Science.gov

Sample records for blaster kolib pci-e-le

  1. The Astro-Blaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, Richard V.; Long, Kevin R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Astro-Blaster as a method of the laws of conservation of momentum and energy during the creation of a supernova. Several elastic balls are aligned for a drop, followed by multiple collisions which result in the top ball reaching tremendous heights relative to the drop height. (JRH)

  2. 30 CFR 905.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.955 Certification... Indian Lands, shall apply to the training, examinatioin and certification of blasters for surface...

  3. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  4. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer. PMID:27171416

  5. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification...

  6. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification...

  7. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification...

  8. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification...

  9. 30 CFR 903.955 - Certification of blasters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of blasters. 903.955 Section 903.955 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.955 Certification...

  10. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot-blast machine that removes layer of concrete of varying depths. Hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is reused until it is pulverized to dust, which is deposited in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  11. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  12. Concrete Cleaning, Inc. centrifugal shot blaster: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The centrifugal shot blaster technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The centrifugal shot blaster is an electronically operated shot blast machine that has been modified to remove layers of concrete to varying depths. A hardened steel shot propelled at a high rate of speed abrades the surface of the concrete. The depth of material removed is determined by the rate of speed the machine is traveling and the volume of shot being fired into the blast chamber. The steel shot is recycled and used over until it is pulverized into dust, which ends up in the waste container with the concrete being removed. Debris is continually vacuumed by a large dust collection system attached to the shot blaster. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  13. Widgets and Blasters: A Game on the Theory of the Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Presents instructions for playing "Widgets and Blasters," an educational game designed to illustrate the functioning of a competitive market and help students understand economic models. Explains that the aims of the activity are to encourage students to identify the pattern of price over time and analyze the pattern in terms of causation. (SG)

  14. IBPAT/OSHA Health and Safety Education Quiz Book. Painters, Abrasive Blasters, Tapers, Paint Makers, Floorcoverers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades, Washington, DC.

    Designed for use by instructors using the "Health and Safety Education Book" (International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades/Occupational Safety and Health Act), this book contains quizzes specifically for painters, abrasive blasters, tapers, paint makers, and floorcoverers. Quizzes included in the book focus on testing areas such as (1)…

  15. 30 CFR 955.12 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or the equivalent shall: (1) Have received on-the-job training, including practical field experience in blasting operations, from a blaster or the equivalent for 2 out of the 3 years preceding the submission of his or her application; and (2) Have obtained from the blaster or the equivalent, the...

  16. 30 CFR 955.12 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or the equivalent shall: (1) Have received on-the-job training, including practical field experience in blasting operations, from a blaster or the equivalent for 2 out of the 3 years preceding the submission of his or her application; and (2) Have obtained from the blaster or the equivalent, the...

  17. 30 CFR 906.15 - Approval of Colorado regulatory program amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of Colorado regulatory program... 25, 1982, May 26, 1983, August 2, 1983 May 1, 1984 CRS 34-33-108, 2 CCR 407-2, 1.13, 2.07.6(3), 4.05... 407-2, 1.04; 6.01-4; blaster training program; blaster certification examination. August 18,...

  18. 30 CFR 850.13 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training. 850.13 Section 850.13 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.13 Training. (a) The regulatory authority shall establish procedures...

  19. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  20. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  1. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  2. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  3. 30 CFR 817.61 - Use of explosives: General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of explosives: General requirements. 817.61... ACTIVITIES § 817.61 Use of explosives: General requirements. (a) Sections 817.61-817.68 apply to surface... regulations in the use of explosives. (c) Blasters. (1) No later than 12 months after the...

  4. 30 CFR 850.10 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Information collection. 850.10 Section 850.10... FOR CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.10 Information collection. The information collection requirements... assigned clearance number 1029-0080. The information is being collected to meet the requirements...

  5. 30 CFR 850.10 - Information collection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Information collection. 850.10 Section 850.10... FOR CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.10 Information collection. The information collection requirements... assigned clearance number 1029-0080. The information is being collected to meet the requirements...

  6. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  7. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  8. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  9. Software Reviews. Programs Worth a Second Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Roxanne; Eiser, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages for use in middle/high school classrooms. Included are "MacWrite II," a word-processing program for MacIntosh computers; "Super Story Tree," a word-processing program for Apple and IBM computers; and "Math Blaster Mystery," for IBM, Apple, and Tandy computers. (CW)

  10. Storage stability of flour-blasted brown rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown rice was blasted with rice flour rather than sand in a sand blaster to make microscopic nicks and cuts so that water can easily penetrate into the brown rice endosperm and cook the rice in a shorter time. The flour-blasted American Basmati brown rice, long grain brown rice, and parboiled long...

  11. 30 CFR 955.11 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate, a person shall: (a) Be at least 20 years old prior to submitting an application, and at least 21 years old prior to the grant of a certificate; (b) In the 3 years prior to submitting an application... blaster or the equivalent, for the following cumulative length of time: (1) Certificate issuance—2...

  12. 30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  13. 30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  14. 30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  15. 30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  16. 30 CFR 816.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  17. 30 CFR 817.68 - Use of explosives: Records of blasting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... retain a record of all blasts for at least 3 years. Upon request, copies of these records shall be made... following data: (a) Name of the operator conducting the blast. (b) Location, date, and time of the blast. (c) Name, signature, and certification number of the blaster conducting the blast. (d)...

  18. 30 CFR 955.17 - Suspension and revocation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....17 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS IN... Board of Land Appeals under 43 CFR 4.1280 to 4.1286. (d) Surrender of certificate. Upon...

  19. How To: Protect against a Zero-Hour Attack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Rob

    2005-01-01

    In the last year, a series of viruses and worms that caused damage across the Internet in record time has made very clear how vulnerable computer systems are. The MS Blaster, Slammer, Sasser, and Korgo.W worms have shown that signature-based antivirus software and traditional firewalls are not enough to protect networks. Everyone is worried about…

  20. 30 CFR 850.12 - Responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Responsibility. 850.12 Section 850.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRAINING... CERTIFICATION OF BLASTERS § 850.12 Responsibility. (a) The regulatory authority is responsible for...

  1. 75 FR 25037 - Lead; Clearance and Clearance Testing Requirements for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... paint through high-speed operation, such as power sanders or abrasive blasters, this proposal would also... material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available electronically at http://www.regulations.gov , or, if only available...

  2. 77 FR 65928 - Buy America Waiver Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ...) Gazex Avalanche Exploder in the State of Utah and TAS O'Bell Avalanche Initiating Blaster for the State... appropriate to use non-domestic TAS Gazex Avalanche Exploder for the State of Utah and TAS O'Bell Avalanche... intent to issue a waiver on its Web site for TAS Gazex Avalanche Exploder for the State of Utah (...

  3. Potential of Air-Propelled Abrasives for Selective Weed Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel forms of selective weed control are needed by many types of growers, but especially organic growers who are restricted from using synthetic herbicides. Abrasive grit made from corn cobs was expelled from a sand blaster at 517 kPa pressure and aimed at seedlings of common lambsquarters and corn...

  4. Potential Use of Abrasive Air-Propelled Agricultural Residues for Weed Control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new postemergence weed control tactic is proposed for organic production systems that results in plant abrasion and death upon assault from abrasive grits propelled by compressed air. Grit derived from granulated walnut shells was delivered by a sand blaster at 517 kPa at distances of 30 to 60 cm ...

  5. Teaching with Toys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mary; Miller, Dolores

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of toys in teaching science. Describes toys that model concepts including Playful Penguins and Blaster Balls; toys in demonstrations such as the Heat Solution, Rainbow Glasses, and Energy Ball; toys as mnemonic devices including Stackable Rings and Color Racers; and toys illustrating science and technology integration such as…

  6. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underwater blasting. 1926.912 Section 1926.912 Labor... Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired without... explosives aboard vessels used in underwater blasting operations shall be according to provisions...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.906 - Initiation of explosive charges-electric blasting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...” position at all times, except when firing. It shall be so designed that the firing lines to the cap circuit... be entrusted only to the blaster. (m) Blasting machines shall be in good condition and the efficiency of the machine shall be tested periodically to make certain that it can deliver power at its...

  8. [An occupational physiology study at the Asarel Mining and Milling Works. The evaluation of the work load in the basic jobs in an open-pit mine].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, L; Khadzhiolova, I; Deianov, Kh

    1995-01-01

    This occupational physiology study was undertaken within a wider applied-research framework designed to evaluate the occupational environment and its impact on workers at "Asarel" Mining and Milling Works. Analysis of activities showed physical effort (dynamic and static) to be the major problem at the open pit, though varying in extent between jobs (most prominent for blasters and bulldozerists). Nervous/emotional strain, while not leading, was sustained mostly by diggers and blasters, followed by drivers. Organization of work (shift regimen, no regulated breaks, stepwise schedule of days off work) was hardly appropriate and did not allow for recovery. Interviewed workers qualified working conditions as extremely unfavorable; they disapproved with the physical factors of the occupational environment, the workplace, the state of machines and devices, and remuneration for work performed. Exertion from work, assessed by pulse rate and energy expended, was moderate for most activities of diggers, drivers, and drillers. The burden of physical effort was great for blasters at the open pit and for diggers and drillers performing extra repair operations (pulse rate, 100-110 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.2-5.5 Kcal/min). Hardest and least attractive was the work of blasters at stores for explosive materials (pulse rate, 120-141 strokes/min; energy expended, 5.5-6.5 Kcal/min). These adverse factors of labor activities might produce a negative impact on worker health and performance, leading to occupational impairment of their musculoskeletal system, to labor-related disorders of their cardiovascular and nervous systems, etc. Preventive measures are thus necessary to limit physical exertion, optimize the work-and-rest regimen; also, there is a need for conducting pertinent preventive medical examinations, providing social measures (conditions for transportation, rest, nutrition, sports), etc. PMID:8524750

  9. A TRP5/5-fluoroanthranilic acid counter-selection system for gene disruption in Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Foureau, Emilien; Clastre, Marc; Millerioux, Yoann; Simkin, Andrew J; Cornet, Lucie; Dutilleul, Christelle; Besseau, Sébastien; Marais, Emeline; Melin, Céline; Guillard, Jérôme; Crèche, Joël; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    Candida guilliermondii is an interesting biotechnological model for the industrial production of value-added metabolites and also remains an opportunistic emerging fungal agent of candidiasis often associated with oncology patients. The aim of the present study was to establish a convenient transformation system for C. guilliermondii by developing both an ATCC 6260-derived recipient strain and a recyclable selection marker. We first disrupted the TRP5 gene in the wild-type strain and demonstrated that trp5 mutants were tryptophan auxotroph as well as being resistant to the antimetabolite 5-fluoroanthranilic acid (FAA). Following an FAA selection of spontaneous mutants derived from the ATCC 6260 strain and complementation analysis, we demonstrated that trp5 genotypes could be directly recovered on FAA-containing medium. The TRP5 wild-type allele, flanked by two short repeated sequences of its 3'UTR, was then used to disrupt the FCY1 gene in C. guilliermondii trp5 recipient strains. The resulting fcy1 mutants displayed strong flucytosine resistance and a counter-selection on FAA allowed us to pop-out the TRP5 allele from the FCY1 locus. To illustrate the capacity of this blaster system to achieve a second round of gene disruption, we knocked out both the LEU2 and the HOG1 genes in the trp5, fcy1 background. Although all previously described yeast "TRP blaster" disruption systems used TRP1 as counter-selectable marker, this study demonstrated the potential of the TRP5 gene in such strategies. This newly created "TRP5 blaster" disruption system thus represents a powerful genetic tool to study the function of a large pallet of genes in C. guilliermondii. PMID:22618436

  10. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

    1993-11-01

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) grit media (approximately 37 {mu}m. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000{degrees}C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 {mu}m deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} to less than 80 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed.

  11. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  12. Using handheld GPS for data acquisition in blasting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Blasters in the field for years have been faced with the task of plotting blast locations for future reference and calculating scaled distances or seismograph placement from maps, aerial photo`s etc. With the constellation fully operational, GPS provides a satellite signal transmitted to a ground receiver which will display the desired coordinate positioning worldwide, 24 hours a day in any kind of weather conditions. There are a variety of GPS receivers available with varying levels of accuracy. The field trials of a handheld navigational quality instrument for plotting blast and seismograph locations along with other necessary industry related data is the basis of this paper.

  13. Debilitating Lung Disease Among Surface Coal Miners With No Underground Mining Tenure

    PubMed Central

    Halldin, Cara N.; Reed, William R.; Joy, Gerald J.; Colinet, Jay F.; Rider, James P.; Petsonk, Edward L.; Abraham, Jerrold L.; Wolfe, Anita L.; Storey, Eileen; Laney, A. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Methods Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical history information. Results Among eight miners who worked as drill operators or blasters for most of their tenure (median, 35.5 years), two reported poor dust control practices, working in visible dust clouds as recently as 2012. Chest radiographs progressed to progressive massive fibrosis in as few as 11 years. One miner’s lung biopsy demonstrated fibrosis and interstitial accumulation of macrophages containing abundant silica, aluminum silicate, and titanium dust particles. Conclusions Overexposure to respirable silica resulted in progressive massive fibrosis among current surface coal miners with no underground mining tenure. Inadequate dust control during drilling/blasting is likely an important etiologic factor. PMID:25563541

  14. A VISAR velocity interferometer system at MRL for slapper detonator and shockwave studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, David J.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the commissioning and appraisal of a conventional 3-detector VISAR velocity interferometer system for measuring the velocity time histories of small plastic flyer plates produced by exploding bridge foil generators. Proper treatment of the flyer surface to diffusely reflect the laser beam was found to be important. Roughening the surface with a miniature grit-blaster produced the best results. Peak velocities in the range of 1500 m/sec to 3900 m/sec were obtained for small and medium scale flyers. Accelerations were in the range of 10 Gm/sec to 100 Gm/sec. The uncertainty of the measurements was found to be related to the limited high frequency response of the photodetectors. After replacement of the original non-flat beamsplitter, the arms of the interferometer were not quite compensated. A modified VISAR velocity equation that allows for the effective etalon length of the lambda/8 waveplate/beamsplitter combination is derived.

  15. Non-terrorist suicidal death by oral explosion: A rare case from India.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Jamebaseer Masiuddin; Farooqui, Anjum Ara Jamebaseer; Mukherjee, Bimbisar Bikas; Manjhi, Shiv Narayan

    2016-07-01

    Suicidal deaths involving explosives are rare. Their occurrence depends on both the availability of materials and the victim's expertise in handling explosive material. We report here a rare case from India of non-terrorist suicidal death involving explosives. The victim was around 25 years old, a blaster by occupation. He committed suicide by detonating dynamite in his mouth. The materials he used to operate this explosion were found near his body at the crime scene. There was characteristic bilateral symmetrical laceration around the oral cavity. Considering all the facts of the case in relation to history, location, nature, distribution and extent of injuries and recovered material at crime scene enables the cause and manner of death to be ascertained.

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  17. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2016-07-12

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  18. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  19. Manual modification and plasma exposure of boron nitride ceramic to study Hall effect thruster plasma channel material erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satonik, Alexander J.

    Worn Hall effect thrusters (HET) show a variety of unique microstructures and elemental compositions in the boron nitride thruster channel walls. Worn thruster channels are typically created by running test thrusters in vacuum chambers for hundreds of hours. Studies were undertaken to manually modify samples of boron nitride without the use of a hall effect thruster. Samples were manually abraded with an abrasive blaster and sandpaper, in addition to a vacuum heater. Some of these samples were further exposed to a xenon plasma in a magnetron sputter device. Sandpaper and abrasive blaster tests were used to modify surface roughness values of the samples from 10,000 A to 150,000 A, matching worn thruster values. Vacuum heat treatments were performed on samples. These treatments showed the ability to modify chemical compositions of boron nitride samples, but not in a manner matching changes seen in worn thruster channels. Plasma erosion rate was shown to depend on the grade of the BN ceramic and the preparation of the surface prior to plasma exposure. Abraded samples were shown to erode 43% more than their pristine counterparts. Unique surface features and elemental compositions on the worn thruster channel samples were overwritten by new surface features on the ceramic grains. The microscope images of the ceramic surface show that the magnetron plasma source rounded the edges of the ceramic grains to closely match the worn HET surface. This effect was not as pronounced in studies of ion beam bombardment of the surface and appears to be a result of the quasi-neutral plasma environment.

  20. Limited Role of Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases Sap1 to Sap6 in Candida albicans Virulence and Host Immune Response in Murine Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis▿

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Alexandra; Lermann, Ulrich; Teixeira, Luzia; Cerca, Filipe; Botelho, Sofia; Gil da Costa, Rui M.; Sampaio, Paula; Gärtner, Fátima; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Vilanova, Manuel; Pais, Célia

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) are considered virulence-associated factors. Several members of the Sap family were claimed to play a significant role in the progression of candidiasis established by the hematogenous route. This assumption was based on the observed attenuated virulence of sap-null mutant strains. However, the exclusive contribution of SAP genes to their attenuated phenotype was not unequivocally confirmed, as the Ura status of these mutant strains could also have contributed to the attenuation. In this study, we have reassessed the importance of SAP1 to SAP6 in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis using sap-null mutant strains not affected in their URA3 gene expression and compared their virulence phenotypes with those of Ura-blaster sap mutants. The median survival time of BALB/c mice intravenously infected with a mutant strain lacking SAP1 to SAP3 was equivalent to that of mice infected with wild-type strain SC5314, while those infected with mutant strains lacking SAP5 showed slightly extended survival times. Nevertheless, no differences could be observed between the wild type and a Δsap456 mutant in their abilities to invade mouse kidneys. Likewise, a deficiency in SAP4 to SAP6 had no noticeable impact on the immune response elicited in the spleens and kidneys of C. albicans-infected mice. These results contrast with the behavior of equivalent Ura-blaster mutants, which presented a significant reduction in virulence. Our results suggest that Sap1 to Sap6 do not play a significant role in C. albicans virulence in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis and that, in this model, Sap1 to Sap3 are not necessary for successful C. albicans infection. PMID:20679440

  1. State-of-the-science review of the occupational health hazards of crystalline silica in abrasive blasting operations and related requirements for respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Madl, Amy K; Donovan, Ellen P; Gaffney, Shannon H; McKinley, Meg A; Moody, Emily C; Henshaw, John L; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2008-08-01

    Excessive exposures to airborne crystalline silica have been known for over 100 years to pose a serious health hazard. Work practices and regulatory standards advanced as the knowledge of the hazards of crystalline silica evolved. This article presents a comprehensive historical examination of the literature on exposure, health effects, and personal protective equipment related to silica and abrasive blasting operations over the last century. In the early 1900s, increased death rates and prevalence of pulmonary disease were observed in industries that involved dusty operations. Studies of these occupational cohorts served as the basis for the first occupational exposure limits in the 1930s. Early exposure studies in foundries revealed that abrasive blasting operations were particularly hazardous and provided the basis for many of the engineering control and respiratory protection requirements that are still in place today. Studies involving abrasive blasters over the years revealed that engineering controls were often not completely effective at reducing airborne silica concentrations to a safe level; consequently, respiratory protection has always been an important component of protecting workers. During the last 15-20 yr, quantitative exposure-response modeling, experimental animal studies, and in vitro methods were used to better understand the relationship between exposure to silica and disease in the workplace. In light of Occupational Safety and Health Administration efforts to reexamine the protectiveness of the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) for crystalline silica and its focus on protecting workers who are known to still be exposed to silica in the workplace (including abrasive blasters), this state-of-the-science review of one of the most hazardous operations involving crystalline silica should provide useful background to employers, researchers, and regulators interested in the historical evolution of the recognized occupational health hazards

  2. [An occupational physiology study at the Asarel Mining and Milling Works--screening for risk factors of the cardiovascular system in workers in an open-pit mine].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, L; Khadzhiolova, I

    1995-01-01

    It was the purpose of this study to define the frequency of occurrence of a number of individual and occupational factors contributing to development of arterial hypertension in "Asarel" MMW open-pit workers. The investigated subjects numbered 36 and ranged in age from 22 to 55 years (average, 36 +/- 1.9 years). The jobs represented included mainly: diggers, bulldozers, driver, drillers, blasters, road-service workers, electric and mechanic fitters. Endpoints measured and evaluated included: arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, biometric characteristics (age, occupational experience, body height and weight), common risk factors, such as family antecedents, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, level of physical activity at and off work, etc. For this sample of open-pit workers, findings indicated a relatively high incidence of hypertension (28% of subjects). The level of arterial hypertension consistently correlated with worker age, length of occupational experience, and body weight. There was high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors: alcohol consumption, family history, cigarette smoking, use of salty foods, overweight. The observed changes in the cardiovascular system and high prevalence of risk factors point to the necessity of taking specific medical prevention measures. These have been taken into consideration in designing the overall program of upgrading work conditions and organization, as well as improving the style of life of "Asarel" MMW workers. PMID:8524751

  3. Solitaire AB Stent-Assisted Coiling of Wide-Neck Micro Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-dong; Qin, Jun; Xiao, Zhen-yong; Feng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Solitaire AB stent-assisted coiling facilitates the endovascular treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We present our experience of coiling the micro-aneurysms of wide-neck with Solitaire AB stent assisting in a single center. Methods Thirty-one Solitaire AB stents were used to treat via endovascular approach patients with 31 wide-neck micro aneurysms in a single center in China. Technical and clinical complications were recorded. Modified Rankin Scale was used to evaluate the patients' conditions via clinic and telephone follow-up. Results The mean width of aneurysm sac was 2.30±0.42 mm, and the mean diameter of aneurysm neck was 2.83±0.48 mm. Complete occlusion was achieved in 28 aneurysms (90.32%); neck remnant was seen in 3 aneurysms (9.68%). Technical and clinical complications related to the procedure were encountered in four patients (12.5%). Two patients died (6.25%). No patient had a permanent deficit. Conclusion Solitaire AB stent was a safe and efficiency tool in assisting coiling of micro aneurysms with wide neck, but may be not suitable for a blaster-like one. Mid- and long-term follow-up will be required to elucidate the impact of the Solitaire AB stent on recanalization rate. PMID:27446513

  4. Ergonomics of abrasive blasting: a comparison of high pressure water and steel shot.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Beth; Yuan, Lu; Fulmer, Scott

    2006-09-01

    Abrasive blasting with silica sand has long been associated with silicosis. Alternatives to sand are being used increasingly. While NIOSH has done extensive investigations of the respiratory effects of the substitutes for sand, the ergonomic effects of the substitutes have not been examined. Too often, hazards are shifted, and technologies that might save workers' lungs could do so at the expense of their musculoskeletal systems. Hence, the objective of this study was to examine the ergonomic effects of alternatives to sand. Multiple methods, both qualitative and quantitative, were used to yield numerous kinds of data for the analysis of exposures to abrasive blasters. PATH, a method for quantifying ergonomic exposure in non-routine work, was combined with interviews with workers, biomechanical modeling and noise level readings to assess the ergonomics of two abrasive blasting operations: high-pressure water and steel shot. Advantages and disadvantages of each medium are discussed. High-pressure water was slightly less ergonomically stressful, environmentally cleaner, much quieter and less dusty that steel shot, and it was reported to be slower on those tasks where both media could be used.

  5. Use Of High-Speed Motion Picture Photography In Blast Evaluation And Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappetta, R. F.; Mammele, Mark E.

    1988-02-01

    A useful and foolproof method of analyzing explosive phenomena and designing blasts is with information obtained from high-speed, 16mm motion picture photography. Utilizing this information along with the methodologies developed adds confidence to custom and site specific blast designs for use in mining, quarry, coal, utility, construction, research and specialized military applications. The numerical and analytical techniques developed allow a blaster or engineer to evaluate blasting performance, compare explosive efficiencies, optimize millisecond delay timing between detonations, evaluate damage to particular seams of material such as coal, optimize overburden casting, predict explosive energy required to displace toe burdens, compare over-all blast designs, investigate air decks for presplitting and reclamation purposes, and to study general detonation phenomena. Results are based on the analysis of a few hundred films of blasts performed in full-scale production environments. Instrumentation, field set-ups, and specific data interpre-tation are discussed in detail. The presentation is also supplemented with a 10 minute film of selected test blasts.

  6. Deletion and Allelic Exchange of the Aspergillus fumigatus veA Locus via a Novel Recyclable Marker Module

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Sven; Bayram, Özgür; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2005-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of gene functions in an asexual fungus requires advanced methods of molecular biology. For the generation of targeted gene deletions in the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus we designed a novel blaster module allowing dominant selection of transformants due to resistance to phleomycin as well as dominant (counter)selection of a Cre recombinase-mediated marker excision event. For validation purposes we have deleted the A. fumigatus pabaA gene in a wild-type isolate by making use of this cassette. The resulting pabaA::loxP strain served as the recipient for subsequent targeting of the velvet locus. Homologous reconstitution of the deleted gene was performed by an allele whose expression is driven in a nitrogen source-dependent manner, as validated by Northern analyses. Overexpression of the veA locus in A. fumigatus does not result in any obvious phenotype, whereas the sporulation capacities of the veA null mutant are reduced on nitrate-containing medium, a phenotype that is completely restored in the reconstituted strain. PMID:16002655

  7. Effects of hypodontia on craniofacial structures and mandibular growth pattern

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction This study was performed to examine craniofacial structures in persons with hypodontia and to reveal any differences, that may occur, when agenetic teeth are only found in the maxilla, the mandible or in both jaws. The groups consistent of 50 children (33 girls, 17 boys) aged between 9 and 13.5 years were analyzed and assigned to three subgroups. Group 1 = upper jaw hypodontia. Group 2 = lower jaw hypodontia. Group 3 = hypodontia in both jaws. Materials and methods Eleven angular and three index measurements from lateral encephalographs and two linear measurements from dental blaster casts were calculated. All data was statistically analyzed, parameters with p < 5% were investigated for each subgroup respectively. Results In comparison with standards the study group showed bimaxillary retrognathism and a reduction of the lower anterior facial height. Moreover both overbite and overjet significantly increased. Other values laid within the normal ranges. Evaluating results of the subgroups, differences in the means of SNA, SNB and overjet between the groups were observed. Analysis of the mandibular growth pattern revealed, that neither vertical nor horizontal patterns are dominant in hypodontia patients. Conclusions In certain dentofacial parameters differences between persons with hypodontia and such with full dentition exist. According to our findings agenetic teeth may have a negative influence on the saggital development of a jaw and the lower face and may be responsible for increased overbites. This should receive attention in orthodontic treatment of hypodontia patients. PMID:22142280

  8. Severe noise-induced deafness--a 10-year review of cases.

    PubMed

    Tay, P

    1996-08-01

    Noise Induced Deafness (NID) is the leading occupational disease in Singapore. Every year, over 500 new cases of NID are detected by the Department of Industrial Health (DIH). Severe NID is a disabling disease which is compensable under the law. A retrospective study was conducted to elicit the profile of workers with severe, disabling NID. From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1994, the DIH confirmed 127 of such cases. Of these, 57 (44.9%) were involved in the building and repair of ships and boats, 30 (23.6%) with the basic steel industries, manufacture and fabrication of metal products and storage batteries, 9 (7.2%) with the transport and allied support industries, 7 (5.5%) in granite quarrying, 7 (5.5%) in the manufacture of food and drinks, 5 (3.9%) in the manufacture of wooden furniture and 7 (5.5%) in other industries such as manufacture of glass, electricity generation, construction, textiles, printing and so on. The mean age of these workers upon diagnosis of severe NID was 48 years (SD 8.07). The mean duration of exposure to noise was 24 years (SD 9.11). The mean of the average hearing thresholds at 1, 2 and 3 kHz for these workers was found to be 61.5 dBA (SD 4.26). The main jobs at risk were grit blasters, steel workers, fitters, boiler fabricators, panel beaters and carpenters. Noise dosimetry was performed on 46 of the cases and the mean time-weighted exposure level was 90 dBA (SD 10.00). Finally, 82.7% of cases already had audiometric evidence of severe deafness at the time of notification. PMID:8993132

  9. Severe noise-induced deafness--a 10-year review of cases.

    PubMed

    Tay, P

    1996-08-01

    Noise Induced Deafness (NID) is the leading occupational disease in Singapore. Every year, over 500 new cases of NID are detected by the Department of Industrial Health (DIH). Severe NID is a disabling disease which is compensable under the law. A retrospective study was conducted to elicit the profile of workers with severe, disabling NID. From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1994, the DIH confirmed 127 of such cases. Of these, 57 (44.9%) were involved in the building and repair of ships and boats, 30 (23.6%) with the basic steel industries, manufacture and fabrication of metal products and storage batteries, 9 (7.2%) with the transport and allied support industries, 7 (5.5%) in granite quarrying, 7 (5.5%) in the manufacture of food and drinks, 5 (3.9%) in the manufacture of wooden furniture and 7 (5.5%) in other industries such as manufacture of glass, electricity generation, construction, textiles, printing and so on. The mean age of these workers upon diagnosis of severe NID was 48 years (SD 8.07). The mean duration of exposure to noise was 24 years (SD 9.11). The mean of the average hearing thresholds at 1, 2 and 3 kHz for these workers was found to be 61.5 dBA (SD 4.26). The main jobs at risk were grit blasters, steel workers, fitters, boiler fabricators, panel beaters and carpenters. Noise dosimetry was performed on 46 of the cases and the mean time-weighted exposure level was 90 dBA (SD 10.00). Finally, 82.7% of cases already had audiometric evidence of severe deafness at the time of notification.

  10. Surveillance of nasal and bladder cancer to locate sources of exposure to occupational carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, K; Morgan, M S; Checkoway, H; Franklin, G; Spinelli, J J; van Belle, G; Weiss, N S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To locate sources of occupational exposure to nasal and bladder carcinogens for surveillance follow up in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: Incident cases of nasal cancer (n = 48), bladder cancer (n = 105), and population based controls (n = 159) matched for sex and age, were interviewed about their jobs, exposures, and smoking histories. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for 57 occupational groups with stratified exact methods to control for age, sex, and smoking. RESULTS: Occupational groups at increased risk of nasal cancer included: textile workers (six cases, OR 7.6); miners, drillers, and blasters (six cases, OR 3.5); welders (two cases, OR 3.5); pulp and paper workers (three cases, OR 3.1); and plumbers and pipefitters (two cases, OR 3.0). Nasal cancer ORs were not increased in occupations exposed to wood dust, possibly due to low exposures in local wood industries. Strongly increased risks of bladder cancer were found for sheet metal workers (four cases, OR 5.3), miners (19 cases, OR 4.5), gardeners (six cases, OR 3.7), and hairdressers (three cases, OR 3.2). Among occupations originally considered at risk, the following had increased risks of bladder cancer: painters (four cases, OR 2.8); laundry workers (five cases, OR 2.3); chemical and petroleum workers (15 cases, OR 1.8); machinists (eight cases, OR 1.6); and textile workers (three cases, OR 1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Occupational groups with increased risks and three or more cases with similar duties were selected for surveillance follow up. For nasal cancer, these included textile workers (five were garment makers) and pulp and paper workers (three performed maintenance tasks likely to entail stainless steel welding). For bladder cancer, these included miners (12 worked underground), machinists (five worked in traditional machining), hairdressers (three had applied hair dyes), and laundry workers (three were drycleaners). PMID:9245952

  11. Decontamination testing of radioactive-contaminated stainless steel coupons using a Ce(IV) solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Elmore, M.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Richardson, G.M.; Anderson, L.D.

    1992-08-01

    The current Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) reference process for canister decontamination describes an air-atomized frit/water slurry blaster developed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) identified incentives to evaluate potential HWVP cost savings from adapting the Ce(IV)/HNO{sub 3} canister decontamination approach being developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, New York. Development studies were recommended by WHC to address issues related to further assessment of the adaptation of the Ce(IV)/HN0{sub 3} decontamination system to HWVP, and to resolve a number of technical uncertainties. Laboratory studies at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) were performed to provide further data to support the selection of an effective flowsheet for the Ce(IV)/HN0{sub 3} decontamination of HWVP stainless steel (SS) vitrification canisters. The results reconfirmed the predictability of this unique chemical milling and decontamination process. The decontamination process developed in the laboratory will be scaled up by a factor of 5,000:1 and tested in FY 1992 by the WVDP at West Valley using uncontaminated full-scale glass-filled canisters. An engineering uncertainty remains to be resolved concerning the removal of a layer of loosely held oxide, some of which may remain on the SS surface after removal of the canister from the decontamination solution. In this laboratory study, low-pressure water from a standard laboratory wash bottle was used to rinse the surfaces of the test coupons. Ultrasonic agitation has been a suggested alternative or addition to spray nozzles for rinsing but has not been selected for the initial series of full-scale tests.

  12. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  13. Combined evidence annotation of transposable elements in genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Quesneville, Hadi; Bergman, Casey M; Andrieu, Olivier; Autard, Delphine; Nouaud, Danielle; Ashburner, Michael; Anxolabehere, Dominique

    2005-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile, repetitive sequences that make up significant fractions of metazoan genomes. Despite their near ubiquity and importance in genome and chromosome biology, most efforts to annotate TEs in genome sequences rely on the results of a single computational program, RepeatMasker. In contrast, recent advances in gene annotation indicate that high-quality gene models can be produced from combining multiple independent sources of computational evidence. To elevate the quality of TE annotations to a level comparable to that of gene models, we have developed a combined evidence-model TE annotation pipeline, analogous to systems used for gene annotation, by integrating results from multiple homology-based and de novo TE identification methods. As proof of principle, we have annotated "TE models" in Drosophila melanogaster Release 4 genomic sequences using the combined computational evidence derived from RepeatMasker, BLASTER, TBLASTX, all-by-all BLASTN, RECON, TE-HMM and the previous Release 3.1 annotation. Our system is designed for use with the Apollo genome annotation tool, allowing automatic results to be curated manually to produce reliable annotations. The euchromatic TE fraction of D. melanogaster is now estimated at 5.3% (cf. 3.86% in Release 3.1), and we found a substantially higher number of TEs (n = 6,013) than previously identified (n = 1,572). Most of the new TEs derive from small fragments of a few hundred nucleotides long and highly abundant families not previously annotated (e.g., INE-1). We also estimated that 518 TE copies (8.6%) are inserted into at least one other TE, forming a nest of elements. The pipeline allows rapid and thorough annotation of even the most complex TE models, including highly deleted and/or nested elements such as those often found in heterochromatic sequences. Our pipeline can be easily adapted to other genome sequences, such as those of the D. melanogaster heterochromatin or other species in the

  14. Tools Developed to Prepare and Stabilize Reactor Spent Fuel for Retrieval from Tile Holes - 12251

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Michael; Clough, Malcolm

    2012-07-01

    Spent fuel from the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear reactors is stored in the waste management areas on site. This fuel is contained within carbon steel spent fuel cans that are stored inside vertical carbon steel lined concrete pipes in the ground known as tile holes. The fuel cans have been stored in the tile holes for greater than 30 years. Some of the fuel cans have experienced corrosion which may have affected their structural integrity as well as the potential to form hydrogen gas. In addition to these potential hazards, there was a need to clean contaminated surfaces inside of and around the exposed upper surface of the tile holes. As part of the site waste management remediation plan spent fuel will be retrieved from degraded tile holes, dried, and relocated to a new purpose built above ground storage facility. There have been a number of tools that are required to be developed to ensure spent fuel cans are in a safe condition prior to retrieval and re-location. A series of special purpose tools have been designed and constructed to stabilize the contents of the tile holes, to determine the integrity of the fuel containers and to decontaminate inside and around the tile holes. Described herein are the methods and types of tools used. Tools that have been presented here have been used, or will be used in the near future, in the waste management areas of the CRL Site in preparation for storage of spent fuel in a new above ground facility. The stabilization tools have been demonstrated on mock-up facilities prior to successful use in the field to remove hydrogen gas and uranium hydrides from the fuel cans. A lifting tool has been developed and used successfully in the field to confirm the integrity of the fuel cans for future relocation. A tool using a commercial dry ice blaster has been developed and is ready to start mock-up trials and is scheduled to be used in the field during the summer of 2012. (authors)

  15. istar: a web platform for large-scale protein-ligand docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Ballester, Pedro J; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a key computational method in the design of starting points for the drug discovery process. We are motivated by the desire to automate large-scale docking using our popular docking engine idock and thus have developed a publicly-accessible web platform called istar. Without tedious software installation, users can submit jobs using our website. Our istar website supports 1) filtering ligands by desired molecular properties and previewing the number of ligands to dock, 2) monitoring job progress in real time, and 3) visualizing ligand conformations and outputting free energy and ligand efficiency predicted by idock, binding affinity predicted by RF-Score, putative hydrogen bonds, and supplier information for easy purchase, three useful features commonly lacked on other online docking platforms like DOCK Blaster or iScreen. We have collected 17,224,424 ligands from the All Clean subset of the ZINC database, and revamped our docking engine idock to version 2.0, further improving docking speed and accuracy, and integrating RF-Score as an alternative rescoring function. To compare idock 2.0 with the state-of-the-art AutoDock Vina 1.1.2, we have carried out a rescoring benchmark and a redocking benchmark on the 2,897 and 343 protein-ligand complexes of PDBbind v2012 refined set and CSAR NRC HiQ Set 24Sept2010 respectively, and an execution time benchmark on 12 diverse proteins and 3,000 ligands of different molecular weight. Results show that, under various scenarios, idock achieves comparable success rates while outperforming AutoDock Vina in terms of docking speed by at least 8.69 times and at most 37.51 times. When evaluated on the PDBbind v2012 core set, our istar platform combining with RF-Score manages to reproduce Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's correlation coefficient of as high as 0.855 and 0.859 respectively between the experimental binding affinity and the predicted binding affinity of the docked conformation. istar