inclusions very uniformly distributed on the cross section of the billet, while there were more sulfide inclusions showing a banded structure at the outside 25 mm layer of the billet. The calculated solidification velocity was higher than the upper limit at which inclusions were entrapped by the solidifying front, revealing that for oxide inclusions smaller than 8μm in this study, the centrifugal force had little influence on its final distribution in billets. Instead, oxide inclusions were rapidly entrapped by solidifying front.

  18. Fluid Flow-Related Transport Phenomena in Steel Slab Continuous Casting Strands under Electromagnetic Brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufeng; Zhang, Lifeng

    2011-12-01

    In the current study, a three-dimensinal (3D) numerical model is built to investigate the effect of a local-type electromagnetic brake (EMBr) on the fluid flow, heat transfer, and inclusion motion in slab continuous casting strands. The results indicate that the magnetic force affects the jet characteristics, including jet angle, turbulent kinetic energy, and its dissipation rate. To reduce the top surface velocity and stabilize the top surface, the magnetic flux intensity should be larger than a critical value. With a 0.39 T magnetic flux intensity, the top surface velocity and its fluctuation can be well controlled, and less slag is entrained. The motion of argon bubbles is also studied. More bubbles, especially >2.0-mm bubbles, escape from the top surface between the mold submerged entry nozzle (SEN) and 1/4 width for the case with a 0.39 T EMBr. This may push the top slag away and create an open "eye" on the top slag. Small bubbles (≤1 mm) tend to escape from one side of wide face no matter with or without EMBr, which is induced by the swirl flow from the SEN outport. EMBr has a little effect on the overall removal fraction of inclusions; however, it affects the local distribution of inclusion in the slab. With EMBr, more inclusions accumulate the region just below the surface, thus a worse subsurface quality, whereas the inner quality of the slab is better than that without EMBr. For heat transfer in the mold, the heat flux on the narrow face and the area of possible break-out zones can be reduced by using EMBr. Prevention of bias flow and/or asymmetrical flow in mold by EMBr is also concluded.

  19. Oscillation-Mark Formation and Liquid-Slag Consumption in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Meng, Xiangning; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-04-01

    Traditional understanding on the complex multiphysics phenomenon of the meniscus in the oscillating mold for continuously cast steel, including oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption, has never considered the shape influence of the flux channel between the mold wall and the solidifying shell surface. Based on the reciprocating oscillation of mold, this study was carried out to calculate theoretically the periodic pressure and the liquid-slag layer thickness in the flux channel for the upper and the lower meniscus that possess different shapes in combination with a transient equilibrium profile of the flux channel as well as the sinusoidal and the nonsinusoidal oscillation modes of mold. The effect of flux channel shape on the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus was determined by the physical oscillation simulation by using an experimental cold model mold. The results show that the shape difference between the upper and the lower meniscus leads to the opposite direction of pressure in the flux channel. The pressure in the opposite direction plays a respective role in oscillation-mark formation and liquid-slag consumption in an oscillation cycle of mold, and thus, it makes a new mechanism for explaining the multiphysics phenomenon in the meniscus. The oscillation mark is initially formed by the rapid increase of positive channel pressure in the upper meniscus, and most of the liquid slag is infiltrated into the flux channel by the negative channel pressure in the lower meniscus from the end of a positive strip time to the beginning of the next positive strip time, including the negative strip time in between. Furthermore, the physical characteristics of the lubrication behavior in the meniscus are summarized, including liquid-slag infiltration, solidifying shell deformation, and the thickness change of the liquid-slag layer.

  20. The variable reagent blank: protein determination as a model.

    PubMed

    Bozimowski, D; Artiss, J D; Zak, B

    1985-10-01

    Three total protein assays were analyzed to determine the extent of deviation encountered when a constant measured reagent blank is compared to a continuously decreasing true reagent blank. This blank effect owes its regressive nature to the consumption of the active reagent ingredient by the protein reactive species, variably and sometimes, with certain reactants, nonlinearly in the presence of increasing protein concentrations. However, the blank effect of interest here is apparent only when the reagent and the reagent-protein complex present overlapping spectra and therefore absorb at the wavelength of measurement. Thus it was found that while the biuret and the Coomassie brilliant blue assays produced pronounced differences in the variable true reagent blanks, the Folin-Ciocalteau reaction did not develop a deviation from the true blank since the reagent blank does not absorb to any extent at the assay wavelength. In this manner, the latter procedure could serve as a marker against which the former two blank reactions can be shown to display relatively excessive deviations.

  1. The influence of chemical composition of the slags on the surface tension used in the continuous casting of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Csaba Attila; Ardelean, Erika; Heput, Teodor

    2016-06-01

    An important factor that can influence the surface quality of the continuous cast is the lubrication slag used in the crystallizer. The paper introduces the multiple 2nd degree correlations between the slags surface tension (dependent parameter) and its major oxides (independent parameters). The graphic correlations allow the determination of the variation limits for the independent parameters so as to range the values of the dependent parameters within a given domain.

  2. Solidification structures grown under induced flow and continuous casting of steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsavaras, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of induced flow as a means to control solidification structures in strand cast steel is investigated. The quality problems in strand cast steel stemming from columnar growth can be partially controlled, by Electro Magnetic Stirring (EMS). Induced flow changes the normal morphology of dendrites. Solids grown under intense stirring conditions show both negative and positive segregation which is considered unacceptable by some steel producers. The inclusion size and population is strongly affected by induced flow (EMS). Laboratory and industrial data show substantial reduction in inclusion size and content, but the overall effect of flow on inclusions is affected by the particular type of flow patterns utilized in each case. Productivity and quality are raised substantially in steel strand casting by utilizing EMS.

  3. Thermal Stress Cracking of Slide-Gate Plates in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung-Jun; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    The slide-gate plates in a cassette assembly control the steel flow through the tundish nozzle, and may experience through-thickness cracks, caused by thermal expansion and/or mechanical constraint, leading to air aspiration and safety concerns. Different mechanisms for common and rare crack formation are investigated with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element model of thermal mechanical behavior of the slide-gate plate assembly during bolt pretensioning, preheating, tundish filling, casting, and cooling stages. The model was validated with previous plant temperature measurements of a ladle plate during preheating and casting, and then applied to a typical tundish-nozzle slide-gate assembly. The formation mechanisms of different types of cracks in the slide-gate plates are investigated using the model and evaluated with actual slide-gate plates at POSCO. Common through-thickness radial cracks, found in every plate, are caused during casting by high tensile stress on the outside surfaces of the plates, due to internal thermal expansion. In the upper plate, these cracks may also arise during preheating or tundish filling. Excessive bolt tightening, combined with thermal expansion during casting may cause rare radial cracks in the upper and lower plates. Rare radial and transverse cracks in middle plate appear to be caused during tundish filling by impingement of molten steel on the middle of the middle plate that generates tensile stress in the surrounding refractory. The mechanical properties of the refractory, the bolt tightening conditions, and the cassette/plate design are all important to service life.

  4. Experimental und numerical investigations on cooling efficiency of Air-Mist nozzles on steel during continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arth, G.; Taferner, M.; Bernhard, C.; Michelic, S.

    2016-07-01

    Cooling strategies in continuous casting of steel can vary from rapid cooling to slow cooling, mainly controlled by adjusting the amount of water sprayed onto the surface of the product. Inadequate adjustment however can lead to local surface undercooling or reheating, leading to surface and inner defects. This paper focuses on cooling efficiency of Air-Mist nozzles on casted steel and the experimental and numerical prediction of surface temperature distributions over the product width. The first part explains the determination of heat transfer coefficients (HTC) on laboratory scale, using a so called nozzle measuring stand (NMS). Based on measured water distributions and determined HTC's for air-mist nozzles using the NMS, surface temperatures are calculated by a transient 2D-model on a simple steel plate, explained in the second part of this paper. Simulations are carried out varying water impact density and spray water distribution, consequently influencing the local HTC distribution over the plate width. Furthermore, these results will be interpreted with regard to their consequence for surface and internal quality of the cast product. The results reveal the difficulty of correct adjustment of the amount of sprayed water, concurrent influencing water distribution and thus changing HTC distribution and surface temperature.

  5. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  6. A silicon sheet casting experiment. [for solar cell water production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sampson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The casting of silicon blanks for solar cells directly without slicing is an exciting concept. An experiment was performed to investigate the feasibility of developing a machine that casts wafers directly. A Czochralski furnace was modified to accept a graphite ingot-simulating fixture. Silicon was melted in the middle of the ingot simulator in a boron nitride mold. Sample castings showed reasonable crystal size. Solar cells were made from the cast blanks. The performance is reported.

  7. Computational and Experimental Study of the Transient Transport Phenomena in a Full-Scale Twin-Roll Continuous Casting Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Li, Zhongyang; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-02-01

    To gain a fundamental understanding of the transient fluid flow in twin-roll continuous casting, the current paper applies both large eddy simulation (LES) and full-scale water modeling experiments to investigate the characteristics of the top free surface, stirring effect of the roll rotation, boundary layer fluctuations, and backflow stability. The results show that, the characteristics of the top free surface and the flow field in the wedge-shaped pool region are quite different with/without the consideration of the roll rotation. The roll rotation decreases the instantaneous fluctuation range of the top free surface, but increases its horizontal velocity. The stirring effect of the roll rotating makes the flow field more homogenous and there exists clear shear flow on the rotating roll surface. The vortex shedding induced by the Kármán Vortex Street from the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) causes the "velocity magnitude wave" and strongly influences the boundary layer stability and the backflow stability. The boundary layer fluctuations or the "velocity magnitude wave" induced by the vortex shedding could give rise to the internal porosity. In strip continuous casting process, the vortex shedding phenomenon indicates that the laminar flow can give rise to instability and that it should be made important in the design of the feeding system and the setting of the operating parameters.

  8. Geologic continuous casting below continental and deep-sea detachment faults and at the striated extrusion of Sacsayhuaman, Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the common type of industrial continuous casting, partially molten metal is extruded from a vessel through a shaped orifice called a mold in which the metal assumes the cross-sectional form of the mold as it cools and solidifies. Continuous casting can be sustained as long as molten metal is supplied and thermal conditions are maintained. I propose that a similar process produced parallel sets of grooves in three geologic settings, as follows: (1) corrugated metamorphic core complexes where mylonized mid-crustal rocks were exhumed by movement along low-angle normal faults known as detachment faults; (2) corrugated submarine surfaces where ultramafic and mafic rocks were exhumed by normal faulting within oceanic spreading centers; and (3) striated magma extrusions exemplified by the famous grooved outcrops at the Inca fortress of Sacsayhuaman in Peru. In each case, rocks inferred to have overlain the corrugated surface during corrugation genesis molded and shaped a plastic to partially molten rock mass as it was extruded from a moderate- to high-temperature reservoir.

  9. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  10. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2001 Blank. Blank means a...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Filberts in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.2001 Blank. Blank means a...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing....2001 Blank. Blank means a filbert containing no kernel or a kernel filling less than one-fourth...

  13. 7 CFR 51.2001 - Blank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blank. 51.2001 Section 51.2001 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing....2001 Blank. Blank means a filbert containing no kernel or a kernel filling less than one-fourth...

  14. Industrial application of a numerical model to simulate lubrication, mould oscillation, solidification and defect formation during continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Lopez, Pavel E.; Sjöström, Ulf; Jonsson, Thomas; Lee, Peter D.; Mills, Kenneth C.; Petäjäjärvi, Marko; Pirinen, Jarno

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, the addition of the slag phase to numerical models of the Continuous Casting (CC) process has opened the door to a whole new range of predictions. These include the estimation of slag infiltration and powder consumption (lubrication), heat transfer and cooling through the cooper mould (solidification) and investigating the effect of operational parameters such as mould oscillation and powder composition on surface quality / defect formation. This work presents 2D and 3D CC models capable of describing the dynamic behaviour of the liquid/solid slag in both the shell mould-gap and bed as well as its effects on heat extraction and shell formation. The present paper also illustrates the application of the model to a variety of casters and the challenges faced during its implementation. The model attained good agreement on the prediction of mould temperatures and shell thicknesses as well as slag film formation and heat flux variations during the casting sequence. The effect of different oscillation strategies (sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal) was explored in order to enhance powder consumption and surface quality. Furthermore, the modelling approach allows one to predict the conditions leading to irregular shell growth and uneven lubrication; these are responsible for defects such as, stickers, cracking and, in the worst case scenario, to breakouts. Possible mechanisms for defect formation are presented together with strategies to enhance process stability and productivity of the CC machine.

  15. Determination for the Entrapment Criterion of Non-metallic Inclusions by the Solidification Front During Steel Centrifugal Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2016-06-01

    In the current study, the three-dimensional fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification in steel centrifugal continuous casting strands were simulated. The volume of fluid model was used to solve the multiphase phenomena between the molten steel and the air. The entrapment and final distribution of inclusions in the solidified shell were studied with the discussion on the effect of rotation behavior of the caster system. Main results indicate that after applying the rotation of the shell, the fluid flow transformed from a recirculation flow to a rotation flow in the mold region and was driven to flow around in the casting direction. As the distance below the meniscus increased, the distribution of the tangential speed of the flow and the centrifugal force along one diameter of the strand became symmetrical gradually. The jet flow from the nozzle hardly impinged on the same location on the shell due to the rotation of the shell during solidification. Thus, the shell thickness on the same height was uniform around, and the thinning shell and a hot spot on the surface of shell were avoided. Both of the measurement and the calculation about the distribution of oxide inclusions along the radial direction indicated the number of inclusions at the side and the center was more than that at the quarter on the cross section of billet. With a larger diameter, inclusions tended to be entrapped toward the center area of the billet.

  16. Effect of superheat on macrostructure and macrosegregation in continuous cast low-alloy steel slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, T.; Vuorenmaa, V.; Rentola, I.; Leinonen, M.; Porter, D.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of superheat on grain sedimentation and macrosegregation has been investigated using experimental castings of a low-alloyed steel grade. With a high superheat of ∼ 40 °C, the central equiaxed parts of the slabs consisted of randomly oriented fine dendrites but with a low superheat of ∼ 10 °C, coarse globular structures formed. The mean carbon content measured with optical emission spectroscopy was of the order of 15% smaller with coarse globular structures than in fine equiaxed dendritic structures. Electron probe microanalysis of other alloying elements indicates that the negative segregation in the slab central zones is caused by sedimentation of globulites. With superheat in the range ∼ 20 - 40 °C, the equiaxed zone is bordered by a columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) zone. In this region a positive macrosegregation of carbon and other alloying elements was observed. These phenomena are important when considering the through-thickness properties of the slabs and final products.

  17. Control of Crystal Morphology for Mold Flux During High-Aluminum AHSS Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, Jing; SEO, Myung-Duk; SHI, Cheng-Bin; CHO, Jung-Wook; KIM, Seon-Hyo

    2016-08-01

    In the present manuscript, the efforts to control the crystal morphology are carried out aiming at improving the lubrication of lime-alumina-based mold flux for casting advanced high-strength steel with high aluminum. Jackson α factors for crystals of melt crystallization in multi-component mold fluxes are established and reasonably evaluated by applying thermodynamic databases to understand the crystal morphology control both in lime-alumina-based and lime-silica-based mold fluxes. The results show that Jackson α factor and supercooling are the most critical factors to determine the crystal morphology in a mold flux. Crystals precipitating in mold fluxes appear with different morphologies due to their different Jackson α factors and are likely to be more faceted with higher Jackson α factor. In addition, there is a critical supercooling degree for crystal morphology dendritic transition. When the supercooling over the critical value, the crystals transform from faceted shape to dendritic ones in morphology as the kinetic roughening occurs. Typically, the critical supercooling degrees for cuspidine dendritic transition in the lime-silica-based mold fluxes are evaluated to be between 0.05 and 0.06. Finally, addition of a small amount of Li2O in the mold flux can increase the Jackson α factor and decrease the supercooling for cuspidine precipitation; thus, it is favorable to enhance a faceted cuspidine crystal.

  18. Analysis of cracking phenomena in continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel billets with final electromagnetic stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu; Xu, Rong-jun; Fan, Zheng-jie; Li, Cheng-bin; Deng, An-yuan; Wang, En-gang

    2016-05-01

    Solidification cracking that occurs during continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel was investigated with and without final electromagnetic stirring (F-EMS). The results show that cracks initiates and propagates along the grain boundaries where the elements of carbon and sulfur are enriched. The final stirrer should be appropriately placed at a location that is 7.5 m away from the meniscus, and the appropriate thickness of the liquid core in the stirring zone is 50 mm. As a stirring current of 250 A is imposed, it can promote columnar-equiaxed transition, decrease the secondary dendrite arm spacing, and reduce the segregation of both carbon and sulfur. F-EMS can effectively decrease the amount of cracks in 1Cr13 stainless steel.

  19. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2016-12-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/h is larger than 0.4.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification in a Twin-Roll Strip Continuous Casting Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong; Wang, Guodong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional enthalpy-porosity mixture solidification model is employed to describe the basic rules of heat transfer and solidification in a twin-roll strip continuous casting machine equipped with a multi-port trough-shaped feeding system, and reasons for the formation of these rules are analyzed. The two-layer zonal turbulence model is used to incorporate the turbulence in fluid flow, and the fluid flow in the wedge-shaped pool region in various conditions is studied. The results show that the fluid flow field in the pool region is quite different with/without the consideration of rotating rolls when the solidification is ignored, which indicates the importance of the consideration of rotating rolls in the water modeling equipment design. There are three aspects including molten steel jet impingement, roll rotating, and backward flow of the mushy zone, which strongly influence the temperature distribution in the pool region. The solidification process in the pool region could be divided into three stages: at the first stage, there exists a fast solidification region which obeys the square root law, and an approximately linear growth region could be found at the second stage, while a parabolic growth region could be found at the last stage. The formation of the first stage and the last stage could be mainly due to the geometry of the feeding system and the backward flow of the mushy zone, respectively. The first stage of solidification could be modified by a better designed feeding system, but the backward flow of mushy zone determined by the properties of metals and casting parameters could be one of the biggest obstacles for commercial production of steel sheets by a twin-roll caster.

  1. Effect of Electromagnetic Ruler Braking (EMBr) on Transient Turbulent Flow in Continuous Slab Casting using Large Eddy Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, R.; Thomas, B. G.; Vanka, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    Static electromagnetic braking (EMBr) fields affect greatly the turbulent flow pattern in steel continuous casting, which leads to potential benefits such as decreasing flow instability, surface defects, and inclusion entrapment if applied correctly. To gain a fundamental understanding of how EMBr affects transient turbulent flow, the current work applies large eddy simulations (LES) to investigate the effect of three EMBr ruler brake configurations on transient turbulent flow through the bifurcated nozzle and mold of a liquid-metal GaInSn model of a typical steel slab-casting process, but with deep nozzle submergence and insulated walls with no solidifying shell. The LES calculations are performed using an in-house graphic-processing-unit-based computational-fluid-dynamics code (LES-CU-FLOW) on a mesh of ~7 million brick cells. The LES model is validated first via ultrasonic velocimetry measurements in this system. It is then applied to quantify the mean and instantaneous flow structures, Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy and its budgets, and proper orthogonal modes of four cases. Positioning the strongest part of the ruler magnetic field over the nozzle bottom suppresses turbulence in this region, thus reducing nozzle well swirl and its alternation. This process leads to strong and focused jets entering the mold cavity making large-scale and low-frequency (<0.02 Hz) flow variations in the mold with detrimental surface velocity variations. Lowering the ruler below nozzle deflects the jets upward, leading to faster surface velocities than the other cases. The double-ruler and no-EMBr cases have the most stable flow. The magnetic field generates large-scale vortical structures tending toward two-dimensional (2-D) turbulence. To avoid detrimental large-scale, low-frequency flow variations, it is recommended to avoid strong magnetic fields across the nozzle well and port regions.

  2. Mold Simulator Study on the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel Near the Corner of Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Peisheng; Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Haihui

    2017-02-01

    Corner cracks are one of the most widespread surface defects of continuous casting slabs, and they are especially severe for peritectic steels and low-alloy steels. Therefore, a clear understanding of molten steel initial solidification around mold corner would be of great importance for the inhibition of corner cracks. This paper has been conducted with the aim to elucidate this understanding, by using a novel mold simulator equipped with a right-angle copper mold. The responding temperatures and heat fluxes across the mold hot-face and corner were firstly calculated through a 2D-inverse heat conduction program mathematical model, and the results suggested that the cooling ability and the fluctuation of heat fluxes around the mold corner are stronger than those for mold hot-face. With the help of power spectral density analysis and fast Fourier transformation, the four characteristic signals of heat fluxes were discussed in this paper. Next, the relation between the thickness of solidified shell and solidification time was fitted with the solidification square root law; as a result, the average solidification factor bar{K} for the hot-face shell is 2.32 mm/s1/2, and it is 2.77 mm/s1/2 for the shell near-corner. For the same oscillation marks (OMs), it appeared that the OMs positions on the shell corner are lower than those on the shell hot-face along the casting direction, because the stronger shrinkage of shell at the corner allows the overflowing steel to penetrate deeper into the larger gap between the shell corner and mold, which is demonstrated through the heat transfer analysis and metallographic examination. Finally, the interrelation between shell profile, mold oscillation, variation rate of heat flux, high-frequency heat flux and high-frequency temperature was discussed for above two cases, and the results suggested that meniscus conditions (heat transfer and melt flow) around the mold corner are more unsteady.

  3. Modeling of Quasi-Four-Phase Flow in Continuous Casting Mold Using Hybrid Eulerian and Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Sun, Zhenbang; Li, Baokuan

    2017-04-01

    Lagrangian tracking model combined with Eulerian multi-phase model is employed to predict the time-dependent argon-steel-slag-air quasi-four-phase flow inside a slab continuous casting mold. The Eulerian approach is used for the description of three phases (molten steel, liquid slag, and air at the top of liquid slag layer). The dispersed argon bubble injected from the SEN is treated in the Lagrangian way. The complex interfacial momentum transfers between various phases are considered. Validation is supported by the measurement data of cold model experiments and industrial practice. Close agreements were achieved for the gas volume fraction, liquid flow pattern, level fluctuation, and exposed slag eye phenomena. Many known phenomena and new predictions were successfully reproduced using this model. The vortex slag entrapment phenomenon at the slag-steel interface was obtained using this model, some small slag drops are sucked deep into the liquid pool of molten steel. Varying gas flow rates have a large effect on the steel flow pattern in the upper recirculation zone. Three typical flow patterns inside the mold with different argon gas flow rates have been obtained: double roll, three roll, and single roll. Effects of argon gas flow rate, casting speed, and slag layer thickness on the exposed slag eye and level fluctuation at the slag-steel interface were studied. A dimensionless value of H ave/ h was proposed to describe the time-averaged level fluctuation of slag-steel interface. The exposed slag eye near the SEN would be formed when the value of H ave/ h is larger than 0.4.

  4. Deformed ellipsoidal diffraction grating blank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decew, Alan E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Deformed Ellipsoidal Grating Blank (DEGB) is the primary component in an ultraviolet spectrometer. Since one of the major concerns for these instruments is throughput, significant efforts are made to reduce the number of components and subsequently reflections. Each reflection results in losses through absorption and scattering. It is these two sources of photon loss that dictated the requirements for the DEGB. The first goal is to shape the DEGB in such a way that the energy at the entrance slit is focused as well as possible on the exit slit. The second goal is to produce a surface smooth enough to minimize the photon loss due to scattering. The program was accomplished in three phases. The first phase was the fabrication planning. The second phase was the actual fabrication and initial testing. The last phase was the final testing of the completed DEGB.

  5. Comparison of Experimentally Measured Temperature Gradient and Finite-Element-Method Simulations for Two Continuously Cast Bloom Heating Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvíčala, M.; Frydrýšek, K.; Štamborská, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of experimentally measured temperature gradients and finite-element-method (FEM) simulations of two heating strategies that were used for continuously cast bloom soaking. The temperature gradient between the bloom surface and center was measured by two thermocouples incorporated directly into the bloom. Scanning electron microscopy equipped by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, hot tensile tests, and interdendritic solidification software was used for modeling of steel thermophysical properties with respect to the alloying-elements macrosegregation. The model of the bloom was programmed in the Fortran language. The FEM software MARC/MENTAT 2012 was used for simulation of two heating strategies (plane strain formulation). The first heating model was fitted to the commonly used heating strategy when internal defects grew above the critical limit. The second heating model was a newly proposed strategy that consisted of slower heating up to 1073 K when the first warming-through period occurred. The FEM simulations included determinations of the temperature gradient, the equivalent of stress, the equivalent of elastic strain, the equivalent of plastic strain, and the equivalent of total strain. The simulation results were in good agreement with experimental observations. The new heating strategy based on the FEM simulations led to significantly lower occurrence of internal defects in hot-rolled billets that are used for cylinder production.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of Transient Flow and Inclusions Transport in Continuous Casting Mold under Different Electromagnetic Brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to analyze transient fluid flow and inclusions transport in a slab continuous casting mold, considering the effects of electromagnetic brake (EMBr) arrangement and magnetic field strength. Transient flow of molten steel in the mold is calculated by using the large eddy simulation. The electromagnetic force is incorporated into the Navier-Stokes equation. The transport of inclusion inside the mold is calculated using the Lagrangian approach based on the transient flow field. The predicted results of this model are compared with the measurements of the ultrasonic testing of the rolled steel plates and the water model experiments. The transient asymmetrical flow pattern and inclusion transport inside the mold exhibits satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurements. With electromagnetic brake effect, the velocities around the braking region are significantly suppressed, and the recirculating flow in the lower part drops and tends to develop a plug-like flow. The EMBr arrangement has an insignificant effect on the overall removal fraction of inclusions, especially for larger inclusions. The inclusion removal rate for the flow-control mold (FCM arrangement) reduces instead compared with no EMBr, especially for smaller inclusions.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulation of Transient Horizontal Gas-Liquid Flow in Continuous Casting Using Dynamic Subgrid-Scale Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Baokuan

    2017-03-01

    Euler-Euler simulations of transient horizontal gas-liquid flow in a continuous-casting mold are presented. The predictions were compared with previous experimental measurements by two-channel laser Doppler velocimeter. Simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity to different turbulence closure models [k-ɛ, shear stress transport (SST), Reynolds stress model (RSM), and large-eddy simulation (LES)] and different interfacial forces (drag, lift, virtual mass, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion). It was found that the LES model showed better agreement than the other turbulence models in predicting the velocity components of the liquid phase. Furthermore, an appropriate drag force coefficient model, lift force coefficient model, and virtual mass force coefficient were chosen. Meanwhile, the wall lubrication force and turbulent dispersion force did not have much effect on the current gas-liquid two-phase system. This work highlights the importance of choosing an appropriate bubble size in accordance with experiment. Finally, coupled with the optimized interfacial force models and bubble size, LES with a dynamic subgrid model was used to calculate the transient two-phase turbulent flow inside the mold. More instantaneous details of the two-phase flow characteristics in the mold were captured by LES, including multiscale vortex structures, fluctuation characteristics, and the vorticity distribution. The LES model can also be used to describe the time-averaged gas-liquid flow field, giving reasonably good agreement with mean experimental data. Thus, LES can be used effectively to study transient two-phase flow inside molds.

  8. Effects of MgO Nanoparticle Additions on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Continuously Cast Steel Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangzhou; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Yang, Yindong; Chattopadhyay, Kinnor; McLean, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A new approach for pre-dispersing MgO nanoparticles and adding them to molten steel during continuous casting operations was established. The influence of different mass fractions of MgO nanoparticles on inclusion characteristics, steel microstructure, and the ability of inclusions to induce acicular ferrite (AF) formation, was investigated. The results revealed that after adding different mass fractions of nanoparticles, the majority of inclusions contained MgO-Al2O3, and the inclusion size was considerably refined. These inclusions promoted AF formation, and with increasing inclusion size from 1.0 to 1.8 μm, the proportion of AF progressively increased. The ability of inclusions to induce AF was greatly reduced when the inclusion size reached 7.0 μm. This was primarily due to the relationship between the ferrite nucleation rate and inclusion size. It was also found that the size of inclusions that functioned as pinning particles was larger than that of inclusions that served as AF nucleation cores. When the mass fraction of MgO nanoparticles reached 0.05 pct, the degree of interlocking of AF within the microstructure of billet specimens was maximized and this was associated with optimal values for strength and impact properties.

  9. Simulation and validation of two-phase turbulent flow and particle transport in continuous casting of steel slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, K.; Thomas, B. G.; Liu, R.; Vanka, S. P.; Ruan, X. M.

    2015-06-01

    In continuous steel casting, argon gas is usually injected at the slide gate or stopper rod to prevent clogging, but entrapped bubbles may cause defects in the final product. To better understand this, the flow of molten steel and the transport and capture of argon gas bubbles have been simulated and compared with plant measurements. First, the flow field was solved with an Eulerian k-s model of the steel, which was two-way coupled with a Lagrangian model of the large bubbles using a Discrete Random Walk method to include dispersion of bubbles due to turbulence. The asymmetrical flow pattern predicted on the top surface agreed well with nailboard measurements. Then, the motion and capture of over two million bubbles were simulated using two different capture criteria. Results with the advanced capture criterion agreed well with measurements of the number, locations, and sizes of captured bubbles, especially for larger bubbles. The relative capture fraction of 0.3% was close to the measured 0.2% for 1mm bubbles, and occurred very near the top surface. The model presented here is an efficient tool to study the capture of bubbles and inclusion particles in solidification processes.

  10. Quality control of laser tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Tailor welded blanks were widely used in the automobile industry for their special advantages. A combination of different materials, thickness, and coatings could be welded together to form a blank for stamping car body panels. With the gradually growing consciousness on safety requirement of auto body structural, the business of laser tailor welded blanks is developing rapidly in China. Laser tailor welded blanks were just the semi products between steel factory and automobile manufacturers. As to the laser welding defects such as convexity and concavity, automobile industry had the strict requirement. In this paper, quality standard on laser tailor welded blanks were discussed. As for the production of laser tailor welded blanks, online quality control of laser tailor welded blanks was introduced. The image processing system for welding laser positioning and weld seam monitoring were used in the production of laser tailor welded blanks. The system analyzes images from the individual cameras and transmits the results to the machine control system via a CAN bus.

  11. Physical and Mathematical Modeling of Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Zone Air-Mist Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León B., Melecio; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2015-10-01

    This study is an attempt to unveil the fluid dynamic phenomena occurring during interaction of air-mists with the surface of the steel strand during its pass through the continuous casting secondary cooling system. Air-mists generated under conditions of practical interest are studied while impacting on a vertical wall at room temperature. Experimentally a spatial multiple-counting technique based on capturing instantaneous double-exposure shadowgraphs is used to visualize the internal structure of mists at distances between 0 and 4 mm from the wall. Analysis of single exposure images allows determination of size distributions of primary (impinging) and secondary (ejecting) drops and of fluctuating thickness of water films formed on the wall surface. Besides, examination of image pairs enables measurement of velocity and trajectory angles of both kinds of drops. These results aided in the formulation and validation of a transient, turbulent, 3D, multiphase fluid dynamic model for simulating impinging air-mists. The model is based on KIVA-3V and for simulating the airborne mist region it solves the continuity equations—mass, momentum, turbulence quantities—for the air coupled with the equation of motion for drops sampled randomly from distributions assumed to govern their size and volume flux at the nozzle orifice. While for the impingement region submodels are established to estimate the results of drop/wall interaction, i.e., the dynamics of secondary drops and water films formed by the impingement of primary drops. The model forecasts reasonably well the random distributions of diameters, velocities, trajectory angles, and Weber numbers of both kind of drops moving near the wall. Additionally, it predicts well the average thickness of the water film and the important effect that air nozzle pressure has on the normal impinging velocity of drops; high pressures result in large drop velocities favoring intimate contact with the surface.

  12. Casting Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Michael D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) casting technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell casting, shell molding, and die casting; (2) evaporative pattern casting for metals; and (3) high technological casting with silicone rubber. (JOW)

  13. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of conventionally-cast Al matrix composites reinforced by quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe particles using continuous ball indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, E.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, D. H.

    2000-10-01

    Room temperature mechanical properties of the Al/(AlCuFe)p and Al96Cu4/(AlCuFe)p cast composites were estimated from uniaxial compressive test and continuous ball indentation technique. Values of the Young's modulus and yield stress determined from continuous ball indentation tests were slightly overestimated, suggesting a surface effect on the mechanical properties. However, it was shown that the Al-Cu-Fe particles provided a significant increase of the elastic modulus, yield stress, and strain hardening, especially in the range up to 10% volume fraction of reinforcements. Also, determination of the hardness by continuous-ball-indentation tests revealed a strong influence of the matrix strength on the mechanical properties of the conventionally cast composites.

  14. LBM-LES Simulation of the Transient Asymmetric Flow and Free Surface Fluctuations under Steady Operating Conditions of Slab Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Li, Qiang; Kuang, S. B.; Zou, Zongshu

    2017-02-01

    Transient flow structures in a continuous casting mold can strongly influence the slag entrainment in liquid steel and the bubbles capture in the initial solidified shell, both of which are associated with the quality of the final product. This paper presents a numerical study of the turbulent flow with a top free surface in the continuous casting mold at a meso-scale level by a three-dimensional combined approach of Free Surface Lattice Boltzmann Method and Large Eddy Simulation (FSLBM-LES). The validity of the model is verified by the good agreement between the calculated results and the measurements from various water experiments in terms of the flow velocity and free surface profile. The mathematical model is then used to reveal the transient and spatiotemporal asymmetric characteristics associated with the transient flow field and the free surface fluctuation, although the steady state operation is considered during the continuous casting process. The results show that the locations of the jets of liquid steel from the two out ports of the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN) always fluctuate alternatively within a certain range, and periodically deviate from the design angle of the SEN within the same time period. The oscillating behavior of the jets promotes the asymmetric flow patterns and multi-scale vortices at both sides of the SEN. By introducing the Q-criterion in the results analysis, the formation, development, and shedding of the coherent structure (CS) of the turbulent flow are quantitatively characterized. The interaction between the transient flow patterns and the fluctuations of the top free surface as well as the evolution of the transient profile and velocities of the free surface are also demonstrated. The results obtained from the current study suggest that the FSLBM-LES model offers a promising way to study the complex flows and related transfer phenomena in the continuous casting process.

  15. Mold behavior and its influence on quality in the continuous casting of steel slabs: Part i. Industrial trials, mold temperature measurements, and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, R. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Samarasekera, I. V.; Walker, N.; Paterson, E. A.; Young, J. D.

    1991-12-01

    An extensive study has been conducted to elucidate mold behavior and its influence on quality during the continuous casting of slabs. The study combined industrial measurements, mathe matical modeling, and metallographic examination of cast slab samples. The industrial mea surements involved instrumenting an operating slab mold with 114 thermocouples in order to determine the axial mold wall temperature profiles for a wide range of casting conditions. A three-dimensional (3-D) heat-flow model of the mold wall was developed to characterize the heat fluxes in the mold quantitatively from the measured mold temperature data. Furthermore, heat-flow models were developed to examine steel solidification phenomena and mold flux behavior at the meniscus. Slab samples collected during the industrial trials were examined metallographically to evaluate the cast structure and defects. Owing to the length of the study, it is presented in two parts, the first of which describes the experimental techniques employed in the instrumentation of the mold together with the details of the industrial trials and mold temperature measurements. Also, the mathematical modeling technique applied to determine the axial heat-flux profiles from the measured mold temperature data is presented. It is shown that a fully 3-D model of the mold wall is needed to convert the measured temperatures to heat-flux profiles properly.

  16. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  17. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    One type of "Blank Field X-ray Source" is now being seen in deep Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. These are the newly dubbed "XBONGs" (X-ray Bright, Optically Normal Galaxies). The study of the brighter counterparts from ROSAT and XMM- Newton serendipitous surveys is therefore of renewed interest and topicality. We continue to define the properties of the ROSAT sample which is the basis of this grant. We expect to publish the SEDs of these sources soon.

  18. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  19. Urinary casts

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cell (WBC) casts are more common with acute kidney infections. Your provider will tell you more about your results. Risks There are no risks with this test. Alternative Names Hyaline casts; Granular casts; Renal tubular epithelial casts; Waxy casts; Casts in the ...

  20. Formability Studies on Transverse Tailor Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, V. Vijay; Narasimhan, K.

    2005-08-01

    Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB) technology is one of the several approaches that have been used to reduce the weight of the automobile body. TWBs are made up of two or more blanks having different/same properties (geometry, material etc.) prior to forming. The formability of these blanks depends on material and geometric parameters like strength ratio and thickness ratio. The study of these blanks can be classified on the basis of the weld orientation chosen viz. transverse weld or longitudinal weld with respect to the major straining direction. This paper studies the formability issues related to transverse TWB by FE simulation. The formability is assessed by analyzing tensile and Limit Dome Height (LDH) tests. The weld region is assumed to be a line in all the simulations. While modeling the tensile test, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation are monitored, and in LDH testing, pole height and maximum load (in near plane strain condition) are monitored. LDH testing shows that as thickness ratio increases, the load bearing capacity and the pole height decreases. There is a contribution from both the thicker and the thinner blank to the overall deforming volume. Failure location analysis shows that there is an abrupt change in the location of the failure from punch nose region to weld line region as the thickness ratio reaches a critical magnitude (1.08). The study of material properties shows that as the yield strength ratio (S ratio) and strain hardening exponent ratio (N ratio) between the blanks increases, the maximum load which the blank can sustain without failure (UTS) increases. This becomes constant and comparable to that of single sheet at higher N and S ratios.

  1. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  2. Enhancing EUV mask blanks usability through smart shift and blank-design pairing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Rakesh Kumar; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter; Thwaite, Peter

    2016-10-01

    EUV Defect avoidance techniques will play a vital role in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) photomask fabrication with the anticipation that defect free mask blanks won't be available and that cost effective techniques will not be available for defect repairing. In addition, mask shops may not have a large inventory of expensive EUV mask blanks. Given these facts, defect avoidance can be used as cost effective technique to optimize the mask blank and design data (mask data) pair selection across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops so that overall mask blank utilization can be enhanced. In previous work, it was determined that the pattern shift based solution increases the chance that a defective mask blank can be used that would otherwise be discarded [1]. In pattern shift, design data is shifted such that defects are either moved to isolated regions or hidden under the patterns that are written. However pattern shifts techniques don't perform well with masks with higher defect counts. Pattern shift techniques in this form assume all defects to be equally critical. In addition, a defect is critical or important only if it lands on the main pattern. A defect landing on fill, sub-resolution assist feature (SRAF) or fiducial areas may not be critical. In this paper we assess the performance of pattern shift techniques assuming defects that are not critical based upon size or type, as well as defects landing in non-critical areas (smart shift) can be ignored. In a production mask manufacturing environment it is necessary to co-optimize and prioritize blank-design pairing for multiple mask layouts in the queue with the available blanks. A blank-design pairing tool maximizes the utilization of blanks by finding the best pairing between blanks and design data so that the maximum number of mask blanks can be used. In this paper we also propose a novel process which would optimize the usage of costly EUV mask blanks across mask blank manufacturers and mask shops

  3. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  4. Comparison of Uniform and Non-uniform Water Flux Density Approaches Applied on a Mathematical Model of Heat Transfer and Solidification for a Continuous Casting of Round Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Charles Sostenes; Tavares, Roberto Parreiras; Oliveira, Guilherme; Pereira, Luiz Carlos

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the water flux densities of nozzles with flat jet and full cone jet were experimentally measured using an apparatus in industrial scale that reproduces the secondary cooling of the continuous casting of round billets of Vallourec Tubos do Brasil. A mathematical function was defined to express the water flux density in both longitudinal and angular directions of the strand. A mathematical model for heat transfer and solidification for the continuous casting of round billets was developed applying the experimental water flux density profile, establishing a non-uniform water distribution approach. The mathematical model was validated by experimental measurements of the billet superficial temperature, performed at the industrial plant. The results of the mathematical model using both uniform and non-uniform water flux density approaches were compared. The non-uniform water distribution approach enabled to identify important variations of the heat transfer coefficients and the billet temperatures, especially in the first cooling zones where the steel temperature is higher, and to assess more accurately the local effects of the water distribution on the thermal behavior of the strand. The non-uniform water flux density approach applied to the mathematical model was a useful and more accurate tool to improve the comprehension of the thermal behavior of the steel along the secondary cooling.

  5. Evolution of halictine castes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  6. Molar absorptivity and the blank correction factor.

    PubMed

    Kroll, M H; Elin, R J

    1985-03-01

    In photometry, where both the product formed and one or several reactants absorb light at the same wavelength, the absorbance of the "blank" of the sample at the end of the reaction may be less than that measured at the beginning of the reaction, because of consumption of reactant(s). The blank correction factor for the determined result with one light-absorbing reagent is epsilon P / (epsilon P - epsilon R), where epsilon R and epsilon P are the molar absorptivities of the reagent and the product, respectively. We derived a factor for the case when more than one reagent absorbs light at the same wavelength as the measured product. This factor is independent of the concentration of reagent(s) and can correct the determined result or absorbance for the consumption of light-absorbing reagent(s) during the reaction.

  7. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  8. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: Study of Red Quasars and Blank X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A major paper describing the technique and providing a list of 'blanks' was published in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below). The results revealed a fascinating trove of novel X-ray sources: high redshift clusters of galaxies found efficiently; X-ray absorbed, optically clean AGN, which may be the bright prototypes of Chandra Deep Survey sources; and several with a still unknown nature. Recent XMM-Newton results confirm the existence of this class of X-ray source with much refined positions. During the first year of this project we have made a major discovery. The second 'blanks' X-ray source observed with Chandra was found to be extended. Using Chandra data and ground-based R and K band imaging we estimated this to be a high redshift cluster of galaxies with z approx. 0.85. Spectroscopy agrees with this estimate (z=0.89). This success shows that our method of hunting down 'blank' field X-ray sources is a highly efficient method of finding the otherwise elusive high redshift clusters. With extensive follow-up we should be able to use 'blanks' to make cosmological tests. The paper is now in press in the Astrophysical Journal (abstract below.) The other Chandra source is point-like, showing that there are a variety of 'blank' source types. Other follow-up observations with XMM-Newton, and (newly approved in cycle 2) with Chandra are eagerly awaited. A follow-up paper uses a large amount of supporting data for the remaining blanks. A combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data convincingly identified one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy (abstract below). This program resulted in 3 refereed papers in major journals, 4 conference proceedings and a significant fraction of the PhD thesis of Dr. Ilaria Cagnoni. Details of the publications are given.

  9. Validation of a systematic approach to modeling spray quenching of aluminum alloy extrusions, composites, and continuous castings

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.D.; Mudawar, I.; Morgan, R.E.; Ehlers, S.L.

    1997-02-01

    Optimal cooling of aluminum alloys following the high-temperature extrusion process suppresses precipitation of intermetallic compounds and results in a part capable of possessing maximum strength and hardness after the subsequent age-hardening process. Rapid quenching suppresses precipitation but can lad to large spatial temperature gradients in complex-shaped parts, causing distortion, cracking, high residual stress, and/or nonuniform mechanical properties. Conversely, slow cooling significantly reduces or eliminates these undesirable conditions but allows considerable precipitation, resulting in low strength, soft spots, and/or low corrosion resistance. This study presents a systematic method of locating and operating multiple spray nozzles for any shaped extrusion such that uniform, rapid cooling and superior mechanical and metallurgical properties are achieved. New correlations, offering increased accuracy and less computational time, were formulated for the high-temperature boiling regimes which have a critical influence on final mechanical properties. The quench factor technique related predicted thermal history to metallurgical transformations occurring within the extrusion to predict hardness distribution. The validity of this unique approach was demonstrated by comparing model predictions to the temperature response (and hardness after artificial aging) of an L-shaped Al2024-T6 extrusion to quenches with multiple, overlapping water sprays. The validation study reported herein concludes by exploring the possibility of applying quenching technology to improving the properties of extruded metal-matrix composites such as SiC{sub p}/Al6061 and cast alloys.

  10. Attachment of Alumina on the Wall of Submerged Entry Nozzle During Continuous Casting of Al-Killed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhiyin; Zhu, Miaoyong; Zhou, Yelian; Sichen, Du

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of the formation of different attachments on the walls of submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied for the processes of Al-killed steel (Ca-treated, HSLA) and ultra-low carbon Al-killed steel (ULC). To understand the mechanism, the types of inclusions in the steel taken in tundish and in bloom (or slab) were identified. In the case of ULC, the reoxidation product, micro-alumina particles were found to be the source of attachment on the inner wall of the SEN. To avoid reoxidation of the steel by the top slag, removal of the slag could be considered in order to improve the situation. No attached layer was found on the outer surface of the SEN after casting of the ULC steel. In the case of HSLA steel, an attached layer composed of plate-like alumina crystals was found in some trials. The entrainment of oxygen through the mold powder due to improper operation would be the reason for the formation of this type of attachment. The formation of the plate-like crystals was discussed with the help of CFD calculation.

  11. Interfacial characteristics and properties of a low-clad-ratio AA4045/AA3003 cladding billet fabricated by semi-continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing; Zhang, Hai-tao; Shao, Bo; Li, Lei; Qin, Ke; Cui, Jian-zhong

    2016-09-01

    A low-clad-ratio AA4045/AA3003 cladding billet was fabricated using a semi-continuous casting process and was subsequently extruded indirectly into a cladding pipe. The temperature distribution near the interface was measured. The microstructures, elemental distribution, Vickers hardness around the bonding interface, and the interfacial shear strength were examined. The results showed that the interface temperature rebounded when AA4045 melt contacted the supporting layer. The two alloys bonded well, with few defects, via the diffusion of Si and Mn in the temperature range from 569°C to 632°C. The mean shear strength of the bonding interface was 82.3 MPa, which was greater than that of AA3003 (75.8 MPa), indicating that the two alloys bonded with each other metallurgically via elemental interdiffusion. Moreover, no relative slip occurred between the two alloys during the extrusion process.

  12. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  13. 40 CFR 63.5885 - How do I calculate percent reduction to demonstrate compliance for continuous lamination/casting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calculate percent reduction. (d) Combination option. Use Equations 1 through 3 of this section, as... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I calculate percent reduction to... How do I calculate percent reduction to demonstrate compliance for continuous...

  14. 33 CFR 149.115 - What are the requirements for blank flange and shutoff valves?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for blank flange and shutoff valves? 149.115 Section 149.115 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION,...

  15. High Sensitivity EMAT System using Chirp Pulse Compression and Its Application to Crater End Detection in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Y.; Awajiya, Y.

    2014-06-01

    A high sensitivity EMAT system using chirp pulse compression technique was developed. The system uses a high power gated amplifier having 2kVpp output to transmit chirp waves. Pulse compression of the received signals are performed digitally in a PC after amplification and analog-to-digital conversion. A 20dB improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved by chirp pulse compression and synchronous averaging. A new surface cooling technique was also developed to improve the signal amplitude of the bulk shear wave with hot steel, and its effectiveness was demonstrated. An actual plant test of crater end detection by the developed EMAT system was conducted at a continuous caster, and clear detection by non-contact EMATs was achieved.

  16. Hydroforming Of Patchwork Blanks — Numerical Modeling And Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Klaus; Merklein, Marion; Geiger, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In comparison to the commonly applied technology of tailored blanks the concept of patchwork blanks offers a number of additional advantages. Potential application areas for patchwork blanks in automotive industry are e.g. local reinforcements of automotive closures, structural reinforcements of rails and pillars as well as shock towers. But even if there is a significant application potential for patchwork blanks in automobile production, industrial realization of this innovative technique is decelerated due to a lack of knowledge regarding the forming behavior and the numerical modeling of patchwork blanks. Especially for the numerical simulation of hydroforming processes, where one part of the forming tool is replaced by a fluid under pressure, advanced modeling techniques are required to ensure an accurate prediction of the blanks' forming behavior. The objective of this contribution is to provide an appropriate model for the numerical simulation of patchwork blanks' forming processes. Therefore, different finite element modeling techniques for patchwork blanks are presented. In addition to basic shell element models a combined finite element model consisting of shell and solid elements is defined. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of the weld seam. For this purpose the local mechanical properties of the weld metal, which have been determined by means of Martens-hardness measurements and uniaxial tensile tests, are integrated in the finite element models. The results obtained from the numerical simulations are compared to experimental data from a hydraulic bulge test. In this context the focus is laid on laser- and spot-welded patchwork blanks.

  17. The Effect of Fe Content on Recrystallization Texture Evolution, Microstructures, and Earing of Cold Rolled Continuous Cast AA5052 Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiyu; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanbin; Xu, Bin; Zeng, Qiang; Liu, Yansheng; Tong, Lirong; Zhai, Tongguang; Li, Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Continuous cast AA5052 Al alloys, containing iron contents of 0.120 and 0.466 wt pct, respectively, were cold rolled and annealed at temperatures ranging from 505 K to 755 K (232 °C to 482 °C). The recrystallization textures in the two alloys were analyzed using X-ray diffraction and electron back scatter diffraction, respectively. It was found that higher Fe content promoted the formation of deformation textures and retarded the formation of cube texture in the two alloys. Most cube-oriented grains formed in both these alloys were associated with coarse particles, whereas the P—{011}<566>, R—{123}<634>, and Goss or randomly oriented grains were often related to particle stringers consisted of fine particles along the rolling direction. It was also found that the volume fraction of each texture component was a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov-type function of annealing temperature in the two alloys. The texture evolution rate with the annealing temperature was calculated from this function and used to determine the onset temperature of each recrystallization texture component.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Flow in a Continuous-Casting Mold under the Influence of a Transverse, Direct Current Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmel, Klaus; Eckert, Sven; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2011-02-01

    This article describes laboratory experiments aimed at investigations of flow structures and related transport processes in the continuous-casting mold under the influence of an external direct current (DC) magnetic field. The main value of cold metal laboratory experiments consists in the capabilities to obtain quantitative flow measurements with a reasonable spatial and temporal resolution. The experimental results presented here were obtained using a physical model operating with the room-temperature alloy GaInSn. According to the concept of the electromagnetic brake, the impact of a DC magnetic field on the outlet flow from the submerged entry nozzle (SEN) has been studied up to Hartmann numbers of approximately 400. The effect of the magnetic field on the flow structure turned out to be complex. The flow measurements do not manifest a general braking effect, which would be expected as an overall damping of the flow velocity and the related fluctuations all over the mold volume. Variations of the wall conductivity showed a striking impact on the resulting flow structures. The experiments provide a substantial database for the validation of respective numerical simulations.

  19. Transient Two-Phase Flow in Slide-Gate Nozzle and Mold of Continuous Steel Slab Casting with and without Double-Ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong-Mook; Thomas, Brian G.; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2016-10-01

    Transient mold flow could produce undesirable surface instabilities and slag entrainments, leading to the formation of defects during continuous slab casting of steel. In this work, two Large Eddy Simulations coupled with Discrete Phase Model are run, with and without MagnetoHydroDynamic model, to gain new insights into the surface variations of molten steel-argon gas flow with anisotropic turbulence in the slide-gate nozzle and the mold, with and without double-ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking (EMBr). The model calculations are validated with plant measurements, and applied to investigate the flow variations related to the slide gate on nozzle swirl, jet wobbling, and surface flow variations by quantifying the variations of velocity, horizontal angle, and vertical angle of the transient flow. Transient flow in the slide-gate nozzle bottom is almost always swirling, alternating chaotically between clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation. The clockwise swirl, caused by stronger flow down the same side of the nozzle as the open area near the Outside Radius side of the slide-gate middle plate, produces faster jet flow and higher velocity flow across the top surface of the mold. Counter-clockwise swirl produces slower jet and surface flow, but with more variations. The double-ruler EMBr decreases the asymmetry and duration of velocity variations during nozzle swirl flipping, resulting in less flow variations in the jet and across the surface in the mold.

  20. Blank fire configuration for automatic pistol

    DOEpatents

    Teague, Tommy L.

    1990-01-01

    A pistol configured to fire blank cartridges includes a modified barrel with a breech portion connected to an aligned inner sleeve. Around the inner sleeve, there is disposed an outer sleeve having a vent therein through which the cartridge discharges. The breech portion is connected to a barrel anchor to move backward in a slight arc when the pistol is fired. A spring retention rod projects from the barrel anchor and receives a shortened recoil spring therearound which recoil spring has one end abutting a stop on the barrel anchor and the other end in abutment with the end of a spring retaining cup. The spring retaining cup is engaged by a flange projecting from a slide so that when the pistol is fired, the slide moves rearwardly against the compression of the spring to eject the spent cartridge and then moves forwardly under the urging of the spring to load a fresh cartridge into the breech portion. The spring then returns all of the slidable elements to their initial position so that the pistol may again be fired.

  1. An electron optical theory of beam blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesley, M.

    1993-11-01

    Trajectory equations are derived in closed form for electrons in time-dependent electric fields produced by beam blankers. Simple parallel plate and double-deflection blankers with transmission delay lines are evaluated. Lens imaging of the apparent beam motion is analyzed by developing the virtual electron trajectories obtained from linear extrapolation back into the blanker region. Lens excitation effects and conjugate blanking optics can then be described. The blanker voltage is represented by a damped exponential cosine term, which satisfies a typical circuit equation for the driver-amplifier. The form of the trajectory equation is written as a 3×3 matrix, which comprises a set of conditional solutions that are determined by blanker geometry. The optimum delay line length of any double-deflection blanker can then be determined. The blanker-induced beam jitter is shown to be significantly reduced by using this configuration. The effect of the blanker beam stop on the motion at the target plane is given by combining results on the real and apparent beam trajectories.

  2. Novel acid-free cleaning process for mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Harald; Branz, Karsten; Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter; Hess, Guenter

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of particle removal during the mask cleaning was transferred to the blank cleaning and vice versa. The experiments are focusing on a variety of blank substrates (glass substrates, chrome on glass blanks and phase shift mask blanks substrates). The principal equipment concept and the process optimization strategies for cleaning of those different kinds of blank substrates are presented. With a fixed process flow, including UV-treatment, Fulljet and MegaSonic treatment, Rinse and Dry, process parameters are varied to define the optimum process conditions. Criteria for an optimum process are particle removal efficiency in general and optical integrity for phase shift mask blanks in particular. The particle removal efficiency for all investigated blank types is within a range of 96-100%. Especially for Ta/SiO2 phase shift mask blanks we demonstrate that during the cleaning process the optical properties only change by 0.07° phase loss and 0.01% transmission loss per cleaning cycle, respectively.

  3. Enabling advanced mirror blank design through modern optical fabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Genberg, Victor L.

    1994-02-01

    Mirror blanks used in high-reliability optical systems for airborne and spaceborne applications have many requirements in terms of weight, stiffness and moment of inertia, as well as mounting and gravitational influences. Lightweight and ultra-lightweight mirror blank design techniques have been enhanced by recent technological developments in mirror blank fabrication and optical figuring. This paper briefly reviews traditional mirror blank design considerations in light of new fabrication technologies such as abrasive water jet machining of mirror cores and ion figuring of optical surfaces. The impact of these new technologies on mirror blank design is also discussed, as well as new design and analytical techniques using NASTRAN. Actual production data using these techniques are presented.

  4. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  5. The Development of CaO-SiO2-B2O3-based Fluorine-Free Mold Flux for a Continuous Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-09-01

    Designing and developing high-performance fluorine-free (F-free) mold flux has become a hot topic in steel continuous casting processes, with concerns of environment protection and energy saving. In conventional commercial mold flux, fluorine plays important roles on the properties as it works as a fluxing agent; however, it tends to cause serious environmental and health problems. In this paper, a new F-free mold flux based on the CaO-SiO2-B2O3 slag system has been introduced through summarizing previous works. The melting temperature range of F-free mold flux decreases with the addition of Na2O/Li2O and B2O3; the viscosity and heat flux decrease with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O, as well as the decrease of B2O3 contents. Also, the crystallization temperatures of F-free mold fluxes increase with the increase of basicity and Na2O/Li2O content. The analyses of EDS and XRD show that Ca11Si4B2O22 and Ca14Mg2(SiO4)8 are the two main precipitated crystalline phases in F-free mold fluxes, and that the Ca11Si4B2O22 is a common and stable crystalline phase in the designed F-free mold fluxes system that shows the potential to replace Ca4Si2O7F2 in conventional flourine-containing mold fluxes.

  6. Ladle and Continuous Casting Process Models for Reduction of SiO2 in SiO2-Al2O3-CaO Slags by Al in Fe-Al(-Si) Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiwon; Sridhar, S.; Fruehan, Richard J.

    2015-02-01

    Based on a mixed control or two-phase mass transfer model considering mass transport in the metal and the slag phases, process models for ladle and continuous castor mold were developed to predict the changes in the metal and the slag chemistry and viscosity. In the ladle process model, the rate of reaction is primarily determined by stirring gas flow rate, which greatly alters the mass transports of the metal and the slag phases. In the continuous casting process model, the effects of the Al, Si, and SiO2 contents in the incoming flow of the fluid phases, casting speed, mold flux consumption rate, and depth of the liquid mold flux pool on the steady-state compositions of the metal and the mold flux were assessed.

  7. W-CMOS blanking device for projection multibeam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurisch, Michael; Irmscher, Mathias; Letzkus, Florian; Eder-Kapl, Stefan; Klein, Christof; Loeschner, Hans; Piller, Walter; Platzgummer, Elmar

    2010-05-01

    As the designs of future mask nodes become more and more complex the corresponding pattern writing times will rise significantly when using single beam writing tools. Projection multi-beam lithography [1] is one promising technology to enhance the throughput compared to state of the art VSB pattern generators. One key component of the projection multi-beam tool is an Aperture Plate System (APS) to form and switch thousands of individual beamlets. In our present setup a highly parallel beam is divided into 43,008 individual beamlets by a Siaperture- plate. These micrometer sized beams pass through larger openings in a blanking-plate and are individually switched on and off by applying a voltage to blanking-electrodes which are placed around the blanking-plate openings. A charged particle 200x reduction optics demagnifies the beamlet array to the substrate. The switched off beams are filtered out in the projection optics so that only the beams which are unaffected by the blanking-plate are projected to the substrate with 200x reduction. The blanking-plate is basically a CMOS device for handling the writing data. In our work the blanking-electrodes are fabricated using CMOS compatible add on processes like SiO2-etching or metal deposition and structuring. A new approach is the implementation of buried tungsten electrodes for beam blanking.

  8. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  9. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification During the Twin-Roll Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2016-02-01

    The commercialization of aluminum twin-roll casting was realized in the early 1950s, while it is still a dream for engineers to produce steel strip by this process. In the present paper, a two-dimensional mathematical model is employed to study the fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidification during the twin-roll casting for both steel and aluminum. The turbulent flow in the pool is examined using the Lam and Bremhorst low-Reynolds-number turbulence model. In order to facilitate the comparison and analysis, a new transformed coordinate system ( r, φ) is established. Characteristics of the momentum boundary layer and the solidification front are described. Reasons of the formation of the wedge-shaped zone near the surface of rotating roll are given. In the transformed coordinate system ( r, φ), the effect of the centrifugal force induced by the rotating roll is presented using the velocity component in the r direction and the pressure gradient in the r direction. At last, the evaluation of the solidified shell in the pool is analyzed. The results show that the twin-roll casting is a roll-rotating-driven process. The variation of the thickness of the momentum boundary layer can be divided into three stages and its thickness is very uniform at the last stage. Near the roll surface, there exists a wedge-shaped zone induced by the near-roll-surface shear flow that washes the mushy zone front, which increases the depth of the liquid pool and decreases the length of the rolling region. The rotating roll gives rise to the stirring effect to the pool region and the metal is moving away from the roll surface in the positive radial velocity region, and the effect of the centrifugal force becomes weak in the lower part of the pool. At the solidification front, the non-dimensional effective heat transfer coefficient distribution in steel twin-roll casting is larger than that in aluminum twin-roll casting. Considering that the turbulence level is determined by the flow

  10. 12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. BUILDING 227. BLANK AMMUNITION LOADING PLANT. ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS. November 1, 1940 - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 227, South side of Hagner Road between Ripley & Mellon Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Predicting the forming limit of friction stir welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramulu, Perumalla Janaki; Narayanan, R. Ganesh

    2011-05-01

    Friction stir welded blanks (FSWB) are tailored blanks made by friction stir welding of sheets of different thicknesses and quality. In order to reduce the trial-and-error principles and costs, the computational simulation of stamping processes of FSW blanks is required for which a feasible methodology or theory to evaluate the forming characteristics has to be incorporated. In the present work, the validity of effective strain rate based necking criterion (ESRC) in both original and modified forms to predict the forming limit of FSW blanks made of AA6111, DP590 is analyzed. The FLC thus predicted is compared with FLC from thickness gradient based necking criterion and from literature. It is found from the validation done with literature results that a consistent and accurate forming limit prediction is obtained from modified ESRC when compared to original ESRC. The failure pattern prediction is also agreeing well with the literature results.

  12. Western view of coupling blank building, with general machine shop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Western view of coupling blank building, with general machine shop and pattern shop on left. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Auxiliary Buildings, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  14. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars And Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The primary source catalog of 'blanks' (bright ROSAT sources with no optical counterparts) has been published in the Astrophysical Journal. The first follow-up paper has also been published. This paper used a combination of ROSAT, Chandra and ground based data to convincingly identify one of the blanks as a Ultra-luminous X-ray source (ULX) in a spiral galaxy. A paper detailing optical and near-IR imaging observations of the remaining sources is underway.

  15. High-throughput automatic defect review for 300mm blank wafers with atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2015-03-01

    While feature size in lithography process continuously becomes smaller, defect sizes on blank wafers become more comparable to device sizes. Defects with nm-scale characteristic size could be misclassified by automated optical inspection (AOI) and require post-processing for proper classification. Atomic force microscope (AFM) is known to provide high lateral and the highest vertical resolution by mechanical probing among all techniques. However, its low throughput and tip life in addition to the laborious efforts for finding the defects have been the major limitations of this technique. In this paper we introduce automatic defect review (ADR) AFM as a post-inspection metrology tool for defect study and classification for 300 mm blank wafers and to overcome the limitations stated above. The ADR AFM provides high throughput, high resolution, and non-destructive means for obtaining 3D information for nm-scale defect review and classification.

  16. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... moving. The outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, ... color! These casts are lighter and stronger than plaster casts. Plaster casts are usually white and made ...

  17. Experimental and Numerical Study on Blanking Process with Negative Clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Kenji; Yanaga, Hiroki; Fukushima, Katsunori

    This study summarizes the characteristics of blanking behavior with a negative clearance. Several experiments were performed for two aluminum sheets over a wide range of clearances including negative values. Blanking with negatively large clearances was found to produce fine cut edges with less roll-over and no fracture zone even for a brittle material. Corresponding simulations were performed using the Ayada's criterion for predicting ductile fracture initiation. Each zone of blanked part edges such as roll-over and fractured zone agreed well with that obtained in the experiments except a few cases accompanied by secondary shear. The reason for prevention of fracture by using negative clearances was explained with the change of the damage value during the process; the damage value was kept low throughout the blanking operation since the mean stress dominating the damage value became compressive around the die edge. Influences of blanking parameters on load-stroke curves were also investigated. The curves for negative clearances showed gradual increase in load toward the end of stroke. The earlier fracture initiated, the earlier the load reached a peak. Simulated curves showed the same tendency and in good agreement with the experimental ones quantitatively.

  18. Seeing Red and Shooting Blanks: A Study of Red Quasars and Blank Field X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a population of 'blank field sources' (or 'blanks') among the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) bright unidentified X-ray sources with faint optical counterparts. The extreme X-ray over optical flux ratio of blank field sources is not compatible with the main classes of X-ray emitters except for extreme BL Lacertae objects at fx/fv is equal to or less than 35. From the analysis of ROSAT archival data we found evidence for only three sources, out of 16, needing absorption in excess of the Galactic value and no indication of variability. We also found evidence for an extended nature for only one of the five blanks with a serendipitous HRI (High Resolution Imager) detection; this source (1WGA J1226.9+3332) was confirmed as a z=0.89 cluster of galaxies. Palomar images reveal the presence of a red (O - E is equal to or greater than 2) counterpart in the X-ray error circle for six blanks. The identification process brought to the discovery of another high z cluster of galaxies, one (possibly extreme) BL Lac and two apparently normal type 1 AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei). These AGNs, together with four more AGN-like objects seem to form a well defined group: they present type 1 X-ray spectra but red Palomar counterparts. We discuss the possible explanations for the discrepancy between the X-ray and optical data, among which: a suppressed big blue bump emission, an extreme dust to gas (approximately 40 - 60 the Galactic ratio) ratio value and a high redshift (z is greater than or equal to 3.5) QSO (Quasi-Stellar Object) nature. These AGN-like blanks seem to be the bright (and easier to study) analogs of the sources which are being found in deep Chandra observations. Five more blanks have a still an unknown nature.

  19. Formation mechanism of the photomask blanks material related haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Jin; Choi, Junyoul; Koh, Soowan; Kim, Minho; Lee, Jiyoung; Lee, Han-Shin; Kim, Byung Gook; Jeon, Chan-uk

    2016-05-01

    We have observed a new type haze of which formation deviates from the generally accepted models with respect to the size, shape, and removability by chemicals. It has very small size of 50~100nm and are crowded around the cell boundary, while the typical haze doesn't prefer a special region on mask in the majority of cases. It is hard to remove by general cleaning, while the typical haze is easily removed by general cleaning process and even de-ionized water. It is confirmed that the source of the haze is blank material related ions which are formed by chemical etching of blanks during mask cleaning process or the photomask blanks itself.

  20. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The document outlines procedures for implementing Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…

  1. Paper Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrasjid, Dorine A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an art project, based on the work of artist Chew Teng Beng, in the molding of wet paper on a plaster cast to create embossed paper designs. The values of such a project are outlined, including a note that its tactile approach makes it suitable to visually handicapped students. (SJL)

  2. CASTING FURNACES

    DOEpatents

    Ruppel, R.H.; Winters, C.E.

    1961-01-01

    A device is described for casting uranium which comprises a crucible, a rotatable table holding a plurality of molds, and a shell around both the crucible and the table. The bottom of the crucible has an eccentrically arranged pouring hole aligned with one of the molds at a time. The shell can be connected with a vacuum.

  3. Large optical glass blanks for the ELT generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Petzold, Uwe; Dietrich, Volker; Wittmer, Volker; Rexius, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The upcoming extremely large telescope projects like the E-ELT, TMT or GMT telescopes require not only large amount of mirror blank substrates but have also sophisticated instrument setups. Common instrument components are atmospheric dispersion correctors that compensate for the varying atmospheric path length depending on the telescope inclination angle. These elements consist usually of optical glass blanks that have to be large due to the increased size of the focal beam of the extremely large telescopes. SCHOTT has a long experience in producing and delivering large optical glass blanks for astronomical applications up to 1 m and in homogeneity grades up to H3 quality in the past. The most common optical glass available in large formats is SCHOTT N-BK7. But other glass types like F2 or LLF1 can also be produced in formats up to 1 m. The extremely large telescope projects partly demand atmospheric dispersion components even in sizes beyond 1m up to a range of 1.5 m diameter. The production of such large homogeneous optical glass banks requires tight control of all process steps. To cover this demand in the future SCHOTT initiated a research project to improve the large optical blank production process steps from melting to annealing and measurement. Large optical glass blanks are measured in several sub-apertures that cover the total clear aperture of the application. With SCHOTT's new stitching software it is now possible to combine individual sub-aperture measurements to a total homogeneity map of the blank. In this presentation first results will be demonstrated.

  4. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  5. Information model construction of MES oriented to mechanical blanking workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin-bo; Wang, Jin-ye; Yue, Yan-fang; Yao, Xue-min

    2016-11-01

    Manufacturing Execution System (MES) is one of the crucial technologies to implement informatization management in manufacturing enterprises, and the construction of its information model is the base of MES database development. Basis on the analysis of the manufacturing process information in mechanical blanking workshop and the information requirement of MES every function module, the IDEF1X method was adopted to construct the information model of MES oriented to mechanical blanking workshop, and a detailed description of the data structure feature included in MES every function module and their logical relationship was given from the point of view of information relationship, which laid the foundation for the design of MES database.

  6. Hardening of the surface layers of a hollow billet formed by centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, V. I.; Chumanov, I. V.; Anikeev, A. N.; Garifulin, R. R.

    2010-12-01

    One of the methods to increase the mechanical properties of steel is its hardening via the introduction of a refractory fine-grained phase into a melt. A method of fabrication of a tube blank by centrifugal casting accompanied by hardening with a refractory phase is considered. The introduction of fine tungsten and silicon carbides is shown to improve the structure of grade 15 steel and to increase the wear resistance of a tube blank made of this steel.

  7. The Concurrent Validity of the Correctional Officers' Interest Blank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevy, Bruce A.

    1988-01-01

    Available data yields an estimated validity of .27 for the Corrections Officer Interest Blank (COIB) as a predictor of job performance of corrections officers. The COIB is only weakly related to the job performance of juvenile counselors and has no relationship to the performance of probation officers. (JOW)

  8. Strong Vocational Interest Blank Introversion Extraversion and Occupational Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, Charles B.

    1970-01-01

    Item responses for the Strong Vocational Interest Blank (SVIB) were contrasted for a group of introverts and extraverts. A scale was constructed for the SVIB to measure a dimension of occupational introversion extraversion (OIE). Test retest reliability of the OIE was ofthe same magnitude as the other SVIB scales. Occupations were then ranked on…

  9. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  10. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  11. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  12. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  13. 17 CFR 230.419 - Offerings by blank check companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... companies. 230.419 Section 230.419 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... check companies. (a) Scope of the rule and definitions. (1) The provisions of this section shall apply to every registration statement filed under the Act relating to an offering by a blank check...

  14. Flexible laser welding of tailored blanks in small batch series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagger, Claus B.; Olsen, Flemming O.

    2003-03-01

    In a EU Craft project including eight partners in five countries, the most important aspects regarding efficient and low cost manufacture by small and medium sized enterprises (SME) of tailored blanks has been systematically investigated. In this paper, small batch series laser welding of tailored blanks in SME will be described. This includes the design, development and systematic use of a flexible and low cost clamping device as well as the practical experience obtained on the job shop through systematic optimization of welding of tailored blanks with even and uneven thickness (0.75 and 1.25 mm). A clamping device that is able to hold finished parts up to 1 x 1 m is successfully manufactured and tested. A special arrangement with alignment needles along the weld line is used to precisely position the sheets. These needles are turned into the clamping device during welding, where root shielding is employed. Hydraulic presses hold down the sheets, so they move less than 0.01 mm during welding. High quality tailored blank welds are successfully manufactured in ten different combinations, including mild steel and medium strength steel with even and uneven thickness with and without zinc coating.

  15. Casting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  16. Emulsion based cast booster - a priming system

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the potential of emulsion based cast booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional cast booster and emulsion based cast booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional cast booster while the other one with emulsion based cast booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based cast booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based cast booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  17. CASTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-09-23

    An apparatus is described for casting small quantities of uranlum. It consists of a crucible having a hole in the bottom with a mold positioned below. A vertical rcd passes through the hole in the crucible and has at its upper end a piercing head adapted to break the oxide skin encasing a molten uranium body. An air tight cylinder surrounds the crucible and mold, and is arranged to be evacuated.

  18. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Robert S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Sussman, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  19. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  20. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  2. Study on the Multi-wavelength Emissivity of GCr15 Steel and its Application on Temperature Measurement for Continuous Casting Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Xie, Zhi; Hu, Zhenwei

    2016-12-01

    A method for measuring the multi-wavelength emissivity of a steel surface is proposed, and an applicable experimental apparatus is designed. Multi-wavelength radiant energy emitted from a sample was measured using a fiber-optic spectrometer and its temperature measured using a NiCrSi/NiSiMg thermocouple. Utilizing the unique vacuum control and background noise-shielding systems, we investigated the multi-wavelength emissivity of GCr15 steel at three different degrees of surface oxidation at temperatures ranging from 1000°C to 1100°C. The experimental results show that the multi-wavelength (0.7 μ m-0.9 μ m) emissivity increased substantially, from 0.409-0.565 to 0.609-0.702, once the steel was oxidized. In addition, the emissivity increased slightly with increasing temperature, but the trends for emissivity and wavelength were similar. To measure the surface temperature of casting billets based on multi-wavelength thermometry, the functional relationships between emissivity and wavelength at different extents of oxidation were determined. Temperature measurements based on our technique were compared with those from common colorimetric thermometry. Our approach reduced the temperature fluctuation from ± 23°C to ± 3.5°C, indicating that a reliable measurement of the multi-wavelength emissivity of GCr15 steel is obtained using this experimental apparatus.

  3. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  4. Advances in Low-Defect Multilayers for EUVL Mask Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Folta, J A; Davidson, J C; Larson, C C; Walton, C C; Kearney, P A

    2002-04-15

    Low-defect multilayer coatings are required to fabricate mask blanks for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL). The mask blanks consist of high reflectance E W multilayers on low thermal expansion substrates. A defect density of 0.0025 printable defects/cm{sup 2} for both the mask substrate and the multilayer is required to provide a mask blank yield of 60%. Current low defect multilayer coating technology allows repeated coating-added defect levels of 0.05/cm{sup 2} for defects greater than 90 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) equivalent size for lots of 20 substrates. Extended clean operation of the coating system at levels below 0.08/cm{sup 2} for 3 months of operation has also been achieved. Two substrates with zero added defects in the quality area have been fabricated, providing an existence proof that ultra low defect coatings are possible. Increasing the ion source-to-target distance from 410 to 560 mm to reduce undesired coating of the ion source caused the defect density to increase to 0.2/cm{sup 2}. Deposition and etching diagnostic witness substrates and deposition pinhole cameras showed a much higher level of ion beam spillover (ions missing the sputter target) than expected. Future work will quantify beam spillover, and test designs to reduce spillover, if it is confirmed to be the cause of the increased defect level. The LDD system will also be upgraded to allow clean coating of standard format mask substrates. The upgrade will confirm that the low defect process developed on Si wafers is compatible with the standard mask format 152 mm square substrates, and will provide a clean supply of EUVL mask blanks needed to support development of EUVL mask patterning processes and clean mask handling technologies.

  5. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a... failure would preclude continued safe flight and landing of the airplane or result in serious injury to... mechanical properties of the material in the casting and provides for demonstration of these properties...

  6. 14 CFR 23.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction § 23.621... casting whose failure would preclude continued safe flight and landing of the airplane or result in... procured to a specification that guarantees the mechanical properties of the material in the casting...

  7. Hand-based thumb spica casting.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W O

    1998-03-01

    A hand-based thumb spica cast can be used to protect the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and interphalangeal (IP) joints of the thumb after uncomplicated ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) sprains and certain other thumb injuries. The cast allows continued participation in many activities, letting the patient grip an implement and move the wrist joint but immobilizing the thumb joints.

  8. 21 CFR 888.5960 - Cast removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cast removal instrument. 888.5960 Section 888.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient. This generic type of device includes the electric cast cutter and cast vacuum. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 888.5960 - Cast removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cast removal instrument. 888.5960 Section 888.5960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient. This generic type of device includes the electric cast cutter and cast vacuum. (b)...

  10. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  11. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  12. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  13. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  14. 46 CFR 153.239 - Use of cast iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of cast iron. 153.239 Section 153.239 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK... Systems § 153.239 Use of cast iron. (a) Cast iron used in a cargo containment system must meet...

  15. SEGREGATION IN SMALL STEEL CASTINGS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Carbon segregation in small castings often occurs near riser necks. Systematic studies were continued to determine effect on segregation of such...intensity of carbon segregation under ’neck-down’ risers varies directly as the neck length and inversely as the neck diameter. The degree of segregation

  16. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  17. Method and apparatus for inspecting an EUV mask blank

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2005-11-08

    An apparatus and method for at-wavelength EUV mask-blank characterization for inspection of moderate and low spatial frequency coating uniformity using a synchrotron or other source of EUV light. The apparatus provides for rapid, non-destruction, non-contact, at-wavelength qualification of large mask areas, and can be self-calibrating or be calibrated to well-characterized reference samples. It can further check for spatial variation of mask reflectivity or for global differences among masks. The apparatus and method is particularly suited for inspection of coating uniformity and quality and can detect defects in the order of 50 .mu.m and above.

  18. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A blank mask and its preparation stages, such as cleaning or resist coating, play an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using it. Blank mask defects' impact analysis directly depends on the amount of available information such as the number of defects observed, their accurate locations and sizes. Mask usability qualification at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect information such as size is sought to estimate eventual defect printability on the wafer. Tracking of defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, across multiple stages, can further be indicative of process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. At the first level, inspection machines address the requirement of defect characterization by detecting and reporting relevant defect information. The analysis of this information though is still largely a manual process. With advancing technology nodes and reducing half-pitch sizes, a large number of defects are observed; and the detailed knowledge associated, make manual defect review process an arduous task, in addition to adding sensitivity to human errors. Cases where defect information reported by inspection machine is not sufficient, mask shops rely on other tools. Use of CDSEM tools is one such option. However, these additional steps translate into increased costs. Calibre NxDAT based MDPAutoClassify tool provides an automated software alternative to the manual defect review process. Working on defect images generated by inspection machines, the tool extracts and reports additional information such as defect location, useful for defect avoidance[4][5]; defect size, useful in estimating defect printability; and, defect nature e.g. particle, scratch, resist void, etc., useful for process monitoring. The tool makes use of smart and elaborate post-processing algorithms to achieve this. Their elaborateness is a consequence of the variety and

  19. Casting propellant in rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, J. E.; Froehling, S. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for casting a solid propellant in the casing of a rocket engine having a continuous wall with a single opening which is formed by leaves of a material which melt at a temperature of the propellant and with curved edges concentric to the curvature of the spherical casing. The leaves are inserted into the spherical casing through the opening forming a core having a greater width than the width of the single opening and with curved peripheral edges. The cast propellant forms a solid mass and then heated to melt the leaves and provide a central opening with radial projecting flutes.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2002-10-06

    This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

  1. Morphological castes in a vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    O'Riain, M. J.; Jarvis, J. U. M.; Alexander, R.; Buffenstein, R.; Peeters, C.

    2000-01-01

    Morphological specialization for a specific role has, until now, been assumed to be restricted to social invertebrates. Herein we show that complete physical dimorphism has evolved between reproductives and helpers in the eusocial naked mole-rat. Dimorphism is a consequence of the lumbar vertebrae lengthening after the onset of reproduction in females. This is the only known example of morphological castes in a vertebrate and is distinct from continuous size variation between breeders and helpers in other species of cooperatively breeding vertebrates. The evolution of castes in a mammal and insects represents a striking example of convergent evolution for enhanced fecundity in societies characterized by high reproductive skew. Similarities in the selective environment between naked mole-rats and eusocial insect species highlight the selective conditions under which queen/worker castes are predicted to evolve in animal societies. PMID:11087866

  2. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. High Precision Low-blank Lithium Isotope Ratios in Forams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, S.; Froelich, P. N.

    2007-12-01

    We present a high precision (±1‰, 2σ) low blank (<500 fg/ml) method for Li isotope measurements of forams using <2 ng of Li by single collector Quad ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cs). The Li isotope ratio of seawater (δ7Li) recorded in planktonic forams has the potential to constrain the evolution of seawater chemistry and elucidate the factors driving variations of oceanic mass balances linked to the continental and sea floor/hydrothermal silica cycles. In addition a δ7Li record of seawater will complement other long-term recorders of seawater chemistry such as Sr, Os and S isotopes. Li isotope measurements of forams are limited by several factors: low Li concentrations in forams (1-2 ppm), instrument-induced fractionation and mass bias effects, matrix effects, high Li blanks and incomplete recovery of Li during column separation. Modest concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth elements in the matrix result in variable mass bias in measured Li isotope ratios. Even worse, Li strongly fractionates during chromatographic clean-up to remove Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, from +100‰ in the leading edge to - 100‰ in the trailing edge of elution peaks (Urey 1938). Consequently, miniscule incomplete recoveries of Li during chromatographic separations can result in large unrecognized isotope fractionation of eluents. Large mass-dependent fractionation caused by a difference of 17% in mass between 6Li and 7Li, makes Li a powerful tracer of geochemical processes, but also promotes large and difficult-to-fix isotope fractionations during laboratory chemical processing. Matrix effects of Na & Ca and of column chromatography on Li isotope ratios were investigated using artificial Li solutions representative of foram compositions (matrix matching). Li/Ca and Li/Na ratios in cleaned forams are 10 μmol/mol and 3 mmol/mol respectively. An ICP-MS tolerance limit of 20 ppb for Na and 20 μM for Ca was established, much higher tolerances than by TIMS. A single step chromatographic method to

  4. [Multiple firearm injury caused with a blank pistol].

    PubMed

    Nevická, Eva; Rozboril, Rastislav; Ťažký, Boris; Závodný, Ivan; Zdarílek, Martin; Šidlo, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a case of a complex suicide of a 60-year-old woman found dead on her bed. A blank pistol Umarex caliber 9-mm, several blank cartridges and a lot of drug packages were discovered near the body. The woman suffered from a psychiatric depression. There were three gunshot wounds on the body: in the right temporal region, on the palatum of the mouth and on the left chest wall. The gunshot wounds in the right temporal region and in the mouth had central circle defects with the margins of stellate or star-like appearance and blackening. In the right temporal region the temporal muscle was contused but skull and intracranial tissues were without any injury. On the palatum of the mouth there was neither facial skeleton nor skull injury. The numerous small tears of lips and contusions of buccal mucosa were observed. On the left chest wall there was an abrasion with a bruise on the skin and contusion of thoracic muscles. Neither ribs nor intrathoracic organs were inflicted. At autopsy blood in the amount of 600 ml and a few tablets were found in the stomach as well as an insignificant blood aspiration into lungs. In spite of the fact that all the gunshot wounds were caused by shots fired at contact range they were not lethal. The woman died of lethal intoxication with tramadol and dibenzepin. Although this report differs from the ones published in literature, the authors believe that can contribute to the issue of gunshot wounds caused by gas weapons.

  5. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  6. Cool Cast Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass casts are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass casts come in many different colors — if you' ...

  7. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  8. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  9. LLNL casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  10. Caste in 21st Century India: Competing Narratives

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sonalde; Dubey, Amaresh

    2012-01-01

    Recent debates regarding inclusion of caste in 2011 Census have raised questions about whether caste still matters in modern India. Ethnographic studies of the mid-20th century identified a variety of dimensions along which caste differentiation occurs. At the same time, whether this differentiation translates into hierarchy remains a contentious issue as does the persistence of caste, given the economic changes of the past two decades. Using data from a nationally representative survey of 41,554 households conducted in 2005, this paper examines the relationship between social background and different dimensions of well-being. The results suggest continued persistence of caste disparities in education, income and social networks. PMID:22736803

  11. A New Modelling of Blanking for Thin Sheet in Copper Alloys with Dynamic Recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Touache, A.; Thibaud, S.; Chambert, J.; Picart, P.

    2007-05-17

    Precision blanking process is widely used by electronic and micromechanical industries to produce small and thin components in large quantities. To take account of the influence of strain rate and temperature on precision blanking of thin sheet in copper alloys, we have proposed a thermo-elasto-visco-plastic modelling. In addition, dynamic recrystallization takes place in Cual copper alloy during the blanking process of thin sheet. A new modelling of dynamic recrystallization based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes is presented. Blanking simulations of Cual copper sheet are carried out in order to analyze the softening effect induced by dynamic recrystallization.

  12. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PORCELAIN ENAMELING POINT SOURCE... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  13. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PORCELAIN ENAMELING POINT SOURCE... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  14. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PORCELAIN ENAMELING POINT SOURCE... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  15. Numerical and experimental investigations into Tailored Welded Blanks formability

    SciTech Connect

    Gaied, Sadok; Balabane, Mikhael

    2007-05-17

    A Tailor welded blank (TWB) technology gives automotive designers the ability to selectively vary body panel thickness and alloy to optimize the use of material. TWBs offer several notable benefits including decreased part weight, reduced manufacturing costs, increased environmental friendliness, and improved dimensional consistency. In order to take advantage of these benefits, however, designers need to overcome the formability of TWBs and be able to accurately predict unique characteristics related to TWB forming early in the design process. In this paper, a numerical model to predict the forming height dome and a specific forming curve of TWBs is presented. Finite element analyses of standard TWB forming tests (Nakazima) were performed in Arcelor Mittal Auto Application Research Center to determine the interaction between the weaker and the stronger materials. To measure the critical strain at necking a numerical method is used. A comparison of numerical and experimental results highlights a good agreement. The numerical approach offers a considerable gain to obtain specific FLC for all configurations.

  16. Mind-blanking: when the mind goes away

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Adrian F.; Wegner, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    People often feel like their minds and their bodies are in different places. Far from an exotic experience, this phenomenon seems to be a ubiquitous facet of human life (e.g., Killingsworth and Gilbert, 2010). Many times, people's minds seem to go “somewhere else”—attention becomes disconnected from perception, and people's minds wander to times and places removed from the current environment (e.g., Schooler et al., 2004). At other times, however, people's minds may seem to go nowhere at all—they simply disappear. This mental state—mind-blanking—may represent an extreme decoupling of perception and attention, one in which attention fails to bring any stimuli into conscious awareness. In the present research, we outline the properties of mind-blanking, differentiating this mental state from other mental states in terms of phenomenological experience, behavioral outcomes, and underlying cognitive processes. Seven experiments suggest that when the mind seems to disappear, there are times when we have simply failed to monitor its whereabouts—and there are times when it is actually gone. PMID:24098287

  17. Application Of CO2 Lasers To High Speed Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, L. E.

    1986-11-01

    While laser cutting of sheetmetal has attained wide acceptance in the automotive industry for the purposes of prototyping and very limited preproduction work, the production rates possible with currently available systems have precluded the use of this technique in a production environment. The device design to be described embodies a high speed X-Y positioner carrying a cutting head with limited Z-axis capability. This approach confers two main benefits, first, production rate is limited only by laser power, since the positioner technology selected will permit movement at rates up to 1.5 m/s (60 in/s), second, the use of a high speed non-contact surface follower to control the Z-axis movement reduces the need to clamp the workpiece rigidly to a precision reference surface. The realized reduction of the clamping requirement permits some latitude in the feed methods that can be employed, allowing the use of coil or sheet feeding as appropriate. The author will provide estimated production rates for the proposed design and demonstrate that a suitable choice of laser source and material feed will permit the production of parts at a rate and cost comparable to conventional blanking with the advantage of much greater flexibility and reduced retooling time.

  18. Metal flow of a tailor-welded blank in deep drawing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi; Guo, Ruiquan

    2005-01-01

    Tailor welded blanks were used in the automotive industry to consolidate parts, reduce weight, and increase safety. In recent years, this technology was developing rapidly in China. In Chinese car models, tailor welded blanks had been applied in a lot of automobile parts such as rail, door inner, bumper, floor panel, etc. Concerns on the properties of tailor welded blanks had become more and more important for automobile industry. A lot of research had shown that the strength of the welded seam was higher than that of the base metal, such that the weld failure in the aspect of strength was not a critical issue. However, formability of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process was complex. Among them, the metal flow of tailor welded blanks in the stamping process must be investigated thoroughly in order to reduce the scrap rate during the stamping process in automobile factories. In this paper, the behavior of metal flow for tailor welded blanks made by the laser welding process with two types of different thickness combinations were studied in the deep drawing process. Simulations and experiment verification of the movement of weld line for tailor welded blanks were discussed in detail. Results showed that the control on the movement of welded seam during stamping process by taking some measures in the aspect of blank holder was effective.

  19. 40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operational field precision and blank... Methods for PM 2.5 or PM 10-2,5 § 53.58 Operational field precision and blank test. (a) Overview. This... days of field operation, using three collocated test samplers. Measurements of PM are made at a...

  20. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, Randall Sidney

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  1. Riser Feeding Evaluation Method for Metal Castings Using Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nadiah

    One of the design aspects that continues to create a challenge for casting designers is the optimum design of casting feeders (risers). As liquid metal solidifies, the metal shrinks and forms cavities inside the casting. In order to avoid shrinkage cavities, risers are added to the casting shape to supply additional molten metal when shrinkage occurs during solidification. The shrinkage cavities in the casting are compensated by controlling the cooling rate to promote directional solidification. This control can be achieved by designing the casting such that the cooling begins at the sections that are farthest away from the risers and ends at the risers. Therefore, the risers will solidify last and feed the casting with the molten metal. As a result, the shrinkage cavities formed during solidification are in the risers which are later removed from the casting. Since casting designers have to usually go through iterative processes of validating the casting designs which are very costly due to expensive simulation processes or manual trials and errors on actual casting processes, this study investigates more efficient methods that will help casting designers utilize their casting experiences systematically to develop good initial casting designs. The objective is to reduce the casting design method iterations; therefore, reducing the cost involved in that design processes. The aim of this research aims at finding a method that can help casting designers design effective risers used in sand casting process of aluminum-silicon alloys by utilizing the analysis of solidification simulation. The analysis focuses on studying the significance of pressure distribution of the liquid metal at the early stage of casting solidification, when heat transfer and convective fluid flow are taken into account in the solidification simulation. The mathematical model of casting solidification was solved using the finite volume method (FVM). This study focuses to improve our

  2. Improving Metal Casting Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  3. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  4. Cast Aluminum Bonding Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    fabricated using P?-’r;est11 bur)ld II19 te(hnll I Oly with 6 cIsL nqs. The cast a lumi num alloy used was A357 . The sur- face preparation was phosphoric acid...from a cast aluminum alloy designated A357 . The bonding surfaces of the adherends were prepared using PAA. One primer and two adhesives considered...System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 18 11 Bond Area of 350°F Adhesive System, Cast Aluminum Lap Shear 19 vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 A357 Chemical

  5. Foil Blanking Mechanism Research Using Rubber Tool by Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang-Kai; Li, Xiao-Xing; Lang, Li-Hui; Xiao, Rui; Ge, Yu-Long

    2016-08-01

    For foil blanking process, the usage of flexible tool can effectively reduce the requirement of the manufacturing and assembling precision, compared with using conventional tool. However, the blanking mechanism using rubber tool is not clear. To investigate this question, the Finite Element (FE) model of rubber and process is established using ABAQUS package. The result of FE simulation affirm that the fracture emerges as a result of shear, not tensile. Then, for titanium foil with 0.08mm thickness, the cutting experiment is executed to verify the validity of blanking mechanism and FE simulation.

  6. Cast segment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diem, H. G.; Studhalter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation program to determine feasibility of fabricating segmented rocket engine thrust chambers using low cost, lightweight castings extends state of the art in areas of casting size and complexity, and in ability to provide thin sections and narrow, deep, cooling channels. Related developments are discussed.

  7. Higher Education's Caste System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  8. A cast orientation index.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, J R; Mahanna, G K

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a technique that allows multiple master casts to be precisely oriented to the same path of insertion and withdrawal. This technique is useful in situations where multiple fixed prosthodontic preparations require surveyed restorations and a single master cast is not available.

  9. Hot isostatic atmospheric pressure casting H-K9L lightweight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianfeng; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Gufeng; Ni, Yin; Huang, QiTai; Wang, Gang; Tang, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    Glass lightweight mirror can be made by Hot Isostatic Atmospheric Pressure (HIAP) casting method which melting small glass chunks into a mold that made lots of hexagon-shaped pockets in the back of the mirror. Alumina-silica refractory cores which used to form honeycomb mold can withstand over 950 degree Celsius temperature. Furnace temperature rises to 950 degree Celsius after H4 H-K9L chunks loaded into mold, holds this temperature over 2 hours and then drops to room temperature slowly. HIAP casting lightweight blank can used to form 1/60 λ RMS (λ=0.6328μm) mirror and this method can use to made big diameter lightweight blank.

  10. Ageing of Insensitive DNAN Based Melt-Cast Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Systems Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TN-1332 ABSTRACT DNAN or 2,4-dinitroanisole is a new melt- cast matrix that...replaces traditional TNT based melt- cast explosives. Aside from sensitiveness improvements, the use of DNAN allows for the continued operation of

  11. 91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SCRAP HOUSE AND CAST HOUSE, BUILDINGS 101 AND 72; BUILDING 101 IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH HOUSED SCRAP METAL CLEANING AND PROCESSING FACILITIES; BUILDING 72 AT RIGHT CENTER HOUSED MELTING FURNACES AND CONTINUOUS CASTING MACHINERY - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  12. 42 CFR 414.106 - Splints and casts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Splints and casts. 414.106 Section 414.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (PEN) Nutrients, Equipment and Supplies, Splints, Casts, and...

  13. Experimental Procedure for Warm Spinning of Cast Aluminum Components.

    PubMed

    Roy, Matthew J; Maijer, Daan M

    2017-02-01

    High performance, cast aluminum automotive wheels are increasingly being incrementally formed via flow forming/metal spinning at elevated temperatures to improve material properties. With a wide array of processing parameters which can affect both the shape attained and resulting material properties, this type of processing is notoriously difficult to commission. A simplified, light-duty version of the process has been designed and implemented for full-size automotive wheels. The apparatus is intended to assist in understanding the deformation mechanisms and the material response to this type of processing. An experimental protocol has been developed to prepare for, and subsequently perform forming trials and is described for as-cast A356 wheel blanks. The thermal profile attained, along with instrumentation details are provided. Similitude with full-scale forming operations which impart significantly more deformation at faster rates is discussed.

  14. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. 73.646 Section 73.646 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS....646 Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. (a) Telecommunications services permitted on the vertical blanking interval (VBI) and in the visual signal include...

  15. 76 FR 14697 - Aleris Blanking and Rim Products, Inc., a Division of Aleris International, Inc., Terre Haute, IN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... the Federal Register on March 2, 2010 (75 FR 9436-9437). The workers produce aluminum blanks and hoops... directly competitive with aluminum blanks and hoops produced by the subject firm have increased... customer regarding their purchases of aluminum blanks and hoops during the relevant period. The...

  16. Corning 7972 ULE material for segmented and large monolithic mirror blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Robert; Edwards, Mary J.; VanBrocklin, Randy; Wells, Bruce

    2006-06-01

    Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE ®) glass has been and continues to be a significant material for astronomical applications. With a nominal composition of 7 wt. %TiO II in SiO II, Corning Code 7972 ULE ® has a mean room temperature coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 0 +/- 30 ppb/°C with a typical CTE range of less than 15 ppb/°C, properties vital to the manufacture of high resolution optics requiring extreme thermal stability. Combined with lightweighting techniques developed at Corning during the past 30 years, ULE ® has been successfully employed for numerous monolithic and lightweight mirror applications including the 2.4 meter Hubble Space Telescope lightweight primary mirror, the Airborne Laser (ABL) primary mirrors, and most recently the Discovery Channel Telescope 4 meter mirror blank. ULE ® maintains its strong candidacy for future ELT applications. Recent challenges in mirror surface specifications and the development of alternative material choices calls for a comparison with ULE ®. The objective of this article is to review ULE ® properties and manufacturing capabilities, and to compare relevant material properties to those of alternative material options, thus allowing designers to properly execute material selection. Finally, recent development efforts directed toward improving ULE ® will be discussed.

  17. The capability of high magnification review function for EUV actinic blank inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyai, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Takehisa, Kiwamu; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Yamane, Takeshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Mori, Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    One of the most challenging tasks to make EUVL (Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography) a reality is to achieve zero defects for mask blanks. However, since it is uncertain whether mask blanks can be made completely defect-free, defect mitigation schemes are considered crucial for realization of EUVL. One of the mitigation schemes, pattern shift, covers ML defects under absorber patterns by device pattern adjustment and prevents the defects from being printed onto wafers. This scheme, however, requires accurate defect locations, and blank inspection tools must be able to provide the locations within a margin of the error of tens of nanometers. In this paper we describe a high accuracy defect locating function of the EUV Actinic Blank Inspection (ABI) tool being developed for HVM hp16 nm and 11 nm nodes.

  18. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  19. Analysis of Proposed Solutions to the 5.56mm Blank Cartridge (M200) Malfunction Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    TO THE 5 . 56MM BLANK CARTRIDGE (M200 ) MALFUNCTION RATE. — 8 - TITLE CLASSIFICATION: UNCLASSIFIED — 9 - DESCRIPTIVE NOTE: FINAL NOTE, —10...REGION DOES NOT ALWAYS STACK AS SHOWN by Rock Island in Sept 1975. The tested items consisted of 3 weapons (produced by Colt), 300 rounds of M200 blank...round (stubs were not recorded). Therefore, the testing of the 20-round magazine with that weapon was discontinued. Three 30- round magazines were

  20. Prototyping 9-inch size PSM mask blanks for 450mm wafer process (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harashima, Noriyuki; Iso, Hiroyuki; Chishima, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    6-inch size (known as 6025QZ) binary Cr mask is widely used in the semiconductor lithography for over 20years. Recently for the 450mm wafer process, high grade 9-inch size mask is expected. For this application, we have studied and developed prototyping 9-inch size PSM KrF and ArF mask blanks. This time we will explain these PSM mask blanks status.

  1. Research on flow mechanism of material for spur gear in closed extruding fine blanking process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming; Liu, Lu-zhou

    2013-05-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is applied to analyze closed extruding fine blanking gear. The reason of engendering corner collapse is the friction between blank and die. Meanwhile, this paper analyzes effects of various counterpunch forces on the flow characteristics, obtains the fiber distribution on different sections of the gear. The effects of counterpunch forces on material flow characteristics in deformation zone and the swirling flow in scrap are also obtained.

  2. INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE CASTING MACHINE CASTING A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  4. Reducing the cost (and increasing the availability) of low-expansion fused glass mirror blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Steven J.; Griffith, B.; Federico, Dan R.; Mehle, Gregory V.

    2003-12-01

    For many years, lightweighted sandwich-style mirror blanks made from Corning's Ultra-Low Expansion glass (ULE) have been used in space telescope systems that demand superior optical performance. Despite the superior performance of this technology, the historically high cost and long schedule to procure such a blank has limited their use to only the most elite missions. Future missions, such as JWST, will seek to dramatically reduce the historical cost/schedule paradigm for ULE blanks by capitalizing on economies-of-scale associated with a multi-segment design. However, for this blank technology to become accessible to a broader range of missions, fundamental changes in technical and business approaches are needed. Over the last four years, ATK COI has worked to develop the requisite technologies to produce ULE mirror blanks in-house, with an emphasis on reducing cost and schedule. Our focus has been in three areas: process development to enable reclamation of ULE glass residuals, glass fusion process qualification, and tooling cost reduction. The status of each of these areas is presented, and conclusions drawn about possible future costs of lightweight ULE mirror blanks.

  5. 40 CFR 464.40 - Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the zinc... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.40 Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory. The provisions of...

  6. 40 CFR 464.40 - Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability; description of the zinc... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS METAL MOLDING AND CASTING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zinc Casting Subcategory § 464.40 Applicability; description of the zinc casting subcategory. The provisions of...

  7. 21 CFR 888.5980 - Manual cast application and removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual cast application and removal instrument... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5980 Manual cast application and removal instrument. (a) Identification. A manual cast application and removal instrument is...

  8. Symptomatic stent cast.

    PubMed

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  9. CASTING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gray, C.F.; Thompson, R.H.

    1958-10-01

    An improved apparatus for the melting and casting of uranium is described. A vacuum chamber is positioned over the casting mold and connected thereto, and a rod to pierce the oxide skin of the molten uranium is fitted into the bottom of the melting chamber. The entire apparatus is surrounded by a jacket, and operations are conducted under a vacuum. The improvement in this apparatus lies in the fact that the top of the melting chamber is fitted with a plunger which allows squeezing of the oxide skin to force out any molten uranium remaining after the skin has been broken and the molten charge has been cast.

  10. 21 CFR 880.6185 - Cast cover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cast cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices §...

  11. Adhesion Casting In Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion casting in low gravity proposed as technique for making new and improved materials. Advantages of low-gravity adhesion casting, in comparison with adhesion casting in normal Earth gravity, comes from better control over, and greater uniformity of, thicknesses of liquid films that form on and adhere to solid surfaces during casting.

  12. Tundish Technology for Casting Clean Steel: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2016-08-01

    With increasing demand of high-quality clean steel, cleanliness is of paramount importance in steel production and casting. Tundish plays an important role in controlling the continuously cast steel quality as it links a batch vessel, ladle, to a continuous casting mold. Tundish is also the last vessel in which metal flows before solidifying in mold. For controlling the quality of steel, flow and temperature control of the melt are critical, and these are presented in this paper. Use of proper flux, design of flow control devices, and gas injection in tundish become important factors in casting clean steel. Recycling of hot tundish, centrifugal flow tundish, H-shaped tundish, etc. are some of the developments which were implemented to cast clean steel and these are discussed.

  13. Impact of the analytical blank in the uncertainty evaluation of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Elcio Cruz; Monteiro, Maria Inês Couto; Pontes, Fernanda Veronesi Marinho; de Almeida, Marcelo Dominguez; Carneiro, Manuel Castro; da Silva, Lílian Irene Dias; Alcover Neto, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysts use analytical blanks in their analyses, but seldom is this source of uncertainty evaluated. Generally, there is great confusion. Although the numerical value of the blank, in some situations, can be negligible, its source of uncertainty cannot be. This article discusses the uncertainty contribution of the analytical blank using a numerical example of the copper content in waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results indicate that the uncertainties of the analytical blank can contribute up to 50% when the blank sample is considered in this analysis, confirming its high impact. This effect can be primarily observed where the analyte concentration approaches the lower range of the analytical curve. Even so, the blank is not always computed. Therefore, the relevance of the analytical blank can be confirmed by uncertainty evaluation.

  14. MOLDS FOR CASTING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.W.; Miley, F.; Pritchard, W.C.

    1962-02-27

    A coated mold for casting plutonium comprises a mold base portion of a material which remains solid and stable at temperatures as high as the pouring temperature of the metal to be cast and having a thin coating of the order of 0.005 inch thick on the interior thereof. The coating is composed of finely divided calcium fluoride having a particle size of about 149 microns. (AEC)

  15. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  16. Method of casting aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  17. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  18. A Winning Cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative cast metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for casting molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in cast metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape castings in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional casting methods, Howmet's computer-modeled castings come out on top.

  19. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility.

    PubMed

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R; McPherron, Shannon P

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  20. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  1. 40 CFR 466.20 - Applicability; description of the cast iron basis material subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PORCELAIN ENAMELING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY... of pollutants into publicly owned treatment works from porcelain enameling of cast iron...

  2. Artifacts Induced by Selective Blanking of Time-Domain Data in Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Feng; Valeja, Santosh G.; Beu, Steve C.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-11-01

    Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) of the isolated isotopic distribution for a highly charged biomolecule produces time-domain signal containing large amplitude signal "beats" separated by extended periods of much lower signal magnitude. Signal-to-noise ratio for data sampled between beats is low because of destructive interference of the signals induced by members of the isotopic distribution. Selective blanking of the data between beats has been used to increase spectral signal-to-noise ratio. However, blanking also eliminates signal components and, thus, can potentially distort the resulting FT spectrum. Here, we simulate the time-domain signal from a truncated isotopic distribution for a single charge state of an antibody. Comparison of the FT spectra produced with or without blanking and with or without added noise clearly show that blanking does not improve mass accuracy and introduces spurious peaks at both ends of the isotopic distribution (thereby making it more difficult to identify posttranslational modifications and/or adducts). Although the artifacts are reduced by use of multiple Gaussian (rather than square wave) windowing, blanking appears to offer no advantages for identifying true peaks or for mass measurement.

  3. Deep blank-field catalogue for medium- and large-sized telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Esteban, F. M.; Cabrera Lavers, A.; Cardiel, N.; Alacid, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The observation of blank fields, defined as regions of the sky that are devoid of stars down to a given threshold magnitude, constitutes one of the most relevant calibration procedures required for the proper reduction of astronomical data obtained following typical observing strategies. In this work, we have used Delaunay triangulation to search for deep blank fields throughout the whole sky, with a minimum size of 10 arcmin in diameter and an increasing threshold magnitude from 15 to 18 in the R band of the USNO-B Catalog of the United States Naval Observatory. The result is a catalogue with the deepest blank fields known so far. A short sample of these regions has been tested with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias, and it has been shown to be extremely useful for medium- and large-sized telescopes. Because some of the regions found could also be suitable for new extragalactic studies, we have estimated the galactic extinction in the direction of each deep blank field. This catalogue is accessible through the virtual observatory tool TESELA, and the user can retrieve - and visualize using ALADIN - the deep blank fields available near a given position in the sky.

  4. Numerical simulation and experimental assessment for cold cylindrical deep drawing without blank-holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiorescu, D.; Chiorescu, E.; Filipov, F.

    2016-08-01

    The metal forming process through plastic deformation, represented by deep drawing, is an extremely vast research field. In this article we analyse the influence of the die punch clearance, the average velocity in the active phase as well as of the lubrication on the deep drawing quality revealed by the thickness evenness on the finished product surface. For thorough research and in order to minimize the number of experimental trials, a fractional factorial design of TAGUCHI type was developed attached to an orthogonal array, thus analysing the contribution of the three aforementioned parameters to the quality of cylindrical deep drawing without a blank holder. In order to compare the experimental results, a conceptual 3D model of the system punch-blank-die was made, which respects entirely the geometry of the active elements and of the blank, but schematizes/approximates the material properties of the blank. Thus, using these simulations, we can investigate the variation of the deformation parameters throughout the drawing process: from the initial blank form to the final drawn part. The numerical simulation of the drawing of cylindrical cups was made using the ANSYS V14 program, the Explicit Dynamic module. Using the signal-to-noise ratio suggested by TAGUCHI, we determined the influence of each of the three parameters under study on deep drawing quality, as well as their optimal values.

  5. The Exicor DUV birefringence measurement system and its application to measuring lithography-grade CaF2 lens blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoliang; Griffiths, C. O.; Rockwell, Rick R.; List, Jennifer; Mark, Doug

    2003-11-01

    Optical lithography continues its transition to shorter wavelengths to support the semiconductor industry"s production of faster microchips to meet evolving market demands. The next step for optical lithography is likely to use the F2 excimer laser at 157.63 nm (157 nm,according to the industry" s naming convention).At 157 nm, among the limited number of fluoride crystals with acceptable optical properties calcium fluoride is the only practical lens material for step and scan systems due to its readiness for mass production. Since the discovery of intrinsic birefringence in CaF2 at deep ultraviolet (DUV)wavelengths,the optical lithography industry has developed a critical interest in measuring birefringence at 157 nm. In response to this need, we have developed a DUV birefringence measurement system. In this article,we describe the working principle, system construction, technical performance and selected applications for measuring lithography grade calcium fluoride lens blanks at DUV wavelengths.

  6. ULE design considerations for a 3m class light weighted mirror blank for E-ELT M5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Andrew; Hobbs, Tom; Edwards, Mary; Arnold, Matthew; Sawyer, Kent

    2016-07-01

    It is expected that the next generation of large ground based astronomical telescopes will need large fast-steering/tip-tilt mirrors made of ultra-lightweight construction. These fast-steering mirrors are used to continuously correct for atmospheric disturbances and telescope vibrations. An example of this is the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) M5 lightweight mirror, which is part of the Tip-Tilt/Field-Stabilization Unit. The baseline design for the E-ELT M5 mirror, as presented in the E-ELT Construction Proposal, is a closed-back ULE mirror with a lightweight core using square core cells. Corning Incorporated (Corning) has a long history of manufacturing lightweight mirror blanks using ULE in a closed-back construction, going back to the 1960's, and includes the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror, Subaru Telescope secondary and tertiary mirrors, the Magellan I and II tertiary mirrors, and Kepler Space Telescope primary mirror, among many others. A parametric study of 1-meter class lightweight mirror designs showed that Corning's capability to seal a continuous back sheet to a light-weighted core structure provides superior mirror rigidity, in a near-zero thermal expansion material, relative to other existing technologies in this design space. Corning has investigated the parametric performance of several design characteristics for a 3-meter class lightweight mirror blank for the E-ELT M5. Finite Element Analysis was performed on several design scenarios to obtain weight, areal density, and first Eigen frequency. This paper presents an overview of Corning ULE and lightweight mirror manufacturing capabilities, the parametric performance of design characteristics for 1-meter class and 3-meter class lightweight mirrors, as well as the manufacturing advantages and disadvantages of those characteristics.

  7. Failure Analysis of a Sheet Metal Blanking Process Based on Damage Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Y.; Chen, Z. H.; Zang, Y.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a blanking process of sheet metal is studied by the methods of numerical simulation and experimental observation. The effects of varying technological parameters related to the quality of products are investigated. An elastoplastic constitutive equation accounting for isotropic ductile damage is implemented into the finite element code ABAQUS with a user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The simulations of the damage evolution and ductile fracture in a sheet metal blanking process have been carried out by the FEM. In order to guarantee computation accuracy and avoid numerical divergence during large plastic deformation, a specified remeshing technique is successively applied when severe element distortion occurs. In the simulation, the evolutions of damage at different stage of the blanking process have been evaluated and the distributions of damage obtained from simulation are in proper agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Control of Polishing Machine of Crystal Blank which Used Network Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Mitsuo

    Quartz crystal devices have become an essential factor in electronic equipment such as mobile communication equipment or PC. As prices of electronic equipment have lowered, the cost-down of quartz crystal devices has been strongly demanded. To achieve the cost-down of quartz crystal device manufacturing, which uses a complex manufacturing process, the yield of the quartz crystal blank lapping process, which is the preliminary process of the quartz crystal device manufacturing process, must be increased. By introducing the network analyzer to the quartz crystal blank lapping process, we have obtained real time lapping characteristics. By obtaining the new process characteristics in real-time and visualizing them when changing lapping conditions, the network analyzer can now optimize the conditions of the process. In addition, the network analyzer can now measure the optical quartz crystal blank polishing process, which was difficult to measure by using a conventional controller.

  9. Fatalities caused by spherical bullets fired from blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzün, Ibrahim; Büyük, Yalçin; Erkol, Zerrin; Ağritmiş, Hasan; Kir, Ziya

    2009-09-01

    Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and are not considered to be firearms in the legal sense in most countries. To show the danger of these guns upon simple modifications, we report 59 fatalities resulting from these simply modified blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey. The great majority of the victims were males and the age of those ranged from 11 to 61 years. In 55.9% of these cases, homicide was the origin followed by suicide (39%). The right temporal region was detected to be the preferred region in suicidal shots by blank cartridge guns with a frequency of 56.5%. In trial shots, all these guns were detected to discharge steel or lead spherical objects, generally 4 or 5 mm in diameter, successfully. Our findings strongly suggest that these guns should also be considered as handguns in the legal sense.

  10. Enhanced procedural blank control for organic geochemical studies of critical sample material.

    PubMed

    Leider, A; Schumacher, T C; Hallmann, C

    2016-09-01

    Organic contamination of sedimentary rocks can produce artefacts in studies of hydrocarbon composition, and this can have significant negative consequences for interpretations of the geobiological record. False positives - that is cases of non-syngenetic hydrocarbon biomarkers - are common in Precambrian studies, and significant challenges persist despite the intensive effort devoted to these studies. Efforts to standardize the 'burden of proof' for distinguishing between contamination and syngenetic material have to date failed to yield a simple or universal protocol, yet the need remains great, as both bitumen-lean rocks and bitumen-rich samples can be vulnerable to the accumulation of false-positive signals. In an effort to determine the best approach to quality control, we tested the capability of different blank materials to collect ambient contamination by assessing their capacity to adsorb hydrocarbons during storage in plastic bags and found that commonly used Quartz sand does not provide an adequate measure of storage- or laboratory-induced contamination. Brick blanks, having the advantage that they can parallel rock samples even during the sawing process, are characterized by similar poor adsorption properties. Primarily steered by mineralogy, organic carbon content and surface area, model-black shales can adsorb up to 20 times more contaminants than sand blanks and up to 200 times more contaminants than organic-free model-carbonates. This observation provides an explanation for reports and observations of seemingly systematic stratigraphic variation of contaminants, but mostly should raise awareness for the evaluation of procedural blanks, in particular of sample-to-blank ratios, when studying bitumen-lean rock samples of varying lithologies. Additionally, differences between the hydrocarbon profiles in plastic bags and the hydrocarbon signatures transferred to blank materials emphasize difficulties in the unequivocal detection of contamination sources

  11. Mercury Deposition Network Site Operator Training for the System Blank and Blind Audit Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates the external quality assurance project for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network. The project includes the system blank and blind audit programs for assessment of total mercury concentration data quality for wet-deposition samples. This presentation was prepared to train new site operators and to refresh experienced site operators to successfully process and submit system blank and blind audit samples for chemical analysis. Analytical results are used to estimate chemical stability and contamination levels of National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network samples and to evaluate laboratory variability and bias.

  12. The Quality Issue of the Parts Blanked from Thin Silicon Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Jacek; Jaworski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the wear mechanism of punches made of M3:2 and M2 steel sheet which are used in blanking process of the rotor part of the low-power asynchronous motor was presented. The influence of additional TiN coating on the punch flank surface degradation intensity was described. The punch wear influence on the hardness changes close the material intersection surface was determined. The research results indicate that the tool durability ensures the quality of parts blanked from electrotechnical steel. The results will allow for selection of new tools materials for this type of tools which are used in difficult tribological conditions.

  13. Influence of Refiner in ZA-12 Alloys During Centrifugal Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, P. N.; Shailesh, Rao A.; Jagath, M. C.; Channakeshavalu, K.

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of the molten melt plays a predominant role in determining the quality cast product. In continuous casting, addition of refiner 1% (Al+Ti+B2) onto the molten metal increases its mechanical properties as a result of the nucleation within the process. In this article, the effect of refiners in the centrifugal casting process was studied. Eutectic ZA-12 alloys were taken for our experiment and cast at various rotational speeds (400 rpm, 600 rpm, and 800 rpm) with and without the addition of refiners. Rather than increase in the solidification rate as in continuous casting, these refiners diminish the solidification rate, which in turn forms an irregular-shaped cast tube. The microstructure and hardness for the entire cast specimen were discussed finally.

  14. Method for casting polyethylene pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are cast in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during casting and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.

  15. Sealing micropores in thin castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersereau, G. A.; Nitzschke, G. O.; Ochs, H. L.; Sutch, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic pores in thin-walled aluminum castings are sealed by impregnation pretreatment. Technique was developed for investment castings used in hermetically sealed chassic for electronic circuitry. Excessively high leakage rates were previously measured in some chassis.

  16. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    castings. Liquid-solid slurries were cast Rheocasting ) to evaluate cast- ing properties and opportunities for enhanced mold life with a reduced temperature...pouring temperature, 600 0C mold temperature, all-metal mold. Figure 29 Schem.atic of rheocasting attachment for vacuum melting furnace. Motor and gear...33 Alumina paddle and rheocasting . Paddle cracked during itirring. Casting did not fill, probably due to poor stirring of melt. Figure 34 ZrO 2

  17. Casting Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Procedure for casting thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal casting at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape cast one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer cast from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.

  18. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Consortium was tasked by GE Transportation Systems (GETS) with development of the IFE, a complex ductile iron casting for a commercial loco- motive that... ductile iron foundry with this tooling, it was clear that castings with acceptable quality could not be made. These castings were on the GE...requirements. Therefore, the design specifies a thin - walled casting with complex structures and the requirements demand tight dimensional tolerances and

  19. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  20. ToxCast Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  1. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  2. Microporosity in casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1975-06-01

    Three series of tensile test pieces were produced using a nickel base partial denture casting alloy. For the first series induction heating was employed, for the second a resistance crucible, and for the third an oxy-acetylene torch. Samples from each series were sectioned longitudinally, mounted, polished and examined microscopically for evidence of microporosity.

  3. ShakeCast Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Kuo-Wan; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users? facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  4. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  5. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  6. Theoretical Analysis on Mechanical Deformation of Membrane-Based Photomask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marumoto, Kenji; Aya, Sunao; Yabe, Hedeki; Okada, Tatsunori; Sumitani, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Membrane-based photomask is used in proximity X-ray lithography including that in LIGA (Lithographie, Galvanoformung und Abformung) process, and near-field photolithography. In this article, out-of-plane deformation (OPD) and in-plane displacement (IPD) of membrane-based photomask blanks are theoretically analyzed to obtain the mask blanks with flat front surface and low stress absorber film. First, we derived the equations of OPD and IPD for the processing steps of membrane-based photomask such as film deposition, back-etching and bonding, using a theory of symmetrical bending of circular plates with a coaxial circular hole and that of deformation of cylinder under hydrostatic pressure. The validity of the equations was proved by comparing the calculation results with experimental ones. Using these equations, we investigated the relation between the geometry of the mask blanks and the distortions generally, and gave the criterion to attain the flat front surface. Moreover, the absorber stress-bias required to obtain zero-stress on finished mask blanks was also calculated and it has been found that only little stress-bias was required for adequate hole size of support plate.

  7. Analysis and control of thin film stresses during extreme ultraviolet lithography mask blank fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liang

    2010-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the leading candidate for Next-Generation Lithography (NGL) in the sub-45 nm regime. One of the critical technical problems to be solved before the commercialization of EUVL is the control of image placement errors during EUVL mask blank fabrication. This paper focuses on the characterization of image placement errors induced by the thin film stresses during EUVL mask blank fabrication. Firstly, the causes and classifications of the stresses in the thin films were discussed. Then an analytical analysis was developed to reveal the effects of the thin film stresses on the distortions of the EUVL mask. Lastly, finite element (FE) models were established to simulate each process step in EUVL mask blank fabrication. The out-of-plane distortions (OPD) and inplane distortions (IPD) were tracked for each process step. The numerical results are compared with the analytical results to validate the FE models. Comparison indicated that numerical results and theoretical results agree very well with each other. The research in this paper provides a solid support for EUVL mask blank fabrication, theoretically and numerically. Further mounting and chucking procedures can keep image placement errors within the allotted error budget as well as provide the necessary flatness.

  8. Avoiding the Blank Stare: Teacher Training with the Gradual Release of Responsibility in Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Most teachers have experienced the "blank stare" when after teaching a lesson implementing all their best strategies using their best language-learning English and at the moment of releasing responsibility--that is, moving from the teacher's responsibility to prepare students for the task to their responsibility to carry it out--the…

  9. Fill in the Blank: Culture Jamming and the Advertising of Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Beatty, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    This article is a review on billboard liberation and some other projects that develop the idea of talking back or over advertising in a playful and youthful way. In one of them, Ji Lee's Bubble Project, an artist places blank thought-bubble stickers on street advertisements and waits to see what people write on them, completing the work of art and…

  10. Use of Monocrystalline Silicon as Tool Material for Highly Accurate Blanking of Thin Metal Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Hildering, Sven; Engel, Ulf; Merklein, Marion

    2011-05-04

    The trend towards miniaturisation of metallic mass production components combined with increased component functionality is still unbroken. Manufacturing these components by forming and blanking offers economical and ecological advantages combined with the needed accuracy. The complexity of producing tools with geometries below 50 {mu}m by conventional manufacturing methods becomes disproportional higher. Expensive serial finishing operations are required to achieve an adequate surface roughness combined with accurate geometry details. A novel approach for producing such tools is the use of advanced etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon that are well-established in the microsystems technology. High-precision vertical geometries with a width down to 5 {mu}m are possible. The present study shows a novel concept using this potential for the blanking of thin copper foils with monocrystallline silicon as a tool material. A self-contained machine-tool with compact outer dimensions was designed to avoid tensile stresses in the brittle silicon punch by an accurate, careful alignment of the punch, die and metal foil. A microscopic analysis of the monocrystalline silicon punch shows appropriate properties regarding flank angle, edge geometry and surface quality for the blanking process. Using a monocrystalline silicon punch with a width of 70 {mu}m blanking experiments on as-rolled copper foils with a thickness of 20 {mu}m demonstrate the general applicability of this material for micro production processes.

  11. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  12. The MDT Innovation: Machine-Scoring of Fill-in-the-Blank Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Paul S.

    The Multi-Digit Technologies (MDT) testing technique is discussed as the first major advance in computer assisted testing in several decades. The MDT testing method uses fill-in-the-blank or completion-type questions, with an alphabetized long list of possible responses. An MDT answer sheet is used to record the code number of the answer. For…

  13. Sensitivity-Limiting Factors of at-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Blank Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Tomie, Toshihisa

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity-limiting factors of at-wavelength inspection for extreme UV lithography (EUVL) mask blanks have been analyzed. The sensitivity of the inspection tool is modeled on the basis of the inspection image of programmed multilayer defects and the characterized attributes of the tool components. The characterization includes point spread function (PSF) analysis of the imaging optics and the back-illuminated charge-coupled-device (BI-CCD) sensor as well as power spectral density (PSD) analysis of the mask blank surface. The statistical scaling of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in conjunction with the variables of optics, sensors, and mask blanks has predicted effective improvement paths of its sensitivity. Increasing the magnification of optics, reducing the total PSF, and improving the roughness of mask blanks will address the needs for its application in future generations. Signal intensity dependency on the geometrical attributes of defects is also studied by both experiment and electromagnetic simulation. It is revealed that the bottom height of defects and defect smoothing throughout the multilayer deposition significantly influence defect signal intensity. Comprehensive measures to accommodate a variety of defects and to mitigate associated risks are also discussed.

  14. Seismic blanking zones in the deep-water Ullung Basin, East Sea of Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Riedel, Michael; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2015-04-01

    A total 12366.395 L.km of 2D multichannel seismic data were acquired by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) for detecting and mapping seismic indicators for the presence of gas hydrate in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea. The seismic data were acquired using Trilogy System of Geco-Prakla, Bolt Air-gun System onboard the R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM during the years of 2000 to 2004. The seismic faices of shallow sediments were also analyzed to understand the sedimentary strata developed in the basin. Seismic data were processed to define gas hydrate indicators such as bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) and seismic blank zones. The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone, on heat flow and other thermal data for the region and on seismic velocity data. The seismic velocity analysis was also conducted for determining the velocity deviation effect of high-velocity gas hydrate and underlying low-velocity free gas. The BSRs occur mainly in the southern part of the basin where mass transport deposits are widely occurring. A number of vertical to sub-vertical seismic blanking zones were identified in the basin. The blanking zones are near-vertical broad chimney-like structures of reduced seismic reflectivity. They may be formed by gas and/or fluid upwelling through fractures and faults. Many of the blanking zones show apparent velocity pull-up effects of sediment layering structures that are interpreted to be a result of higher velocity gas hydrate. The presence of substantial amounts of gas hydrate in the blank zones were first found by piston coring in 2007, and subsequently confirmed by two deep-drilling expeditions in 2007 and 2010. Most of the blanking zones occur in well-bedded turbidite/hemi-pelagic sediments in the northern deep basin. The

  15. Bioinspired Design: Magnetic Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael Martin

    Nature is the ultimate experimental scientist, having billions of years of evolution to design, test, and adapt a variety of multifunctional systems for a plethora of diverse applications. Next-generation materials that draw inspiration from the structure-property-function relationships of natural biological materials have led to many high-performance structural materials with hybrid, hierarchical architectures that fit form to function. In this dissertation, a novel materials processing method, magnetic freeze casting, is introduced to develop porous scaffolds and hybrid composites with micro-architectures that emulate bone, abalone nacre, and other hard biological materials. This method uses ice as a template to form ceramic-based materials with continuously, interconnected microstructures and magnetic fields to control the alignment of these structures in multiple directions. The resulting materials have anisotropic properties with enhanced mechanical performance that have potential applications as bone implants or lightweight structural composites, among others.

  16. Computer cast blast modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; McGill, M.; Preece, D.S.

    1994-07-01

    Cast blasting can be designed to utilize explosive energy effectively and economically for coal mining operations to remove overburden material. The more overburden removed by explosives, the less blasted material there is left to be transported with mechanical equipment, such as draglines and trucks. In order to optimize the percentage of rock that is cast, a higher powder factor than normal is required plus an initiation technique designed to produce a much greater degree of horizontal muck movement. This paper compares two blast models known as DMC (Distinct Motion Code) and SABREX (Scientific Approach to Breaking Rock with Explosives). DMC, applies discrete spherical elements interacted with the flow of explosive gases and the explicit time integration to track particle motion resulting from a blast. The input to this model includes multi-layer rock properties, and both loading geometry and explosives equation-of-state parameters. It enables the user to have a wide range of control over drill pattern and explosive loading design parameters. SABREX assumes that heave process is controlled by the explosive gases which determines the velocity and time of initial movement of blocks within the burden, and then tracks the motion of the blocks until they come to a rest. In order to reduce computing time, the in-flight collisions of blocks are not considered and the motion of the first row is made to limit the motion of subsequent rows. Although modelling a blast is a complex task, the DMC can perform a blast simulation in 0.5 hours on the SUN SPARCstation 10--41 while the new SABREX 3.5 produces results of a cast blast in ten seconds on a 486-PC computer. Predicted percentage of cast and face velocities from both computer codes compare well with the measured results from a full scale cast blast.

  17. Blank corrections for ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon dating of sedimentary and soil organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Santos, Guaciara M; Williams, Elizabeth K; Pendergraft, Matthew A; Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E

    2014-12-16

    Ramped pyrolysis (RP) targets distinct components of soil and sedimentary organic carbon based on their thermochemical stabilities and allows the determination of the full spectrum of radiocarbon ((14)C) ages present in a soil or sediment sample. Extending the method into realms where more precise ages are needed or where smaller samples need to be measured involves better understanding of the blank contamination associated with the method. Here, we use a compiled data set of RP measurements of samples of known age to evaluate the mass of the carbon blank and its associated (14)C signature, and to assess the performance of the RP system. We estimate blank contamination during RP using two methods, the modern-dead and the isotope dilution method. Our results indicate that during one complete RP run samples are contaminated by 8.8 ± 4.4 μg (time-dependent) of modern carbon (MC, fM ∼ 1) and 4.1 ± 5.5 μg (time-independent) of dead carbon (DC, fM ∼ 0). We find that the modern-dead method provides more accurate estimates of uncertainties in blank contamination; therefore, the isotope dilution method should be used with caution when the variability of the blank is high. Additionally, we show that RP can routinely produce accurate (14)C dates with precisions ∼100 (14)C years for materials deposited in the last 10,000 years and ∼300 (14)C years for carbon with (14)C ages of up to 20,000 years.

  18. Precision cast vs. wrought superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. K.; Borofka, J. C.; Casey, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    While cast polycrystalline superalloys recommend themselves in virtue of better 'buy-to-fly' ratios and higher strengthening gamma-prime volume fractions than those of wrought superalloys, the expansion of their use into such critical superalloy applications as gas turbine hot section components has been slowed by insufficient casting process opportunities for microstructural control. Attention is presently drawn, however, to casting process developments facilitating the production of defect-tolerant superalloy castings having improved fracture reliability. Integrally bladed turbine wheel and thin-walled turbine exhaust case near-net-shape castings have been produced by these means.

  19. Cast Aluminum Primary Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    ABSTRAC R A A A357 cast aluminum alloy forward fuselage pressure bulkhead has been developed and manufactured for the AMST-YC-14 aircraft. This work...urring in castings. Test coupons were! removed from castings containing defU-ts and subjected to repeated loads. The shift of the S-N curve for A357 ...selected for the casting is A357 . The cast bulkhead (Fig 2) measures approximately 2.29 m (7.5 ft) by 1.37 m (4.5 ft). It is designed to replace the

  20. AMCC casting development, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    PCC successfully cast and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC castings. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the castings and the remaining six castings were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six castings shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more castings have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC casting has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the casting required the development of an innovative casting technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the casting during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment casting arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.

  1. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. 73.646 Section 73.646 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS....646 Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal....

  2. 47 CFR 73.646 - Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal. 73.646 Section 73.646 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS....646 Telecommunications Service on the Vertical Blanking Interval and in the Visual Signal....

  3. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  4. Quartz sand as "blank" compound in rehabilitation experience of industrial barren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, T. T.; Ivanova, L. A.; Kikuchi, R.; Gerardo, R.

    2010-05-01

    During 2008 the field test was performed near the smelter complex Monchegorsk (67°51'N, 32°48'E) to estimate suitability of innovate method for site remediation in severe conditions such as in industrial barren. The method is based on cultivation of perennial grasses using hydroponics with thermally inflated vermiculite from local deposit (Kovdor) followed by rolled lawn placement on very contaminated sites near Monchegorsk. Growing in very contaminated ground resulted in 50% rolled lawn surface loss during first year but with biodiversity maintenance. Field experiment was carried out in three variants (1- mineral ground - flat site; 2- mineral ground- slope sites; 3- organogenic ground - flat site in depression in five replicates. More comprehensive results were received for mineral ground due to better natural washing compared to organogenic ground. In all variants we observed secondary roots formation. It seems obvious that plant roots choose the best zones of soils to grow, and that they avoided toxic zones. Observations continued during 2009 to follow freezing influence and nutrient loss rate. We observed grass survival of about 20-30% during second year of field test but grass roots proliferated very slowly in contaminated ground. Affinity to the ground is one of most important estimate of rolled lawn efficiency for grass cover creation. One of possible measure to improve rolled lawn affinity is to establish additional permeable barrier for grass roots isolation from toxic ground. Simultaneously with rolled lawn placement litterbag experiment was carried out with quartz sand as filling. Quartz was chosen as blank compound and as possible material for permeable barrier creation. Original quartz have some initial nutritional status: pH 6.87, available forms of K 1.9 mg g-1, Ca 9.5 mg g-1, Mg 2.8 mg g-1, P 0.4 mg g-1. There was both increasing and decreasing of quartz nutritional status during 2008-2009 period. Besides quartz is recognized to be some barrier

  5. Blank Slate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber-Thrush, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Ullysses Tucker likes a good challenge. After spending the first 20 years of his career working in media, he entered the development profession in 2000. He worked for the State University of New York Plattsburgh, New Jersey's Montclair State University, Louisiana's Grambling State University, and Western Illinois University before joining London…

  6. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy.

  7. A Rapid and Portable DIC Analysis for Aquatic Systems: Rise of the Blanks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olack, G.; Pfister, C. A.; Wootton, J. T.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon analysis, in both fresh water and marine systems, can help determine carbon sources, sinks and flows through an ecosystem (Apongwa et al. 2013). Methods to measure DIC with small quantities in situ are becoming more important as the need for DIC estimation increases across aquatic ecosystems. Recently a number of papers have measured both δ13CVPDB and concentrations by injecting a relatively small amount of sample, e.g. 1 to 2 mL, into prepared sample tubes and then analyzing the headspace gas (Spötl 2004, Torres et al. 2005, Assayag et al. 2006). The initial sampling can be done in the field and samples are stable for weeks to months (Capasso et al. 2005, Taipale and Sonninen 2009) prior to analysis. However, CO2 gas samples can have a contaminant interfering with measurements when concentrations are low, e.g. 0.04% CO2 (Knohl et al. 2004), though the effect can be negligible at higher concentrations, e.g. 1% (Spötl 2005). We investigate fitting a blank correction to a suite of standards to quantify the contamination and more accurately measure the DIC concentration and isotopic values. We examined 6 and 18 month time points, using the suite of standards with δ13CVPDB of 18.69, -2.69 and -16.86 ‰, 2 to 3 mM concentration range. Fitting the blank correction allows us to detect the blank in the 6 month time point. The blank only has a minor effect on the -2.69 and -16.86 ‰ standards, <0.1 ‰, but a significant one for the 18.69 ‰ standard, ~0.4 ‰. Samples run ca. 2 mM in the range of 0 ‰ only see a blank effect in the range of 0.15 ‰, but samples run at < 1 mM show potential shifts of up to 0.8 ‰. The 18 month test showed the tubes are under vacuum—apparently the He diffuses thru the chlorobutyl rubber septa. Those samples can still be analyzed, either by charging them with He so they will not be under vacuum, or running as is and letting the vacuum in the tubes draw in air during the analysis. After correcting for the

  8. Advanced Casting Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    water , aged 5 hrs on 155 C. Fig. 15 Time required for 19 mm thick test slab casting, poured in sand, to cool...fraction rare earth could be solution treated, quenched and artificially aged to give high tensile properties at room temperature, which were well...Strength. MagnesiumrZincrRare. Earth . Alloys In parallel with the development of silver containing alloy systems, further improvements were obtained

  9. USGS ShakeCast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David; Lin, Kuo-Wan

    2007-01-01

    Automating, Simplifying, and Improving the Use of ShakeMap for Post-Earthquake Decisionmaking and Response. ShakeCast is a freely available, post-earthquake situational awareness application that automatically retrieves earthquake shaking data from ShakeMap, compares intensity measures against users facilities, and generates potential damage assessment notifications, facility damage maps, and other Web-based products for emergency managers and responders.

  10. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  11. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  12. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  13. Solidification science in cast MMCs: The influence of merton flemings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep; Asthana, Rajiv

    2001-09-01

    The solidification science of cast metalmatrix composites (MMC) evolved as a subset of the broad field of solidification of monolithic alloys pioneered by Merton Flemings and his students. As a result of advances in solidification, the cast MMC field has evolved from its early incarnation—employing empirical research to engineer novel materials using versatile and cost-effective casting techniques—to using solidification-science-based approaches to tailor advanced materials for application-specific needs. The current and emerging applications of cast MMCs in a variety of automotive, aerospace, electronic packaging, and consumer-good industries exemplify the maturity of the field and the materials. Innovations in composite-forming techniques and efforts at wider industrial acceptance of MMCs will undoubtedly continue. However, the scientific principles underlying the solidification microstructure evolution that governs the composite properties have become well established, to a great extent, due to Flemings’ early, pioneering work on monolithic alloys and some of his more recent studies on solidification of reinforced metals. This paper reviews some aspects of solidification of discontinuously reinforced cast metals that owe their current understanding to Flemings’ contributions, in particular, the scientific understanding of macro- and microsegregation, fluidity and rheology of multiphase slurries, and stircasting, semi-solid casting, and preform infiltration. Current research to develop and test prototype components made from cast composites, including Al-flyash, Cu-graphite, Al-graphite, Al-alumina, and SiC-Al, is also presented, along with directions for future research.

  14. Development of a CFD code for casting simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murph, Jesse E.

    1993-01-01

    Because of high rejection rates for large structural castings (e.g., the Space Shuttle Main Engine Alternate Turbopump Design Program), a reliable casting simulation computer code is very desirable. This code would reduce both the development time and life cycle costs by allowing accurate modeling of the entire casting process. While this code could be used for other types of castings, the most significant reductions of time and cost would probably be realized in complex investment castings, where any reduction in the number of development castings would be of significant benefit. The casting process is conveniently divided into three distinct phases: (1) mold filling, where the melt is poured or forced into the mold cavity; (2) solidification, where the melt undergoes a phase change to the solid state; and (3) cool down, where the solidified part continues to cool to ambient conditions. While these phases may appear to be separate and distinct, temporal overlaps do exist between phases (e.g., local solidification occurring during mold filling), and some phenomenological events are affected by others (e.g., residual stresses depend on solidification and cooling rates). Therefore, a reliable code must accurately model all three phases and the interactions between each. While many codes have been developed (to various stages of complexity) to model the solidification and cool down phases, only a few codes have been developed to model mold filling.

  15. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST) Phase VI. Technology Transfer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    system and ultimately fill the mold cavity to produce a casting. The fluidity of a given metal is measured with standard fluidity test molds. One...showed that the pouring temperature for large, thin-wall aluminum castings must be (1) high enough to provide sufficient fluidity for complete filling of...castings should have the following specific characteristics: good flowability , permeability, tensile strength, and compressive strength; high hot

  16. Cast Aluminum Structures Technology (CAST). Phase I. Preliminary Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    49 26 Assumed Crack Growth Rate -- A357 . . . . . . . . . .. 50 27 Flaw Growth at Hole of Gear Attachment Point .... .... 52 28 A357 S-N...wo TABLES Number ?Ile 1 Statistics on.16 Classes of A357 Aluminum Casting Data .. 14 2 "CAST" Preliminary Design Allowables .. .. .. ....... 20 3...damage tolerance criteria; development of preliminary design allowables data for A357 aluminum casting alloy to be used for design until completion

  17. Method for fabricating an ultra-low expansion mask blank having a crystalline silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) using Ultra-Low Expansion (ULE) substrates and crystalline silicon. ULE substrates are required for the necessary thermal management in EUVL mask blanks, and defect detection and classification have been obtained using crystalline silicon substrate materials. Thus, this method provides the advantages for both the ULE substrate and the crystalline silicon in an Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) mask blank. The method is carried out by bonding a crystalline silicon wafer or member to a ULE wafer or substrate and thinning the silicon to produce a 5-10 .mu.m thick crystalline silicon layer on the surface of the ULE substrate. The thinning of the crystalline silicon may be carried out, for example, by chemical mechanical polishing and if necessary or desired, oxidizing the silicon followed by etching to the desired thickness of the silicon.

  18. A Grain Structure Model based on Voronoi polygon of Non- oriented Electrical Steel in Blanking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Shuhui; Dong, Liang; He, Ji

    2016-08-01

    World-wide there is a trend to develop higher permeability grades, thin thickness and coarse grain of non-oriented electrical steels, a core function material of motors. Blanking is the most popular technique for producing the motor laminations. However, the deformation of material is significantly influenced by grain size. In this paper, Voronoi polygon is used for generate the random microstructures of the studied non-oriented electrical steel. Finite Element (FE) model considering grain size is thus established to analysis the blanking process. The material behaviour of grains is derived from the widely accepted surface layer model. Compared to the conventional model without considering the grain size, the novel model shows good matching with the experimental results.

  19. Numerical simulation of fine blanking process using fully coupled advanced constitutive equations with ductile damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labergere, C.; Saanouni, K.; Benafia, S.; Galmiche, J.; Sulaiman, H.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the modelling and adaptive numerical simulation of the fine blanking process. Thermodynamically-consistent constitutive equations, strongly coupled with ductile damage, together with specific boundary conditions (particular command of forces on blank holder and counterpunch) are presented. This model is implemented into ABAQUS/EXPLICIT using the Vumat user subroutine and connected with an adaptive 2D remeshing procedure. The different material parameters are identified for the steel S600MC using experimental tensile tests conducted until the final fracture. A parametric study aiming to examine the sensitivity of the process parameters (die radius, clearance die/punch) to the punch force and fracture surfaces topology (convex zone, sheared zone, fracture zone and the burr).

  20. Investigation on process parameters affecting blanking of AISI 1006 low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Annibale, Antonello; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Panaccio, Lorenzo; Di Ilio, Antoniomaria; Gabrielli, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    A blanking apparatus was designed and built in order to study the effects of the process parameters on blanking low carbon steel disks, with particular reference to the study of punch-die gap influence and Brozzo's damage criterion by keeping punch and die fillet radii constant. The goal of the shearing tests was to optimize the gap between punch and die, according to the material damage and the force curves obtained by experimental tests. By using a 2D axis-symmetry FE model, the authors studied a set of parameters in order to reduce damage. After studying the material damage by a first simulation series, a second series was carried out in order to evaluate the punch-die gap effects on force-stroke trend; good results in term of external surface finish were obtained in the geometry of the final workpiece.

  1. High density tape casting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is provided for casting thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be cast at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is cast against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry cast. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the casting surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before casting slurry against the chamber walls.

  2. Predetermined Flake Production at the Lower/Middle Paleolithic Boundary: Yabrudian Scraper-Blank Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shimelmitz, Ron; Kuhn, Steven L.; Ronen, Avraham; Weinstein-Evron, Mina

    2014-01-01

    While predetermined débitage technologies are recognized beginning with the middle Acheulian, the Middle Paleolithic is usually associated with a sharp increase in their use. A study of scraper-blank technology from three Yabrudian assemblages retrieved from the early part of the Acheulo-Yabrudian complex of Tabun Cave (ca. 415–320 kyr) demonstrates a calculated and preplanned production, even if it does not show the same complexity and elaboration as in the Levallois technology. These scraper dominated assemblages show an organization of production based on an intensive use of predetermination blank technology already in place at the end of the Lower Paleolithic of the Levant. These results provide a novel perspective on the differences and similarities between the Lower and Middle Paleolithic industries. We suggest that there was a change in the paradigm in the way hominins exploited stone tools: in many Middle Paleolithic assemblages the potential of the stone tools for hafting was a central feature, in the Lower Paleolithic ergonometric considerations of manual prehension were central to the design of blanks and tools. PMID:25192429

  3. Development and characterization of advanced phase-shift mask blanks for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Jun; Jang, Kyu-Jin; Choi, Min-Ki; Yang, Chul-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Chul; Lee, Jong-Keun; Kang, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Shin, Cheol; Nam, Kee-Soo

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the development of semiconductor process for 14nm node and beyond is in progress. The mask-making process demands higher resolution and CD accuracy to meet requirements. Current conventional ArF PSM has several problems such as higher 3D effect and higher loading effect due to the thicker film. These problems cause the CD performance degradation. This study is about the manufacturing of advance ArF PSM, which has thinner phase shift layer and higher etch rate Cr absorber film. The thickness of phase shift film is less than 60nm and the total etch-time for the Cr absorber film is reduced more than 30%. The mask CD performance of this new blank was evaluated in terms of CD uniformity, CD linearity, pattern resolution, and loading effect and so on. Adapting to this new blank, we can achieve better CD performance by reducing the loading effect. In addition, the chemical durability and ArF exposure durability were also improved. In conclusion, the mask-making process margin was extended by using this new blank, and it is expected that we can achieve the required specifications for 14nm node and beyond.

  4. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding To Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current joining technologies for automotive aluminum alloys are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum welded components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability utilizing a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  5. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  6. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  7. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    possible today. Extensive work was conducted on casting of semi-solid alloys when highly fluid (’ Rheocasting ’) and when thixotropically gelled...Thixocasting’). In initial phases of the program, copper base alloys and cast iron alloys were prepared with special non-dendritic Rheocast structure by batch...processing. Compatibility studies were carried out to select materials suitable for preparing cast iron with the Rheocast structure. Design

  8. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard bandage that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while ... water. Plaster of Paris casts are heavier than fiberglass casts and don't hold up as well ...

  9. Cast Care: Do's and Don'ts

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically lighter and more durable than are traditional plaster casts. Air circulates more freely inside a fiberglass ... Also, X-rays penetrate fiberglass casts better than plaster casts. This is helpful if your child's doctor ...

  10. When Your Child Needs a Cast

    MedlinePlus

    ... that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. Casts keep bones in place while they heal. ... Types of Casts Casts usually are made of: Plaster of Paris: This heavy white powder forms a ...

  11. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise.

  12. Education and Caste in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  13. Lost-Soap Aluminum Casting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalow, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Lost-wax casting in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum casting process is described. (Author/KC)

  14. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Weppelman, I Gerward C; Garming, Mathijs W H; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2016-10-17

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial hardware in a standard SEM, which allows us to easily switch from pulsed to continuous operation of the SEM. Electron pulses of 80-90 ps duration are generated by conjugate blanking of a high-brightness electron beam, which allows probing emitters within a large range of decay rates. Moreover, we simultaneously attain a resolution better than λ/10, which ensures details at deep-subwavelength scales can be retrieved. As a proof-of-principle, we employ the pulsed electron beam to spatially measure excited-state lifetime modifications in a phosphor material across the edge of an aluminum half-plane, coated on top of the phosphor. The measured emission dynamics can be directly related to the structure of the sample by recording photon arrival histograms together with the secondary-electron signal. Our results show that time-resolved electron cathodoluminescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool of choice for nanophotonics, within reach of a large audience.

  15. Relationship between casting distortion, mold filling, and interfacial heat transfer. Annual technical report, September 1997 - September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, K.A.; Parker, J.K.; Piwonka, T.S.; Owusu, Y.

    1998-10-22

    In the third year of this program, the final castings necessary to evaluate the effect of casting orientation and gating in silica sand lost foam were poured and measured using a CMM machine. Interfacial heat transfer and gap formation measurements continued. However, significant problems were encountered in making accurate measurements. No consistent evidence of gap formation was found in aluminum sand casting. Initial analysis yields heat transfer values below those previously reported in the literature. The program in continuing.

  16. 29 CFR 1926.703 - Requirements for cast-in-place concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. 1926.703 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. (a) General requirements for formwork....

  17. 29 CFR 1926.703 - Requirements for cast-in-place concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. 1926.703 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. (a) General requirements for formwork....

  18. 29 CFR 1926.703 - Requirements for cast-in-place concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. 1926.703 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. (a) General requirements for formwork....

  19. 29 CFR 1926.703 - Requirements for cast-in-place concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. 1926.703 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. (a) General requirements for formwork....

  20. 29 CFR 1926.703 - Requirements for cast-in-place concrete.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. 1926.703 Section..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction § 1926.703 Requirements for cast-in-place concrete. (a) General requirements for formwork....

  1. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franěk, Zdeněk; Kavička, František; Štětina, Josef; Masarik, Miloš

    2010-06-01

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  2. EBR-II fuel slug casting experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C. W.; Batte`, G. L.; Tracy, D. B.; Griffiths, V.

    1987-07-01

    The following paper presents a chronology of EBR-II fuel slug casting experience. Starting with the early vendor campaigns, the paper explains how production of EBR-II fuel, as well as fuel for off-site reactors, has evolved. The production facilities (i.e., EFL, Room 20, FMF, etc.) and casting techniques are discussed in detail. The paper also presents how the original casting operations have improved and the problems encountered as the techniques were developed. Extensive descriptions and data are given on the major experimental programs currently ongoing at EBR-II. Major programs include the IFR lead subassemblies, large diameter slugs, IFR metal fuel RBCB, and the FFTF subassembly program. Concluding the paper is a brief description of future development projects being considered and a summation of how EBR-II Fuels and Materials has been able to overcome various administration obstacles (i.e., improved security and safeguards measures) to continue to meet the increasing demands of fuel production while maintaining an aggressive and active research and development program in fuel slug production.

  3. A numerical study on intended and unintended failure mechanisms in blanking of sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Soyarslan, C.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Metal-polymer-metal sandwich plates are widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. As for different applications the sandwich plates can be divided into two types. They are sound-damping laminates with a polymer core much thinner than the metallic faces and low-density laminates with a core thickness of approximately 40-60% of the total thickness. One frequent process step in production of parts made of these plates is the blanking process whose hereditary effects draw the limits of further forming stages or service performance and life; e.g. the failure of the adhesive in the thermoplastic polymer interface affects the sound-damping efficiency intensively. With this motivation, we present FE simulation of an axi-symmetric blanking process of steel/polyethylene/steel sound-damping laminates. The mechanical behavior of the metallic layers was characterized by finite strain rate independent elasto-plasticity where progressive material deterioration and fracture are given account for using continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This material model is made accessible via implementations as VUMAT subroutines for ABAQUS/Explicit. Possible failure of the thermoplastic polymer which may lead to delamination of the metallic layers is modeled using ABAQUS built-in cohesive zone elements. The results show that existing intended and unintended failure modes, e.g. blanking of the metallic and thermoplastic polymer constituents as well as failure of polymer layer under shear and compression, can be effectively studied with the proposed framework for process enhancement. As a future work, a damage coupled nonlinear visco-elastic constitutive model will be devised for the simulation of the thermoplastic layer in low-density laminates.

  4. Cone of Darkness: Finding Blank-sky Positions for Multi-object Wide-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, N. P. F.

    2014-05-01

    We present the Cone of Darkness, an application to automatically configure blank-sky positions for a series of stacked, wide-field observations, such as those carried out by the SAMI instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT). The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) uses a plug-plate to mount its 13×61 core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical plane at the telescope's prime focus. To make the most efficient use of each plug-plate, several observing fields are typically stacked to produce a single plate. When choosing blank-sky positions for the observations it is most effective to select these such that one set of 26 holes gives valid sky positions for all fields on the plate. However, when carried out manually this selection process is tedious and includes a significant risk of error. The Cone of Darkness software aims to provide uniform blank-sky position coverage over the field of observation, within the limits set by the distribution of target positions and the chosen input catalogs. This will then facilitate the production of the best representative median sky spectrum for use in sky subtraction. The application, written in C++, is configurable, making it usable for a range of instruments. Given the plate characteristics and the positions of target holes, the software segments the unallocated space on the plate and determines the position which best fits the uniform distribution requirement. This position is checked, for each field, against the selected catalog using a TAP ADQL search. The process is then repeated until the desired number of sky positions is attained.

  5. Interface Formation During Fusion™ Casting of AA3003/AA4045 Aluminum Alloy Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Ciano, Massimo; Caron, E. J. F. R.; Weckman, D. C.; Wells, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fusion™ casting is a unique Direct Chill continuous casting process whereby two different alloys can be cast simultaneously, producing a laminated ingot for rolling into clad sheet metal such as AA3003/AA4045 brazing sheet. Better understanding of the wetting and interface formation process during Fusion™ casting is required to further improve process yields and also explore use of other alloy systems for new applications. In this research, AA3003-core/AA4045-clad ingots were cast using a well-instrumented lab-scale Fusion™ casting system. As-cast Fusion™ interfaces were examined metallurgically and by mechanical testing. Computational fluid dynamic analyses of the FusionTM casts were also performed. It was shown that the liquid AA4045-clad alloy was able to successfully wet and create an oxide-free, metallurgical, and mechanically sound interface with the lightly oxidized AA3003-core shell material. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that the bond formation process at the alloys interface during casting is a result of discrete penetration of AA4045 liquid at defects in the preexisting AA3003 oxide, dissolution of underlying AA3003 by liquid AA4045, and subsequent bridging between penetration sites. Spot exudation on the AA3003 chill cast surface due to remelting and inverse segregation may also improve the wetting and bonding process.

  6. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  7. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Jung, H. B.; Wang, Guohui

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  8. Application of particle method to the casting process simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, N.; Zulaida, Y. M.; Anzai, K.

    2012-07-01

    Casting processes involve many significant phenomena such as fluid flow, solidification, and deformation, and it is known that casting defects are strongly influenced by the phenomena. However the phenomena complexly interacts each other and it is difficult to observe them directly because the temperature of the melt and other apparatus components are quite high, and they are generally opaque; therefore, a computer simulation is expected to serve a lot of benefits to consider what happens in the processes. Recently, a particle method, which is one of fully Lagrangian methods, has attracted considerable attention. The particle methods based on Lagrangian methods involving no calculation lattice have been developed rapidly because of their applicability to multi-physics problems. In this study, we combined the fluid flow, heat transfer and solidification simulation programs, and tried to simulate various casting processes such as continuous casting, centrifugal casting and ingot making. As a result of continuous casting simulation, the powder flow could be calculated as well as the melt flow, and the subsequent shape of interface between the melt and the powder was calculated. In the centrifugal casting simulation, the mold was smoothly modeled along the shape of the real mold, and the fluid flow and the rotating mold are simulated directly. As a result, the flow of the melt dragged by the rotating mold was calculated well. The eccentric rotation and the influence of Coriolis force were also reproduced directly and naturally. For ingot making simulation, a shrinkage formation behavior was calculated and the shape of the shrinkage agreed well with the experimental result.

  9. Storage Stability and Antibacterial Activity against E. coli O157:H7 of Carvacrol in Edible Apple Films made by Two Different Casting Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activities against E. coli O157:H7, as well as the stability of carvacrol, the main constituent of oregano oil, were evaluated during the preparation and storage of apple-based edible films made by two different casting methods, continuous casting and batch casting. Antimicrobial ...

  10. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer warning diagnosis procedure using blank solution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoros, Christine; Salin, Eric D.

    1998-05-01

    Lines available while running a blank solution were used to monitor the analytical performance of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system in real time. Using H and Ar lines and their signal-to-background ratios (SBRs), simple rules in the form of a prediction table were developed by inspection of the data. These rules could be used for predicting changes in radio-frequency power, carrier gas flow rates, and sample introduction rate. The performance of the prediction table was good but not excellent. Another set of rules in the form of a decision tree was developed in an automated fashion using the C4.5 induction engine. The performance of the decision tree was superior to that of the prediction table. It appears that blank spectral information can be used to predict with over 90% accuracy when an ICP-AES is breaking down. However this is not as definitive at identifying the exact fault as some more exhaustive approaches involving the use of standard solutions.

  11. Growth and Printability of Multilayer Phase Defects on EUV MaskBlanks

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ted; Ultanir, Erdem; Zhnag, Guojing; Park, Seh-Jin; Anderson, Erik; Gullikson, Eric; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mirkarimi, Paul; Spiller, Eberhard; Baker, Sherry

    2007-06-10

    The ability to fabricate defect-free mask blanks is a well-recognized challenge in enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for semiconductor manufacturing. Both the specification and reduction of defects necessitate the understanding of their printability and how they are generated and grow during Mo-Si multilayer (ML) deposition. A ML phase defect can be depicted by its topographical profile on the surface as either a bump or pit, which is then characterized by height or depth and width. The complexity of such seemingly simple phase defects lies in the many ways they can be generated and the difficulties of measuring their physical shape/size and optical effects on printability. An effective way to study phase defects is to use a programmed defect mask (PDM) as 'model' test sample where the defects are produced with controlled growth on a ML blank and accurate placement in varying proximity to absorber patterns on the mask. This paper describes our recent study of ML phase defect printability with resist data from exposures of a ML PDM on the EUV micro-exposure tool (MET, 5X reduction with 0.3NA).

  12. Technique for rapid at-wavelength inspection of extreme ultraviolet mask blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, S. J.; White, D. L.; Tennant, D. M.; Ocola, L. E.; Novembre, A. E.; Peabody, M. L.; Wood, O. R. II

    1999-11-01

    We have developed two new methods for at-wavelength inspection of mask blanks for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In one method an EUV photoresist is applied directly to a mask blank which is then flood exposed with EUV light and partially developed. In the second method, the photoresist is applied to an EUV transparent membrane that is placed in close proximity to the mask and then exposed and developed. Both reflectivity defects and phase defects alter the exposure of the resist, resulting in mounds of resist at defect sites that can then be located by visual inspection. In the direct application method, a higher contrast resist was shown to increase the height of the mounds, thereby improving the sensitivity of the technique. In the membrane method, a holographic technique was used to reconstruct an image of the mask, revealing the presence of very small defects, approximately 0.2 {mu}m in size. The demonstrated clean transfer of phase and amplitude defects to resist features on a membrane will be important when flagging defects in an automatic inspection tool. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  13. Enhancing native defect sensitivity for EUV actinic blank inspection: optimized pupil engineering and photon noise study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yow-Gwo; Neureuther, Andrew; Naulleau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of optimized pupil engineering and photon noise on native defect sensitivity in EUV actinic blank inspection. Native defects include phase-dominated defects, absorber defects, and defects with a combination of phase and absorption behavior. First, we extend the idea of the Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) method and study the impact of optimum phase shift in the pupil plane on native defect sensitivity, showing a 23% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement compare to bright field (BF) for a phase defect with 20% absorption. We also describe the possibility to increase target defect SNR on target defect sizes at the price of losing the sensitivity on smaller (non-critical) defects. Moreover, we show the advantage of the optimized phase contrast (OZPC) method over BF EUV actinic blank inspection. A single focus scan from OZPC has better inspection efficiency over BF. Second, we make a detailed comparison between the phase contrast with apodization (AZPC) method and dark field (DF) method based on defect sensitivity in the presence of both photon shot noise and camera noise. Performance is compared for a variety of photon levels, mask roughness conditions, and combinations of defect phase and absorption.

  14. Formability of Friction Stir-Welded Blanks with Different Thickness Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolahgar, Sina; Ghaffarpour, Morteza; Habibi, Niloufar; Kokabi, Amir Hossein; Akbarzadeh, Abbas

    2016-05-01

    Welded sheets with different thicknesses are one of the interesting types of tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) that are widely used in metal-forming industries. In the present work, the formability behavior of different 1100-aluminum TWBs was studied. In this regard, the TWBs were made with different thickness ratios by using friction stir welding (FSW) at different welding rotational speeds ( ω). The thickness ratios of 1.0, 1.3, and 1.7 were investigated where the thinner sheets had 1.5 mm thick for all conditions; i.e., the volume of welded material increased when the thickness ratio increased. Macrostructural observations, mechanical investigations, and sheet-forming limit tests were conducted. The results indicate that increasing ω leads to increasing the weld nugget size up to a maximum level and welding became impossible at higher ω. Furthermore, increasing heat input during FSW, the ultimate tensile strength of welds reduced in comparison with the initial cold-worked base metal. However, the ductility improved by increasing the heat input, which produced the sound welds. Formability studies of the friction stir-welded blanks with equal thicknesses have shown that the forming ratio improves up to 2.8 times the base metal. Forming limit curves also illustrate that increasing the thickness ratio of TWB causes the formability ratio to decrease steadily. Thus, when the thickness ratio becomes 1.7, the formability of TWB decreases approximately to the thinnest base metal.

  15. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze casting is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze casting can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-cast materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  16. Rapid Cycle Casting of Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Figs. 10 and 11 show carbon segregation as a function of a N at casting temperatures of 1185 0 C and 1360°C. 5.7.5 Macrosegregation for non-ideal...casting temperature. Run# T a N Carbon Segregation , % 0 C L 7.5mm L 35mn L =65nm L =90nm R53 1185 .3900 11 -2 -2 -2 R52 1185 .0860 17 -3 -3 -3 R51 1185...superheated shot and melt; superheat = 66cc and casting temperature = 1198 C. Run# tI Carbon segregation , % sL = 29mm L = 43mm L = 80mm L =98mm Rl 0.35

  17. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  18. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  19. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  20. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  1. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  2. 49 CFR 192.755 - Protecting cast-iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protecting cast-iron pipelines. 192.755 Section 192.755 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS...-iron pipelines. When an operator has knowledge that the support for a segment of a buried...

  3. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.

  4. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    t^ ~cMnrc.pVbU of evaluating rheocasting as tell as more conventional casting techniques has been designed and is presently under construction...construction. The immediate objective of this machine is to study rheocasting and conventional casting with respect to .processing and properties. The...used in small, bottom-pour ladles. The stirring required by the Rheocasting proce- dures is to be accomplished by the paddle assembly shown in Figure

  5. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    high- lights of the earlier reports and much detail about Rheocast - ing and the casting of aluminum containing superalloys by Hitchiner’s patented...Augmented Hipo-v Procer-s EVALUATION OF RHEOCASTING WITH TFT: CTA PROCESS fU.S. Pat. 3,863,706) . Introduction to Rheocasting ... Rheocasting ...Drawing of suspension Bomb Lug. 13 Apparatus used to CLA pour Rheocast aluminum. 14 collection of parts cast by CLA process in semi- solid 35 5 aluminum

  6. Moldless casting by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.

    1997-09-01

    The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct casting (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.

  7. Recent advances in SEMATECH's mask blank development program, the remaining technical challenges, and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Frank; Kearney, Patrick; Kadaksham, Arun J.; Wurm, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    film for the device. In addition to the increase in complexity of the mask, introduction of EUVL requires infrastructure development of new substrate, mask blank, and finished reticle inspection tools and techniques for handling and storage of a mask without a pellicle. This paper will highlight recent advances in the ability to produce pilot line quality EUV mask blanks to meet the near-term requirements and review the existing technology gaps which must be closed to extend the current capability to meet HVM needs. A special focus will be put on substrate and mask blank defect densities; other process and infrastructure challenges will also be discussed.

  8. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  9. Feasibility study of transmission of OTV camera control information in the video vertical blanking interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Preston A., III

    1994-01-01

    The Operational Television system at Kennedy Space Center operates hundreds of video cameras, many remotely controllable, in support of the operations at the center. This study was undertaken to determine if commercial NABTS (North American Basic Teletext System) teletext transmission in the vertical blanking interval of the genlock signals distributed to the cameras could be used to send remote control commands to the cameras and the associated pan and tilt platforms. Wavelength division multiplexed fiberoptic links are being installed in the OTV system to obtain RS-250 short-haul quality. It was demonstrated that the NABTS transmission could be sent over the fiberoptic cable plant without excessive video quality degradation and that video cameras could be controlled using NABTS transmissions over multimode fiberoptic paths as long as 1.2 km.

  10. Repair of localized defects in multilayer-coated reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2004-11-23

    A method is provided for repairing defects in a multilayer coating layered onto a reticle blank used in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system. Using high lateral spatial resolution, energy is deposited in the multilayer coating in the vicinity of the defect. This can be accomplished using a focused electron beam, focused ion beam or a focused electromagnetic radiation. The absorbed energy will cause a structural modification of the film, producing a localized change in the film thickness. The change in film thickness can be controlled with sub-nanometer accuracy by adjusting the energy dose. The lateral spatial resolution of the thickness modification is controlled by the localization of the energy deposition. The film thickness is adjusted locally to correct the perturbation of the reflected field. For example, when the structural modification is a localized film contraction, the repair of a defect consists of flattening a mound or spreading out the sides of a depression.

  11. Construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank with clinic-referred and nonreferred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weis, Robert; Toolis, Erin E; Cerankosky, Brittany C

    2008-11-01

    We examined the construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (RISB; Rotter, Lah, & Rafferty, 1992) as a measure of psychological maladjustment in adolescents. In Study 1, we investigated the reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of the RISB with adolescents referred to treatment. In Studies 2 and 3, we examined the RISB's ability to differentiate referred and nonreferred adolescents. The RISB showed adequate interrater reliability and converged with self-reported, parent-reported, and teacher-reported social-emotional and behavioral problems. Criterion-related evidence suggests that the RISB may be useful as a screening measure for adolescents using a 135 or 140 cut score. We provide normative data to facilitate the test's use with adolescents in clinical and research settings.

  12. Backside defect printability for contact layer with different reticle blank material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Holfeld, Christian; Fischer, Daniel; Ackmann, Paul; Holfeld, Andre; Kurth, Karin; Sczyrba, Martin; Hertzsch, Tino; Seltmann, Rolf; Ho, Angeline; GN, Fang H.

    2012-11-01

    Backside defects are out of focus during wafer exposure by the mask thickness and cannot be directly imaged on wafer. However, backside defects will induce transmission variation during wafer exposure. When the size of backside defect is larger than 200 microns, the shadow of such particles will locally change the illumination conditions of the mask patterns and may result in a long range critical dimension (CD) variation on wafer depending on numerical aperture (NA) and pupil shape. Backside defects will affect both wafer CD and critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially for two-dimensional (2D) structures. This paper focuses on the printability of backside defects on contact layer using annular and quadrupole illumination mode, as well as using different reticle blank material. It also targets for gaining better understanding of critical sizes of backside defects on contact layer for different reticle blanks. We have designed and manufactured two test reticles with repeating patterns of 28nm and 40nm technology node of contact layers. Programmed chrome defects of varying size are placed on the backside opposite to the repeating front side patterns in order to measure the spatial variation of transmission and wafer CD. The test mask was printed on a bare silicon wafer, and the printed features measured for size by spatial sampling. We have investigated two contact layers with different illumination conditions. One is advance binary with single exposure; another is phase shift mask with double exposure. Wafer CD variation for different backside defect sizes are demonstrated for the two contact layers. The comparison between backside defect size with inter-field and intra-field CD variation is also discussed.

  13. Metal pins fired from unmodified blank cartridge guns and very small calibre weapons--technical and wound ballistic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rabl, W; Riepert, T; Steinlechner, M

    1998-01-01

    Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and are not considered to be firearms in most countries. A comparison of the legal situations in Germany and Austria concerning weapons is given. There have been several reports of serious injuries and even fatalities due to these weapons. Ballistic experiments show that even unmodified blank cartridge guns and very small calibre weapons can fire wire nails and can inflict potentially fatal injuries even at distances of 50 cm. Two serious injuries inflicted by metal pins fired from a blank cartridge gun and a very small calibre weapon are reported. These cases suggest that such weapons should also be considered handguns in the legal sense.

  14. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  15. Effect of localized heat treatment on the weld line shift in deep drawing of tailor welded blanks (TWBs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satya Suresh V. V., N.; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash; Ratna Sudheer, G.

    2016-10-01

    This work relates to warm forming of a tailor welded blank (TWB) where in two or more material blanks are welded together and subjected to localized heating before forming to obtain a desired square cup shape. A novel method of selective heating is carried out by using a split punch and a die in which the high strength blank material is subjected to localized heating by the hot punch so as to induce tailored properties by selective heating to soften it thus reducing and controlling the movement of the weld line during forming. TWB sheets which has different thickness/strength need selective heating and cooling to control weld line shift. The stronger material is subjected to localized softening and thereby decreasing the flow stress thus allowing the blank material to flow into the die cavity. Care has been taken so that the heat is not transferred to the weaker blank material otherwise it will lead to further weakening of the part. For this, cooling mechanism is provided by circulating ice water/coolant to the weaker part. The present work is aimed at studying the weld line shift of TWB's of two different materials namely IFHS and DP 590. Cracks appeared in the weld during forming for drawing ratios greater than 1.7. From the results it was found that the weld line shift is considerably reduced as compared with the results using a single punch. Also it was noticed that there is considerable increase in cup height. Local softening increased the formability of the high strength blank material.

  16. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  17. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  18. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  19. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  20. Improved EPMA Trace Element Accuracy Using a Matrix Iterated Quantitative Blank Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, J. J.; Wark, D. A.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    At trace element levels below several hundred PPM, accuracy is more often the limiting factor for EPMA quantification rather than precision. Modern EPMA instruments equipped with low noise detectors, counting electronics and large area analyzing crystals can now routinely achieve sensitivities for most elements in the 10 to 100 PPM levels (or even lower). But due to various sample and instrumental artifacts in the x-ray continuum, absolute accuracy is often the limiting factor for ultra trace element quantification. These artifacts have various mechanisms, but are usually attributed to sample artifacts (e.g., sample matrix absorption edges)1, detector artifacts (e.g., Ar or Xe absorption edges) 2 and analyzing crystal artifacts (extended peak tails preventing accurate determination of the true background and ¡§negative peaks¡¨ or ¡§holes¡¨ in the x-ray continuum). The latter being first described3 by Self, et al. and recently documented for the Ti kÑ in quartz geo-thermometer. 4 Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Ti (ka) Si () O () Total Average: -.00146 -.00031 -.00180 .00013 .00240 46.7430 53.2563 99.9983 Std Dev: .00069 .00075 .00036 .00190 .00117 .00000 .00168 .00419 The general magnitude of these artifacts can be seen in the above analyses of Ti ka in a synthetic quartz standard. The values for each spectrometer/crystal vary systematically from ¡V18 PPM to + 24 PPM. The exact mechanism for these continuum ¡§holes¡¨ is not known but may be related to secondary lattice diffraction occurring at certain Bragg angles depending on crystal mounting orientation for non-isometric analyzing crystals5. These x-ray continuum artifacts can produce systematic errors at levels up to 100 PPM or more depending on the particular analytical situation. In order to correct for these inaccuracies, a ¡§blank¡¨ correction has been developed that applies a quantitative correction to the measured x-ray intensities during the matrix iteration, by calculating the intensity

  1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  3. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  4. The Use of Application Blanks as Pre-Screening Devices in Employee Selection: An Assessment of Practices in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeson, Paul V.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a study of the use of employment application blanks as prescreening devices in public school employee selection. Findings suggest two major areas for further research. The first relates to legal compliance with Equal Opportunity Employment guidelines. The second concerns information relevancy to personnel selection. (JAM)

  5. Testing the Reliability of Delay Discounting of Ten Commodities Using the Fill-in-the-Blank Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2011-01-01

    Several measures of delay discounting have been shown to be reliable over periods of up to 3 months. In the present study, 115 participants completed a fill-in-the-blank (FITB) delay-discounting task on sets of 5 different commodities, 12 weeks apart. Results showed that discounting rates were not well described by a hyperbolic function but were…

  6. Design of Channel Type Indirect Blank Holder for Prevention of Wrinkling and Fracture in Hot Stamping Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hong-seok; Ha, Se-yoon; Cha, Seung-hoon; kang, Chung-gil; Kim, Byung-min

    2011-08-01

    The hot stamping process has been used in the automotive industry to reduce the weight of the body-in-white and to increase passenger safety via improved crashworthiness. In this study, a new form die with a simple structure that can prevent defects such as wrinkle and fracture is proposed for the manufacture of hot stamped components. The wrinkling at the flange cannot be eliminated when using a conventional form die. It is known that the initiation of wrinkling is influenced by many factors such as the mechanical properties of the sheet material, geometry of the sheet and tool, and other process parameters, including the blank holding force (BHF) and the contact conditions. In this research, channel type indirect blank holder (CIBH) is introduced to replace general blank holder for manufacturing the hot stamped center pillar. First, we investigate the tension force acting on the blank according to the channel shapes. We determine the appropriate range by comparing the tension force with the upper and lower BHFs in a conventional stamping process. We then use FE-analysis to study the influence of the slope angle and corner radius of the channel on the formability. Finally, the center pillar is manufactured using the form die with the selected channel.

  7. Blank-Comparison Assessment of Stimulus-Stimulus Relations in Individuals with Mental Retardation: A Methodological Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Richard W.; Wilkinson, Krista M.; McIlvane, William J.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments illustrate using blank-comparison matching to sample with adolescents with mental retardation. In the first experiment, the method was used to explore bases for emergent symbolic mapping performances. In the second, similarity judgments between form stimuli were assessed. Both experiments confirmed the feasibility and utility of…

  8. Summary and evaluation of pesticides in field blanks collected for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Schertz, Terry L.

    1999-01-01

    Field blanks did show evidence of contamination by some pesticides. Most of the pesticides detected in field blanks, however, were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in environmental water samples. Two criteria were used to evaluate the need to consider contamination in water-quality assessments: (1) a ratio of the frequency of pesticide detection in environmental water samples to the frequency of detection in field blanks of 5.0 or less and (2) a ratio of the median concentration detected in environmental water samples to the maximum concentration detected in field blanks of 2.0 or less. These criteria indicate that contamination, for the majority of the pesticide data collected for the NAWQA Program, probably does not need to be considered in the analysis and interpretation of (1) the frequency of pesticide detection or (2) the median concentration of pesticides detected. Contamination must be considered, however, in detection frequency for cispermethrin, pronamide, p,p' -DDE, pebulate, propargite, ethalfluralin, and triallate in surface water and fenuron, benfluralin, pronamide, cis-permethrin, triallate, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, propanil, p,p' -DDE, bromacil, dacthal, diazinon, and diuron in ground water. Contamination also must be considered in median concentrations detected for pronamide, p,p' -DDE, propargite, napropamide, and triallate in surface water and benfluralin, cis-permethrin, triallate, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, p,p' -DDE, dacthal, and diazinon in ground water.

  9. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity.

  10. 78 FR 68474 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... COMMISSION Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From China AGENCY: United... iron pipe fittings from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  11. Mundrabilla: A Microgravity Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budka, P. Z.; Viertl, J. R. M.

    1993-07-01

    The name "Mundrabilla" is applied to two nickel-iron meteorite masses (combined mass over 22,700 kg), which apparently were a single mass before atmospheric entry [1]. A medium octahedrite, Mundrabilla exhibits the microstructural features common to other nickel-iron meteorites such as Widmanstatten structure and troilite; however, its macrostructure is anything but common. Described by Buchwald as "anomalous" [1], Mundrabilla's macrostructural morphology is characterized by strikingly prominent, rounded Widmanstatten areas separated by regions of sulfur segregation (Fig. 1). While microstructural development of a metal can reflect both solidification and solid state reactions, macrostructural features are determined during solidification. Thus, a typical metallurgist, unfamiliar with microgravity solidification, might describe Mundrabilla's macrostructure as an "anomalous" casting. Those familiar with microgravity solidification might characterize Mundrabilla's macrostructural features as due to solidification of two immiscible liquids [2]--one rich in nickel-iron, the other rich in sulfur. Combining these observations, Mundrabilla's macrostructural features are consistent with that of a liquid mass solidified under microgravity conditions [3,4]. Since nickel-iron meteorite cooling rates often serve as the foundation for assumptions about the formation of solar system bodies, information on the solidification time for the Mundrabilla mass may give additional insights. How long did it take for Mundrabilla, with a minimum "as received" mass of approximately 22,700 kg to solidify? Because Mundrabilla's mass before atmospheric entry is unknown, we take as an upper boundary a mass of 4.1 x 10^15kg. These masses, assumed spherical, range in diameter between 1.8 meters and 10 kilometers, respectively. Mundrabilla can be idealized as a pure iron liquid mass cooling from the melting point of pure iron (1535C) by radiation into space at absolute zero. The latent heat of

  12. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  13. Chimerical categories: caste, race, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Sharjeel

    2003-12-01

    Is discrimination based on caste equivalent to racism? This paper explores the complex relationship between genetic, race and caste. It also discusses the debate over the exclusion of a discussion of caste-based discrimination at the 2001 World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance held in Durban, South Africa.

  14. Pressure distribution in centrifugal dental casting.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J P

    1978-02-01

    Equations are developed for liquid metal pressure in centrifugal dental casting, given the instantaneous rotational velocity, density, and certain dimensions of the casting machine and casting pattern. A "reference parabola" is introduced making the fluid pressure concept more understandable. A specially designed specimen demonstrates experimentally the reference parabola at freezing.

  15. Prediction of Microporosity in Shrouded Impeller Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S. Nelson, C.D.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Morris Bean and Company was to link computer models of heat and fluid flow with previously developed quality criteria for the prediction of microporosity in a Al-4.5% Cu alloy shrouded impeller casting. The results may be used to analyze the casting process design for the commercial production of 206 o alloy shrouded impeller castings. Test impeller castings were poured in the laboratory for the purpose of obtaining thermal data and porosity distributions. Also, a simulation of the test impeller casting was conducted and the results validated with porosity measurements on the test castings. A comparison of the predicted and measured microporosity distributions indicated an excellent correlation between experiments and prediction. The results of the experimental and modeling studies undertaken in this project indicate that the quality criteria developed for the prediction of microporosity in Al-4.5% Cu alloy castings can accurately predict regions of elevated microporosity even in complex castings such as the shrouded impeller casting. Accordingly, it should be possible to use quality criteria for porosity prediction in conjunction with computer models of heat and fluid flow to optimize the casting process for the production of shrouded impeller castings. Since high levels of microporosity may be expected to result in poor fatigue properties, casting designs that are optimized for low levels of microporosity should exhibit superior fatigue life.

  16. Evaluation of the Capability of a Multibeam Confocal Inspection System for Inspection of EUVL Mask Blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivers, Alan R.; Liang, Ted; Penn, Michael J.; Lieberman, Barry; Shelden, Gilbert V.; Folta, James A.; Larson, Cindy C.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Walton, Christopher C.; Gulliksong, Eric M.; Yi, Moonsuk

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer defects (phase defects) are a defect type unique to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) masks. A manufacturable inspection capability for these defects is key to the success of EUV lithography. Simulations of EUV scattering from multilayer defects suggest that defect printability is related to the phase error induced by the defect, which is in turn strongly coupled to the size of a multilayer surface protrusion or intrusion. We can adopt a strategy of measuring the multilayer surface to detect phase defects. During the past year a working group composed of members of Intel Corporation, Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and International Sematech searched for a commercial tool for EUVL mask substrate and blank inspection. This working group established the tool requirements, methodologies for tool evaluation, collected data and recommended a supplier for further development with International Sematech. We collected data from several vendors and found that a multibeam confocal inspection (MCI) system had a capability significantly better than the tools used today. We will present our strategy, requirements, methodologies and results. We will discuss in detail our unique programmed substrate and multilayer defect masks used to support the tool selection, including their actinic characterization. We will present data that quantifies the inspection capability of the MCI system.

  17. Delineating the Construct Network of the Personnel Reaction Blank: Associations with Externalizing Tendencies and Normal Personality

    PubMed Central

    Blonigen, Daniel M.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Gasperi, Marianna; Steffen, Benjamin; Ones, Deniz S.; Arvey, Richard D.; de Oliveira Baumgartl, Viviane; do Nascimento, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Integrity testing has long been utilized in personnel selection to screen for tendencies toward counterproductive workplace behaviors. The construct of externalizing from the psychopathology literature represents a coherent spectrum marked by disinhibitory traits and behaviors. The present study used a sample of male and female undergraduates to examine the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank (PRB; Gough, Arvey, & Bradley, 2004), a measure of integrity, in relation to externalizing as well as normal-range personality constructs assessed by the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; Tellegen & Waller, 2008). Results revealed moderate to strong associations between several PRB scales and externalizing, which were largely accounted for by MPQ traits subsumed by Negative Emotionality and Constraint. After accounting for MPQ traits in the prediction of externalizing, a modest predictive increment was achieved when adding the PRB scales, particularly biographical indicators from the Prosocial Background subscale. The findings highlight externalizing as a focal criterion for scale development in the integrity testing literature, and help delineate the construct network of the PRB within the domains of personality and psychopathology. PMID:21171783

  18. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Laffite, S.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.

    2014-08-15

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  19. Engineering multiple biological functional motifs into a blank collagen-like protein template from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong Y; Stoichevska, Violet; Schacht, Kristin; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-07-01

    Bacterially derived triple-helical, collagen-like proteins are attractive as potential biomedical materials. The collagen-like domain of the Scl2 protein from S. pyogenes lacks any specific binding sites for mammalian cells yet possesses the inherent structural integrity of the collagen triple-helix of animal collagens. It can, therefore, be considered as a structurally-stable "blank slate" into which various defined, biological sequences, derived from animal collagens, can be added by substitutions or insertions, to enable production of novel designed materials to fit specific functional requirements. In the present study, we have used site directed mutagenesis to substitute two functional sequences, one for heparin binding and the other for integrin binding, into different locations in the triple-helical structure. This provided three new constructs, two containing the single substitutions and one containing both substitutions. The stability of these constructs was marginally reduced when compared to the unmodified sequence. When compared to the unmodified bacterial collagen, both the modified collagens that contain the heparin binding site showed marked binding of fluorescently labeled heparin. Similarly, the modified collagens from both constructs containing the integrin binding site showed significant adhesion of L929 cells that are known to possess the appropriate integrin receptor. C2C12 cells that lack any appropriate integrins did not bind. These data show that bacterial collagen-like sequences can be modified to act like natural extracellular matrix collagens by inserting one or more unique biological domains with defined function.

  20. Estimation of the noise contributions from blank, transmission and emission scans in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, S.; Jensen, M.; Toft, P.

    1996-08-01

    This work determines the relative importance of noise from blank (B), transmission (T) and emission (E) scans in PET using a GE Advance scanner on a 20 cm cylinder, a brain phantom, and a torso-like ellipse (18/35 cm) with examples of human scans (brain O-15 water and F-18 FDG, heart FDG). Phantom E scans were acquired in both 2D and 3D modes as decay series with C-11 or F-18 over 3--6 decades of Noise Equivalent Counts (NEC). B and T scans were made using two pin sources ({approx} 500 MBq total) over 64-32768 sec. In humans only a limited subset was available. In homogeneous phantoms normalized variance (var) was estimated from pixel distributions in single images. In other objects, including the human studies, calculations were performed on differences of paired images. In all cases a fit was made to a simple noise model. The cylinder data show expected relations of T to B noise proving the adequacy of B scan times {le} 20 min for most purposes. For the brain phantom, a contour plot is provided for var (E,T). In a typical 3D O-15 water study with 0.5 M counts per central slice, a 10 min T-scan adds less than 10% to the total noise level. An example shows how to split a total scan time between E and T scans, in order to minimize the variance.

  1. Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission Organic Free Blank: Method to distinguish Mars organics from terrestrial organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Woida, R.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H. V.; Shinohara, C.; Golden, D. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Arvidson, R. E.; Stewart, R. L.; Tamppari, L. K.; Gross, M.; Smith, P.

    2008-10-01

    The Organic Free Blank (OFB) for the Mars 2007 Phoenix Scout mission provides an organic carbon null sample to compare against possible Martian organic signatures obtained by the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA). Major OFB requirements are an organic carbon content of <=10 ng C g-1 of sample, a nonporous structure, and strength and integrity that permits machining by the Robotic Arm (RA) Icy Soil Acquisition Device (ISAD). A specially fabricated form of commercial Macor™ (a machinable glass ceramic), made with nitrate salts replacing carbonate salts, was selected as the OFB material. The OFB has a total inorganic carbon content of approximately 1.6 μg C g-1 after fabrication, cleaning, and heat treatment in oxygen gas at 550°C. The detection limit for organic carbon is ~100 ng C g-1 of sample, or about a factor of 10 higher than the design goal. One scenario for OFB use on Mars is subsequent to the first TEGA detection of organic carbon. The OFB sample, acquired by the RA ISAD and delivered to TEGA, would come in contact with all surfaces in the sample transfer chain, collecting residual terrestrial contamination that accompanied the spacecraft to Mars. A second sample of the putative Martian organic-bearing material would then be obtained and analyzed by TEGA. Different organic contents and/or different mass spectrometer fragmentation patterns between the OFB material and the two Martian samples would indicate that the detected organic carbon is indigenous to Mars.

  2. Temperature Distribution in Teeth and Blanks of Ultra-High-Speed Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozaki, Yasuyoshi; Matsumoto, Susumu; Fukutomi, Masatoshi

    Currently in industries, high-speed turbo machineries such as compressors and steam or gas turbines are required to have increased power capacities. Due to this, a large gear size is required which leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. As the result of nonuniform temperature distribution, nonuniform thermal distortion occurs. Change in load distribution due to this thermal distortion is considered to be closely related to scoring and pitting failures. In order to ensure reliability of high-speed gear units, it is necessary to improve the following techniques. (1) The method of predicting the temperature rise of gears and thermal distortion. (2) Tooth correction against thermal distortion. In this paper, a three-dimensional model for calculating the temperature of teeth surfaces and blanks is presented. This model includes the effects of convective cooling by lubricating oil and the change in load distribution due to mechanical deformation. The calculated results of gear teeth temperature and bending stress are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. It is confirmed that the analytical method is practical and useful.

  3. Delineating the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank: associations with externalizing tendencies and normal personality.

    PubMed

    Blonigen, Daniel M; Patrick, Christopher J; Gasperi, Marianna; Steffen, Benjamin; Ones, Deniz S; Arvey, Richard D; Baumgartl, Viviane de Oliveira; do Nascimento, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Integrity testing has long been utilized in personnel selection to screen for tendencies toward counterproductive workplace behaviors. The construct of externalizing from the psychopathology literature represents a coherent spectrum marked by disinhibitory traits and behaviors. The present study drew on a sample of male and female undergraduates to examine the construct network of the Personnel Reaction Blank (PRB; H. G. Gough, R. D. Arvey, & P. Bradley, 2004), a measure of integrity, in relation to externalizing as well as normal-range personality constructs assessed by the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; A. Tellegen & N. G. Waller, 2008). Results revealed moderate to strong associations between several PRB scales and externalizing, which were largely accounted for by MPQ traits subsumed by Negative Emotionality and Constraint. After accounting for MPQ traits in the prediction of externalizing, a modest predictive increment was achieved when adding the PRB scales, particularly biographical indicators from the Prosocial Background subscale. The findings highlight externalizing as a focal criterion for scale development in the integrity testing literature and help delineate the construct network of the PRB within the domains of personality and psychopathology.

  4. Preparation and characterization of Ag nanoparticle-embedded blank and ligand-anchored silica gels.

    PubMed

    Im, Hee-Jung; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yeon, Jei-Won

    2013-11-01

    Ag nanoparticles, used for halogen (especially iodine) adsorption and an evaluation of halogen behavior, were embedded in synthesized inorganic-organic hybrid gels. In particular, an irradiation method using an electron beam plays a part in introducing Ag nanoparticles to the organofunctionalized silica gels from AgNO3 solutions in a simple way at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For preparation of the Ag nanoparticle-embedded inorganic-organic hybrid gels, ligands of ethylenediamine (NH2CH2CH2NH-, TMSen) and mercapto (HS-) functionalized three-dimensional porous SiO2 sol-gels were first synthesized through hydrolysis and condensation reactions, and Ag nanoparticles were then embedded into the ethylenediamine- and mercapto-anchored silica gels each, through electron-beam irradiation. The addition of ligands yielded larger average pore sizes than the absence of any ligand. Moreover, the ethylenediamine ligand led to looser structures and better access of the Ag nanoparticles to the ethylenediamine-anchored gel. As a result, more Ag nanoparticles were introduced into the ethylenediamine-anchored gel. The preparation and characterization of Ag nanoparticle-embedded blank and ligand-anchored silica gels are discussed in detail.

  5. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffite, S.; Baton, S. D.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Koenig, M.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  6. Thick silicon membranes as mask blank for SU-8 x-ray deep lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Izaque A.; Ferreira, Luis O. S.; Piazzetta, Maria Helena O.; Natal, Graziele C.

    2001-08-01

    Home made masks having thick (35-50 micrometers ) silicon membranes as blanks were used in deep X-ray lithography of SU8 - a negative tone photoresist. X-ray masks were fabricated by the following sequence of steps: (a) vacuum deposition of Ti and Au thin layers on a 220 micrometers thick (100) silicon wafer, (b) optical lithography of two different patterns in both negative (SU-8) or positive (AZ4620) photoresist (c) gold electroforming and (d) silicon substrate thinning with KOH etch to form the membrane. X-ray exposures was performed in the X-ray beam line of the LNLS synchrotron light source. The samples consisted of 125 micrometers thick layers of SU-8 supported on silicon and assorted substrates. The optimum dose for silicon substrates have been used in the remaining substrates, namely, metallic thin films (Cr, Cu, Au, Pt), printed circuit board (PCB), quartz, alumina ceramic and glass. The influence of mask defects, substrate type and X-ray dose values on the lithography of SU-8 is discussed. Criteria for defining upper and lower dose values for SU-8 X-ray deep lithography was proposed on the basis of characteristic defects. Advantages in using SU-8 rather than PMMA in the LIGA technology are commented.

  7. Low Frequency Phased Array Application for Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    As part of a multi-year program funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) to address nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability of inservice inspection (ISI) programs, studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the US NRC on the utility, effec¬tiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as related to the ISI of primary piping components in US commercial nuclear power plants. This paper describes progress, recent developments and results from an assessment of a portion of the work relating to the ultrasonic low frequency phased array inspection technique. Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank vintage specimens having very coarse grains that are representative of early centrifugally cast piping installed in PWRs, were used for assessing the inspection method. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1.0 MHz and 500 kHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. Several dual, transmit-receive, custom designed low-frequency arrays were employed in laboratory trials. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection, localization and length sizing effectiveness are discussed.

  8. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  9. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

  10. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  11. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    produce porosity-free parts and to evaluate the Rheocasting and Thixocasting processes from both a technical and economical point of view. Analytical...and computer models were developed for solutionizing of Rheocast and conventional cast (dendritic) alloys. The predictions were compared with

  12. Casting Freedom, 1860-1862

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was cast in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…

  13. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  14. A Review of Mold Flux Development for the Casting of High-Al Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wanlin; Lu, Boxun; Xiao, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Mold flux plays key roles during the continuous casting process of molten steel, which accounts for the quality of final slabs. With the development of advanced high strength steels (AHSS), certain amounts of Al have been added into steels that would introduce severe slag/metal interaction problems during process of continuous casting. The reaction is between Al and SiO2 that is the major component in the mold flux system. Intensive efforts have been conducted to optimize the mold flux and a CaO-Al2O3-based mold flux system has been proposed, which shows the potential to be applied for the casting process of AHSS. The latest developments for this new mold flux system were summarized with the aim to offer technical guidance for the design of new generation mold flux system for the casting of AHSS.

  15. Fabrication of Al/Diamond Particles Functionally Graded Materials by Centrifugal Sintered-Casting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Shibuya, Masafumi; Sato, Hisashi

    2013-03-01

    The continuous graded structure of functionally graded materials (FGMs) can be created under a centrifugal force. Centrifugal sintered-casting (CSC) method, proposed by the authors, is one of the fabrication methods of FGM under centrifugal force. This method is a combination of the centrifugal sintering method and centrifugal casting method. In this study, Al/diamond particle FGM was fabricated by the proposed method.

  16. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  17. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  18. Cast aluminum alloys containing dispersions of zircon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, A.; Surappa, M. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1983-06-01

    A process for preparing Al-alloy castings containing dispersions of zircon particles is described. Composites were prepared by stirring zircon particles (40 to 200 µm size) in commercially pure Al (99.5 pct)* and Al-11.8 pct Si melts and subsequently casting these melts in permanent molds. It was found to be necessary to alloy the above two melts with 3 pct Mg to disperse substantial amounts of zircon particles (25 to 30 pct). Further, it was possible to disperse up to 60 wt pct zircon by adding up to 5 pct Mg; however, the melts containing above 30 wt pct zircon showed insufficient fluidity for gravity diecasting and had to be pressure diecast. Microstructural studies of cast composites indicated the presence of a reaction zone at the periphery of zircon particles, and electron probe microanalysis showed concentrations of Mg and Si at the particle-matrix interface. Hardness, abrasive wear resistance, elastic modulus, 0.2 pct proof stress, and tensile strength of cast Al-3 pct Mg alloy were found to improve with the dispersions of zircon particles. Scanning electron micrographs of abraded and fractured surfaces did not show any evidence of particle pull-outs or voids at the particle matrix interface, indicating strong continuous bonding.

  19. Simultaneous cast shadows, illumination and geometry inference using hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Alexandros; Wang, Chaohui; Samaras, Dimitris; Paragios, Nikos

    2013-02-01

    The cast shadows in an image provide important information about illumination and geometry. In this paper, we utilize this information in a novel framework in order to jointly recover the illumination environment, a set of geometry parameters, and an estimate of the cast shadows in the scene given a single image and coarse initial 3D geometry. We model the interaction of illumination and geometry in the scene and associate it with image evidence for cast shadows using a higher order Markov Random Field (MRF) illumination model, while we also introduce a method to obtain approximate image evidence for cast shadows. Capturing the interaction between light sources and geometry in the proposed graphical model necessitates higher order cliques and continuous-valued variables, which make inference challenging. Taking advantage of domain knowledge, we provide a two-stage minimization technique for the MRF energy of our model. We evaluate our method in different datasets, both synthetic and real. Our model is robust to rough knowledge of geometry and inaccurate initial shadow estimates, allowing a generic coarse 3D model to represent a whole class of objects for the task of illumination estimation, or the estimation of geometry parameters to refine our initial knowledge of scene geometry, simultaneously with illumination estimation.

  20. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  1. Inner surface roughness of complete cast crowns made by centrifugal casting machines.

    PubMed

    Ogura, H; Raptis, C N; Asgar, K

    1981-05-01

    Six variables that could affect the surface roughness of a casting were investigated. The variables were (1) type of alloy, (2) mold temperature, (3) metal casting temperature, (4) casting machine, (5) sandblasting, and (6) location of each section. It was determined that the training portion of a complete cast crown had rougher surfaces than the leading portion. Higher mold and casting temperatures produced rougher castings, and this effect was more pronounced in the case of the base metal alloy. Sandblasting reduced the roughness, but produced scratched surfaces. Sandblasting had a more pronounced affect on the surface roughness of the base metal alloy cast either at a higher mold temperature or metal casting temperature. The morphology and the roughness profile of the original cast surface differed considerably with the type of alloy used.

  2. Titanium casting: the surface reaction layer of castings obtained using ultra-low-temperature molds.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Onouchi, M; Hsu, H C; Kurotani, T; Nishiyama, M

    2001-03-01

    To examine whether the surface reaction layer of titanium castings can be reduced by lowering the mold temperature during casting, we cast titanium at three mold temperatures, including an ultra-low temperature produced by cooling the mold with liquid nitrogen, then measured the tensile strength and elongation of the castings. The titanium was cast using a centrifugal casting machine, and the molds were incinerated according to the manufacturers' instructions. Castings were then made with the molds at 200 degrees C, 600 degrees C, and an ultra-low temperature (-196 degrees C). The castability of titanium cast in the mold at the ultra-low temperature was good. The Vickers hardness near the surface layer of castings decreased as the mold temperature decreased.

  3. The cast structure of a 7075 alloy produced by a water-cooling centrifugal casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.W. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Jong, S.H.

    1994-03-01

    A water-cooling centrifugal casting method was applied to cast the 7075 Al alloy to generate a much finer cast structure than that produced by conventional ingot casting methods. The effects of casting parameters, i.e., rotation speed, pouring temperature, water flow, and grain refiner, on casting structure were systematically studied so that the optimum casting condition and the solidification mechanism could be established. The typical cast structure along the thickness direction of a cast ring could be divided into four equiaxed zones, including the chill zone which is in contact with the mold wall. All zones have their characteristic grain size, morphology, and relative thickness, which are all dependent on the casting condition. The optimum casting condition yielding the finest structure available was found to be 3,000 rpm, 650 C, and sufficient water cooling. A uniform portion occupying 90 pct of the whole thickness and having a grain size of 17 [mu]m could be achieved under such a casting condition. When a grain refiner was added, the whole ring became further concentrated with grains of fine structure. A mechanism concerning the overall effects of rapid solidification, turbulent flow, and centrifugal force has been proposed for the present casting method and might explain the zone-structure formation and the effects of the casting parameters on microstructural features.

  4. Innovative algorithm for cast detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, Francesca; Schettini, Raimondo; Gallina, Paolo

    2001-12-01

    The paper describes a method for detecting a color cast (i.e. a superimposed dominant color) in a digital image without any a priori knowledge of its semantic content. The color gamut of the image is first mapped in the CIELab color space. The color distribution of the whole image and of the so-called Near Neutral Objects (NNO) is then investigated using statistical tools then, to determine the presence of a cast. The boundaries of the near neutral objects in the color space are set adaptively by the algorithm on the basis of a preliminary analysis of the image color gamut. The method we propose has been tuned and successfully tested on a large data set of images, downloaded from personal web-pages or acquired using various digital and traditional cameras.

  5. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  6. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    During this year the basic Rheocasting system, which was fully operational at the beginning of the year, was improved in various ways to increase...graphite inserts at the bottom of the Rheocaster to eliminate ’hot spots’. Large quantities of 304 and 440C stainless steel alloys were cast during this...period (approximately 800 pounds of 304 and 2000 pounds of 440C) and smaller quantities of other materials were also Rheocast including M2 tool steel, and

  7. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    To protect the shot sleeve and plunger, a graphite wafer was inserted against the plunger tip, and a Fiberfrax (R) cloth was placed on the bottom...of the shot sleeve. After casting, (R) the Fiberfrax cloth was matted in the biscuit, and the wafer was on the end of the biscuit where it could... Fiberfrax cloth on the bottom of the shot sleeve, and insert a graphite wafer against the shot ram tip. Then, molten metal is poured into a preheated

  8. Improved tumor targeting and antitumor activity of camptothecin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by preinjection of blank solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Moon, Cheol; Oh, Euichaul

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to enhance the in vivo antitumor effects of camptothecin (CPT), a strong antitumor agent whose delivery is limited by poor aqueous solubility and instability of the active lactone form. CPT was loaded into sterically stabilized, solid lipid nanoparticles (CPT-SLNs) formulated for intravenous administration. The influence of preinjected blank SLNs on the tumor targeting, pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of CPT-SLNs was investigated. The CPT-SLNs composed of trilaurin-based lipid matrix containing poloxamer188 and pegylated phospholipid as stabilizers were prepared by hot homogenization method and evaluated for in vitro characteristics and in vivo performance. The CPT-SLNs showed an in vitro long-term sustained release pattern and effectively protected the CPT lactone form from hydrolysis under physiological conditions. Notable tumor targeting and tumor growth inhibition were observed after intravenous administration of CPT-SLNs to mice with subcutaneous transplants of CT26 carcinoma cells. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, CPT-SLNs markedly elevated plasma CPT level and prolonged blood circulation compared to free CPT. Nonetheless, high uptake of CPT-SLNs by reticuloendothelial system (RES)-rich tissues resulted in limited tumor targeting of CPT-SLNs and plasma CPT levels. Preinjection of blank SLNs before administration of CPT-SLNs to tumor-bearing mice substantially reduced the accumulation of CPT-SLNs in RES organs. This led to significantly enhanced tumor targeting, improved pharmacokinetic parameters and increased antitumor efficacy of CPT-SLNs. These results suggested that the in vivo antitumor effects of CPT-SLNs could be further enhanced by preinjection of blank SLNs. Therefore, CPT-SLNs with preinjected blank SLNs could be a potential approach for stable and effective CPT-based cancer therapy.

  9. Evaluating the blank contamination and recovery of sample pretreatment procedures for analyzing organophosphorus flame retardants in waters.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kang; Niu, Yumin; Yin, Yongguang; Liu, Jingfu

    2015-08-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), used as flame retardants and plasticizers, are widely present in environmental waters. Development of accurate determination methods for trace OPEs in water is urgent for understanding the fate and risk of this class of emerging pollutants. However, the wide use of OPEs in experimental materials results in blank interference, which influences the accuracy of analytical results. In the present work, blank contamination and recovery of pretreatment procedures for analysis of OPEs in water samples were systematically examined for the first time. Blank contaminations were observed in filtration membranes, glass bottles, solid phase extraction cartridges, and nitrogen blowing instruments. These contaminations could be as high as 6.4-64ng/L per treatment. Different kinds of membranes were compared in terms of contamination levels left after common glassware cleaning, and a special wash procedure was proposed to eliminate the contamination from membranes. Meanwhile, adsorption of highly hydrophobic OPEs on the inside wall of glass bottles was found to be 42.4%-86.1%, which was the primary cause of low recoveries and was significantly reduced by an additional washing step with acetonitrile. This work is expected to provide guidelines for the establishment of analysis methods for OPEs in aqueous samples.

  10. PREFACE: MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, H.

    2015-06-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 - 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan

  11. Using Low-Frequency Phased Arrays to Detect Cracks in Cast Austenitic Piping Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-12-30

    As part of a multi-year program funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) to address NDE reliability of inservice inspection (ISI) programs, recent studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the US NRC on the utility, effec¬tiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) inspection techniques as related to the ISI of primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes progress, recent developments and early results from an assessment of a portion of this work relating to the ultrasonic low frequency phased array inspection technique. Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank vintage specimens having very coarse grains that are representative of early centrifugally cast piping installed in PWRs, are being used for assessing the inspection method. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1.0 MHz and 500 kHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. Several dual, transmit-receive, custom designed low-frequency arrays are employed in laboratory trials. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection of thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks in cast stainless steel piping welds are discussed. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830; NRC JCN Y6604; Mr. Wallace Norris, Program Monitor.

  12. [The cast structure after vacuum-pressure casting and centrifugal casting].

    PubMed

    Finger, W; Jung, T; Quast, U

    1975-02-01

    Evaluation of polished sections revealed the following: 1. Grain size in marginal areas of the crown is, in general, smaller than it is in the occlusal region. 2. Grain size varies depending on the casting method applied. Differences in hardness were found only to a limited extent. They were not always in line with the grain structure. This phenomenon deviating from the rule cannot satisfactorily be explained. The piping distribution was in accordance with observations made so far.

  13. [The possibility of forensic medical assessment of the damage to clothes caused by a blank shots with the MP-79-9TM pistol].

    PubMed

    Kutsenko, K I; Makarov, I Iu

    2013-01-01

    The authors undertook an analysis of constructional features of standard blank and non-lethal cartridges for the MP-79-9TM pistol. The composition of gunshot products and the maximum distance over which they propagate have been determined. Special attention is given to the peculiarities of the damage caused to the target cloths (cotton and woolen) by blank rounds shot from different distances. A new chemical method was used for the first time to detect the particles of gunpowder on the victim's cloth; the possibility of its application for differential diagnostics of gunshot damages inflicted by blank and traumatic cartridges affected from different distances was estimated.

  14. Method for casting thin metal objects

    DOEpatents

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  15. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  16. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  17. Accuracy of Casting Single Crowns in Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    in bone (Branemark, et.al. 1985). Titanium’s biocompatibility in dental implantology created an interest in its use in cast restorations. The aerospace...and dental implantology , but implants are fabricated by machining, not casting. The first use of Ti as a cast dental restoration was accomplished in...Chairman of Dental Research, WHMC) and Dr. Adrian F. VanDellen (Veterinary Research Pathologist) for their assistance in accomplishing the

  18. Integrally Cast Low-Cost Compressor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-03

    and AE355 for discs). Figures 3 through 6 sumarize cast Custom 450 properties compared with wrought A350 and 355 and cast 17 - 4PH (a common compressor...experience with the casting of other Custom 450 alloy and 17 - 4PH alloy components. Although higher cagting and mold temperatures normally assist alloy...by regulation of air pressure. Tip deflection was related to the stress at failure locations by strain gaging techniques. 94 AOL- TABLE 17 . TENSILE

  19. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  20. Formation of intermetallic compound coating on magnesium AZ91 cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianping; Gao, Wei

    2009-08-01

    This study describes an intermetallic compound coating formed on AZ91 Mg cast alloy. The Al sputtered on AZ91 cast alloy reacted with substrate during a short period of heat treatment at 435°C, resulting in the formation of a continuous intermetallic compound layer. The short period treatment has the advantage of minimizing the negative effect on the microstructure of substrate and the mechanical properties, comparing with the reported diffusion coatings. DSC measurement and examination on the cross-section of Al sputtered samples show that local melting occurred along the Al/substrate interface at the temperature range between 430~435°C. The formation mechanism of intermetallic compound coating is proposed in terms of the local melting at Al/substrate interface. The salt water immersion test showed significant improvement in corrosion resistance of the intermetallic compound coated AZ91 cast alloy compared with the as-cast alloys.

  1. High-Density-Tape Casting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Centrifuge packs solids from slurry into uniform, dense layer. New system produces tapes of nearly theoretical packing density. Centrifugal system used to cast thin tapes for capacitors, fuel cells, and filters. Cylindrical rotary casting chamber mounted on high-speed bearings and connected to motor. Liquid for vapor-pressure control and casting slurry introduced from syringes through rotary seal. During drying step, liquid and vapor vented through feed tubes or other openings. Laminated tapes produced by adding more syringes to cast additional layers of different materials.

  2. Release of ToxCastDB and ExpoCastDB databases

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released two databases - the Toxicity Forecaster database (ToxCastDB) and a database of chemical exposure studies (ExpoCastDB) - that scientists and the public can use to access chemical toxicity and exposure data. ToxCastDB users can search and download data from over 50...

  3. Spray casting project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  4. Machine Casting of Ferrous Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    C-0110 June 1975 by M. C. Flemings, R. Mehrabian, J. R. Melcher, R. G. Riek, K. P. Young N. Matsumoto, D. G. Backman, F. S. Blackall , &E. Bond, E...17. F. Blackall , "The Delivery and Casting of Semi-Solid Metals", S.M. Thesis, 1975, M.I.T. 18. V. Laxmanan, "Rheocasting of Superalloys", S.M...Flemings, R. Mehrabian, J.R. Melcher, R.G. Riek, K.P. Young, N. Matsumoto D.G.Backman, F.S. Blackall , B.E. Bond, E.J. McHal^ S. Schottman 8. CONTRACT

  5. Microdefects in cast multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, E.; Klinger, D.; Bergmann, S.

    1995-08-01

    The microdefect etching behavior of cast multicrystalline BAYSIX and SILSO samples is mainly the same as that of EFG silicon, in spite of the very different growth parameters applied to these two techniques and the different carbon contents of the investigated materials. Intentional decorating of mc silicon with copper, iron and gold did not influence the results of etching and with help of infrared transmission microscopy no metal precipitates at the assumed microdefects could be established. There are many open questions concerning the origin of the assumed, not yet doubtless proved microdefects.

  6. Unraveling the Earthquake History of the Denali Fault System, Alaska: Filling a Blank Canvas With Paleoearthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Seitz, G. G.; Dawson, T. E.; Stenner, H. D.; Matmon, A.; Crone, A. J.; Personius, S.; Burns, P. B.; Cadena, A.; Thoms, E.

    2005-12-01

    Developing accurate rupture histories of long, high-slip-rate strike-slip faults is is especially challenging where recurrence is relatively short (hundreds of years), adjacent segments may fail within decades of each other, and uncertainties in dating can be as large as, or larger than, the time between events. The Denali Fault system (DFS) is the major active structure of interior Alaska, but received little study since pioneering fault investigations in the early 1970s. Until the summer of 2003 essentially no data existed on the timing or spatial distribution of past ruptures on the DFS. This changed with the occurrence of the M7.9 2002 Denali fault earthquake, which has been a catalyst for present paleoseismic investigations. It provided a well-constrained rupture length and slip distribution. Strike-slip faulting occurred along 290 km of the Denali and Totschunda faults, leaving unruptured ?140km of the eastern Denali fault, ?180 km of the western Denali fault, and ?70 km of the eastern Totschunda fault. The DFS presents us with a blank canvas on which to fill a chronology of past earthquakes using modern paleoseismic techniques. Aware of correlation issues with potentially closely-timed earthquakes we have a) investigated 11 paleoseismic sites that allow a variety of dating techniques, b) measured paleo offsets, which provide insight into magnitude and rupture length of past events, at 18 locations, and c) developed late Pleistocene and Holocene slip rates using exposure age dating to constrain long-term fault behavior models. We are in the process of: 1) radiocarbon-dating peats involved in faulting and liquefaction, and especially short-lived forest floor vegetation that includes outer rings of trees, spruce needles, and blueberry leaves killed and buried during paleoearthquakes; 2) supporting development of a 700-900 year tree-ring time-series for precise dating of trees used in event timing; 3) employing Pb 210 for constraining the youngest ruptures in

  7. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to four time s the

  8. The Variability of Fatigue Crack Growth Life of Aluminum Casting Alloy A357-T6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    34,FWAL-TR-86-4115 . A THE VARIABILITY OF FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH LIFE OF ALUMINUM CASTING ALLOY A357 -T6 .D. TIRPAK, CAPT, USAF Materials Engineering...Fatigue Crack Growth Life of Aluminum Casting Alloy A357 -T6 17 COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT 1%iRMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by...fContinue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) "This investigation considers the variability of fatigue crack growth (FCG) life of A357 -T6

  9. The Role of Indian Caste Identity and Caste Inconsistent Norms on Status Representation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Sindhuja; Sekerdej, Maciek; von Hecker, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The Indian caste system is a complex social structure wherein social roles like one’s profession became ‘hereditary,’ resulting in restricted social mobility and fixed status hierarchies. Furthermore, we argue that the inherent property of caste heightens group identification with one’s caste. Highly identified group members would protect the identity of the group in situations when group norms are violated. In this paper, we were interested in examining the consequence of caste norm violation and how an individual’s status is mentally represented. High caste norms are associated with moral values while the lower caste norms are associated with immorality. We predicted a ‘black sheep effect,’ that is, when high caste individuals’ group identity (caste norm violation condition) is threatened their salient high caste identity would increase, thereby resulting in devaluing the status of their fellow in-group member if the latter is perceived as perpetrator. We presented participants with a social conflict situation of a victim and a perpetrator that is ‘Caste norm consistent’ (Lower caste individual as a perpetrator and higher caste individual as a victim) and vice versa ‘Caste norm inconsistent’ condition (higher caste individual as perpetrator and lower caste individual as a victim). Then, participants had to choose from nine pictorial depictions representing the protagonists in the story on a vertical line, with varying degrees of status distance. Results showed evidence for the black sheep effect and, furthermore, revealed that no other identity (religious, national, and regional) resulted in devaluing the status of fellow in-group member. These results help us understand the ‘black sheep’ effect in the context of moral norms and status representation and are discussed in the framework of the Indian society.

  10. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  11. 21 CFR 888.5960 - Cast removal instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.5960 Cast removal instrument. (a) Identification... patient. This generic type of device includes the electric cast cutter and cast vacuum. (b)...

  12. DE LAVAUD CASTING FACING NORTH, NOTE CORE MOUNTED IN PREPARATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DE LAVAUD CASTING FACING NORTH, NOTE CORE MOUNTED IN PREPARATION FOR NEXT PIPE CASTING. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Eppich, Robert E.

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  14. Estimation of organic carbon blank values and error structures of the speciation trends network data for source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Kim; Philip K. Hopke; Youjun Qin

    2005-08-01

    Because the particulate organic carbon (OC) concentrations reported in U.S. Environment Protection Agency Speciation Trends Network (STN) data were not blank corrected, the OC blank concentrations were estimated using the intercept in particulate matter {lt} 2.5 {mu}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) regression against OC concentrations. The estimated OC blank concentrations ranged from 1 to 2.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3} showing higher values in urban areas for the 13 monitoring sites in the northeastern United States. In the STN data, several different samplers and analyzers are used, and various instruments show different method detection limit (MDL) values, as well as errors. A comprehensive set of error structures that would be used for numerous source apportionment studies of STN data was estimated by comparing a limited set of measured concentrations and their associated uncertainties. To examine the estimated error structures and investigate the appropriate MDL values, PM2.5 samples collected at a STN site in Burlington, VT, were analyzed through the application of the positive matrix factorization. A total of 323 samples that were collected between December 2000 and December 2003 and 49 species based on several variable selection criteria were used, and eight sources were successfully identified in this study with the estimated error structures and min values among different MDL values from the five instruments: secondary sulfate aerosol (41%) identified as the result of emissions from coal-fired power plants, secondary nitrate aerosol (20%), airborne soil (15%), gasoline vehicle emissions (7%), diesel emissions (7%), aged sea salt (4%), copper smelting (3%), and ferrous smelting (2%). Time series plots of contributions from airborne soil indicate that the highly elevated impacts from this source were likely caused primarily by dust storms.

  15. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  16. A New Method to Calculate Threshold Values of Ductile Fracture Criteria for Advanced High-Strength Sheet Blanking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changsheng; Chen, Jun; Xia, Cedric; Ren, Feng; Chen, Jieshi

    2014-04-01

    A new approach is presented in this paper to calculate the critical threshold value of fracture initiation. It is based on the experimental data for forming limit curves and fracture forming limit curves. The deformation path for finally a fractured material point is assumed as two-stage proportional loading: biaxial loading from the beginning to the onset of incipient necking, followed plane strain deformation within the incipient neck until the final fracture. The fracture threshold value is determined by analytical integration and validated by numerical simulation. Four phenomenological models for ductile fracture are selected in this study, i.e., Brozzo, McClintock, Rice-Tracey, and Oyane models. The threshold value for each model is obtained through best-fitting of experimental data. The results are compared with each other and test data. These fracture criteria are implemented in ABAQUS/EXPLICIT through user subroutine VUMAT to simulate the blanking process of advanced high-strength steels. The simulated fracture surfaces are examined to determine the initiation of ductile fracture during the process, and compared with experimental results for DP780 sheet steel blanking. The comparisons between FE simulated results coupled with different fracture models and experimental one show good agreements on punching edge quality. The study demonstrates that the proposed approach to calculate threshold values of fracture models is efficient and reliable. The results also suggest that the McClintock and Oyane fracture models are more accurate than the Rice-Tracey or Brozzo models in predicting load-stroke curves. However, the predicted blanking edge quality does not have appreciable differences.

  17. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  18. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  19. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  20. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  1. 14 CFR 27.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 27.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  2. 14 CFR 29.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section must...

  3. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Casting factors. 25.621 Section 25.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section...

  4. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Casting factors. 25.621 Section 25.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a) General. The factors, tests, and inspections specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section...

  5. Processing of IN-718 Lattice Block Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a low cost casting method known as lattice block casting has been developed by JAM Corporation, Wilmington, Massachusetts for engineering materials such as aluminum and stainless steels that has shown to provide very high stiffness and strength with only a fraction of density of the alloy. NASA Glenn Research Center has initiated research to investigate lattice block castings of high temperature Ni-base superalloys such as the model system Inconel-718 (IN-718) for lightweight nozzle applications. Although difficulties were encountered throughout the manufacturing process , a successful investment casting procedure was eventually developed. Wax formulation and pattern assembly, shell mold processing, and counter gravity casting techniques were developed. Ten IN-718 lattice block castings (each measuring 15-cm wide by 30-cm long by 1.2-cm thick) have been successfully produced by Hitchiner Gas Turbine Division, Milford, New Hampshire, using their patented counter gravity casting techniques. Details of the processing and resulting microstructures are discussed in this paper. Post casting processing and evaluation of system specific mechanical properties of these specimens are in progress.

  6. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  7. 14 CFR 25.621 - Casting factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be applied in addition to those necessary to establish foundry quality control. The inspections must... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.621 Casting factors. (a...) Examples of these castings are structural attachment fittings, parts of flight control systems,...

  8. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  9. Reticle blanks for extreme ultraviolet lithography: Ion beam sputter deposition of low defect density Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kearney, P.A.; Levesque, R.A.; Hayes, A.V.; Druz, B.; Osten, E.; Rajan, R.; Hedge, H.

    1996-06-24

    We report on growth of low defect density Mo/Si multilayer (ML) coatings. The coatings were grown in a deposition system designed for EUVL reticle blank fabrication. Complete, 81 layer, high reflectance Mo/Si ML coatings were deposited on 150 mm dia (100) oriented Si wafer substrates using ion beam sputter deposition. Added defects, measured by optical scattering, correspond to defect densities of 2x10{sup -2}/cm{sup 2}. This represents a reduction in defect density of Mo/Si ML coatings by a factor of 10{sup 5}.

  10. Review of Trace-Element Field-Blank Data Collected for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program, May 2004-January 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Trace-element quality-control samples (for example, source-solution blanks, field blanks, and field replicates) were collected as part of a statewide investigation of groundwater quality in California, known as the Priority Basins Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basins Project is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to assess and monitor the quality of groundwater resources used for drinking-water supply and to improve public knowledge of groundwater quality in California. Trace-element field blanks were collected to evaluate potential bias in the corresponding environmental data. Bias in the environmental data could result from contamination in the field during sample collection, from the groundwater coming into contact with contaminants on equipment surfaces or from other sources, or from processing, shipping, or analyzing the samples. Bias affects the interpretation of environmental data, particularly if any constituents are present solely as a result of extrinsic contamination that would have otherwise been absent from the groundwater that was sampled. Field blanks were collected, analyzed, and reviewed to identify and quantify extrinsic contamination bias. Data derived from source-solution blanks and laboratory quality-control samples also were considered in evaluating potential contamination bias. Eighty-six field-blank samples collected from May 2004 to January 2008 were analyzed for the concentrations of 25 trace elements. Results from these field blanks were used to interpret the data for the 816 samples of untreated groundwater collected over the same period. Constituents analyzed were aluminum (Al), antimony (Sb), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), beryllium (Be), boron (B), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum

  11. BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMM SHAKEOUT AND VIBRATING CONVEYOR TRANSPORT SAND AND CASTINGS TO SEPARATIONS SCREENS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  13. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  14. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  15. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  16. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are clearly... components, accessories, attachments and parts) then the particular forging, casting, extrusion,...

  17. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  18. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India.

  19. Final report on Expendable Pattern Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Expendable Pattern Casting (EPC) process is a potential casting process breakthrough which could dramatically improve the competitiveness of the US foundry industry. Cooperatively supported by US Industry and the Department of Energy and managed by the American Foundrymen's Society, a project was started in May 1989 to develop and optimize expendable pattern casting technology. Four major tasks were conducted in the first phase of the project. Those tasks involved: (1) reviewing published literature to determine the major problems in the EPC process, (2) evaluating factors influencing sand flow and compaction, (3) evaluating and comparing factors influencing sand flow and compaction, (3) evaluating and comparing casting precision obtained in the EPC process with that obtained in other processes, and (4) identifying critical parameters that control dimensional precision and defect formation in EP castings. 26 refs., 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.