Science.gov

Sample records for blaster kolib pci-e-le

  1. The Astro-Blaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, Richard V.; Long, Kevin R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Astro-Blaster as a method of the laws of conservation of momentum and energy during the creation of a supernova. Several elastic balls are aligned for a drop, followed by multiple collisions which result in the top ball reaching tremendous heights relative to the drop height. (JRH)

  2. 29 CFR 1926.901 - Blaster qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... types of drugs. (c) A blaster shall be qualified, by reason of training, knowledge, or experience, in the field of transporting, storing, handling, and use of explosives, and have a working knowledge of... furnish satisfactory evidence of competency in handling explosives and performing in a safe manner the...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.901 - Blaster qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... types of drugs. (c) A blaster shall be qualified, by reason of training, knowledge, or experience, in the field of transporting, storing, handling, and use of explosives, and have a working knowledge of... furnish satisfactory evidence of competency in handling explosives and performing in a safe manner the...

  4. 30 CFR 921.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 921.955 Section 921.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.955...

  5. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification of...

  6. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification of...

  7. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification of...

  8. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification of...

  9. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification of...

  10. 30 CFR 937.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 937.955 Section 937.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.955 Certification...

  11. 30 CFR 937.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 937.955 Section 937.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.955 Certification...

  12. 30 CFR 937.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 937.955 Section 937.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.955 Certification...

  13. 30 CFR 937.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 937.955 Section 937.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.955 Certification...

  14. 30 CFR 941.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 941.955 Section 941.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.955...

  15. 30 CFR 941.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 941.955 Section 941.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.955...

  16. 30 CFR 941.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 941.955 Section 941.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.955...

  17. 30 CFR 941.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 941.955 Section 941.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.955...

  18. 30 CFR 941.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 941.955 Section 941.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.955...

  19. 30 CFR 912.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 912.955 Section 912.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.955 Certification of...

  20. 30 CFR 912.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 912.955 Section 912.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.955 Certification of...

  1. 30 CFR 912.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 912.955 Section 912.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.955 Certification of...

  2. 30 CFR 912.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 912.955 Section 912.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.955 Certification of...

  3. 30 CFR 912.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 912.955 Section 912.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.955 Certification of...

  4. 30 CFR 947.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 947.955 Section 947.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.955 Certification...

  5. 30 CFR 947.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 947.955 Section 947.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.955 Certification...

  6. 30 CFR 947.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 947.955 Section 947.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.955 Certification...

  7. 30 CFR 942.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 942.955 Section 942.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.955 Certification...

  8. 30 CFR 942.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 942.955 Section 942.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.955 Certification...

  9. 30 CFR 942.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 942.955 Section 942.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.955 Certification...

  10. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  11. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  12. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  13. IBPAT/OSHA Health and Safety Education Quiz Book. Painters, Abrasive Blasters, Tapers, Paint Makers, Floorcoverers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades, Washington, DC.

    Designed for use by instructors using the "Health and Safety Education Book" (International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades/Occupational Safety and Health Act), this book contains quizzes specifically for painters, abrasive blasters, tapers, paint makers, and floorcoverers. Quizzes included in the book focus on testing areas such as (1)…

  14. Mini-blaster-mediated targeted gene disruption and marker complementation in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Several gene disruption strategies have been described in Candida albicans to create homozygous mutants. We describe here a recyclable mini-blaster cassette containing C. albicans URA3 gene and 200 bp flanking repeats that is useful for disruption of C. albicans genes. The cassette can be used to create unmarked homozygous mutants which can be complemented at the HIS1 gene locus. This strategy of creating gene disruptions and subsequent complementation can be used to study gene function. PMID:22328365

  15. Construction of Candida albicans Tet-on tagging vectors with a Ura-blaster cassette.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Chung; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Jian, Ting; Lee, Tai-Lin; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Shieh, Jia-Ching

    2011-03-01

    It has been difficult to develop molecular tools for studying the fungal pathogen Candida albicans because this species uses a non-standard genetic code and is diploid without a complete sexual cycle. Vector systems with regulatable promoters to produce conditional mutants, epitope tags for protein detection and recyclable selection markers are useful for functional study of genes. However, most currently available vectors contain only a subset of desired properties, which limits their application. To combine several useful properties in one vector, the vector pTET25 was initially modified into pTET25M, so that the URA3 gene flanked by dpl200 could be used repetitively. To enable more choices for cloning, a multiple cloning site was introduced at both ends of GFP in pTET25M. GFP expression was induced by doxycycline in a dose- and time-dependent manner when the plasmid was introduced into C. albicans with or without URA3. The applicability of the vectors was verified by constructing strains capable of expressing either the N-terminal GFP fusion of Cdc10 or the C-terminal GFP fusion of Cdc11. Additionally, by replacing the GFP gene of pTET25M with DNA sequence encoding Cdc10 with an epitope tag of six histidine residues at the C-terminus, doxycycline-induced expression of CDC10 was achieved when the expression vector was introduced into C. albicans. This new system allows for inducible expression of a desired C. albicans gene with the advantage of convenience of cloning. It also allows the presence of a recyclable URA3 marker and the detectable expression of fusion or epitope-tagged protein.

  16. Catalog of Existing Small Tools for Surface Preparation and Support Equipment for Blasters and Painters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Mobile Blasting Machine 3.2.3.4 Texstar, Inc. Automatic Descaling Equipment 3.2.3.5 Future Development SPECIAL APPLICATIONS ABRASIVES 3.2.5.1...4220). A Cleco-Dresser horizontal grinder, Model 15 GEL -180, equipped with a Black & Decker 4" radial-type brush (Catalog No. 23201) can be useful in...Texstar’s Magstar machine performed ef- fectively, descaling mild rust and removing in- organic shop primer from the LNG. Some rework of the heavier

  17. 30 CFR 850.15 - Certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of any provision of the State or Federal explosives laws or regulations. (iv) Providing false... authority may require the periodic reexamination, training, or other demonstration of continued blaster...

  18. 30 CFR 850.15 - Certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of any provision of the State or Federal explosives laws or regulations. (iv) Providing false... authority may require the periodic reexamination, training, or other demonstration of continued blaster...

  19. 30 CFR 850.15 - Certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of any provision of the State or Federal explosives laws or regulations. (iv) Providing false... authority may require the periodic reexamination, training, or other demonstration of continued blaster...

  20. 30 CFR 850.14 - Examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... blaster certification are examined by reviewing and verifying the— (1) Competence of persons directly... demonstrate that the candidate possesses practical knowledge of blasting techniques, understands the hazards...

  1. 30 CFR 955.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... not granted through reciprocity. Reciprocity means the recognition by OSM of a blaster certificate... subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which additional training and... blaster certificate a subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which...

  2. 30 CFR 955.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... not granted through reciprocity. Reciprocity means the recognition by OSM of a blaster certificate... subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which additional training and... blaster certificate a subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which...

  3. 30 CFR 955.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... not granted through reciprocity. Reciprocity means the recognition by OSM of a blaster certificate... subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which additional training and... blaster certificate a subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which...

  4. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the blaster...

  5. 30 CFR 955.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... not granted through reciprocity. Reciprocity means the recognition by OSM of a blaster certificate... subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which additional training and... blaster certificate a subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for...

  6. 30 CFR 955.5 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... not granted through reciprocity. Reciprocity means the recognition by OSM of a blaster certificate... subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for which additional training and... blaster certificate a subsequent certificate that is not granted through reciprocity and for...

  7. 30 CFR 850.14 - Examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EXAMINATION, AND CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS PERMANENT REGULATORY PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS-STANDARDS FOR CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.14 Examination. (a) The regulatory authority shall ensure that candidates for... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examination. 850.14 Section 850.14...

  8. 30 CFR 48.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... working in an underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in... workers, such as drillers and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or...

  9. 30 CFR 48.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... working in an underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in... workers, such as drillers and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or...

  10. 30 CFR 48.22 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in shaft or slope... and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or engaged in shaft or slope...

  11. 30 CFR 48.22 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in shaft or slope... and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or engaged in shaft or slope...

  12. 30 CFR 48.22 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in shaft or slope... and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or engaged in shaft or slope...

  13. 30 CFR 48.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... working in an underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in... workers, such as drillers and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or...

  14. 30 CFR 850.10 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TRAINING, EXAMINATION, AND CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS PERMANENT REGULATORY PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS-STANDARDS... contained in this part have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under 44 U.S.C. 3507 and...

  15. 30 CFR 48.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... working in an underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in... workers, such as drillers and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process...

  16. 30 CFR 48.22 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... underground mine and who is engaged in the extraction and production process, or engaged in shaft or slope... and blasters, who are engaged in the extraction and production process or engaged in shaft or...

  17. Projecting the Retention of Navy Careerists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Assemblers 126. Assemblers, NEC ! 127. Metalworking Operatives 128. Drill Press & Boring Machine Operators 129. Electroplaters 130. Grinding...All Other Operatives 143. Batch Plant Operatives 144. Blasters 145. Boring Machine Operators, Wood 146. Coil Finishers 147. Cutters, Machine

  18. 30 CFR 850.13 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... crew or assist in the use of explosives receive direction and on-the-job training from a blaster. (b) The regulatory authority shall ensure that courses are available to train persons responsible for the...

  19. 30 CFR 850.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING, EXAMINATION, AND CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS PERMANENT REGULATORY PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS-STANDARDS FOR CERTIFICATION OF... development of regulatory programs for training, examination, and certification of persons engaging in...

  20. GapBlaster—A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer. PMID:27171416

  1. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM finds...

  2. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM finds...

  3. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM finds...

  4. Helicopter Maritime Environment Trainer: Operational Software CSCI Version Description Document (Simulateur D’Entrainement Virtuel pour Helicoptere Maritime: Logiciel Operationnel CSCI, Document de Description de la Version)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    following system environments: 1. Hardware Environment • Intel Pentium III 933 MHz with 256 KB cache • 512 MB RAM • Creative Labs Sound Blaster Live...KEYWORDS, DESCRIPTORS or IDENTIFIERS (Technically meaningful terms or short phrases that characterize a document and could be helpful in cataloguing

  5. 30 CFR 955.13 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Application. 955.13 Section 955.13 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.13 Application. (a) Submission procedures. Any person seeking an OSM blaster certificate shall: (1) Complete and submit to OSM an application on the form prescribed by paragraph (b) of...

  6. 30 CFR 955.13 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application. 955.13 Section 955.13 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.13 Application. (a) Submission procedures. Any person seeking an OSM blaster certificate shall: (1) Complete and submit to OSM an application on the form prescribed by paragraph (b) of...

  7. How To: Protect against a Zero-Hour Attack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Rob

    2005-01-01

    In the last year, a series of viruses and worms that caused damage across the Internet in record time has made very clear how vulnerable computer systems are. The MS Blaster, Slammer, Sasser, and Korgo.W worms have shown that signature-based antivirus software and traditional firewalls are not enough to protect networks. Everyone is worried about…

  8. Anomaly-Based Intrusion Detection Systems Utilizing System Call Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    HLLW.Raleka.A, Alasrou.A, Kassbot, Shelp.A, Blaster, Francette) • E-mail worms – 9 instances (5 variants of w32.Netsky and 4 variants of w32. Beagle ...For instance, the Beagle worm drops itself into the system folder, and then it e-mails its dropper. However, our prototype system 56

  9. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underwater blasting. 1926.912 Section 1926.912 Labor... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... swimming or diving operations are in progress in the vicinity of the blasting area. If such operations are...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underwater blasting. 1926.912 Section 1926.912 Labor... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... swimming or diving operations are in progress in the vicinity of the blasting area. If such operations are...

  11. 30 CFR 850.10 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Information collection. 850.10 Section 850.10... FOR CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.10 Information collection. The information collection requirements... assigned clearance number 1029-0080. The information is being collected to meet the requirements of...

  12. 30 CFR 955.11 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certificate, a person shall: (a) Be at least 20 years old prior to submitting an application, and at least 21 years old prior to the grant of a certificate; (b) In the 3 years prior to submitting an application... blaster or the equivalent, for the following cumulative length of time: (1) Certificate issuance—2 years...

  13. 30 CFR 955.11 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certificate, a person shall: (a) Be at least 20 years old prior to submitting an application, and at least 21 years old prior to the grant of a certificate; (b) In the 3 years prior to submitting an application... blaster or the equivalent, for the following cumulative length of time: (1) Certificate issuance—2 years...

  14. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  15. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  16. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  17. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... blasting caps, care must be exercised to ensure that an adequate quantity of delivered current is available... shall connect the leading wires to the machine. (q) Blasters, when testing circuits to charged holes... live powerline by the force of an explosion, care shall be taken to see that the total length of wires...

  19. Storage stability of flour-blasted brown rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brown rice was blasted with rice flour rather than sand in a sand blaster to make microscopic nicks and cuts so that water can easily penetrate into the brown rice endosperm and cook the rice in a shorter time. The flour-blasted American Basmati brown rice, long grain brown rice, and parboiled long...

  20. 30 CFR 850.13 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Training. 850.13 Section 850.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.13 Training. (a) The regulatory authority shall establish procedures which...

  1. 30 CFR 850.13 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training. 850.13 Section 850.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.13 Training. (a) The regulatory authority shall establish procedures which...

  2. Software Reviews. Programs Worth a Second Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Roxanne; Eiser, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages for use in middle/high school classrooms. Included are "MacWrite II," a word-processing program for MacIntosh computers; "Super Story Tree," a word-processing program for Apple and IBM computers; and "Math Blaster Mystery," for IBM, Apple, and Tandy computers. (CW)

  3. Defense Use of Skilled Labor: An Introduction to LDEIMS (Defense Economic Impact Modeling System).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    makers & assemblers L125. Machine assemblers L126. Assemblers, n.e.c. L127. Metalworking operatives L128. Drill press & boring machine operatives L129...8217 L144. Blasters L145. Boring machine operators, wood L146. Coil finishers %.. L147. Cutters, machine %OP L148. Cutters, portable machine L149. Cutter

  4. Teaching with Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mary; Miller, Dolores

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of toys in teaching science. Describes toys that model concepts including Playful Penguins and Blaster Balls; toys in demonstrations such as the Heat Solution, Rainbow Glasses, and Energy Ball; toys as mnemonic devices including Stackable Rings and Color Racers; and toys illustrating science and technology integration such as…

  5. Teaching with Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mary; Miller, Dolores

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of toys in teaching science. Describes toys that model concepts including Playful Penguins and Blaster Balls; toys in demonstrations such as the Heat Solution, Rainbow Glasses, and Energy Ball; toys as mnemonic devices including Stackable Rings and Color Racers; and toys illustrating science and technology integration such as…

  6. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  7. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  8. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  9. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  10. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM...

  11. 30 CFR 955.16 - Reciprocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reciprocity. 955.16 Section 955.16 Mineral... AND ON INDIAN LANDS § 955.16 Reciprocity. (a) Grant of certificate. OSM shall grant an OSM blaster certificate through reciprocity to any qualified applicant who demonstrates that he or she, and whom OSM...

  12. Potential Use of Abrasive Air-Propelled Agricultural Residues for Weed Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new postemergence weed control tactic is proposed for organic production systems that results in plant abrasion and death upon assault from abrasive grits propelled by compressed air. Grit derived from granulated walnut shells was delivered by a sand blaster at 517 kPa at distances of 30 to 60 cm ...

  13. Potential of Air-Propelled Abrasives for Selective Weed Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel forms of selective weed control are needed by many types of growers, but especially organic growers who are restricted from using synthetic herbicides. Abrasive grit made from corn cobs was expelled from a sand blaster at 517 kPa pressure and aimed at seedlings of common lambsquarters and corn...

  14. 30 CFR 850.13 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training. 850.13 Section 850.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.13 Training. (a) The regulatory authority shall establish procedures...

  15. 30 CFR 850.5 - Definition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition. 850.5 Section 850.5 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING, EXAMINATION, AND CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS PERMANENT REGULATORY PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS-STANDARDS...

  16. 30 CFR 850.10 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information collection. 850.10 Section 850.10 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING, EXAMINATION, AND CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS PERMANENT REGULATORY PROGRAM...

  17. How To: Protect against a Zero-Hour Attack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Rob

    2005-01-01

    In the last year, a series of viruses and worms that caused damage across the Internet in record time has made very clear how vulnerable computer systems are. The MS Blaster, Slammer, Sasser, and Korgo.W worms have shown that signature-based antivirus software and traditional firewalls are not enough to protect networks. Everyone is worried about…

  18. FloCon 2006 Proceedings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    SNORT: KICKASS_PORN DRAGON: PORN HARDCORE SOURCEDEST SOURCE SOURCE SOURCE DEST DEST DEST DEST Stepping stone 51.251.22.183 Username password Sept...While packet counts do only show a minor increase in distance before and af- ter the Blaster outbreak, the other three metrics indicate a more drastic...consists of approximately 40 user assigned hosts, although the actual number of hosts is subject to minor fluctuations over time. Approximately an

  19. Using handheld GPS for data acquisition in blasting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Blasters in the field for years have been faced with the task of plotting blast locations for future reference and calculating scaled distances or seismograph placement from maps, aerial photo`s etc. With the constellation fully operational, GPS provides a satellite signal transmitted to a ground receiver which will display the desired coordinate positioning worldwide, 24 hours a day in any kind of weather conditions. There are a variety of GPS receivers available with varying levels of accuracy. The field trials of a handheld navigational quality instrument for plotting blast and seismograph locations along with other necessary industry related data is the basis of this paper.

  20. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  1. Exposure to crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations where silica and non-silica abrasives are used.

    PubMed

    Radnoff, Diane L; Kutz, Michelle K

    2014-01-01

    on crystalline silica content for non-silica abrasives. Measurement of blaster exposure was challenging in this study as the blasters evaluated conducted this task intermittently throughout the work shift, frequently removing their blasting helmets. In spite of the challenges in accurately measuring blaster exposure, the measurements were still, for the most part, over the 8-h OEL. Further work is required to develop more effective sampling strategies to evaluate blaster exposure over the full work shift when task-based monitoring is not practical.

  2. Use of explosives for boiler deslagging gains acceptance

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1996-03-01

    This article examines an unconventional technique for removing slag from solid-fuel-fired boilers, used for more than two decades, that recently has exploded in popularity. The risks are very real; extensive damage at several recent jobs confirms that all blasters are not created equal. At solid-fuel-fired powerplants, slag removal can be a constant battle. Conventional weapons include picks, jackhammers, shotguns fired through portholes, hydro-blasting, and CO{sub 2}-blasting. But each of these methods is labor intensive, consumes substantial amounts of downtime, and may not dislodge severe deposits. In the 1960s, a midwestern plant superintendent, short of personnel because of a labor strike and frustrated by seemingly immovable slagging, resorted to dynamite. The good results surprised both the superintendent and the blasting contractor who had been called in from a nearby civil engineering job. Over the next two decades or so, the technique spread through a core group of believers at powerplants who largely relied on the one original blasting contractor. In recent years, explosive deslagging has become more widely accepted as a state-of-the-art combat technique and several hundred powerplants through the US now make use of it during annual outages. As the technique`s acceptance has grown, so has the number of contractors entering the field. Some veterans worry that the industry has expanded too fast, and unqualified blasters are being allowed into the powerplant.

  3. Non-terrorist suicidal death by oral explosion: A rare case from India.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Jamebaseer Masiuddin; Farooqui, Anjum Ara Jamebaseer; Mukherjee, Bimbisar Bikas; Manjhi, Shiv Narayan

    2016-07-01

    Suicidal deaths involving explosives are rare. Their occurrence depends on both the availability of materials and the victim's expertise in handling explosive material. We report here a rare case from India of non-terrorist suicidal death involving explosives. The victim was around 25 years old, a blaster by occupation. He committed suicide by detonating dynamite in his mouth. The materials he used to operate this explosion were found near his body at the crime scene. There was characteristic bilateral symmetrical laceration around the oral cavity. Considering all the facts of the case in relation to history, location, nature, distribution and extent of injuries and recovered material at crime scene enables the cause and manner of death to be ascertained.

  4. White House Science Fair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Girl Scout troop 2612 members from Tulsa, OK take photos of one another with Google Glass at the White House Science Fair Tuesday, May 27, 2014. Avery Dodson, 6; Natalie Hurley, 8; Miriam Schaffer, 8; Claire Winton, 8; and Lucy Claire Sharp, 8 participated in the Junior FIRST Lego League's Disaster Blaster Challenge, which invites elementary-school-aged students from across the country to explore how simple machines, engineering, and math can help solve problems posed by natural disasters. The girls invented the "Flood Proof Bridge" and built a model mechanizing the bridge using motors and developing a computer program to automatically retract the bridge when flood conditions are detected. The fourth White House Science Fair was held at the White House and included 100 students from more than 30 different states who competed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions. (Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  6. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2016-07-12

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  7. Debilitating lung disease among surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure.

    PubMed

    Halldin, Cara N; Reed, William R; Joy, Gerald J; Colinet, Jay F; Rider, James P; Petsonk, Edward L; Abraham, Jerrold L; Wolfe, Anita L; Storey, Eileen; Laney, A Scott

    2015-01-01

    To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical history information. Among eight miners who worked as drill operators or blasters for most of their tenure (median, 35.5 years), two reported poor dust control practices, working in visible dust clouds as recently as 2012. Chest radiographs progressed to progressive massive fibrosis in as few as 11 years. One miner's lung biopsy demonstrated fibrosis and interstitial accumulation of macrophages containing abundant silica, aluminum silicate, and titanium dust particles. Overexposure to respirable silica resulted in progressive massive fibrosis among current surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure. Inadequate dust control during drilling/blasting is likely an important etiologic factor.

  8. Debilitating Lung Disease Among Surface Coal Miners With No Underground Mining Tenure

    PubMed Central

    Halldin, Cara N.; Reed, William R.; Joy, Gerald J.; Colinet, Jay F.; Rider, James P.; Petsonk, Edward L.; Abraham, Jerrold L.; Wolfe, Anita L.; Storey, Eileen; Laney, A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Methods Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical history information. Results Among eight miners who worked as drill operators or blasters for most of their tenure (median, 35.5 years), two reported poor dust control practices, working in visible dust clouds as recently as 2012. Chest radiographs progressed to progressive massive fibrosis in as few as 11 years. One miner’s lung biopsy demonstrated fibrosis and interstitial accumulation of macrophages containing abundant silica, aluminum silicate, and titanium dust particles. Conclusions Overexposure to respirable silica resulted in progressive massive fibrosis among current surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure. Inadequate dust control during drilling/blasting is likely an important etiologic factor. PMID:25563541

  9. Prevention of high-pressure injection injuries to the hand.

    PubMed

    Hart, Raymond G; Smith, Gillian D; Haq, Adeel

    2006-01-01

    To identify populations at high risk for, and the usual mechanisms of injury in, high-pressure injection injuries to the hand. A case note review of a historical cohort of 76 patients, presenting with high-pressure injections injuries to the hand over a 12-year period, collected information including sex, age, hand dominance, and occupation of the patient and mechanism of injury, when documented. Eighty-two percent of these injuries were work-related, affecting mainly manual workers (84%), including 13 painters, 10 mechanics, 8 farmers, and 3 water blasters. The mechanism of injury, recorded in 63%, was most commonly a ruptured hose or inadvertent gun discharge during cleaning or use. Preventative measures could include a targeted safety program for equipment users, engineering improvements in gun and hose design, economic incentives, and workplace legislation.

  10. [The evaluation of sound level in dental practice].

    PubMed

    Morăraşu, C; Burlui, V; Bortă, C; Ignat, L; Bortă, B; Morăraşu, G

    2001-01-01

    Noise pollution is one of the most important problems of the contemporary world. Dentistry is one of the most affected areas because the activity in a dental practice involves the use of different devices that generate noise. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the sound level in a dental practice with 4 dental units using a complex system, which comprises: a Sound Blaster Live 5.1, a Dual microphone, a PC and special software for the acquisition and data analysis. The sound level detected by us is similar with the data from the international literature with some particular aspects and suggests that the dental practice is a noise polluted environment although most of the sound levels are beneath the damaging noise level for the human ear (85 dB).

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  12. Identification of Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase, as drug target and its inhibitors in Brucella melitensis bv. 1 16M using metabolic pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Brucella melitensis is a pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium which is known for causing zoonotic diseases (Brucellosis). The organism is highly contagious and has been reported to be used as bioterrorism agent against humans. Several antibiotics and vaccines have been developed but these antibiotics have exhibited the sign of antibiotic resistance or ineffective at lower concentrations, which imposes an urgent need to identify the novel drugs/drug targets against this organism. In this work, metabolic pathways analysis has been performed with different filters such as non-homology with humans, essentially of genes and choke point analysis, leading to identification of novel drug targets. A total of 18 potential drug target proteins were filtered out and used to develop the high confidence protein-protein interaction network The Phosphoribosyl-AMP cyclohydrolase (HisI) protein has been identified as potential drug target on the basis of topological parameters. Further, a homology model of (HisI) protein has been developed using Modeller with multiple template (1W6Q (48%), 1ZPS (55%), and 2ZKN (48%)) approach and validated using PROCHECK and Verify3D. The virtual high throughput screening (vHTS) using DockBlaster tool has been performed against 16,11,889 clean fragments from ZINC database. Top 500 molecules from DockBlaster were docked using Vina. The docking analysis resulted in ZINC04880153 showing the lowest binding energy (-9.1 kcal/mol) with the drug target. The molecular dynamics study of the complex HisI-ZINC04880153 was conducted to analyze the stability and fluctuation of ligand within the binding pocket of HisI. The identified ligand could be analyzed in the wet-lab based experiments for future drug discovery.

  13. Manual modification and plasma exposure of boron nitride ceramic to study Hall effect thruster plasma channel material erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satonik, Alexander J.

    Worn Hall effect thrusters (HET) show a variety of unique microstructures and elemental compositions in the boron nitride thruster channel walls. Worn thruster channels are typically created by running test thrusters in vacuum chambers for hundreds of hours. Studies were undertaken to manually modify samples of boron nitride without the use of a hall effect thruster. Samples were manually abraded with an abrasive blaster and sandpaper, in addition to a vacuum heater. Some of these samples were further exposed to a xenon plasma in a magnetron sputter device. Sandpaper and abrasive blaster tests were used to modify surface roughness values of the samples from 10,000 A to 150,000 A, matching worn thruster values. Vacuum heat treatments were performed on samples. These treatments showed the ability to modify chemical compositions of boron nitride samples, but not in a manner matching changes seen in worn thruster channels. Plasma erosion rate was shown to depend on the grade of the BN ceramic and the preparation of the surface prior to plasma exposure. Abraded samples were shown to erode 43% more than their pristine counterparts. Unique surface features and elemental compositions on the worn thruster channel samples were overwritten by new surface features on the ceramic grains. The microscope images of the ceramic surface show that the magnetron plasma source rounded the edges of the ceramic grains to closely match the worn HET surface. This effect was not as pronounced in studies of ion beam bombardment of the surface and appears to be a result of the quasi-neutral plasma environment.

  14. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D. ); Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D. )

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 [times] 6l0 [times] 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m[sup 2] of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 [mu]m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO[sub 2] aerosols. We used a 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m[sup 3]/hr exhaust system.

  15. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D.; Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 {times} 6l0 {times} 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m{sup 2} of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 {mu}m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO{sub 2} aerosols. We used a 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m{sup 3}/hr exhaust system.

  16. State-of-the-science review of the occupational health hazards of crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations and related requirements for respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Donovan, Ellen P; Gaffney, Shannon H; McKinley, Meg A; Moody, Emily C; Henshaw, John L; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2008-08-01

    Excessive exposures to airborne crystalline silica have been known for over 100 years to pose a serious health hazard. Work practices and regulatory standards advanced as the knowledge of the hazards of crystalline silica evolved. This article presents a comprehensive historical examination of the literature on exposure, health effects, and personal protective equipment related to silica and abrasive blasting operations over the last century. In the early 1900s, increased death rates and prevalence of pulmonary disease were observed in industries that involved dusty operations. Studies of these occupational cohorts served as the basis for the first occupational exposure limits in the 1930s. Early exposure studies in foundries revealed that abrasive blasting operations were particularly hazardous and provided the basis for many of the engineering control and respiratory protection requirements that are still in place today. Studies involving abrasive blasters over the years revealed that engineering controls were often not completely effective at reducing airborne silica concentrations to a safe level; consequently, respiratory protection has always been an important component of protecting workers. During the last 15-20 yr, quantitative exposure-response modeling, experimental animal studies, and in vitro methods were used to better understand the relationship between exposure to silica and disease in the workplace. In light of Occupational Safety and Health Administration efforts to reexamine the protectiveness of the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) for crystalline silica and its focus on protecting workers who are known to still be exposed to silica in the workplace (including abrasive blasters), this state-of-the-science review of one of the most hazardous operations involving crystalline silica should provide useful background to employers, researchers, and regulators interested in the historical evolution of the recognized occupational health hazards

  17. Solitaire AB Stent-Assisted Coiling of Wide-Neck Micro Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Dong; Qin, Jun; Xiao, Zhen-Yong; Feng, Yi; Chen, Jia-Kang

    2016-07-01

    Solitaire AB stent-assisted coiling facilitates the endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We present our experience of coiling the micro-aneurysms of wide-neck with Solitaire AB stent assisting in a single center. Thirty-one Solitaire AB stents were used to treat via endovascular approach patients with 31 wide-neck micro aneurysms in a single center in China. Technical and clinical complications were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale was used to evaluate the patients' conditions via clinic and telephone follow-up. The mean width of aneurysm sac was 2.30±0.42 mm, and the mean diameter of aneurysm neck was 2.83±0.48 mm. Complete occlusion was achieved in 28 aneurysms (90.32%); neck remnant was seen in 3 aneurysms (9.68%). Technical and clinical complications related to the procedure were encountered in four patients (12.5%). Two patients died (6.25%). No patient had a permanent deficit. Solitaire AB stent was a safe and efficiency tool in assisting coiling of micro aneurysms with wide neck, but may be not suitable for a blaster-like one. Mid- and long-term follow-up will be required to elucidate the impact of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rate.

  18. Development of an algorithm for the analysis of surface defects in mechanical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargione, Giovanna A.; Geraci, Alberto L.; Pennisi, Luigi; Risitano, Antonino

    1998-10-01

    The non-destructive tests allow to establish the physical and structural conditions of a mechanical part, to verify its condition, the superficial wear and tear and then evaluate its `remaining' efficiency. The non-destructive tests are applied in all those fields of engineering in which the determination of the mechanical and structural characteristics of elements in use is requested, without making them undergo destructive or damaging tests. In the present work an application program has been developed which, examining the surface of mechanical parts under an optical microscope and a blaster video, is able to characterize the material and to recognize and identify the possible presence of a superficial crack. The program constitutes the first step towards the realization of an industrial prototype which, thanks to the utilization of a plan moved by step-by-step motors, allowing the scanning of the whole surface of a part and the recognition of the crack in an automatic way, that is without the presence of an operator, and its characterization, in case it is identified, through the determination of some geometric parameters useful to ascertain the structural integrity of the element under examination. For the realization of the program different techniques of image analysis have been applied and the use of an artificial neural network preset for the recognition of the crack has been necessary. The program has been realized in C language and it works in Linux system.

  19. Benchmarking Sets for Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Niu; Shoichet, Brian K.; Irwin, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Ligand enrichment among top-ranking hits is a key metric of molecular docking. To avoid bias, decoys should resemble ligands physically, so that enrichment is not simply a separation of gross features, yet be chemically distinct from them, so that they are unlikely to be binders. We have assembled a directory of useful decoys (DUD), with 2950 ligands for 40 different targets. Every ligand has 36 decoy molecules that are physically similar but topologically distinct, leading to a database of 98,266 compounds. For most targets, enrichment was at least half a log better with uncorrected databases such as the MDDR than with DUD, evidence of bias in the former. These calculations also allowed forty-by-forty cross docking, where the enrichments of each ligand set could be compared for all 40 targets, enabling a specificity metric for the docking screens. DUD is freely available online as a benchmarking set for docking at http://blaster.docking.org/dud/. PMID:17154509

  20. [Acoustic behavior of Fenestra bohlsii Giglio-Tos (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae)].

    PubMed

    Lorier, Estrellita; Clemente, Maria E; García, Maria D; Presa, Juan J

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic behavior of Fenestra bohlsii Giglio-Tos is described for the first time. The sounds and behaviors were observed and registered in captivity. The signals were digitized with the Sound-Blaster AWE64 Gold program and analysed with the Avisoft SAS Lab Pro 30 PC for MS Windows software. Seven different types of sounds are described as produced by males: spontaneous song (also used during the courtship), two different types of courtship song, assault song, tapping associated to the courtship, interaction between males and fly crackling. For each one, the characteristic oscillograms and frequency spectra are given. Sounds are produced by different mechanisms: femoro-tegminal stridulation, typical for Gomphocerinae, fly crackling, hind tarsi tapping and alar beat, the last produced by the beat and clash of hind alae, that is, the castanet method which up to now was only known, among Orthoptera, in Stenobothrus rubicundulus Kruseman & Jeekel. A description of the stridulatory file of male and female is given, as well as that of the alar special structures. Behavioral units and their sequence during the courtship are defined. There, in addition to the acoustic signals, visual signals are present, referring to positions, hind legs, antennae and palpi movements and body vibrations.

  1. Pushing the Envelope: A Case Study of Building the First Manufactured Home Using Structural Insulated Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Sparkman, Ronald; Lubliner, Michael

    2002-06-01

    This paper for the ACEEE Summer Study describes construction of the first manufactured home ever produced from structural insulated panels. The home was built in July 2000 by Champion Enterprises at its Silverton, Oregon, plant. The house was completed on the assembly line in 9 days including a 300-mile road test. The paper examines the design and approval process leading to the project, the manufacturing process and its adjustment to SIPs, and the transportation and energy performance of the house after it was built. PNNL coordinated this project and conducted long-term monitoring on the house. The WSU Energy Program conducted building diagnostics testing once the house was occupied. PNNL’s and WSU’s involvement was funded by the U.S. DOE Building America Program. The Oregon Office of Energy conducted blower door and duct blaster tests. The completed home was estimated to reduce energy consumption by 50% and to have twice the structural strength required by HUD code for manufactured homes. The demonstration proved that the manufactured home production line could support SIPs production simultaneously with traditional construction and without major modifications, the line work in parallel with SIPs and traditional materials. The project revealed severl possibilities for further improving cost and time savings with SIPs construction, that might translate into increased capacity.

  2. Evacuation of coal from hoppers/silos with low pressure pneumatic blasting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The need for an efficient, economical, effective and quiet device for moving coal and other difficult bulk solids was recognized. Thus came the advent of the low pressure pneumatic blasting system - a very efficient means of using a small amount of plant air (up to 125 PSI) to eliminate the most troublesome material hang-ups in storage containers. This simple device has one moving part and uses approximately 3% of the air consumed by a pneumatic vibrator on the same job. The principle of operation is very simple: air stored in the unit's reservoir is expelled directly into the material via a patented quick release valve. The number, size, and placement of the blaster units on the storage vessel is determined by a series of tests to ascertain flowability of the problem material. These tests in conjunction with the hopper or silo configuration determine specification of a low pressure pneumatic blasting system. This concept has often proven effective in solving flow problems when all other means have failed.

  3. Effects of hypodontia on craniofacial structures and mandibular growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Kreczi, Amelia; Proff, Peter; Reicheneder, Claudia; Faltermeier, Andreas

    2011-12-06

    This study was performed to examine craniofacial structures in persons with hypodontia and to reveal any differences, that may occur, when agenetic teeth are only found in the maxilla, the mandible or in both jaws. The groups consistent of 50 children (33 girls, 17 boys) aged between 9 and 13.5 years were analyzed and assigned to three subgroups. Group 1 = upper jaw hypodontia. Group 2 = lower jaw hypodontia. Group 3 = hypodontia in both jaws. Eleven angular and three index measurements from lateral encephalographs and two linear measurements from dental blaster casts were calculated. All data was statistically analyzed, parameters with p < 5% were investigated for each subgroup respectively. In comparison with standards the study group showed bimaxillary retrognathism and a reduction of the lower anterior facial height. Moreover both overbite and overjet significantly increased. Other values laid within the normal ranges. Evaluating results of the subgroups, differences in the means of SNA, SNB and overjet between the groups were observed.Analysis of the mandibular growth pattern revealed, that neither vertical nor horizontal patterns are dominant in hypodontia patients. In certain dentofacial parameters differences between persons with hypodontia and such with full dentition exist. According to our findings agenetic teeth may have a negative influence on the saggital development of a jaw and the lower face and may be responsible for increased overbites. This should receive attention in orthodontic treatment of hypodontia patients. © 2011 Kreczi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Digital Processing of Weak Signals Buried in Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Darrel

    This article describes the use of digital signal processing to pull the AMSAT AO-13 ZRO test signal out of the noise. In the ZRO tests, a signal is transmitted from the Oscar 13 satellite at progressively lower power levels, in 3 dB steps. The challenge is to decode successfully the weakest possible signal. The signal from the receiver audio was digitized using a Sound Blaster card, then filtered with a modified FFT routine. The modification was to allow the pre-detection filter to follow the slowly drifting signal. After using the matched, sliding filter before detection, the post-detection signal was passed through another matched filter. Finally, a cross-correlation technique comparing the detected, filtered signal with every possible combination of ZRO signal was applied, taking also into account a gradual drift of CW sending speed. The final, statistically most probable, solution turned out to be correct. This gave the only successful detection of level A transmissions from Oscar 13 so far (Aug 1996.) The extensive digital processing partly made up for the relatively poor receiving antenna; a 10-element 146 MHz Yagi, part of the Cushcraft AOP-1 combination.

  5. Cloning and sequencing of a Candida albicans catalase gene and effects of disruption of this gene.

    PubMed

    Wysong, D R; Christin, L; Sugar, A M; Robbins, P W; Diamond, R D

    1998-05-01

    Catalase plays a key role as an antioxidant, protecting aerobic organisms from the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases has been postulated to be a virulence factor. To help elucidate the function of catalase in Candida albicans, a single C. albicans-derived catalase gene, designated CAT1, was isolated and cloned. Degenerate PCR primers based on highly conserved areas of other fungal catalase genes were used to amplify a 411-bp product from genomic DNA of C. albicans ATCC 10261. By using this product as a probe, catalase clones were isolated from genomic libraries of C. albicans. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 487 amino acid residues. Construction of a CAT1-deficient mutant was achieved by using the Ura-blaster technique for sequential disruption of multiple alleles by integrative transformation using URA3 as a selectable marker. Resulting mutants exhibited normal morphology and comparable growth rates of both yeast and mycelial forms. Enzymatic analysis revealed an abundance of catalase in the wild-type strain but decreasing catalase activity in heterozygous mutants and no detectable catalase in a homozygous null mutant. In vitro assays showed the mutant strains to be more sensitive to damage by both neutrophils and concentrations of exogenous peroxide that were sublethal for the parental strain. Compared to the parental strain, the homozygous null mutant strain was far less virulent for mice in an intravenous infection model of disseminated candidiasis. Definitive linkage of CAT1 with virulence would require restoration of activity by reintroduction of the gene into mutants. However, initial results in mice, taken together with the enhanced susceptibility of catalase-deficient hyphae to damage by human neutrophils, suggest that catalase may enhance the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  6. Noise in a Laboratory Animal Facility from the Human and Mouse Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Randall P; Kinard, Will L; Degraff, Jesse J; Leverage, Ned; Norton, John N

    2010-01-01

    The current study was performed to understand the level of sound produced by ventilated racks, animal transfer stations, and construction equipment that mice in ventilated cages hear relative to what humans would hear in the same environment. Although the ventilated rack and animal transfer station both produced sound pressure levels above the ambient level within the human hearing range, the sound pressure levels within the mouse hearing range did not increase above ambient noise from either noise source. When various types of construction equipment were used 3 ft from the ventilated rack, the sound pressure level within the mouse hearing range was increased but to a lesser degree for each implement than were the sound pressure levels within the human hearing range. At more distant locations within the animal facility, sound pressure levels from the large jackhammer within the mouse hearing range decreased much more rapidly than did those in the human hearing range, indicating that less of the sound is perceived by mice than by humans. The relatively high proportion of low-frequency sound produced by the shot blaster, used without the metal shot that it normally uses to clean concrete, increased the sound pressure level above the ambient level for humans but did not increase sound pressure levels above ambient noise for mice at locations greater than 3 ft from inside of the cage, where sound was measured. This study demonstrates that sound clearly audible to humans in the animal facility may be perceived to a lesser degree or not at all by mice, because of the frequency content of the sound. PMID:20858361

  7. Surveillance of nasal and bladder cancer to locate sources of exposure to occupational carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, K; Morgan, M S; Checkoway, H; Franklin, G; Spinelli, J J; van Belle, G; Weiss, N S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To locate sources of occupational exposure to nasal and bladder carcinogens for surveillance follow up in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: Incident cases of nasal cancer (n = 48), bladder cancer (n = 105), and population based controls (n = 159) matched for sex and age, were interviewed about their jobs, exposures, and smoking histories. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for 57 occupational groups with stratified exact methods to control for age, sex, and smoking. RESULTS: Occupational groups at increased risk of nasal cancer included: textile workers (six cases, OR 7.6); miners, drillers, and blasters (six cases, OR 3.5); welders (two cases, OR 3.5); pulp and paper workers (three cases, OR 3.1); and plumbers and pipefitters (two cases, OR 3.0). Nasal cancer ORs were not increased in occupations exposed to wood dust, possibly due to low exposures in local wood industries. Strongly increased risks of bladder cancer were found for sheet metal workers (four cases, OR 5.3), miners (19 cases, OR 4.5), gardeners (six cases, OR 3.7), and hairdressers (three cases, OR 3.2). Among occupations originally considered at risk, the following had increased risks of bladder cancer: painters (four cases, OR 2.8); laundry workers (five cases, OR 2.3); chemical and petroleum workers (15 cases, OR 1.8); machinists (eight cases, OR 1.6); and textile workers (three cases, OR 1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Occupational groups with increased risks and three or more cases with similar duties were selected for surveillance follow up. For nasal cancer, these included textile workers (five were garment makers) and pulp and paper workers (three performed maintenance tasks likely to entail stainless steel welding). For bladder cancer, these included miners (12 worked underground), machinists (five worked in traditional machining), hairdressers (three had applied hair dyes), and laundry workers (three were drycleaners). PMID:9245952

  8. Severe noise-induced deafness--a 10-year review of cases.

    PubMed

    Tay, P

    1996-08-01

    Noise Induced Deafness (NID) is the leading occupational disease in Singapore. Every year, over 500 new cases of NID are detected by the Department of Industrial Health (DIH). Severe NID is a disabling disease which is compensable under the law. A retrospective study was conducted to elicit the profile of workers with severe, disabling NID. From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1994, the DIH confirmed 127 of such cases. Of these, 57 (44.9%) were involved in the building and repair of ships and boats, 30 (23.6%) with the basic steel industries, manufacture and fabrication of metal products and storage batteries, 9 (7.2%) with the transport and allied support industries, 7 (5.5%) in granite quarrying, 7 (5.5%) in the manufacture of food and drinks, 5 (3.9%) in the manufacture of wooden furniture and 7 (5.5%) in other industries such as manufacture of glass, electricity generation, construction, textiles, printing and so on. The mean age of these workers upon diagnosis of severe NID was 48 years (SD 8.07). The mean duration of exposure to noise was 24 years (SD 9.11). The mean of the average hearing thresholds at 1, 2 and 3 kHz for these workers was found to be 61.5 dBA (SD 4.26). The main jobs at risk were grit blasters, steel workers, fitters, boiler fabricators, panel beaters and carpenters. Noise dosimetry was performed on 46 of the cases and the mean time-weighted exposure level was 90 dBA (SD 10.00). Finally, 82.7% of cases already had audiometric evidence of severe deafness at the time of notification.

  9. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Simon, K.; Frye, L.

    1994-11-01

    The authors have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2{prime} x 2{prime} {times} l{prime} HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to the authors specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. The authors suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  10. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  11. istar: A Web Platform for Large-Scale Protein-Ligand Docking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Ballester, Pedro J.; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a key computational method in the design of starting points for the drug discovery process. We are motivated by the desire to automate large-scale docking using our popular docking engine idock and thus have developed a publicly-accessible web platform called istar. Without tedious software installation, users can submit jobs using our website. Our istar website supports 1) filtering ligands by desired molecular properties and previewing the number of ligands to dock, 2) monitoring job progress in real time, and 3) visualizing ligand conformations and outputting free energy and ligand efficiency predicted by idock, binding affinity predicted by RF-Score, putative hydrogen bonds, and supplier information for easy purchase, three useful features commonly lacked on other online docking platforms like DOCK Blaster or iScreen. We have collected 17,224,424 ligands from the All Clean subset of the ZINC database, and revamped our docking engine idock to version 2.0, further improving docking speed and accuracy, and integrating RF-Score as an alternative rescoring function. To compare idock 2.0 with the state-of-the-art AutoDock Vina 1.1.2, we have carried out a rescoring benchmark and a redocking benchmark on the 2,897 and 343 protein-ligand complexes of PDBbind v2012 refined set and CSAR NRC HiQ Set 24Sept2010 respectively, and an execution time benchmark on 12 diverse proteins and 3,000 ligands of different molecular weight. Results show that, under various scenarios, idock achieves comparable success rates while outperforming AutoDock Vina in terms of docking speed by at least 8.69 times and at most 37.51 times. When evaluated on the PDBbind v2012 core set, our istar platform combining with RF-Score manages to reproduce Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's correlation coefficient of as high as 0.855 and 0.859 respectively between the experimental binding affinity and the predicted binding affinity of the docked conformation. istar

  12. Tools Developed to Prepare and Stabilize Reactor Spent Fuel for Retrieval from Tile Holes - 12251

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Michael; Clough, Malcolm

    2012-07-01

    Spent fuel from the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear reactors is stored in the waste management areas on site. This fuel is contained within carbon steel spent fuel cans that are stored inside vertical carbon steel lined concrete pipes in the ground known as tile holes. The fuel cans have been stored in the tile holes for greater than 30 years. Some of the fuel cans have experienced corrosion which may have affected their structural integrity as well as the potential to form hydrogen gas. In addition to these potential hazards, there was a need to clean contaminated surfaces inside of and around the exposed upper surface of the tile holes. As part of the site waste management remediation plan spent fuel will be retrieved from degraded tile holes, dried, and relocated to a new purpose built above ground storage facility. There have been a number of tools that are required to be developed to ensure spent fuel cans are in a safe condition prior to retrieval and re-location. A series of special purpose tools have been designed and constructed to stabilize the contents of the tile holes, to determine the integrity of the fuel containers and to decontaminate inside and around the tile holes. Described herein are the methods and types of tools used. Tools that have been presented here have been used, or will be used in the near future, in the waste management areas of the CRL Site in preparation for storage of spent fuel in a new above ground facility. The stabilization tools have been demonstrated on mock-up facilities prior to successful use in the field to remove hydrogen gas and uranium hydrides from the fuel cans. A lifting tool has been developed and used successfully in the field to confirm the integrity of the fuel cans for future relocation. A tool using a commercial dry ice blaster has been developed and is ready to start mock-up trials and is scheduled to be used in the field during the summer of 2012. (authors)

  13. istar: a web platform for large-scale protein-ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Ballester, Pedro J; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a key computational method in the design of starting points for the drug discovery process. We are motivated by the desire to automate large-scale docking using our popular docking engine idock and thus have developed a publicly-accessible web platform called istar. Without tedious software installation, users can submit jobs using our website. Our istar website supports 1) filtering ligands by desired molecular properties and previewing the number of ligands to dock, 2) monitoring job progress in real time, and 3) visualizing ligand conformations and outputting free energy and ligand efficiency predicted by idock, binding affinity predicted by RF-Score, putative hydrogen bonds, and supplier information for easy purchase, three useful features commonly lacked on other online docking platforms like DOCK Blaster or iScreen. We have collected 17,224,424 ligands from the All Clean subset of the ZINC database, and revamped our docking engine idock to version 2.0, further improving docking speed and accuracy, and integrating RF-Score as an alternative rescoring function. To compare idock 2.0 with the state-of-the-art AutoDock Vina 1.1.2, we have carried out a rescoring benchmark and a redocking benchmark on the 2,897 and 343 protein-ligand complexes of PDBbind v2012 refined set and CSAR NRC HiQ Set 24Sept2010 respectively, and an execution time benchmark on 12 diverse proteins and 3,000 ligands of different molecular weight. Results show that, under various scenarios, idock achieves comparable success rates while outperforming AutoDock Vina in terms of docking speed by at least 8.69 times and at most 37.51 times. When evaluated on the PDBbind v2012 core set, our istar platform combining with RF-Score manages to reproduce Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's correlation coefficient of as high as 0.855 and 0.859 respectively between the experimental binding affinity and the predicted binding affinity of the docked conformation. istar

  14. Continuous Speech Recognition for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Atif; Overhage, J. Marc; McDonald, Clement J.

    1999-01-01

    The current generation of continuous speech recognition systems claims to offer high accuracy (greater than 95 percent) speech recognition at natural speech rates (150 words per minute) on low-cost (under $2000) platforms. This paper presents a state-of-the-technology summary, along with insights the authors have gained through testing one such product extensively and other products superficially. The authors have identified a number of issues that are important in managing accuracy and usability. First, for efficient recognition users must start with a dictionary containing the phonetic spellings of all words they anticipate using. The authors dictated 50 discharge summaries using one inexpensive internal medicine dictionary ($30) and found that they needed to add an additional 400 terms to get recognition rates of 98 percent. However, if they used either of two more expensive and extensive commercial medical vocabularies ($349 and $695), they did not need to add terms to get a 98 percent recognition rate. Second, users must speak clearly and continuously, distinctly pronouncing all syllables. Users must also correct errors as they occur, because accuracy improves with error correction by at least 5 percent over two weeks. Users may find it difficult to train the system to recognize certain terms, regardless of the amount of training, and appropriate substitutions must be created. For example, the authors had to substitute “twice a day” for “bid” when using the less expensive dictionary, but not when using the other two dictionaries. From trials they conducted in settings ranging from an emergency room to hospital wards and clinicians' offices, they learned that ambient noise has minimal effect. Finally, they found that a minimal “usable” hardware configuration (which keeps up with dictation) comprises a 300-MHz Pentium processor with 128 MB of RAM and a “speech quality” sound card (e.g., SoundBlaster, $99). Anything less powerful will result in

  15. Evaluation of surface roughness as a function of multiple blasting processing variables.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Guilherme B; Jimbo, Ryo; Teixeira, Hellen S; Bonfante, Estevam A; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of implant surface blasting variables, such as blasting media size, velocity, and surface coverage and their two- and three-way interaction in surface roughness parameters. Machined, grade IV titanium-alloy implants (n = 180) had their surfaces treated by a combination of 36 different blasting protocols according to the following variables: aluminum oxide blasting media particle size (50, 100, and 150 μm); velocity (75, 100, 125, and 150 m/s), and surface coverage (5, 15, 25 g/in.(2) ) (n = 5 per blasting protocol). A single 0.46 inch nozzle of the blaster was pointed at the threaded area and spaced 0.050 inches away. Surface topography (n = 5 measurements per implant) was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Roughness parameters Sa, Sq, Sdr, and Sds were evaluated by optical interferometry. A GLM statistical model evaluated the effects of blasting variables on the surface parameters, and their two- and three-way interaction (P < 0.05). Statistical inferences for Sa and Sq were performed after a log(10) transformation to correct for data skewness. Prior to the log(10) transformation, Sa and Sq values for all processing groups ranged from ~0.5 to ~2.6 μm and from ~0.75 to 4 μm, respectively. Statistical inferences showed that Sa, Sq, and Sdr values were significantly dependent on blasting media, velocity, and surface coverage (all P < 0.001). Media × velocity, media × coverage, and media × velocity × coverage also significantly affected Sa, Sq, and Sdr values (P < 0.002). The highest levels were obtained with 100 μm blasting media, coverage for 5 g/in.(2) , and velocity of 100 m/s. No significant differences were observed for Sds (P > 0.15). The blasting variables produced different surface topography features and knowledge of their interaction could be used to tailor a desired implant surface configuration. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Virtual screening of selective multitarget kinase inhibitors by combinatorial support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Ma, X H; Wang, R; Tan, C Y; Jiang, Y Y; Lu, T; Rao, H B; Li, X Y; Go, M L; Low, B C; Chen, Y Z

    2010-10-04

    Multitarget agents have been increasingly explored for enhancing efficacy and reducing countertarget activities and toxicities. Efficient virtual screening (VS) tools for searching selective multitarget agents are desired. Combinatorial support vector machines (C-SVM) were tested as VS tools for searching dual-inhibitors of 11 combinations of 9 anticancer kinase targets (EGFR, VEGFR, PDGFR, Src, FGFR, Lck, CDK1, CDK2, GSK3). C-SVM trained on 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors correctly identified 26.8%-57.3% (majority >36%) of the 56-230 intra-kinase-group dual-inhibitors (equivalent to the 50-70% yields of two independent individual target VS tools), and 12.2% of the 41 inter-kinase-group dual-inhibitors. C-SVM were fairly selective in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 3.7%-48.1% (majority <20%) of the 233-1,316 non-dual-inhibitors of the same kinase pairs and 0.98%-4.77% of the 3,971-5,180 inhibitors of other kinases. C-SVM produced low false-hit rates in misidentifying as dual-inhibitors 1,746-4,817 (0.013%-0.036%) of the 13.56 M PubChem compounds, 12-175 (0.007%-0.104%) of the 168 K MDDR compounds, and 0-84 (0.0%-2.9%) of the 19,495-38,483 MDDR compounds similar to the known dual-inhibitors. C-SVM was compared to other VS methods Surflex-Dock, DOCK Blaster, kNN and PNN against the same sets of kinase inhibitors and the full set or subset of the 1.02 M Zinc clean-leads data set. C-SVM produced comparable dual-inhibitor yields, slightly better false-hit rates for kinase inhibitors, and significantly lower false-hit rates for the Zinc clean-leads data set. Combinatorial SVM showed promising potential for searching selective multitarget agents against intra-kinase-group kinases without explicit knowledge of multitarget agents.

  17. Continuous speech recognition for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Zafar, A; Overhage, J M; McDonald, C J

    1999-01-01

    The current generation of continuous speech recognition systems claims to offer high accuracy (greater than 95 percent) speech recognition at natural speech rates (150 words per minute) on low-cost (under $2000) platforms. This paper presents a state-of-the-technology summary, along with insights the authors have gained through testing one such product extensively and other products superficially. The authors have identified a number of issues that are important in managing accuracy and usability. First, for efficient recognition users must start with a dictionary containing the phonetic spellings of all words they anticipate using. The authors dictated 50 discharge summaries using one inexpensive internal medicine dictionary ($30) and found that they needed to add an additional 400 terms to get recognition rates of 98 percent. However, if they used either of two more expensive and extensive commercial medical vocabularies ($349 and $695), they did not need to add terms to get a 98 percent recognition rate. Second, users must speak clearly and continuously, distinctly pronouncing all syllables. Users must also correct errors as they occur, because accuracy improves with error correction by at least 5 percent over two weeks. Users may find it difficult to train the system to recognize certain terms, regardless of the amount of training, and appropriate substitutions must be created. For example, the authors had to substitute "twice a day" for "bid" when using the less expensive dictionary, but not when using the other two dictionaries. From trials they conducted in settings ranging from an emergency room to hospital wards and clinicians' offices, they learned that ambient noise has minimal effect. Finally, they found that a minimal "usable" hardware configuration (which keeps up with dictation) comprises a 300-MHz Pentium processor with 128 MB of RAM and a "speech quality" sound card (e.g., SoundBlaster, $99). Anything less powerful will result in the system lagging

  18. Comparison of voice-automated transcription and human transcription in generating pathology reports.

    PubMed

    Al-Aynati, Maamoun M; Chorneyko, Katherine A

    2003-06-01

    Software that can convert spoken words into written text has been available since the early 1980s. Early continuous speech systems were developed in 1994, with the latest commercially available editions having a claimed accuracy of up to 98% of speech recognition at natural speech rates. To evaluate the efficacy of one commercially available voice-recognition software system with pathology vocabulary in generating pathology reports and to compare this with human transcription. To draw cost analysis conclusions regarding human versus computer-based transcription. Two hundred six routine pathology reports from the surgical pathology material handled at St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario, were generated simultaneously using computer-based transcription and human transcription. The following hardware and software were used: a desktop 450-MHz Intel Pentium III processor with 192 MB of RAM, a speech-quality sound card (Sound Blaster), noise-canceling headset microphone, and IBM ViaVoice Pro version 8 with pathology vocabulary support (Voice Automated, Huntington Beach, Calif). The cost of the hardware and software used was approximately Can 2250 dollars. A total of 23 458 words were transcribed using both methods with a mean of 114 words per report. The mean accuracy rate was 93.6% (range, 87.4%-96%) using the computer software, compared to a mean accuracy of 99.6% (range, 99.4%-99.8%) for human transcription (P <.001). Time needed to edit documents by the primary evaluator (M.A.) using the computer was on average twice that needed for editing the documents produced by human transcriptionists (range, 1.4-3.5 times). The extra time needed to edit documents was 67 minutes per week (13 minutes per day). Computer-based continuous speech-recognition systems in pathology can be successfully used in pathology practice even during the handling of gross pathology specimens. The relatively low accuracy rate of this voice-recognition software with resultant increased editing

  19. Demonstration of a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over an operating envelope could also be useful in the modeling detailed physical processes. The sensor has been embedded in many regressing media for the purposes of proof-of-concept testing. A gross demonstration of its capabilities was performed using a sanding wheel to remove layers of metal. A longer-term demonstration measurement involved the placement of the sensor in a brake pad, monitoring the removal of pad material associated with the normal wear-and-tear of driving. It was used to measure the regression rates of the combustable media in small model rocket motors and road flares. Finally, a test was performed using a sand blaster to remove small amounts of material at a time. This test was aimed at demonstrating the unit's present resolution, and is compared with laser profilometry data obtained simultaneously. At the lowest resolution levels, this unit should be useful in locally quantifying the erosion rates of the channel walls in plasma thrusters. .