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Sample records for block movement proteins

  1. Cell-to-cell movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus: I. Heterologous complementation experiments provide evidence for specific interactions among the triple gene block proteins.

    PubMed

    Lauber, E; Bleykasten-Grosshans, C; Erhardt, M; Bouzoubaa, S; Jonard, G; Richards, K E; Guilley, H

    1998-07-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) requires three proteins encoded by a triple gene block (TGB) on viral RNA 2. A BNYVV RNA 3-derived replicon was used to express movement proteins to functionally substitute for the BNYVV TGB proteins was tested by coinoculation of TGB-defective BNYVV with the various replicons to Chenopodium quinoa. Trans-heterocomplementation was successful with the movement protein (P30) of tobacco mosaic virus but not with the tubule-forming movement proteins of alfalfa mosaic virus and grapevine fanleaf virus. Trans-complementation of BNYVV movement was also observed when all three TGB proteins of the distantly related peanut clump virus were supplied together but not when they were substituted for their BNYVV counterparts one by one. When P30 was used to drive BNYVV movement in trans, accumulation of the first TGB protein of BNYVV was adversely affected by null mutations in the second and third TGB proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that highly specific interactions among cognate TGB proteins are important for their function and/or stability in planta.

  2. The triple gene block movement proteins of a grape virus in the genus Foveavirus confer limited cell-to-cell spread of a mutant Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krinpreet; Meng, Baozhong

    2013-08-01

    Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV) is a member of the genus Foveavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. The genome of GRSPaV encodes five proteins, among which are three movement proteins designated the triple gene block (TGB) proteins. The TGB proteins of GRSPaV are highly similar to their counterparts in Potato virus X (PVX), as reflected in size, modular structure, conservation of critical amino acid sequence motifs, as well as similar cellular localization. Based on these similarities, we predicted that the TGB proteins of these two viruses would be interchangeable. To test this hypothesis, we replaced the entire or partial sequence of PVX TGB with the corresponding regions from GRSPaV, creating chimeric viruses that contain the PVX backbone and different sequences from GRSPaV TGB. These chimeric constructs were delivered into plants of Nicotiana benthamiana through agro-infiltration to test whether they were capable of cell-to-cell and systemic movement. To our surprise, viruses derived from pPVX.GFP(CH3) bearing GRSPaV TGB in place of PVX TGB lost the ability to move either cell-to-cell or systemically. Interestingly, another chimeric virus resulting from pPVX.GFP(HY2) containing four TGB genes (TGB1 from PVX and TGB1-3 from GRSPaV), exhibited limited cell-to-cell, but not systemic, movement. Our data question the notion that analogous movement proteins encoded by even distantly related viruses are functionally interchangeable and can be replaced by each other. These data suggest that other factors, besides the TGB proteins, may be required for successful intercellular and/or systemic movement of progeny viruses. This is the first experimental demonstration that the GRSPaV TGB function as movement proteins in the context of a chimeric virus and that four TGB genes were required to support the intercellular movement of the chimeric virus.

  3. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  4. Arg-16 and Arg-21 in the N-terminal region of the triple-gene-block protein 1 of Bamboo mosaic virus are essential for virus movement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Kuem; Chang, Ban-Yang; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2004-01-01

    The protein encoded by the first gene of the triple gene block (TGBp1) of potexviruses is required for movement of the viruses. It has been reported that single Arg-->Ala substitutions at position 11, 16 or 21 of TGBp1 of Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) eliminate its RNA-binding activity, while substitutions at position 16 or 21 only affect its NTPase activity (Liou et al., Virology 277, 336-344, 2000). However, it remains unclear whether these Arg-->Ala substitutions also affect the movement of BaMV in plants. To address this question, six mutants of BaMV, each containing either a single- or a double-alanine substitution at Arg-11, Arg-16 and Arg-21 of TGBp1, were constructed and used to infect Chenopodium quinoa and Nicotiana benthamiana. We found that all of the BaMV mutants were able to replicate in protoplasts of N. benthamiana. However, only the mutant with an Arg-11-->Ala substitution in TGBp1 remained capable of movement from cell to cell in plants. Mutants with Arg-16, Arg-21 or both Arg-16 and Arg-21 of TGBp1 replaced with alanine were defective in virus movement. This defect was suppressed when a wild-type TGBp1 allele was co-introduced into the cells using a novel satellite replicon. The ability to trans-complement the movement defect by the wild-type TGBp1 strongly suggests that the Arg-->Ala substitution at position 16 or 21 of TGBp1, which diminishes the RNA-binding and NTPase activities of TGBp1, also eliminates the capability of BaMV to move from cell to cell in host plants.

  5. A novel block of plant virus movement genes.

    PubMed

    Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Lezzhov, Alexander A; Komarova, Tatiana V; Morozov, Sergey Y; Heinlein, Manfred; Solovyev, Andrey G

    2016-04-26

    Hibiscus green spot virus (HGSV) is a recently discovered and so far poorly characterized bacilliform plant virus with a positive-stranded RNA genome consisting of three RNA species. Here, we demonstrate that the proteins encoded by the ORF2 and ORF3 in HGSV RNA2 are necessary and sufficient to mediate cell-to-cell movement of transport-deficient Potato virus X in Nicotiana benthamiana. These two genes represent a specialized transport module called a 'binary movement block' (BMB), and ORF2 and ORF3 are termed BMB1 and BMB2 genes. In agroinfiltrated epidermal cells of N. benthamiana, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-BMB1 fusion protein was distributed diffusely in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. However, in the presence of BMB2, GFP-BMB1 was directed to cell wall-adjacent elongated bodies at the cell periphery, to cell wall-embedded punctate structures co-localizing with callose deposits at plasmodesmata, and to cells adjacent to the initially transformed cell. Thus, BMB2 can mediate the transport of BMB1 to and through plasmodesmata. In general, our observations support the idea that cell-to-cell trafficking of movement proteins involves an initial delivery to membrane compartments adjacent to plasmodesmata, subsequent entry of the plasmodesmata cavity and, finally, transport to adjacent cells. This process, as an alternative to tubule-based transport, has most likely evolved independently in triple gene block (TGB), double gene block (DGB), BMB and the single gene-coded transport system.

  6. Importin-α-Mediated Nucleolar Localization of Potato Mop-Top Virus TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) Protein Facilitates Virus Systemic Movement, Whereas TGB1 Self-Interaction Is Required for Cell-to-Cell Movement in Nicotiana benthamiana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I.; Cowan, Graham H.; Vetukuri, Ramesh R.; Tilsner, Jens; Torrance, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become evident that nucleolar passage of movement proteins occurs commonly in a number of plant RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm. Systemic movement of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) involves two viral transport forms represented by a complex of viral RNA and TRIPLE GENE BLOCK1 (TGB1) movement protein and by polar virions that contain the minor coat protein and TGB1 attached to one extremity. The integrity of polar virions ensures the efficient movement of RNA-CP, which encodes the virus coat protein. Here, we report the involvement of nuclear transport receptors belonging to the importin-α family in nucleolar accumulation of the PMTV TGB1 protein and, subsequently, in the systemic movement of the virus. Virus-induced gene silencing of two importin-α paralogs in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in significant reduction of TGB1 accumulation in the nucleus, decreasing the accumulation of the virus progeny in upper leaves and the loss of systemic movement of RNA-CP. PMTV TGB1 interacted with importin-α in N. benthamiana, which was detected by bimolecular fluorescence complementation in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus. The interaction was mediated by two nucleolar localization signals identified by bioinformatics and mutagenesis in the TGB1 amino-terminal domain. Our results showed that while TGB1 self-interaction is needed for cell-to-cell movement, importin-α-mediated nucleolar targeting of TGB1 is an essential step in establishing the efficient systemic infection of the entire plant. These results enabled the identification of two separate domains in TGB1: an internal domain required for TGB1 self-interaction and cell-to-cell movement and the amino-terminal domain required for importin-α interaction in plants, nucleolar targeting, and long-distance movement. PMID:25576325

  7. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation.

  8. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  9. Deficiency of the eIF4E isoform nCBP limits the cell-to-cell movement of a plant virus encoding triple-gene-block proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Keima, Takuya; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Neriya, Yutaro; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Nishida, Shuko; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2017-01-01

    One of the important antiviral genetic strategies used in crop breeding is recessive resistance. Two eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E family genes, eIF4E and eIFiso4E, are the most common recessive resistance genes whose absence inhibits infection by plant viruses in Potyviridae, Carmovirus, and Cucumovirus. Here, we show that another eIF4E family gene, nCBP, acts as a novel recessive resistance gene in Arabidopsis thaliana toward plant viruses in Alpha- and Betaflexiviridae. We found that infection by Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV), a potexvirus, was delayed in ncbp mutants of A. thaliana. Virus replication efficiency did not differ between an ncbp mutant and a wild type plant in single cells, but viral cell-to-cell movement was significantly delayed in the ncbp mutant. Furthermore, the accumulation of triple-gene-block protein 2 (TGB2) and TGB3, the movement proteins of potexviruses, decreased in the ncbp mutant. Inoculation experiments with several viruses showed that the accumulation of viruses encoding TGBs in their genomes decreased in the ncbp mutant. These results indicate that nCBP is a novel member of the eIF4E family recessive resistance genes whose loss impairs viral cell-to-cell movement by inhibiting the efficient accumulation of TGB2 and TGB3. PMID:28059075

  10. Sound and Movement Exploration on a City Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Nana Sue

    The product of a Special Studies Institute, this teacher developed resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents concepts and activities relative to sound and movement as explored in the urban out-of-doors. Emphasis is on integration of cognitive and physical learning ("if a child physically feels a concept, his learning of that…

  11. A short survey on protein blocks

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Agarwal, Garima; Mahajan, Swapnil; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Offmann, Bernard; Cadet, Frédéric; Bornot, Aurélie; Tyagi, Manoj; Valadié, Hélène; Schneider, Bohdan; Etchebest, Catherine; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; De Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2010-01-01

    Protein structures are classically described in terms of secondary structures. Even if the regular secondary structures have relevant physical meaning, their recognition from atomic coordinates has some important limitations such as uncertainties in the assignment of boundaries of helical and β-strand regions. Further, on an average about 50% of all residues are assigned to an irregular state, i.e., the coil. Thus different research teams have focused on abstracting conformation of protein backbone in the localized short stretches. Using different geometric measures, local stretches in protein structures are clustered in a chosen number of states. A prototype representative of the local structures in each cluster is generally defined. These libraries of local structures prototypes are named as “structural alphabets”. We have developed a structural alphabet, named Protein Blocks, not only to approximate the protein structure, but also to predict them from sequence. Since its development, we and other teams have explored numerous new research fields using this structural alphabet. We review here some of the most interesting applications. PMID:21731588

  12. Proteins mediating DNA loops effectively block transcription.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Zsuzsanna; Yan, Yan; Kovari, Daniel T; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2017-07-01

    Loops are ubiquitous topological elements formed when proteins simultaneously bind to two noncontiguous DNA sites. While a loop-mediating protein may regulate initiation at a promoter, the presence of the protein at the other site may be an obstacle for RNA polymerases (RNAP) transcribing a different gene. To test whether a DNA loop alters the extent to which a protein blocks transcription, the lac repressor (LacI) was used. The outcome of in vitro transcription along templates containing two LacI operators separated by 400 bp in the presence of LacI concentrations that produced both looped and unlooped molecules was visualized with scanning force microscopy (SFM). An analysis of transcription elongation complexes, moving for 60 s at an average of 10 nt/s on unlooped DNA templates, revealed that they more often surpassed LacI bound to the lower affinity O2 operator than to the highest affinity Os operator. However, this difference was abrogated in looped DNA molecules where LacI became a strong roadblock independently of the affinity of the operator. Recordings of transcription elongation complexes, using magnetic tweezers, confirmed that they halted for several minutes upon encountering a LacI bound to a single operator. The average pause lifetime is compatible with RNAP waiting for LacI dissociation, however, the LacI open conformation visualized in the SFM images also suggests that LacI could straddle RNAP to let it pass. Independently of the mechanism by which RNAP bypasses the LacI roadblock, the data indicate that an obstacle with looped topology more effectively interferes with transcription. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  13. Plasmodesmal Targeting and Accumulation of TMV Movement Protein.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathryn M; Chapman, Sean; Roberts, Alison G

    2007-05-01

    The interaction between tobacco mosaic virus and its host plant cells has been intensively studied as a model for macromolecular trafficking. The observation that GFP-labelled TMV movement protein localises to microtubules led to the suggestion that microtubules are required for the cell to cell movement of the virus. In a recent paper we have demonstrated that the targeting of TMV movement protein to plasmodesmata requires the actin and ER networks, which supports previous evidence from our laboratory that showed that disruption of microtubules did not prevent cell to cell movement of TMV virus, and that a mutated movement protein, which did not localise to micro-tubules, showed enhanced viral movement. In this addendum we speculate where the TMV movement protein accumulates within plasmodesmata, and the relationship of this accumulation to the cell to cell movement of the virus.

  14. A dynamical basis for crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1983-01-01

    The stress field in the earth's crust as inferred from satellite gravity data causes crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe. The satellite-determined stresses in the crust of central Europe are consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms, joint-orientation and in situ stress measurements.

  15. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    PubMed

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  16. Classification of Domain Movements in Proteins Using Dynamic Contact Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: “free”, “open-closed”, “anchored”, “sliding-twist”, and “see-saw.” A directed graph is introduced called the “Dynamic Contact Graph” which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified. PMID:24260562

  17. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  18. Responsive block copolymer photonics triggered by protein-polyelectrolyte coacervation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yin; Tang, Shengchang; Thomas, Edwin L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-11-25

    Ionic interactions between proteins and polyelectrolytes are demonstrated as a method to trigger responsive transitions in block copolymer (BCP) photonic gels containing one neutral hydrophobic block and one cationic hydrophilic block. Poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) blocks in lamellar poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) block copolymer thin films are quaternized with primary bromides to yield swollen gels that show strong reflectivity peaks in the visible range; exposure to aqueous solutions of various proteins alters the swelling ratios of the quaternized P2VP (QP2VP) gel layers in the PS-QP2VP materials due to the ionic interactions between proteins and the polyelectrolyte. Parameters such as charge density, hydrophobicity, and cross-link density of the QP2VP gel layers as well as the charge and size of the proteins play significant roles on the photonic responses of the BCP gels. Differences in the size and pH-dependent charge of proteins provide a basis for fingerprinting proteins based on their temporal and equilibrium photonic response. The results demonstrate that the BCP gels and their photonic effect provide a robust and visually interpretable method to differentiate different proteins.

  19. Vagally induced block and delayed conduction as a mechanism for circus movement tachycardia in frog atria.

    PubMed

    Rosenshtraukh, L V; Zaitsev, A V; Fast, V G; Pertsov, A M; Krinsky, V I

    1989-02-01

    Episodes of tachycardia induced by strong vagal stimulation in spontaneously beating isolated atria of frog (Rana temporaria) were studied with multielectrode mapping technique. These episodes were inducible in 19 of 39 preparations. The arrhythmia started several seconds after cessation of vagal stimulation strong enough to cause sinus arrest, without electrical stimulation of the myocardium. The arrhythmia consisted of two to 20 beats (6 +/- 4, mean +/- SD, n = 42) with a cycle length of 100-500 msec. Recording from 32 sites with spatial resolution of 1-2 mm showed that the arrhythmia was due to intra-atrial circus movement. The estimated perimeter of the reentrant circuit ranged from 6 to 20 mm. In circuits of the minimal size, the average conduction velocity along the circuit was as low as 2-3 cm/sec. Paroxysms of the tachycardia were always preceded by vagally induced nonuniform depression of conduction, with some areas of atria being completely blocked. As the vagal influence decreased, the blocked areas recovered in an inhomogeneous manner, their unblocking being significantly (p less than 0.05) delayed after inhibition of tissue cholinesterase by proserine. The reentrant tachycardia was initiated when a sinus impulse arrived during certain phase of the unblocking. Unlike the well-known mechanism of reentrant excitation, which is based on inhomogeneous refractoriness and critically timed extrabeat(s), the circus movement in our model depended on vagally induced conduction block and could be launched by a single sinus impulse.

  20. Novel protein-protein interaction family proteins involved in chloroplast movement response.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-04-01

    To optimize photosynthetic activity, chloroplasts change their intracellular location in response to ambient light conditions; chloroplasts move toward low intensity light to maximize light capture, and away from high intensity light to avoid photodamage. Although several proteins have been reported to be involved in the chloroplast photorelocation movement response, any physical interaction among them was not found so far. We recently found a physical interaction between two plant-specific coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 (Weak Chloroplast Movement under Blue Light 1) and PMI2 (Plastid Movement Impaired 2), that were identified to regulate chloroplast movement velocity. Since the both coiled-coil regions of WEB1 and PMI2 were classified into an uncharacterized protein family having DUF827 (DUF: Domain of Unknown Function) domain, it was the first report that DUF827 proteins could mediate protein-protein interaction. In this mini-review article, we discuss regarding molecular function of WEB1 and PMI2, and also define a novel protein family composed of WEB1, PMI2 and WEB1/PMI2-like proteins for protein-protein interaction in land plants.

  1. Principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Zheng, Jie; Zanuy, David; Haspel, Nurit; Wolfson, Haim; Alemán, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-07-01

    Currently there is increasing interest in nanostructures and their design. Nanostructure design involves the ability to predictably manipulate the properties of the self-assembly of autonomous units. Autonomous units have preferred conformational states. The units can be synthetic material science-based or derived from functional biological macromolecules. Autonomous biological building blocks with available structures provide an extremely rich and useful resource for design. For proteins, the structural databases contain large libraries of protein molecules and their building blocks with a range of shapes, surfaces, and chemical properties. The introduction of engineered synthetic residues or short peptides into these can expand the available chemical space and enhance the desired properties. Here we focus on the principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

  2. Tight knots in proteins: can they block the mitochondrial pores?

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. In the present article, I briefly review the experimental and numerical studies of tight knots in proteins, with a particular emphasis on the estimates of the size of these knots. Next, I discuss the process of protein translocation through the mitochondrial pores and report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of knotted protein translocation, which show how the knot can indeed block the pore.

  3. Nanopatterning of recombinant proteins and viruses using block copolymer templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur Von Wald

    The study of interfaces is important in understanding biological interactions, including cellular signaling and virus infection. This thesis is an original effort to examine the interaction between a block copolymer and both a protein and a virus. Block copolymers intrinsically form nanometer-scale structures over large areas without expensive processing, making them ideal for the synthesis of the nanopatterned surfaces used in this study. The geometry of these nanostructures can be easily tuned for different applications by altering the block ratio and composition of the block copolymer. Block copolymers can be used for controlled uptake of metal ions, where one block selectively binds metal ions while the other does not. 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid is synthesized through ring-opening metathesis polymerization. It formed spherical domains with spheres approximately 30 nm in diameter, and these spheres were then subsequently loaded with nickel ion. This norbornene block copolymer was tested for its ability to bind histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and it was found that the nickel-loaded copolymer was able to retain hisGFP through chelation between the histidine tag and the metal-containing portions of the copolymer surface. Poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS/P4VP) was also loaded with nickel, forming a cylindrical microstructure. The binding of Tobacco mosaic virus and Tobacco necrosis virus was tested through Tween 20 detergent washes. Electron microscopy allowed for observation of both block copolymer nanostructures and virus particles. Results showed that Tween washes could not remove bound Tobacco mosaic virus from the surface of PS/P4VP. It was also seen that the size and tunability of block copolymers and the lack of processing needed to attain different structures makes them attractive for many applications, including microfluidic devices, surfaces to influence cellular signaling and growth, and as a nanopatterning surface for

  4. Multi-block poloxamer surfactants suppress aggregation of denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Smith, Catherine M; Makinen, Marvin W; Lee, Raphael C

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of elastic light scattering, we have compared the capacity of the multi-block, surfactant copolymers Poloxamer 108 (P108), Poloxamer 188 (P188), and Tetronic 1107 (T1107), of average molecular weight 4700, 8400, and 15,000, respectively, with that of polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight 8000) to suppress aggregation of heat-denatured hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). We also compared the capacity of P188 to that of PEG to suppress aggregation of carboxypeptidase A denatured in the presence of trifluoroethanol and to facilitate recovery of catalytic activity. In contrast to the multi-block copolymers, PEG had no effect in inhibiting aggregation of HEWL or of carboxypeptidase A with the recovery of catalytic activity. At very high polymer:protein ratios (>or=10:1), PEG increased aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL and BSA, consistent with its known properties to promote macromolecular crowding and crystallization of proteins. At a polymer:protein ratio of 2:1, the tetra-block copolymer T1107 was the most effective of the three surfactant copolymers, completely suppressing aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL. At a T1107:BSA ratio of 10:1, the poloxamer suppressed aggregation of heat-denatured BSA by 50% compared to that observed in the absence of the polymer. We showed that the extent of suppression of aggregation of heat-denatured proteins by multi-block surfactant copolymers is dependent on the size of the protein and the copolymer:protein molar ratio. We also concluded that at least one of the tertiary nitrogens in the ethylene-1,2-diamine structural core of the T1107 copolymer is protonated, and that this electrostatic factor underlies its capacity to suppress aggregation of denatured proteins more effectively than nonionic, multi-block poloxamers. These results indicate that amphiphilic, surfactant, multi-block copolymers are efficient as additives to suppress aggregation and to facilitate refolding of denatured

  5. Detection of block movements in ortho-rectified HiRISE images of the north pole of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanara, Lida; Gwinner, Klaus; Hauber, Ernst; Oberst, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    We are working toward automatically identifying new and disintegrated blocks at the foot of the steep north polar scarps of Mars. This region has been closely monitored by High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) over the past 9 years. Repeated imaging revealed that mass movement events are very common at the steep margins of the polar cap. The most frequently observed events are block movements, which originate at the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) or at the Basal Unit (BU). Blocks come to rest intact or after breaking up into smaller fragments. Their original sizes are in the order of a couple of cubic meters. We have manually identified hundreds of single-block movements as well as events involving a large number of blocks and are currently developing a process for detecting these automatically. First we accurately locate the events by ortho-rectifying the images using HiRISE Digital Terrain Models (DTMs). Then we use the resulting co-registered images taken at different times as the basis for change detection, at which stage we focus on retrieving the size and shape of the moved blocks in order to classify them according to specific geometric criteria. These results can be combined with the corresponding DTMs to estimate the volume of the mass movements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379.

  6. A block to pre-prepared movement in gait freezing, relieved by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Pogosyan, Alek; Hyam, Jonathan A; Jenkinson, Ned; Bogdanovic, Marko; Coyne, Terry J; Silburn, Peter A; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Gait freezing and postural instability are disabling features of Parkinsonian disorders, treatable with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Both features are considered deficits of proximal and axial musculature, innervated predominantly by reticulospinal pathways and tend to manifest when gait and posture require adjustment. Adjustments to gait and posture are amenable to pre-preparation and rapid triggered release. Experimentally, such accelerated release can be elicited by loud auditory stimuli--a phenomenon known as 'StartReact'. We observed StartReact in healthy and Parkinsonian controls. However, StartReact was absent in Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing and postural instability. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation restored StartReact proximally and proximal reaction times to loud stimuli correlated with gait and postural disturbance. These findings suggest a relative block to triggered, pre-prepared movement in gait freezing and postural instability, relieved by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

  7. Observations of water movement in a block of fractured welded Tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Thamir, F.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Hampson, D.; Anderton, S.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory water infiltration experiment through a block of fractured, moderately welded volcanic tuff was conducted at different boundary pressures. The block measured 47.5 cm long {times} 54.3 cm wide {times} 80.6 cm high. The purpose of the experiment was: (a) to test an instrumentation scheme for a field test, and (b) to make flow measurements through a fractured network at different boundary pressures to understand mechanisms that affect fracture flow. The upper boundary water pressure was decreased in steps; each step lasted several weeks where the pressure was kept steady. Water inflow and outflow rates were measured for each boundary condition. Entrapped air was found to impede water movement. The gas phase in the fracture network was found to not be continuous; its pressure within the network was not known. The matric potential values could not be measured with tensiometers alone since a known gas pressure is required. Long-term input and output flow rates were equal. Outflow rate did not stabilize during the test period; it continued to decrease, even when the upper boundary water pressure was kept steady. No relation between boundary pressure and flow rate was established. Bacteria, which was found in the outflow, possibly caused variations in the behavior. Trapped air caused the outflow to periodically decrease or stop; however, outflow rates following the interruptions did not change long-term flow trends.

  8. The systemic movement of a tobamovirus is inhibited by a cadmium-ion-induced glycine-rich protein.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shoko; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2002-07-01

    Systemic movement is central to plant viral infection. Exposure of tobacco plants to low levels of cadmium ions blocks the systemic spread of turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV). We identified a tobacco glycine-rich protein, cdiGRP, specifically induced by low concentrations of cadmium and expressed in the cell walls of plant vascular tissues. Constitutive cdiGRP expression inhibited systemic transport of TVCV, whereas suppression of cdiGRP production allowed TVCV movement in the presence of cadmium. cdiGRP exerted its inhibitory effect on TVCV transport by enhancing callose deposits in the vasculature. So cdiGRP may function to control plant viral systemic movement.

  9. Interactions among DIV voltage-sensor movement, fast inactivation, and resurgent Na current induced by the NaVβ4 open-channel blocking peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H.

    2013-01-01

    Resurgent Na current flows as voltage-gated Na channels recover through open states from block by an endogenous open-channel blocking protein, such as the NaVβ4 subunit. The open-channel blocker and fast-inactivation gate apparently compete directly, as slowing the onset of fast inactivation increases resurgent currents by favoring binding of the blocker. Here, we tested whether open-channel block is also sensitive to deployment of the DIV voltage sensor, which facilitates fast inactivation. We expressed NaV1.4 channels in HEK293t cells and assessed block by a free peptide replicating the cytoplasmic tail of NaVβ4 (the “β4 peptide”). Macroscopic fast inactivation was disrupted by mutations of DIS6 (L443C/A444W; “CW” channels), which reduce fast-inactivation gate binding, and/or by the site-3 toxin ATX-II, which interferes with DIV movement. In wild-type channels, the β4 peptide competed poorly with fast inactivation, but block was enhanced by ATX. With the CW mutation, large peptide-induced resurgent currents were present even without ATX, consistent with increased open-channel block upon depolarization and slower deactivation after blocker unbinding upon repolarization. The addition of ATX greatly increased transient current amplitudes and further enlarged resurgent currents, suggesting that pore access by the blocker is actually decreased by full deployment of the DIV voltage sensor. ATX accelerated recovery from block at hyperpolarized potentials, however, suggesting that the peptide unbinds more readily when DIV voltage-sensor deployment is disrupted. These results are consistent with two open states in Na channels, dependent on the DIV voltage-sensor position, which differ in affinity for the blocking protein. PMID:23940261

  10. Compatibility of the movement protein and the coat protein of cucumoviruses is required for cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Katalin; Gellért, Akos; Huppert, Emese; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Balázs, Ervin

    2004-04-01

    For the cell-to-cell movement of cucumoviruses both the movement protein (MP) and the coat protein (CP) are required. These are not reversibly exchangeable between Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Tomato aspermy virus (TAV). The MP of CMV is able to function with the TAV CP (chimera RT), but TAV MP is unable to promote the cell-to-cell movement in the presence of CMV CP (chimera TR). To gain further insight into the non-infectious nature of the TR recombinant, RNA 3 chimeras were constructed with recombinant MPs and CPs. The chimeric MP and one of the CP recombinants were infectious. The other recombinant CP enabled virus movement only after the introduction of two point mutations (Glu-->Lys and Lys-->Arg at aa 62 and 65, respectively). The mutations served to correct the CP surface electrostatic potential that was altered by the recombination. The infectivity of the TR virus on different test plants was restored by replacing the sequence encoding the C-terminal 29 aa of the MP with the corresponding sequence of the CMV MP gene or by exchanging the sequence encoding the C-terminal 15 aa of the CP with the same region of TAV. The analysis of the recombinant clones suggests a requirement for compatibility between the C-terminal 29 aa of the MP and the C-terminal two-thirds of the CP for cell-to-cell movement of cucumoviruses.

  11. Aminoguanidine inhibits protein browning without extensive Amadori carbonyl blocking.

    PubMed

    Requena, J R; Vidal, P; Cabezas-Cerrato, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that aminoguanidine reacts extensively with Amadori carbonyl groups of glycated proteins thus blocking them and inhibiting the further reactions which lead to browning and fluorescence development. We have glycated bovine serum albumin in the presence of 1, 5, 10 and 25 mM aminoguanidine and measured fluorescence development at 440 nm upon excitation at 370 nm, free (unblocked) Amadori groups as fructosamine with a colorimetric assay and furosine by HPLC, as an index of total Amadori products. Aminoguandine significantly inhibited fluorescence development at all the tested concentrations (31%, 65%, 69% and 82% inhibitions, respectively) (P < 0.001). Blocking of Amadori groups was demonstrated by decreased fructosamine and unchanged furosine yields but only at the higher concentrations and to a very limited extent (13% and 27% blocking, respectively) (P < 0.01). Incubation of Aminoguanidine with albumin produced the appearance of 320 nm absorbing yellow chromophores, quite increased in the presence of glucose. These results suggest that Aminoguanidine is able to block Amadori groups, as previously hypothesized, but question the importance of this mechanism as an explanation of its capacity to inhibit browning. Scavenging of glucose seems to have no impact on glycation as seen by unchanged furosine yields.

  12. Nanopatterning of Viruses and Proteins Using Microphase Separated Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresce, Arthur; Lewandowski, Angela; Bentley, William; Kofinas, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Diblock copolymers containing nickel ions have been prepared that are capable of selectively adsorbing histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (hisGFP), and also binding tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). A block copolymer of norbornene and norbornene dicarboxylic acid was synthesized using ring-opening metathesis polymerization. A 400/50 block ratio achieved a spherical microphase-separated morphology with roughly 20 nm diameter dicarboxylic acid spheres. The spherical phase was exposed to nickel ions in solution, templating the formation of nickel nanoparticles. This process gave a nickel-loaded diblock copolymer film whose surface was used to chelate hisGFP. Fluorescence spectroscopy and TEM confirmed the presence of the protein on the polymer surface. A sulfonated triblock copolymer was loaded with nickel ions using a similar solution-doping procedure. The morphology of this copolymer was lamellar, and its sulfonated block was loaded with nickel ions. TEM studies revealed the presence of the virus on the surface of the copolymer and showed that the bond between the TMV and the polymer surface can withstand severe detergent washes.

  13. Protein Conjugation with Amphiphilic Block Copolymers for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Batrakova, Elena; Banks, William A.; Vinogradov, Serguei; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Modification of a model protein, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), with amphiphilic block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (Pluronic), was previously shown to enhance the transport of this protein across the blood—brain barrier in vivo and brain microvessel endothelial cells in vitro. This work develops procedures for synthesis and characterization of HRP with Pluronic copolymers, having different lengths of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) blocks. Four monoamine Pluronic derivatives (L81, P85, L121, P123) were synthesized and successfully conjugated to a model protein, HRP, via biodegradable or nondegradable linkers (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) (DSP), dimethyl 3,3′-dithiobispropionimidate (DTBP), and disuccinimidyl propionate (DSS)). The conjugation was confirmed by HRP amino group titration, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight spectroscopy, and cation-exchange chromatography. HRP conjugates containing an average of one to two Pluronic moieties and retaining in most cases over 70% of the activity were synthesized. Increased cellular uptake of these conjugates was demonstrated using the Mardin-Derby canine kidney cell line and primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells. The optimal modifications included Pluronic L81 and P85. These copolymers have shorter PPO chains compared to Pluronic P123 and L121, which were less efficient. There was little if any dependence of the uptake on the length of the hydrophilic PEO block for the optimal modifications. The proposed modifications may be used to increase cellular uptake of other proteins. PMID:18447367

  14. Evidence of basement-block movement, middle Ordovician shelf sediments, western passive margin, North America

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    Short-lived, basement-block movements initiated sedimentation in the early Middle Ordovician Kanosh basin. The basin was a north-south, elongate, intrashelf structure covering approximately 90,000 km/sup 2/ of Utah and Nevada, and was subdivided into the northern Utah and Ibex subbasins by the east-west-trending Tooele arch. The Kanosh Shale, an organic-rich (TOC less than or equal to 5.6%), graptolitic shale with numerous, thin, interbedded calcarenites, was deposited throughout the basin. Deposition began abruptly and was nearly synchronous, corresponding roughly to the base of macrofossil zone M, early Whiterock stage. The intertidal and shallow, subtidal carbonate sedimentation that preceded the Kanosh Shale continued in area surrounding the basin during Kanosh deposition; abrupt, local subsidence rather than regional sea level rise initiated Kanosh deposition. Basal sands of the lower Swan Peak quartzite and carbonates of the Lehman Formation encroaching on the basin terminated Kanosh deposition. Recurrent uplift of the Tooele arch during the deposition of these two units (middle and late macrofossil zone N, middle Whiterock) caused them to thin markedly over the axis of the arch; this effect is much less noticeable in the underlying Kanosh Shale.

  15. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  16. Turnip vein clearing virus movement protein nuclear activity: Do Tobamovirus movement proteins play a role in immune response suppression?

    PubMed

    Levy, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses' cell-to-cell movement requires the function of virally encoded movement proteins (MPs). The Tobamovirus, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has served as the model virus to study the activities of single MPs. However, since TMV does not infect the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana I have used a related Tobamovirus, Turnip vein-clearing virus (TVCV). I recently showed that, despite belonging to the same genus, the behavior of the 2 viruses MPs differ significantly during infection. Most notably, MP(TVCV), but not MP(TMV), targets the nucleus and induces the formation of F actin-containing filaments that associate with chromatin. Mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MP(TVCV) was necessary for TVCV local and systemic infection in both Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis. In this addendum, I propose possible targets for the MP(TVCV) nuclear activity, and suggest viewing MPs as viral effector-like proteins, playing a role in the inhibition of plant defense.

  17. Fluctuation analysis of motor protein movement and single enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, K; Mitra, P P; Block, S M

    1994-01-01

    We studied fluctuations in the displacement of silica beads driven by single molecules of the motor protein kinesin, moving under low mechanical loads at saturating ATP concentrations. The variance in position was significantly smaller than expected for the case of stepwise movement along a regular lattice of positions with exponentially distributed intervals. The small variance suggests that two or more sequential processes with comparable reaction rates dominate the biochemical cycle. The low value is inconsistent with certain recently proposed thermal ratchet models for motor movement as well as with scenarios where the hydrolysis of a single ATP molecule leads to a cluster of several steps. Fluctuation analysis is a potential powerful tool for studying kinetic behavior whenever the output of a single enzyme can be monitored. PMID:7991536

  18. Similarities in intracellular transport of plant viral movement proteins BMB2 and TGB3.

    PubMed

    Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Lezzhov, Alexander A; Golyshev, Sergey A; Morozov, Sergey Y; Heinlein, Manfred; Solovyev, Andrey G

    2017-09-01

    The cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses through plasmodesmata requires viral movement proteins (MPs) encoded by a 'triple gene block' (TGB) and termed TGB1, TGB2 and TGB3. TGB3 is a small integral membrane protein that contains subcellular targeting signals and directs both TGB2 and the helicase domain-containing TGB1 protein to plasmodesmata-associated structures. Recently, we described a 'binary movement block' (BMB) coding for two MPs, BMB1 and BMB2. The BMB2 protein associates with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, accumulates at plasmodesmata-associated membrane bodies and directs the BMB1 helicase to these structures. TGB3 transport to cell peripheral bodies was previously shown to bypass the secretory pathway and involve a non-conventional mechanism. Here, we provide evidence that the intracellular transport of both poa semilatent virus TGB3 and hibiscus green spot virus BMB2 to plasmodesmata-associated sites can occur via lateral translocation along the ER membranes. Agrobacterium-mediated transient co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves revealed that green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused actin-binding domains of Arabidopsis fimbrin (ABD2-GFP) and mouse talin (TAL-GFP) inhibited the subcellular targeting of TGB3 and BMB2 to plasmodesmata-associated bodies, which resulted in TGB3 and BMB2 accumulation in the cytoplasm in association with aberrant ER structures. Inhibition of COPII budding complex formation by the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of the small GTPase Sar1 had no detectable effect on BMB2 subcellular targeting, which therefore could occur without exit from the ER in COPII transport vesicles. Collectively, the presented data support the current view that plant viral MPs exploit the ER:actin network for their intracellular transport.

  19. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  20. Experimental and bioinformatic evidence that raspberry leaf blotch emaravirus P4 is a movement protein of the 30K superfamily.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chulang; Karlin, David G; Lu, Yuwen; Wright, Kathryn; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2013-09-01

    Emaravirus is a recently described genus of negative-strand RNA plant viruses. Emaravirus P4 protein localizes to plasmodesmata, suggesting that it could be a viral movement protein (MP). In the current study, we showed that the P4 protein of raspberry leaf blotch emaravirus (RLBV) rescued the cell-to-cell movement of a defective potato virus X (PVX) that had a deletion mutation in the triple gene block 1 movement-associated protein. This demonstrated that RLBV P4 is a functional MP. Sequence analyses revealed that P4 is a distant member of the 30K superfamily of MPs. All MPs of this family contain two highly conserved regions predicted to form β-strands, namely β1 and β2. We explored by alanine mutagenesis the role of two residues of P4 (Ile106 and Asp127) located in each of these strands. We also made the equivalent substitutions in the 29K MP of tobacco rattle virus, another member of the 30K superfamily. All substitutions abolished the ability to complement PVX movement, except for the I106A substitution in the β1 region of P4. This region has been shown to mediate membrane association of 30K MPs; our results show that it is possible to make non-conservative substitutions of a well-conserved aliphatic residue within β1 without preventing the membrane association or movement function of P4.

  1. A plant virus movement protein regulates the Gcn2p kinase in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Frederic; Aparicio-Sanchis, Rafael; Gadea, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús Ángel; Pallás, Vicente; Murguía, José Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Virus life cycle heavily depends on their ability to command the host machinery in order to translate their genomes. Animal viruses have been shown to interfere with host translation machinery by expressing viral proteins that either maintain or inhibit eIF2α function by phosphorylation. However, this interference mechanism has not been described for any plant virus yet. Prunnus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is a serious pathogen of cultivated stone fruit trees. The movement protein (MP) of PNRSV is necessary for the cell-to-cell movement of the virus. By using a yeast-based approach we have found that over-expression of the PNRSV MP caused a severe growth defect in yeast cells. cDNA microarrays analysis carried out to characterise at the molecular level the growth interference phenotype reported the induction of genes related to amino acid deprivation suggesting that expression of MP activates the GCN pathway in yeast cells. Accordingly, PNRSV MP triggered activation of the Gcn2p kinase, as judged by increased eIF2α phosphorylation. Activation of Gcn2p by MP expression required a functional Tor1p kinase, since rapamycin treatment alleviated the yeast cell growth defect and blocked eIF2α phosphorylation triggered by MP expression. Overall, these findings uncover a previously uncharacterised function for PNRSV MP viral protein, and point out at Tor1p and Gcn2p kinases as candidate susceptibility factors for plant viral infections.

  2. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for x-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and x-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. In yet another study, use of hanging drop vapour diffusion geometry on the IML-2 shuttle mission showed, again via CCD video monitoring, growing apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) protein crystal executing near cyclic movement, reminiscent of Marangoni convection flow of fluid, the crystals serving as "markers" of the fluid flow. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. Some comment is given on gel protein crystal growth in attempts to 'mimic' the benefits of microgravity on Earth. Finally, the recent new results from our experiments on the shuttle mission LMS are described. These results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to Earth, by reciprocal space mapping at the NSLS, Brookhaven, and full X-ray data collection on LMS and Earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  3. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; Zagalsky, Peter F.; Bi, Ru-Chang; Helliwell, John R.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for x-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and x-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. In yet another study, use of hanging drop vapour diffusion geometry on the IML-2 shuttle mission showed, again via CCD video monitoring, growing apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) protein crystal executing near cyclic movement, reminiscent of Marangoni convection flow of fluid, the crystals serving as "markers" of the fluid flow. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. Some comment is given on gel protein crystal growth in attempts to 'mimic' the benefits of microgravity on Earth. Finally, the recent new results from our experiments on the shuttle mission LMS are described. These results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to Earth, by reciprocal space mapping at the NSLS, Brookhaven, and full X-ray data collection on LMS and Earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  4. Assessing the utility of photoswitchable fluorescent proteins for tracking intercellular protein movement in the Arabidopsis root.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Koizumi, Koji; Macrae-Crerar, Aurora; Gallagher, Kimberly L

    2011-01-01

    One way in which cells communicate is through the direct transfer of proteins. In plants, many of these proteins are transcription factors, which are made by one cell type and traffic into another. In order to understand how this movement occurs and its role in development, we would like to track this movement in live, intact plants in real-time. Here we examine the utility of the photoconvertible proteins, Dendra2 and (to a lesser extent) EosFP as tags for studying intracellular and intercellular protein movement in the Arabidopsis root. To this end, we made fusions between Dendra2 and six mobile transcription factors. Our results show that Dendra2 is an effective tool for studying protein movement between plant cells. Interestingly, we found that Dendra2 could not simply be swapped into existing constructs that had originally contained GFP. Most of the fusions made in this way failed to produce a fluorescent fusion. In addition we found that the optimal settings for photoconversion of Dendra2 in stably transformed roots were different from what has been published for photoconversion in transient assays in plants or in animal cells. By modifying the confocal setting, we were able to photoconvert Dendra2 in all cell layers in the root. However the efficiency of photoconversion was affected by the position of the cell layer within the root, with more internal tissues requiring more energy. By examining the Dendra2 fusions, we confirmed the mobility of the SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and CAPRICE (CPC) transcription factors between cells and we further discovered that SHR movement in stele and CPC movement in the epidermis are non-directional.

  5. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  8. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  9. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... protein block feeding for 3 days. Milk taken from animals during treatment and within 96 hours (8 milkings... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name....

  10. A Family of Plasmodesmal Proteins with Receptor-Like Properties for Plant Viral Movement Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L.; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J.; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement. PMID:20886105

  11. A family of plasmodesmal proteins with receptor-like properties for plant viral movement proteins.

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Boutant, Emmanuel; Hofmann, Christina; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement.

  12. A protein block based fold recognition method for the annotation of twilight zone sequences.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Ganesan, K; Parthasarathy, S

    2013-03-01

    The description of protein backbone was recently improved with a group of structural fragments called Structural Alphabets instead of the regular three states (Helix, Sheet and Coil) secondary structure description. Protein Blocks is one of the Structural Alphabets used to describe each and every region of protein backbone including the coil. According to de Brevern (2000) the Protein Blocks has 16 structural fragments and each one has 5 residues in length. Protein Blocks fragments are highly informative among the available Structural Alphabets and it has been used for many applications. Here, we present a protein fold recognition method based on Protein Blocks for the annotation of twilight zone sequences. In our method, we align the predicted Protein Blocks of a query amino acid sequence with a library of assigned Protein Blocks of 953 known folds using the local pair-wise alignment. The alignment results with z-value ≥ 2.5 and P-value ≤ 0.08 are predicted as possible folds. Our method is able to recognize the possible folds for nearly 35.5% of the twilight zone sequences with their predicted Protein Block sequence obtained by pb_prediction, which is available at Protein Block Export server.

  13. Remorin, a Solanaceae Protein Resident in Membrane Rafts and Plasmodesmata, Impairs Potato virus X Movement[W

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Lafarge, David; Cluzet, Stéphanie; German Retana, Sylvie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Lherminier, Jeannine; Noirot, Elodie; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Moreau, Patrick; Ott, Thomas; Maule, Andrew J.; Reymond, Philippe; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Farmer, Edward E.; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Remorins (REMs) are proteins of unknown function specific to vascular plants. We have used imaging and biochemical approaches and in situ labeling to demonstrate that REM clusters at plasmodesmata and in ∼70-nm membrane domains, similar to lipid rafts, in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. From a manipulation of REM levels in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that Potato virus X (PVX) movement is inversely related to REM accumulation. We show that REM can interact physically with the movement protein TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 from PVX. Based on the localization of REM and its impact on virus macromolecular trafficking, we discuss the potential for lipid rafts to act as functional components in plasmodesmata and the plasma membrane. PMID:19470590

  14. Offline Optimization of the Relative Timing of Movements in a Sequence Is Blocked by Retroactive Behavioral Interference

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jason; Korman, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of motor skills often involves the concatenation of single movements into sequences. Along the course of learning, sequential performance becomes progressively faster and smoother, presumably by optimization of both motor planning and motor execution. Following its encoding during training, “how-to” memory undergoes consolidation, reflecting transformations in performance and its neurobiological underpinnings over time. This offline post-training memory process is characterized by two phenomena: reduced sensitivity to interference and the emergence of delayed, typically overnight, gains in performance. Here, using a training protocol that effectively induces motor sequence memory consolidation, we tested temporal and kinematic parameters of performance within (online) and between (offline) sessions, and their sensitivity to retroactive interference. One group learned a given finger-to-thumb opposition sequence (FOS), and showed robust delayed (consolidation) gains in the number of correct sequences performed at 24 h. A second group learned an additional (interference) FOS shortly after the first and did not show delayed gains. Reduction of touch times and inter-movement intervals significantly contributed to the overall offline improvement of performance overnight. However, only the offline inter-movement interval shortening was selectively blocked by the interference experience. Velocity and amplitude, comprising movement time, also significantly changed across the consolidation period but were interference –insensitive. Moreover, they paradoxically canceled out each other. Current results suggest that shifts in the representation of the trained sequence are subserved by multiple processes: from distinct changes in kinematic characteristics of individual finger movements to high-level, temporal reorganization of the movements as a unit. Each of these processes has a distinct time course and a specific susceptibility to retroactive interference

  15. Cell-mediated immune response to unrelated proteins and unspecific inflammation blocked by orally tolerated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gustavo C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Azevedo, Geraldo M; Pinho, Vanessa; Carvalho, Cláudia R; Vaz, Nelson M

    2009-03-01

    Oral tolerance promotes a generalized decrease in specific immune responsiveness to proteins previously encountered via the oral route. In addition, parenteral immunization with a tolerated protein also triggers a significant reduction in the primary responsiveness to a second unrelated antigen. This is generally explained by 'innocent bystander suppression', suggesting that the transient and episodic effects of inhibitory cytokines released by contact with the tolerated antigen would block responses to the second antigen. In disagreement with this view, we have previously shown that: (i) these inhibitory effects do not require concomitance or contiguity of the injections of the two proteins; (ii) that intravenous or intragastric exposures to the tolerated antigen are not inhibitory; and (iii) that the inhibitory effect, once triggered, persists in the absence of further contact with the tolerated protein, possibly by inhibition of secondary responsiveness (immunological memory). The present work confirms that immunological memory of the second unrelated antigen is hindered by exposure to the tolerated antigen and, in addition, shows that this exposure: (i) inhibits the inflammation triggered by an unrelated antigen through the double effect of inhibiting production of leucocytes in the bone marrow and blocking their migration to inflammed sites; and (ii) significantly blocks footpaw swelling triggered by carrageenan. Taken together, these results conclusively demonstrate that inhibitory effects of parenteral injection of tolerated antigens are much more general than suggested by the 'innocent bystander suppression' hypothesis.

  16. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynda S.

    This document summarizes 20 articles and books which stress the importance of movement in the overall development of the human species. Each summary ranges in length from 100 to 200 words and often includes direct quotations. A wide range of movement activities suitable for people of all ages (from infants to adults) are discussed. Many summaries…

  17. Control of Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein fate by CELL-DIVISION-CYCLE protein48.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Amari, Khalid; Gereige, Dalya; Brandner, Katrin; Mély, Yves; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-12-01

    Like many other viruses, Tobacco mosaic virus replicates in association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and exploits this membrane network for intercellular spread through plasmodesmata (PD), a process depending on virus-encoded movement protein (MP). The movement process involves interactions of MP with the ER and the cytoskeleton as well as its targeting to PD. Later in the infection cycle, the MP further accumulates and localizes to ER-associated inclusions, the viral factories, and along microtubules before it is finally degraded. Although these patterns of MP accumulation have been described in great detail, the underlying mechanisms that control MP fate and function during infection are not known. Here, we identify CELL-DIVISION-CYCLE protein48 (CDC48), a conserved chaperone controlling protein fate in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and animal cells by extracting protein substrates from membranes or complexes, as a cellular factor regulating MP accumulation patterns in plant cells. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDC48 is induced upon infection, interacts with MP in ER inclusions dependent on the MP N terminus, and promotes degradation of the protein. We further provide evidence that CDC48 extracts MP from ER inclusions to the cytosol, where it subsequently accumulates on and stabilizes microtubules. We show that virus movement is impaired upon overexpression of CDC48, suggesting that CDC48 further functions in controlling virus movement by removal of MP from the ER transport pathway and by promoting interference of MP with microtubule dynamics. CDC48 acts also in response to other proteins expressed in the ER, thus suggesting a general role of CDC48 in ER membrane maintenance upon ER stress.

  18. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  19. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  20. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  1. Bromovirus movement protein genes play a crucial role in host specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Mise, K; Allison, R F; Janda, M; Ahlquist, P

    1993-01-01

    Monocot-adapted brome mosaic virus (BMV) and dicot-adapted cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) are closely related bromoviruses with tripartite RNA genomes. Although RNAs 1 and 2 together are sufficient for RNA replication in protoplasts, systemic infection also requires RNA3, which encodes the coat protein and the nonstructural 3a movement protein. We have previously shown with bromoviral reassortants that host specificity determinants in both viruses are encoded by RNA3 as well as by RNA1 and/or RNA2. Here, to test their possible role in host specificity, the 3a movement protein genes were precisely exchanged between BMV and CCMV. The hybrid viruses, but not 3a deletion mutants, systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana, a permissive host for both parental viruses. The hybrids thus retain basic competence for replication, packaging, cell-to-cell spread, and long-distance (vascular) spread. However, the hybrids failed to systemically infect either barley or cowpea, selective hosts for parental viruses. Thus, the 3a gene and/or its encoded 3a protein contributes to host specificity of both monocot- and dicot-adapted bromoviruses. Tests of inoculated cowpea leaves showed that the spread of the CCMV hybrid containing the BMV 3a gene was blocked at a very early stage of infection. Moreover, the BMV hybrid containing the CCMV 3a gene appeared to spread farther than wt BMV in inoculated cowpea leaves. Several pseudorevertants directing systemic infection in cowpea leaves were obtained from plants inoculated with the CCMV(BMV 3a) hybrid, suggesting that the number of mutations required to adapt the hybrid to dicots is small. Images PMID:7682628

  2. The cognate coat protein is required for cell-to-cell movement of a chimeric brome mosaic virus mediated by the cucumber mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Nagano, H; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1999-12-20

    Cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) and brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV) have many similarities, including the three-dimensional structure of virions, genome organizations, and requirement of the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. We have shown that a chimeric BMV with the CMV 3a movement protein (MP) gene instead of its own cannot move from cell to cell in Chenopodium quinoa, a common permissive host for both BMV and CMV. Another chimeric BMV was constructed by replacing both MP and CP genes of BMV with those of CMV (MP/CP-chimera) and tested for its infectivity in C. quinoa, to determine whether the CMV CP has some functions required for the CMV MP-mediated cell-to-cell movement and to exhibit functional difference between CPs of BMV and CMV. Cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera occurred, and small local lesions were induced on the inoculated leaves. A frameshift mutation introduced in the CMV CP gene of the MP/CP-chimera resulted in a lack of cell-to-cell movement of the chimeric virus. These results indicate that the viral movement mediated by the CMV MP requires its cognate CP. Deletion of the amino-terminal region in CMV CP, which is not obligatory for CMV movement, also abolished cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera. This may suggest some differences in cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera and CMV. On the other hand, the sole replacement of BMV CP gene with that of CMV abolished viral cell-to-cell movement, suggesting a possibility that the viral movement mediated by the BMV MP may also require its cognate CP. Functional compatibility between MP and CP in viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Cell-to-cell movement of Potato virus X: the role of p12 and p8 encoded by the second and third open reading frames of the triple gene block.

    PubMed

    Tamai, A; Meshi, T

    2001-10-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) requires three proteins, p25, p12, and p8, encoded by the triple gene block plus the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. When each of these proteins was co-expressed with a cytosolic green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana by the microprojectile bombardment-mediated gene delivery method, only p12 enhanced diffusion of co-expressed GFP, indicating an ability to alter plasmodesmal permeability. p25, p12, and CP, expressed transiently in the initially infected cells, transcomplemented the corresponding movement-defective mutants to spread through two or more cell boundaries. Thus, these proteins probably move from cell to cell with the genomic RNA. In contrast, p8 only functioned intracellularly and was not absolutely required for cell-to-cell movement. Since overexpression of p12 overcame the p8 deficiency, p8 appears to facilitate the functioning of p12, presumably by mediating its intracellular trafficking. Considering the likelihood that p12 and p8 are membrane proteins, it is suggested that intercellular as well as intracellular movement of PVX involves a membrane-mediated process.

  4. Effects of brefeldin A on the localization of Tobamovirus movement protein and cell-to-cell movement of the virus.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Yuko; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2007-04-25

    It has been demonstrated that the subcellular location of Tobamovirus movement protein (MP) which was fused with green fluorescent protein (MP:GFP) changed during the infection process. However, the intracellular route through which MP is transported and its biological meaning are still obscure. Treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), which disrupts ER-to-Golgi transport, inhibited the formation of irregularly shaped and filamentous structures of MP. In this condition, MP was still targeted to plasmodesmata in leaf cells. Furthermore, the viral cell-to-cell movement was not inhibited by BFA treatment. These data indicated that the targeting of viral replication complexes (VRCs) to plasmodesmata is mediated by a BFA-insensitive pathway and that the ER-to-Golgi transport pathway is not involved in viral intercellular movement.

  5. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials.

  6. The nature of protein interactions governing globular protein-polymer block copolymer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christopher N; Kim, Minkyu; Thomas, Carla S; Chang, Dongsook; Sanoja, Gabriel E; Okwara, Chimdimma U; Olsen, Bradley D

    2014-04-14

    The effects of protein surface potential on the self-assembly of protein-polymer block copolymers are investigated in globular proteins with controlled shape through two approaches: comparison of self-assembly of mCherry-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) bioconjugates with structurally homologous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-PNIPAM bioconjugates, and mutants of mCherry with altered electrostatic patchiness. Despite large changes in amino acid sequence, the temperature-concentration phase diagrams of EGFP-PNIPAM and mCherry-PNIPAM conjugates have similar phase transition concentrations. Both materials form identical phases at two different coil fractions below the PNIPAM thermal transition temperature and in the bulk. However, at temperatures above the thermoresponsive transition, mCherry conjugates form hexagonal phases at high concentrations while EGFP conjugates form a disordered micellar phase. At lower concentration, mCherry shows a two-phase region while EGFP forms homogeneous disordered micellar structures, reflecting the effect of changes in micellar stability. Conjugates of four mCherry variants with changes to their electrostatic surface patchiness also showed minimal change in phase behavior, suggesting that surface patchiness has only a small effect on the self-assembly process. Measurements of protein/polymer miscibility, second virial coefficients, and zeta potential show that these coarse-grained interactions are similar between mCherry and EGFP, indicating that coarse-grained interactions largely capture the relevant physics for soluble, monomeric globular protein-polymer conjugate self-assembly.

  7. Replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes have limited stability in vitro.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Guy, Colin P

    2008-08-29

    There are many barriers that replication forks must overcome in order to duplicate a genome in vivo. These barriers include damage to the template DNA and proteins bound to this template. If replication is halted by such a block, then the block must be either removed or bypassed for replication to continue. If continuation of replication employs the original fork, avoiding the need to reload the replication apparatus, then the blocked replisome must retain functionality. In vivo studies of Escherichia coli replication forks suggest that replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes retain the ability to resume replication upon removal of the block for several hours. Here we tested the functional stability of replication forks reconstituted in vitro and blocked by lac repressor-operator complexes. Once a fork comes to a halt at such a block, it cannot continue subsequently to translocate through the block until addition of IPTG induces repressor dissociation. However, the ability to resume replication is retained only for 4-6 min regardless of the topological state of the template DNA. Comparison of our in vitro data with previous in vivo data suggests that either accessory factors that stabilise blocked forks are present in vivo or the apparent stability of blocked forks in vivo is due to continual reloading of the replication apparatus at the site of the block.

  8. Adaptivity via mesh movement with three-dimensional block-structured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Catherall, D.

    1996-12-31

    The method described here is one in which grid nodes are redistributed so that they are attracted towards regions of high solution activity. The major difficulty in attempting this arises from the degree of grid smoothness and orthogonality required by the flow solver. These requirements are met by suitable choice of grid equations, to be satisfied by the adapted grid, and by the inclusion of certain source terms, for added control in regions where grid movement is limited by the local geometry. The method has been coded for multiblock grids, so that complex configurations may be treated. It is demonstrated here for inviscid supercritical flow with two test cases: an ONERA M6 wing with a rounded tip, and a forward-swept wing/fuselage configuration (M151).

  9. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-05-11

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for cp-actin filament accumulation. However, other factors involved in cp-actin filament regulation during chloroplast movement remain to be determined. Here, we report that two kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, are essential for chloroplasts to move and anchor to the plasma membrane. A kac1 mutant showed severely impaired chloroplast accumulation and slow avoidance movement. A kac1kac2 double mutant completely lacked chloroplast photorelocation movement and showed detachment of chloroplasts from the plasma membrane. KAC motor domains are similar to those of the kinesin-14 subfamily (such as Ncd and Kar3) but do not have detectable microtubule-binding activity. The C-terminal domain of KAC1 could interact with F-actin in vitro. Instead of regulating microtubules, KAC proteins mediate chloroplast movement via cp-actin filaments. We conclude that plants have evolved a unique mechanism to regulate actin-based organelle movement using kinesin-like proteins.

  10. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  11. Engineering building blocks for self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Like natural viruses, manmade protein cages for drug delivery are to be ideally formed by repetitive subunits with self-assembling properties, mimicking viral functions and molecular organization. Naturally formed nanostructures (such as viruses, flagella or simpler protein oligomers) can be engineered to acquire specific traits of interest in biomedicine, for instance through the addition of cell targeting agents for desired biodistribution and specific delivery of associated drugs. However, fully artificial constructs would be highly desirable regarding finest tuning and adaptation to precise therapeutic purposes. Although engineering of protein assembling is still in its infancy, arising principles and promising strategies of protein manipulation point out the rational construction of nanoscale protein cages as a feasible concept, reachable through conventional recombinant DNA technologies and microbial protein production. PMID:21192790

  12. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer–phospholipid hybrid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness. PMID:27547605

  13. Reconstitution of the membrane protein OmpF into biomimetic block copolymer-phospholipid hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bieligmeyer, Matthias; Artukovic, Franjo; Nussberger, Stephan; Hirth, Thomas; Schiestel, Thomas; Müller, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Structure and function of many transmembrane proteins are affected by their environment. In this respect, reconstitution of a membrane protein into a biomimetic polymer membrane can alter its function. To overcome this problem we used membranes formed by poly(1,4-isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) block copolymers blended with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. By reconstituting the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli into these membranes, we demonstrate functionality of this protein in biomimetic lipopolymer membranes, independent of the molecular weight of the block copolymers. At low voltages, the channel conductance of OmpF in 1 M KCl was around 2.3 nS. In line with these experiments, integration of OmpF was also revealed by impedance spectroscopy. Our results indicate that blending synthetic polymer membranes with phospholipids allows for the reconstitution of transmembrane proteins under preservation of protein function, independent of the membrane thickness.

  14. Effects of movement protein mutations on the formation of tubules in plant protoplasts expressing a fusion between the green fluorescent protein and Cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Han, Y; Howell, S H

    2001-08-01

    Fusions between the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) movement protein (MP) induce the formation of fluorescent foci and surface tubules in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Tubules elongate coordinately and progressively in an assembly process approximately 6 to 12 h following transfection of protoplasts with GFP-MP constructs. Tubules are not formed in protoplasts transfected by GFP-MP(ER2A), a MP mutation that renders CaMV noninfectious. A small number of short tubules are formed on protoplasts transfected by GFP-MP(N6) and GFP-MP(N13), two second-site revertants of ER2A that partially restore infectivity. Protoplasts cotransfected with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-MP(WT) and GFP-MP(ER2A) form tubules containing both MP fusions, indicating that although the GFP-MP(ER2A) cannot induce tubule formation, GFP-MP(ER2A) can coassemble or colocalize with CFP-MP(WT) in tubules. Thus, CaMV MP-induced tubule formation in protoplasts correlates closely with the infectivity of mutation ER2A and its revertants, suggesting that tubule-forming capacity in plant protoplasts reflects a process required for virus infection or movement.

  15. Loss of BiP/GRP78 function blocks translocation of secretory proteins in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    BiP/GRP78 is an essential member of the HSP70 family that resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, BiP/GRP78 is encoded by the KAR2 gene. A temperature sensitive mutation was isolated in KAR2 and found to cause a rapid block in protein secretion. Secretory precursors of a number of proteins (invertase, carboxypeptidase Y, alpha-factor, and BiP) accumulated that were characteristic of a block in translocation into the lumen of the ER. Protease protection experiments confirmed that the precursors accumulated on the cytoplasmic side of the ER membrane. Moreover, depletion of wild-type KAR2 protein also resulted in a block in translocation of secretory proteins. These results implicate BiP/GRP78 function in the continued translocation of proteins into the lumen of the ER. PMID:2190988

  16. "Graft-to" Protein/Polymer Conjugates Using Polynorbornene Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Isarov, Sergey A; Lee, Parker W; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2016-02-08

    A series of water-soluble polynorbornene block copolymers prepared via Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) were grafted to proteins to form ROMP-derived bioconjugates. ROMP afforded low-dispersity polymers and allowed for strict control over polymer molecular weight and architecture. The polymers consisted of a large block of PEGylated monoester norbornene and were capped with a short block of norbornene dicarboxylic anhydride. This cap served as a reactive linker that facilitated attachment of the polymer to lysine residues under mildly alkaline conditions. The generality of this approach was shown by synthesizing multivalent polynorbornene-modified viral nanoparticles derived from bacteriophage Qβ, a protein nanoparticle used extensively for nanomedicine. The conjugated nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity to NIH 3T3 murine fibroblast cells. These findings establish protein bioconjugation with functionalized polynorbornenes as an effective alternative to conventional protein/polymer modification strategies and further expand the toolbox for protein bioconjugates.

  17. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein functions as a structural microtubule-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jamie; Boutant, Emmanuel; Seemanpillai, Mark; Groner, Anna; Sambade, Adrian; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-09-01

    The cell-to-cell spread of Tobacco mosaic virus infection depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), which is believed to form a ribonucleoprotein complex with viral RNA (vRNA) and to participate in the intercellular spread of infectious particles through plasmodesmata. Previous studies in our laboratory have provided evidence that the vRNA movement process is correlated with the ability of the MP to interact with microtubules, although the exact role of this interaction during infection is not known. Here, we have used a variety of in vivo and in vitro assays to determine that the MP functions as a genuine microtubule-associated protein that binds microtubules directly and modulates microtubule stability. We demonstrate that, unlike MP in whole-cell extract, microtubule-associated MP is not ubiquitinated, which strongly argues against the hypothesis that microtubules target the MP for degradation. In addition, we found that MP interferes with kinesin motor activity in vitro, suggesting that microtubule-associated MP may interfere with kinesin-driven transport processes during infection.

  18. Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Functions as a Structural Microtubule-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Jamie; Boutant, Emmanuel; Seemanpillai, Mark; Sambade, Adrian; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The cell-to-cell spread of Tobacco mosaic virus infection depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), which is believed to form a ribonucleoprotein complex with viral RNA (vRNA) and to participate in the intercellular spread of infectious particles through plasmodesmata. Previous studies in our laboratory have provided evidence that the vRNA movement process is correlated with the ability of the MP to interact with microtubules, although the exact role of this interaction during infection is not known. Here, we have used a variety of in vivo and in vitro assays to determine that the MP functions as a genuine microtubule-associated protein that binds microtubules directly and modulates microtubule stability. We demonstrate that, unlike MP in whole-cell extract, microtubule-associated MP is not ubiquitinated, which strongly argues against the hypothesis that microtubules target the MP for degradation. In addition, we found that MP interferes with kinesin motor activity in vitro, suggesting that microtubule-associated MP may interfere with kinesin-driven transport processes during infection. PMID:16912284

  19. Amphiphilic block copolymer-based photonic platform towards efficient protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Afroditi; Gibson, Thomas J.; Themistou, Efrosyni; Pispas, Stergios; Riziotis, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The development of a low complexity fiber optic based protein sensor by functionalizing the surface of silica optical fibers using block copolymers having both hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and hydrophilic poly[2- (dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) blocks is presented here. The amphiphilic thiol-functionalized PMMA117-b-P(DMAEMA17-st-TEMA2) and vinyl-sulfone PMMA117-b-P(DMAEMA17-st-VSTEMA2) block copolymers designed and synthesized in this work contain a cationic hydrophilic PDMAEMA block that can electrostatically bind selected oppositely charged proteins and also appropriate functional groups for reversible or non-reversible protein binding, respectively, leading to a refractive index change of the overlayer and hence, enabling the sensing. The developed PMMA117-b-PDMAEMA16-based platform has been evaluated for bovine serum albumin (BSA) sensing, exhibiting linear response to detected BSA concentrations.

  20. Morbillivirus V Proteins Exhibit Multiple Mechanisms to Block Type 1 and Type 2 Interferon Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chinnakannan, Senthil K.; Nanda, Sambit K.; Baron, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Morbilliviruses form a closely related group of pathogenic viruses which encode three non-structural proteins V, W and C in their P gene. Previous studies with rinderpest virus (RPV) and measles virus (MeV) have demonstrated that these non-structural proteins play a crucial role in blocking type I (IFNα/β) and type II (IFNγ) interferon action, and various mechanisms have been proposed for these effects. We have directly compared four important morbilliviruses, rinderpest (RPV), measles virus (MeV), peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and canine distemper virus (CDV). These viruses and their V proteins could all block type I IFN action. However, the viruses and their V proteins had varying abilities to block type II IFN action. The ability to block type II IFN-induced gene transcription correlated with co-precipitation of STAT1 with the respective V protein, but there was no correlation between co-precipitation of either STAT1 or STAT2 and the abilities of the V proteins to block type I IFN-induced gene transcription or the creation of the antiviral state. Further study revealed that the V proteins of RPV, MeV, PPRV and CDV could all interfere with phosphorylation of the interferon-receptor-associated kinase Tyk2, and the V protein of highly virulent RPV could also block the phosphorylation of another such kinase, Jak1. Co-precipitation studies showed that morbillivirus V proteins all form a complex containing Tyk2 and Jak1. This study highlights the ability of morbillivirus V proteins to target multiple components of the IFN signalling pathways to control both type I and type II IFN action. PMID:23431397

  1. The design and characterization of protein based block polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghpanah, Jennifer Shorah

    Over the past decades, protein engineering has provided noteworthy advances in basic science as well as in medicine and industry. Protein engineers are currently focusing their efforts on developing elementary rules to design proteins with a specific structure and function. Proteins derived from natural sources have been used generate a plethora of materials with remarkable structural and functional properties. In the first chapter, we show how we can fabricate protein polymers comprised of two different self-assembling domains (SADs). From our studies, we discover that SADs in different orientations have a large impact on their overall microscopic and macroscopic features. In the second chapter, we explore the impact of cellulose (Tc) on the diblocks EC and CE. We discover that Tc is able to selectively impact the mechanical propertied of CE because CE has smaller particle sizes and more E domain exposed on its surface at RT. In the third chapter, we appended an extra C domain to CE to generate CEC with improved mechanical properties, structure and small molecule recognition.

  2. Tardive Syndromes are Rarely Reversible after Discontinuing Dopamine Receptor Blocking Agents: Experience from a University-based Movement Disorder Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Deepti; Cloud, Leslie J.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have examined reversibility of tardive syndromes (TS), primarily in psychotic patients who are maintained on dopamine receptor blocking drugs. The results have varied widely. However, few have assessed remission rates after discontinuing the offending agents. This study evaluated reversibility of TS in patients who permanently withdrew the causative agent(s). We also examined for any possible clinical predictors of reversibility. Methods A retrospective cohort of 108 TS patients was studied. Most of the patients were not psychotic; most patients were being treated either for a mood disorder with atypical antipsychotics or for a gastrointestinal disturbance with metoclopramide. Patients were stratified on the basis of reversibility, and statistical tests were used for subgroup comparisons of relevant clinical variables. Logistic regression was undertaken to identify clinical variables predictive of reversibility. Results Only 13% of the cohort experienced reversibility of the TS, 2% without medical intervention. When stratified by reversibility, there were no significant differences in any study variables between subgroups. None of the study variables predicted reversibility in the logistic regression. Discussion Our study demonstrated a low remission rate for TS in a cohort of psychiatric and non-psychiatric patients seen in a movement disorder clinic after the offending agents were completely withdrawn. Such a finding has significant prognostic implications. It is possible that limitations of the retrospective design may have resulted in an underestimation. There is a clear need for prospective, multicenter, clinical trials in populations that can be safely withdrawn from dopamine receptor blocking agents so that true remission rates can be measured. PMID:25374768

  3. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  4. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  5. Identification of Ourmiavirus 30K movement protein amino acid residues involved in symptomatology, viral movement, subcellular localization and tubule formation.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Paolo; Anderson, Charles T; Turina, Massimo; Rosa, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Several plant viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) classified in the 30K superfamily. Despite a great functional diversity, alignment analysis of MP sequences belonging to the 30K superfamily revealed the presence of a central core region, including amino acids potentially critical for MP structure and functionality. We performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) MP, and studied the effects of amino acid substitutions on MP properties and virus infection. We identified five OuMV mutants that were impaired in systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana, and two mutants showing necrosis and pronounced mosaic symptoms, respectively, in N. benthamiana. Green fluorescent protein fusion constructs (GFP:MP) of movement-defective MP alleles failed to localize in distinct foci at the cell wall, whereas a GFP fusion with wild-type MP (GFP:MPwt) mainly co-localized with plasmodesmata and accumulated at the periphery of epidermal cells. The movement-defective mutants also failed to produce tubular protrusions in protoplasts isolated from infected leaves, suggesting a link between tubule formation and the ability of OuMV to move. In addition to providing data to support the importance of specific amino acids for OuMV MP functionality, we predict that these conserved residues might be critical for the correct folding and/or function of the MP of other viral species in the 30K superfamily. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Proteins as Supramolecular Building Blocks for Responsive Materials and Nanodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-20

    the New Zealand government, which has incorporated the proteins and peptides designed in this programme into useful materials and devices. 1. REPORT...successfully completed. In addition to the work funded by this programme, significant synergies were gained with a parallel programme funded by the New ...published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support from the start of the project to

  7. Bromovirus movement protein conditions for the host specificity of virus movement through the vascular system and affects pathogenicity in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Fujita, M; Mise, K; Kobori, T; Osaki, T; Furusawa, I

    2000-11-01

    Previously, we reported that CCMV(B3a), a hybrid of bromovirus Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) with the 3a cell-to-cell movement protein (MP) gene replaced by that of cowpea-nonadapted bromovirus Brome mosaic virus (BMV), can form small infection foci in inoculated cowpea leaves, but that expansion of the foci stops between 1 and 2 days postinoculation. To determine whether the lack of systemic movement of CCMV(B3a) is due to restriction of local spread at specific leaf tissue interfaces, we conducted more detailed analyses of infection in inoculated leaves. Tissue-printing and leaf press-blotting analyses revealed that CCMV(B3a) was confined to the inoculated cowpea leaves and exhibited constrained movement into leaf veins. Immunocytochemical analyses to examine the infected cell types in inoculated leaves indicated that CCMV(B3a) was able to reach the bundle sheath cells through the mesophyll cells and successfully infected the phloem cells of 50% of the examined veins. Thus, these data demonstrate that the lack of long-distance movement of CCMV(B3a) is not due to an inability to reach the vasculature, but results from failure of the virus to move through the vascular system of cowpea plants. Further, a previously identified 3a coding change (A776C), which is required for CCMV(B3a) systemic infection of cowpea plants, suppressed formation of reddish spots, mediated faster spread of infection, and enabled the virus to move into the veins of inoculated cowpea leaves. From these data, and the fact that CCMV(B3a) directs systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana, a permissive systemic host for both BMV and CCMV, we conclude that the bromovirus 3a MP engages in multiple activities that contribute substantially to host-specific long-distance movement through the phloem.

  8. An ent-kaurene that inhibits mitotic chromosome movement and binds the kinetochore protein ran-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Natalie T; Nelson, Jim; Flory, Mark R; Joseph, Jomon; Th'ng, John; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dasso, Mary; Andersen, Raymond J; Roberge, Michel

    2006-08-22

    Using a chemical genetics screen, we have identified ent-15-oxokaurenoic acid (EKA) as a chemical that causes prolonged mitotic arrest at a stage resembling prometaphase. EKA inhibits the association of the mitotic motor protein centromeric protein E with kinetochores and inhibits chromosome movement. Unlike most antimitotic agents, EKA does not inhibit the polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin. To identify EKA-interacting proteins, we used a cell-permeable biotinylated form that retains biological activity to isolate binding proteins from living cells. Mass spectrometric analysis identified six EKA-binding proteins, including Ran-binding protein 2, a kinetochore protein whose depletion by small interfering RNA causes a similar mitotic arrest phenotype.

  9. Fluorescent protein recruitment assay for demonstration and analysis of in vivo protein interactions in plant cells and its application to Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Emmanuel; Didier, Pascal; Niehl, Annette; Mély, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2010-04-01

    We describe a simple fluorescent protein-based method to investigate interactions with a viral movement protein in living cells that relies on the in vivo re-localization of proteins in the presence of their interaction partners. We apply this method in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to demonstrate that a domain of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) previously predicted to mediate protein:protein interactions is dispensable for these contacts. We suggest that this method can be generalized for analysis of other protein interactions in planta.

  10. Fast glycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid protein as predictors of sensory block in anesthesia with subarachnoid Ropivacaine.

    PubMed

    Collini, S; Troisi, F; Pacella, F; Merlin, P; De Sio, S; Pacella, E

    2016-01-01

    Identify if glycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid protein could influence the time of sensory block to T10, the duration and the metameric block's level, after a standard dose of Ropivacaine. 80 patients, ASA I - III undergoing to transurethral prostate resection with spinal anesthesia in a prospected open study were recruited. A 0.2 ml liquor's sample was taken; glycorrhachia, by glycemic stix and CSF protein, by urinary stix, were got, before Ropivacaine 0.5% 15 mg injection (0.10 - 0.15 mlsec). After anti-trendelemburg, with 30 ° tilting for 15 min, the onset of sensory block to T10, the maximum metameric level to 15' and the time of sensory block were reported. The data collection were analyzed using the software language R. A significant correlation liquor specific weigh preoperative glycemia (0.749), liquoral specific weigh glycorrhachia (rho = 0.751; R2 = 0.564; P 0.05) and specific weigh CSF protein (rho = 0.684; R2 = 0.468; P 0.05) were reported. Inverse relation CSF weightsensory block level (rho -0.789, P 0.05, R2 0.621) was evidenced. Inverse relation onset time to T10 glycorrhachia (84%) and cephalic block glycorrhachia (76%) were found. Inverse correlation onset time to T 10 CSF protein and cephalic block proteinorrachia was respectively 84% and 67%. A rho of 0.712 with R2 of 51% BMI onset to T10 and rho of 0.681 with R2 of 51% BMI maximum cephalic block with P 0.05 were reported. The predictability of a iso-hypobaric local anesthetic could reduce the risk of procedure failure and adverse events by further cephalic spread.

  11. Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Interacts with Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Microtubule End-Binding Protein 11[W

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, Katrin; Sambade, Adrian; Boutant, Emmanuel; Didier, Pascal; Mély, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    The targeting of the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus to plasmodesmata involves the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network and does not require an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Nevertheless, the ability of MP to facilitate the cell-to-cell spread of infection is tightly correlated with interactions of the protein with microtubules, indicating that the microtubule system is involved in the transport of viral RNA. While the MP acts like a microtubule-associated protein able to stabilize microtubules during late infection stages, the protein was also shown to cause the inactivation of the centrosome upon expression in mammalian cells, thus suggesting that MP may interact with factors involved in microtubule attachment, nucleation, or polymerization. To further investigate the interactions of MP with the microtubule system in planta, we expressed the MP in the presence of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused microtubule end-binding protein 1a (EB1a) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtEB1a:GFP). The two proteins colocalize and interact in vivo as well as in vitro and exhibit mutual functional interference. These findings suggest that MP interacts with EB1 and that this interaction may play a role in the associations of MP with the microtubule system during infection. PMID:18408045

  12. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein interacts with green fluorescent protein-tagged microtubule end-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Katrin; Sambade, Adrian; Boutant, Emmanuel; Didier, Pascal; Mély, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-06-01

    The targeting of the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus to plasmodesmata involves the actin/endoplasmic reticulum network and does not require an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Nevertheless, the ability of MP to facilitate the cell-to-cell spread of infection is tightly correlated with interactions of the protein with microtubules, indicating that the microtubule system is involved in the transport of viral RNA. While the MP acts like a microtubule-associated protein able to stabilize microtubules during late infection stages, the protein was also shown to cause the inactivation of the centrosome upon expression in mammalian cells, thus suggesting that MP may interact with factors involved in microtubule attachment, nucleation, or polymerization. To further investigate the interactions of MP with the microtubule system in planta, we expressed the MP in the presence of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused microtubule end-binding protein 1a (EB1a) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtEB1a:GFP). The two proteins colocalize and interact in vivo as well as in vitro and exhibit mutual functional interference. These findings suggest that MP interacts with EB1 and that this interaction may play a role in the associations of MP with the microtubule system during infection.

  13. The movement of proteins across the insect and tick digestive system.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Laura A; Michael Roe, R

    2008-02-01

    The movement of intact proteins across the digestive system was shown in a number of different blood-feeding and non-blood-feeding insects in the orders Blattaria, Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera, Orthoptera, Neuroptera and Siphonaptera, as well as in two tick families Ixodidae and Argasidae. Protein movement was observed for both normal dietary and xenobiotic proteins, which suggest that the mechanism for transfer is not substrate specific. The number of studies on the mechanism of movement is limited. The research so far suggests that movement can occur by either a transcellular or an intercellular pathway in the ventriculus with most of the research describing the former. Transfer is by continuous diffusion with no evidence of pinocytosis or vesicular transport common in mammalian systems. Proteins can move across the digestive system without modification of their primary or multimeric structure and with retention of their functional characteristics. Accumulation in the hemolymph is the result of the protein degradation rate in the gut and hemolymph and transfer rate across the digestive system and can be highly variable depending on species. Research on the development of delivery systems to enhance protein movement across the insect digestive system is in its infancy. The approaches so far considered with some success include the use of lipophilic-polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, the development of fusion proteins with lectins, reduced gut protease activity and the development of amphiphilic peptidic analogs. Additional research on understanding the basic mechanisms of protein delivery across the insect digestive system, the importance of structure activity in this transfer and the development of technology to improve movement across the gut could be highly significant to the future of protein and nucleic acid-based insecticide development as well as traditional chemical insecticidal technologies.

  14. A plant-specific protein essential for blue-light-induced chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Luesse, Darron L; Hangarter, Roger P

    2005-09-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), light-dependent chloroplast movements are induced by blue light. When exposed to low fluence rates of light, chloroplasts accumulate in periclinal layers perpendicular to the direction of light, presumably to optimize light absorption by exposing more chloroplast area to the light. Under high light conditions, chloroplasts become positioned parallel to the incoming light in a response that can reduce exposure to light intensities that may damage the photosynthetic machinery. To identify components of the pathway downstream of the photoreceptors that mediate chloroplast movements (i.e. phototropins), we conducted a mutant screen that has led to the isolation of several Arabidopsis mutants displaying altered chloroplast movements. The plastid movement impaired1 (pmi1) mutant exhibits severely attenuated chloroplast movements under all tested fluence rates of light, suggesting that it is a necessary component for both the low- and high-light-dependant chloroplast movement responses. Analysis of pmi1 leaf cross sections revealed that regardless of the light condition, chloroplasts are more evenly distributed in leaf mesophyll cells than in the wild type. The pmi1-1 mutant was found to contain a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of At1g42550. This gene encodes a plant-specific protein of unknown function that appears to be conserved among angiosperms. Sequence analysis of the protein suggests that it may be involved in calcium-mediated signal transduction, possibly through protein-protein interactions.

  15. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  16. A Plant-Specific Protein Essential for Blue-Light-Induced Chloroplast Movements1

    PubMed Central

    DeBlasio, Stacy L.; Luesse, Darron L.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2005-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), light-dependent chloroplast movements are induced by blue light. When exposed to low fluence rates of light, chloroplasts accumulate in periclinal layers perpendicular to the direction of light, presumably to optimize light absorption by exposing more chloroplast area to the light. Under high light conditions, chloroplasts become positioned parallel to the incoming light in a response that can reduce exposure to light intensities that may damage the photosynthetic machinery. To identify components of the pathway downstream of the photoreceptors that mediate chloroplast movements (i.e. phototropins), we conducted a mutant screen that has led to the isolation of several Arabidopsis mutants displaying altered chloroplast movements. The plastid movement impaired1 (pmi1) mutant exhibits severely attenuated chloroplast movements under all tested fluence rates of light, suggesting that it is a necessary component for both the low- and high-light-dependant chloroplast movement responses. Analysis of pmi1 leaf cross sections revealed that regardless of the light condition, chloroplasts are more evenly distributed in leaf mesophyll cells than in the wild type. The pmi1-1 mutant was found to contain a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of At1g42550. This gene encodes a plant-specific protein of unknown function that appears to be conserved among angiosperms. Sequence analysis of the protein suggests that it may be involved in calcium-mediated signal transduction, possibly through protein–protein interactions. PMID:16113226

  17. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for X-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The methods of protein crystal growth are under increasing study whereby different methods are being compared via diagnostic monitoring including Charge Coupled Device (CCD) video and interferometry. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and X-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. Choice of a liquid-liquid linear crystal growth geometry and microgravity can yield a spatial stability of growing crystals and fluid, as seen in protein crystallization experiments on the unmanned platform EURICA. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. The results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to earth, by rocking curve experiments and full X-ray data collection on LMS and earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  18. Protein Crystal Movements and Fluid Flows During Microgravity Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, Titus J.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Snell, Edward H.; Dong, Jun; Lautenschlager, Peter; Potthast, Lothar; Siddons, D. Peter; Stojanoff, Vivian; Gordon, Elspeth; Thompson, Andrew W.; Zagalsky, Peter F.; Bi, Ru-Chang; Helliwell, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The growth of protein crystals suitable for X-ray crystal structure analysis is an important topic. The methods of protein crystal growth are under increasing study whereby different methods are being compared via diagnostic monitoring including Charge Coupled Device (CCD) video and interferometry. The quality (perfection) of protein crystals is now being evaluated by mosaicity analysis (rocking curves) and X-ray topographic images as well as the diffraction resolution limit and overall data quality. Choice of a liquid-liquid linear crystal growth geometry and microgravity can yield a spatial stability of growing crystals and fluid, as seen in protein crystallization experiments on the unmanned platform EURICA. A review is given here of existing results and experience over several microgravity missions. The results include CCD video as well as interferometry during the mission, followed, on return to earth, by rocking curve experiments and full X-ray data collection on LMS and earth control lysozyme crystals. Diffraction data recorded from LMS and ground control apocrustacyanin C(sub 1) crystals are also described.

  19. Low-Temperature Processable Block Copolymers That Preserve the Function of Blended Proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kyohei; Tanaka, Shinya; Taniguchi, Ikuo

    2016-07-11

    Low-temperature processable polymers have attracted increasing interest as ecological materials because of their reduced energy consumption during processing and suitability for making composites with heat-sensitive biomolecules at ambient temperature. In the current study, low-temperature processable biodegradable block copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide (LLA) using polyphosphoester as a macroinitiator. The polymer films could be processed under a hydraulic pressure of 35 MPa. The block copolymer films swelled in water because the polyphosphoester block was partially hydrated. Interestingly, the swelling ratio of the films changed with temperature. The pressure-induced order-to-disorder transition of the block copolymers was characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering; a crystallinity reduction in the block copolymers was observed after application of pressure. The crystallinity of the block copolymers was recovered after removing the applied pressure. The Young's modulus of the block copolymer films increased as the LLA unit content increased. Moreover, the modulus did not change after multiple processing cycles and the recyclability of the block copolymers was also confirmed. Finally, polymer films with embedded proteinase K as a model protein were prepared. The activity of catalase loaded into the polymer films was evaluated after processing at different temperatures. The activity of catalase was preserved when the polymer films were processed at room temperature but was significantly reduced after high-temperature processing. The suitability of low-temperature processable biodegradable polymers for making biofunctional composites without reducing protein activity was clarified. These materials will be useful for biomedical and therapeutic applications.

  20. Designed, Helical Protein Nanotubes with Variable Diameters from a Single Building Block.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Jeffrey D; Smith, Sarah J; Carr, Jessica R; Tezcan, F Akif

    2015-08-26

    Due to their structural and mechanical properties, 1D helical protein assemblies represent highly attractive design targets for biomolecular engineering and protein design. Here we present a designed, tetrameric protein building block, Zn8R4, which assembles via Zn coordination interactions into a series of crystalline, helical nanotubes whose widths can be controlled by solution conditions. X-ray crystallography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements indicate that all classes of protein nanotubes are constructed through the same 2D arrangement of Zn8R4 tetramers held together by Zn coordination. The mechanical properties of these nanotubes are correlated with their widths. All Zn8R4 nanotubes are found to be highly flexible despite possessing crystalline order, owing to their minimal interbuilding-block interactions mediated solely by metal coordination.

  1. Solution Self-Assembly of Globular Protein-Polymer Conjugate Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Controlling the nanostructured self-assembly of globular proteins and enzymes can significantly advance the applications of soft materials as catalysts, sensors, and medical materials. However, the incorporation of globular proteins as one block in the block copolymer introduces changes in chain shape, chain entropy, and specific interactions that significantly impact the thermodynamics of self-assembly. Here, we explore the self-assembly of model globular protein-polymer block copolymers in concentrated solutions to form nanostructured materials. A phase diagram as a function of concentration and temperature for a model material mCherry-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is asymmetric, showing hexagonal cylinders for coil fractions less than 0.5 and a lamellar ordering for coil fractions greater than 0.5, divided by a narrow region of hexagonally perforated lamellae. Order-order transitions as a function of temperature are driven by the thermoresponsive desolvation of PNIPAM. Surprisingly, the materials exhibit reentrant order-disorder transition behavior, such that the conjugate block copolymers are disordered at both low and high concentrations but well-ordered at intermediate concentrations. Changing the polymer chemistry to monomers with different types of hydrogen bonding results in significant changes in the self-assembly, including the observation of a cubic phase that shows the same scattering pattern as the gyroid phase observed in traditional block copolymers. The choice of polymer also has a strong impact on the order-disorder transition concentration, demonstrating that the polymer-protein interaction plays a significant role in governing self-assembly in solution. Consistent with this effect, the order-disorder transition concentration is minimized in symmetric conjugates. Changing the protein from mCherry to myoglobin results in a reduction in ordering, suggesting that the regularity of the protein shape is important. This research was supported by

  2. Cell-to-cell movement of potato virus X involves distinct functions of the coat protein.

    PubMed

    Fedorkin, O; Solovyev, A; Yelina, N; Zamyatnin, A; Zinovkin, R; Mäkinen, K; Schiemann, J; Yu Morozov, S

    2001-02-01

    Complementation of movement-deficient potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP) mutants, namely PVX.CP-Xho lacking the 18 C-terminal amino acid residues and PVX.DeltaCP lacking the entire CP gene, was studied by transient co-expression with heterologous proteins. These data demonstrated that the potyvirus CPs and both the major and minor CPs of beet yellows closterovirus could complement cell-to-cell movement of PVX.CP-Xho but not PVX.DeltaCP. These data also indicated that the C-terminally truncated PVX CP lacked a movement function which could be provided in trans by the CPs of other filamentous viruses, whereas another movement determinant specified by some region outside the most C-terminal part of the PVX CP could not be complemented either by potyvirus or closterovirus CPs. Surprisingly, the CP of spherical cocksfoot mottle sobemovirus rescued all of the PVX CP movement functions, complementing the spread of PVX.CP-Xho and, to a lesser extent, PVX.DeltaCP. Both these mutants were also rescued by the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP). To shed light on the movement function of PVX CP, attempts were made to complement PVX.CP-Xho by a series of TMV MP mutants. An internal deletion abolished complementation, suggesting that the internal region of TMV MP, which includes a number of overlapping functional domains important for cell-to-cell transport, provides an activity complementing movement determinant(s) specified by the C-terminal region of PVX CP.

  3. Role of cucumovirus capsid protein in long-distance movement within the infected plant.

    PubMed Central

    Taliansky, M E; García-Arenal, F

    1995-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a host-specific role of the cucumovirus capsid protein in long-distance movement within infected plants. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a systemic host for cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV). Tomato aspermy cucumovirus, strain 1 (1-TAV), multiplied to the levels of CMV (i.e., replicated, moved from cell to cell, and formed infectious particles) in the inoculated leaves of cucumbers but was completely unable to spread systemically. The defective long-distance systemic movement of 1-TAV was complemented by CMV in mixed infections. Coinfection of cucumbers with 1-TAV RNA with various combinations of transcripts from full-length cDNA clones of CMV genomic RNA 1, RNA2, and RNA3 showed that CMV RNA3 alone complemented 1-TAV long-distance movement. We obtained mutants containing mutations in the two open reading frames in CMV RNA3 encoding the 3a protein and the capsid protein (CP), both of which are necessary for cell-to-cell movement of CMV. Complementation experiments with mutant CMV RNA3 showed that only 3a protein mutants, i.e., those with an intact CP, complemented the long-distance movement of 1-TAV in cucumbers. Since CMV and TAV have common systemic host plants, the results presented here are strong evidence for an active, host-specific function of the CPs of these two cucumoviruses for long-distance spread in the phloem. The results also suggest that the plasmodesmata in the vascular system and/or at the boundary between the mesophyll and the vascular system, involved in long-distance movement through the phloem, and those in the mesophyll, involved in cell-to-cell movement, differ functionally. PMID:7815560

  4. Stability and movement of mRNAs and their encoded proteins in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The stability and movement of several polyadenylated (poly A+) and nonpolyadenylated (poly A-) mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes have been examined. At least 50% of the poly A+ mRNA molecules (9S rabbit globin mRNA, chicken ovalbumin, and lysozyme) were stable in oocytes over a 48- h period, irrespective of the amount injected. About 50% of injected poly A- reovirus mRNAs was degraded within the first 24 h of injection, irrespective of the amount injected, although no further degradation was observed over an additional 24 h. The movement of all poly A+ mRNAs injected at either the animal or vegetal pole of the oocyte was very slow. Little movement of RNA from the animal half to the vegetal half was observed even 48 h after injection. In contrast, similar amounts of mRNA were present in both halves 48 h after vegetal pole injection. Similar results were obtained after injection of poly A- reovirus mRNAs. The movement of the proteins encoded by the poly A+ mRNAs was studied in the 6-h period after injection when little mRNA movement had occurred. 85% of the globin synthesized accumulated in the animal half irrespective of injection site. The movement of the sequestered secretory proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme in the same oocytes as globin was much slower; very little lysozyme appeared in the half of the oocyte opposite the site of injection. PMID:2858488

  5. Antibodies to plant-produced Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage protein Pfs25 exhibit transmission blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Farrance, Christine E; Chichester, Jessica A; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Shamloul, Moneim; Rhee, Amy; Manceva, Slobodanka D; Jones, R Mark; Mamedov, Tarlan; Sharma, Satish; Mett, Vadim; Streatfield, Stephen J; Roeffen, Will; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Sauerwein, Robert W; Wu, Yimin; Muratova, Olga; Miller, Louis; Duffy, Patrick; Sinden, Robert; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal mosquito-borne disease caused by a protozoan parasite. Each year, it is estimated that over one million people are killed by malaria, yet the disease is preventable and treatable. Developing vaccines against the parasite is a critical component in the fight against malaria and these vaccines can target different stages of the pathogen's life cycle. We are targeting sexual stage proteins of P. falciparum which are found on the surface of the parasite reproductive cells present in the mosquito gut. Antibodies against these proteins block the progression of the parasite's life cycle in the mosquito, and thus block transmission to the next human host. Transmission blocking vaccines are essential to the malaria eradication program to ease the disease burden at the population level. We have successfully produced multiple versions of the Pfs25 antigen in a plant virus-based transient expression system and have evaluated these vaccine candidates in an animal model. The targets are expressed in plants at a high level, are soluble and most importantly, generate strong transmission blocking activity as determined by a standard membrane feeding assay. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expressing Plasmodium antigens in a plant-based system for the economic production of a transmission blocking vaccine against malaria.

  6. Production in Pichia pastoris of protein-based polymers with small heterodimer-forming blocks.

    PubMed

    Domeradzka, Natalia E; Werten, Marc W T; de Vries, Renko; de Wolf, Frits A

    2016-05-01

    Some combinations of leucine zipper peptides are capable of forming α-helical heterodimeric coiled coils with very high affinity. These can be used as physical cross-linkers in the design of protein-based polymers that form supramolecular structures, for example hydrogels, upon mixing solutions containing the complementary blocks. Such two-component physical networks are of interest for many applications in biomedicine, pharmaceutics, and diagnostics. This article describes the efficient secretory production of A and B type leucine zipper peptides fused to protein-based polymers in Pichia pastoris. By adjusting the fermentation conditions, we were able to significantly reduce undesirable proteolytic degradation. The formation of A-B heterodimers in mixtures of the purified products was confirmed by size exclusion chromatography. Our results demonstrate that protein-based polymers incorporating functional heterodimer-forming blocks can be produced with P. pastoris in sufficient quantities for use in future supramolecular self-assembly studies and in various applications.

  7. Are block nets necessary? Movement of stream-dwelling salmonids in response to three common survey methods

    Treesearch

    James T. Peterson; Nolan P. Banish; Russell F. Thurow

    2005-01-01

    Fish movement during sampling may negatively bias sample data and population estimates. We evaluated the short-term movements of stream-dwelling salmonids by recapture of marked individuals during day and night snorkeling and backpack electrofishing. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were...

  8. Identification of Bacterial Target Proteins for the Salicylidene Acylhydrazide Class of Virulence-blocking Compounds*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dai; Zetterström, Caroline E.; Gabrielsen, Mads; Beckham, Katherine S. H.; Tree, Jai J.; Macdonald, Sarah E.; Byron, Olwyn; Mitchell, Tim J.; Gally, David L.; Herzyk, Pawel; Mahajan, Arvind; Uvell, Hanna; Burchmore, Richard; Smith, Brian O.; Elofsson, Mikael; Roe, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    A class of anti-virulence compounds, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been widely reported to block the function of the type three secretion system of several Gram-negative pathogens by a previously unknown mechanism. In this work we provide the first identification of bacterial proteins that are targeted by this group of compounds. We provide evidence that their mode of action is likely to result from a synergistic effect arising from a perturbation of the function of several conserved proteins. We also examine the contribution of selected target proteins to the pathogenicity of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and to expression of virulence genes in Escherichia coli O157. PMID:21724850

  9. TYLCV-Is movement in planta does not require V2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hak, Hagit; Levy, Yael; Chandran, Sam A.; Belausov, Eduard; Loyter, Abraham; Lapidot, Moshe; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen causing extensive crop losses, is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus. V2 mutants of TYLCV-Is and related viruses tend to induce symptomless infection with attenuated viral DNA levels, while accumulating close to wild-type DNA levels in protoplasts, suggesting V2 as a movement protein. The discovery of plant-silencing mechanisms and viral silencing suppressors, V2 included, led us to reconsider V2's involvement in viral movement. We studied two mutant versions of the virus, one impaired in V2 silencing-suppression activity, and another carrying a non-translatable V2. While both mutant viruses spread in the infected plant to newly emerged leaves at the same rate as the wild-type virus, their DNA-accumulation levels were tenfold lower than in the wild-type virus. Thus, we suggest that the setback in virus proliferation, previously ascribed to a movement impediment, is due to lack of silencing-suppression activity. - Highlights: • TYLCV-Is V2 protein is localized in distinct microbodies throughout the cell cytoplasm, around the nucleus and in association with cytoplasmic strands but is not associated with the plasmodesmata. • Disruption of RNA-silencing suppression activity of TYLCV-Is V2 protein causes low titer of the virus in the infected plants. • The movement of TYLCV-Is in planta does not require a functional V2 protein.

  10. Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptoms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Absence of a reliable reverse genetics system for Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has impeded direct demonstration of gene function. We previously used a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movement in the absen...

  11. Cytorhabdovirus P3 genes encode 30K-like cell-to-cell movement proteins.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krin S; Bejerman, Nicolas; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. In this study, using trans-complementation of a movement-defective turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) replicon, we show for the first time for cytorhabdoviruses (lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) and alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV)) that their P3 proteins function as MP similar to the TVCV P30 protein. All three MP localized to plasmodesmata when ectopically expressed. In addition, we show that these MP belong to the 30K superfamily since movement was inhibited by mutation of an aspartic acid residue in the critical 30K-specific LxD/N50-70G motif. We also report that Nicotiana benthamiana microtubule-associated VOZ1-like transcriptional activator interacts with LNYV P3 and TVCV P30 but not with ADV P3 or any of the MP point mutants. This host protein, which is known to interact with P3 of sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus, may be involved in aiding the cell-to-cell movement of LNYV and TVCV.

  12. Human rhinovirus 16 causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation without blocking protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Mousnier, Aurelie; Swieboda, Dawid; Pinto, Anaïs; Guedán, Anabel; Rogers, Andrew V; Walton, Ross; Johnston, Sebastian L; Solari, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The replication of picornaviruses has been described to cause fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus that blocks the secretory pathway. The inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation and cytokine, chemokine and interferon secretion may have important implications for host defense. Previous studies have shown that disruption of the secretory pathway can be replicated by expression of individual nonstructural proteins; however the situation with different serotypes of human rhinovirus (HRV) is unclear. The expression of 3A protein from HRV14 or HRV2 did not cause Golgi apparatus disruption or a block in secretion, whereas other studies showed that infection of cells with HRV1A did cause Golgi apparatus disruption which was replicated by the expression of 3A. HRV16 is the serotype most widely used in clinical HRV challenge studies; consequently, to address the issue of Golgi apparatus disruption for HRV16, we have systematically and quantitatively examined the effect of HRV16 on both Golgi apparatus fragmentation and protein secretion in HeLa cells. First, we expressed each individual nonstructural protein and examined their cellular localization and their disruption of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus architecture. We quantified their effects on the secretory pathway by measuring secretion of the reporter protein Gaussia luciferase. Finally, we examined the same outcomes following infection of cells with live virus. We demonstrate that expression of HRV16 3A and 3AB and, to a lesser extent, 2B caused dispersal of the Golgi structure, and these three nonstructural proteins also inhibited protein secretion. The infection of cells with HRV16 also caused significant Golgi apparatus dispersal; however, this did not result in the inhibition of protein secretion. Importance: The ability of replicating picornaviruses to influence the function of the secretory pathway has important implications for host defense. However, there appear to be

  13. Cellular Targets of Functional and Dysfunctional Mutants of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Fused to Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vitaly; van der Laak, Jessica; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Suslova, Elena; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Heinlein, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Intercellular transport of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA involves the accumulation of virus-encoded movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (Pd), in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived inclusion bodies, and on microtubules. The functional significance of these interactions in viral RNA (vRNA) movement was tested in planta and in protoplasts with TMV derivatives expressing N- and C-terminal deletion mutants of MP fused to the green fluorescent protein. Deletion of 55 amino acids from the C terminus of MP did not interfere with the vRNA transport function of MP:GFP but abolished its accumulation in inclusion bodies, indicating that accumulation of MP at these ER-derived sites is not a requirement for function in vRNA intercellular movement. Deletion of 66 amino acids from the C terminus of MP inactivated the protein, and viral infection occurred only upon complementation in plants transgenic for MP. The functional deficiency of the mutant protein correlated with its inability to associate with microtubules and, independently, with its absence from Pd at the leading edge of infection. Inactivation of MP by N-terminal deletions was correlated with the inability of the protein to target Pd throughout the infection site, whereas its associations with microtubules and inclusion bodies were unaffected. The observations support a role of MP-interacting microtubules in TMV RNA movement and indicate that MP targets microtubules and Pd by independent mechanisms. Moreover, accumulation of MP in Pd late in infection is insufficient to support viral movement, confirming that intercellular transport of vRNA relies on the presence of MP in Pd at the leading edge of infection. PMID:11070034

  14. A movement protein and three capsid proteins are all necessary for the cell-to-cell movement of apple latent spherical cheravirus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, N; Okada, K; Asamuma, K; Watanabe, K; Igarasi, A; Li, C; Isogai, M

    2006-05-01

    Immunoblot analysis of apple latent spherical cheravirus (ALSV)-infected leaves using a polyclonal antibody against the 21 C-terminal amino acids of a 53 K/42 K movement protein (MP) showed that a protein with an Mr of 42 kDa (42KP) is the dominant form found in vivo, which could indicate that the second AUG is used as an initiation codon of a ORF in RNA2. Co-expression of GFP with 42KP in tobacco epidermal cells showed that 42KP is able to facilitate cell-to-cell trafficking of GFP that is expressed in the same cells. The analysis of deletion mutants on each of MP, Vp24, Vp20, or Vp25 using an ALSV vector that stably expresses GFP indicated that an MP and three capsid proteins are all indispensable for the cell-to-cell movement of the virus. In ultrathin sections of infected leaves, a file of virus-like particles passing through the plasmodesmata connecting neighboring cells and tubular structures containing virus-like particles extending into the cytoplasm were observed. These results show that ALSV moves from cell to cell as virus particles.

  15. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  16. Transport of TMV movement protein particles associated with the targeting of RNA to plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Sambade, Adrian; Brandner, Katrin; Hofmann, Christina; Seemanpillai, Mark; Mutterer, Jerome; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-12-01

    The cell-to-cell movement of Tobacco mosaic virus through plasmodesmata (PD) requires virus-encoded movement protein (MP). The MP targets PD through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/actin network, whereas the intercellular movement of the viral RNA genome has been correlated with the association of the MP with mobile, microtubule-proximal particles in cells at the leading front of infection as well as the accumulation of the protein on the microtubule network during later infection stages. To understand how the associations of MP with ER and microtubules are functionally connected, we applied multiple marker three-dimensional confocal and time-lapse video microscopies to Nicotiana benthamiana cells expressing fluorescent MP, fluorescent RNA and fluorescent cellular markers. We report the reconstitution of MP-dependent RNA transport to PD in a transient assay. We show that transiently expressed MP occurs in association with small particles as observed during infection. The same MP accumulates in PD and mediates the transport of its messenger RNA transcript to the pore. In the cellular cortex, the particles occur at microtubule-proximal sites and can undergo ER-associated and latrunculin-sensitive movements between such sites. These and other observations suggest that the microtubule network performs anchorage and release functions for controlling the assembly and intracellular movement of MP-containing RNA transport particles in association with the ER.

  17. Structure-based ligand design for flexible proteins: Application of new F-DycoBlock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Fan, Hao; Liu, Haiyan; Shi, Yunyu

    2001-11-01

    A method of structure-based ligand design - DycoBlock - has been proposed and tested by Liu et al.[1]. It was further improved by Zhu et al. and applied to design new selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase 2 [2]. In the current work, we present a new methodology - F-DycoBlock that allows for the incorporation of receptor flexibility. During the designing procedure, both the receptor and molecular building blocks are subjected to the multiple-copy stochastic molecular dynamics (MCSMD) simulation [1], while the protein moves in the mean field of all copies. It is tested for two enzymes studied previously - cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) protease. To identify the applicability of F-DycoBlock, the binding protein structure was used as starting point to explore the conformational space around the bound state. This method can be easily extended to accommodate the flexibility in different degree. Four types of treatment of the receptor flexibility - all-atom restrained, backbone restrained, intramolecular hydrogen-bond restrained and active-site flexible - were tested with or without the grid approximation. Two inhibitors, SC-558 for COX-2 and L700417 for HIV-1 protease, are used in this testing study for comparison with previous results. The accuracy of recovery, binding energy, solvent accessible surface area (SASA) and positional root-mean-square (RMS) deviation are used as criteria. The results indicate that F-DycoBlock is a robust methodology for flexible drug design. It is particularly notable that the protein flexibility has been perfectly associated with each stage of drug design - search for the binding sites, dynamic assembly and optimization of candidate compounds. When all protein atoms were restrained, F-DycoBlock yielded higher accuracy of recovery than DycoBlock (100%). If backbone atoms were restrained, the same ratio of accuracy was achieved. Moreover, with the intramolecular hydrogen bonds restrained, reasonable

  18. Repeat protein engineering: creating functional nanostructures/biomaterials from modular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Main, Ewan R G; Phillips, Jonathan J; Millership, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    There is enormous interest in molecular self-assembly and the development of biological systems to form smart nanostructures for biotechnology (so-called 'bottom-up fabrications'). Repeat proteins are ideal choices for development of such systems as they: (i) possess a relatively simple relationship between sequence, structure and function; (ii) are modular and non-globular in structure; (iii) act as diverse scaffolds for the mediation of a diverse range of protein-protein interactions; and (iv) have been extensively studied and successfully engineered and designed. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the use of engineered repeat proteins in the self-assembly of novel materials, nanostructures and biosensors. In particular, we show that repeat proteins are excellent monomeric programmable building blocks that can be triggered to associate into a range of morphologies and can readily be engineered as stimuli-responsive biofunctional materials.

  19. Insulin/poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) Complexes: Physicochemical Properties and Protein Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Kalinova, Radostina; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-04

    Insulin (INS) was encapsulated into complexes with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLys), which is a polypeptide-based block copolymer (a neutral-cationic block polyelectrolyte). The particular cationic-neutral block copolymer can complex INS molecules in aqueous media via electrostatic interactions. Light-scattering techniques are used to study the complexation process and structure of the hybrid nanoparticles in a series of buffers, as a function of protein concentration. The physicochemical and structural characteristics of the complexes depend on the ionic strength of the aqueous medium, while the concentration of PEG-b-PLys was constant through the series of solutions. As INS concentration increased the size distribution of the complexes decreased, especially at the highest ionic strength. The size/structure of complexes diluted in biological medium indicated that the copolymer imparts stealth properties and colloidal and biological stability to the complexes, features that could in turn affect the clearance properties in vivo. Therefore, these studies could be a rational roadmap for designing the optimum complexes/effective nanocarriers for proteins and peptides.

  20. Control of Protein Affinity of Bioactive Nanocellulose and Passivation Using Engineered Block and Random Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Vuoriluoto, Maija; Orelma, Hannes; Zhu, Baolei; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-03-02

    We passivated TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF) toward human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) by modification with block and random copolymers of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA). The block copolymers reversibly adsorbed on TOCNF and were highly effective in preventing nonspecific interactions with hIgG, especially if short PDMAEMA blocks were used. In such cases, total protein rejection was achieved. This is in contrast to typical blocking agents, which performed poorly. When an anti-human IgG biointerface was installed onto the passivated TOCNF, remarkably high affinity antibody-antigen interactions were observed (0.90 ± 0.09 mg/m(2)). This is in contrast to the nonpassivated biointerface, which resulted in a significant false response. In addition, regeneration of the biointerface was possible by low pH aqueous wash. Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus was also utilized to successfully increase the sensitivity for human IgG recognition (1.28 ± 0.11 mg/m(2)). Overall, the developed system based on TOCNF modified with multifunctional polymers can be easily deployed as bioactive material with minimum fouling and excellent selectivity.

  1. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  2. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  3. Control of Tobacco mosaic virus Movement Protein Fate by CELL-DIVISION-CYCLE Protein481[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Amari, Khalid; Gereige, Dalya; Brandner, Katrin; Mély, Yves; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Like many other viruses, Tobacco mosaic virus replicates in association with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and exploits this membrane network for intercellular spread through plasmodesmata (PD), a process depending on virus-encoded movement protein (MP). The movement process involves interactions of MP with the ER and the cytoskeleton as well as its targeting to PD. Later in the infection cycle, the MP further accumulates and localizes to ER-associated inclusions, the viral factories, and along microtubules before it is finally degraded. Although these patterns of MP accumulation have been described in great detail, the underlying mechanisms that control MP fate and function during infection are not known. Here, we identify CELL-DIVISION-CYCLE protein48 (CDC48), a conserved chaperone controlling protein fate in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and animal cells by extracting protein substrates from membranes or complexes, as a cellular factor regulating MP accumulation patterns in plant cells. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDC48 is induced upon infection, interacts with MP in ER inclusions dependent on the MP N terminus, and promotes degradation of the protein. We further provide evidence that CDC48 extracts MP from ER inclusions to the cytosol, where it subsequently accumulates on and stabilizes microtubules. We show that virus movement is impaired upon overexpression of CDC48, suggesting that CDC48 further functions in controlling virus movement by removal of MP from the ER transport pathway and by promoting interference of MP with microtubule dynamics. CDC48 acts also in response to other proteins expressed in the ER, thus suggesting a general role of CDC48 in ER membrane maintenance upon ER stress. PMID:23027663

  4. Protein-mediated transbilayer movement of lipids in eukaryotes and prokaryotes: the relevance of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Tannert, Astrid; Pohl, Antje; Pomorski, Thomas; Herrmann, Andreas

    2003-09-01

    Lipid distribution across cellular membranes is regulated by specific membrane proteins controlling transbilayer movement of lipids. Flippases facilitate flip-flop of lipids and allow them to equilibrate between the two membrane leaflets independent of ATP. Distinct P-Type-ATPases transport specific lipids unidirectionally across the membrane at the expense of ATP. A group of ATP-dependent lipid transporters, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, was identified in studies originally related to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Meanwhile, lipid transport activity has been shown for full and half size ABC proteins in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This activity may not only modify the organisation of lipids in membranes, but could also be of significant consequence for cell homeostasis. The various types of lipid movement mediating proteins and their cellular localisation in eukaryotes and prokaryotes are reviewed.

  5. The Tobacco mosaic virus Movement Protein Associates with but Does Not Integrate into Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Ana; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Tamborero, Silvia; Pallás, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant positive-strand RNA viruses require association with plant cell endomembranes for viral translation and replication, as well as for intra- and intercellular movement of the viral progeny. The membrane association and RNA binding of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) are vital for orchestrating the macromolecular network required for virus movement. A previously proposed topological model suggests that TMV MP is an integral membrane protein with two putative α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. Here we tested this model using an experimental system that measured the efficiency with which natural polypeptide segments were inserted into the ER membrane under conditions approximating the in vivo situation, as well as in planta. Our results demonstrated that the two hydrophobic regions (HRs) of TMV MP do not span biological membranes. We further found that mutations to alter the hydrophobicity of the first HR modified membrane association and precluded virus movement. We propose a topological model in which the TMV MP HRs intimately associate with the cellular membranes, allowing maximum exposure of the hydrophilic domains of the MP to the cytoplasmic cellular components. IMPORTANCE To facilitate plant viral infection and spread, viruses encode one or more movement proteins (MPs) that interact with ER membranes. The present work investigated the membrane association of the 30K MP of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and the results challenge the previous topological model, which predicted that the TMV MP behaves as an integral membrane protein. The current data provide greatly needed clarification of the topological model and provide substantial evidence that TMV MP is membrane associated only at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and that neither of its domains is integrated into the membrane or translocated into the lumen. Understanding the topology of MPs in the ER is vital for understanding the role of the ER in plant virus transport

  6. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  7. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  8. Potato virus X movement in Nicotiana benthamiana: new details revealed by chimeric coat protein variants.

    PubMed

    Betti, Camilla; Lico, Chiara; Maffi, Dario; D'Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Faoro, Franco; Baschieri, Selene

    2012-02-01

    Potato virus X coat protein is necessary for both cell-to-cell and phloem transfer, but it has not been clarified definitively whether it is needed in both movement phases solely as a component of the assembled particles or also of differently structured ribonucleoprotein complexes. To clarify this issue, we studied the infection progression of a mutant carrying an N-terminal deletion of the coat protein, which was used to construct chimeric virus particles displaying peptides selectively affecting phloem transfer or cell-to-cell movement. Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with expression vectors encoding the wild-type, mutant and chimeric viral genomes were examined by microscopy techniques. These experiments showed that coat protein-peptide fusions promoting cell-to-cell transfer only were not competent for virion assembly, whereas long-distance movement was possible only for coat proteins compatible with virus particle formation. Moreover, the ability of the assembled PVX to enter and persist into developing xylem elements was revealed here for the first time.

  9. Rapamycin administration in humans blocks the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Micah J; Fry, Christopher S; Glynn, Erin L; Dreyer, Hans C; Dhanani, Shaheen; Timmerman, Kyle L; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2009-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signalling are concurrently stimulated following muscle contraction in humans. In an effort to determine whether mTORC1 signalling is essential for regulating muscle protein synthesis in humans, we treated subjects with a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to performing a series of high-intensity muscle contractions. Here we show that rapamycin treatment blocks the early (1–2 h) acute contraction-induced increase (∼40%) in human muscle protein synthesis. In addition, several downstream components of the mTORC1 signalling pathway were also blunted or blocked by rapamycin. For instance, S6K1 phosphorylation (Thr421/Ser424) was increased post-exercise 6-fold in the control group while being unchanged with rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, eEF2 phosphorylation (Thr56) was reduced by ∼25% post-exercise in the control group but phosphorylation following rapamycin treatment was unaltered, indicating that translation elongation was inhibited. Rapamycin administration prior to exercise also reduced the ability of raptor to associate with mTORC1 during post-exercise recovery. Surprisingly, rapamycin treatment prior to resistance exercise completely blocked the contraction-induced increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) and blunted the increase in MNK1 (Thr197/202) phosphorylation. However, the phosphorylation of a known target of MNK1, eIF4E (Ser208), was similar in both groups (P > 0.05) which is consistent with the notion that rapamycin does not directly inhibit MAPK signalling. We conclude that mTORC1 signalling is, in part, playing a key role in regulating the contraction-induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in humans, while dual activation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 stimulation may be required for full stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis. PMID:19188252

  10. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  11. The Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and Fe65, an APP-Binding Protein, Regulate Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, Shasta L.; Ikin, Annat F.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Greengard, Paul

    2001-01-01

    FE65 binds to the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the function of this interaction has not been identified. Here, we report that APP and FE65 are involved in regulation of cell movement. APP and FE65 colocalize with actin and Mena, an Abl-associated signaling protein thought to regulate actin dynamics, in lamellipodia. APP and FE65 specifically concentrate with β1-integrin in dynamic adhesion sites known as focal complexes, but not in more static adhesion sites known as focal adhesions. Overexpression of APP accelerates cell migration in an MDCK cell wound–healing assay. Coexpression of APP and FE65 dramatically enhances the effect of APP on cell movement, probably by regulating the amount of APP at the cell surface. These data are consistent with a role for FE65 and APP, possibly in a Mena-containing macromolecular complex, in regulation of actin-based motility. PMID:11425871

  12. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson’s-like movement disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Springer, Danielle A.; Allen, Michele D.; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Lenardo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson’s-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25222142

  13. Genetic deficiency of the mitochondrial protein PGAM5 causes a Parkinson's-like movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Springer, Danielle A; Allen, Michele D; Zheng, Lixin; Chao, Brittany; Zhang, Yan; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Lenardo, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that selectively disposes of dysfunctional mitochondria. Delineating the molecular regulation of mitophagy is of great importance because defects in this process lead to a variety of mitochondrial diseases. Here we report that mice deficient for the mitochondrial protein, phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5), displayed a Parkinson's-like movement phenotype. We determined biochemically that PGAM5 is required for the stabilization of the mitophagy-inducing protein PINK1 on damaged mitochondria. Loss of PGAM5 disables PINK1-mediated mitophagy in vitro and leads to dopaminergic neurodegeneration and mild dopamine loss in vivo. Our data indicate that PGAM5 is a regulator of mitophagy essential for mitochondrial turnover and serves a cytoprotective function in dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Moreover, PGAM5 may provide a molecular link to study mitochondrial homeostasis and the pathogenesis of a movement disorder similar to Parkinson's disease.

  14. Elucidation of the Structure Formation of Polymer-Conjugated Proteins in Solution and Block Copolymer Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferebee, Rachel L.

    The broader technical objective of this work is to contribute to the development of enzyme-functionalized nanoporous membranes that can function as autonomous and target selective dynamic separators. The scientific objective of the research performed within this thesis is to elucidate the parameters that control the mixing of proteins in organic host materials and in block copolymers templates in particular. A "biomimetic" membrane system that uses enzymes to selectively neutralize targets and trigger a change in permeability of nanopores lined with a pH-responsive polymer has been fabricated and characterized. Mechanical and functional stability, as well as scalability, have been demonstrated for this system. Additional research has focused on the role of polymeric ligands on the solubility characteristics of the model protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). For this purpose BSA was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ligands of varied degree of polymerization and grafting density. Combined static and dynamic light scattering was used (in conjunction with MALDI-TOF) to determine the second virial coefficient in PBS solutions. At a given mass fraction PEG or average number of grafts, the solubility of BSA-PEG conjugates is found to increase with the degree of polymerization of conjugated PEG. This result informs the synthesis of protein-conjugate systems that are optimized for the fabrication of block copolymer blend materials with maximum protein loading. Blends of BSA-PEG conjugates and block copolymer (BCP) matrices were fabricated to evaluate the dispersion morphology and solubility limits in a model system. Electron microscopy was used to evaluate the changes in lamellar spacing with increased filling fraction of BSA-PEG conjugates.

  15. The functional analysis of distinct tospovirus movement proteins (NSM) reveals different capabilities in tubule formation, cell-to-cell and systemic virus movement among the tospovirus species.

    PubMed

    Leastro, Mikhail O; Pallás, Vicente; Resende, Renato O; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A

    2017-01-02

    The lack of infectious tospovirus clones to address reverse genetic experiments has compromised the functional analysis of viral proteins. In the present study we have performed a functional analysis of the movement proteins (NSM) of four tospovirus species Bean necrotic mosaic virus (BeNMV), Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV), Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which differ biologically and molecularly, by using the Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) model system. All NSM proteins were competent to: i) support the cell-to-cell and systemic transport of AMV, ii) generate tubular structures on infected protoplast and iii) transport only virus particles. However, the NSM of BeNMV (one of the most phylogenetically distant species) was very inefficient to support the systemic transport. Deletion assays revealed that the C-terminal region of the BeNMV NSM, but not that of the CSNV, TCSV and TSWV NSM proteins, was dispensable for cell-to-cell transport, and that all the non-functional C-terminal NSM mutants were unable to generate tubular structures. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that the C-terminus of the BeNMV NSM was not required for the interaction with the cognate nucleocapsid protein, showing a different protein organization when compared with other movement proteins of the '30K family'. Overall, our results revealed clearly differences in functional aspects among movement proteins from divergent tospovirus species that have a distinct biological behavior.

  16. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  17. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  18. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies: quasi-equivalence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, D.L.D.

    1980-10-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called autostery, by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assembles of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements.

  19. Action of protein synthesis inhibitors in blocking electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux from corn roots

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, C.J.; LaFayette, P.R.; Hanson, J.B.

    1981-04-01

    The block in the electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux is inhibition of K/sup +/ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase.

  20. Iron regulatory proteins control a mucosal block to intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Galy, Bruno; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Becker, Christiane; Gretz, Norbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Schümann, Klaus; Hentze, Matthias W

    2013-03-28

    Mammalian iron metabolism is regulated systemically by the hormone hepcidin and cellularly by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that orchestrate a posttranscriptional regulatory network. Through ligand-inducible genetic ablation of both IRPs in the gut epithelium of adult mice, we demonstrate that IRP deficiency impairs iron absorption and promotes mucosal iron retention via a ferritin-mediated "mucosal block." We show that IRP deficiency does not interfere with intestinal sensing of body iron loading and erythropoietic iron need, but rather alters the basal expression of the iron-absorption machinery. IRPs thus secure sufficient iron transport across absorptive enterocytes by restricting the ferritin "mucosal block" and define a basal set point for iron absorption upon which IRP-independent systemic regulatory inputs are overlaid.

  1. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  2. Exploring the stochastic dynamics of correlated movement of receptor proteins in plasma membranes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jung Y.; Lin, Chien Y.

    2015-12-14

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization plays a crucial role in the signaling process of living cells. In this study, we developed a theoretical model and performed single-molecule tracking to explore the correlated diffusion processes of liganded epidermal growth factor receptors prior to dimer formation. We disclosed that both an attractive potential between liganded receptor proteins in proximity and correlated fluctuations in the local environments of the proteins play an important role to produce the observed correlated movement of the receptors. This result can serve as the foundation to shed light on the way in which receptor functions are regulated in plasma membranes in vivo.

  3. The Interaction between Bamboo Mosaic Virus Replication Protein and Coat Protein Is Critical for Virus Movement in Plant Hosts ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Cheng; Ho, Yuan-Ning; Hu, Rei-Hsing; Yen, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zheng-Cheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Meng, Menghsiao

    2011-01-01

    Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Potexvirus. Open reading frame 1 (ORF1) encodes the viral replication protein that consists of a capping enzyme domain, a helicase-like domain (HLD), and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain from the N to C terminus. ORF5 encodes the viral coat protein (CP) required for genome encapsidation and the virus movement in plants. In this study, application of a yeast-two hybrid assay detected an interaction between the viral HLD and CP. However, the interaction did not affect the NTPase activity of the HLD. To identify the critical amino acids of CP interacting with the HLD, a random mutational library of CP was created using error-prone PCR, and the mutations adversely affecting the interaction were screened by a bacterial two-hybrid system. As a result, the mutations A209G and N210S in CP were found to weaken the interaction. To determine the significance of the interaction, the mutations were introduced into a BaMV infectious clone, and the mutational effects on viral replication, movement, and genome encapsidation were investigated. There was no effect on accumulations of BaMV CP and genomic RNAs within protoplasts; however, the virus cell-to-cell movement in plants was restricted. Sequence alignment revealed that A209 of BaMV CP is conserved in many potexviruses. Mutation of the corresponding residue in Foxtail mosaic virus CP also reduced the viral HLD-CP interaction and restricted the virus movement, suggesting that interaction between CP and a widely conserved HLD in the potexviral replication protein is crucial for viral trafficking through plasmodesmata. PMID:21917973

  4. The tomato mosaic tobamovirus movement protein interacts with a putative transcriptional coactivator KELP.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Deguchi, M; Youda, M; Nishiguchi, M; Nyunoya, H

    2001-08-31

    Viral movement through plasmodesmata in host plants likely depends on the interaction between virus-encoded movement protein (MP) and host proteins. In order to search for MP-interacting protein (MIP), we carried out far-western screening of a Brassica campestris cDNA library using a recombinant MP of tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV) as a probe. One of the positive clones, designated MIP102, was found to be a putative orthologue for a transcriptional coactivator KELP of Arabidopsis thaliana. In vitro analysis with recombinant proteins revealed that ToMV MP could bind to KELP proteins that are derived from different plant species. At least 31 amino acids from the carboxyl-terminus of ToMV MP were dispensable for the interaction with KELP. Other MPs, derived from crucifer tobamovirus CTMV-W and cucumber mosaic cucumovirus, also exhibited comparable binding abilities. This suggests that these MPs could commonly interact with KELP, possibly to modulate the host gene expression.

  5. Light scattering evidence of selective protein fouling on biocompatible block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Fernando C; Stepánek, Petr; Schmidt, Vanessa; Jäger, Eliézer; Jäger, Alessandro; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2012-08-07

    Selective protein fouling on block copolymer micelles with well-known potential for tumour-targeting drug delivery was evidenced by using dynamic light scattering measurements. The stability and interaction of block copolymer micelles with model proteins (BSA, IgG, lysozyme and CytC) is reported for systems featuring a hydrophobic (poly[2-(diisopropylamino)-ethyl methacrylate]) (PDPA) core and hydrophilic coronas comprising poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PEO-b-PG2MA) or poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine] (PMPC). The results revealed that protein size and hydrophilic chain density play important roles in the observed interactions. The PEO(113)-b-PG2MA(30)-b-PDPA(50) nanoparticles are stable and protein adsorption is prevented at all investigated protein environments. The successful protein-repellent characteristic of these nanoparticles is attributed to a high hydrophilic surface chain density (>0.1 chains per nm(2)) and to the length of the hydrophilic chains. On the other hand, although PMPC also has protein-repellent characteristics, the low surface chain density of the hydrophilic shell is supposed to enable interactions with small proteins. The PMPC(40)-b-PDPA(70) micelles are stable in BSA and IgG environments due to weak repulsion forces between PMPC and the proteins, to the hydration layer, and particularly to a size-effect where the large BSA (R(H) = 4.2 nm) and IgG (R(H) = 7.0 nm) do not easily diffuse within the PMPC shell. Conversely, a clear interaction was observed with the 2.1 nm radius lysozyme. The lysozyme protein can diffuse within the PMPC micellar shell towards the PDPA hydrophobic core in a process favored by its smaller size and the low hydrophilic PMPC surface chain density (∼0.049 chains per nm(2)) as compared to PEO-b-PG2MA (∼0.110 chains per nm(2)). The same behavior was not evidenced with the 2.3 nm radius positively charged CytC, probably due to its higher surface hydrophilicity and the consequent

  6. SVM-PB-Pred: SVM based protein block prediction method using sequence profiles and secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Suresh, V; Parthasarathy, S

    2014-01-01

    We developed a support vector machine based web server called SVM-PB-Pred, to predict the Protein Block for any given amino acid sequence. The input features of SVM-PB-Pred include i) sequence profiles (PSSM) and ii) actual secondary structures (SS) from DSSP method or predicted secondary structures from NPS@ and GOR4 methods. There were three combined input features PSSM+SS(DSSP), PSSM+SS(NPS@) and PSSM+SS(GOR4) used to test and train the SVM models. Similarly, four datasets RS90, DB433, LI1264 and SP1577 were used to develop the SVM models. These four SVM models developed were tested using three different benchmarking tests namely; (i) self consistency, (ii) seven fold cross validation test and (iii) independent case test. The maximum possible prediction accuracy of ~70% was observed in self consistency test for the SVM models of both LI1264 and SP1577 datasets, where PSSM+SS(DSSP) input features was used to test. The prediction accuracies were reduced to ~53% for PSSM+SS(NPS@) and ~43% for PSSM+SS(GOR4) in independent case test, for the SVM models of above two same datasets. Using our method, it is possible to predict the protein block letters for any query protein sequence with ~53% accuracy, when the SP1577 dataset and predicted secondary structure from NPS@ server were used. The SVM-PB-Pred server can be freely accessed through http://bioinfo.bdu.ac.in/~svmpbpred.

  7. Cooperation in Viral Movement: The Geminivirus BL1 Movement Protein Interacts with BR1 and Redirects It from the Nucleus to the Cell Periphery.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderfoot, A. A.; Lazarowitz, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    For plant viruses to systemically infect a host requires the active participation of viral-encoded movement proteins. It has been suggested that BL1 and BR1, the two movement proteins encoded by the bipartite geminivirus squash leaf curl virus (SqLCV), act cooperatively to facilitate movement of the viral single-stranded DNA genome from its site of replication in the nucleus to the cell periphery and across the cell wall to adjacent uninfected cells. To better understand the mechanism of SqLCV movement, we investigated the ability of BL1 and BR1 to interact specifically with each other using transient expression assays in insect cells and Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi protoplasts. In this study, we showed that when individually expressed, BL1 is localized to the periphery and BR1 to nuclei in both cell systems. However, when coexpressed in either cell type, BL1 relocalized BR1 from the nucleus to the cell periphery. This interaction was found to be specific for BL1 and BR1, because BL1 did not relocalize the SqLCV nuclear-localized AL2 or coat protein. In addition, mutations in BL1 known to affect viral infectivity and pathogenicity were found to be defective in either their subcellular localization or their ability to relocalize BR1, and, thus, identified regions of BL1 required for correct subcellular targeting or interaction with BR1. These findings extend our model for SqLCV movement, demonstrating that BL1 and BR1 appear to interact directly with each other to facilitate movement cooperatively and that BL1 is responsible for providing directionality to movement of the viral genome. PMID:12242403

  8. Movement Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Associates with Apoplastic Ascorbate Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Reenu; Kumar, Surender; Singh, Lakhmir; Hallan, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Plant viral movement proteins facilitate virion movement mainly through interaction with a number of factors from the host. We report the association of a cell wall localized ascorbate oxidase (CsAO4) from Cucumis sativus with the movement protein (MP) of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). This was identified first in a yeast two-hybrid screen and validated by in vivo pull down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. The BiFC assay showed localization of the bimolecular complexes of these proteins around the cell wall periphery as punctate spots. The expression of CsAO4 was induced during the initial infection period (up to 72 h) in CMV infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. To functionally validate its role in viral spread, we analyzed the virus accumulation in CsAO4 overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana and transiently silenced N. benthamiana plants (through a Tobacco rattle virus vector). Overexpression had no evident effect on virus accumulation in upper non-inoculated leaves of transgenic lines in comparison to WT plants at 7 days post inoculation (dpi). However, knockdown resulted in reduced CMV accumulation in systemic (non-inoculated) leaves of NbΔAO-pTRV2 silenced plants as compared to TRV inoculated control plants at 5 dpi (up to 1.3 fold difference). In addition, functional validation supported the importance of AO in plant development. These findings suggest that AO and viral MP interaction helps in early viral movement; however, it had no major effect on viral accumulation after 7 dpi. This study suggests that initial induction of expression of AO on virus infection and its association with viral MP helps both towards targeting of the MP to the apoplast and disrupting formation of functional AO dimers for spread of virus to nearby cells, reducing the redox defense of the plant during initial stages of infection. PMID:27668429

  9. Movement Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Associates with Apoplastic Ascorbate Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Reenu; Kumar, Surender; Singh, Lakhmir; Hallan, Vipin

    Plant viral movement proteins facilitate virion movement mainly through interaction with a number of factors from the host. We report the association of a cell wall localized ascorbate oxidase (CsAO4) from Cucumis sativus with the movement protein (MP) of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). This was identified first in a yeast two-hybrid screen and validated by in vivo pull down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. The BiFC assay showed localization of the bimolecular complexes of these proteins around the cell wall periphery as punctate spots. The expression of CsAO4 was induced during the initial infection period (up to 72 h) in CMV infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. To functionally validate its role in viral spread, we analyzed the virus accumulation in CsAO4 overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana and transiently silenced N. benthamiana plants (through a Tobacco rattle virus vector). Overexpression had no evident effect on virus accumulation in upper non-inoculated leaves of transgenic lines in comparison to WT plants at 7 days post inoculation (dpi). However, knockdown resulted in reduced CMV accumulation in systemic (non-inoculated) leaves of NbΔAO-pTRV2 silenced plants as compared to TRV inoculated control plants at 5 dpi (up to 1.3 fold difference). In addition, functional validation supported the importance of AO in plant development. These findings suggest that AO and viral MP interaction helps in early viral movement; however, it had no major effect on viral accumulation after 7 dpi. This study suggests that initial induction of expression of AO on virus infection and its association with viral MP helps both towards targeting of the MP to the apoplast and disrupting formation of functional AO dimers for spread of virus to nearby cells, reducing the redox defense of the plant during initial stages of infection.

  10. Local activation of protein kinase A inhibits morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Byung-Ho; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2003-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has various biological roles in many organisms. However, little is known about its role in the developmental processes of vertebrates. In this study, we describe the functional analysis of PKA during gastrulation movements in Xenopus laevis. Overexpression of constitutively active PKA (cPKA) in the dorsal equatorial region of the embryo affects morphogenetic movement during gastrulation. We also show that intrinsic differences of PKA activities along the dorsoventral axis are set up and the level of PKA activity on the dorsal region is lower than that on the ventral region from late blastula to gastrula stages. In addition, PKA activation in animal explants inhibits activin-induced elongation. In cPKA-injected embryos, there were no changes in the expressions of markers involved in mesoderm specification, although the correct expression domains of these genes were altered. The effects of PKA activation can be restored by coexpression of PKI, a pseudosubstrate of PKA. We further analyzed the effects of PKA activation on the behavior of migratory gastrulating cells in vitro. Expression of cPKA in head mesoderm cells causes less polarized and/or randomized migration as demonstrated by a directional cell migration assay. Finally, we show that RhoA GTPase lies downstream of PKA, affecting activin-induced convergent extension movements. Taken together, these results suggest that overexpressed PKA can modulate a pathway responsible for morphogenetic movements during Xenopus gastrulation.

  11. Blocking of TRPV-1 in the parodontium relieves orthodontic pain by inhibiting the expression of TRPV-1 in the trigeminal ganglion during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunan; Liu, Yingfei; Zhu, Kun; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiao, Hu; Lu, Zhen; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Hong

    2016-08-15

    Orthodontic pain has confused the orthodontics for a long time, and recent research demonstrated that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) had crucial functions in transduction of painful stimuli. The present research investigated the analgesia effects of the blocking TRPV1 on orthodontic pain during experimental tooth movement. Under challenge with experimental tooth movement, the expression of TRPV1 in the parodontium was increased in a time-dependent and force-dependent manner. And treatment with selective TRPV1 antagonist AMG-9810 in the parodontium reduced the expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and decreased the secretion of IL-1β in the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, AMG-9810 could relieve orthodontic pain arising from experimental tooth movement in rats. We suggest that TRPV1 both in the parodontium and trigeminal ganglion are involved in orthodontic pain, and TRPV1 in the parodontium influence on orthodontic pain through reducing the expression of TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglion. Our finding may help to develop strategies for relieving orthodontic pain after orthodontics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Paleomagnetic evidence for the continuity and independent movement of a distinct major crustal block in the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.

    1982-07-01

    The magnetization of 22 granitic and gneissic southern Appalachian rock units, with estimated cooling ages of 415-250 m.y., has been determined. Included are 842 samples from 114 sites within 19 granites (100 sites) and 3 gneisses (14 sites) located in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Samples from 57 of these sites in 14 granites and 3 gneissic bodies yield a remanent magnetism after af demagnetization which exhibits good within-site and/or between-site directional consistency. Data for units which cooled to temperatures <300°C between 350-240 m.y., a period of apparently only slight North American plate motion, can be divided into two groups. A mean paleopole calculated for the first of these groups, group A (derived from six granites and gneisses 365-325 m.y. in age), located in the vicinity of Atlanta, Ga., is coincident with well-defined Lower Carboniferous North American paleopoles. Site paleolatitude is estimated to be ˜11°S. Group B granites (six units) range in age from 350-250 m.y., are located to the SE of an arc drawn from Columbia, S.C., through Athens, Ga., to Macon, Ga., are apparently anomalous, and lie in a crustal block >20,000 km2 in size. The southeastern extent of this block is unknown due to Coastal Plain onlap. A mean paleopole for this group, with corrections for maximum tilt estimates, exhibits good precision but has a paleosite latitude of ˜10°N. Without tilt correction the paleopole for group B still exhibits an anomalous paleosite latitude of ˜4°N. These data indicate that the group B block (Elberton-Sparta Crustal Block) lying to the SE has an apparent paleosite latitude corresponding to magnetization at a location to the north of the zone containing group A units. The preferred explanations for these data are (1) a northwest postemplacement tilting of the Elberton-Sparta Crustal Block during the Alleghenian orogenic event in the southeastern Appalachians, or (2) emplacement as a microplate caught between North America

  13. An antiviral disulfide compound blocks interaction between arenavirus Z protein and cellular promyelocytic leukemia protein

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C.C.; Topisirovic, I.; Djavani, M.; Borden, K.L.B.; Damonte, E.B.; Salvato, M.S.

    2010-03-19

    The promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) forms nuclear bodies (NB) that can be redistributed by virus infection. In particular, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) influences disruption of PML NB through the interaction of PML with the arenaviral Z protein. In a previous report, we have shown that the disulfide compound NSC20625 has antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses, inducing unfolding and oligomerization of Z without affecting cellular RING-containing proteins such as the PML. Here, we further studied the effect of the zinc-finger-reactive disulfide NSC20625 on PML-Z interaction. In HepG2 cells infected with LCMV or transiently transfected with Z protein constructs, treatment with NSC20625 restored PML distribution from a diffuse-cytoplasmic pattern to punctate, discrete NB which appeared identical to NB found in control, uninfected cells. Similar results were obtained in cells transfected with a construct expressing a Z mutant in zinc-binding site 2 of the RING domain, confirming that this Z-PML interaction requires the integrity of only one zinc-binding site. Altogether, these results show that the compound NSC20625 suppressed Z-mediated PML NB disruption and may be used as a tool for designing novel antiviral strategies against arenavirus infection.

  14. Test of a non-physical barrier consisting of light, sound, and bubble screen to block upstream movement of sea lamprey in an experimental raceway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miehls, Scott M.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Hrodey, Pete J.

    2017-01-01

    Control of the invasive Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus is critical for management of commercial and recreational fisheries in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Use of physical barriers to block Sea Lampreys from spawning habitat is a major component of the control program. However, the resulting interruption of natural streamflow and blockage of nontarget species present substantial challenges. Development of an effective nonphysical barrier would aid the control of Sea Lampreys by eliminating their access to spawning locations while maintaining natural streamflow. We tested the effect of a nonphysical barrier consisting of strobe lights, low-frequency sound, and a bubble screen on the movement of Sea Lampreys in an experimental raceway designed as a two-choice maze with a single main channel fed by two identical inflow channels (one control and one blocked). Sea Lampreys were more likely to move upstream during trials when the strobe light and low-frequency sound were active compared with control trials and trials using the bubble screen alone. For those Sea Lampreys that did move upstream to the confluence of inflow channels, no combination of stimuli or any individual stimulus significantly influenced the likelihood that Sea Lampreys would enter the blocked inflow channel, enter the control channel, or return downstream.

  15. Physiological effects of constitutive expression of Oilseed Rape Mosaic Tobamovirus (ORMV) movement protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Carmen; Aguilar, Isabel; Martínez-Herrera, David; Sánchez, Flora; Ponz, Fernando

    2006-12-01

    Movement proteins (MPs) are non-cell autonomous viral-encoded proteins that assist viruses in their cell-to-cell movement. The MP encoded by Tobamoviruses is the best characterized example among MPs of non-tubule-inducing plant RNA viruses. The MP of Oilseed Rape Mosaic Tobamovirus (ORMV) was transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, ecotype RLD, under the expression of the 35S promoter from Cauliflower Mosaic Virus. Transgenic lines were obtained in sense and antisense orientations. One of the sense transgenic lines was further characterized turning out to carry one copy of the transgene inserted in the terminal region of the right arm of chromosome 1. The constitutive expression of ORMV-MP induced mild physiological effects in Arabidopsis. Plants of the transgenic line allowed a faster systemic movement of the phloem tracer carboxyfluorescein. The tracer was unloaded differentially in different flower parts, revealing differential effects of ORMV-MP on phloem unloading in sink organs. On the other hand, transgenic Arabidopsis did not show any effect on biomass partitioning or sugar availability, effects reported for equivalent transgenic solanaceous plants expressing the MP of Tobacco Mosaic Virus, another Tobamovirus. Finally, the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were susceptible to ORMV infection, although showing milder overall symptoms than non-transgenic controls. The results highlight the relevance of the specific host-virus system, in the physiological outcome of the molecular interactions established by MPs.

  16. Detection of conserved segments in proteins: iterative scanning of sequence databases with alignment blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Tatusov, R L; Altschul, S F; Koonin, E V

    1994-01-01

    We describe an approach to analyzing protein sequence databases that, starting from a single uncharacterized sequence or group of related sequences, generates blocks of conserved segments. The procedure involves iterative database scans with an evolving position-dependent weight matrix constructed from a coevolving set of aligned conserved segments. For each iteration, the expected distribution of matrix scores under a random model is used to set a cutoff score for the inclusion of a segment in the next iteration. This cutoff may be calculated to allow the chance inclusion of either a fixed number or a fixed proportion of false positive segments. With sufficiently high cutoff scores, the procedure converged for all alignment blocks studied, with varying numbers of iterations required. Different methods for calculating weight matrices from alignment blocks were compared. The most effective of those tested was a logarithm-of-odds, Bayesian-based approach that used prior residue probabilities calculated from a mixture of Dirichlet distributions. The procedure described was used to detect novel conserved motifs of potential biological importance. Images PMID:7991589

  17. Evidence for proteolytic processing of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R K; Perbal, M C; Maule, A J; Hull, R

    1995-01-01

    Two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana were transformed with the gene encoding tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (P30). P30 accumulated largely in a subcellular fraction containing cell wall components and as a soluble protein. The protein migrated in denaturing gels with an M(r) of 30K, significantly faster than P30 (M(r) approximately 34K) accumulating after expression in transgenic tobacco, Escherichia coli or Spodoptera frugiperda cells, or after virus multiplication in tobacco. The P30 from A. thaliana infected with TMV for 14 days comigrated with that from E. coli, but that from A. thaliana infected for 49 days was of the smaller size. The use of antisera specific for the N- or C-termini of P30 showed that in A. thaliana P30 was proteolytically processed at the N-terminus, a region essential for P30 function. The failure of these plants to complement a TMV P30 mutant indicated that processed P30 was nonfunctional, although the processing was not so rapid that it prevented the development of systemic infections with wild type TMV. The absence of detectable P30 phosphorylation in A. thaliana demonstrated that phosphorylation was not essential for movement protein function and suggested that this species may use proteolytic cleavage of the N-terminus as an alternative strategy to tobacco for deactivating P30.

  18. Light scattering evidence of selective protein fouling on biocompatible block copolymer micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, Fernando C.; Stepánek, Petr; Schmidt, Vanessa; Jäger, Eliézer; Jäger, Alessandro; Giacomelli, Cristiano

    2012-07-01

    Selective protein fouling on block copolymer micelles with well-known potential for tumour-targeting drug delivery was evidenced by using dynamic light scattering measurements. The stability and interaction of block copolymer micelles with model proteins (BSA, IgG, lysozyme and CytC) is reported for systems featuring a hydrophobic (poly[2-(diisopropylamino)-ethyl methacrylate]) (PDPA) core and hydrophilic coronas comprising poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PEO-b-PG2MA) or poly[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine] (PMPC). The results revealed that protein size and hydrophilic chain density play important roles in the observed interactions. The PEO113-b-PG2MA30-b-PDPA50 nanoparticles are stable and protein adsorption is prevented at all investigated protein environments. The successful protein-repellent characteristic of these nanoparticles is attributed to a high hydrophilic surface chain density (>0.1 chains per nm2) and to the length of the hydrophilic chains. On the other hand, although PMPC also has protein-repellent characteristics, the low surface chain density of the hydrophilic shell is supposed to enable interactions with small proteins. The PMPC40-b-PDPA70 micelles are stable in BSA and IgG environments due to weak repulsion forces between PMPC and the proteins, to the hydration layer, and particularly to a size-effect where the large BSA (RH = 4.2 nm) and IgG (RH = 7.0 nm) do not easily diffuse within the PMPC shell. Conversely, a clear interaction was observed with the 2.1 nm radius lysozyme. The lysozyme protein can diffuse within the PMPC micellar shell towards the PDPA hydrophobic core in a process favored by its smaller size and the low hydrophilic PMPC surface chain density (~0.049 chains per nm2) as compared to PEO-b-PG2MA (~0.110 chains per nm2). The same behavior was not evidenced with the 2.3 nm radius positively charged CytC, probably due to its higher surface hydrophilicity and the consequent chemical

  19. Caulimoviridae Tubule-Guided Transport Is Dictated by Movement Protein Properties ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fajardo, Thor; Zicca, Stefania; Pallás, Vicente; Stavolone, Livia

    2010-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata (PD) either as nucleoprotein complexes (NPCs) or as tubule-guided encapsidated particles with the help of movement proteins (MPs). To explore how and why MPs specialize in one mechanism or the other, we tested the exchangeability of MPs encoded by DNA and RNA virus genomes by means of an engineered alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) system. We show that Caulimoviridae (DNA genome virus) MPs are competent for RNA virus particle transport but are unable to mediate NPC movement, and we discuss this restriction in terms of the evolution of DNA virus MPs as a means of mediating DNA viral genome entry into the RNA-trafficking PD pathway. PMID:20130061

  20. Biomimetic block copolymer particles with gated nanopores and ultrahigh protein sorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haizhou; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Nunes, Suzana P.; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The design of micro- or nanoparticles that can encapsulate sensitive molecules such as drugs, hormones, proteins or peptides is of increasing importance for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Examples are micelles, liposomes and vesicles. The tiny and, in most cases, hollow spheres are used as vehicles for transport and controlled administration of pharmaceutical drugs or nutrients. Here we report a simple strategy to fabricate microspheres by block copolymer self-assembly. The microsphere particles have monodispersed nanopores that can act as pH-responsive gates. They contain a highly porous internal structure, which is analogous to the Schwarz P structure. The internal porosity of the particles contributes to their high sorption capacity and sustained release behaviour. We successfully separated similarly sized proteins using these particles. The ease of particle fabrication by macrophase separation and self-assembly, and the robustness of the particles makes them ideal for sorption, separation, transport and sustained delivery of pharmaceutical substances.

  1. Nanoporous membrane based on block copolymer thin film for protein drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-03-01

    We studied long term and controlled release of protein drugs by using nanoporous membranes with various pore sizes. Nanoporous membrane consists of the separation layer prepared by polystyrene-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) copolymer thin film and conventional microfiltration membrane as a support. We demonstrate a long-term constant in vitro release of bovine serum albumin (BSA)and human growth hormone ) (hGH) without their denaturation up to 2 months. A nearly constant serum concentration of hGH was maintained up to 3 weeks in SD rats. The long-term constant delivery based on this membrane for protein drugs within the therapeutic range can be highly appreciated for the patients with hormone- deficiency.

  2. In vitro self-assembly of tailorable nanotubes from a simple protein building block

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Lai, Angela H.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Cheng, Yifan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for generating discretely structured protein nanotubes from the simple ring-shaped building block, homohexameric Hcp1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our design exploited the observation that the crystal lattice of Hcp1 contains rings stacked in a repeating head-to-tail pattern. High-resolution detail of the ring–ring interface allowed the selection of sites for specific cysteine mutations capable of engaging in disulfide bond formation across rings, thereby generating stable Hcp1 nanotubes. Protein nanotubes containing up to 25 subunits (≈100 nm in length) were self-assembled under simple conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the tube ends and interior can be independently and specifically functionalized to generate nanocapsules. PMID:18310321

  3. Systemic spread of an RNA insect virus in plants expressing plant viral movement protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Ranjit; Garcia, Bradley H.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Flock house virus (FHV), a single-stranded RNA insect virus, has previously been reported to cross the kingdom barrier and replicate in barley protoplasts and in inoculated leaves of several plant species [Selling, B. H., Allison, R. F. & Kaesberg, P. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 434–438]. There was no systemic movement of FHV in plants. We tested the ability of movement proteins (MPs) of plant viruses to provide movement functions and cause systemic spread of FHV in plants. We compared the growth of FHV in leaves of nontransgenic and transgenic plants expressing the MP of tobacco mosaic virus or red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). Both MPs mobilized cell-to-cell and systemic movement of FHV in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The yield of FHV was more than 100-fold higher in the inoculated leaves of transgenic plants than in the inoculated leaves of nontransgenic plants. In addition, FHV accumulated in the noninoculated upper leaves of both MP-transgenic plants. RCNMV MP was more efficient in mobilizing FHV to noninoculated upper leaves. We also report here that FHV replicates in inoculated leaves of six additional plant species: alfalfa, Arabidopsis, Brassica, cucumber, maize, and rice. Our results demonstrate that plant viral MPs cause cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of an animal virus in plants and offer approaches to the study of the evolution of viruses and mechanisms governing mRNA trafficking in plants as well as to the development of promising vectors for transient expression of foreign genes in plants. PMID:11296259

  4. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  5. Selective separation of similarly sized proteins with tunable nanoporous block copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Haizhou; Karunakaran, Madhavan; Pradeep, Neelakanda; Nunes, Suzana P; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2013-01-22

    An integral asymmetric membrane was fabricated in a fast and one-step process by combining the self-assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) with nonsolvent-induced phase separation. The structure was found to be composed of a thin layer of densely packed highly ordered cylindrical channels with uniform pore sizes perpendicular to the surface on top of a nonordered sponge-like layer. The as-assembled membrane obtained a water flux of more than 3200 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), which was at least an order of magnitude higher than the water fluxes of commercially available membranes with comparable pore sizes, making this membrane particularly well suited to size-selective and charge-based separation of biomolecules. To test the performance of the membrane, we conducted diffusion experiments at the physiological pH of 7.4 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and globulin-γ, two proteins with different diameters but too close in size (2-fold difference in molecular mass) to be efficiently separated via conventional dialysis membrane processes. The diffusion rate differed by a factor of 87, the highest value reported to date. We also analyzed charge-based diffusive transport and separation of two proteins of similar molecular weight (BSA and bovine hemoglobin (BHb)) through the membrane as a function of external pH. The membrane achieved a selectivity of about 10 at pH 4.7, the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. We then positively charged the membrane to improve the separation selectivity. With the modified membrane BSA was completely blocked when the pH was 7.0, the pI of BHb, while BHb was completely blocked at pH 4.7. Our results demonstrate the potential of our asymmetric membrane to efficiently separate biological substances/pharmaceuticals in bioscience, biotechnology, and biomedicine applications.

  6. New learning while consolidating memory during sleep is actively blocked by a protein synthesis dependent process

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Roi; Levitan, David; Susswein, Abraham J

    2016-01-01

    Brief experiences while a memory is consolidated may capture the consolidation, perhaps producing a maladaptive memory, or may interrupt the consolidation. Since consolidation occurs during sleep, even fleeting experiences when animals are awakened may produce maladaptive long-term memory, or may interrupt consolidation. In a learning paradigm affecting Aplysia feeding, when animals were trained after being awakened from sleep, interactions between new experiences and consolidation were prevented by blocking long-term memory arising from the new experiences. Inhibiting protein synthesis eliminated the block and allowed even a brief, generally ineffective training to produce long-term memory. Memory formation depended on consolidative proteins already expressed before training. After effective training, long term memory required subsequent transcription and translation. Memory formation during the sleep phase was correlated with increased CREB1 transcription, but not CREB2 transcription. Increased C/EBP transcription was a correlate of both effective and ineffective training and of treatments not producing memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17769.001 PMID:27919318

  7. Heterogeneous patterns on block copolymer thin film via solvent annealing: Effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Zhu, Jintao; Liang, Haojun

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous patterns consisting of nanometer-scaled hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains were generated by self-assembly of poly(styrene)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PHEMA) block copolymer thin film. The effect of the heterogeneity of the polymer film surface on the nonspecific adsorption of the protein human plasma fibrinogen (FBN, 5.0 × 5.0 × 47.5 nm3) was investigated. The kinetics of the FBN adsorption varies from a single-component Langmuir model on homogeneous hydrophilic PHEMA to a two-stage spreading relaxation model on homogeneous hydrophobic PS surface. On a heterogeneous PS-b-PHEMA surface with majority PS part, the initial FBN adsorption rate remains the same as that on the homogeneous PS surface. However, hydrophilic PHEMA microdomains on the heterogeneous surface slow down the second spreading stage of the FBN adsorption process, leading to a surface excess of adsorbed FBN molecules less than the presumed one simply calculated as adsorption onto multiple domains. Importantly, when the PS-b-PHEMA surface is annealed to form minority domelike PS domains (diameter: ˜50-100 nm) surrounded by a majority PHEMA matrix, such surface morphology proves to be strongly protein-repulsive. These interesting findings can be attributed to the enhancement of the spread FBN molecule in a mobile state by the heterogeneity of polymer film surface before irreversible adsorption occurs.

  8. A comparison of take-off dynamics during three different spikes, block and counter-movement jump in female volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Kabacinski, Jaroslae; Dworak, Lecholslaw B; Murawa, Michal; Ostarello, John; Rzepnicka, Agata; Maczynski, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the take-off dynamics in counter-movement jump (CMJ), volleyball block and spikes. Twelve professional female players, representing the highest volleyball league in Poland, participated in the laboratory tests. A force platform was used to record ground reaction force (GRF) during take-off phase in CMJ test, block from a run-up and spikes: front row attack, slide attack, back row attack. Vertical (v) GRF (peak: Rmax and integral mean: ), impulse of vGRF (J) and mechanical power (peak: Pmax and integral mean:

    ) were analyzed. Significant differences (P<0.05) of values of the dynamic parameters (Rmax, , J, Pmax, and

    ) were found between CMJ, block from a run-up and three different technique spikes. The highest values were recorded during take-off in the back row attack: peak vGRF (2.93±0.05 BW), integral mean vGRF (1.90±0.08 BW), impulse of vGRF (354±40 Ns), peak power (5320±918 W) and integral mean power (3604±683 W). Peak power (2608±217 W) and integral mean power (1417±94 W) were determined in CMJ test to evaluate the force-velocity capabilities of the players. In terms of GRF and the mechanical power, high level of dynamics in take-off influences positively the jumping height and significantly increases the effectiveness of attacks during spike of the ball over the block of the opponent.

  9. The conundrum of a unique protein encoded by citrus tristeza virus that is dispensable for infection of most hosts yet shows characteristics of a viral movement protein.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2015-11-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), one of the most economically important viruses, produces a unique protein, p33, which is encoded only in the genomes of isolates of CTV. Recently, we demonstrated that membrane association of the p33 protein confers virus ability to extend its host range. In this work we show that p33 shares characteristics of viral movement proteins. Upon expression in a host cell, the protein localizes to plasmodesmata and displays the ability to form extracellular tubules. Furthermore, p33 appears to traffic via the cellular secretory pathway and the actin network to plasmodesmata locations and is likely being recycled through the endocytic pathway. Finally, our study reveals that p33 colocalizes with a putative movement protein of CTV, the p6 protein. These results suggest a potential role of p33 as a noncanonical viral movement protein, which mediates virus translocation in the specific hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Disruption of microtubule organization and centrosome function by expression of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Ferralli, Jacqueline; Ashby, Jamie; Fasler, Monika; Boyko, Vitaly; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-06-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus mediates the cell-to-cell transport of viral RNA through plasmodesmata, cytoplasmic cell wall channels for direct cell-to-cell communication between adjacent cells. Previous in vivo studies demonstrated that the RNA transport function of the protein correlates with its association with microtubules, although the exact role of microtubules in the movement process remains unknown. Since the binding of MP to microtubules is conserved in transfected mammalian cells, we took advantage of available mammalian cell biology reagents and tools to further address the interaction in flat-growing and transparent COS-7 cells. We demonstrate that neither actin, nor endoplasmic reticulum (ER), nor dynein motor complexes are involved in the apparent alignment of MP with microtubules. Together with results of in vitro coprecipitation experiments, these findings indicate that MP binds microtubules directly. Unlike microtubules associated with neuronal MAP2c, MP-associated microtubules are resistant to disruption by microtubule-disrupting agents or cold, suggesting that MP is a specialized microtubule binding protein that forms unusually stable complexes with microtubules. MP-associated microtubules accumulate ER membranes, which is consistent with a proposed role for MP in the recruitment of membranes in infected plant cells and may suggest that microtubules are involved in this process. The ability of MP to interfere with centrosomal gamma-tubulin is independent of microtubule association with MP, does not involve the removal of other tested centrosomal markers, and correlates with inhibition of centrosomal microtubule nucleation activity. These observations suggest that the function of MP in viral movement may involve interaction with the microtubule-nucleating machinery.

  11. Disruption of Microtubule Organization and Centrosome Function by Expression of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ferralli, Jacqueline; Ashby, Jamie; Fasler, Monika; Boyko, Vitaly; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus mediates the cell-to-cell transport of viral RNA through plasmodesmata, cytoplasmic cell wall channels for direct cell-to-cell communication between adjacent cells. Previous in vivo studies demonstrated that the RNA transport function of the protein correlates with its association with microtubules, although the exact role of microtubules in the movement process remains unknown. Since the binding of MP to microtubules is conserved in transfected mammalian cells, we took advantage of available mammalian cell biology reagents and tools to further address the interaction in flat-growing and transparent COS-7 cells. We demonstrate that neither actin, nor endoplasmic reticulum (ER), nor dynein motor complexes are involved in the apparent alignment of MP with microtubules. Together with results of in vitro coprecipitation experiments, these findings indicate that MP binds microtubules directly. Unlike microtubules associated with neuronal MAP2c, MP-associated microtubules are resistant to disruption by microtubule-disrupting agents or cold, suggesting that MP is a specialized microtubule binding protein that forms unusually stable complexes with microtubules. MP-associated microtubules accumulate ER membranes, which is consistent with a proposed role for MP in the recruitment of membranes in infected plant cells and may suggest that microtubules are involved in this process. The ability of MP to interfere with centrosomal γ-tubulin is independent of microtubule association with MP, does not involve the removal of other tested centrosomal markers, and correlates with inhibition of centrosomal microtubule nucleation activity. These observations suggest that the function of MP in viral movement may involve interaction with the microtubule-nucleating machinery. PMID:16731920

  12. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  13. Roles of Replication Protein-a Subunits 2 and 3 in DNA Replication Fork Movement in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Maniar, H. S.; Wilson, R.; Brill, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    Replication Protein-A, the eukaryotic SSB, consists of a large subunit (RPA1) with strong ssDNA binding activity and two smaller subunits (RPA2 and 3) that may cooperate with RPA1 to bind ssDNA in a higher-order mode. To determine the in vivo function of the two smaller subunits and the potential role of higher-order ssDNA binding, we isolated an assortment of heat-lethal mutations in the genes encoding RPA2 and RPA3. At the permissive temperature, the mutants show a range of effects on DNA replication fidelity and sensitivities to UV and MMS. At the nonpermissive temperature, four out of five RPA2 mutants show a fast-stop DNA synthesis phenotype typical of a replication fork block. In contrast, the fifth RPA2 mutant and all RPA3 mutants are able to complete at least one round of DNA replication at the nonpermissive temperature. The effect of these mutations on the stability of the RPA complex was tested using a coprecipitation assay. At the nonpermissive temperature, we find that RPA1 and RPA2 are dissociated in the fast-stop mutants, but not in the slow-stop mutants. Thus, replication fork movement in vivo requires the association of at least two subunits of RPA. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that RPA functions in vivo by binding ssDNA in a higher-order mode. PMID:9093844

  14. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  15. Poly-dipeptides encoded by the C9ORF72 repeats block global protein translation.

    PubMed

    Kanekura, Kohsuke; Yagi, Takuya; Cammack, Alexander J; Mahadevan, Jana; Kuroda, Masahiko; Harms, Matthew B; Miller, Timothy M; Urano, Fumihiko

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of the Chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This genetic alteration leads to the accumulation of five types of poly-dipeptides translated from the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat. Among these, poly-proline-arginine (poly-PR) and poly-glycine-arginine (poly-GR) peptides are known to be neurotoxic. However, the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with these poly-dipeptides are not clear. A proteomics approach identified a number of interacting proteins with poly-PR peptide, including mRNA-binding proteins, ribosomal proteins, translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors. Immunostaining of brain sections from patients with C9orf72 ALS showed that poly-GR was colocalized with a mRNA-binding protein, hnRNPA1. In vitro translation assays showed that poly-PR and poly-GR peptides made insoluble complexes with mRNA, restrained the access of translation factors to mRNA, and blocked protein translation. Our results demonstrate that impaired protein translation mediated by poly-PR and poly-GR peptides plays a role in neurotoxicity and reveal that the pathways altered by the poly-dipeptides-mRNA complexes are potential therapeutic targets for treatment of C9orf72 FTD/ALS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. In vitro phosphorylation of the movement protein of tomato mosaic tobamovirus by a cellular kinase.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Hanazawa, K; Yoshioka, K; Oguchi, T; Kawakami, S; Watanabe, Y; Nishiguchi, M; Nyunoya, H

    2000-08-01

    The movement protein (MP) of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was produced in E. coli as a soluble fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. When immobilized on glutathione affinity beads, the recombinant protein was phosphorylated in vitro by incubating with cell extracts of Nicotiana tabacum and tobacco suspension culture cells (BY-2) in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. Phosphorylation occurred even after washing the beads with a detergent-containing buffer, indicating that the recombinant MP formed a stable complex with some protein kinase(s) during incubation with the cell extract. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the MP was phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues. Phosphorylation of the MP was decreased by addition of kinase inhibitors such as heparin, suramin and quercetin, which are known to be effective for casein kinase II (CK II). The phosphorylation level was not changed by other types of inhibitor. In addition, as shown for animal and plant CK II, [gamma-(32)P]GTP was efficiently used as a phosphoryl donor. Phosphorylation was not affected by amino acid replacements at serine-37 and serine-238, but was completely inhibited by deletion of the carboxy-terminal 9 amino acids, including threonine-256, serine-257, serine-261 and serine-263. These results suggest that the MP of ToMV could be phosphorylated in plant cells by a host protein kinase that is closely related to CK II.

  17. Structure Activity Relationships of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Complex with a Blocking Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Reid,C.; Rushe, M.; Jarpe, M.; Van Vlijmen, H.; Dolinski, B.; Qian, F.; Cachero, T.; Cuervo, H.; Yanachkova, M.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) are cytokines that direct immune cells bearing appropriate receptors to sites of inflammation or injury and are therefore attractive therapeutic targets for inhibitory molecules. 11K2 is a blocking mouse monoclonal antibody active against several human and murine MCPs. A 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Fab fragment of this antibody in complex with human MCP-1 has been solved. The Fab blocks CCR2 receptor binding to MCP-1 through an adjacent but distinct binding site. The orientation of the Fab indicates that a single MCP-1 dimer will bind two 11K2 antibodies. Several key residues on the antibody and on human MCPs were predicted to be involved in antibody selectivity. Mutational analysis of these residues confirms their involvement in the antibody- chemokine interaction. In addition to mutations that decreased or disrupted binding, one antibody mutation resulted in a 70-fold increase in affinity for human MCP-2. A key residue missing in human MCP-3, a chemokine not recognized by the antibody, was identified and engineering the preferred residue into the chemokine conferred binding to the antibody.

  18. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L.; Duman, John G.; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J.; Voets, Ilja K.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application. PMID:26936953

  19. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Olijve, Luuk L C; Meister, Konrad; DeVries, Arthur L; Duman, John G; Guo, Shuaiqi; Bakker, Huib J; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-05

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of commonly used colligative antifreezes such as salts and alcohols, the advantage of using AFPs as an additive is that they do not alter the physicochemical properties of the water-based material. Here, we report the first comprehensive evaluation of thermal hysteresis (TH) and ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity of all major classes of AFPs using cryoscopy, sonocrystallization, and recrystallization assays. The results show that TH activities determined by cryoscopy and sonocrystallization differ markedly, and that TH and IRI activities are not correlated. The absence of a distinct correlation in antifreeze activity points to a mechanistic difference in ice growth inhibition by the different classes of AFPs: blocking fast ice growth requires rapid nonbasal plane adsorption, whereas basal plane adsorption is only relevant at long annealing times and at small undercooling. These findings clearly demonstrate that biomimetic analogs of antifreeze (glyco)proteins should be tailored to the specific requirements of the targeted application.

  20. Torins are potent antimalarials that block replenishment of Plasmodium liver stage parasitophorous vacuole membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Kirsten K.; Ressurreição, Ana S.; Buchholz, Kathrin; Prudêncio, Miguel; Herman-Ornelas, Jonathan D.; Rebelo, Maria; Beatty, Wandy L.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Hänscheid, Thomas; Moreira, Rui; Marti, Matthias; Mota, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    Residence within a customized vacuole is a highly successful strategy used by diverse intracellular microorganisms. The parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) is the critical interface between Plasmodium parasites and their possibly hostile, yet ultimately sustaining, host cell environment. We show that torins, developed as ATP-competitive mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase inhibitors, are fast-acting antiplasmodial compounds that unexpectedly target the parasite directly, blocking the dynamic trafficking of the Plasmodium proteins exported protein 1 (EXP1) and upregulated in sporozoites 4 (UIS4) to the liver stage PVM and leading to efficient parasite elimination by the hepatocyte. Torin2 has single-digit, or lower, nanomolar potency in both liver and blood stages of infection in vitro and is likewise effective against both stages in vivo, with a single oral dose sufficient to clear liver stage infection. Parasite elimination and perturbed trafficking of liver stage PVM-resident proteins are both specific aspects of torin-mediated Plasmodium liver stage inhibition, indicating that torins have a distinct mode of action compared with currently used antimalarials. PMID:23836641

  1. Dietary fish oil blocks carcinogen-induced down-regulation of colonic protein kinase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y H; Lupton, J R; Chapkin, R S

    1997-02-01

    In order to elucidate the influence of dietary constituents on colonic intracellular signal transduction, the effect of different fats on rat colonic epithelial protein kinase C (PKC) alpha (classical), delta (novel) and lambda-zeta (atypical) expression was determined in carcinogen-treated animals. Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with one of two fats (corn oil and fish oil); plus or minus the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) and killed at two time points (15 and 37 weeks) in a 2x2x2 factorial design. At 5 and 6 weeks of age, animals were injected s.c. with either AOM at a dose of 15 mg/kg body weight or saline once a week for 2 weeks and continued on the same diet until termination of the study. At 15 and 37 weeks after the second injection, 10 rats from each treatment group were killed. Colonic PKC alpha, delta and lambda-zeta steady-state protein and mRNA levels were determined using immunoblotting and relative quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Colonic mucosa from rats injected with AOM had significantly suppressed membrane and cytosolic PKC alpha and cytosolic lambda-zeta protein levels (P < 0.05) as compared to saline-injected control animals at both time points. In contrast, rats fed fish oil diets had significantly higher (P < 0.05) cytosolic PKC delta and lambda-zeta protein levels relative to animals fed corn oil diets. However, the effect of diet and AOM on the steady-state expression of PKC alpha, delta and zeta mRNA was not consistent with changes in the respective isozyme protein levels, suggesting regulation at the post-transcriptional level. These data demonstrate that dietary fish oil blocks the carcinogen-induced decrease in the steady-state levels of colonic mucosal PKC delta and lambda-zeta, which may in part explain why this fat source protects against colon cancer development.

  2. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. PMID:28167888

  3. Localization of Barley yellow dwarf virus Movement Protein Modulating Programmed Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jiwon; Kim, Kangmin; Lee, Kui-Jae; Lee, Wang Hu; Ju, Ho-Jong

    2017-02-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) belongs to Luteovirus and is limited only at phloem related tissues. An open reading frame (ORF) 4 of BYDV codes for the movement protein (MP) of BYDV gating plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus movement. Like other Luteoviruses, ORF 4 of BYDV is embedded in the ORF3 but expressed from the different reading frame in leaky scanning manner. Although MP is a very important protein for systemic infection of BYDV, there was a little information. In this study, MP was characterized in terms of subcellular localization and programmed cell death (PCD). Gene of MP or its mutant (ΔMP) was expressed by Agroinfiltration method. MP was clearly localized at the nucleus and the PD, but ΔMP which was deleted distal N-terminus of MP showed no localization to PD exhibited the different target with original MP. In addition to PD localization, MP appeared associated with small granules in cytoplasm whereas ΔMP did not. MP associated with PD and small granules induced PCD, but ΔMP showed no association with PD and small granules did not exhibit PCD. Based on this study, the distal N-terminal region within MP is seemingly responsible for the localization of PD and the induction small granules and PCD induction. These results suggest that subcellular localization of BYDV MP may modulate the PCD in Nicotiana benthamiana.

  4. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  5. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-03-07

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer.

  6. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M; Henn, Melissa A; Long, Whitney M; Rohrbach, Barton W

    2014-07-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 μg/kg and infusion of 6 μg/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean ± SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 ± 4.0%, 15.0 ± 4.0%, and 46.0 ± 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ≥ 0.05) between T1 (3.70 ± 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 ± 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone.

  7. Cyclosporine inhibits flavivirus replication through blocking the interaction between host cyclophilins and viral NS5 protein.

    PubMed

    Qing, Min; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Bo; Zou, Gang; Robida, John M; Yuan, Zhiming; Tang, Hengli; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2009-08-01

    Although flaviviruses cause significant human diseases, no effective therapy is currently available. Host factors essential for viral replication are potential targets for antiviral development. Here we report that cyclophilins (CyPs), a family of cellular peptidyl-prolyl isomerases (PPIases), play a role in flavivirus replication. Huh-7.5 cells with knockdown of different isoforms of CyP were less efficient than parental cells in supporting flavivirus replication, including West Nile virus (WNV), dengue virus, and yellow fever virus. The low viral replication in CyP A (CyPA) knockdown cells could be rescued by trans supplying of a wild-type CyPA but not by trans supplying of a mutant CyPA (defective in the PPIase activity), indicating that the isomerase activity of CyPA is critical for viral replication. Immunoprecipitation and biochemical pulldown analyses showed that CyPA interacts with WNV genomic RNA and viral NS5 protein in the replication complex. Furthermore, antiviral experiments demonstrated that cyclosporine (Cs; an 11-amino-acid cyclic peptide known to block the PPIase activity of CyPA) inhibits flavivirus replication in cell culture at nontoxic concentrations. Time-of-addition and transient replicon results indicated that Cs inhibits flavivirus at the step of viral RNA synthesis. Biochemical analysis showed that Cs directly blocks the interaction between CyPA and WNV NS5 protein. Our results suggest that host CyPA is a component of flavivirus replication complex and could be targeted for potential antiviral development.

  8. Development of a blocking ELISA for detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection based on a monoclonal antibody against protein P65

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Maojun; DU, Gaimei; ZHANG, Yue; WU, Yuzi; WANG, Haiyan; LI, Bin; BAI, Yun; FENG, Zhixin; XIONG, Qiyan; BAI, Fangfang; BROWNING, Glenn F; SHAO, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae causes porcine enzootic pneumonia, an economically important disease of swine. A more sensitive and reliable method for detection of serum antibodies is needed for epidemiological investigations and to evaluate the effect of immunization. We expressed the M. hyopneumoniae protein P65 in Escherichia coli and produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that bound specifically to recombinant P65. Using this mAb, a blocking enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed. The blocking ELISA had similar specificity to and sensitivity with the commercial ELISA produced by IDEXX. Thus, this blocking ELISA is a useful test for serological confirmation of M. hyopneumoniae infection. PMID:27075114

  9. Inhibition of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement by Expression of an Actin-Binding Protein1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane. PMID:19218363

  10. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  11. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koolivand, Davoud; Bashir, Nemat Sokhandan; Behjatnia, Seyed Aliakbar; Joozani, Raziallah Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) encoding the movement protein (MP) was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM) each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA) before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs) and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection. PMID:27721695

  12. Actin-crosslinking protein regulation of filament movement in motility assays: a theoretical model.

    PubMed Central

    Janson, L W; Taylor, D L

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of single actin filaments on a myosin-coated coverslip has been modeled by several authors. One model adds a component of "frictional drag" by myosin heads that oppose movement of the actin filaments. We have extended this concept by including the resistive drag from actin crosslinking proteins to understand better the relationship among crosslinking number, actin-myosin force generation, and motility. The validity of this model is supported by agreement with the experimental results from a previous study in which crosslinking proteins were added with myosin molecules under otherwise standard motility assay conditions. The theoretical relationship provides a means to determine many physical parameters that characterize the interaction between a single actin filament and a single actin-crosslinking molecule (various types). In particular, the force constant of a single filamin molecule is calculated as 1.105 pN, approximately 3 times less than a driving myosin head (3.4 pN). Knowledge of this parameter and others derived from this model allows a better understanding of the interaction between myosin and the actin/actin-binding protein cytoskeleton and the role of actin-binding proteins in the regulation and modulation of motility. PMID:7811954

  13. The PIKfyve Inhibitor YM201636 Blocks the Continuous Recycling of the Tight Junction Proteins Claudin-1 and Claudin-2 in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    Tight junctions mediate the intercellular diffusion barrier found in epithelial tissues but they are not static complexes; instead there is rapid movement of individual proteins within the junctions. In addition some tight junction proteins are continuously being endocytosed and recycled back to the plasma membrane. Understanding the dynamic behaviour of tight junctions is important as they are altered in a range of pathological conditions including cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. In this study we investigate the effect of treating epithelial cells with a small molecule inhibitor (YM201636) of the lipid kinase PIKfyve, a protein which is involved in endocytic trafficking. We show that MDCK cells treated with YM201636 accumulate the tight junction protein claudin-1 intracellularly. In contrast YM201636 did not alter the localization of other junction proteins including ZO-1, occludin and E-cadherin. A biochemical trafficking assay was used to show that YM201636 inhibited the endocytic recycling of claudin-1, providing an explanation for the intracellular accumulation. Claudin-2 was also found to constantly recycle in confluent MDCK cells and treatment with YM201636 blocked this recycling and caused accumulation of intracellular claudin-2. However, claudin-4 showed negligible endocytosis and no detectable intracellular accumulation occurred following treatment with YM201636, suggesting that not all claudins show the same rate of endocytic trafficking. Finally, we show that, consistent with the defects in claudin trafficking, incubation with YM201636 delayed formation of the epithelial permeability barrier. Therefore, YM201636 treatment blocks the continuous recycling of claudin-1/claudin-2 and delays epithelial barrier formation. PMID:22396724

  14. (S)-α-Chlorohydrin Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation through Blocking Cyclic AMP - Protein Kinase A Pathway in Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwei; Yang, Bei; Pi, Jingbo; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    α-Chlorohydrin is a common contaminant in food. Its (S)-isomer, (S)-α-chlorohydrin (SACH), is known for causing infertility in animals by inhibiting glycolysis of spermatozoa. The aim of present work was to examine the relationship between SACH and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP), which plays a critical role in regulating mammalian sperm capacitation. In vitro exposure of SACH 50 µM to isolated rat epididymal sperm inhibited PTP. Sperm-specific glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) activities, the intracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) levels, 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) substrates in rat sperm were diminished dramatically, indicating that both glycolysis and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway were impaired by SACH. The inhibition of both PTP and phosphorylation of PKA substrates by SACH could be restored by addition of cAMP analog dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP) and phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Moreover, addition of glycerol protected glycolysis, ATP levels, phosphorylation of PKA substrates and PTP against the influence of SACH. These results suggested SACH inhibited PTP through blocking cAMP/PKA pathway in sperm, and PTP inhibition may play a role in infertility associated with SACH. PMID:22916194

  15. Lithium blocks ethanol-induced modulation of protein kinases in the developing brain

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Saito, Mitsuo; Mao, Rui-Fen; Wang, Ray; Vadasz, Csaba; Saito, Mariko

    2008-03-14

    Lithium has been shown to be neuroprotective against various insults including ethanol exposure. We previously reported that ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the postnatal day 7 (P7) mice is associated with decreases in phosphorylation levels of Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and alteration in lipid profiles in the brain. Here, P7 mice were injected with ethanol and lithium, and the effects of lithium on ethanol-induced alterations in phosphorylation levels of protein kinases and lipid profiles in the brain were examined. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses showed that lithium significantly blocked ethanol-induced caspase-3 activation and reduction in phosphorylation levels of Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK. Further, lithium inhibited accumulation of cholesterol ester (ChE) and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) triggered by ethanol in the brain. These results suggest that Akt, GSK-3{beta}, and AMPK are involved in ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and the neuroprotective effects of lithium by modulating both apoptotic and survival pathways.

  16. Fluconazole inhibits hERG K(+) channel by direct block and disruption of protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Han, Shengna; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Qiu; Duan, Yanyan; Zheng, Tenghao; Hu, Xiangjie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Lirong

    2011-01-10

    Fluconazole, a commonly used azole antifungal drug, can induce QT prolongation, which may lead to Torsades de Pointes and sudden death. To investigate the arrhythmogenic side effects of fluconazole, we studied the effect of fluconazole on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K(+) channels (wild type, Y652A and F656C) expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells using a whole-cell patch clamp technique, Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Fluconazole inhibited wild type hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximum block concentration (IC(50)) of 48.2±9.4μM. Fluconazole did not change other channel kinetics (activation and steady-state inactivation) of hERG channel. Mutations in drug- binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel significantly attenuated the hERG current blockade by fluconazole. In addition, fluconazole inhibited the trafficking of hERG protein by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy, respectively. These findings indicate that fluconazole may cause acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS) via a direct inhibition of hERG current and by disrupting hERG protein trafficking, and the mutations Y652 and F656 may be obligatory determinants in inhibition of hERG current for fluconazole.

  17. Selective inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 blocks initiation and maintenance of B-cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Mahasenan, Kiran V.; Yan, Fengting; Karkhanis, Vrajesh; Chung, Ji-Hyun; Smith, Emily M.; Quinion, Carl; Smith, Porsha L.; Kim, Lisa; Patton, John T.; Lapalombella, Rosa; Yu, Bo; Wu, Yun; Roy, Satavisha; De Leo, Alessandra; Pileri, Stefano; Agostinelli, Claudio; Ayers, Leona; Bradner, James E.; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Elemento, Olivier; Motiwala, Tasneem; Majumder, Sarmila; Byrd, John C.; Jacob, Samson; Sif, Said; Li, Chenglong

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic events that are essential drivers of lymphocyte transformation remain incompletely characterized. We used models of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–induced B-cell transformation to document the relevance of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) to regulation of epigenetic-repressive marks during lymphomagenesis. EBV+ lymphomas and transformed cell lines exhibited abundant expression of PRMT5, a type II PRMT enzyme that promotes transcriptional silencing of target genes by methylating arginine residues on histone tails. PRMT5 expression was limited to EBV-transformed cells, not resting or activated B lymphocytes, validating it as an ideal therapeutic target. We developed a first-in-class, small-molecule PRMT5 inhibitor that blocked EBV-driven B-lymphocyte transformation and survival while leaving normal B cells unaffected. Inhibition of PRMT5 led to lost recruitment of a PRMT5/p65/HDAC3-repressive complex on the miR96 promoter, restored miR96 expression, and PRMT5 downregulation. RNA-sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments identified several tumor suppressor genes, including the protein tyrosine phosphatase gene PTPROt, which became silenced during EBV-driven B-cell transformation. Enhanced PTPROt expression following PRMT5 inhibition led to dephosphorylation of kinases that regulate B-cell receptor signaling. We conclude that PRMT5 is critical to EBV-driven B-cell transformation and maintenance of the malignant phenotype, and that PRMT5 inhibition shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for B-cell lymphomas. PMID:25742700

  18. Interaction of Sesbania Mosaic Virus Movement Protein with VPg and P10: Implication to Specificity of Genome Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Soumya; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2011-01-01

    Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) is a single strand positive-sense RNA plant virus that belongs to the genus Sobemovirus. The mechanism of cell-to-cell movement in sobemoviruses has not been well studied. With a view to identify the viral encoded ancillary proteins of SeMV that may assist in cell-to-cell movement of the virus, all the proteins encoded by SeMV genome were cloned into yeast Matchmaker system 3 and interaction studies were performed. Two proteins namely, viral protein genome linked (VPg) and a 10-kDa protein (P10) c v gft encoded by OFR 2a, were identified as possible interacting partners in addition to the viral coat protein (CP). Further characterization of these interactions revealed that the movement protein (MP) recognizes cognate RNA through interaction with VPg, which is covalently linked to the 5′ end of the RNA. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of MP involved in the interaction with VPg and P10. This study implicates for the first time that VPg might play an important role in specific recognition of viral genome by MP in SeMV and shed light on the possible role of P10 in the viral movement. PMID:21246040

  19. Movement Protein Pns6 of Rice dwarf phytoreovirus Has Both ATPase and RNA Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunhong; Ye, Gongyin; Zhang, Zhongkai; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui; Li, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell movement is essential for plant viruses to systemically infect host plants. Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate such movement. Unlike the well-characterized MPs of DNA viruses and single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses, knowledge of the functional mechanisms of MPs encoded by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses is very limited. In particular, many studied MPs of DNA and ssRNA viruses bind non-specifically ssRNAs, leading to models in which ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) move from cell to cell. Thus, it will be of special interest to determine whether MPs of dsRNA viruses interact with genomic dsRNAs or their derivative sRNAs. To this end, we studied the biochemical functions of MP Pns6 of Rice dwarf phytoreovirus (RDV), a member of Phytoreovirus that contains a 12-segmented dsRNA genome. We report here that Pns6 binds both dsRNAs and ssRNAs. Intriguingly, Pns6 exhibits non-sequence specificity for dsRNA but shows preference for ssRNA sequences derived from the conserved genomic 5′- and 3′- terminal consensus sequences of RDV. Furthermore, Pns6 exhibits magnesium-dependent ATPase activities. Mutagenesis identified the RNA binding and ATPase activity sites of Pns6 at the N- and C-termini, respectively. Our results uncovered the novel property of a viral MP in differentially recognizing dsRNA and ssRNA and establish a biochemical basis to enable further studies on the mechanisms of dsRNA viral MP functions. PMID:21949821

  20. Probing the mechanisms underlying modulation of quinidine sensitivity to cardiac IKs block by protein kinase A-mediated IKs phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Kanki, Hideaki; Zhang, Wei; Roden, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cardiac IKs is enhanced by protein kinase A (PKA) stimulation. And PKA-stimulated IKs is about threefold less sensitive to quinidine block than basal current. In this study, we further tested two competing hypotheses: IKs phosphorylation either (i) modulates access of blocking drugs to a binding site; or (ii) destabilizes the drug–channel interaction. Experimental approach: To distinguish between these hypotheses, we studied quinidine block of IKs channels in which three PKA site residues of the α-subunit KCNQ1 were mutated with a bulky negative charged aspartic acid (D). To study alleviation of IKs block by quinidine, we compared activating current at +60 mV, either with or without 5 s hyperpolarizing prepulses to −120 mV. Key results: Without PKA stimulation, quinidine (100 µM) blocked wild-type current to a similar extent with and without the prepulse (93 ± 2% of pre-drug current at +60 mV vs. 95 ± 1%). With PKA-stimulated wild-type channels, however, there was less block with the hyperpolarization to −120 mV: at +60 mV, block was 71 ± 2% (−prepulse) versus 58 ± 3% (+prepulse). Individual D-mutations and the triple-D mutant were resistant to quinidine block similar to that seen with PKA-stimulated wild-type IKs. Conclusions and implications: We conclude that phosphorylation-induced insertion of bulky negative charges alleviates quinidine block and that PKA-induced stimulation, by conferring negative charges to the channels, blunts IKs block as the interaction between the channels and blockers becomes destabilized. These effects would be of clinical significance in providing protective mechanisms against pro-arrhythmias caused by drug-induced inhibition of IKs and IKr. PMID:19522859

  1. Manipulation of Plant Host Susceptibility: An Emerging Role for Viral Movement Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs. PMID:22639637

  2. Manipulation of plant host susceptibility: an emerging role for viral movement proteins?

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Vazquez, Franck; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense response in plants. Recent studies indicate a role of virus-derived siRNAs in manipulating the expression of specific host genes and that certain plant viral movement proteins (MPs) can act as viral enhancers of RNA silencing (VERs) by stimulating the spread of silencing between cells. This suggests that viruses have evolved complex responses capable to efficiently hijack the host RNA silencing machinery to their own advantage. We draw here a dynamic model of the interaction of plant viruses with the silencing machinery during invasion of the host. The model proposes that cells at the spreading front of infection, where infection starts from zero and the VSR levels are supposedly low, represent potential sites for viral manipulation of host gene expression by using virus- and host-derived small RNAs. Viral MPs may facilitate the spread of silencing to produce a wave of small RNA-mediated gene expression changes ahead of the infection to increase host susceptibility. When experimentally ascertained, this hypothetical model will call for re-defining viral movement and the function of viral MPs.

  3. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  4. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  5. Novel Mutant AAV2 Rep Proteins Support AAV2 Replication without Blocking HSV-1 Helpervirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; de Oliveira, Anna-Paula; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Vogt, Bernd; Büning, Hildegard; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    As their names imply, parvoviruses of the genus Dependovirus rely for their efficient replication on the concurrent presence of a helpervirus, such as herpesvirus, adenovirus, or papilloma virus. Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is such an example, which in turn can efficiently inhibit the replication of each helpervirus by distinct mechanisms. In a previous study we have shown that expression of the AAV2 rep gene is not compatible with efficient replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In particular, the combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities of the Rep68/78 proteins have been shown to exert opposite effects on the replication of AAV2 and HSV-1. While essential for AAV2 DNA replication these protein activities account for the Rep-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 replication. Here, we describe a novel Rep mutant (Rep-D371Y), which displayed an unexpected phenotype. Rep-D371Y did not block HSV-1 replication, but still supported efficient AAV2 replication, at least when a double-stranded AAV2 genome template was used. We also found that the capacity of Rep-D371Y to induce apoptosis and a Rep-specific DNA damage response was significantly reduced compared to wild-type Rep. These findings suggest that AAV2 Rep-helicase subdomains exert diverging activities, which contribute to distinct steps of the AAV2 life cycle. More important, the novel AAV2 mutant Rep-D371Y may allow deciphering yet unsolved activities of the AAV2 Rep proteins such as DNA second-strand synthesis, genomic integration or packaging, which all involve the Rep-helicase activity. PMID:28125695

  6. Periodic distributions of hydrophobic amino acids allows the definition of fundamental building blocks to align distantly related proteins.

    PubMed

    Baussand, J; Deremble, C; Carbone, A

    2007-05-15

    Several studies on large and small families of proteins proved in a general manner that hydrophobic amino acids are globally conserved even if they are subjected to high rate substitution. Statistical analysis of amino acids evolution within blocks of hydrophobic amino acids detected in sequences suggests their usage as a basic structural pattern to align pairs of proteins of less than 25% sequence identity, with no need of knowing their 3D structure. The authors present a new global alignment method and an automatic tool for Proteins with HYdrophobic Blocks ALignment (PHYBAL) based on the combinatorics of overlapping hydrophobic blocks. Two substitution matrices modeling a different selective pressure inside and outside hydrophobic blocks are constructed, the Inside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix and the Outside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix, and a 4D space of gap values is explored. PHYBAL performance is evaluated against Needleman and Wunsch algorithm run with Blosum 30, Blosum 45, Blosum 62, Gonnet, HSDM, PAM250, Johnson and Remote Homo matrices. PHYBAL behavior is analyzed on eight randomly selected pairs of proteins of >30% sequence identity that cover a large spectrum of structural properties. It is also validated on two large datasets, the 127 pairs of the Domingues dataset with >30% sequence identity, and 181 pairs issued from BAliBASE 2.0 and ranked by percentage of identity from 7 to 25%. Results confirm the importance of considering substitution matrices modeling hydrophobic contexts and a 4D space of gap values in aligning distantly related proteins. Two new notions of local and global stability are defined to assess the robustness of an alignment algorithm and the accuracy of PHYBAL. A new notion, the SAD-coefficient, to assess the difficulty of structural alignment is also introduced. PHYBAL has been compared with Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis and HMMSUM methods. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R. D.; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell–cell signaling can depend on cell–cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell–cell signaling that induces a directed cell–cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell–cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell–cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell–cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell–cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells. PMID:27140641

  8. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells.

  9. Force-dependent switch in protein unfolding pathways and transition-state movements.

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Pavel I; Hinczewski, Michael; Chakrabarti, Shaon; Marqusee, Susan; Thirumalai, D

    2016-02-09

    Although it is known that single-domain proteins fold and unfold by parallel pathways, demonstration of this expectation has been difficult to establish in experiments. Unfolding rate, [Formula: see text], as a function of force f, obtained in single-molecule pulling experiments on src SH3 domain, exhibits upward curvature on a [Formula: see text] plot. Similar observations were reported for other proteins for the unfolding rate [Formula: see text]. These findings imply unfolding in these single-domain proteins involves a switch in the pathway as f or [Formula: see text] is increased from a low to a high value. We provide a unified theory demonstrating that if [Formula: see text] as a function of a perturbation (f or [Formula: see text]) exhibits upward curvature then the underlying energy landscape must be strongly multidimensional. Using molecular simulations we provide a structural basis for the switch in the pathways and dramatic shifts in the transition-state ensemble (TSE) in src SH3 domain as f is increased. We show that a single-point mutation shifts the upward curvature in [Formula: see text] to a lower force, thus establishing the malleability of the underlying folding landscape. Our theory, applicable to any perturbation that affects the free energy of the protein linearly, readily explains movement in the TSE in a β-sandwich (I27) protein and single-chain monellin as the denaturant concentration is varied. We predict that in the force range accessible in laser optical tweezer experiments there should be a switch in the unfolding pathways in I27 or its mutants.

  10. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-09

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth.

  11. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mushegian, Arcady R.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  12. Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks: A valuable underexploited resource for extraction of DNA, RNA, and protein.

    PubMed

    Kokkat, Theresa J; Patel, Miral S; McGarvey, Diane; LiVolsi, Virginia A; Baloch, Zubair W

    2013-04-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material presents a readily available resource in the study of various biomarkers. There has been interest in whether the storage period has significant effect on the extracted macromolecules. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the storage period had an effect on the quantity/quality of the extracted nucleic acids and proteins. We systematically examined the quality/quantity of genomic DNA, total RNA, and total protein in the FFPE blocks of malignant tumors of lung, thyroid, and salivary gland that had been stored over several years. We show that there is no significant difference between macromolecules extracted from blocks stored over 11-12 years, 5-7 years, or 1-2 years in comparison to the current year blocks.

  13. Archived Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Blocks: A Valuable Underexploited Resource for Extraction of DNA, RNA, and Protein

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Miral S.; McGarvey, Diane; LiVolsi, Virginia A.; Baloch, Zubair W.

    2013-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material presents a readily available resource in the study of various biomarkers. There has been interest in whether the storage period has significant effect on the extracted macromolecules. Thus, in this study, we investigated if the storage period had an effect on the quantity/quality of the extracted nucleic acids and proteins. We systematically examined the quality/quantity of genomic DNA, total RNA, and total protein in the FFPE blocks of malignant tumors of lung, thyroid, and salivary gland that had been stored over several years. We show that there is no significant difference between macromolecules extracted from blocks stored over 11–12 years, 5–7 years, or 1–2 years in comparison to the current year blocks. PMID:24845430

  14. Beet yellows closterovirus HSP70-like protein mediates the cell-to-cell movement of a potexvirus transport-deficient mutant and a hordeivirus-based chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Agranovsky, A A; Folimonov, A S; Folimonova SYu; Morozov SYu; Schiemann, J; Lesemann, D; Atabekov, J G

    1998-04-01

    It has been suggested that the beet yellows closterovirus (BYV)-encoded p65 protein, a homologue of HSP70 cell chaperones, plays a role as a virus movement protein (MP). To test this hypothesis, we used two types of complementation experiments with plant viruses containing the triple gene block (TGB) of MP genes. In one, the BYV p65 gene was cloned into a 35S promoter plasmid and introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants by microprojectile bombardment along with the 35S promoter-driven GUS gene-tagged cDNA of a transport-deficient potexvirus mutant. Transient expression of p65 complemented the mutant as visualized by the significant increase in the number of cells expressing the GUS reporter gene in the infection foci. In the other test, the p65 gene was inserted into the infectious cDNA of the hordeivirus RNA beta component to replace either the 58 kDa MP gene or the whole TGB. Inoculation of Chenopodium quinoa and Chenopodium amaranticolor plants with the T7 transcripts of the chimeric RNA beta, together with the hordeivirus RNA alpha and RNA gamma, caused symptomless infection in inoculated leaves detected by hybridization of the total leaf RNA with a specific cDNA probe. The ability of BYV p65 to substitute for the potexvirus or hordeivirus MPs provides direct evidence for its involvement in the cell-to-cell movement of closterovirus infection.

  15. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    amyloidogenic proteins. Analysis of the structure-activity relationship in phthalocyanines revealed that their anti-amyloid activity is highly dependent on the type of metal ion coordinated to the tetrapyrrolic system but is not sensitive to the number of peripheral charged substituents. The tendency of phthalocyanines to oligomerize (self-association) via aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions correlates precisely with their binding capabilities to target proteins and, more importantly, determines their efficiency as anti-amyloid agents. The ability to block different types of disease-associated protein aggregation raises the possibility that these cyclic tetrapyrrole compounds have a common mechanism of action to impair the formation of a variety of pathological aggregates. Because the structural and molecular basis for the anti-amyloid effects of these molecules is starting to emerge, combined efforts from the fields of structural, cellular, and animal biology will result critical for the rational design and discovery of new drugs for the treatment of amyloid related neurological disorders.

  16. RVMAB: Using the Relevance Vector Machine Model Combined with Average Blocks to Predict the Interactions of Proteins from Protein Sequences.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Yong; You, Zhu-Hong; Meng, Fan-Rong; Xu, Shu-Juan; Wang, Yin

    2016-05-18

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play essential roles in most cellular processes. Knowledge of PPIs is becoming increasingly more important, which has prompted the development of technologies that are capable of discovering large-scale PPIs. Although many high-throughput biological technologies have been proposed to detect PPIs, there are unavoidable shortcomings, including cost, time intensity, and inherently high false positive and false negative rates. For the sake of these reasons, in silico methods are attracting much attention due to their good performances in predicting PPIs. In this paper, we propose a novel computational method known as RVM-AB that combines the Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) model and Average Blocks (AB) to predict PPIs from protein sequences. The main improvements are the results of representing protein sequences using the AB feature representation on a Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), reducing the influence of noise using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and using a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) based classifier. We performed five-fold cross-validation experiments on yeast and Helicobacter pylori datasets, and achieved very high accuracies of 92.98% and 95.58% respectively, which is significantly better than previous works. In addition, we also obtained good prediction accuracies of 88.31%, 89.46%, 91.08%, 91.55%, and 94.81% on other five independent datasets C. elegans, M. musculus, H. sapiens, H. pylori, and E. coli for cross-species prediction. To further evaluate the proposed method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier on the yeast dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that our RVM-AB method is obviously better than the SVM-based method. The promising experimental results show the efficiency and simplicity of the proposed method, which can be an automatic decision support tool. To facilitate extensive studies for future proteomics research, we developed a freely

  17. Hibiscus virus S is a new subgroup II tobamovirus: evidence from its unique coat protein and movement protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, K G; Narendrakumar, R; Wong, S M

    2002-08-01

    The coat protein (CP) and movement protein (MP) sequences of a new tobamovirus infecting Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L were determined. The CP gene encodes 163 amino acid (aa) residues and with a theoretical molecular weight of 18.19 kDa. The MP gene encodes 282 amino acids and its theoretical molecular weight is 30.36 kDa. The nucleotide (nt) and aa sequences of the CP were 46.88 % to 51.63 % and 45.34 % to 57.06 % identical to other tobamoviruses, respectively. The nt and aa sequence identities of MP ranged from 38.81 % to 43.90 % and 30.85 % to 37.88 %, respectively. The predicted virion origin of assembly (OAS) was located in the CP gene. Phylogenetic trees generated based on the nt and aa sequences of both CP and MP genes indicate that this new virus clusters with members of subgroup II of tobamoviruses. Although this hibiscus virus shared a high nt and aa sequence identity with Sunn-hemp mosaic virus (SHMV), Western analysis showed that it is serologically unrelated to SHMV. We propose the name Hibiscus virus S (HVS) for this Singapore isolate. This is the first report on partial nt sequence of a tobamovirus that infects hibiscus.

  18. A plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein interacts with the Abutilon mosaic virus movement protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krenz, Bjoern; Windeisen, Volker; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2010-05-25

    The movement protein (MP) of bipartite geminiviruses facilitates cell-to-cell as well as long-distance transport within plants and influences viral pathogenicity. Yeast two-hybrid assays identified a chaperone, the nuclear-encoded and plastid-targeted heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein (cpHSC70-1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a potential binding partner for the Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) MP. In planta, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis showed cpHSC70-1/MP complexes and MP homooligomers at the cell periphery and co-localized with chloroplasts. BiFC revealed cpHSC70-1 oligomers associated with chloroplasts, but also distributed at the cellular margin and in filaments arising from plastids reminiscent of stromules. Silencing the cpHSC70 gene of Nicotiana benthamiana using an AbMV DNA A-derived gene silencing vector induced minute white leaf areas, which indicate an effect on chloroplast stability. Although AbMV DNA accumulated within chlorotic spots, a spatial restriction of these occurred, suggesting a functional relevance of the MP-chaperone interaction for viral transport and symptom induction.

  19. Protein PEGylation decreases observed target association rates via a dual blocking mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kubetzko, Susanne; Sarkar, Casim A; Plückthun, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    PEGylation is an attractive strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of proteins with a short serum half-life. It can be used to extend the serum persistence and to reduce the immunogenicity of proteins. However, PEGylation can also lead to a decrease in the functional activity of the molecule to which it is applied. We constructed site-specifically PEGylated variants of anti-p185(HER-2) antibody fragments in the format of a monovalent single-chain variable fragment and a divalent miniantibody and characterized the antigen binding properties in detail. Mass-transport limited BIAcore measurements and binding assays on HER-2-overexpressing cells demonstrated that the immunoreactivity of the antibody fragments is fully maintained after PEGylation. Nevertheless, we found that the attachment of a 20-kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety led to a reduction in apparent affinity of approximately 5-fold, although in both formats, the attachment site was most distal to the antigen binding regions. This decrease in affinity was observed in kinetic BIAcore measurements as well as in equilibrium binding assays on whole cells. By analysis of the binding kinetics, we could pinpoint this reduction exclusively to slower apparent on rates. Through both experimental and computational analyses, we demonstrate that these reduced on-rates do not arise from diffusion limitations. We show that a mathematical model accounting for both intramolecular and intermolecular blocking mechanisms of the PEG moiety can robustly explain the observed binding kinetics. The results suggest that PEGylation can significantly alter the binding-competent fraction of both ligands and receptors and may help to explain some of the beneficial effects of PEGylation in vivo.

  20. Protein ubiquitination in postsynaptic densities after hypoxia in rat neostriatum is blocked by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Capani, Francisco; Saraceno, Gustavo Ezequiel; Botti, Valeria; Aon-Bertolino, Laura; de Oliveira, Diêgo Madureira; Barreto, George; Galeano, Pablo; Giraldez-Alvarez, Lisandro Diego; Coirini, Héctor

    2009-10-01

    Synaptic dysfunction has been associated with neuronal cell death following hypoxia. The lack of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction prompted us to investigate the morphological changes in the postsynaptic densities (PSDs) induced by hypoxia. The results presented here demonstrate that PSDs of the rat neostriatum are highly modified and ubiquitinated 6 months after induction of hypoxia in a model of perinatal asphyxia. Using both two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) electron microscopic analyses of synapses stained with ethanolic phosphotungstic acid (E-PTA), we observed an increment of PSD thickness dependent on the duration and severity of the hypoxic insult. The PSDs showed clear signs of damage and intense staining for ubiquitin. These morphological and molecular changes were effectively blocked by hypothermia treatment, one of the most effective strategies for hypoxia-induced brain injury available today. Our data suggest that synaptic dysfunction following hypoxia may be caused by long-term misfolding and aggregation of proteins in the PSD.

  1. Aplotaxene blocks T cell activation by modulation of protein kinase C-θ-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Na, Bo-Ra; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kwon, Min-Sung; Lee, Hyun-Su; Piragyte, Indre; Choi, Eun-Ju; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Han, Weon-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Ho; Jun, Chang-Duk

    2013-12-01

    Aplotaxene, (8Z, 11Z, 14Z)-heptadeca-1, 8, 11, 14-tetraene, is one of the major components of essential oil obtained from Inula helenium root, which is used in Oriental medicine. However, the effects of aplotaxene on immunity have not been investigated. Here, we show that aplotaxene inhibits T cell activation in terms of IL-2 and CD69 expression. Aplotaxene, at a concentration that optimally inhibits IL-2 production, has little effect on apoptotic or necrotic cell death, suggesting that apoptosis is not a mechanism for aplotaxene-mediated inhibition of T cell activation. Aplotaxene affects neither superantigeninduced conjugate formation between Jurkat T cells and Raji B cells nor clustering of CD3 and LFA-1 at the immunological synapse. Aplotaxene significantly inhibits PKC-θ phosphorylation and translocation to the immunological synapse, and blocks PMA-induced T-cell receptor internalization. Furthermore, aplotaxene leads to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK, ERK and p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB, NF-AT, and AP-1 promoter activities in Jurkat T cells. Taken together, our findings provide evidence for the immunosuppressive effect of aplotaxene on activated T cells through the modulation of the PKC-θ and MAPK pathways, suggesting that aplotaxene may be a novel immunotherapeutic agent for immunological diseases related to the overactivation of T cells.

  2. Two homologous host proteins interact with potato virus X RNAs and CPs and affect viral replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-06-29

    Because viruses encode only a small number of proteins, all steps of virus infection rely on specific interactions between viruses and hosts. We previously screened several Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) proteins that interact with the stem-loop 1 (SL1) RNA structure located at the 5' end of the potato virus X (PVX) genome. In this study, we characterized two of these proteins (NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b), which are homologous and are induced upon PVX infection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that both proteins bind to either SL1(+) or SL1(-) RNAs of PVX. The two proteins also interact with the PVX capsid protein (CP) in planta. Overexpression of NbCPIP2a positively regulated systemic movement of PVX in N. benthamiana, whereas NbCPIP2b overexpression did not affect systemic movement of PVX. Transient overexpression and silencing experiments demonstrated that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b are positive regulators of PVX replication and that the effect on replication was greater for NbCPIP2a than for NbCPIP2b. Although these two host proteins are associated with plasma membranes, PVX infection did not affect their subcellular localization. Taken together, these results indicate that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b specifically bind to PVX SL1 RNAs as well as to CP and enhance PVX replication and movement.

  3. Conformational distributions of denatured and unstructured proteins are similar to those of 20 × 20 blocked dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Jung, Young-Sang; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Cho, Minhaeng

    2012-05-01

    Understanding intrinsic conformational preferences of amino-acids in unfolded proteins is important for elucidating the underlying principles of their stability and re-folding on biological timescales. Here, to investigate the neighbor interaction effects on the conformational propensities of amino-acids, we carried out (1)H NMR experiments for a comprehensive set of blocked dipeptides and measured the scalar coupling constants between alpha protons and amide protons as well as their chemical shifts. Detailed inspection of these NMR properties shows that, irrespective of amino-acid side-chain properties, the distributions of the measured coupling constants and chemical shifts of the dipeptides are comparatively narrow, indicating small variances of their conformation distributions. They are further compared with those of blocked amino-acids (Ac-X-NHMe), oligopeptides (Ac-GGXGG-NH(2)), and native (lysozyme), denatured (lysozyme and outer membrane protein X from Escherichia coli), unstructured (Domain 2 of the protein 5A of Hepatitis C virus), and intrinsically disordered (hNlg3cyt: intracellular domain of human NL3) proteins. These comparative investigations suggest that the conformational preferences and local solvation environments of the blocked dipeptides are quite similar to not only those of other short oligopeptides but also those of denatured and natively unfolded proteins.

  4. Malakite: an automatic tool for characterisation of structure of reliable blocks in multiple alignments of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Burkov, Boris; Nagaev, Boris; Spirin, Sergei; Alexeevski, Andrei

    2010-06-01

    It makes sense to speak of alignment of protein sequences only within the regions, where the sequences are related to each other. This simple consideration is often disregarded by programs of multiple alignment construction. A package for alignment analysis MAlAKiTE (Multiple Alignment Automatic Kinship Tiling Engine) is introduced. It aims to find the blocks of reliable alignment, which contain related regions only, within the whole alignment and allows for dealing with them. The validity of the detection of reliable blocks' was verified by comparison with structural data.

  5. Soybean protein as a cost-effective lignin-blocking additive for the saccharification of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Florencio, Camila; Badino, Alberto C; Farinas, Cristiane S

    2016-12-01

    Addition of surfactants, polymers, and non-catalytic proteins can improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials by blocking the exposed lignin surfaces, but involves extra expense. Here, soybean protein, one of the cheapest proteins available, was evaluated as an alternative additive for the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. The effect of the enzyme source was investigated using enzymatic cocktails from A. niger and T. reesei cultivated under solid-state, submerged, and sequential fermentation. The use of soybean protein led to approximately 2-fold increases in hydrolysis, relative to the control, for both A. niger and T. reesei enzymatic cocktails from solid-state fermentation. The effect was comparable to that of BSA. Moreover, the use of soybean protein and a 1:1 combination of A. niger and T. reesei enzymatic cocktails resulted in 54% higher glucose release, compared to the control. Soybean protein is a potential cost-effective additive for use in the biomass conversion process.

  6. Ophioviruses CPsV and MiLBVV movement protein is encoded in RNA 2 and interacts with the coat protein.

    PubMed

    Robles Luna, Gabriel; Peña, Eduardo José; Borniego, María Belén; Heinlein, Manfred; Garcia, Maria Laura

    2013-07-05

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) and Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus (MiLBVV), members of the Ophioviridae family, have segmented negative-sense single-stranded RNA genomes. To date no reports have described how ophioviruses spread within host plants and/or the proteins involved in this process. Here we show that the 54K protein of CPsV is encoded by RNA 2 and describe its subcellular distribution. Upon transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells the 54K protein, and also its 54K counterpart protein of MiLBVV, localize to plasmodesmata and enhance GFP cell-to-cell diffusion between cells. Both proteins, but not the coat proteins (CP) of the respective viruses, functionally trans-complement cell-to-cell movement-defective Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) mutants. The 54K and 54K proteins interact with the virus-specific CP in the cytoplasm, suggesting a potential role of CP in ophiovirus movement. This is the first study characterizing the movement proteins (MP) of ophioviruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of domains of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Deletion and alanine-substitution mutants of the Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein were generated to identify domains involved in tubule formation, movement and symptomatology, using a heterologous expression system derived from Tobacco mosaic virus. Two regions of NSm were required for both tub...

  8. Functional analysis of a DNA-shuffled movement protein reveals that microtubules are dispensable for the cell-to-cell movement of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Trudi; Boevink, Petra; Haupt, Sophie; Roberts, Alison G; Toth, Rachel; Valentine, Tracy; Chapman, Sean; Oparka, Karl J

    2002-06-01

    Microtubules interact strongly with the viral movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and are thought to transport the viral genome between plant cells. We describe a functionally enhanced DNA-shuffled movement protein (MP(R3)) that remained bound to the vertices of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, showing limited affinity for microtubules. A single amino acid change was shown to confer the MP(R3) phenotype. Disruption of the microtubule cytoskeleton in situ with pharmacological agents, or by silencing of the alpha-tubulin gene, had no significant effect on the spread of TMV vectors expressing wild-type MP (MP(WT)) and did not prevent the accumulation of MP(WT) in plasmodesmata. Thus, cell-to-cell trafficking of TMV can occur independently of microtubules. The MP(R3) phenotype was reproduced when infection sites expressing MP(WT) were treated with a specific proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the degradation of MP(R3) is impaired. We suggest that the improved viral transport functions of MP(R3) arise from evasion of a host degradation pathway.

  9. The Potato virus X TGBp3 protein associates with the ER network for virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Heppler, Marty; Mitra, Ruchira; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Cell-to-cell movement of TGBp3 was studied using biolistic bombardment of plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp3. TGBp3 moves between cells in Nicotiana benthamiana, but requires TGBp1 to move in N. tabacum leaves. In tobacco leaves GFP:TGBp3 accumulated in a pattern resembling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To determine if the ER network is important for GFP:TGBp3 and for PVX cell-to-cell movement, a single mutation inhibiting membrane binding of TGBp3 was introduced into GFP:TGBp3 and into PVX. This mutation disrupted movement of GFP:TGBp3 and PVX. Brefeldin A, which disrupts the ER network, also inhibited GFP:TGBp3 movement in both Nicotiana species. Two deletion mutations, that do not affect membrane binding, hindered GFP:TGBp3 and PVX cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp2 and GFP:TGBp3 were bombarded to several other PVX hosts and neither protein moved between adjacent cells. In most hosts, TGBp2 or TGBp3 cannot move cell-to-cell.

  10. The Potato virus X TGBp3 protein associates with the ER network for virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Heppler, Marty; Mitra, Ruchira; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Cell-to-cell movement of TGBp3 was studied using biolistic bombardment of plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp3. TGBp3 moves between cells in Nicotiana benthamiana, but requires TGBp1 to move in N. tabacum leaves. In tobacco leaves GFP:TGBp3 accumulated in a pattern resembling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To determine if the ER network is important for GFP:TGBp3 and for PVX cell-to-cell movement, a single mutation inhibiting membrane binding of TGBp3 was introduced into GFP:TGBp3 and into PVX. This mutation disrupted movement of GFP:TGBp3 and PVX. Brefeldin A, which disrupts the ER network, also inhibited GFP:TGBp3 movement in both Nicotiana species. Two deletion mutations, that do not affect membrane binding, hindered GFP:TGBp3 and PVX cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP:TGBp2 and GFP:TGBp3 were bombarded to several other PVX hosts and neither protein moved between adjacent cells. In most hosts, TGBp2 or TGBp3 cannot move cell-to-cell.

  11. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  12. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications—from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action. PMID:27476873

  13. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein enhances the spread of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Hannes; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Dang, Vy; Sambade, Adrian; Fasler, Monika; Ashby, Jamie; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-04-04

    Eukaryotic cells restrain the activity of foreign genetic elements, including viruses, through RNA silencing. Although viruses encode suppressors of silencing to support their propagation, viruses may also exploit silencing to regulate host gene expression or to control the level of their accumulation and thus to reduce damage to the host. RNA silencing in plants propagates from cell to cell and systemically via a sequence-specific signal. Since the signal spreads between cells through plasmodesmata like the viruses themselves, virus-encoded plasmodesmata-manipulating movement proteins (MP) may have a central role in compatible virus:host interactions by suppressing or enhancing the spread of the signal. Here, we have addressed the propagation of GFP silencing in the presence and absence of MP and MP mutants. We show that the protein enhances the spread of silencing. Small RNA analysis indicates that MP does not enhance the silencing pathway but rather enhances the transport of the signal through plasmodesmata. The ability to enhance the spread of silencing is maintained by certain MP mutants that can move between cells but which have defects in subcellular localization and do not support the spread of viral RNA. Using MP expressing and non-expressing virus mutants with a disabled silencing suppressing function, we provide evidence indicating that viral MP contributes to anti-viral silencing during infection. Our results suggest a role of MP in controlling virus propagation in the infected host by supporting the spread of silencing signal. This activity of MP involves only a subset of its properties implicated in the spread of viral RNA.

  14. Tobacco mosaic virus Movement Protein Enhances the Spread of RNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Hannes; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Dang, Vy; Sambade, Adrian; Fasler, Monika; Ashby, Jamie; Heinlein, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells restrain the activity of foreign genetic elements, including viruses, through RNA silencing. Although viruses encode suppressors of silencing to support their propagation, viruses may also exploit silencing to regulate host gene expression or to control the level of their accumulation and thus to reduce damage to the host. RNA silencing in plants propagates from cell to cell and systemically via a sequence-specific signal. Since the signal spreads between cells through plasmodesmata like the viruses themselves, virus-encoded plasmodesmata-manipulating movement proteins (MP) may have a central role in compatible virus:host interactions by suppressing or enhancing the spread of the signal. Here, we have addressed the propagation of GFP silencing in the presence and absence of MP and MP mutants. We show that the protein enhances the spread of silencing. Small RNA analysis indicates that MP does not enhance the silencing pathway but rather enhances the transport of the signal through plasmodesmata. The ability to enhance the spread of silencing is maintained by certain MP mutants that can move between cells but which have defects in subcellular localization and do not support the spread of viral RNA. Using MP expressing and non-expressing virus mutants with a disabled silencing suppressing function, we provide evidence indicating that viral MP contributes to anti-viral silencing during infection. Our results suggest a role of MP in controlling virus propagation in the infected host by supporting the spread of silencing signal. This activity of MP involves only a subset of its properties implicated in the spread of viral RNA. PMID:18389061

  15. The Movement of Coiled Bodies Visualized in Living Plant Cells by the Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boudonck, Kurt; Dolan, Liam; Shaw, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Coiled bodies are nuclear organelles that contain components of at least three RNA-processing pathways: pre-mRNA splicing, histone mRNA 3′- maturation, and pre-rRNA processing. Their function remains unknown. However, it has been speculated that coiled bodies may be sites of splicing factor assembly and/or recycling, play a role in histone mRNA 3′-processing, or act as nuclear transport or sorting structures. To study the dynamics of coiled bodies in living cells, we have stably expressed a U2B"–green fluorescent protein fusion in tobacco BY-2 cells and in Arabidopsis plants. Time-lapse confocal microscopy has shown that coiled bodies are mobile organelles in plant cells. We have observed movements of coiled bodies in the nucleolus, in the nucleoplasm, and from the periphery of the nucleus into the nucleolus, which suggests a transport function for coiled bodies. Furthermore, we have observed coalescence of coiled bodies, which suggests a mechanism for the decrease in coiled body number during the cell cycle. Deletion analysis of the U2B" gene construct has shown that the first RNP-80 motif is sufficient for localization to the coiled body. PMID:10397766

  16. Purification of scatter factor, a fibroblast-derived basic protein that modulates epithelial interactions and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, E; Gray, J; Stoker, M; Perryman, M; Furlong, R

    1989-01-01

    Scatter factor is a fibroblast-derived protein that causes separation of contiguous epithelial cells and increased local mobility of unanchored cells. Highly purified scatter factor has been obtained by a combination of ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from serum-free medium conditioned by a ras-transformed clone (D4) of mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Under nonreducing conditions scatter factor has a pI of approximately 9.5 and migrates in SDS/polyacrylamide gels as a single band at approximately 62 kDa from which epithelial scatter activity can be recovered. Treatment with reducing agents destroys biological activity and is associated with the appearance of two major bands at approximately 57 and approximately 30 kDa. Whether both the 57-kDa and 30-kDa polypeptides are required for biological activity remains to be established. All the activities observed in crude medium conditioned by cells producing scatter factor are retained by highly purified preparations of scatter factor. These include (i) increased local movement, modulation of morphology, and inhibition of junction formation by single epithelial cells and (ii) disruption of epithelial interactions and cell scattering from preformed epithelial sheets. These changes occur with picomolar concentrations of purified scatter factor and without an effect on cell growth. Images PMID:2527367

  17. Processing-Body Movement in Arabidopsis Depends on an Interaction between Myosins and DECAPPING PROTEIN1[W

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Alexandra; Jaegle, Benjamin; Tresch, Achim; Hülskamp, Martin; Jakoby, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Processing (P)-bodies are cytoplasmic RNA protein aggregates responsible for the storage, degradation, and quality control of translationally repressed messenger RNAs in eukaryotic cells. In mammals, P-body-related RNA and protein exchanges are actomyosin dependent, whereas P-body movement requires intact microtubules. In contrast, in plants, P-body motility is actin based. In this study, we show the direct interaction of the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN1 (DCP1) with the tails of different unconventional myosins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). By performing coexpression studies with AtDCP1, dominant-negative myosin fragments, as well as functional full-length myosin XI-K, the association of P-bodies and myosins was analyzed in detail. Finally, the combination of mutant analyses and characterization of P-body movement patterns showed that myosin XI-K is essential for fast and directed P-body transport. Together, our data indicate that P-body movement in plants is governed by myosin XI members through direct binding to AtDCP1 rather than through an adapter protein, as known for membrane-coated organelles. Interspecies and intraspecies interaction approaches with mammalian and yeast protein homologs suggest that this mechanism is evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:24525673

  18. An auxilin-like J-domain protein, JAC1, regulates phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The ambient-light conditions mediate chloroplast relocation in plant cells. Under the low-light conditions, chloroplasts accumulate in the light (accumulation response), while under the high-light conditions, they avoid the light (avoidance response). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the accumulation response is mediated by two blue-light receptors, termed phototropins (phot1 and phot2) that act redundantly, and the avoidance response is mediated by phot2 alone. A mutant, J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (jac1), lacks the accumulation response under weak blue light but shows a normal avoidance response under strong blue light. In dark-adapted wild-type cells, chloroplasts accumulate on the bottom of cells. Both the jac1 and phot2 mutants are defective in this chloroplast movement in darkness. Positional cloning of JAC1 reveals that this gene encodes a J-domain protein, resembling clathrin-uncoating factor auxilin at its C terminus. The amounts of JAC1 transcripts and JAC1 proteins are not regulated by light and by phototropins. A green fluorescent protein-JAC1 fusion protein showed a similar localization pattern to green fluorescent protein alone in a transient expression assay using Arabidopsis mesophyll cells and onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, suggesting that the JAC1 protein may be a soluble cytosolic protein. Together, these results suggest that JAC1 is an essential component of phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement.

  19. The tubule-forming NSm protein from Tomato spotted wilt virus complements cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of Tobacco mosaic virus hybrids.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Dennis J; Adkins, Scott

    2005-11-10

    A Florida isolate of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was able to complement cell-to-cell movement of a movement-defective Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector expressing the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP). To test for complementation of movement in the absence of other TSWV proteins, the open reading frame for the NSm protein was expressed from TMV constructs encoding only the TMV replicase proteins. NSm was expressed from either the coat protein or movement protein subgenomic promoter, creating virus hybrids that moved cell to cell in inoculated leaves of tobacco, providing the first functional demonstration that NSm is the TSWV movement protein. Furthermore, these CP-deficient hybrids moved into upper leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, demonstrating that NSm can support long-distance movement of viral RNAs. Tubules, characteristic of the NSm protein, were also formed in tobacco protoplasts infected with the TMV-TSWV hybrids. The C-terminus of the NSm protein was shown to be required for movement. TMV-TSWV hybrids expressing NSm and GFP moved within inoculated leaves. Our combination of single-cell and intact plant experiments to examine multiple functions of a heterologous viral protein provides a generalized strategy with wider application to other viruses also lacking a reverse genetic system.

  20. Chromosome Movements Promoted by the Mitochondrial Protein SPD-3 Are Required for Homology Search during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Labrador, Leticia; Barroso, Consuelo; Lightfoot, James; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Flibotte, Stephane; Taylor, Jon; Moerman, Donald G.; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Martinez-Perez, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC). These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18) mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote homolog pairing and

  1. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    PubMed

    Labrador, Leticia; Barroso, Consuelo; Lightfoot, James; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Flibotte, Stephane; Taylor, Jon; Moerman, Donald G; Villeneuve, Anne M; Martinez-Perez, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC). These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18) mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote homolog pairing and

  2. Selective inhibition of virus protein synthesis by prostaglandin A1: a translational block associated with HSP70 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Amici, C; Giorgi, C; Rossi, A; Santoro, M G

    1994-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins are potent inhibitors of virus replication. The antiviral activity has been associated with the induction of 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) synthesis. In this report, we describe that in African green monkey kidney cells infected with Sendai virus (SV) and treated with prostaglandin A1 (PGA1), SV protein synthesis was selectively blocked as long as HSP70 was being synthesized by the host cell. The block appeared to be at the translational level, as indicated by the following (i) PGA1 had no effect on SV primary transcription, and a dramatic decrease in the abundance of SV mRNA occurred only at later stages of infection; and (ii) treatment with PGA1 started at 6 h postinfection, at which time SV mRNA had already accumulated in infected cells, did not suppress the levels of NP mRNA, but it reduced the amount of ribosome-bound NP mRNA and caused a dramatic decrease in the level of genomic RNA. The PGA1-induced block of SV protein synthesis appeared to be cell mediated, since it was prevented by actinomycin D, while PGA1 had no effect on SV mRNA translation in vitro. The possibility that HSP70 could be a mediator of the antiviral effect is suggested by the fact that treatment with other classical inducers of HSP70, including sodium arsenite, cadmium, and heat shock at 42 degrees C for 5 h, also selectively prevented SV protein synthesis as long as heat shock protein synthesis occurred. Moreover, SV protein synthesis was not inhibited by PGA1 in murine Friend erythroleukemic cells, which lack the ability to induce HSP70 expression in response to PGA1. Images PMID:7933069

  3. Distribution pattern of versican, link protein and hyaluronic acid in the rat periodontal ligament during experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Sato, R; Yamamoto, H; Kasai, K; Yamauchi, M

    2002-02-01

    The ability of the periodontal ligament (PDL) to rapidly remodel is the basis of orthodontic tooth movement. During the tooth movement, matrix proteoglycans (PGs) may play important roles in spatial, mechanical and biological aspects for the maintenance and repair of the PDL. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of a large hyaluronic acid (HA)-binding proteoglycan, versican, link protein (LP) and HA in the rat molar PDL during experimental tooth movement by histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Experimental tooth movement was performed according to Waldo's method. Histologically, regressive changes, such as decrease of fibroblasts and collagen fibers and exudative change of edema were observed in the compressive side and progressive changes, such as proliferation of fibroblasts and collagen fibers, in the strain side one day after treatment. By 3 days after tooth movement, regressive or progressive changes were not observed in either side. Using monoclonal antibodies specific to versican core protein or LP, the positive immunoreactivity for both molecules was constantly observed throughout the PDL. After the experimental force was applied to the tooth, however, the immunostainings of versican and LP became significantly intense only in the compressive side but decreased in the strain side. The intensity in the compressive side was strongest one day after the force was applied and gradually diminished thereafter. HA of both sides did not change during experimental tooth movement. Since HA is present in the PDL, large amounts of versican and LP expressed in the compressive side may create large hydrated aggregates via their association with HA that dissipates the compressive force applied to this tissue.

  4. Barley stripe mosaic virus-encoded proteins triple-gene block 2 and gammab localize to chloroplasts in virus-infected monocot and dicot plants, revealing hitherto-unknown roles in virus replication.

    PubMed

    Torrance, L; Cowan, G H; Gillespie, T; Ziegler, A; Lacomme, C

    2006-08-01

    Replication of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV), genus Hordeivirus, is thought to be associated with vesicles in proplastids and chloroplasts, but the molecular details of the process and identity of virus proteins involved in establishing the virus replication complexes are unknown. In addition, BSMV encodes a triple-gene block of movement proteins (TGBs) that putatively share functional roles with their counterparts in other hordei-, pomo- and pecluviruses, but detailed information on the intracellular locations of the individual TGBs is lacking. Here, the subcellular localizations of BSMV-encoded proteins TGB2 and gammab fused to green or red fluorescent proteins were examined in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana and barley (Hordeum vulgare 'Black Hulless'). The fusion proteins were expressed from a BSMV vector or under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The subcellular localizations were studied by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM studies showed that both proteins were recruited to chloroplasts in the presence of viral RNA and that virus RNA, coat protein and gammab protein were detected in plastid preparations from infected leaves. Electron microscope images of thin sections of virus-infected leaves revealed abnormal chloroplasts with cytoplasmic inclusions containing virus-like particles. In addition, cellular localizations of BSMV TGB2 suggest subtle differences in function between the hordei-like TGB2 proteins. The results indicate that TGB2 and gammab proteins play a previously unknown functional role at the site of virus replication.

  5. Frequencies of amino acid strings in globular protein sequences indicate suppression of blocks of consecutive hydrophobic residues

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Russell; Istrail, Sorin; King, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Patterns of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues play a major role in protein folding and function. Long, predominantly hydrophobic strings of 20–22 amino acids each are associated with transmembrane helices and have been used to identify such sequences. Much less attention has been paid to hydrophobic sequences within globular proteins. In prior work on computer simulations of the competition between on-pathway folding and off-pathway aggregate formation, we found that long sequences of consecutive hydrophobic residues promoted aggregation within the model, even controlling for overall hydrophobic content. We report here on an analysis of the frequencies of different lengths of contiguous blocks of hydrophobic residues in a database of amino acid sequences of proteins of known structure. Sequences of three or more consecutive hydrophobic residues are found to be significantly less common in actual globular proteins than would be predicted if residues were selected independently. The result may reflect selection against long blocks of hydrophobic residues within globular proteins relative to what would be expected if residue hydrophobicities were independent of those of nearby residues in the sequence. PMID:11316883

  6. Complete resolution of myoclonus-like involuntary movements under subarachnoid block after midazolam administration in a patient undergoing cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Hirota, Kiichi; Iwai, Teppei; Shingu, Koh

    2015-04-01

    Involuntary movement during and after neuraxial anesthesia, such as spinal and epidural anesthesia, is rarely observed. In this report, we describe a case of myoclonus-like involuntary movement of the upper extremities in a patient undergoing a planned repeat cesarean section under spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine that completely subsided after administration of 2 mg of midazolam. The myoclonus-like movement did not recur or cause any apparent neurological side effects.

  7. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  8. Functional analyses and identification of two arginine residues essential to the ATP-utilizing activity of the triple gene block protein 1 of bamboo mosaic potexvirus.

    PubMed

    Liou, D Y; Hsu, Y H; Wung, C H; Wang, W H; Lin, N S; Chang, B Y

    2000-11-25

    The TGBp1 of bamboo mosaic potexvirus (BaMV) is encoded by the first overlapping gene of the triple-gene-block (TGB), whose products are thought to play roles in virus movement between plant cells. This protein forms cytoplasmic inclusions associated with virus particles in the BaMV-infected tissues. It has been proposed that the inclusion is one of the active forms of TGBp1. To prove this idea, we purified the TGBp1 inclusions from both the BaMV-infected Chenopodium quinoa and Escherichia coli cells overexpressing this protein to test some of their biochemical activities. We found that the TGBp1 inclusions isolated from the infected plant leaves, but not from E. coli, possess the NTP-binding and NTPase activities. However, they lack the RNA-binding activity possessed by the soluble TGBp1. These results indicate that the TGBp1 proteins in the BaMV-infected tissues assume two different functional forms. Mutational analyses and competition experiments show that the two arginine residues, Arg-16 and Arg-21, essential to RNA binding, are also required for the ATP-utilizing activity of the soluble TGBp1. This indicates that a same-structure motif is required for the two functions of the soluble TGBp1. The location of the two arginine residues outside the seven conserved motifs of the NTP-utilizing superfamily I RNA helicases, to which TGBp1 belongs, suggests that an extra-structure motif, besides the seven conserved ones, is required for the NTP-utilizing activity of the TGBp1 protein of BaMV. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Two interacting coiled-coil proteins, WEB1 and PMI2, maintain the chloroplast photorelocation movement velocity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yutaka; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-11-09

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light (accumulation response) and away from strong light (avoidance response). The fast and accurate movement of chloroplasts in response to ambient light conditions is essential for efficient photosynthesis and photodamage prevention in chloroplasts. Here, we report that two Arabidopsis mutants, weak chloroplast movement under blue light 1 (web1) and web2, are defective in both the avoidance and the accumulation responses. Map-based cloning revealed that both genes encode coiled-coil proteins and that WEB2 is identical to the plastid movement impaired 2 (PMI2) gene. The velocities of chloroplast movement in web1 and pmi2 were approximately threefold lower than that in the wild type. Defects in the avoidance response of web1 and pmi2 were suppressed by mutation of the J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (JAC1) gene, which is essential for the accumulation response; these results indicate that WEB1 and PMI2 play a role in suppressing JAC1 under strong light conditions. A yeast two-hybrid analysis and a nuclear recruitment assay identified a physical interaction between WEB1 and PMI2, and transient expression analysis of CFP-WEB1 and YFP-PMI2 revealed that they colocalized in the cytosol. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis confirmed the interaction of these proteins in the cytosol. Blue light-induced changes in short chloroplast actin filaments (cp-actin filaments) were impaired in both web1 and pmi2. Our findings suggest that a cytosolic WEB1-PMI2 complex maintains the velocity of chloroplast photorelocation movement via cp-actin filament regulation.

  10. Chloroplast photorelocation movement mediated by phototropin family proteins in green plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2007-09-01

    Chloroplasts gather in areas irradiated with weak light to maximize photosynthesis (the accumulation response). They move away from areas irradiated with strong light to minimize damage of the photosynthetic apparatus (the avoidance response). The processes underlying these chloroplast movements can be divided into three parts: photoperception, signal transduction, and chloroplast movement. Photoreceptors for chloroplast movement have been identified recently in various plant species. A blue light receptor phototropin (phot) mediates chloroplast photorelocation movement in the seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, the moss Physcomitrella patens and possibly the green alga Mougeotia scalaris. A chimeric photoreceptor between phytochrome and phototropin, neochrome (neo), was found in some advanced ferns and in the green alga M. scalaris. While the mechanism of chloroplast movement is not well understood, it is known that actin filaments play an important role in this process. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with chloroplast movement, several mutants were isolated in A. thaliana (jac1 and chup1) and the corresponding genes were cloned. In this review, recent progress in photoreceptor research into chloroplast movement in various plant species and the possible factors functioning in signal transduction or the regulation of actin filaments identified in A. thaliana is discussed.

  11. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-28

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  12. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences. PMID:26723608

  13. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  14. Transmembrane movement of a water-soluble analogue of mannosylphosphoryldolichol is mediated by an endoplasmic reticulum protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Based on topological studies mannosylphosphoryldolichol (Man-P-Dol) is synthesized on the cytoplasmic face of the RER, but functions as a mannosyl donor in Glc3Man9GlcNAc2-P-P-dolichol biosynthesis after the mannosyl-phosphoryl headgroup diffuses transversely to the luminal compartment. The transport of mannosylphosphorylcitronellol (Man-P- Cit), a water-soluble analogue of Man-P-Dol, by microsomal vesicles from mouse liver, has been investigated as a potential experimental approach to determine if a membrane protein(s) mediates the transbilayer movement of Man-P-Dol. For these studies beta-[3H]Man-P- Cit was synthesized enzymatically with a partially purified preparation of Man-P-undecaprenol synthase from Micrococcus luteus. The uptake of the radiolabeled water-soluble analogue was found to be (a) time dependent; (b) stereoselective; (c) dependent on an intact permeability barrier; (d) saturable; (e) protease-sensitive; and (f) highest in ER- enriched vesicles relative to Golgi complex-enriched vesicles and intact mitochondria. Consistent with the involvement of a membrane protein, the analogue did not enter synthetic phosphatidylcholine- liposomes. [3H]Man-P-Cit also was not transported by human erythrocytes. These results indicate that the transport of Man-P-Cit by sealed microsomal vesicles from mouse liver is mediated by a membrane protein transport system. It is possible that the same membrane protein(s) participates in the transbilayer movement of Man-P-Dol in the ER. PMID:7622555

  15. AtTCTP2 mRNA and protein movement correlates with formation of adventitious roots in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Martínez-Navarro, Angélica Concepción; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Proteins, or TCTP, is a superfamily of exclusively eukaryotic proteins essential in the regulation of proliferation and general growth. However, it is clear that these are multifunctional proteins given (1) the pleiotropic effects of its mutations, and (2), the multiple processes in which this protein is involved. TCTP function in general is conserved, since Arabidopsis AtTCTP1 can rescue a Drosophila mutant, and vice versa. It has become clear, however, that these proteins may have “taxon-specific” functions. In the case of plants, mRNA and/or proteins have been found in the phloem translocation stream of different species, suggesting a role in long-distance signaling. We have found that a second Arabidopsis TCTP gene, AtTCTP2, codes for a protein that moves long-distance through a graft union in tobacco. Interestingly, the mRNA is also transported long-distance. Both mRNA and protein move long-distance; interestingly, the movement, while more efficient from source to sink tissues, also occurs in the opposite direction. The protein reaches the nuclei of parenchyma cells and adventitious roots. Furthermore, it is clear that the long-distance delivery of AtTCTP2 protein and mRNA is required for the induction of adventitious roots. A model is presented that accounts for these observations. PMID:26237533

  16. EGF-like peptide-enhanced cell movement in Dictyostelium is mediated by protein kinases and the activity of several cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-09-01

    DdEGFL1, a synthetic epidermal growth factor-like (EGFL) peptide based on the first EGFL repeat of the extracellular matrix, cysteine-rich, calmodulin-binding protein CyrA, has previously been shown to sustain the threonine phosphorylation of a 210kDa protein during the starvation of Dictyostelium cells. Immunoprecipitation coupled with a LC/MS/MS analysis identified the 210kDa protein as vinculin B (VinB). VinB shares sequence similarity with mammalian vinculin, a protein that links the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. Both threonine phosphorylated VinB (P-VinB) and VinB-GFP localized to the cytoplasm and cytoskeleton of Dictyostelium amoebae. VinB-GFP was also shown to be threonine phosphorylated and co-immunoprecipitated with established vinculin-binding cytoskeletal proteins (e.g. myosin II heavy chain, actin, alpha-actinin, talin). P-VinB and VinB-GFP were detected in DdEGFL1 pull-down assays, which also identified a 135kDa phosphothreonine protein and two phosphotyrosine proteins (35 and 32kDa) as potential components of the DdEGFL1 signaling pathway. DdEGFL1-enhanced cell movement required the cytoskeletal proteins talin B and paxillin B and tyrosine kinase activity mediated by PKA signaling, however VinB threonine phosphorylation was shown to be independent of PI3K/PLA2 signaling and PI3K and PKA kinase activity. Finally, VinB-GFP over-expression suppressed DdEGFL1-enhanced random cell movement, but not folic acid-mediated chemotaxis. Together, this study provides the first evidence for VinB function plus new insight into the signaling pathway(s) mediating EGFL repeat/peptide-enhanced cell movement in Dictyostelium. This information is integrated into an emerging model that summarizes existing knowledge.

  17. Non-Targeted and Targeted Protein Movement through Plasmodesmata in Leaves in Different Developmental and Physiological States1

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Katrina M.; Zambryski, Patricia C.

    2001-01-01

    Plant cells rely on plasmodesmata for intercellular transport of small signaling molecules as well as larger informational macromolecules such as proteins. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter and low-pressure microprojectile bombardment were used to quantify the degree of symplastic continuity between cells of the leaf at different developmental stages and under different growth conditions. Plasmodesmata were observed to be closed to the transport of GFP or dilated to allow the traffic of GFP. In sink leaves, between 34% and 67% of the cells transport GFP (27 kD), and between 30% and 46% of the cells transport double GFP (54 kD). In leaves in transition transport was reduced; between 21% and 46% and between 2% and 9% of cells transport single and double GFP, respectively. Thus, leaf age dramatically affects the ability of cells to exchange proteins nonselectively. Further, the number of cells allowing GFP or double GFP movement was sensitive to growth conditions because greenhouse-grown plants exhibited higher diffusion rates than culture-grown plants. These studies reveal that leaf cell plasmodesmata are dynamic and do not have a set size exclusion limit. We also examined targeted movement of the movement protein of tobacco mosaic virus fused to GFP, P30::GFP. This 58-kD fusion protein localizes to plasmodesmata, consistently transits from up to 78% of transfected cells, and was not sensitive to developmental age or growth conditions. The relative number of cells containing dilated plasmodesmata varies between different species of tobacco, with Nicotiana clevelandii exhibiting greater diffusion of proteins than Nicotiana tabacum. PMID:11299360

  18. The Tomato mosaic virus 30 kDa movement protein interacts differentially with the resistance genes Tm-2 and Tm-2(2).

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Ohnesorge, S; Silber, M V; Pfitzner, A J P

    2004-08-01

    In tomato plants ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), the genes Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) confer resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV). Sequence analysis of ToMV strains able to break the Tm-2 or Tm-2(2) resistance revealed distinct amino acid exchanges in the viral 30 kDa protein, suggesting that the movement protein is recognized by both resistance genes to induce the plant defense reaction. To analyze the interactions between the ToMV movement protein and the Tm-2 and Tm-2(2) genes in detail, we generated transgenic tomato lines expressing various movement protein gene constructs. Crosses of the transgenic tomato lines with cultivars containing either the Tm-2 or the Tm-2(2) gene demonstrated that both genes are able to elicit a hypersensitive reaction in response to movement proteins from resistance inducing ToMV strains. However, the domains and the structural requirements for induction of the necrotic response by the ToMV movement protein are completely different for either resistance gene. In the context of the Tm-2 gene, the resistance determinant lies within the N-terminal 188 amino acids of the ToMV movement protein. Interaction of the 30 kDa protein with the Tm-2(2) gene requires two distinct domains localized at the C-terminus and in a different region of the protein, respectively.

  19. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT.

  20. Nanoporous Gyroid-Structured Epoxy from Block Copolymer Templates for High Protein Adsorbability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Bo; Lin, Tze-Chung; Hsueh, Han-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chieh; He, Xiao-Dong; Ho, Rong-Ming

    2016-06-28

    Nanoporous epoxy with gyroid texture is fabricated by using a nanoporous polymer with gyroid-forming nanochannels as a template for polymerization of epoxy. The nanoporous polymer template is obtained from the self-assembly of degradable block copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(l-lactide) (PS-PLLA), followed by hydrolysis of PLLA blocks. Templated polymerization can be conducted under ambient conditions to create well-defined, bicontinuous epoxy networks in a PS matrix. By taking advantage of multistep curing of epoxy, well-ordered robust nanoporous epoxy can be obtained after removal of PS template, giving robust porous materials. The through-hole nanoporous epoxy in the film state can be used as a coated layer to enhance the adsorbability for both lysozyme and bovine serum albumin.

  1. Cathepsin D-mediated yolk protein degradation is blocked by acid phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Eliane; Nakamura, Angelica; Juliano, Luiz; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2005-04-15

    Vitellin (VT) is a lipoglycophosphoprotein stored inside the eggs of every oviparous organism during oogenesis. In the blood-sucking bug Rhodnius prolixus, VT is deposited inside growing oocytes together with two acid hydrolases: acid phosphatase (AP) and cathepsin D (CD). Egg fertilization triggers AP activity and VT proteolysis in vivo [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2002 (32) 847]. Here, we show that CD is the main protease targeting VT proteolysis during egg development. CD activity in total egg homogenates is blocked by the classical aspartyl protease inhibitor, pepstatin A. Surprisingly, AP inhibitors such as NaF, Na+/K+ tartrate, and inorganic phosphate also block VT proteolysis, whereas this effect is not observed when tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors such as vanadate and phenylarsine oxide or an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatases such as levamisole are used in a VT proteolysis assay. NaF concentrations that block isolated AP activity do not affect the activity of partially purified CD. Therefore, a specific repressor of VT proteolysis must be dephosphorylated by AP in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that acid hydrolases act cooperatively to promote yolk degradation during egg development in arthropods.

  2. Protease substrate profiling using bacterial display of self-blocking affinity proteins and flow-cytometric sorting.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Jonsson, Andreas; Löfblom, John

    2017-01-01

    Proteases are involved in fundamental biological processes and are important tools in both biotechnological and biomedical research. An important property of proteases is to discriminate among potential substrates. Here, a new method for substrate profiling of proteases is presented. The substrates are displayed between two anti-idiotypic affinity domains on the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus. The first domain functions as a reporter tag and has affinity for a labeled reporter protein, whereas the second domain blocks the reporter tag from interacting with the reporter protein. Site-specific proteolysis of the substrate results in release of the blocking domain, enabling the reporter tag to bind the labeled reporter protein. Proteolysis is therefore reflected in reporter binding, which is quantified by flow cytometry. First, the method with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is evaluated and then the substrate preference of matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) is determined using two libraries of around three million substrates each. Identified substrate peptides contained the previously reported motif (PXXXHy ) and on-cell determination of apparent kcat /KM revealed that the enriched substrate peptides are hydrolyzed six to eight-fold more efficiently than a previously reported substrate peptide. The method thus works as intended and the authors believe it has potential as an efficient tool for substrate profiling.

  3. Equine Tetherin Blocks Retrovirus Release and Its Activity Is Antagonized by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism. PMID:24227834

  4. Equine tetherin blocks retrovirus release and its activity is antagonized by equine infectious anemia virus envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism.

  5. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (P<0.05). The cancer cells could be detected in nodular tumor of mice in each group. The volume of the tumor-bearing mice in the nodular tumor of the non-coating group was larger than that of anti-Robol antibody coating group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in tumor volume between anti-Robo4 antibody coating group and non-coating group (P>0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (P<0.01). In conclusion, Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a

  6. A versatile building block: the structures and functions of negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Guo, Yu; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NPs) of negative-sense single-stranded RNA (-ssRNA) viruses function in different stages of viral replication, transcription, and maturation. Structural investigations show that -ssRNA viruses that encode NPs preliminarily serve as structural building blocks that encapsidate and protect the viral genomic RNA and mediate the interaction between genomic RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, recent structural results have revealed other biological functions of -ssRNA viruses that extend our understanding of the versatile roles of virally encoded NPs.

  7. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Mushegian, Arcady R; Elena, Santiago F

    2015-02-01

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is essential for chloroplast anchorage to the plasma membrane and chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Kazusato; Yamasato, Akihiro; Kong, Sam-Geun; Kasahara, Masahiro; Nakai, Masato; Takahashi, Fumio; Ogura, Yasunobu; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2008-10-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. Previously, we isolated the chloroplast unusual positioning1 (chup1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This mutant is defective in normal chloroplast relocation movement and shows aggregation of chloroplasts at the bottom of palisade mesophyll cells. The isolated gene encodes a protein with an actin-binding motif. Here, we used biochemical analyses to determine the subcellular localization of full-length CHUP1 on the chloroplast outer envelope. A CHUP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, which was detected at the outermost part of mesophyll cell chloroplasts, complemented the chup1 phenotype, but GFP-CHUP1, which was localized mainly in the cytosol, did not. Overexpression of the N-terminal hydrophobic region (NtHR) of CHUP1 fused with GFP (NtHR-GFP) induced a chup1-like phenotype, indicating a dominant-negative effect on chloroplast relocation movement. A similar pattern was found in chloroplast OUTER ENVELOPE PROTEIN7 (OEP7)-GFP transformants, and a protein containing OEP7 in place of NtHR complemented the mutant phenotype. Physiological analyses of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing truncated CHUP1 in a chup1 mutant background and cytoskeletal inhibitor experiments showed that the coiled-coil region of CHUP1 anchors chloroplasts firmly on the plasma membrane, consistent with the localization of coiled-coil GFP on the plasma membrane. Thus, CHUP1 localization on chloroplasts, with the N terminus inserted into the chloroplast outer envelope and the C terminus facing the cytosol, is essential for CHUP1 function, and the coiled-coil region of CHUP1 prevents chloroplast aggregation and participates in chloroplast relocation movement.

  9. Self-Assembling Nano-Architectures Created from a Protein Nano-Building Block Using an Intermolecularly Folded Dimeric de Novo Protein.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Yanase, Keiichi; Sato, Takaaki; Unzai, Satoru; Hecht, Michael H; Arai, Ryoichi

    2015-09-09

    The design of novel proteins that self-assemble into supramolecular complexes is an important step in the development of synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Recently, we described the three-dimensional structure of WA20, a de novo protein that forms an intermolecularly folded dimeric 4-helix bundle (PDB code 3VJF ). To harness the unusual intertwined structure of WA20 for the self-assembly of supramolecular nanostructures, we created a protein nanobuilding block (PN-Block), called WA20-foldon, by fusing the dimeric structure of WA20 to the trimeric foldon domain of fibritin from bacteriophage T4. The WA20-foldon fusion protein was expressed in the soluble fraction in Escherichia coli, purified, and shown to form several homooligomeric forms. The stable oligomeric forms were further purified and characterized by a range of biophysical techniques. Size exclusion chromatography, multiangle light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses indicate that the small (S form), middle (M form), and large (L form) forms of the WA20-foldon oligomers exist as hexamer (6-mer), dodecamer (12-mer), and octadecamer (18-mer), respectively. These findings suggest that the oligomers in multiples of 6-mer are stably formed by fusing the interdigitated dimer of WA20 with the trimer of foldon domain. Pair-distance distribution functions obtained from the Fourier inversion of the SAXS data suggest that the S and M forms have barrel- and tetrahedron-like shapes, respectively. These results demonstrate that the de novo WA20-foldon is an effective building block for the creation of self-assembling artificial nanoarchitectures.

  10. RING finger protein PLR-1 blocks Wnt signaling by altering trafficking of Wnt Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ryan E.

    Secreted Wnt proteins control a wide range of essential developmental processes, including axon guidance and establishment of anteroposterior neuronal polarity. We identified a transmembrane RING finger protein, PLR-1, that governs the response to Wnts by reducing the cell surface levels of Wnt receptors Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are normally enriched at the plasma membrane where they are capable of detecting and responding to extracellular Wnts. However, when PLR-1 is expressed Frizzled, CAM-1 and LIN-18 are no longer detected at the cell surface and instead colocalize with PLR-1 in endosomes and Golgi. PLR-1 is related to a broad family of transmembrane proteins that contain a lumenal protease associated domain and a cytosolic RING finger. The RING finger is a hallmark of one type of E3 ubiquitin ligase and monoubiquitination is commonly used to regulate protein trafficking. Protease associated domains are largely thought to mediate interactions between proteins. To identify the domains responsible for PLR-1 regulation of Frizzled from the cell surface we utilized a series of fluorescently tagged fusion proteins and protein truncations containing various domains from PLR-1 and Frizzled. Our data suggests that PLR-1 and Frizzled interact and form a complex via their respective extracellular/lumenal domains, and that ubiqiuitination of Frizzled by PLR-1 targets the Frizzled/PLR-1 complex to the endosome.

  11. Identification of a Functional Plasmodesmal Localization Signal in a Plant Viral Cell-To-Cell-Movement Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Cheng; Lazarowitz, Sondra G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our fundamental knowledge of the protein-sorting pathways required for plant cell-to-cell trafficking and communication via the intercellular connections termed plasmodesmata has been severely limited by the paucity of plasmodesmal targeting sequences that have been identified to date. To address this limitation, we have identified the plasmodesmal localization signal (PLS) in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) cell-to-cell-movement protein (MP), which has emerged as the paradigm for dissecting the molecular details of cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. We report here the identification of a bona fide functional TMV MP PLS, which encompasses amino acid residues between positions 1 and 50, with residues Val-4 and Phe-14 potentially representing critical sites for PLS function that most likely affect protein conformation or protein interactions. We then demonstrated that this PLS is both necessary and sufficient for protein targeting to plasmodesmata. Importantly, as TMV MP traffics to plasmodesmata by a mechanism that is distinct from those of the three plant cell proteins in which PLSs have been reported, our findings provide important new insights to expand our understanding of protein-sorting pathways to plasmodesmata. PMID:26787834

  12. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  13. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  14. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

     Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles. PMID:21248205

  15. Identification of an inhibitory budding signal that blocks the release of HIV particles and exosome/microvesicle proteins.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xin; Gould, Stephen J

    2011-03-15

    Animal cells bud exosomes and microvesicles (EMVs) from endosome and plasma membranes. The combination of higher-order oligomerization and plasma membrane binding is a positive budding signal that targets diverse proteins into EMVs and retrovirus particles. Here we describe an inhibitory budding signal (IBS) from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein. This IBS was identified in the spacer peptide 2 (SP2) domain of Gag, is activated by C-terminal exposure of SP2, and mediates the severe budding defect of p6-deficient and PTAP-deficient strains of HIV. This IBS also impairs the budding of CD63 and several other viral and nonviral EMV proteins. The IBS does not prevent cargo delivery to the plasma membrane, a major site of EMV and virus budding. However, the IBS does inhibit an interaction between EMV cargo proteins and VPS4B, a component of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Taken together, these results demonstrate that inhibitory signals can block protein and virus budding, raise the possibility that the ESCRT machinery plays a role in EMV biogenesis, and shed new light on the role of the p6 domain and PTAP motif in the biogenesis of HIV particles.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of the Contact and Complement Systems Is Blocked by SIC, a Protein Secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Inga-Maria; Shannon, Oonagh; Åkesson, Per; Mörgelin, Matthias; Collin, Mattias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Björck, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that activation of complement and contact systems results in the generation of antibacterial peptides. Streptococcus pyogenes, a major bacterial pathogen in humans, exists in >100 different serotypes due to sequence variation in the surface-associated M protein. Cases of invasive and life-threatening S. pyogenes infections are commonly associated with isolates of the M1 serotype, and in contrast to the large majority of M serotypes, M1 isolates all secrete the SIC protein. Here, we show that SIC interferes with the activation of the contact system and blocks the activity of antibacterial peptides generated through complement and contact activation. This effect promotes the growth of S. pyogenes in human plasma, and in a mouse model of S. pyogenes sepsis, SIC enhances bacterial dissemination, results which help explain the high frequency of severe S. pyogenes infections caused by isolates of the M1 serotype. PMID:21068386

  17. Localized Depolymerization of the Major Sperm Protein Cytoskeleton Correlates with the Forward Movement of the Cell Body in the Amoeboid Movement of Nematode Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Joseph E.; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    The major sperm protein (MSP)-based amoeboid motility of Ascaris suum sperm requires coordinated lamellipodial protrusion and cell body retraction. In these cells, protrusion and retraction are tightly coupled to the assembly and disassembly of the cytoskeleton at opposite ends of the lamellipodium. Although polymerization along the leading edge appears to drive protrusion, the behavior of sperm tethered to the substrate showed that an additional force is required to pull the cell body forward. To examine the mechanism of cell body movement, we used pH to uncouple cytoskeletal polymerization and depolymerization. In sperm treated with pH 6.75 buffer, protrusion of the leading edge slowed dramatically while both cytoskeletal disassembly at the base of the lamellipodium and cell body retraction continued. At pH 6.35, the cytoskeleton pulled away from the leading edge and receded through the lamellipodium as its disassembly at the cell body continued. The cytoskeleton disassembled rapidly and completely in cells treated at pH 5.5, but reformed when the cells were washed with physiological buffer. Cytoskeletal reassembly occurred at the lamellipodial margin and caused membrane protrusion, but the cell body did not move until the cytoskeleton was rebuilt and depolymerization resumed. These results indicate that cell body retraction is mediated by tension in the cytoskeleton, correlated with MSP depolymerization at the base of the lamellipodium. PMID:10477761

  18. A comprehensive library of blocked dipeptides reveals intrinsic backbone conformational propensities of unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Im; Lee, Kyung-Koo; Park, Eun-Kyung; Jung, Youngae; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Cho, Minhaeng

    2012-04-01

    Despite prolonged scientific efforts to elucidate the intrinsic peptide backbone preferences of amino-acids based on understanding of intermolecular forces, many open questions remain, particularly concerning neighboring peptide interaction effects on the backbone conformational distribution of short peptides and unfolded proteins. Here, we show that spectroscopic studies of a complete library of 400 dipeptides reveal that, irrespective of side-chain properties, the backbone conformation distribution is narrow and they adopt polyproline II and β-strand, indicating the importance of backbone peptide solvation and electronic effects. By directly comparing the dipeptide circular dichroism and NMR results with those of unfolded proteins, the comprehensive dipeptides form a complete set of structural motifs of unfolded proteins. We thus anticipate that the present dipeptide library with spectroscopic data can serve as a useful database for understanding the nature of unfolded protein structures and for further refinements of molecular mechanical parameters. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Virtual screening and selection of drug-like compounds to block noggin interaction with bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shaila; Metpally, Raghu Prasad Rao; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B

    2010-04-01

    Noggin is a major natural extracellular antagonist to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) which binds to BMPs and blocks binding of them to BMP-specific receptors and thus negatively regulates BMP-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) signal through heteromeric protein complexes composed of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors. Preventing the BMP-2/noggin interaction will preserve free BMP-2 and enhance the efficacy of BMP-2 to induce bone formation. This work is an attempt to use the current understanding of BMP-2, and its interaction with its receptors and antagonist to design an inhibitor of BMP-2/noggin interaction with the goal of lowering the dose of BMP-2 required in clinical applications. The crystal structure of the BMP-7/noggin complex, the BMP-2/BMP receptor IA ectodomain complex and the extracellular domain of BMP receptor II monomer are known. We modeled the BMP-2 based on the structure of its homologue BMP-7 and its binding complex with noggin. We also modeled a complex of BMP-2/BMPRIA/BMPRII by modeling BMPRII and replacing ActRIIB in the BMP-2/BMPRIA/ActRIIB complex. We then identified the binding region of noggin with BMP-2 and the receptors with BMP-2. From the analysis of structures of these complexes and modeling we identified the key amino acids present in the entire interacting surfaces among these proteins that play important physiological role in the regulation of cell differentiation and bone metabolism. By in silico screening we selected and ranked several compounds that have high theoretical scores to bind to noggin to block BMP-noggin interaction.

  20. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation-dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel C; Hammill, Jared T; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C; Goktug, Asli N; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A; Cannon, Joe R; Shelat, Anang A; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R; Alpi, Arno F; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Harper, J Wade; Schulman, Brenda A; Guy, R Kip

    2017-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ∼80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation-dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide-binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2-E3 ligases.

  1. Synthesis of histone proteins by CPE ligation using a recombinant peptide as the C-terminal building block.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Yoshikawa, Ryo; Fujiyoshi, Yuki; Mishima, Yuichi; Hojo, Hironobu; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-11-01

    The post-translational modification of histones plays an important role in gene expression. We report herein on a method for synthesizing such modified histones by ligating chemically prepared N-terminal peptides and C-terminal recombinant peptide building blocks. Based on their chemical synthesis, core histones can be categorized as two types; histones H2A, H2B and H4 which contain no Cys residues, and histone H3 which contains a Cys residue(s) in the C-terminal region. A combination of native chemical ligation and desulphurization can be simply used to prepare histones without Cys residues. For the synthesis of histone H3, the endogenous Cys residue(s) must be selectively protected, while keeping the N-terminal Cys residue of the C-terminal building block that is introduced for purposes of chemical ligation unprotected. To this end, a phenacyl group was successfully utilized to protect endogenous Cys residue(s), and the recombinant peptide was ligated with a peptide containing a Cys-Pro ester (CPE) sequence as a thioester precursor. Using this approach it was possible to prepare all of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 with any modifications. The resulting proteins could then be used to prepare a core histone library of proteins that have been post-translationally modified. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic synthesis and characterization of pH- and temperature-sensitive silk-elastinlike protein block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Nagarsekar, Ashish; Crissman, John; Crissman, Mary; Ferrari, Franco; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to synthesize and characterize a pH- and temperature-sensitive block copolymer containing repeating sequences from silk (Gly-Ala-Gly-Ala-Gly-Ser) and elastin (Gly-Val-Gly-Val-Pro) protein. The monomer contained one repeat of silk and eight repeat units of elastin, with the first valine in one of the elastin repeats being replaced by glutamic acid. The copolymer was synthesized using genetic engineering techniques. The sensitivity of the copolymer to pH and temperature was examined at various polymer concentrations and ionic strengths. Turbidity measurements were carried out over a temperature range of 20 to 100 degrees C at various pH, concentration, and ionic strength values. The introduction of an ionizable residue (glutamic acid) rendered the copolymer sensitive to changes in pH. The transition termperature (T(t)), the temperature at which the polymer became insoluble upon increase in temperature, was modulated by changing the pH. In general, the T(t) value, was found: (1) to increase with an increase in pH, (2) to decrease with increasing ionic strength, and (3) to decrease with increasing concentration. Results of these studies suggest that by strategic placement of charged amino acids in genetically engineered silk-elastinlike protein block copolymers it is possible to precisely control sensitivity to stimuli such as pH and temperature. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A subset of yeast vacuolar protein sorting mutants is blocked in one branch of the exocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2002-01-21

    Exocytic vesicles that accumulate in a temperature-sensitive sec6 mutant at a restrictive temperature can be separated into at least two populations with different buoyant densities and unique cargo molecules. Using a sec6 mutant background to isolate vesicles, we have found that vacuolar protein sorting mutants that block an endosome-mediated route to the vacuole, including vps1, pep12, vps4, and a temperature-sensitive clathrin mutant, missort cargo normally transported by dense exocytic vesicles, such as invertase, into light exocytic vesicles, whereas transport of cargo specific to the light exocytic vesicles appears unaffected. Immunoisolation experiments confirm that missorting, rather than a changed property of the normally dense vesicles, is responsible for the altered density gradient fractionation profile. The vps41Delta and apl6Delta mutants, which block transport of only the subset of vacuolar proteins that bypasses endosomes, sort exocytic cargo normally. Furthermore, a vps10Delta sec6 mutant, which lacks the sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), accumulates both invertase and CPY in dense vesicles. These results suggest that at least one branch of the yeast exocytic pathway transits through endosomes before reaching the cell surface. Consistent with this possibility, we show that immunoisolated clathrin-coated vesicles contain invertase.

  4. The silver lining of a viral agent: increasing seed yield and harvest index in Arabidopsis by ectopic expression of the potato leaf roll virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Kronberg, Kristin; Vogel, Florian; Rutten, Twan; Hajirezaei, Mohammed-Reza; Sonnewald, Uwe; Hofius, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    Ectopic expression of viral movement proteins (MPs) has previously been shown to alter plasmodesmata (PD) function and carbon partitioning in transgenic plants, giving rise to the view of PD being dynamic and highly regulated structures that allow resource allocation to be adapted to environmental and developmental needs. However, most work has been restricted to solanaceous species and the potential use of MP expression to improve biomass and yield parameters has not been addressed in detail. Here we demonstrate that MP-mediated modification of PD function can substantially alter assimilate allocation, biomass production, and reproductive growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These effects were achieved by constitutive expression of the potato leaf roll virus 17-kD MP (MP17) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different Arabidopsis ecotypes. The resulting transgenic plants were analyzed for PD localization of the MP17:GFP fusion protein and different lines with low to high expression levels were selected for further analysis. Low-level accumulation of MP17 resulted in enhanced sucrose efflux from source leaves and a considerably increased vegetative biomass production. In contrast, high MP17 levels impaired sucrose export, resulting in source leaf-specific carbohydrate accumulation and a strongly reduced vegetative growth. Surprisingly, later during development the MP17-mediated inhibition of resource allocation was reversed, and final seed yield increased in average up to 30% in different transgenic lines as compared to wild-type plants. This resulted in a strongly improved harvest index. The release of the assimilate export block was paralleled by a reduced PD binding of MP17 in senescing leaves, indicating major structural changes of PD during leaf senescence.

  5. Interaction of the Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein with microtubules during the cell cycle in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Boutant, Emmanuel; Fitterer, Chantal; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-10-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) involves the interaction of virus-encoded 30-kDa movement protein (MP) with microtubules. In cells behind the infection front that accumulate high levels of MP, this activity is reflected by the formation of stabilized MP/microtubule complexes. The ability of MP to bind along and stabilize microtubules is conserved upon expression in mammalian cells. In mammalian cells, the protein also leads to inhibition of mitosis and cell division through a microtubule-independent process correlated with the loss of centrosomal gamma-tubulin and of centrosomal microtubule-nucleation activity. Since MP has the capacity to interact with plant factors involved in microtubule nucleation and dynamics, we used inducible expression in BY-2 cells to test whether MP expression inhibits mitosis and cell division also in plants. We demonstrate that MP:GFP associates with all plant microtubule arrays and, unlike in mammalian cells, does not interfere with mitosis. Thus, MP function and the interaction of MP with factors of the cytoskeleton do not entail an inhibition of mitosis in plants. We also report that the protein targets primary plasmodesmata in BY-2 cells immediately upon or during cytokinesis and that the accumulation of MP in plasmodesmata occurs in the presence of inhibitors of the cytoskeleton and the secretory pathway.

  6. Interaction of the trans-frame potyvirus protein P3N-PIPO with host protein PCaP1 facilitates potyvirus movement.

    PubMed

    Vijayapalani, Paramasivan; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Nagasaki-Takekuchi, Nahoko; Miller, W Allen

    2012-01-01

    A small open reading frame (ORF), pipo, overlaps with the P3 coding region of the potyviral polyprotein ORF. Previous evidence suggested a requirement for pipo for efficient viral cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide immunoblotting evidence that the protein PIPO is expressed as a trans-frame protein consisting of the amino-terminal half of P3 fused to PIPO (P3N-PIPO). P3N-PIPO of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) fused to GFP facilitates its own cell-to-cell movement. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, we found that P3N-PIPO interacts with host protein PCaP1, a cation-binding protein that attaches to the plasma membrane via myristoylation. BiFC revealed that it is the PIPO domain of P3N-PIPO that binds PCaP1 and that myristoylation of PCaP1 is unnecessary for interaction with P3N-PIPO. In PCaP1 knockout mutants (pcap1) of Arabidopsis, accumulation of TuMV harboring a GFP gene (TuMV-GFP) was drastically reduced relative to the virus level in wild-type plants, only small localized spots of GFP were visible, and the plants showed few symptoms. In contrast, TuMV-GFP infection in wild-type Arabidopsis yielded large green fluorescent patches, and caused severe stunting. However, viral RNA accumulated to high level in protoplasts from pcap1 plants indicating that PCaP1 is not required for TuMV RNA synthesis. In contrast to TuMV, the tobamovirus Oilseed rape mosaic virus did not require PCaP1 to infect Arabidopsis plants. We conclude that potyviral P3N-PIPO interacts specifically with the host plasma membrane protein PCaP1 to participate in cell-to-cell movement. We speculate that PCaP1 links a complex of viral proteins and genomic RNA to the plasma membrane by binding P3N-PIPO, enabling localization to the plasmodesmata and cell-to-cell movement. The PCaP1 knockout may contribute to a new strategy for recessive resistance to potyviruses.

  7. Interaction of the Trans-Frame Potyvirus Protein P3N-PIPO with Host Protein PCaP1 Facilitates Potyvirus Movement

    PubMed Central

    Vijayapalani, Paramasivan; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Nagasaki-Takekuchi, Nahoko; Miller, W. Allen

    2012-01-01

    A small open reading frame (ORF), pipo, overlaps with the P3 coding region of the potyviral polyprotein ORF. Previous evidence suggested a requirement for pipo for efficient viral cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide immunoblotting evidence that the protein PIPO is expressed as a trans-frame protein consisting of the amino-terminal half of P3 fused to PIPO (P3N-PIPO). P3N-PIPO of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) fused to GFP facilitates its own cell-to-cell movement. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, we found that P3N-PIPO interacts with host protein PCaP1, a cation-binding protein that attaches to the plasma membrane via myristoylation. BiFC revealed that it is the PIPO domain of P3N-PIPO that binds PCaP1 and that myristoylation of PCaP1 is unnecessary for interaction with P3N-PIPO. In PCaP1 knockout mutants (pcap1) of Arabidopsis, accumulation of TuMV harboring a GFP gene (TuMV-GFP) was drastically reduced relative to the virus level in wild-type plants, only small localized spots of GFP were visible, and the plants showed few symptoms. In contrast, TuMV-GFP infection in wild-type Arabidopsis yielded large green fluorescent patches, and caused severe stunting. However, viral RNA accumulated to high level in protoplasts from pcap1 plants indicating that PCaP1 is not required for TuMV RNA synthesis. In contrast to TuMV, the tobamovirus Oilseed rape mosaic virus did not require PCaP1 to infect Arabidopsis plants. We conclude that potyviral P3N-PIPO interacts specifically with the host plasma membrane protein PCaP1 to participate in cell-to-cell movement. We speculate that PCaP1 links a complex of viral proteins and genomic RNA to the plasma membrane by binding P3N-PIPO, enabling localization to the plasmodesmata and cell-to-cell movement. The PCaP1 knockout may contribute to a new strategy for recessive resistance to potyviruses. PMID:22511869

  8. BriX: a database of protein building blocks for structural analysis, modeling and design

    PubMed Central

    Vanhee, Peter; Verschueren, Erik; Baeten, Lies; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution structures of proteins remain the most valuable source for understanding their function in the cell and provide leads for drug design. Since the availability of sufficient protein structures to tackle complex problems such as modeling backbone moves or docking remains a problem, alternative approaches using small, recurrent protein fragments have been employed. Here we present two databases that provide a vast resource for implementing such fragment-based strategies. The BriX database contains fragments from over 7000 non-homologous proteins from the Astral collection, segmented in lengths from 4 to 14 residues and clustered according to structural similarity, summing up to a content of 2 million fragments per length. To overcome the lack of loops classified in BriX, we constructed the Loop BriX database of non-regular structure elements, clustered according to end-to-end distance between the regular residues flanking the loop. Both databases are available online (http://brix.crg.es) and can be accessed through a user-friendly web-interface. For high-throughput queries a web-based API is provided, as well as full database downloads. In addition, two exciting applications are provided as online services: (i) user-submitted structures can be covered on the fly with BriX classes, representing putative structural variation throughout the protein and (ii) gaps or low-confidence regions in these structures can be bridged with matching fragments. PMID:20972210

  9. BriX: a database of protein building blocks for structural analysis, modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Peter; Verschueren, Erik; Baeten, Lies; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution structures of proteins remain the most valuable source for understanding their function in the cell and provide leads for drug design. Since the availability of sufficient protein structures to tackle complex problems such as modeling backbone moves or docking remains a problem, alternative approaches using small, recurrent protein fragments have been employed. Here we present two databases that provide a vast resource for implementing such fragment-based strategies. The BriX database contains fragments from over 7000 non-homologous proteins from the Astral collection, segmented in lengths from 4 to 14 residues and clustered according to structural similarity, summing up to a content of 2 million fragments per length. To overcome the lack of loops classified in BriX, we constructed the Loop BriX database of non-regular structure elements, clustered according to end-to-end distance between the regular residues flanking the loop. Both databases are available online (http://brix.crg.es) and can be accessed through a user-friendly web-interface. For high-throughput queries a web-based API is provided, as well as full database downloads. In addition, two exciting applications are provided as online services: (i) user-submitted structures can be covered on the fly with BriX classes, representing putative structural variation throughout the protein and (ii) gaps or low-confidence regions in these structures can be bridged with matching fragments.

  10. Photosynthetic protein complexes as bio-photovoltaic building blocks retaining a high internal quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Muhammad; Delgado, Juan D; Friebe, Vincent; Aartsma, Thijs J; Frese, Raoul N

    2014-08-11

    Photosynthetic compounds have been a paradigm for biosolar cells and biosensors and for application in photovoltaic and photocatalytic devices. However, the interconnection of proteins and protein complexes with electrodes, in terms of electronic contact, structure, alignment and orientation, remains a challenge. Here we report on a deposition method that relies on the self-organizing properties of these biological protein complexes to produce a densely packed monolayer by using Langmuir-Blodgett technology. The monolayer is deposited onto a gold electrode with defined orientation and produces the highest light-induced photocurrents per protein complex to date, 45 μA/cm(2) (with illumination power of 23 mW/cm(2) at 880 nm), under ambient conditions. Our work shows for the first time that a significant portion of the intrinsic quantum efficiency of primary photosynthesis can be retained outside the biological cell, leading to an internal quantum efficiency (absorbed photon to electron injected into the electrode) of the metal electrode-protein complex system of 32%.

  11. Long distance movement of an Arabidopsis Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (AtTCTP2) mRNA and protein in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is an almost ubiquitous protein found in eukaryotes, fundamental for the regulation of development and general growth. The multiple functions of TCTP have been inferred from its involvement in several cell pathways, but the specific function of TCTP is still not known in detail. On the other hand, TCTP seems to respond to a plethora of external signals, and appears to be regulated at the transcriptional and/or translational levels by mechanisms yet to be determined. In the present work, we analyzed the capacity of AtTCTP2 gene products (mRNA and protein) to translocate long distance through tobacco heterografts (transgenic/WT and WT/transgenic). The results indicate that both AtTCTP2 mRNA and protein are capable of moving long distance in both directions (stock-scion and scion-stock) with a tendency for movement from source to sink tissue (stock to scion). Interestingly, aerial roots emerged only in heterografts where the protein was detected in both stock and scion, suggesting a correlation between the presence of AtTCTP2 and aerial root appearance. More detailed analysis showed that these aerial roots harbored the transgene and expressed both transcript and protein. In addition, the protein localization pattern in transgenic aerial and primary roots was basically the same, indicating specific nuclear destination in roots, but also in leaves. These findings provide an approach to understand the role of long-distance movement in the function of plant TCTPs, supporting the notion that some of these act in a non-cell autonomous manner, as the human counterpart, the Histamine Releasing Factor (HRF). PMID:25566280

  12. Rice ragged stunt virus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein Pns6 complements cell-to-cell movement of Tobacco mosaic virus-based chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zujian; Wu, Jianguo; Adkins, Scott; Xie, Lianhui; Li, Weimin

    2010-09-01

    The protein(s) that support intercellular movement of Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) have not yet been identified. In this study, the role of three nonstructural proteins Pns6, Pns7 and Pns10 in cell-to-cell movement were determined with a movement-deficient Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) vector. The results showed that only the Pns6 could complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-deficient TMV in Nicotiana tabacum Xanthi nc and N. benthamiana plants, and both N- and C-terminal 50 amino acids of Pns6 were essential for the cell-to-cell movement. Transient expression in epidermal cells from N. benthamiana showed that the Pns6-eGFP fusion protein was present predominantly along the cell wall as well as a few punctate sites perhaps indicating plasmodesmata. Taken together with previous finding that the Pns6 has nucleic acid-binding activity (Shao et al., 2004), the possible role of Pns6 in cell-to-cell movement of RRSV were discussed.

  13. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana contributes to potyvirus movement and transports to plasmodesmata via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin system.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-02-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5'-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement.

  14. DEVELOPMENTALLY REGULATED PLASMA MEMBRANE PROTEIN of Nicotiana benthamiana Contributes to Potyvirus Movement and Transports to Plasmodesmata via the Early Secretory Pathway and the Actomyosin System1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Chao; Cong, Qian-Qian; Li, Xiang-Dong; Mou, An-Li; Gao, Rui; Liu, Jin-Liang; Tian, Yan-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular movement of plant viruses requires both viral and host proteins. Previous studies have demonstrated that the frame-shift protein P3N-PIPO (for the protein encoded by the open reading frame [ORF] containing 5′-terminus of P3 and a +2 frame-shift ORF called Pretty Interesting Potyviridae ORF and embedded in the P3) and CYLINDRICAL INCLUSION (CI) proteins were required for potyvirus cell-to-cell movement. Here, we provide genetic evidence showing that a Tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV; genus Potyvirus) mutant carrying a truncated PIPO domain of 58 amino acid residues could move between cells and induce systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants; mutants carrying a PIPO domain of seven, 20, or 43 amino acid residues failed to move between cells and cause systemic infection in this host plant. Interestingly, the movement-defective mutants produced progeny that eliminated the previously introduced stop codons and thus restored their systemic movement ability. We also present evidence showing that a developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein of N. benthamiana (referred to as NbDREPP) interacted with both P3N-PIPO and CI of the movement-competent TVBMV. The knockdown of NbDREPP gene expression in N. benthamiana impeded the cell-to-cell movement of TVBMV. NbDREPP was shown to colocalize with TVBMV P3N-PIPO and CI at plasmodesmata (PD) and traffic to PD via the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system. We also show that myosin XI-2 is specially required for transporting NbDREPP to PD. In conclusion, NbDREPP is a key host protein within the early secretory pathway and the actomyosin motility system that interacts with two movement proteins and influences virus movement. PMID:25540331

  15. Proteins in aggregates functionally impact multiple neurodegenerative disease models by forming proteasome-blocking complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Gao, Yuan; Yu, Li-Rong; Alla, Ramani; Shmookler Reis, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases progressively form aggregates containing both shared components (e.g., TDP-43, phosphorylated tau) and proteins specific to each disease. We investigated whether diverse neuropathies might have additional aggregation-prone proteins in common, discoverable by proteomics. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing unc-54p/Q40::YFP, a model of polyglutamine array diseases such as Huntington's, accrues aggregates in muscle 2–6 days posthatch. These foci, isolated on antibody-coupled magnetic beads, were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Three Q40::YFP-associated proteins were inferred to promote aggregation and cytotoxicity, traits reduced or delayed by their RNA interference knockdown. These RNAi treatments also retarded aggregation/cytotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease models, nematodes with muscle or pan-neuronal Aβ1–42 expression and behavioral phenotypes. The most abundant aggregated proteins are glutamine/asparagine-rich, favoring hydrophobic interactions with other random-coil domains. A particularly potent modulator of aggregation, CRAM-1/HYPK, contributed < 1% of protein aggregate peptides, yet its knockdown reduced Q40::YFP aggregates 72–86% (P < 10−6). In worms expressing Aβ1–42, knockdown of cram-1 reduced β-amyloid 60% (P < 0.002) and slowed age-dependent paralysis > 30% (P < 10−6). In wild-type worms, cram-1 knockdown reduced aggregation and extended lifespan, but impaired early reproduction. Protection against seeded aggregates requires proteasome function, implying that normal CRAM-1 levels promote aggregation by interfering with proteasomal degradation of misfolded proteins. Molecular dynamic modeling predicts spontaneous and stable interactions of CRAM-1 (or human orthologs) with ubiquitin, and we verified that CRAM-1 reduces degradation of a tagged-ubiquitin reporter. We propose that CRAM-1 exemplifies a class of primitive chaperones that are initially protective and highly

  16. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  17. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  18. Quantifying ERK2-protein interactions by fluorescence anisotropy: PEA-15 inhibits ERK2 by blocking the binding of DEJL domains.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Kari; Rainey, Mark A; Dalby, Kevin N

    2005-12-30

    While mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways constitute highly regulated networks of protein-protein interactions, little quantitative information for these interactions is available. Here we highlight recent fluorescence anisotropy binding studies that focus on the interactions of ERK1 and ERK2 with PEA-15 (antiapoptotic phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kDa), a small protein that sequesters ERK2 in the cytoplasm. The regulation of ERK2 by PEA-15 is appraised in the light of a simple equilibrium-binding model for reversible ERK2 nucleoplasmic-cytoplasmic shuttling, which elaborates on the theory of Burack and Shaw (J. Biol. Chem. 280, 3832-3837; 2005). Also highlighted is the recent observation that the peptide N-QKGKPRDLELPLSPSL-C, derived from the docking site for ERK/JNK and LEL (DEJL) in Elk-1, displaces PEA-15 from ERK2. It is proposed that the C-terminus of PEA-15 ((121)LXLXXXXKK(129)) is a reverse DEJL domain [which has a general consensus of R/K-phi(A)-X(3/4)-phi(B), where phi(A) and phi(B) are hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, or Val)], which mediates one arm of a bidentate PEA-15 interaction with ERK2. The notion that PEA-15 is a potent inhibitor of many ERK2-mediated phosphorylations, by virtue of its ability to block ERK2-DEJL domain interactions, is proposed.

  19. Osh proteins regulate membrane sterol organization but are not required for sterol movement between the ER and PM

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Alexander; Sullivan, David P.; Kersting, Michael C.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Beh, Christopher T.; Menon, Anant K.

    2011-01-01

    Sterol transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and plasma membrane (PM) occurs by an ATP-dependent, non-vesicular mechanism that is presumed to require sterol transport proteins (STPs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologues of the mammalian oxysterol-binding protein (Osh1–7) have been proposed to function as STPs. To evaluate this proposal we took two approaches. First we used dehydroergosterol (DHE) to visualize sterol movement in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. DHE was introduced into the PM under hypoxic conditions and observed to redistribute to lipid droplets on growing the cells aerobically. Redistribution required ATP and the sterol acyltransferase Are2, but did not require PM-derived transport vesicles. DHE redistribution occurred robustly in a conditional yeast mutant (oshΔ osh4-1ts) that lacks all functional Osh proteins at 37°C. In a second approach we used a pulse-chase protocol to analyze the movement of metabolically radiolabeled ergosterol from the ER to the PM. Arrival of radiolabeled ergosterol at the PM was assessed in isolated PM-enriched fractions as well by extracting sterols from intact cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These experiments revealed that whereas ergosterol is transported effectively from the ER to the PM in Osh-deficient cells, the rate at which it moves within the PM to equilibrate with the methyl-β-cyclodextrin extractable sterol pool is slowed. We conclude (i) that the role of Osh proteins in nonvesicular sterol transport between the PM, ER and lipid droplets is either minimal, or subsumed by other mechanisms and (ii) that Osh proteins regulate the organization of sterols at the PM. PMID:21689253

  20. Limitations on geminivirus genome size imposed by plasmodesmata and virus-encoded movement protein: insights into DNA trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Robert L; Sudarshana, Mysore; Jiang, Hao; Rojas, Maria R; Lucas, William J

    2003-11-01

    Animals and plants evolved systems to permit non-cell-autonomous trafficking of RNA, whereas DNA plays a cell-autonomous role. In plants, plasmodesmata serve as the conduit for this phenomenon, and viruses have evolved to use this pathway for the spread of infectious nucleic acids. In this study, a plant DNA virus was used to explore the constraints imposed on the movement of DNA through this endogenous RNA trafficking pathway. The combined properties of the geminivirus-encoded movement protein and plasmodesmata were shown to impose a strict limitation on the size of the viral genome at the level of cell-to-cell movement. Size-increased viral genome components underwent homologous and nonhomologous recombination to overcome this strict limitation. Our results provide insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie viral evolution and provide a likely explanation for why relatively few types of plant DNA viruses have evolved: they would have had to overcome the constraints imposed by an endogenous system operating to ensure that DNA acts in a cell-autonomous manner.

  1. Limitations on Geminivirus Genome Size Imposed by Plasmodesmata and Virus-Encoded Movement Protein: Insights into DNA Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Robert L.; Sudarshana, Mysore; Jiang, Hao; Rojas, Maria R.; Lucas, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Animals and plants evolved systems to permit non-cell-autonomous trafficking of RNA, whereas DNA plays a cell-autonomous role. In plants, plasmodesmata serve as the conduit for this phenomenon, and viruses have evolved to use this pathway for the spread of infectious nucleic acids. In this study, a plant DNA virus was used to explore the constraints imposed on the movement of DNA through this endogenous RNA trafficking pathway. The combined properties of the geminivirus-encoded movement protein and plasmodesmata were shown to impose a strict limitation on the size of the viral genome at the level of cell-to-cell movement. Size-increased viral genome components underwent homologous and nonhomologous recombination to overcome this strict limitation. Our results provide insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie viral evolution and provide a likely explanation for why relatively few types of plant DNA viruses have evolved: they would have had to overcome the constraints imposed by an endogenous system operating to ensure that DNA acts in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:14555695

  2. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties.

  3. Calcium-Mediated Control of S100 Proteins: Allosteric Communication via an Agitator/Signal Blocking Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Shaw, Gary S; Konermann, Lars

    2017-08-23

    Allosteric proteins possess dynamically coupled residues for the propagation of input signals to distant target binding sites. The input signals usually correspond to "effector is present" or "effector is not present". Many aspects of allosteric regulation remain incompletely understood. This work focused on S100A11, a dimeric EF-hand protein with two hydrophobic target binding sites. An annexin peptide (Ax) served as the target. Target binding is allosterically controlled by Ca(2+) over a distance of ∼26 Å. Ca(2+) promotes formation of a [Ca4 S100 Ax2] complex, where the Ax peptides are accommodated between helices III/IV and III'/IV'. Without Ca(2+) these binding sites are closed, precluding interactions with Ax. The allosteric mechanism was probed by microsecond MD simulations in explicit water, complemented by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). Consistent with experimental data, MD runs in the absence of Ca(2+) and Ax culminated in target binding site closure. In simulations on [Ca4 S100] the target binding sites remained open. These results capture the essence of allosteric control, revealing how Ca(2+) prevents binding site closure. Both HDX/MS and MD data showed that the metalation sites become more dynamic after Ca(2+) loss. However, these enhanced dynamics do not represent the primary trigger of the allosteric cascade. Instead, a labile salt bridge acts as an incessantly active "agitator" that destabilizes the packing of adjacent residues, causing a domino chain of events that culminates in target binding site closure. This agitator represents the starting point of the allosteric signal propagation pathway. Ca(2+) binding rigidifies elements along this pathway, thereby blocking signal transmission. This blocking mechanism does not conform to the commonly held view that allosteric communication pathways generally originate at the sites where effectors interact with the protein.

  4. Polyclonal antibody against conserved sequences of mce1A protein blocks MTB infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Sasikala; Namasivayam, Nalini; Chellam, Rajamanickam

    2012-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is largely due to its ability to enter and survive within human macrophages. It is suggested that a specific protein namely mammalian cell entry protein is involved in the pathogenesis and the specific gene for this protein mce1A has been identified in several pathogenic organisms such as Rickettsia, Shigella, Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Streptomyces, Klebsiella, Vibrio, Neisseria, Rhodococcus, Nocardioides, Saccharopolyspora erthyrae, and Pseudomonas. Analysis of mce1 operons in the above mentioned organisms through bioinformatics tools has revealed the presence of unique sequences (conserved regions) suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the process of infection. Presently, the mce1A full-length (1,365 bp) region from Mycobacterium bovis and its conserved regions (303 bp) were cloned in to an expression vector and the purified expressed proteins of molecular weight ~47 and ~11 kDa, respectively, were injected to rabbits to raise the polyclonal antibodies. The purified polyclonal antibodies were checked for their ability to inhibit the Mycobacterium infection in cultured human macrophages. In macrophage invasion assay, when antibody added at high concentration, decrease in viable counts was observed in all cell cultures within the first 5 days after infection, where the intracellular bacterial CFU obtained from the infected MTB increased by the 3rd day at low concentration of antibody. The macrophage invasion assay has indicated that the purified antibodies of mce1A conserved region can inhibit the infection of Mycobacterium.

  5. Reinforcement of Shear Thinning Protein Hydrogels by Responsive Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, Matthew J.; Chan, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Shear thinning hydrogels are promising materials that exhibit rapid self-healing following the cessation of shear, making them attractive for a variety of applications including injectable biomaterials. In this work, self-assembly is demonstrated as a strategy to introduce a reinforcing network within shear thinning artificially engineered protein gels, enabling a responsive transition from an injectable state at low temperatures with a low yield stress to a stiffened state at physiological temperatures with resistance to shear thinning, higher toughness, and reduced erosion rates and creep compliance. Protein-polymer triblock copolymers capable of the responsive self-assembly of two orthogonal networks have been synthesized by conjugating poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to the N- and C- termini of a protein midblock decorated with coiled-coil self-associating domains. Midblock association forms a shear-thinning network, while endblock aggregation at elevated temperatures introduces a second, independent physical network into the protein hydrogel. These new, reversible crosslinks introduce extremely long relaxation times and lead to a five-fold increase in the elastic modulus, significantly larger than is expected from transient network theory. Thermoresponsive reinforcement reduces the high temperature creep compliance by over four orders of magnitude, decreases the erosion rate by at least a factor of five, and increases the yield stress by up to a factor of seven. The reinforced hydrogels also exhibit enhanced resistance to plastic deformation and failure in uniaxial compression. Combined with the demonstrated potential of shear thinning artificial protein hydrogels for various uses, including the minimally-invasive implantation of bioactive scaffolds, this reinforcement mechanism broadens the range of applications that can be addressed with shear-thinning physical gels. PMID:25568642

  6. Epstein-Barr viral BNLF2a protein hijacks the tail-anchored protein insertion machinery to block antigen processing by the transport complex TAP.

    PubMed

    Wycisk, Agnes I; Lin, Jiacheng; Loch, Sandra; Hobohm, Kathleen; Funke, Jessica; Wieneke, Ralph; Koch, Joachim; Skach, William R; Mayerhofer, Peter U; Tampé, Robert

    2011-12-02

    Virus-infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize viral epitopes displayed on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules at the cell surface. Herpesviruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to escape this immune surveillance. During the lytic phase of EBV infection, the viral factor BNLF2a interferes with antigen processing by preventing peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Here we reveal details of the inhibition mechanism of this EBV protein. We demonstrate that BNLF2a acts as a tail-anchored protein, exploiting the mammalian Asna-1/WRB (Get3/Get1) machinery for posttranslational insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, where it subsequently blocks antigen translocation by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). BNLF2a binds directly to the core TAP complex arresting the ATP-binding cassette transporter in a transport-incompetent conformation. The inhibition mechanism of EBV BNLF2a is distinct and mutually exclusive of other viral TAP inhibitors.

  7. The movement protein of cucumber mosaic virus traffics into sieve elements in minor veins of nicotiana clevelandii

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, LM; Boevink, P; Cruz, SS; Palukaitis, P; Oparka, KJ

    1998-01-01

    The location of the 3a movement protein (MP) of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by quantitative immunogold labeling of the wild-type 3a MP in leaves of Nicotiana clevelandii infected by CMV as well as by using a 3a-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion expressed from a potato virus X (PVX) vector. Whether expressed from CMV or PVX, the 3a MP targeted plasmodesmata and accumulated in the central cavity of the pore. Within minor veins, the most extensively labeled plasmodesmata were those connecting sieve elements and companion cells. In addition to targeting plasmodesmata, the 3a MP accumulated in the parietal layer of mature sieve elements. Confocal imaging of cells expressing the 3a-GFP fusion protein showed that the 3a MP assembled into elaborate fibrillar formations in the sieve element parietal layer. The ability of 3a-GFP, expressed from PVX rather than CMV, to enter sieve elements demonstrates that neither the CMV RNA nor the CMV coat protein is required for trafficking of the 3a MP into sieve elements. CMV virions were not detected in plasmodesmata from CMV-infected tissue, although large CMV aggregates were often found in the parietal layer of sieve elements and were usually surrounded by 3a MP. These data suggest that CMV traffics into minor vein sieve elements as a ribonucleoprotein complex that contains the viral RNA, coat protein, and 3a MP, with subsequent viral assembly occurring in the sieve element parietal layer. PMID:9548980

  8. Removal of heparan sulfate from the glomerular basement membrane blocks protein passage.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, Tessa J M; Lensen, Joost F M; Wismans, Ronnie G P; Lefeber, Dirk J; Rops, Angelique L W M M; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H M; van den Heuvel, Lambert P W J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H

    2007-12-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) within the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is thought to play a major role in the charge-selective properties of the glomerular capillary wall. Recent data, however, raise questions regarding the direct role of HS in glomerular filtration. For example, in situ studies suggest that HS may prevent plasma macromolecules from clogging the GBM, keeping it in an "open" state. We evaluated this potential role of HS in vivo by studying the passage of protein through the glomerular capillary wall in the presence and absence of HS. Intravenous administration of neuraminidase removed neuraminic acid--but not HS--from the GBM, and this led to albuminuria. Concomitant removal of HS with heparinase III, confirmed by ultrastructural imaging, prevented the development of albuminuria in response to neuraminidase treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that HS keeps the GBM in an open state, facilitating passage of proteins through the glomerular capillary wall.

  9. Surveillance-Activated Defenses Block the ROS–Induced Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Runkel, Eva D.; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPRmt, and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS–induced UPRmt. Activation of the UPRmt, but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS–induced UPRmt, suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPRmt but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism. PMID:23516373

  10. The tobamovirus Turnip Vein Clearing Virus 30-kilodalton movement protein localizes to novel nuclear filaments to enhance virus infection.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y; Lazarowitz, Sondra G

    2013-06-01

    Plant viruses overcome the barrier of the plant cell wall by encoding cell-to-cell movement proteins (MPs), which direct newly replicated viral genomes to, and across, the wall. The paradigm for how a single MP regulates and coordinates these activities is the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 30-kDa protein (MP(TMV)). Detailed studies demonstrate that TMV multiplies exclusively in the cytoplasm and have documented associations of MP(TMV) with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, microtubules, and plasmodesmata throughout the course of infection. As TMV poorly infects Arabidopsis thaliana, Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) is the tobamovirus of choice for studies in this model plant. A key problem, which has contributed to confusion in the field, is the unproven assumption that the TVCV and TMV life cycles are identical. We engineered an infectious TVCV replicon that expressed a functional fluorescence-tagged MP(TVCV) and report here the unexpected discovery that MP(TVCV), beyond localizing to ER membrane and plasmodesmata, targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent manner, where it localized to novel F-actin-containing filaments that associated with chromatin. The MP(TVCV) NLS appeared to be conserved in the subgroup 3 tobamoviruses, and our mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MP(TVCV) was necessary for efficient TVCV cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our studies identify a novel nuclear stage in TVCV infection and suggest that nuclear MP encoded by TVCV and other subgroup 3 tobamoviruses interacts with F-actin and chromatin to modulate host defenses or cellular physiology to favor virus movement and infection.

  11. Dual targeting of a virus movement protein to ER and plasma membrane subdomains is essential for plasmodesmata localization.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Yusa, Akira; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Kitazawa, Yugo; Netsu, Osamu; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2017-06-01

    Plant virus movement proteins (MPs) localize to plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus cell-to-cell movement. Numerous studies have suggested that MPs use a pathway either through the ER or through the plasma membrane (PM). Furthermore, recent studies reported that ER-PM contact sites and PM microdomains, which are subdomains found in the ER and PM, are involved in virus cell-to-cell movement. However, functional relationship of these subdomains in MP traffic to PD has not been described previously. We demonstrate here the intracellular trafficking of fig mosaic virus MP (MPFMV) using live cell imaging, focusing on its ER-directing signal peptide (SPFMV). Transiently expressed MPFMV was distributed predominantly in PD and patchy microdomains of the PM. Investigation of ER translocation efficiency revealed that SPFMV has quite low efficiency compared with SPs of well-characterized plant proteins, calreticulin and CLAVATA3. An MPFMV mutant lacking SPFMV localized exclusively to the PM microdomains, whereas SP chimeras, in which the SP of MPFMV was replaced by an SP of calreticulin or CLAVATA3, localized exclusively to the nodes of the ER, which was labeled with Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1, a major component of ER-PM contact sites. From these results, we speculated that the low translocation efficiency of SPFMV contributes to the generation of ER-translocated and the microdomain-localized populations, both of which are necessary for PD localization. Consistent with this hypothesis, SP-deficient MPFMV became localized to PD when co-expressed with an SP chimera. Here we propose a new model for the intracellular trafficking of a viral MP. A substantial portion of MPFMV that fails to be translocated is transferred to the microdomains, whereas the remainder of MPFMV that is successfully translocated into the ER subsequently localizes to ER-PM contact sites and plays an important role in the entry of the microdomain-localized MPFMV into PD.

  12. Dual targeting of a virus movement protein to ER and plasma membrane subdomains is essential for plasmodesmata localization

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Yusa, Akira; Koinuma, Hiroaki; Kitazawa, Yugo; Netsu, Osamu; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2017-01-01

    Plant virus movement proteins (MPs) localize to plasmodesmata (PD) to facilitate virus cell-to-cell movement. Numerous studies have suggested that MPs use a pathway either through the ER or through the plasma membrane (PM). Furthermore, recent studies reported that ER-PM contact sites and PM microdomains, which are subdomains found in the ER and PM, are involved in virus cell-to-cell movement. However, functional relationship of these subdomains in MP traffic to PD has not been described previously. We demonstrate here the intracellular trafficking of fig mosaic virus MP (MPFMV) using live cell imaging, focusing on its ER-directing signal peptide (SPFMV). Transiently expressed MPFMV was distributed predominantly in PD and patchy microdomains of the PM. Investigation of ER translocation efficiency revealed that SPFMV has quite low efficiency compared with SPs of well-characterized plant proteins, calreticulin and CLAVATA3. An MPFMV mutant lacking SPFMV localized exclusively to the PM microdomains, whereas SP chimeras, in which the SP of MPFMV was replaced by an SP of calreticulin or CLAVATA3, localized exclusively to the nodes of the ER, which was labeled with Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1, a major component of ER-PM contact sites. From these results, we speculated that the low translocation efficiency of SPFMV contributes to the generation of ER-translocated and the microdomain-localized populations, both of which are necessary for PD localization. Consistent with this hypothesis, SP-deficient MPFMV became localized to PD when co-expressed with an SP chimera. Here we propose a new model for the intracellular trafficking of a viral MP. A substantial portion of MPFMV that fails to be translocated is transferred to the microdomains, whereas the remainder of MPFMV that is successfully translocated into the ER subsequently localizes to ER-PM contact sites and plays an important role in the entry of the microdomain-localized MPFMV into PD. PMID:28640879

  13. The nine C-terminal residues of the grapevine fanleaf nepovirus movement protein are critical for systemic virus spread.

    PubMed

    Belin, C; Schmitt, C; Gaire, F; Walter, B; Demangeat, G; Pinck, L

    1999-06-01

    The grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) RNA2-encoded polyprotein P2 is proteolytically cleaved by the RNA1-encoded proteinase to yield protein 2A, 2B(MP) movement protein and 2C(CP) coat protein. To further investigate the role of the 2B(MP) and 2C(CP) proteins in virus movement, RNA2 was engineered by alternatively replacing the GFLV 2B(MP) and 2C(CP) genes with their counterparts from the closely related Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV). Transcripts of all chimeric RNA2s were able to replicate in Chenopodium quinoa protoplasts and form tubules in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts in the presence of the infectious transcript of GFLV RNA1. Virus particles were produced when the GFLV 2C(CP) gene was replaced with its ArMV counterpart, but systemic virus spread did not occur in C. quinoa plants. In addition, chimeric RNA2 containing the complete ArMV 2B(MP) gene was neither encapsidated nor infectious on plants, probably because polyprotein P2 was incompletely processed. However, chimeric RNA2 encoding ArMV 2B(MP), in which the nine C-terminal residues were those of GFLV 2B(MP), formed virus particles and were infectious in the presence of GFLV but not ArMV 2C(CP). These results suggest that the nine C-terminal residues of 2B(MP) must be of the same virus origin as the proteinase for efficient proteolytic processing of polyprotein P2 and from the same virus origin as the 2C(CP) for systemic virus spread.

  14. The Role of Aquaporin and Tight Junction Proteins in the Regulation of Water Movement in Larval Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Raymond W. M.; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F.

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (Ku) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H+-ATPase-rich cells or Na+/K+-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca2+-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased. PMID:23967101

  15. The role of aquaporin and tight junction proteins in the regulation of water movement in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2013-01-01

    Teleost fish living in freshwater are challenged by passive water influx; however the molecular mechanisms regulating water influx in fish are not well understood. The potential involvement of aquaporins (AQP) and epithelial tight junction proteins in the regulation of transcellular and paracellular water movement was investigated in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). We observed that the half-time for saturation of water influx (K(u)) was 4.3±0.9 min, and reached equilibrium at approximately 30 min. These findings suggest a high turnover rate of water between the fish and the environment. Water influx was reduced by the putative AQP inhibitor phloretin (100 or 500 μM). Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that AQP1a1 protein was expressed in cells on the yolk sac epithelium. A substantial number of these AQP1a1-positive cells were identified as ionocytes, either H⁺-ATPase-rich cells or Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase-rich cells. AQP1a1 appeared to be expressed predominantly on the basolateral membranes of ionocytes, suggesting its potential involvement in regulating ionocyte volume and/or water flux into the circulation. Additionally, translational gene knockdown of AQP1a1 protein reduced water influx by approximately 30%, further indicating a role for AQP1a1 in facilitating transcellular water uptake. On the other hand, incubation with the Ca²⁺-chelator EDTA or knockdown of the epithelial tight junction protein claudin-b significantly increased water influx. These findings indicate that the epithelial tight junctions normally act to restrict paracellular water influx. Together, the results of the present study provide direct in vivo evidence that water movement can occur through transcellular routes (via AQP); the paracellular routes may become significant when the paracellular permeability is increased.

  16. A Novel Approach To Improve the Efficiency of Block Freeze Concentration Using Ice Nucleation Proteins with Altered Ice Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jue; Yurkow, Edward J; Adler, Derek; Lee, Tung-Ching

    2017-03-22

    Freeze concentration is a separation process with high success in product quality. The remaining challenge is to achieve high efficiency with low cost. This study aims to evaluate the potential of using ice nucleation proteins (INPs) as an effective method to improve the efficiency of block freeze concentration while also exploring the related mechanism of ice morphology. Our results show that INPs are able to significantly improve the efficiency of block freeze concentration in a desalination model. Using this experimental system, we estimate that approximately 50% of the energy cost can be saved by the inclusion of INPs in desalination cycles while still meeting the EPA standard of drinking water (<500 ppm). Our investigative tools for ice morphology include optical microscopy and X-ray computed tomography imaging analysis. Their use indicates that INPs promote the development of a lamellar structured ice matrix with larger hydraulic diameters, which facilitates brine drainage and contains less brine entrapment as compared to control samples. These results suggest great potential for applying INPs to develop an energy-saving freeze concentration method via the alteration of ice morphology.

  17. Overproduction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase blocks the differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, M N; Driscoll, D; Mutzel, R; Part, D; Williams, J; Véron, M

    1989-01-01

    During the aggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum extracellular cAMP is known to act as a chemotractant and as an inducer of cellular differentiation. However, its intracellular role as a second messenger remains obscure. We have constructed a fusion gene consisting of the cDNA encoding the regulatory subunit (R) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase fused to the promoter and N-terminal-proximal sequences of a Dictyostelium actin gene. Stable transformants, containing multiple copies of this gene, overproduce the R subunit which accumulates prematurely relative to the endogenous protein. These transformants fail to aggregate. Detailed analysis has shown that they are blocked at interphase, the period prior to aggregation, and that they are severely defective in most responses to cAMP including the induction of gene expression. Our observations suggest that intracellular cAMP acts, presumably by activation of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, to facilitate early development. Images PMID:2551673

  18. Surveillance-activated defenses block the ROS-induced mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Eva D; Liu, Shu; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Disturbance of cellular functions results in the activation of stress-signaling pathways that aim at restoring homeostasis. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify components of the signal transduction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) to a nuclear chaperone promoter. We used the ROS generating complex I inhibitor paraquat to induce the UPR(mt), and we employed RNAi exposure post-embryonically to allow testing genes whose knockdown results in embryonic lethality. We identified 54 novel regulators of the ROS-induced UPR(mt). Activation of the UPR(mt), but not of other stress-signaling pathways, failed when homeostasis of basic cellular mechanisms such as translation and protein transport were impaired. These mechanisms are monitored by a recently discovered surveillance system that interprets interruption of these processes as pathogen attack and depends on signaling through the JNK-like MAP-kinase KGB-1. Mutation of kgb-1 abrogated the inhibition of ROS-induced UPR(mt), suggesting that surveillance-activated defenses specifically inhibit the UPR(mt) but do not compromise activation of the heat shock response, the UPR of the endoplasmic reticulum, or the SKN-1/Nrf2 mediated response to cytosolic stress. In addition, we identified PIFK-1, the orthologue of the Drosophila PI 4-kinase four wheel drive (FWD), and found that it is the only known factor so far that is essential for the unfolded protein responses of both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. This suggests that both UPRs may share a common membrane associated mechanism.

  19. Structural and functional diversity among amyloid proteins: Agents of disease, building blocks of biology, and implications for molecular engineering.

    PubMed

    Bleem, Alissa; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Amyloids have long been associated with protein dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases, but recent research has demonstrated that some organisms utilize the unique properties of the amyloid fold to create functional structures with important roles in biological processes. Additionally, new engineering approaches have taken advantage of amyloid structures for implementation in a wide variety of materials and devices. In this review, the role of amyloid in human disease is discussed and compared to the functional amyloids, which serve a largely structural purpose. We then consider the use of amyloid constructs in engineering applications, including their utility as building blocks for synthetic biology and molecular engineering. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 7-20. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    PubMed

    Caignard, Grégory; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Dhondt, Kevin P; Labernardière, Jean-Louis; Petit, Thierry; Jacob, Yves; Horvat, Branka; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV), a close relative of mumps virus (MuV), has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V) hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host.

  1. The V Protein of Tioman Virus Is Incapable of Blocking Type I Interferon Signaling in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caignard, Grégory; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Dhondt, Kevin P.; Labernardière, Jean-Louis; Petit, Thierry; Jacob, Yves; Horvat, Branka; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV), a close relative of mumps virus (MuV), has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V) hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host. PMID:23342031

  2. RNF17 blocks promiscuous activity of PIWI proteins in mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Kaja A.; Tam, Oliver H.; Knott, Simon R.; Falciatori, Ilaria; Hammell, Molly; Vagin, Vasily V.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    PIWI proteins and their associated piRNAs protect germ cells from the activity of mobile genetic elements. Two classes of piRNAs—primary and secondary—are defined by their mechanisms of biogenesis. Primary piRNAs are processed directly from transcripts of piRNA cluster loci, whereas secondary piRNAs are generated in an adaptive amplification loop, termed the ping-pong cycle. In mammals, piRNA populations are dynamic, shifting as male germ cells develop. Embryonic piRNAs consist of both primary and secondary species and are mainly directed toward transposons. In meiotic cells, the piRNA population is transposon-poor and largely restricted to primary piRNAs derived from pachytene piRNA clusters. The transition from the embryonic to the adult piRNA pathway is not well understood. Here we show that RNF17 shapes adult meiotic piRNA content by suppressing the production of secondary piRNAs. In the absence of RNF17, ping-pong occurs inappropriately in meiotic cells. Ping-pong initiates piRNA responses against not only transposons but also protein-coding genes and long noncoding RNAs, including genes essential for germ cell development. Thus, the sterility of Rnf17 mutants may be a manifestation of a small RNA-based autoimmune reaction. PMID:26115953

  3. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  4. A blocking ELISA for detection of antibody to a subgroup-reactive epitope of African horsesickness viral protein 7 (VP7) using a novel gamma-irradiated antigen.

    PubMed

    House, J A; Stott, J L; Blanchard, M T; LaRocco, M; Llewellyn, M E

    1996-07-23

    A novel gamma irradiated inactivated cell culture derived African horsesickness viral (AHSV) antigen was used in a blocking ELISA (B-ELISA) for detecting antibody to a subgroup-reactive epitope of AHSV. A monoclonal antibody (MAB), class IgM, against an epitope on African horsesickness (AHS) viral protein 7 (VP7) was developed in BALBc mice and used in the B-ELISA. The MAB, designated F9H, was blocked by 69 serums from equidae with antibody to AHS, but its binding activity was not appreciably affected by 301 serums that did not contain antibodies to AHS virus. An ELISA protocol using a blocking format is described.

  5. Targeting Multiple Conformations Leads to Small Molecule Inhibitors of the uPAR·uPA Protein-Protein Interaction that Block Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, May; Wang, Fang; Jo, Inha; Knabe, W. Eric; Wilson, Sarah M.; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Li, Jing; Sledge, George; Khanna, Rajesh; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of the urokinase receptor (uPAR) with its binding partners including the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) at the cell surface triggers a series of proteolytic and signaling events that promote invasion and metastasis. Here, we report the discovery of a small molecule (IPR-456) and its derivatives that inhibit the tight uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. IPR-456 was discovered by virtual screening against multiple conformations of uPAR sampled from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. Biochemical characterization reveal that the compound binds to uPAR with sub-micromolar affinity (Kd = 310 nM) and inhibits the tight protein-protein interaction with an IC50 of 10 μM. Free energy calculations based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations suggested the importance of a carboxylate moiety on IPR-456, which was confirmed by the activity of several derivatives including IPR-803. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that IPR-456 inhibited uPA binding to uPAR of breast MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with an IC50 of 8 μM. The compounds blocked MDA-MB-231 cell invasion, but IPR-456 showed little effect on MDA-MB-231 migration, and no effect on adhesion, suggesting that uPAR mediates these processes through its other binding partners. PMID:21875078

  6. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary

  7. Visualizing Protein Movement on DNA at the Single-molecule Level using DNA Curtains

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Timothy D.; Gibb, Bryan; Greene, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental feature of many nucleic-acid binding proteins is their ability to move along DNA either by diffusion-based mechanisms or by ATP-hydrolysis driven translocation. For example, most site-specific DNA-binding proteins must diffuse to some extent along DNA to either find their target sites, or to otherwise fulfill their biological roles. Similarly, nucleic-acid translocases such as helicases and polymerases must move along DNA to fulfill their functions. In both instances, the proteins must also be capable of moving in crowded environments while navigating through DNA-bound obstacles. These types of behaviors can be challenging to analyze by bulk biochemical methods because of the transient nature of the interactions, and/or heterogeneity of the reaction intermediates. The advent of single-molecule methodologies has overcome some of these problems, and has led to many new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to protein motion along DNA. We have developed DNA curtains as a tool to facilitate single molecule observations of protein-nucleic acid interactions, and we have applied these new research tools to systems involving both diffusive-based motion as well as ATP directed translocation. Here we highlight these studies by first discussing how diffusion contributes to target searches by proteins involved in post-replicative mismatch repair. We then discuss DNA curtain assays of two different DNA translocases, RecBCD and FtsK, which participate in homologous DNA recombination and site-specific DNA recombination, respectively. PMID:24598576

  8. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

    PubMed

    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Loss of Ribosomal Protein L11 Blocks Stress Activation of the Bacillus subtilis Transcription Factor ςB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyu; Scott, Janelle M.; Haldenwang, W. G.

    2001-01-01

    ςB, the general stress response sigma factor of Bacillus subtilis, is activated when the cell's energy levels decline or the bacterium is exposed to environmental stress (e.g., heat shock, ethanol). Physical stress activates ςB through a collection of regulatory kinases and phosphatases (the Rsb proteins) which catalyze the release of ςB from an anti-ςB factor inhibitor. The means by which diverse stresses communicate with the Rsb proteins is unknown; however, a role for the ribosome in this process was suggested when several of the upstream members of the ςB stress activation cascade (RsbR, -S, and -T) were found to cofractionate with ribosomes in crude B. subtilis extracts. We now present evidence for the involvement of a ribosome-mediated process in the stress activation of ςB. B. subtilis strains resistant to the antibiotic thiostrepton, due to the loss of ribosomal protein L11 (RplK), were found to be blocked in the stress activation of ςB. Neither the energy-responsive activation of ςB nor stress-dependent chaperone gene induction (a ςB-independent stress response) was inhibited by the loss of L11. The Rsb proteins required for stress activation of ςB are shown to be active in the RplK− strain but fail to be triggered by stress. The data demonstrate that the B. subtilis ribosomes provide an essential input for the stress activation of ςB and suggest that the ribosomes may themselves be the sensors for stress in this system. PMID:11244072

  10. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.; Knauf, J.A.; Pendergrass, S.H.

    1996-08-06

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using {beta}-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs ({beta}-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized {beta}-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic {beta}-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular studies on bromovirus capsid protein. III. Analysis of cell-to-cell movement competence of coat protein defective variants of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus.

    PubMed

    Rao, A L

    1997-06-09

    To determine whether the role of coat protein (CP) in cell-to-cell movement of dicot-adapted cowpea chlorotic mottle bromovirus (CCMV) is distinct from that of monocot-adapted brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV), two reporter genes, beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), were substituted for the CP in a biologically active clone of CCMV RNA3 (C3). Primary leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa, and cowpea were co-inoculated with wild-type (wt) CCMV RNA 1 and -2 and either C3/delta CP-GUS or C3/delta CP-EGFP and analyzed for GUS activity or the presence of green fluorescence. The visual appearance of infections caused by GUS or EGFP variants indicated that, in CCMV, epidermal cell-to-cell movement can occur without a functional CP. By contrast, inoculation of MP defective variants of C3/delta CP-GUS or C3/delta CP-EGFP resulted in subliminal infections. Additional experiments examining the infectivity of wt BMV RNA 1 and -2 and a BMV RNA3 variant bearing the EGFP in the place of CP (B3/delta CP-EGFP) confirmed previous observations that, unlike CCMV, epidermal cell-to-cell movement of BMV is dependent on the expression of a functional CP. Taken together, the results demonstrate that BMV and CCMV use different mechanisms for initial epidermal cell-to-cell spread, and the individual role played by the respective CP genes in this active process is discussed.

  12. Rapid screening for dominant negative mutations in the beet necrotic yellow vein virus triple gene block proteins P13 and P15 using a viral replicon.

    PubMed

    Lauber, E; Janssens, L; Weyens, G; Jonard, G; Richards, K E; Lefèbvre, M; Guilley, H

    2001-08-01

    Point mutations were introduced into the genes encoding the triple gene bock movement proteins P13 and P15 of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV). Mutations which disabled viral cell-to-cell movement in Chenopodium quinoa were then tested for their ability to act as dominant negative inhibiters of movement of wild-type BNYVV when expressed from a co-inoculated BNYVV RNA 3-based replicon. For P13, three types of mutation inhibited the movement function: non-synomynous mutations in the N- and C-terminal hydrophobic domains, a mutation at the boundary between the N-terminal hydrophobic domain and the central hydrophilic domain (mutant P13-A12), and mutations in the conserved sequence motif in the central hydrophilic domain. However, only the 'boundary' mutant P13-A12 strongly inhibited movement of wild-type virus when expressed from the co-inoculated replicon. Similar experiments with P15 detected four movement-defective mutants which strongly inhibited cell-to-cell movement of wild-type BNYVV when the mutants were expressed from a co-inoculated replicon. Beta vulgaris transformed with two of these P15 mutants were highly resistant to fungus-mediated infection with BNYVV.

  13. Cis-acting element (SL1) of Potato virus X controls viral movement by interacting with the NbMPB2Cb and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Cho, Won Kyong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2012-06-05

    A number of candidate tobacco proteins that bind to cis-acting elements (SL1 RNAs) of Potato virus X (PVX) have been identified in previous studies. We further characterized TMV-MP30 binding protein 2C (MPB2C) homologous protein. We isolated NbMPB2Cb from Nicotiana benthamiana and confirmed the interaction of NbMPB2Cb with SL1 RNAs in vitro. The mRNA level of NbMPB2Cb was increased upon infection by PVX and Tobacco mosaic virus. The movement of PVX was reduced by overexpression of NbMPB2Cb and increased by silenced of NbMPB2Cb. In contrast, PVX RNA accumulation was not significantly altered in protoplasts. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NbMPB2Cb interacts with PVX movement-associated proteins. PVX infection altered the subcellular localization of NbMPB2Cb from microtubules to endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest that the NbMPB2Cb negatively affects PVX movement by interacting with SL1 RNAs and movement-associated proteins of PVX and by re-localizing in response to PVX infection.

  14. Influence of host chloroplast proteins on Tobacco mosaic virus accumulation and intercellular movement.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sumana; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Cole, Anthony B; Ballard, Kimberly D; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) forms dense cytoplasmic bodies containing replication-associated proteins (virus replication complexes [VRCs]) upon infection. To identify host proteins that interact with individual viral components of VRCs or VRCs in toto, we isolated viral replicase- and VRC-enriched fractions from TMV-infected Nicotiana tabacum plants. Two host proteins in enriched fractions, ATP-synthase γ-subunit (AtpC) and Rubisco activase (RCA) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Through pull-down analysis, RCA bound predominantly to the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains of the TMV replicase. Tobamovirus, but not Cucumber mosaic virus or Potato virus X, infection of N. tabacum plants resulted in 50% reductions in Rca and AtpC messenger RNA levels. To investigate the role of these host proteins in TMV accumulation and plant defense, we used a Tobacco rattle virus vector to silence these genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants prior to challenge with TMV expressing green fluorescent protein. TMV-induced fluorescent lesions on Rca- or AtpC-silenced leaves were, respectively, similar or twice the size of those on leaves expressing these genes. Silencing Rca and AtpC did not influence the spread of Tomato bushy stunt virus and Potato virus X. In AtpC- and Rca-silenced leaves TMV accumulation and pathogenicity were greatly enhanced, suggesting a role of both host-encoded proteins in a defense response against TMV. In addition, silencing these host genes altered the phenotype of the TMV infection foci and VRCs, yielding foci with concentric fluorescent rings and dramatically more but smaller VRCs. The concentric rings occurred through renewed virus accumulation internal to the infection front.

  15. Dityromycin and GE82832 bind protein S12 and block EF-G catalyzed translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bulkley, David; Brandi, Letizia; Polikanov, Yury S.; Fabbretti, Attilio; O’Connor, Michael; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The translocation of messenger RNA and transfer RNA through the ribosome is catalyzed by EF-G, a universally conserved GTPase. The mechanism by which the closely related decapeptide antibiotics dityromycin and GE82832 inhibit EF-G-catalyzed translocation is elucidated in this study. Using crystallographic and biochemical experiments we demonstrate that these antibiotics bind to ribosomal protein S12 in solution as well as within the small ribosomal subunit, inducing long-range effects on the ribosomal head. The crystal structure of the antibiotic in complex with the 70S ribosome reveals that the binding involves conserved amino acid residues of S12 whose mutations result in in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance and loss of antibiotic binding. The data also suggest that GE82832/dityromycin inhibits EF-G-catalyzed translocation by disrupting a critical contact between EF-G and S12 that is required to stabilize the post-translocational conformation of EF-G, thereby preventing the ribosome-EF-G complex from entering a conformation productive for translocation. PMID:24412368

  16. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Gachelet, Eliora; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Barcy, Serge; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs). Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication. PMID:25709648

  17. Nelfinavir impairs glycosylation of herpes simplex virus 1 envelope proteins and blocks virus maturation.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Gachelet, Eliora; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Barcy, Serge; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs). Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  18. Natural peptides as building blocks for the synthesis of large protein-like molecules with hydrazone and oxime linkages.

    PubMed

    Rose, K; Zeng, W; Regamey, P O; Chernushevich, I V; Standing, K G; Gaertner, H F

    1996-01-01

    Methods are known for the production of synthetic protein-like molecules of nonlinear architecture with molecular masses in the 10-20 kDa range. To synthesize such compounds of higher molecular mass and complexity, chemoselective ligation of natural (as opposed to synthetic) peptide building blocks was studied. In preliminary experiments with model peptides, conditions for the formation of peptide oximes were investigated, and their stability at alkaline pH was examined, to resolve a literature controversy. It was found that low pH (down to 2.1) was suitable for polyoxime formation and that the oxime bond was stable for up to 65 h at pH 8 and for more than 2 h at pH 9. Then, using natural peptides, it was found to be possible to synthesize, and characterize by mass spectrometry, nine-component species with molecular masses > 48 kDa. This is about twice the size of homogeneous artificial proteins previously described. Such complex molecules of defined structure are beginning to find applications as vaccine candidates, as radioimmunodiagnostic agents, and as nonviral gene therapy delivery vehicles.

  19. Correctly folded Pfs48/45 protein of Plasmodium falciparum elicits malaria transmission-blocking immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Outchkourov, Nikolay S.; Roeffen, Will; Kaan, Anita; Jansen, Josephine; Luty, Adrian; Schuiffel, Danielle; van Gemert, Geert Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2008-01-01

    Malaria kills >1 million people each year, in particular in sub-Saharan Africa. Although asexual forms are directly responsible for disease and death, sexual stages account for the transmission of Plasmodium parasites from human to the mosquito vector and therefore the spread of the parasite in the population. Development of a malaria vaccine is urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Vaccines against sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum are meant to decrease the force of transmission and consequently reduce malaria burden. Pfs48/45 is specifically expressed in sexual stages and is a well established transmission-blocking (TB) vaccine candidate. However, production of correctly folded recombinant Pfs48/45 protein with display of its TB epitopes has been a major challenge. Here, we show the production of a properly folded Pfs48/45 C-terminal fragment by simultaneous coexpression with four periplasmic folding catalysts in Escherichia coli. This C-terminal fragment fused to maltose binding protein was produced at medium scale with >90% purity and a stability over at least a 9-month period. It induces uniform and high antibody titers in mice and elicits functional TB antibodies in standard membrane feeding assays in 90% of the immunized mice. Our data provide a clear perspective on the clinical development of a Pfs48/45-based TB malaria vaccine. PMID:18332422

  20. A self-perpetuating repressive state of a viral replication protein blocks superinfection by the same virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Rong; Guo, Qin; Zhang, Shaoyan; Li, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Diverse animal and plant viruses block the re-infection of host cells by the same or highly similar viruses through superinfection exclusion (SIE), a widely observed, yet poorly understood phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that SIE of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is exclusively determined by p28, one of the two replication proteins encoded by this virus. p28 expressed from a TCV replicon exerts strong SIE to a different TCV replicon. Transiently expressed p28, delivered simultaneously with, or ahead of, a TCV replicon, largely recapitulates this repressive activity. Interestingly, p28-mediated SIE is dramatically enhanced by C-terminally fused epitope tags or fluorescent proteins, but weakened by N-terminal modifications, and it inversely correlates with the ability of p28 to complement the replication of a p28-defective TCV replicon. Strikingly, p28 in SIE-positive cells forms large, mobile punctate inclusions that trans-aggregate a non-coalescing, SIE-defective, yet replication-competent p28 mutant. These results support a model postulating that TCV SIE is caused by the formation of multimeric p28 complexes capable of intercepting fresh p28 monomers translated from superinfector genomes, thereby abolishing superinfector replication. This model could prove to be applicable to other RNA viruses, and offer novel targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:28267773

  1. An integral membrane protein (LMP2) blocks reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus from latency following surface immunoglobulin crosslinking.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C L; Lee, J H; Kieff, E; Longnecker, R

    1994-01-01

    The role of latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection was evaluated by using latently infected primary B lymphocytes that had been growth transformed by wild-type or specifically mutated EBV recombinants. LMP2 null mutant recombinant EBV-infected cells were similar to normal B lymphocytes in their rapid increase in intracellular free calcium after surface immunoglobulin crosslinking. These cells also became more permissive for lytic EBV replication. In sharp contrast, wild-type control infected cells had little or no increase in intracellular free calcium or in permissivity for EBV replication. The block to surface immunoglobulin crosslinking-induced permissivity in cells expressing wild-type LMP2 could be bypassed by raising intracellular free calcium levels with an ionophore and by activating protein kinase C with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. LMP2A, not LMP2B, mediates this effect on calcium mobilization. Genetic and biochemical data are consistent with these effects being due to the interaction of the LMP2A N-terminal cytoplasmic domain with B lymphocyte src family tyrosine kinases. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8290598

  2. Infected Cell Protein (ICP)47 Enhances Herpes Simplex Virus Neurovirulence by Blocking the CD8+ T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Kim; Chen, Wei; Johnson, David C.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected cell protein (ICP)47 blocks CD8+ T cell recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP). In vivo, HSV-1 replicates in two distinct tissues: in epithelial mucosa or epidermis, where the virus enters sensory neurons; and in the peripheral and central nervous system, where acute and subsequently latent infections occur. Here, we show that an HSV-1 ICP47− mutant is less neurovirulent than wild-type HSV-1 in mice, but replicates normally in epithelial tissues. The reduced neurovirulence of the ICP47− mutant was due to a protective CD8+ T cell response. When compared with wild-type virus, the ICP47− mutant expressed reduced neurovirulence in immunologically normal mice, and T cell–deficient nude mice after reconstitution with CD8+ T cells. However, the ICP47− mutant exhibited normal neurovirulence in mice that were acutely depleted of CD8+ T cells, and in nude mice that were not reconstituted, or were reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. In contrast, CD8+ T cell depletion did not increase the neurovirulence of an unrelated, attenuated HSV-1 glycoprotein (g)E− mutant. ICP47 is the first viral protein shown to influence neurovirulence by inhibiting CD8+ T cell protection. PMID:9449714

  3. Blocking the Interactions between Calcium-Bound S100A12 Protein and the V Domain of RAGE Using Tranilast

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jian Wei; Fu, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor in the immunoglobulin superfamily, is involved in several inflammatory processes. RAGE induces cellular signaling pathways upon binding with various ligands, such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs), β-amyloids, and S100 proteins. The solution structure of S100A12 and the V ligand-binding region of RAGE have been reported previously. Using heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy to conduct 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) titration experiments, we identified and mapped the binding interface between S100A12 and the V domain of RAGE. The NMR chemical shift data were used as the constraints for the High Ambiguity Driven biomolecular DOCKing (HADDOCK) calculation to generate a structural model of the S100A12–V domain complex. In addition, tranilast (an anti-allergic drug) showed strong interaction with S100A12 in the 1H–15N HSQC titration, fluorescence experiments, and WST-1 assay. The results also indicated that tranilast was located at the binding site between S100A12 and the V domain, blocking interaction between these two proteins. Our results provide the mechanistic details for a structural model and reveal a potential precursor for an inhibitor for pro-inflammatory diseases, which could be useful for the development of new drugs. PMID:27598566

  4. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSm protein domains involved in tubule formation,movement and symptoms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Direct demonstration of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) gene function has been slowed by the absence of a reliable reverse genetics system. A Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based expression system was previously used by us to demonstrate that the TSWV NSm protein is able to support cell-to-cell movemen...

  5. Hitching a Ride on Vesicles: Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Trafficking in the Endomembrane System1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-01-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes. PMID:24477592

  6. Efficient plant male fertility depends on vegetative nuclear movement mediated by two families of plant outer nuclear membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Meier, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that nuclear migration is important for eukaryotic development. Although nuclear migration is conserved in plants, its importance for plant development has not yet been established. The most extraordinary plant nuclear migration events involve plant fertilization, which is starkly different from that of animals. Instead of evolving self-propelled sperm cells (SCs), plants use pollen tubes to deliver SCs, in which the pollen vegetative nucleus (VN) and the SCs migrate as a unit toward the ovules, a fundamental but barely understood process. Here, we report that WPP domain-interacting proteins (WIPs) and their binding partners the WPP domain-interacting tail-anchored proteins (WITs) are essential for pollen nuclear migration. Loss-of-function mutations in WIT and/or WIP gene families resulted in impaired VN movement, inefficient SC delivery, and defects in pollen tube reception. WIPs are Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-1 Homology (KASH) analogs in plants. KASH proteins are key players in animal nuclear migration. Thus, this study not only reveals an important nuclear migration mechanism in plant fertilization but also, suggests that similar nuclear migration machinery is conserved between plants and animals. PMID:25074908

  7. A single amino acid substitution in movement protein of tomato torrado virus influences ToTV infectivity in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-02-02

    Tomato torrado virus (ToTV), which is a tomato-infecting member of the genus Torradovirus, induces severe systemic necrosis in Solanum lycopersicum cv. Beta Lux as well as leaf malformation and chlorosis in Nicotiana benthamiana. To date, neither the tomato gene conferring resistance to the pathogen nor the ToTV-encoded necrosis determinant have been characterized. We herein revealed that the phenylalanine 210 residue in the movement protein domain encoded by ToTV RNA2 is a necrosis-inducing pathogenicity determinant during tomato infection. Using a ToTV infectious RNA2 clone, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of the phenylalanine 210 residue, confirming its importance during ToTV infection and symptom manifestation in S. lycopersicum cv. Beta Lux, but not in N. benthamiana.

  8. Receptor-Associated Protein Blocks Internalization and Cytotoxicity of Myeloma Light Chain in Cultured Human Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Sule; Erturk, Sehsuvar; Khan, Altaf M.; Batuman, Vecihi

    2013-01-01

    Background Free light chains (LCs) are among the many ligands that bind to cubilin/megalin for endocytosis via the clathrin-dependent endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Receptor associated protein (RAP), is a 39 kDA high-affinity, chaperone-like ligand for megalin that assists in the proper folding and functioning of megalin/cubilin. Although RAP is known to inhibit ligand binding to megalin/cubilin, its effect on LC endocytosis has not been shown directly. Methods and Principal Findings We investigated whether RAP can block the endocytosis of LC in cultured human proximal tubule cells and whether this can prevent LC cytotoxicity. Immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that fluorescently labeled LC endocytosis was markedly inhibited in HK-2 cells pretreated with human RAP. The effect of RAP was dose-dependent, and was predominantly on endocytosis as it had no effect on the small acid-washable fraction of LC bound to cell membrane. RAP significantly inhibited LC induced cytokine production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Prolonged exposure to LC for 48 h resulted in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation in HK-2 cells as evidenced by marked reduction in the expression of the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin, and increased the expression of the mesenchymal marker α-SMA, which was also prevented by RAP in the endocytosis medium. Conclusions RAP inhibited LC endocytosis by ∼88% and ameliorated LC-induced cytokine responses and EMT in human PTCs. The results not only provide additional evidence that LCs endocytosis occurs via the megalin/cubilin endocytic receptor system, but also show that blocking LC endocytosis by RAP can protect proximal tubule cells from LC cytotoxicity. PMID:23894629

  9. Treatment with the matricellular protein CCN3 blocks and/or reverses fibrosis development in obesity with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Riser, Bruce L; Najmabadi, Feridoon; Garchow, Kendra; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Darryl R; Sukowski, Ernest J

    2014-11-01

    Fibrosis is at the core of the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with the complications of diabetes and obesity, including diabetic nephropathy (DN), without any US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with this specific target. We recently provided the first evidence that the matricellular protein CCN3 (official symbol NOV) functions in a reciprocal manner, acting on the profibrotic family member CCN2 to inhibit fibrosis in a mesangial cell model of DN. Herein, we used the BT/BR ob/ob mouse as a best model of human obesity and DN progression to determine whether recombinant human CCN3 could be used therapeutically, and the mechanisms involved. Eight weeks of thrice-weekly i.p. injections (0.604 and 6.04 μg/kg of recombinant human CCN3) beginning in early-stage DN completely blocked and/or reversed the up-regulation of mRNA expression of kidney cortex fibrosis genes (CCN2, Col1a2, TGF-β1, and PAI-1) seen in placebo-treated diabetic mice. The treatment completely blocked glomerular fibrosis, as determined by altered mesangial expansion and deposition of laminin. Furthermore, it protected against, or reversed, podocyte loss and kidney function reduction (rise in plasma creatinine concentration); albuminuria was also greatly reduced. This study demonstrates the potential efficacy of recombinant human CCN3 treatment in DN and points to mechanisms operating at multiple levels or pathways, upstream (eg, protecting against cell injury) and downstream (eg, regulating CCN2 activity and extracellular matrix metabolism).

  10. Developmental Block and Programmed Cell Death in Bos indicus Embryos: Effects of Protein Supplementation Source and Developmental Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  11. Glucocorticoid block of protein kinase C signalling in mouse pituitary corticotroph AtT20 D16:16 cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lijun; Philp, Janet A C; Shipston, Michael J

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) currents by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) and glucocorticoid signalling pathways was investigated in AtT20 D16:16 clonal mouse anterior pituitary corticotroph cells. Maximal activation of PKC using the phorbol esters, 4β-phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate (PDBu) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate (dPPA) elicited a rapid, and sustained, inhibition of the outward steady-state voltage- and calcium- dependent potassium current predominantly carried through BK channels. The effect of PMA was blocked by the PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (BIS; 100 nM) and chelerythrine chloride (CHE; 25 μM) and was not mimicked by the inactive phorbol ester analogue 4α-PMA. PMA had no significant effect on the 1 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA)-insensitive outward current or pharmacologically isolated, high voltage-activated calcium current. PMA had no significant effect on steady-state outward current in cells pre-treated for 2 h with 1 μM of the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone. Dexamethasone had no significant effect on steady-state outward current amplitude or sensitivity to 1 mM TEA and did not block PMA-induced translocation of the phorbol ester-sensitive PKC isoforms, PKCα and PKCε, to membrane fractions. Taken together these data suggest that in AtT20 D16:16 corticotroph cells BK channels are important targets for PKC action and that glucocorticoids inhibit PKC signalling downstream of PKC activation. PMID:10200423

  12. Glucocorticoid block of protein kinase C signalling in mouse pituitary corticotroph AtT20 D16:16 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, L; Philp, J A; Shipston, M J

    1999-05-01

    1. The regulation of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) currents by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) and glucocorticoid signalling pathways was investigated in AtT20 D16:16 clonal mouse anterior pituitary corticotroph cells. 2. Maximal activation of PKC using the phorbol esters, 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate (PDBu) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate (dPPA) elicited a rapid, and sustained, inhibition of the outward steady-state voltage- and calcium- dependent potassium current predominantly carried through BK channels. 3. The effect of PMA was blocked by the PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (BIS; 100 nM) and chelerythrine chloride (CHE; 25 microM) and was not mimicked by the inactive phorbol ester analogue 4alpha-PMA. 4. PMA had no significant effect on the 1 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA)-insensitive outward current or pharmacologically isolated, high voltage-activated calcium current. 5. PMA had no significant effect on steady-state outward current in cells pre-treated for 2 h with 1 microM of the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone. Dexamethasone had no significant effect on steady-state outward current amplitude or sensitivity to 1 mM TEA and did not block PMA-induced translocation of the phorbol ester-sensitive PKC isoforms, PKCalpha and PKCepsilon, to membrane fractions. 6. Taken together these data suggest that in AtT20 D16:16 corticotroph cells BK channels are important targets for PKC action and that glucocorticoids inhibit PKC signalling downstream of PKC activation.

  13. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans.

  14. Effect of 60 minutes exposure to electromagnetic field on fecundity, learning and memory, speed of movement and whole body protein of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    El Kholy, Samar E; El Husseiny, Eman M

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of four different electrical devices as source of electromagnetic field on fecundity, learning and memory function, speed of movement, in addition to the whole body proteins of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The results showed that exposure to EMF has no significant effect on adult fecundity (ANOVA and Duncan's test) but alters learning and memory function in Drosophila larvae, especially those exposed to mobile phone. Highly significant differences occurred in the larval speed of movement after exposure to EMF, with maximal effect occurred for larvae exposed to mobile phone (their speed of movement increased 2.5 times of wild type). Some protein bands serve as characters for exposure to certain electrical devices which suggest that exposure to EMF may affect the whole body proteins.

  15. Willed-movement training reduces brain damage and enhances synaptic plasticity related proteins synthesis after focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaosu; Tang, Qingping; Shen, Qin; Li, Simin

    2016-01-01

    It has been wildly accepted that willed movement(WM) training promotes neurological rehabilitation in patients with stroke. However, it was not clear whether the effect of WM is better than other forms of exercise. The purpose of this study is to assess different effects of WM and other forms of exercise on rats with focal ischemia. The subjects are all had right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery and randomly allocated to three groups of training and one control group with no training. Infarct volume by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) dye, expression of PICK1 and synaptophysin in cerebral cortex and striatum of injured side by western blotting and immunofluorescence performed are analyzed. Exercise has done respectively on rats in each group for 15 days and 30 days. Compared with the control group, the brain damage is reduced in other groups after 15 days exercise. The protein expressions levels of synaptophysin and PICK1 are upregulated after exercise. Concentration of PICK1 protein in WM is greater than other exercise groups, and the expression of synaptophysin in WM and SM groups are higher than EM groups. The number of PICK1 positive cells, synaptophysin and PICK1 co-positive cells are increased by exercise. Synaptophysin is widely distributed in cortex surrounding the injury area in WM and EM. It is indicated in our result that willed-movement training is the most effective intervention in enhancing the PICK1-mediated synaptic plasticity in the area adjacent to the damage region of ischemic rats.

  16. Protein Conformational Plasticity: the 'off-on' Switching Movement in Cdk5

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, Andrea; Recanatini, Maurizio; Berteotti, Anna; Branduardi, Davide; Gervasio, Francesco L.; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-12-26

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are mostly known for their role in the cell cycle regulation. The activation mechanism of all CDKs involves the association with a regulatory protein, generally a cyclin, that binds to the kinase unit and stabilizes a catalytically active conformation. Active and inactive conformations of CDKs are characterized by the different spatial localization of two typical elements, namely the activation loop and an {open_square}-helix, whose amino-acid composition varies throughout the family.

  17. Transmembrane Movement of Exogenous Long-Chain Fatty Acids: Proteins, Enzymes, and Vectorial Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Black, Paul N.; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2003-01-01

    The processes that govern the regulated transport of long-chain fatty acids across the plasma membrane are quite distinct compared to counterparts involved in the transport of hydrophilic solutes such as sugars and amino acids. These differences stem from the unique physical and chemical properties of long-chain fatty acids. To date, several distinct classes of proteins have been shown to participate in the transport of exogenous long-chain fatty acids across the membrane. More recent work is consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to the role played by proteins in this process, there is a diffusional component which must also be considered. Central to the development of this hypothesis are the appropriate experimental systems, which can be manipulated using the tools of molecular genetics. Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are ideally suited as model systems to study this process in that both (i) exhibit saturable long-chain fatty acid transport at low ligand concentrations, (ii) have specific membrane-bound and membrane-associated proteins that are components of the transport apparatus, and (iii) can be easily manipulated using the tools of molecular genetics. In both systems, central players in the process of fatty acid transport are fatty acid transport proteins (FadL or Fat1p) and fatty acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (FACS; fatty acid CoA ligase [AMP forming] [EC 6.2.1.3]). FACS appears to function in concert with FadL (bacteria) or Fat1p (yeast) in the conversion of the free fatty acid to CoA thioesters concomitant with transport, thereby rendering this process unidirectional. This process of trapping transported fatty acids represents one fundamental mechanism operational in the transport of exogenous fatty acids. PMID:12966144

  18. Transmembrane movement of exogenous long-chain fatty acids: proteins, enzymes, and vectorial esterification.

    PubMed

    Black, Paul N; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2003-09-01

    The processes that govern the regulated transport of long-chain fatty acids across the plasma membrane are quite distinct compared to counterparts involved in the transport of hydrophilic solutes such as sugars and amino acids. These differences stem from the unique physical and chemical properties of long-chain fatty acids. To date, several distinct classes of proteins have been shown to participate in the transport of exogenous long-chain fatty acids across the membrane. More recent work is consistent with the hypothesis that in addition to the role played by proteins in this process, there is a diffusional component which must also be considered. Central to the development of this hypothesis are the appropriate experimental systems, which can be manipulated using the tools of molecular genetics. Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are ideally suited as model systems to study this process in that both (i) exhibit saturable long-chain fatty acid transport at low ligand concentrations, (ii) have specific membrane-bound and membrane-associated proteins that are components of the transport apparatus, and (iii) can be easily manipulated using the tools of molecular genetics. In both systems, central players in the process of fatty acid transport are fatty acid transport proteins (FadL or Fat1p) and fatty acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (FACS; fatty acid CoA ligase [AMP forming] [EC 6.2.1.3]). FACS appears to function in concert with FadL (bacteria) or Fat1p (yeast) in the conversion of the free fatty acid to CoA thioesters concomitant with transport, thereby rendering this process unidirectional. This process of trapping transported fatty acids represents one fundamental mechanism operational in the transport of exogenous fatty acids.

  19. Limited utility of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) in monitoring plant virus movement.

    PubMed

    Divéki, Zoltán; Salánki, Katalin; Balázs, Ervin

    2002-10-01

    While the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a routinely used marker gene in higher plants, there are only a few data concerning the use of blue fluorescent protein (BFP). These proteins together are used for dual colour tagging experiments in various biological systems; however, the benefits of this technique in plant virology have not been exploited yet. In this work, our aim was to determine whether the BFP is a suitable second marker in conjunction with GFP for following the progress of virus infection. Nicotiana clevelandii, N. benthamiana and N. tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc plants were infected with potato virus X vector carrying the GFP or the Y66H type BFP gene. While GFP was brightly fluorescent in all species, the fluorescence intensity of BFP varied widely, from the bright fluorescence observed in N. clevelandii to the absence of fluorescence in N. tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc. Since at even mild acidic pH BFP rapidly fades, the more acidic cytosol of N. tabacum could be responsible for impaired in vivo fluorescence. After infiltration of the infected leaves of N. clevelandii with pH 5 phosphate buffer, the fluorescence faded thus confirming this situation.

  20. Yeast ribosomal protein L10 helps coordinate tRNA movement through the large subunit

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey N.; Meskauskas, Arturas; Roshwalb, Sara C.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal protein L10 (E. coli L16) is located at the center of a topological nexus that connects many functional regions of the large subunit. This essential protein has previously been implicated in processes as diverse as ribosome biogenesis, translational fidelity and mRNA stability. Here, the inability to maintain the yeast Killer virus was used as a proxy for large subunit defects to identify a series of L10 mutants. These mapped to roughly four discrete regions of the protein. A detailed analysis of mutants located in the N-terminal ‘hook’ of L10, which inserts into the bulge of 25S rRNA helix 89, revealed strong effects on rRNA structure corresponding to the entire path taken by the tRNA 3′ end as it moves through the large subunit during the elongation cycle. The mutant-induced structural changes are wide-ranging, affecting ribosome biogenesis, elongation factor binding, drug resistance/hypersensitivity, translational fidelity and virus maintenance. The importance of L10 as a potential transducer of information through the ribosome, and of a possible role of its N-terminal domain in switching between the pre- and post-translocational states are discussed. PMID:18824477

  1. Reciprocal phosphorylation and glycosylation recognition motifs control NCAPP1 interaction with pumpkin phloem proteins and their cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Ken-Ichiro; Ham, Byung-Kook; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Rojas, Maria R; Lucas, William J

    2007-06-01

    In plants, cell-to-cell trafficking of non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAPs) involves protein-protein interactions, and a role for posttranslational modification has been implicated. In this study, proteins contained in pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima cv Big Max) phloem sap were used as a source of NCAPs to further explore the molecular basis for selective NCAP trafficking. Protein overlay assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments established that phosphorylation and glycosylation, on both Nicotiana tabacum NON-CELL-AUTONOMOUS PATHWAY PROTEIN1 (Nt-NCAPP1) and the phloem NCAPs, are essential for their interaction. Detailed molecular analysis of a representative phloem NCAP, Cm-PP16-1, identified the specific residues on which glycosylation and phosphorylation must occur for effective binding to NCAPP1. Microinjection studies confirmed that posttranslational modification on these residues is essential for cell-to-cell movement of Cm-PP16-1. Lastly, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Cm-PP16-1 fusion protein system was employed to test whether the peptide region spanning these residues was required for cell-to-cell movement. These studies established that a 36-amino acid peptide was sufficient to impart cell-to-cell movement capacity to GST, a normally cell-autonomous protein. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a phosphorylation-glycosylation recognition motif functions to control the binding of a specific subset of phloem NCAPs to NCAPP1 and their subsequent transport through plasmodesmata.

  2. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Brown, R. Lane; Fujimoto, Zui; Morita, Takashi; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  3. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Protein Ensures Coordination of Motor Movement by Modulating GABAB Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Biswanath; Stewart, Adele; Yang, Jianqi; Loo, Lipin; Sheff, David; Shepherd, Andrew J.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2012-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABAB receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABABR signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ5 and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABABR antagonist. RGS6−/− mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABABR, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6−/− mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABABR signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin. PMID:22179605

  4. Efficacy of the Salmonella siderophore receptor protein vaccine against lymph node carriage and fecal shedding of Samonella in commercial feedlot cattle: A randomized complete block design study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficacy of the Salmonella Newport siderophore receptor protein (SRP)® vaccine for reducing lymph node (LN) carriage and fecal shedding of Salmonella at harvest was investigated in a study of commercial feedlot cattle. The study was designed as a randomized complete block with pen as the experi...

  5. Epithelial NF-kappaB enhances transmucosal fluid movement by altering tight junction protein composition after T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yueming; Clayburgh, Daniel R; Mittal, Navdha; Goretsky, Tatiana; Dirisina, Ramanarao; Zhang, Zheng; Kron, Michelle; Ivancic, David; Katzman, Rebecca B; Grimm, Gery; Lee, Goo; Fryer, Jonathan; Nusrat, Asma; Turner, Jerrold R; Barrett, Terrence A

    2010-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), aberrant activation of innate and adaptive immune responses enhances mucosal permeability through mechanisms not completely understood. To examine the role of epithelial nuclear factor (NF-kappaB) in IBD-induced enhanced permeability, epithelial-specific IkappaBalpha mutant (NF-kappaB super repressor) transgenic (TG) mice were generated. NF-kB activation was inhibited in TG mice, relative to wild-type mice, following T cell-mediated immune cell activation using an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, epithelial NF-kappaB super repressor protein inhibited diarrhea and blocked changes in transepithelial resistance and transmucosal flux of alexa350 (0.35 kDa) and dextran3000 (3 kDa). In vivo perfusion loop studies in TG mice revealed reversed net water secretion and reduced lumenal flux of different molecular probes (bovine serum albumin, alexa350, and dextran3000). Cell-imaging and immunoblotting of low-density, detergent-insoluble membrane fractions confirmed that tight junction proteins (occludin, claudin-1 and zona occludens-1) are internalized through an NF-kappaB-dependent pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that IBD-associated diarrhea results from NF-kappaB-mediated tight junction protein internalization and increased paracellular permeability. Thus, reduction of epithelial NF-kappaB activation in IBD may repair defects in epithelial barrier function, reduce diarrhea, and limit protein (eg, serum albumin) losses. Epithelial NF-kappaB activation induced by mucosal T cells, therefore, actively plays a role in opening paracellular spaces to promote transmucosal fluid effux into the intestinal lumen.

  6. Cefradine blocks solar-ultraviolet induced skin inflammation through direct inhibition of T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Changshu; Zhang, Guiping; Xiao, Juanjuan; Wu, Dan; Zeng, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jingwen; Guo, Jinguang; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Skin inflammation, and skin cancer induced by excessive solar ultraviolet (SUV) is a great threat to human health. SUV induced skin inflammation through activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and c-Jun N-termeinal kinases (JNKs). T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) plays an important role in this process. Herein, the clinical data showed TOPK, phospho-p38, phospho-JNKs were highly expressed in human solar dermatitis. Ex vivo studies showed that SUV induced the phosphorylation of p38 and JNKs in HaCat and JB6 cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Molecule docking model indicated cefradine, an FDA-approved cephalosporin antibiotic, directly binds with TOPK. The result of in vitro binding assay verified cefradine can directly bind with TOPK. In vitro kinase results showed cefradine can inhibit TOPK activity. Ex vivo studies further showed cefradine inhibited SUV-induced the phosphorylation level of p38, JNKs and H2AX through inhibiting TOPK activity in a dose and time dependent manner, and cefradine inhibited the secretion of IL6 and TNF-α in HaCat and JB6 cells. In vivo studies showed that cefradine down-regulated SUV-induced the phosphorylation of p38, JNKs and H2AX and inhibited the secretion of IL6 and TNF-α in Babl/c mice. These results indicated that cefradine can inhibit SUV-induced skin inflammation by blocking TOPK signaling pathway, and TOPK is an effective target for suppressing inflammation induced by SUV irradiation. PMID:27016423

  7. Intramolecular complementing mutations in tobacco mosaic virus movement protein confirm a role for microtubule association in viral RNA transport.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Vitaly; Ashby, Jamie Alan; Suslova, Elena; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Sterthaus, Oliver; Deom, Carl M; Heinlein, Manfred

    2002-04-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) facilitates the cell-to-cell transport of the viral RNA genome through plasmodesmata (Pd). A previous report described the functional reversion of a dysfunctional mutation in MP (Pro81Ser) by two additional amino acid substitution mutations (Thr104Ile and Arg167Lys). To further explore the mechanism underlying this intramolecular complementation event, the mutations were introduced into a virus derivative expressing the MP as a fusion to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Microscopic analysis of infected protoplasts and of infection sites in leaves of MP-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana indicates that MP(P81S)-GFP and MP(P81S;T104I;R167K)-GFP differ in subcellular distribution. MP(P81S)-GFP lacks specific sites of accumulation in protoplasts and, in epidermal cells, exclusively localizes to Pd. MP(P81S;T104I;R167K)-GFP, in contrast, in addition localizes to inclusion bodies and microtubules and thus exhibits a subcellular localization pattern that is similar, if not identical, to the pattern reported for wild-type MP-GFP. Since accumulation of MP to inclusion bodies is not required for function, these observations confirm a role for microtubules in TMV RNA cell-to-cell transport.

  8. Intramolecular Complementing Mutations in Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Confirm a Role for Microtubule Association in Viral RNA Transport

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vitaly; Ashby, Jamie Alan; Suslova, Elena; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Sterthaus, Oliver; Deom, Carl M.; Heinlein, Manfred

    2002-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) facilitates the cell-to-cell transport of the viral RNA genome through plasmodesmata (Pd). A previous report described the functional reversion of a dysfunctional mutation in MP (Pro81Ser) by two additional amino acid substitution mutations (Thr104Ile and Arg167Lys). To further explore the mechanism underlying this intramolecular complementation event, the mutations were introduced into a virus derivative expressing the MP as a fusion to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Microscopic analysis of infected protoplasts and of infection sites in leaves of MP-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana indicates that MPP81S-GFP and MPP81S;T104I;R167K-GFP differ in subcellular distribution. MPP81S-GFP lacks specific sites of accumulation in protoplasts and, in epidermal cells, exclusively localizes to Pd. MPP81S;T104I;R167K-GFP, in contrast, in addition localizes to inclusion bodies and microtubules and thus exhibits a subcellular localization pattern that is similar, if not identical, to the pattern reported for wild-type MP-GFP. Since accumulation of MP to inclusion bodies is not required for function, these observations confirm a role for microtubules in TMV RNA cell-to-cell transport. PMID:11907237

  9. Visualization by atomic force microscopy of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein-RNA complexes formed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kiselyova, O I; Yaminsky, I V; Karger, E M; Frolova, O Y; Dorokhov, Y L; Atabekov, J G

    2001-06-01

    The structure of complexes formed in vitro by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-coded movement protein (MP) with TMV RNA and short (890 nt) synthetic RNA transcripts was visualized by atomic force microscopy on a mica surface. MP molecules were found to be distributed along the chain of RNA and the structure of MP-RNA complexes depended on the molar MP:RNA ratios at which the complexes were formed. A rise in the molar MP:TMV RNA ratio from 20:1 to 60-100:1 resulted in an increase in the density of the MP packaging on TMV RNA and structural conversion of complexes from RNase-sensitive 'beads-on-a-string' into a 'thick string' form that was partly resistant to RNAse. The 'thick string'-type RNase-resistant complexes were also produced by short synthetic RNA transcripts at different MP:RNA ratios. The 'thick string' complexes are suggested to represent clusters of MP molecules cooperatively bound to discrete regions of TMV RNA and separated by protein-free RNA segments.

  10. Defective tobamovirus movement protein lacking wild-type phosphorylation sites can be complemented by substitutions found in revertants.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shigeki; Hori, Koichi; Hosokawa, Daijiro; Okada, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2003-01-01

    We reported previously that the movement protein (MP) of tomato mosaic tobamovirus is phosphorylated, and we proposed that MP phosphorylation is important for viral pathogenesis. Experimental data indicated that phosphorylation enhances the stability of MP in vivo and enables the protein to assume the correct intracellular location to perform its function. A mutant virus designated 37A238A was constructed; this virus lacked two serine residues within the MP, which prevented its phosphorylation. In the present study, we inoculated plants with the 37A238A mutant, and as expected, it was unable to produce local lesions on the leaves. However, after an extended period, we found that lesions did occur, which were due to revertant viruses. Several revertants were isolated, and the genetic changes in their MPs were examined together with any changes in their in vivo characteristics. We found that reversion to virulence was associated first with increased MP stability in infected cells and second with a shift in MP intracellular localization over time. In one case, the revertant MP was not phosphorylated in vivo, but it was functional.

  11. Protein Kinase A in the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus of Rat Contributes to Regulation of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; Desarnaud, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular signaling mechanisms within the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus for the regulation of recovery rapid eye movement (REM) sleep following REM sleep deprivation remain unknown. This study was designed to determine the role of PPT intracellular cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) in the regulation of recovery REM sleep in freely moving rats. The results show that a brief period (3 h) of selective REM sleep deprivation caused REM sleep rebound associated with increased PKA activity and expression of the PKA catalytic subunit protein (PKA-CU) in the PPT. Local application of a cAMP-PKA-activation-selective inhibitor, RpCAMPS (0.55, 1.1, and 2.2 nmol/100 µl; n = 8 rats/group), bilaterally into the PPT, reduced PKA activity and PKA-CU expression in the PPT, and suppressed the recovery REM sleep, in a dose-dependent manner. Regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between: PPT levels of PKA activity and the total percentages of REM sleep recovery (Rsqr = 0.944; n = 40 rats); PPT levels of PKA-CU expression and the total percentages of REM sleep recovery (Rsqr = 0.937; n = 40 rats); PPT levels of PKA-CU expression and PKA activity (Rsqr = 0.945; n = 40 rats). Collectively, these results provide evidence that activation of intracellular PKA in the PPT contributes to REM sleep recovery following REM sleep deprivation. PMID:20844122

  12. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Blocks Wnt3a Protein-induced Autophagy in Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingjing; Belinsky, Glenn; Sagheer, Usman; Zhang, Xuchen; Grippo, Paul J; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-10-14

    An increase in autophagy characterizes pancreatic carcinogenesis, but the signals that regulate this process are incompletely understood. Because canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for the transition from early to advanced pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, we assessed whether Wnt ligands and endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling modulate autophagy. In this study, canonical Wnt3a ligand induced autophagy markers and vacuoles in murine PanIN cells. Furthermore, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a secreted glycoprotein known for its anti-tumor properties, blocked Wnt3a-directed induction of autophagy proteins. Autophagy inhibition was complemented by reciprocal regulation of the oxidative stress enzymes, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase. Transcriptional control of Sod2 expression was mediated by PEDF-induced NFκB nuclear translocation. PEDF-dependent SOD2 expression in PanIN lesions was recapitulated in a murine model of PanIN formation where PEDF was deleted. In human PanIN lesions, co-expression of PEDF and SOD2 was observed in the majority of early PanIN lesions (47/50, 94%), whereas PEDF and SOD2 immunolocalization in high-grade human PanIN-2/3 was uncommon (7/50, 14%). These results indicate that PEDF regulates autophagy through coordinate Wnt signaling blockade and NFκB activation.

  13. Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa reverses acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis through blocking sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 maturation.

    PubMed

    Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Song, Shun-Zong; Wan, Ying; Xie, Wen-Xue; Li, Xin; Bai, Ting; Ouyang, Bing-Qing; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2010-12-22

    This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of Gentiana manshurica Kitagawa (GM) on acute alcohol-induced fatty liver. Mice were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg of body weight) by gavage every 12 h for a total of three doses to induce acute fatty liver. Methanol extract of GM (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or silymarin (100 mg/kg) was gavaged simultaneously with ethanol for three doses. GM administration significantly reduced the increases in serum ALT and AST levels, the serum and hepatic triglyceride levels, at 4 h after the last ethanol administration. GM was also found to prevent ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and necrosis, as indicated by liver histopathological studies. Additionally, GM suppressed the elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, restored the glutathione (GSH) levels, and enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The concurrent administration of GM efficaciously abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. Moreover, GM significantly reduced the nuclear translocation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (nSREBP-1) in ethanol-treated mice. These data indicated that GM possessed the ability to prevent ethanol-induced acute liver steatosis, possibly through blocking CYP2E1-mediated free radical scavenging effects and SREBP-1-regulated fatty acid synthesis. Especially, GM may be developed as a potential therapeutic candidate for ethanol-induced oxidative damage in liver.

  14. Elevated C-reactive protein is associated with severe periodic leg movements of sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Rye, David B; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed; Bliwise, Donald L

    2012-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder in which urges to move the legs are felt during rest, are felt at night, and are improved by leg movement. RLS has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may be a mediator of this relationship. We evaluated systemic inflammation and PLMs in RLS patients to further assess cardiovascular risk. 137 RLS patients had PLM measurements taken while unmedicated for RLS. Banked plasma was assayed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Mean (SD) PLM index was 19.3 (22.0). PLMs were unrelated to TNF-a and IL-6, but were modestly correlated with logCRP (r(129)=0.19, p=0.03). Those patients with at least 45PLMs/h had an odds ratio of 3.56 (95% CI 1.26-10.03, p=0.02, df=1) for having elevated CRP compared to those with fewer than 45PLMs/h. After adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory disorders, CRP-lowering medications, and body mass index, the OR for those with ≥ 45PLMs/h was 8.60 (95% CI 1.23 to 60.17, p=0.03, df=10). PLMs are associated with increased inflammation, such that those RLS patients with at least 45PLMs/h had more than triple the odds of elevated CRP than those with fewer PLMs. Further investigation into PLMs and inflammation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein is associated with severe periodic leg movements of sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Rye, David B.; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W. Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed; Bliwise, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder in which urges to move the legs are felt during rest, are felt at night, and are improved by leg movement. RLS has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may be a mediator of this relationship. We evaluated systemic inflammation and PLMs in RLS patients to further assess cardiovascular risk. Methods 137 RLS patients had PLM measurements taken while unmedicated for RLS. Banked plasma was assayed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Results Mean (SD) PLM index was 19.3 (22.0). PLMs were unrelated to TNF-a and IL-6, but were modestly correlated with log CRP (r(129) = 0.19, p = 0.03). Those patients with at least 45 PLMs/hour had an odds ratio of 3.56 (95% CI 1.26 to 10.03, p = 0.02, df = 1) for having elevated CRP compared to those with fewer than 45 PLMs/hour. After adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory disorders, CRP-lowering medications, and body mass index, the OR for those with ≥ 45 PLMs/hour was 8.60 (95% CI 1.23 to 60.17, p = 0.03, df = 10). Conclusions PLMs are associated with increased inflammation, such that those RLS patients with at least 45 PLMs/hour had more than triple the odds of elevated CRP than those with fewer PLMs. Further investigation into PLMs and inflammation is warranted. PMID:22750520

  16. Plasmodesmata-located protein overexpression negatively impacts the manifestation of systemic acquired resistance and the long-distance movement of Defective in Induced Resistance1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Carella, P; Isaacs, M; Cameron, R K

    2015-03-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defence response that provides immunity to distant uninfected leaves after an initial localised infection. The lipid transfer protein (LTP) Defective in Induced Resistance1 (DIR1) is an essential component of SAR that moves from induced to distant leaves following a SAR-inducing local infection. To understand how DIR1 is transported to distant leaves during SAR, we analysed DIR1 movement in transgenic Arabidopsis lines with reduced cell-to-cell movement caused by the overexpression of Plasmodesmata-Located Proteins PDLP1 and PDLP5. These PDLP-overexpressing lines were defective for SAR, and DIR1 antibody signals were not observed in phloem sap-enriched petiole exudates collected from distant leaves. Our data support the idea that cell-to-cell movement of DIR1 through plasmodesmata is important during long-distance SAR signalling in Arabidopsis.

  17. Preparation of non-aggregated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) by non-covalent coating with a block copolymer and proteins for enhancement of intracellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Woo; Lee, Seonju; Jang, Sangmok; Han, Kyu Young; Kim, Younggyu; Hyun, Jaekyung; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are very promising fluorophores for use in biosystems due to their high biocompatibility and photostability. To overcome their tendency to aggregate in physiological solutions, which severely limits the biological applications of FNDs, we developed a new non-covalent coating method using a block copolymer, PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-BMA), or proteins such as BSA and HSA. By simple mixing of the block copolymer with FNDs, the cationic DMAEMA and hydrophobic BMA moieties can strongly interact with the anionic and hydrophobic moieties on the FND surface, while the PEG block can form a shell to prevent the direct contact between FNDs. The polymer-coated FNDs, along with BSA- and HSA-coated FNDs, showed non-aggregation characteristics and maintained their size at the physiological salt concentration. The well-dispersed, polymer- or protein-coated FNDs in physiological solutions showed enhanced intracellular uptake, which was confirmed by CLSM. In addition, the biocompatibility of the coated FNDs was expressly supported by a cytotoxicity assay. Our simple non-covalent coating with the block copolymer, which can be easily modified by various chemical methods, projects a very promising outlook for future biomedical applications, especially in comparison with covalent coating or protein-based coating.

  18. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  20. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  1. A protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit modulates blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements through regulating actin cytoskeleton in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Feng; Wang, Jinqian; Xing, Da

    2012-08-01

    Chloroplast avoidance movements mediated by phototropin 2 (phot2) are one of most important physiological events in the response to high-fluence blue light (BL), which reduces damage to the photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Protein phosphatase 2A-2 (PP2A-2) is an isoform of the catalytic subunit of PP2A, which regulates a number of developmental processes. To investigate whether PP2A-2 was involved in high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we first analyzed chloroplast migration in the leaves of the pp2a-2 mutant in response to BL. The data showed that PP2A-2 might act as a positive regulator in phot2-mediated chloroplast avoidance movements, but not in phot1-mediated chloroplast accumulation movements. Then, the effect of okadaic acid (OA) and cantharidin (selective PP2A inhibitors) on high-fluence BL response was further investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. Within a certain concentration range, exogenously applied OA or cantharidin inhibited the high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast movements in a concentration-dependent manner. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin phosphorylation assays demonstrated that PP2A-2 can activate/dephosphorylate ADF/cofilin, an actin-binding protein, in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells. Consistent with this observation, the experiments showed that OA could inhibit ADF1 binding to the actin and suppress the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton after high-fluence BL irradiation. The adf1 and adf3 mutants also exhibited reduced high-fluence BL-induced chloroplast avoidance movements. In conclusion, we identified that PP2A-2 regulated the activation of ADF/cofilin, which, in turn, regulated actin cytoskeleton remodeling and was involved in phot2-mediated chloroplast avoidance movements.

  2. Rumen microbes and microbial protein synthesis in Thai native beef cattle fed with feed blocks supplemented with a urea-calcium sulphate mixture.

    PubMed

    Cherdthong, Anusorn; Wanapat, Metha

    2013-12-01

    The influence of slow-release urea ( urea-calcium sulphate mixture; U-CaS) in feed blocks on rumen micro-organisms, predominant cellulolytic bacteria, microbial protein synthesis and ecology was studied in Thai native beef cattle. Four animals with an initial body weight of 100 ± 3.0 kg were randomly assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square design with four dietary treatments (U-CaS in iso-nitrogen feed blocks at 0, 120, 150 and 180 g/kg dry matter (DM), respectively; U-CaS replaced urea). After 21 days of experimental feeding, rumen fluid was collected at 0 and 4 h after feeding. The mean intake of feed blocks and other feedstuffs offered (rice straw and concentrates) amounted to 0.3, 2.3 and 0.6 kg DM/day, respectively. Inclusion of U-CaS did not altered pH and temperature in the rumen. However, ruminal NH3-N concentration decreased quadratically (p < 0.05) in response to U-CaS inclusion, with the lowest value at 180 g U-CaS per kg feed block. With inclusion of U-CaS, the populations of rumen bacteria increased quadratically (p < 0.05) and counts of fungal zoospores were linearly enhanced (p < 0.05), being highest at 180 g U-CaS per kg feed block. Supplementation of U-CaS increased the concentration of total bacteria linearly (p < 0.05) and of Fibrobacter succinogenes quadratically (p < 0.05), whereas Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Ruminococcus albus were not affected by dietary treatments. Microbial crude protein yield and efficiency of microbial nitrogen (N) synthesis were linearly increased with different levels of U-CaS addition. Furthermore, current data clearly indicate that inclusion of U-CaS in feed blocks can affect micro-organism diversity and major cellulolytic bacteria.

  3. Rapid eye movement sleep deprivation decreases long-term potentiation stability and affects some glutamatergic signaling proteins during hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J; Roffwarg, H P; Dreher, A; Bissette, G; Karolewicz, B; Shaffery, J P

    2008-04-22

    Development of the mammalian CNS requires formation and stabilization of neuronal circuits and synaptic connections. Sensory stimulation provided by the environment orchestrates neuronal circuit formation in the waking state. Endogenous sources of activation are also implicated in these processes. Accordingly we hypothesized that sleep, especially rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), the stage characterized by high neuronal activity that is more prominent in development than adulthood, provides endogenous stimulation, which, like sensory input, helps to stabilize and refine neuronal circuits during CNS development. Young (Y: postnatal day (PN) 16) and adolescent (A: PN44) rats were rapid eye movement sleep-deprived (REMSD) by gentle cage-shaking for only 4 h on 3 consecutive days (total 12 h). The effect of REMS deprivation in Y and A rats was tested 3-7 days after the last deprivation session (Y, PN21-25; A, PN49-53) and was compared with younger (immature, I, PN9-12) untreated, age-matched, treated and normal control groups. REMS deprivation negatively affected the stability of long-term potentiation (LTP) in Y but not A animals. LTP instability in Y-REMSD animals was similar to the instability in even the more immature, untreated animals. Utilizing immunoblots, we identified changes in molecular components of glutamatergic synapses known to participate in mechanisms of synaptic refinement and plasticity. Overall, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A, AMPA receptor subunit 1 (GluR1), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and calcium/calmodulin kinase II tended to be lower in Y REMSD animals (NR2B, GluR1 and PSD-95 were significantly lower) compared with controls, an effect not present in the A animals. Taken together, these data indicate that early-life REMS deprivation reduces stability of hippocampal neuronal circuits, possibly by hindering expression of mature glutamatergic synaptic components. The findings

  4. Expression dynamics and ultrastructural localization of epitope-tagged Abutilon mosaic virus nuclear shuttle and movement proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinow, Tatjana; Tanwir, Fariha; Kocher, Cornelia; Krenz, Bjoern; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2009-09-01

    The geminivirus Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) encodes two proteins which are essential for viral spread within plants. The nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) transfers viral DNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas the movement protein (MP) facilitates transport between cells through plasmodesmata and long-distance via phloem. An inducible overexpression system for epitope-tagged NSP and MP in plants yielded unprecedented amounts of both proteins. Western blots revealed extensive posttranslational modification and truncation for MP, but not for NSP. Ultrastructural examination of Nicotiana benthamiana tissues showed characteristic nucleopathic alterations, including fibrillar rings, when epitope-tagged NSP and MP were simultaneously expressed in leaves locally infected with an AbMV DNA A in which the coat protein gene was replaced by a green fluorescent protein encoding gene. Immunogold labelling localized NSP in the nucleoplasm and in the fibrillar rings. MP appeared at the cell periphery, probably the plasma membrane, and plasmodesmata.

  5. Conversion of S–phenylsulfonylcysteine residues to mixed disulfides at pH 4.0: utility in protein thiol blocking and in protein–S–nitrosothiol detection

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, B. D.; Joshi, N.; Campanello, G. C.; Hilmer, J. K.; Chetia, L.; Vance, J. A.; Reinschmidt, J. N.; Miller, C. G.; Giedroc, D. P.; Dratz, E. A.; Singel, D. J.; Grieco, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    A three step protocol for protein S-nitrosothiol conversion to fluorescent mixed disulfides with purified proteins, referred to as the thiosulfonate switch, is explored which involves: 1) thiol blocking at pH 4.0 using S-phenylsulfonylcysteine (SPSC); 2) trapping of protein S-nitrosothiols as their S-phenylsulfonylcysteines employing sodium benzenesulfinate; and 3) tagging the protein thiosulfonate with a fluorescent rhodamine based probe bearing a reactive thiol (Rhod-SH), which forms a mixed disulfide between the probe and the formerly S-nitrosated cysteine residue. S-nitrosated bovine serum albumin and the S-nitrosated C-terminally truncated form of AdhR-SH (alcohol dehydrogenase regulator) designated as AdhR*-SNO were selectively labelled by the thiosulfonate switch both individually and in protein mixtures containing free thiols. This protocol features the facile reaction of thiols with S-phenylsulfonylcysteines forming mixed disulfides at mild acidic pH (pH = 4.0) in both the initial blocking step as well as in the conversion of protein-S-sulfonylcysteines to form stable fluorescent disulfides. Labelling was monitored by TOF-MS and gel electrophoresis. Proteolysis and peptide analysis of the resulting digest identified the cysteine residues containing mixed disulfides bearing the fluorescent probe, Rhod-SH. PMID:24986430

  6. Improvement of Crystal Solubility and Increasing Toxicity against Caenorhabditis elegans by Asparagine Substitution in Block 3 of Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry5Ba

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenshan; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Fengjuan; Chai, Lujun; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    The crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are widely used for their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. The highly conserved sequence blocks play an important role in Cry protein stability and flexibility, the basis of toxicity. The block 3 in Cry5Ba subfamily has a shorter sequence (only 12 residues) and more asparagine residues than that of others which harbor about 48 residues but only one asparagine. Based on the theoretical structure model of Cry5Ba, all three asparagines in block 3 are closely located in the interface of putative three domains, implying their probable importance in structure and function. In this study, all three asparagines in Cry5Ba2 block 3 were individually substituted with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutant proteins were overexpressed and crystallized in acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. However, the crystals formed in one of the mutants, designated N586A, abnormally disappeared and dissolved into the culture supernatant once the sporulation cells lysed, whereas the Cry5Ba crystal and the other mutant crystals were stable. The mutant N586A crystal, isolated from sporulation cells by the ultrasonic process, was found to be easily dissolved at wide range of pH value (5.0 to 10.0). Moreover, the toxicity assays showed that the mutant N586A exhibited nearly 9-fold-higher activity against nematodes and damaged the host's intestine more efficiently than the native Cry5Ba2. These data support the presumption that the amide residue Asn586 at the interface of domains might adversely affect the protein flexibility, solubility and resultant toxicity of Cry5Ba. PMID:22865071

  7. Improvement of crystal solubility and increasing toxicity against Caenorhabditis elegans by asparagine substitution in block 3 of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein Cry5Ba.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenshan; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Fengjuan; Chai, Lujun; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2012-10-01

    The crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are widely used for their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. The highly conserved sequence blocks play an important role in Cry protein stability and flexibility, the basis of toxicity. The block 3 in Cry5Ba subfamily has a shorter sequence (only 12 residues) and more asparagine residues than that of others which harbor about 48 residues but only one asparagine. Based on the theoretical structure model of Cry5Ba, all three asparagines in block 3 are closely located in the interface of putative three domains, implying their probable importance in structure and function. In this study, all three asparagines in Cry5Ba2 block 3 were individually substituted with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutant proteins were overexpressed and crystallized in acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. However, the crystals formed in one of the mutants, designated N586A, abnormally disappeared and dissolved into the culture supernatant once the sporulation cells lysed, whereas the Cry5Ba crystal and the other mutant crystals were stable. The mutant N586A crystal, isolated from sporulation cells by the ultrasonic process, was found to be easily dissolved at wide range of pH value (5.0 to 10.0). Moreover, the toxicity assays showed that the mutant N586A exhibited nearly 9-fold-higher activity against nematodes and damaged the host's intestine more efficiently than the native Cry5Ba2. These data support the presumption that the amide residue Asn586 at the interface of domains might adversely affect the protein flexibility, solubility and resultant toxicity of Cry5Ba.

  8. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J; Høier, Birgitte; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-03-01

    The present study used passive limb movement as an experimental model to study the effect of increased blood flow and passive stretch, without enhanced metabolic demand, in young healthy male subjects. The model used was 90 min of passive movement of the leg leading to a 2.8-fold increase (P < 0.05) in blood flow without a significant enhancement in oxygen uptake. Muscle interstitial fluid was sampled with microdialysis technique and analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and for the effect on endothelial cell proliferation. Biopsies obtained from the musculus vastus lateralis were analyzed for mRNA content of VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The passive leg movement caused an increase (P < 0.05) in interstitial VEGF protein concentration above rest (73 +/- 21 vs. 344 +/- 83 pg/ml). Addition of muscle dialysate to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P < 0.05) than dialysate obtained at rest. Passive movement also enhanced (P < 0.05) the eNOS mRNA level fourfold above resting levels. VEGF mRNA and MMP-2 mRNA levels were unaffected. The results show that a session of passive leg movement, elevating blood flow and causing passive stretch, augments the interstitial concentrations of VEGF, the proliferative effect of interstitial fluid, and eNOS mRNA content in muscle tissue. We propose that enhanced blood flow and passive stretch are positive physiological stimulators of factors associated with capillary growth in human muscle.

  9. Membrane fusion triggers rapid degradation of two gamete-specific, fusion-essential proteins in a membrane block to polygamy in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Misamore, Michael J.; Snell, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membranes of gametes are specialized for fusion, yet, once fusion occurs, in many organisms the new zygote becomes incapable of further membrane fusion reactions. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this loss of fusion capacity (block to polygamy) remain unknown. During fertilization in the green alga Chlamydomonas, the plus gamete-specific membrane protein FUS1 is required for adhesion between the apically localized sites on the plasma membranes of plus and minus gametes that are specialized for fusion, and the minus-specific membrane protein HAP2 is essential for completion of the membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 (GCS1) family members are also required for fertilization in Arabidopsis, and for the membrane fusion reaction in the malaria organism Plasmodium berghei. Here, we tested whether Chlamydomonas gamete fusion triggers alterations in FUS1 and HAP2 and renders the plasma membranes of the cells incapable of subsequent fusion. We find that, even though the fusogenic sites support multi-cell adhesions, triploid zygotes are rare, indicating a fusion-triggered block to the membrane fusion reaction. Consistent with the extinction of fusogenic capacity, both FUS1 and HAP2 are degraded upon fusion. The rapid, fusion-triggered cleavage of HAP2 in zygotes is distinct from degradation occurring during constitutive turnover in gametes. Thus, gamete fusion triggers specific degradation of fusion-essential proteins and renders the zygote incapable of fusion. Our results provide the first molecular explanation for a membrane block to polygamy in any organism. PMID:20335357

  10. Membrane fusion triggers rapid degradation of two gamete-specific, fusion-essential proteins in a membrane block to polygamy in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Misamore, Michael J; Snell, William J

    2010-05-01

    The plasma membranes of gametes are specialized for fusion, yet, once fusion occurs, in many organisms the new zygote becomes incapable of further membrane fusion reactions. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this loss of fusion capacity (block to polygamy) remain unknown. During fertilization in the green alga Chlamydomonas, the plus gamete-specific membrane protein FUS1 is required for adhesion between the apically localized sites on the plasma membranes of plus and minus gametes that are specialized for fusion, and the minus-specific membrane protein HAP2 is essential for completion of the membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 (GCS1) family members are also required for fertilization in Arabidopsis, and for the membrane fusion reaction in the malaria organism Plasmodium berghei. Here, we tested whether Chlamydomonas gamete fusion triggers alterations in FUS1 and HAP2 and renders the plasma membranes of the cells incapable of subsequent fusion. We find that, even though the fusogenic sites support multi-cell adhesions, triploid zygotes are rare, indicating a fusion-triggered block to the membrane fusion reaction. Consistent with the extinction of fusogenic capacity, both FUS1 and HAP2 are degraded upon fusion. The rapid, fusion-triggered cleavage of HAP2 in zygotes is distinct from degradation occurring during constitutive turnover in gametes. Thus, gamete fusion triggers specific degradation of fusion-essential proteins and renders the zygote incapable of fusion. Our results provide the first molecular explanation for a membrane block to polygamy in any organism.

  11. Blocking effect and crystal structure of natrin toxin, a cysteine-rich secretory protein from Naja atra venom that targets the BKCa channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Shen, Bing; Guo, Min; Lou, Xiaohua; Duan, Yuanyuan; Cheng, Xin Ping; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen; Liu, Qun; Huang, Qingqiu; Hao, Quan

    2005-08-02

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are widespread in snake venoms. Some members of these CRISPs recently have been found to block L-type Ca(2+) channels or cyclic nucleotide-gated ion (CNG) channels. Here, natrin purified from Naja atra venom, a member of the CRISP family, can induce a further contractile response in the endothelium-denuded thoracic aorta of mouse which has been contracted by a high-K(+) solution. Further experiments show it can block the high-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channel in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 34.4 nM and a Hill coefficient of 1.02, which suggests that only a single natrin molecule is required to bind an ion channel to block BK(Ca) current. The crystal structure of natrin displaying two domains in tandem shows its cysteine-rich domain (CRD) has relatively independent flexibility, especially for the C-terminal long loop (loop I) of CRD to participate in the interface of two domains. On the basis of previous studies of CNG channel and L-Ca(2+) channel blockers, and the sequence and structural comparison of natrin and stecrisp, the deviation of the vital loop I of CRD is suggested to contribute to different effects of some CRISPs in protein-protein interaction.

  12. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  13. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out of ... what you eat and drink. Sometimes a bowel movement isn't normal. Diarrhea happens when stool passes ...

  14. Deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of cucumber mosaic virus movement protein enables a chimeric brome mosaic virus to move from cell to cell.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Okuno, T; Mise, K; Furusawa, I

    1997-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) gene of brome mosaic virus (BMV) was precisely replaced with that of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infectivity tests of the chimeric BMV on Chenopodium quinoa, a permissive host for cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV, showed that the chimeric BMV failed to move from cell to cell even though it replicated in protoplasts. A spontaneous mutant of the chimeric BMV that displayed cell-to-cell movement was subsequently obtained from a local lesion during one of the experiments. A cloned cDNA representing the genomic RNA encoding the MP of the chimeric BMV mutant was analyzed and found to contain a mutation in the CMV MP gene resulting in deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the MP. Directed mutagenesis of the CMV MP gene showed that the C-terminal deletion was responsible for the movement capability of the mutant. When the mutation was introduced into CMV, the CMV mutant moved from cell to cell in C. quinoa, though the movement was less efficient than that of the wild-type CMV. These results indicate that the CMV MP, except the C-terminal 33 amino acids, potentiates cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV in C. quinoa. In addition, since C. quinoa is a common host for both BMV and CMV, these results suggest that the CMV MP has specificity for the viral genomes during cell-to-cell movement of the virus and that the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the CMV MP are involved in that specificity. PMID:9032362

  15. Comparison of the Oilseed rape mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus movement proteins (MP) reveals common and dissimilar MP functions for tobamovirus spread.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Pasquier, Adrien; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Mély, Yves; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a longstanding model for studying virus movement and macromolecular transport through plasmodesmata (PD). Its movement protein (MP) interacts with cortical microtubule (MT)-associated ER sites (C-MERs) to facilitate the formation and transport of ER-associated viral replication complexes (VRCs) along the ER-actin network towards PD. To investigate whether this movement mechanism might be conserved between tobamoviruses, we compared the functions of Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) MP with those of MP(TMV). We show that MP(ORMV) supports TMV movement more efficiently than MP(TMV). Moreover, MP(ORMV) localizes to C-MERs like MP(TMV) but accumulates to lower levels and does not localize to larger inclusions/VRCs or along MTs, patterns regularly seen for MP(TMV). Our findings extend the role of C-MERs in viral cell-to-cell transport to a virus commonly used for functional genomics in Arabidopsis. Moreover, accumulation of tobamoviral MP in inclusions or along MTs is not required for virus movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  17. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus: influence of subcellular MP localization and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tyulkina, Lidia G; Karger, Elena M; Sheveleva, Anna A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2010-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to recombinant movement protein (MP(REC)) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were used to reveal the dependence of MP epitope accessibility to mAbs on subcellular MP localization and post-translational MP phosphorylation. Leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana or N. tabacum were inoculated mechanically with TMV or agroinjected with an MP expression vector. At different time post-inoculation, ER membrane- and cell wall-enriched fractions (ER-MP and CW-MP, respectively) were isolated and analysed. The N-terminal region (residues 1-30) as well as regions 186-222 and 223-257 of MP from the CW and ER fractions were accessible for interaction with mAbs. By contrast, the MP regions including residues 76-89 and 98-129 were not accessible. The C-terminal TMV MP region (residues 258-268) was inaccessible to mAbs not only in CW-MP, but also in ER-MP fractions. Evidence is presented that phosphorylation of the majority of TMV MP C-terminal sites occurred on ER membranes at an early stage of virus infection, i.e. not after, but before reaching the cell wall. C-terminal phosphorylation of purified MP(REC) abolished recognition of C-proximal residues 258-268 by specific mAbs, which could be restored by MP dephosphorylation. Likewise, accessibility to mAbs of the C-terminal MP epitope in ER-MP and CW-MP leaf fractions was restored by dephosphorylation. Substitution of three or four C-terminal Ser/Thr residues with non-phosphorylatable Ala also resulted in abolition of interaction of mAbs with MP.

  18. Analysis of polypeptide movement in the SecY channel during SecA-mediated protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Karl J; Or, Eran; Osborne, Andrew R; Rapoport, Tom A

    2008-06-06

    In bacteria most secretory proteins are transported across the plasma membrane by the interplay of the ATPase SecA with the translocation channel formed by the SecY complex; SecA uses cycles of ATP hydrolysis to "push" consecutive segments of a polypeptide substrate through the channel. Here we have addressed the mechanism of this process by following the fate of stalled translocation intermediates. These were generated by using a polypeptide substrate containing a bulky disulfide-bonded loop, thus preventing the final residues from passing through the channel. Protease protection experiments showed that the intermediates were stable in the presence of ATP and could complete translocation once the block was removed. The translocation intermediate was also stable when SecA associated with ATPgammaS, a poorly hydrolyzable ATP analog, or ADP plus AlF(4), which mimics the transition state during ATP hydrolysis. In contrast, when SecA was in its ADP-bound state, the translocating polypeptide moved back into the cytosol, as indicated by the disappearance of the protected fragment. Backsliding was not significantly altered by deletion of the plug domain, a short helix in the center of the SecY channel, but it was slowed down when changes were introduced into the pore ring, the constriction of the hourglass-shaped channel. In all cases, backsliding was significantly slower than forward translocation. Together, these data suggest that SecA binds the polypeptide chain in its ATP state and releases it in the ADP state. The channel itself does not bind the polypeptide chain but provides "friction" that minimizes backsliding when ADP-bound SecA resets to "grab" the next segment of the substrate.

  19. A Single Amino Acid Change in Turnip Crinkle Virus Movement Protein p8 Affects RNA Binding and Virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wobbe, Kristin K.; Akgoz, Muslum; Dempsey, D’Maris Amick; Klessig, Daniel F.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of the symptoms caused by turnip crinkle virus strain M (TCV-M) and TCV-B infection of a resistant Arabidopsis thaliana line termed Di-17 demonstrates that TCV-B has a greater ability to spread in planta. This ability is due to a single amino acid change in the viral movement protein p8 and inversely correlates with p8 RNA binding affinity. PMID:9621099

  20. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  1. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  2. The hypermorph FtsA* protein has an in vivo role in relieving the Escherichia coli proto-ring block caused by excess ZapC.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Cristina; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar; Vicente, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Assembly of the proto-ring, formed by the essential FtsZ, FtsA and ZipA proteins, and its progression into a divisome, are essential events for Escherichia coli division. ZapC is a cytoplasmic protein that belongs to a group of non-essential components that assist FtsZ during proto-ring assembly. Any overproduction of these proteins leads to faulty FtsZ-rings, resulting in a cell division block. We show that ZapC overproduction can be counteracted by an excess of the ZipA-independent hypermorph FtsA* mutant, but not by similar amounts of wild type FtsA+. An excess of FtsA+ allowed regular spacing of the ZapC-blocked FtsZ-rings, but failed to promote recruitment of the late-assembling proteins FtsQ, FtsK and FtsN and therefore, to activate constriction. In contrast, overproduction of FtsA*, besides allowing correct FtsZ-ring localization at midcell, restored the ability of FtsQ, FtsK and FtsN to be incorporated into active divisomes.

  3. The hypermorph FtsA* protein has an in vivo role in relieving the Escherichia coli proto-ring block caused by excess ZapC+

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Cristina; Casanova, Mercedes; Palacios, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Assembly of the proto-ring, formed by the essential FtsZ, FtsA and ZipA proteins, and its progression into a divisome, are essential events for Escherichia coli division. ZapC is a cytoplasmic protein that belongs to a group of non-essential components that assist FtsZ during proto-ring assembly. Any overproduction of these proteins leads to faulty FtsZ-rings, resulting in a cell division block. We show that ZapC overproduction can be counteracted by an excess of the ZipA-independent hypermorph FtsA* mutant, but not by similar amounts of wild type FtsA+. An excess of FtsA+ allowed regular spacing of the ZapC-blocked FtsZ-rings, but failed to promote recruitment of the late-assembling proteins FtsQ, FtsK and FtsN and therefore, to activate constriction. In contrast, overproduction of FtsA*, besides allowing correct FtsZ-ring localization at midcell, restored the ability of FtsQ, FtsK and FtsN to be incorporated into active divisomes. PMID:28877250

  4. Organic solvent-free low temperature method of preparation for self assembled amphiphilic poly(ϵ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer based nanocarriers for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Payyappilly, Sanal Sebastian; Panja, Sudipta; Mandal, Pijush; Dhara, Santanu; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-11-01

    Degradation and denaturation of labile biomolecules during preparation of micelles by organic solvent at high temperature are some of the limitations for fabrication of advanced polymer based protein delivery systems. In this paper, effectiveness of heat-chill method for preparation of micelles containing large labile biomolecules was investigated using insulin as a model protein molecule. Micelles (average size, <120 nm) were prepared using amphiphilic diblock and triblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL). Micelles were prepared by heating PEG-PCL block copolymers with distilled water at 60 °C followed by sudden chilling in an ice-water bath. Effects of molecular architecture on morphology, stability and protein loading capacity of micelles were investigated. Micelles prepared using high molecular weight block copolymers exhibited good colloidal stability, encapsulation efficiency and insulin release characteristics. Insulin retained its secondary structure after micelles preparation as confirmed by CD spectroscopic study. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity test suggested that the prepared micellar nanoparticles possessed biocompatibility. In a nut shell, heat-chill method of micellar nanoparticles preparation is well suited for encapsulating labile proteins and other allied biomolecules which degrade in presence of toxic organic solvents and at elevated temperatures.

  5. Measles virus V protein blocks Jak1-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 to escape IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Caignard, Gregory; Guerbois, Mathilde; Labernardiere, Jean-Louis; Jacob, Yves; Jones, Louis M.; Wild, Fabian; Tangy, Frederic Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-11-25

    Viruses have evolved various strategies to escape the antiviral activity of type I interferons (IFN-{alpha}/{beta}). For measles virus, this function is carried by the polycistronic gene P that encodes, by an unusual editing strategy, for the phosphoprotein P and the virulence factor V (MV-V). MV-V prevents STAT1 nuclear translocation by either sequestration or phosphorylation inhibition, thereby blocking IFN-{alpha}/{beta} pathway. We show that both the N- and C-terminal domains of MV-V (PNT and VCT) contribute to the inhibition of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} signaling. Using the two-hybrid system and co-affinity purification experiments, we identified STAT1 and Jak1 as interactors of MV-V and demonstrate that MV-V can block the direct phosphorylation of STAT1 by Jak1. A deleterious mutation within the PNT domain of MV-V (Y110H) impaired its ability to interact and block STAT1 phosphorylation. Thus, MV-V interacts with at least two components of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} receptor complex to block downstream signaling.

  6. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis but Not ß-Adrenergic Receptors Blocks Reconsolidation of a Cocaine-Associated Cue Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Amber B.; Taylor, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously consolidated memories have the potential to enter a state of lability upon memory recall, during which time the memory can be altered before undergoing an additional consolidation-like process and being stored again as a long-term memory. Blocking reconsolidation of aberrant memories has been proposed as a potential treatment for…

  7. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis but Not ß-Adrenergic Receptors Blocks Reconsolidation of a Cocaine-Associated Cue Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Amber B.; Taylor, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Previously consolidated memories have the potential to enter a state of lability upon memory recall, during which time the memory can be altered before undergoing an additional consolidation-like process and being stored again as a long-term memory. Blocking reconsolidation of aberrant memories has been proposed as a potential treatment for…

  8. The MUC1-C Oncoprotein Binds to the BH3 Domain of the Pro-apoptotic BAX Protein and Blocks BAX Function*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Rehan; Alam, Maroof; Rajabi, Hasan; Kufe, Donald

    2012-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BAX protein contains a BH3 domain that is necessary for its dimerization and for activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. The MUC1 (mucin 1) heterodimeric protein is overexpressed in diverse human carcinomas and blocks apoptosis in the response to stress. In this study, we demonstrate that the oncogenic MUC1-C subunit associates with BAX in human cancer cells. MUC1-C·BAX complexes are detectable in the cytoplasm and mitochondria and are induced by genotoxic and oxidative stress. The association between MUC1-C and BAX is supported by the demonstration that the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain is sufficient for the interaction with BAX. The results further show that the MUC1-C cytoplasmic domain CQC motif binds directly to the BAX BH3 domain at Cys-62. Consistent with binding to the BAX BH3 domain, MUC1-C blocked BAX dimerization in response to (i) truncated BID in vitro and (ii) treatment of cancer cells with DNA-damaging agents. In concert with these results, MUC1-C attenuated localization of BAX to mitochondria and the release of cytochrome c. These findings indicate that the MUC1-C oncoprotein binds directly to the BAX BH3 domain and thereby blocks BAX function in activating the mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:22544745

  9. Stereotypical movements.

    PubMed

    Delafield-Butt, J T

    2010-01-01

    A 'stereotypical movement' denotes a movement reproduced in a standardised form. The term is used in two fields, in movement science and in medical assessments of pathology. The former recognises the occurrence of regular patterns of movement across individuals expressed at regular points in development, such as the pre-reach in early infancy. The latter specifies a pathological form of repetitive movement by one individual symptomatic of, for example, autism. This entry explores the interindividual use of the term in movement science and touches on ongoing work to better classify and quantify stereotypical movements for better psychophysiological understanding of action development, and possible sensitive measures of them.

  10. Wheat streak mosaic virus Infects Systemically despite Extensive Coat Protein Deletions: Identification of Virion Assembly and Cell-to-Cell Movement Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Frank; French, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Viral coat proteins function in virion assembly and virus biology in a tightly coordinated manner with a role for virtually every amino acid. In this study, we demonstrated that the coat protein (CP) of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae) is unusually tolerant of extensive deletions, with continued virion assembly and/or systemic infection found after extensive deletions are made. A series of deletion and point mutations was created in the CP cistron of wild-type and/or green fluorescent protein-tagged WSMV, and the effects of these mutations on cell-to-cell and systemic transport and virion assembly of WSMV were examined. Mutants with overlapping deletions comprising N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27, 36 to 84, 85 to 100, 48 to 100, and 36 to 100 or the C-terminal 14 or 17 amino acids systemically infected wheat with different efficiencies. However, mutation of conserved amino acids in the core domain, which may be involved in a salt bridge, abolished virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. N-terminal amino acids 6 to 27 and 85 to 100 are required for efficient virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement, while the C-terminal 65 amino acids are dispensable for virion assembly but are required for cell-to-cell movement, suggesting that the C terminus of CP functions as a dedicated cell-to-cell movement determinant. In contrast, amino acids 36 to 84 are expendable, with their deletion causing no obvious effects on systemic infection or virion assembly. In total, 152 amino acids (amino acids 6 to 27 and 36 to 100 and the 65 amino acids at the C-terminal end) of 349 amino acids of CP are dispensable for systemic infection and/or virion assembly, which is rare for multifunctional viral CPs. PMID:24227854

  11. The extracellular adherence protein from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement by blocking formation of the C3 proconvertase.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Jordan L; Stapels, Daphne A C; Garcia, Brandon L; Ramyar, Kasra X; Keightley, Andrew; Ruyken, Maartje; Syriga, Maria; Sfyroera, Georgia; Weber, Alexander B; Zolkiewski, Michal; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2014-12-15

    The pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus actively evades many aspects of human innate immunity by expressing a series of small inhibitory proteins. A number of these proteins inhibit the complement system, which labels bacteria for phagocytosis and generates inflammatory chemoattractants. Although the majority of staphylococcal complement inhibitors act on the alternative pathway to block the amplification loop, only a few proteins act on the initial recognition cascades that constitute the classical pathway (CP) and lectin pathway (LP). We screened a collection of recombinant, secreted staphylococcal proteins to determine whether S. aureus produces other molecules that inhibit the CP and/or LP. Using this approach, we identified the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) as a potent, specific inhibitor of both the CP and LP. We found that Eap blocked CP/LP-dependent activation of C3, but not C4, and that Eap likewise inhibited deposition of C3b on the surface of S. aureus cells. In turn, this significantly diminished the extent of S. aureus opsonophagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. This combination of functional properties suggested that Eap acts specifically at the level of the CP/LP C3 convertase (C4b2a). Indeed, we demonstrated a direct, nanomolar-affinity interaction of Eap with C4b. Eap binding to C4b inhibited binding of both full-length C2 and its C2b fragment, which indicated that Eap disrupts formation of the CP/LP C3 proconvertase (C4b2). As a whole, our results demonstrate that S. aureus inhibits two initiation routes of complement by expression of the Eap protein, and thereby define a novel mechanism of immune evasion.

  12. Rare earth ions block the ion pores generated by the class II fusion proteins of alphaviruses and allow analysis of the biological functions of these pores.

    PubMed

    Koschinski, Andreas; Wengler, Gerd; Wengler, Gisela; Repp, Holger

    2005-12-01

    Recently, class II fusion proteins have been identified on the surface of alpha- and flaviviruses. These proteins have two functions besides membrane fusion: they generate an isometric lattice on the viral surface and they form ion-permeable pores at low pH. An attempt was made to identify inhibitors for the ion pores generated by the fusion proteins of the alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. These pores can be detected and analysed in three situations: (i) in the target membrane during virus entry, by performing patch-clamp measurements of membrane currents; (ii) in the virus particle, by studying the entry of propidium iodide; and (iii) in the plasma membrane of infected cells, by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of Ca2+ entry into infected cells. It is shown here that, at a concentration of 0.1 mM, rare earth ions block the ion permeability of alphavirus ion pores in all three situations. Even at a concentration of 0.5 mM, these ions do not block formation of the viral fusion pore, as they do not inhibit entry or multiplication of alphaviruses. The data indicate that ions flow through the ion pores into the virus particle in the endosome and from the endosome into the cytoplasm after fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membrane. These ion flows, however, are not necessary for productive infection. The possibility that the ability of class II fusion proteins to form ion-permeable pores reflects their origin from protein toxins that form ion-permeable pores, and that entry via class II fusion proteins may resemble the entry of non-enveloped viruses, is discussed.

  13. Microinjection of 70-kDal heat shock protein into the oral reticular nucleus of the pons suppresses rapid eye movement sleep in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Gusel'nikova, E A; Pastukhov, Yu F

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increases in the duration of slow-wave sleep and decreases in somatovisceral measures in response to microinjections of 70-kDal heat shock protein (Hsp70) into the third ventricle in pigeons may be due to activation of GABAA receptors in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. With the aim of identifying the transmitter mechanisms whose activation is temporally (2-3 h) linked with suppression of rapid eye movement sleep, the present studies were based on injection of Hsp70 into the oral reticular pontine nucleus (nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, NRPO), whose cholinergic neurons are critical for generating rapid eye movement sleep. Hsp70 was found to induce earlier (within the first 2 h) decreases in the number of episodes and the total duration of rapid eye movement sleep, with decreases in electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power in the range 9-14 Hz, the level of muscle contractile activity, and brain temperature. It is hypothesized that the effects of Hsp70 are mediated by activation of GABAA receptors in the NRPO, evoking suppression of the cholinergic mechanisms initiating rapid eye movement sleep. The increase in the total duration of slow-wave sleep occurring with a long latent period (8-12 h after injection of Hsp70 into the NRPO) may be due to the influence of Hsp70 on the population of neurons responsible for maintaining slow-wave sleep outside the NRPO.

  14. Hydralazine inhibits rapid acrolein-induced protein oligomerization: role of aldehyde scavenging and adduct trapping in cross-link blocking and cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Philip C; Pyke, Simon M

    2006-03-01

    Hydralazine strongly suppresses the toxicity of acrolein, a reactive aldehyde that contributes to numerous health disorders. At least two mechanisms may underlie the cytoprotection, both of which involve the nucleophilic hydrazine possessed by hydralazine. Under the simplest scenario, hydralazine directly scavenges free acrolein, decreasing intracellular acrolein availability and thereby suppressing macromolecular adduction. In a second "adduct-trapping" mechanism, the drug forms hydrazones with acrolein-derived Michael adducts in cell proteins, preventing secondary reactions of adducted proteins that may trigger cell death. To identify the most important mechanism, we explored these two pathways in mouse hepatocytes poisoned with the acrolein precursor allyl alcohol. Intense concentration-dependent adduct-trapping in cell proteins accompanied the suppression of toxicity by hydralazine. However, protective concentrations of hydralazine did not alter extracellular free acrolein levels, cellular glutathione loss, or protein carbonylation, suggesting that the cytoprotection is not due to minimization of intracellular acrolein availability. To explore ways whereby adduct-trapping might confer cytoprotection, the effect of hydralazine on acrolein-induced protein cross-linking was examined. Using bovine pancreas ribonuclease A as a model protein, acrolein caused rapid time- and concentration-dependent cross-linking, with dimerized protein detectable within 45 min of commencing protein modification. Lysine adduction in monomeric protein preceded the appearance of oligomers, whereas reductive methylation of protein amine groups abolished both adduction and oligomerization. Hydralazine inhibited cross-linking if added 30 min after commencing acrolein exposure but was ineffective if added after a 90-min delay. Adduct-trapping closely accompanied the inhibition of cross-linking by hydralazine. These findings suggest that cross-link blocking may contribute to hydralazine

  15. The GAPs, GEFs, GDIs and…now, GEMs: New kids on the heterotrimeric G protein signaling block.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Rangamani, Padmini; Kufareva, Irina

    2017-04-03

    The canonical process of activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is well studied. Recently, a rapidly emerging paradigm has revealed the existence of a new, non-canonical set of cytosolic G protein modulators, guanine exchange modulators (GEMs). Among G proteins regulators, GEMs are uniquely capable of initiating pleiotropic signals: these bifunctional modulators can activate cAMP inhibitory (Gi) proteins and inhibit cAMP-stimulatory (Gs) proteins through a single short evolutionarily conserved module. A prototypical member of the GEM family, GIV/Girdin, integrates signals downstream of a myriad of cell surface receptors, e.g., growth factor RTKs, integrins, cytokine, GPCRs, etc., and translates these signals into G protein activation or inhibition. By their pleiotropic action, GIV and other GEMs modulate several key pathways within downstream signaling network. Unlike canonical G protein signaling that is finite and is triggered directly and exclusively by GPCRs, the temporal and spatial features of non-canonical activation of G protein via GIV-family of cytosolic GEMs are unusually relaxed. GIV uses this relaxed circuitry to integrate, reinforce and compartmentalize signals downstream of both growth factors and G proteins in a way that enables it to orchestrate cellular phenotypes in a sustained manner. Mounting evidence suggests the importance of GIV and other GEMs as disease modulators and their potential to serve as therapeutic targets; however, a lot remains unknown within the layers of the proverbial onion that must be systematically peeled. This perspective summarizes the key concepts of the GEM-dependent G protein signaling paradigm and discusses the multidisciplinary approaches that are likely to revolutionize our understanding of this paradigm from the atomic level to systems biology.

  16. Antibodies Directed against Shiga-Toxin Producing Escherichia coli Serotype O103 Type III Secreted Proteins Block Adherence of Heterologous STEC Serotypes to HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desin, Taseen S.; Townsend, Hugh G.; Potter, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O103 is a zoonotic pathogen that is capable of causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. The main animal reservoir for STEC is ruminants and hence reducing the levels of this pathogen in cattle could ultimately lower the risk of STEC infection in humans. During the process of infection, STECO103 uses a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) to secrete effector proteins (T3SPs) that result in the formation of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Vaccination of cattle with STEC serotype O157 T3SPs has previously been shown to be effective in reducing shedding of STECO157 in a serotype-specific manner. In this study, we tested the ability of rabbit polyclonal sera against individual STECO103 T3SPs to block adherence of the organism to HEp-2 cells. Our results demonstrate that pooled sera against EspA, EspB, EspF, NleA and Tir significantly lowered the adherence of STECO103 relative to pre-immune sera. Likewise, pooled anti-STECO103 sera were also able to block adherence by STECO157. Vaccination of mice with STECO103 recombinant proteins induced strong IgG antibody responses against EspA, EspB, NleA and Tir but not against EspF. However, the vaccine did not affect fecal shedding of STECO103 compared to the PBS vaccinated group over the duration of the experiment. Cross reactivity studies using sera against STECO103 recombinant proteins revealed a high degree of cross reactivity with STECO26 and STECO111 proteins implying that sera against STECO103 proteins could potentially provide neutralization of attachment to epithelial cells by heterologous STEC serotypes. PMID:26451946

  17. Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus Coat Protein Is Essential for Cell-to-Cell and Long-Distance Movement but Not for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M.; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  18. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro.

  19. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors in the entorhinal cortex blocks consolidation but not reconsolidation of object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ramón H; Rossato, Janine I; Furini, Cristiane R; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2009-05-01

    Memory consolidation and reconsolidation require the induction of protein synthesis in some areas of the brain. Here, we show that infusion of the protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin, emetine and cycloheximide in the entorhinal cortex immediately but not 180 min or 360 min after training in an object recognition learning task hinders long-term memory retention without affecting short-term memory or behavioral performance. Inhibition of protein synthesis in the entorhinal cortex after memory reactivation involving either a combination of familiar and novel objects or two familiar objects does not affect retention. Our data suggest that protein synthesis in the entorhinal cortex is necessary early after training for consolidation of object recognition memory. However, inhibition of protein synthesis in this cortical region after memory retrieval does not seem to affect the stability of the recognition trace.

  20. Development of Potent and Selective Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 4 (PfCDPK4) Inhibitors that Block the Transmission of Malaria to Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Vidadala, Rama Subba Rao; Ojo, Kayode K.; Johnson, Steven M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Leonard, Stephen E.; Mitra, Arinjay; Choi, Ryan; Reid, Molly C.; Keyloun, Katelyn R.; Fox, Anna M.W.; Kennedy, Mark; Silver-Brace, Tiffany; Hume, Jen C. C.; Kappe, Stefan; Verlinde, Christophe L.M.J.; Fan, Erkang; Merritt, Ethan A.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains a major health concern for a large percentage of the world’s population. While great strides have been made in reducing mortality due to malaria, new strategies and therapies are still needed. Therapies that are capable of blocking the transmission of Plasmodium parasites are particularly attractive, but only primaquine accomplishes this, and toxicity issues hamper its widespread use. In this study, we describe a series of pyrazolopyrimidine- and imidazopyrazine-based compounds that are potent inhibitors of PfCDPK4, which is a calcium-activated Plasmodium protein kinase that is essential for exflagellation of male gametocytes. Thus, PfCDPK4 is essential for the sexual development of Plasmodium parasites and their ability to infect mosquitos. We demonstrate that two structural features in the ATP-binding site of PfCDPK4 can be exploited in order to obtain potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors that are potent inhibitors of the in vitro activity of PfCDPK4 are also able to block P. falciparum exflagellation with no observable toxicity to human cells. This medicinal chemistry effort serves as a valuable starting point in the development of safe, transmission-blocking agents for the control of malaria. PMID:24531197

  1. Movement - uncontrollable

    MedlinePlus

    ... peripheral nervous system References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders: diagnosis and assessment. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 21. Lang AE. Other movement disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  2. Movement - uncoordinated

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of coordination; Coordination impairment; Ataxia; Clumsiness; Uncoordinated movement ... Smooth graceful movement requires a balance between different muscle groups. A part of the brain called the cerebellum manages this balance.

  3. Mutation of a Shc binding site tyrosine residue in ErbB3/HER3 blocks heregulin-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Vijapurkar, U; Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1998-08-14

    The ErbB2 and ErbB3 proteins together constitute a functional coreceptor for heregulin (neuregulin). Heregulin stimulates the phosphorylation of both coreceptor constituents and initiates a variety of other signaling events, which include phosphorylation of the Shc protein. The role of Shc in heregulin-stimulated signal transduction through the ErbB2.ErbB3 coreceptor was investigated here. Heregulin was found to promote ErbB3/Shc association in NIH-3T3 cells expressing endogenous ErbB2 and recombinant ErbB3. A mutant ErbB3 protein was generated in which Tyr-1325 in a consensus Shc phosphotyrosine-binding domain recognition site was mutated to Phe (ErbB3-Y/F). This mutation abolished the association of Shc with ErbB3 and blocked the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by heregulin. Whereas heregulin induced mitogenesis in NIH-3T3 cells transfected with wild-type ErbB3 cDNA, this mitogenic response was markedly attenuated in NIH-3T3 cells transfected with the ErbB3-Y/F cDNA. These results showed a specific interaction of Shc with the ErbB3 receptor protein and demonstrated the importance of this interaction in the activation of mitogenic responses by the ErbB2. ErbB3 heregulin coreceptor complex.

  4. AltMV TGB1 nucleolar localization requires homologous interaction and correlates with cell wall localization associated with cell-to-cell movement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to for...

  5. The NS1 protein of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus blocks host interferon and lipid metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Billharz, Rosalind; Zeng, Hui; Proll, Sean C; Korth, Marcus J; Lederer, Sharon; Albrecht, Randy; Goodman, Alan G; Rosenzweig, Elizabeth; Tumpey, Terrence M; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Katze, Michael G

    2009-10-01

    The "Spanish influenza" of 1918 claimed an unprecedented number of lives, yet the determinants of virulence for this virus are still not fully understood. Here, we used functional genomics and an in vitro human lung epithelial cell infection model to define the global host transcriptional response to the eight-gene 1918 virus. To better understand the role of the 1918 virus NS1 gene, we also evaluated the host response to a reassortant 1918 virus containing the NS1 gene from A/Texas/36/91 (a seasonal isolate of human influenza virus), as well as the host response to a reassortant of A/Texas/36/91 containing the 1918 NS1 gene. Genomic analyses revealed that the 1918 virus blocked the transcription of multiple interferon-stimulated genes and also downregulated a network of genes associated with lipid metabolism. In contrast, the expression of genes encoding chemokines and cytokines, which serve to attract infiltrating immune cells, was upregulated. Viruses containing the NS1 gene from A/Texas/36/91 induced a significant increase in type I interferon signaling but did not repress lipid metabolism. The 1918 NS1 gene may therefore have contributed to the virulence of the 1918 pandemic virus by disrupting the innate immune response, inducing hypercytokinemia, and by blocking the transcription of certain lipid-based proinflammatory mediators that function as part of the host antiviral response.

  6. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  7. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  8. Tobacco rattle virus 29K movement protein is the elicitor of extreme and hypersensitive-like resistance in two cultivars of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Ghazala, Walid; Varrelmann, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Leaf infection experiments were used to analyze the host responses of Solanum tuberosum cultivars known to be resistant or susceptible to natural, nematode-mediated infection of tubers and necrosis induction ("spraing") by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) isolate PpK20 (TRV-PpK20). Extreme and hypersensitive-like resistance (ER and HR-like, respectively) as well as spreading veinal necrosis and systemic infection were observed. Agroinfection of leaves with a DsRed-expressing TRV cDNA clone revealed ER to function on the single-cell level, inhibiting virus replication and possessing the potential to initiate a cell death response. HR-like necrosis was characterized by initial virus replication and cell-to-cell movement before the onset of necrosis. Transient agroexpression and Potato virus X (PVX)-mediated expression assays demonstrated that the 29K-PpK20 movement protein (MP) can elicit ER and HR-like cell-death. A TRV isolate, PpO85M, known to overcome the resistance to spraing in plants that are resistant to TRV-PpK20 encoded a variant 29K protein which did not elicit HR in PpK20-HR plants. Our results show that the TRV MP is the elicitor of both ER and HR-like cell-death, that no other TRV-encoded proteins or RNA replication are required for its elicitor activity, and that the host reactions are likely to be controlled by single dominant resistance genes.

  9. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  10. Heat-precipitation allows the efficient purification of a functional plant-derived malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidate fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Beiss, Veronique; Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Kapelski, Stephanie; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Edgue, Gueven; Sack, Markus; Fendel, Rolf; Reimann, Andreas; Schillberg, Stefan; Pradel, Gabriele; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    Malaria is a vector-borne disease affecting more than two million people and accounting for more than 600,000 deaths each year, especially in developing countries. The most serious form of malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. The complex life cycle of this parasite, involving pre-erythrocytic, asexual and sexual stages, makes vaccine development cumbersome but also offers a broad spectrum of vaccine candidates targeting exactly those stages. Vaccines targeting the sexual stage of P. falciparum are called transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs). They do not confer protection for the vaccinated individual but aim to reduce or prevent the transmission of the parasite within a population and are therefore regarded as an essential tool in the fight against the disease. Malaria predominantly affects large populations in developing countries, so TBVs need to be produced in large quantities at low cost. Combining the advantages of eukaryotic expression with a virtually unlimited upscaling potential and a good product safety profile, plant-based expression systems represent a suitable alternative for the production of TBVs. We report here the high level (300 μg/g fresh leaf weight (FLW)) transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of an effective TBV candidate based on a fusion protein F0 comprising Pfs25 and the C0-domain of Pfs230, and the implementation of a simple and cost-effective heat treatment step for purification that yields intact recombinant protein at >90% purity with a recovery rate of >70%. The immunization of mice clearly showed that antibodies raised against plant-derived F0 completely blocked the formation of oocysts in a malaria transmission-blocking assay (TBA) making F0 an interesting TBV candidate or a component of a multi-stage malaria vaccine cocktail.

  11. Breast cancer proteins PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate polymerase η in recombination-associated DNA synthesis at blocked replication forks.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Niraj, Joshi; Pauty, Joris; Maity, Ranjan; Zhao, Weixing; Coulombe, Yan; Sung, Patrick; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2014-02-13

    One envisioned function of homologous recombination (HR) is to find a template for DNA synthesis from the resected 3'-OH molecules that occur during double-strand break (DSB) repair at collapsed replication forks. However, the interplay between DNA synthesis and HR remains poorly understood in higher eukaryotic cells. Here, we reveal functions for the breast cancer proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 at blocked replication forks and show a role for these proteins in stimulating polymerase η (Polη) to initiate DNA synthesis. PALB2, BRCA2, and Polη colocalize at stalled or collapsed replication forks after hydroxyurea treatment. Moreover, PALB2 and BRCA2 interact with Polη and are required to sustain the recruitment of Polη at blocked replication forks. PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate Polη-dependent DNA synthesis on D loop substrates. We conclude that PALB2 and BRCA2, in addition to their functions in D loop formation, play crucial roles in the initiation of recombination-associated DNA synthesis by Polη-mediated DNA repair. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prostacyclin Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Growth by a Frizzled 9-Dependent Pathway That Is Blocked by Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 112

    PubMed Central

    Tennis, Meredith A; Van Scoyk, Michelle; Heasley, Lynn E; Vandervest, Katherine; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Freeman, Scott; Keith, Robert L; Simpson, Pete; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Winn, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the ability of iloprost, an orally active prostacyclin analog, to inhibit transformed growth of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to define the mechanism of iloprost's tumor suppressive effects. In a panel of NSCLC cell lines, the ability of iloprost to inhibit transformed cell growth was not correlated with the expression of the cell surface receptor for prostacyclin, but instead was correlated with the presence of Frizzled 9 (Fzd 9) and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). Silencing of Fzd 9 blocked PPARγ activation by iloprost, and expression of Fzd 9 in cells lacking the protein resulted in iloprost's activation of PPARγ and inhibition of transformed growth. Interestingly, soluble Frizzled-related protein-1, a well-known inhibitor of Wnt/Fzd signaling, also blocked the effects of iloprost and Fzd 9. Moreover, mice treated with iloprost had reduced lung tumors and increased Fzd 9 expression. These studies define a novel paradigm, linking the eicosanoid pathway and Wnt signaling. In addition, these data also suggest that prostacyclin analogs may represent a new class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of NSCLC where the restoration of noncanonical Wnt signaling maybe important for the inhibition of transformed cell growth. PMID:20234818

  13. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase and movement protein function synergistically in facilitating TMV spread by lateral diffusion in the plasmodesmal desmotubule of Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Guenoune-Gelbart, Dana; Elbaum, Michael; Sagi, Guy; Levy, Amit; Epel, Bernard L

    2008-03-01

    Virus spread through plasmodesmata (Pd) is mediated by virus-encoded movement proteins (MPs) that modify Pd structure and function. The MP of Tobacco mosaic virus ((TMV)MP) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) integral membrane protein that binds viral RNA (vRNA), forming a vRNA:MP:ER complex. It has been hypothesized that (TMV)MP causes Pd to dilate, thus potentiating a cytoskeletal mediated sliding of the vRNA:MP:ER complex through Pd; in the absence of MP, by contrast, the ER cannot move through Pd. An alternate model proposes that cell-to-cell spread takes place by diffusion of the MP:vRNA complex in the ER membranes which traverse Pd. To test these models, we measured the effect of (TMV)MP and replicase expression on cell-to-cell spread of several green fluorescent protein-fused probes: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, two ER lumen proteins, and two ER membrane-bound proteins. Our data support the diffusion model in which a complex that includes ER-embedded MP, vRNA, and other components diffuses in the ER membrane within the Pd driven by the concentration gradient between an infected cell and adjacent noninfected cells. The data also suggest that the virus replicase and MP function together in altering Pd conductivity.

  14. Transgenic expression of Tobacco mosaic virus capsid and movement proteins modulate plant basal defense and biotic stress responses in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Rodriguez, M C; Manacorda, C A; Asurmendi, S

    2012-10-01

    Plant viruses cause metabolic and physiological changes associated with symptomatic disease phenotypes. Symptoms involve direct and indirect effects, which result in disruption of host physiology. We used transgenic tobacco expressing a variant of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP(T42W)) or movement protein (MP), and a hybrid line (MP×CP(T42W)) that coexpresses both proteins, to study the plant response to individual viral proteins. Findings employing microarray analysis of MP×CP(T42W) plants and silenced mp×cp(T42W)* controls revealed that altered transcripts were mostly downregulated, suggesting a persistent shut-off due to MP×CP(T42W) expression. Next, we showed that MP triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, reduction of total ascorbate, and expression of ROS scavenging genes. These effects were enhanced when both proteins were coexpressed. MP and MP×CP(T42W) plants showed increased levels of salicylic acid (SA) and SA-responsive gene expression. Furthermore, these effects were partially reproduced in Nicotiana benthamiana when GMP1 transcript was silenced. CP(T42W) seems to be playing a negative role in the defense response by reducing the expression of PR-1 and RDR-1. MP and MP×CP(T42W) transgenic expression promoted a recovery-like phenotype in TMV RNA infections and enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The individual effects of viral proteins may reflect the ability of a virus to balance its own virulence.

  15. EspL is a bacterial cysteine protease effector that cleaves RHIM proteins to block necroptosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Mühlen, Sabrina; Nachbur, Ueli; Pham, Chi L L; Zhang, Ying; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Oates, Clare V; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Ingle, Danielle; Dagley, Laura F; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Petrie, Emma J; Schroeder, Gunnar N; Crepin, Valerie F; Frankel, Gad; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James; Murphy, James M; Sunde, Margaret; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2017-01-13

    Cell death signalling pathways contribute to tissue homeostasis and provide innate protection from infection. Adaptor proteins such as receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 3 (RIPK3), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) and Z-DNA-binding protein 1 (ZBP1)/DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) that contain receptor-interacting protein (RIP) homotypic interaction motifs (RHIM) play a key role in cell death and inflammatory signalling(1-3). RHIM-dependent interactions help drive a caspase-independent form of cell death termed necroptosis(4,5). Here, we report that the bacterial pathogen enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) uses the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector EspL to degrade the RHIM-containing proteins RIPK1, RIPK3, TRIF and ZBP1/DAI during infection. This requires a previously unrecognized tripartite cysteine protease motif in EspL (Cys47, His131, Asp153) that cleaves within the RHIM of these proteins. Bacterial infection and/or ectopic expression of EspL leads to rapid inactivation of RIPK1, RIPK3, TRIF and ZBP1/DAI and inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF), lipopolysaccharide or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C))-induced necroptosis and inflammatory signalling. Furthermore, EPEC infection inhibits TNF-induced phosphorylation and plasma membrane localization of mixed lineage kinase domain-like pseudokinase (MLKL). In vivo, EspL cysteine protease activity contributes to persistent colonization of mice by the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. The activity of EspL defines a family of T3SS cysteine protease effectors found in a range of bacteria and reveals a mechanism by which gastrointestinal pathogens directly target RHIM-dependent inflammatory and necroptotic signalling pathways.

  16. Peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Thomsen, Rasmus P.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design. PMID:27464951

  17. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic.

    PubMed

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Madsen, Charlotte S; Thomsen, Rasmus P; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J

    2016-07-28

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design.

  18. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte S.; Thomsen, Rasmus P.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Christensen, Niels Johan; Kjems, Jørgen; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Wengel, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J.

    2016-07-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain formation have never been realized for de novo protein design. Here, we show the applicability of peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates for self-assembly of higher-ordered protein-like structures. The resulting nano-assemblies were characterized by ultraviolet-melting, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. These studies revealed the formation of the desired triple helix and coiled coil domains at low concentrations, while a dimer of trimers was dominating at high concentration. CD spectroscopy showed an extraordinarily high degree of α-helicity for the peptide moieties in the assemblies. The results validate the use of orthogonal self-assembly principles as a paradigm for de novo protein design.

  19. [Tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dakang; An, Xinye; Ji, Bing; Cheng, Yanli; Gao, Honglian; Tian, Mingming

    2016-06-01

    Objective To examine whether tripartite motif-containing protein 34 (TRIM34) is colocalized with micronuclei and investigate the influence on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis. Methods The eukaryotic expression vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed, identified and then transfected into HEK293T cells. With 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole 2HCI (DAPI) staining, the colocalization between TRIM34 and micronuclei was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Moreover, MitoTracker(R)Deep Red was used to identify the colocalization between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria under a confocal microscope. Finally, the effect of TRIM34 on the movement of micronuclei chromosome in mitosis was examined. Results DNA sequencing confirmed that the vector TRIM34-pEGFP-N3 was constructed successfully. A fluorescence microscope revealed that TRIM34 could be colocalized with micronuclei in HEK293T cells transfected with TRIM34-pEGFP-N3. In the same manner, a confocal microscope distinctly showed that TRIM34 was colocalized with micronuclei similarly in appearance. However, there was no distinguished colocalization relationship between the complex of TRIM34-micronulei and mitochondria. Interestingly, the micronuclei chromosome conjugated with TRIM34 was hardly transferred to equatorial plate during the metaphase stage of mitosis. Conclusion TRIM34 is colocalized with micronuclei chromosome and hampers its movement to equatorial plate in mitosis.

  20. Expression of green fluorescent protein in pollen of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and its utility for assessing pollen movement in the field.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hong S; Halfhill, Matthew D; Hudson, Laura C; Millwood, Reginald J; Stewart, C Neal

    2006-10-01

    Transgene movement via pollen is an important component of gene flow from transgenic plants. Here, we present proof-of-concept studies that demonstrate the monitoring of short distant movement of pollen expressing a genetically encoded fluorescent tag in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Westar). Transgenic oilseed rape plants were produced using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method with the pBINDC1 construct containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant, mGFP5-ER, under the control of the pollen-specific LAT59 promoter from tomato. Transgenic pollen was differentiated from non-transgenic pollen in vivo by a unique spectral signature, and was shown to be an effective tool to monitor pollen movement in the greenhouse and field. GFP-tagged pollen also served as a practical marker to determine the zygosity of plants. In a greenhouse pollen flow study, more pollen was captured at closer distances from the source plant plot with consistent wind generated by a fan. Under field conditions, GFP transgenic pollen grains were detected up to a distance of 15 m, the farthest distance from source plants assayed. GFP-tagged pollen was easily distinguishable from non-transgenic pollen using an epifluorescence microscope.

  1. Subcellular location prediction of proteins using support vector machines with alignment of block sequences utilizing amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takeyuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2007-11-30

    Subcellular location prediction of proteins is an important and well-studied problem in bioinformatics. This is a problem of predicting which part in a cell a given protein is transported to, where an amino acid sequence of the protein is given as an input. This problem is becoming more important since information on subcellular location is helpful for annotation of proteins and genes and the number of complete genomes is rapidly increasing. Since existing predictors are based on various heuristics, it is important to develop a simple method with high prediction accuracies. In this paper, we propose a novel and general predicting method by combining techniques for sequence alignment and feature vectors based on amino acid composition. We implemented this method with support vector machines on plant data sets extracted from the TargetP database. Through fivefold cross validation tests, the obtained overall accuracies and average MCC were 0.9096 and 0.8655 respectively. We also applied our method to other datasets including that of WoLF PSORT. Although there is a predictor which uses the information of gene ontology and yields higher accuracy than ours, our accuracies are higher than existing predictors which use only sequence information. Since such information as gene ontology can be obtained only for known proteins, our predictor is considered to be useful for subcellular location prediction of newly-discovered proteins. Furthermore, the idea of combination of alignment and amino acid frequency is novel and general so that it may be applied to other problems in bioinformatics. Our method for plant is also implemented as a web-system and available on http://sunflower.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~tamura/slpfa.html.

  2. The Mechanism of Action of Unique Small Molecules that Inhibit the Pim Protein Kinase Blocking Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    ligase for this protein when activated by Cdh1 (25, 26). Phosphorylation of Skp2 by CDK2 (27) and Akt1 (28, 29) on Ser64 and Ser72 protects it from...from Escherichia coli using a Calbiochemnickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column. GST andGST- Skp2 proteins were purified from E. coli using glutathione...purified from insect cells (39) andmixedwith in vitro-translated 35S-labeled p27 that had previously been incubatedwith cyclin E/ Cdk2 alongwithmeth

  3. RGD-grafted poly-L-lysine-graft-(polyethylene glycol) copolymers block non-specific protein adsorption while promoting cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    VandeVondele, Stephanie; Vörös, Janos; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2003-06-30

    A novel class of surface-active copolymers is described, designed to protect surfaces from nonspecific protein adsorption while still inducing specific cell attachment and spreading. A graft copolymer was synthesized, containing poly-(L-lysine) (PLL) as the backbone and substrate binding and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as protein adsorption-resistant pendant side chains. A fraction of the grafted PEG was pendantly functionalized by covalent conjugation to the peptide motif RGD to induce cell binding. The graft copolymer spontaneously adsorbs from dilute aqueous solution onto negatively charged surfaces. The performance of RGD-modified PLL-g-PEG copolymers was analyzed in protein adsorption and cell culture assays. These coatings efficiently blocked the adsorption of serum proteins to Nb(2)O(5) and tissue culture polystyrene while specifically supporting attachment and spreading of human dermal fibroblasts. This surface functionalization technology is expected to be valuable in both the biomaterial and biosensor fields, because different signals can easily be combined, and sterilization and application are straightforward and cost-effective.

  4. Loss of the Sec1/Munc18-family proteins VPS-33.2 and VPS-33.1 bypasses a block in endosome maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Solinger, Jachen A.; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The end of the life of a transport vesicle requires a complex series of tethering, docking, and fusion events. Tethering complexes play a crucial role in the recognition of membrane entities and bringing them into close opposition, thereby coordinating and controlling cellular trafficking events. Here we provide a comprehensive RNA interference analysis of the CORVET and HOPS tethering complexes in metazoans. Knockdown of CORVET components promoted RAB-7 recruitment to subapical membranes, whereas in HOPS knockdowns, RAB-5 was found also on membrane structures close to the cell center, indicating the RAB conversion might be impaired in the absence of these tethering complexes. Unlike in yeast, metazoans have two VPS33 homologues, which are Sec1/Munc18 (SM)-family proteins involved in the regulation of membrane fusion. We assume that in wild type, each tethering complex contains a specific SM protein but that they may be able to substitute for each other in case of absence of the other. Of importance, knockdown of both SM proteins allowed bypass of the endosome maturation block in sand-1 mutants. We propose a model in which the SM proteins in tethering complexes are required for coordinated flux of material through the endosomal system. PMID:25273556

  5. Rapamycin blocks leucine-induced protein synthesis by suppressing mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine (Leu). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Leu stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight fasted 7-day-old piglets were...

  6. Identification of a heparin-binding protein using monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, W A; Granzow, C A; Getts, L A; Thomas, S C; Zotter, L M; Gunzel, K A; Lowe-Krentz, L J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of heparin or heparan sulphate to a variety of cell types results in specific changes in cell function. Endothelial cells treated with heparin alter their synthesis of heparan sulphate proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins. In order to identify a putative endothelial cell heparin receptor that could be involved in heparin signalling, anti-(endothelial cell) monoclonal antibodies that significantly inhibit heparin binding to endothelial cells were prepared. Four of these antibodies were employed in affinity-chromatographic isolation of a heparin-binding protein from detergent-solubilized endothelial cells. The heparin-binding protein isolated from porcine aortic endothelial cells using four different monoclonal antibodies has an M(r) of 45,000 assessed by SDS/PAGE. The 45,000-M(r) heparin-binding polypeptide is isolated as a multimer. The antibody-isolated protein binds to heparin-affinity columns as does the pure 45,000-M(r) polypeptide, consistent with its identification as a putative endothelial heparin receptor. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487882

  7. Blocking of G1/S transition and cell death in the regenerating liver of Hepatitis B virus X protein transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, B.-K.; Li, C.-C.; Chen, H.-J.; Chang, J.-L.; Jeng, K.-S.; Chou, C.-K.; Hsu, M.-T.; Tsai, T.-F. . E-mail: tftsai@ym.edu.tw

    2006-02-17

    The Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein has been strongly implicated in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, effects of the HBx protein on cell proliferation and cell death are controversial. This study investigates the effects of the HBx protein on liver regeneration in two independent lines of HBx transgenic mice, which developed HCC at around 14 to 16 months of age. High mortality, lower liver mass restoration, and impaired liver regeneration were found in the HBx transgenic mice post-hepatectomy. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and {alpha}-fetoprotein detected post-hepatectomy increased significantly in the HBx transgenic livers, indicating that they were more susceptible to damage during the regenerative process. Prolonged activation of the immediate-early genes in the HBx transgenic livers suggested that the HBx protein creates a strong effect by promoting the transition of the quiescent hepatocytes from G0 to G1 phase. However, impaired DNA synthesis and mitosis, as well as inhibited activation of G1, S, and G2/M markers, were detected. These results indicated that HBx protein exerted strong growth arrest on hepatocytes and imbalanced cell-cycle progression resulting in the abnormal cell death; this was accompanied by severe fat accumulation and impaired glycogen storage in the HBx transgenic livers. In conclusion, this study provides First physiological evidence that HBx protein blocks G1/S transition of the hepatocyte cell-cycle progression and causes both a failure of liver functionality and cell death in the regenerating liver of the HBx transgenic mice.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Movement of the Wpd Flexible Loop of Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B in Complex with Halide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aline; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Podjarny, Alberto D.; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2012-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a post-translational modification mechanism, crucial for the regulation of nearly all aspects of cell life. This dynamic, reversible process is regulated by the balanced opposing activity of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases. In particular, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in the regulation of the insulin-receptor activity, leptin-stimulated signal transduction pathways and other clinically relevant metabolic routes, and it has been found overexpressed or overregulated in human breasts, colon and ovary cancers. The WPD loop of the enzyme presents an inherent flexibility, and it plays a fundamental role in the enzymatic catalysis, turning it into a potential target in the design of new efficient PTP1B inhibitors. In order to determine the interactions that control the spatial conformation adopted by the WPD loop, complexes between the enzyme and halide ions (Br- and I- in particular) were crystallized and their crystallographic structure determined, and the collective movements of the aforementioned complexes were studied through Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Both studies yielded concordant results, indicating the existence of a relationship between the identity of the ion present in the complex and the strength of the interactions it establishes with the surrounding protein residues.

  9. Recovery of paramyxovirus simian virus 5 with a V protein lacking the conserved cysteine-rich domain: the multifunctional V protein blocks both interferon-beta induction and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Paterson, Reay G; Stock, Nicola; Durbin, Joan E; Durbin, Russell K; Goodbourn, Stephen; Randall, Richard E; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-11-10

    The V protein of the Paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) is a multifunctional protein containing an N-terminal 164 residue domain that is shared with the P protein and a distinct C-terminal domain that is cysteine-rich and which is highly conserved among Paramyxoviruses. We report the recovery from Vero cells [interferon (IFN) nonproducing cells] of a recombinant SV5 (rSV5) that lacks the V protein C-terminal specific domain (rSV5VDeltaC). In Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC forms large plaques and grows at a rate and titer similar to those of rSV5. In BHK or CV-1 cells rSV5VDeltaC forms small plaques and grows poorly. However, even when grown in Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC reverts to pseudo-wild-type virus in four to five passages, indicating the importance of the V protein for successful replication of SV5. Whereas rSV5 grows in many cell types with minimal cytopathic effect (CPE), rSV5VDeltaC causes extensive CPE in the same cell types. To overcome the antiviral state induced by IFN, many viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract the effects of IFN by blocking the production of IFN and abrogating IFN signaling. Whereas rSV5 blocks IFN signaling by mediating the degradation of STAT1, rSV5VDeltaC does not cause the degradation of STAT1 and IFN signaling occurs through formation of the ISGF3 transcription complex. Furthermore, we find that rSV5 infection of cells prevents production of IFN-beta. The transcription factor IRF-3 which is required for transcription of the IFN-beta gene is not translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in rSV5-infected cells. In contrast, in rSV5VDeltaC-infected cells IRF-3 is localized predominantly in the nucleus and IFN-beta is produced. By using ectopic expression of IRF-3, it was shown that after dsRNA treatment and expression of the V protein IRF-3 remained in the cytoplasm, whereas after dsRNA treatment and expression of the P protein (which lacks the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain) IRF-3 was localized predominantly in the nucleus. Thus

  10. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Genome Size Reduction and the Emergence of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Site in the Movement Protein of New World Bipartite Begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eric S.; Kuchie, Joan; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    Begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infection is devastating to a wide variety of agricultural crops including tomato, squash, and cassava. Thus, understanding the replication and adaptation of begomoviruses has important translational value in alleviating substantial economic loss, particularly in developing countries. The bipartite genome of begomoviruses prevalent in the New World and their counterparts in the Old World share a high degree of genome homology except for a partially overlapping reading frame encoding the pre-coat protein (PCP, or AV2). PCP contributes to the essential functions of intercellular movement and suppression of host RNA silencing, but it is only present in the Old World viruses. In this study, we analyzed a set of non-redundant bipartite begomovirus genomes originating from the Old World (N = 28) and the New World (N = 65). Our bioinformatic analysis suggests ∼120 nucleotides were deleted from PCP’s proximal promoter region that may have contributed to its loss in the New World viruses. Consequently, genomes of the New World viruses are smaller than the Old World counterparts, possibly compensating for the loss of the intercellular movement functions of PCP. Additionally, we detected substantial purifying selection on a portion of the New World DNA-B movement protein (MP, or BC1). Further analysis of the New World MP gene revealed the emergence of a putative tyrosine phosphorylation site, which likely explains the increased purifying selection in that region. These findings provide important information about the strategies adopted by bipartite begomoviruses in adapting to new environment and suggest future in planta experiments. PMID:25383632

  11. Bioinformatic analysis reveals genome size reduction and the emergence of tyrosine phosphorylation site in the movement protein of New World bipartite begomoviruses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eric S; Kuchie, Joan; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    Begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infection is devastating to a wide variety of agricultural crops including tomato, squash, and cassava. Thus, understanding the replication and adaptation of begomoviruses has important translational value in alleviating substantial economic loss, particularly in developing countries. The bipartite genome of begomoviruses prevalent in the New World and their counterparts in the Old World share a high degree of genome homology except for a partially overlapping reading frame encoding the pre-coat protein (PCP, or AV2). PCP contributes to the essential functions of intercellular movement and suppression of host RNA silencing, but it is only present in the Old World viruses. In this study, we analyzed a set of non-redundant bipartite begomovirus genomes originating from the Old World (N = 28) and the New World (N = 65). Our bioinformatic analysis suggests ∼ 120 nucleotides were deleted from PCP's proximal promoter region that may have contributed to its loss in the New World viruses. Consequently, genomes of the New World viruses are smaller than the Old World counterparts, possibly compensating for the loss of the intercellular movement functions of PCP. Additionally, we detected substantial purifying selection on a portion of the New World DNA-B movement protein (MP, or BC1). Further analysis of the New World MP gene revealed the emergence of a putative tyrosine phosphorylation site, which likely explains the increased purifying selection in that region. These findings provide important information about the strategies adopted by bipartite begomoviruses in adapting to new environment and suggest future in planta experiments.

  12. Activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase blocks cumulus cell expansion through inhibition of protein synthesis during in vitro maturation in Swine.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Sasseville, Maxime; Laforest, Martin; Guillemette, Christine; Gilchrist, Robert B; Richard, François J

    2014-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimeric protein known as a metabolic switch, is involved in oocyte nuclear maturation in mice, cattle, and swine. The present study analyzed AMPK activation in cumulus cell expansion during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) is a well-known activator of AMPK. It inhibited oocyte meiotic resumption in COC. Moreover, cumulus cell expansion did not occur in the presence of AICAR, demonstrating its marked impact on cumulus cells. Activation of AMPK was supported by AICAR-mediated phosphorylation of alpha AMPK subunits. Furthermore, the presence of AICAR increased glucose uptake, a classical response to activation of this metabolic switch in response to depleted cellular energy levels. Neither nuclear maturation nor cumulus expansion was reversed by glucosamine, an alternative substrate in hyaluronic acid synthesis, through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which ruled out possible depletion of substrates. Both increased gap junction communication and phosphodiesterase activity in COC are dependent on protein synthesis during the initial hours of IVM; however, both were inhibited in the presence of AICAR, which supports the finding that activation of AMPK by AICAR mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. Moreover, this protein synthesis inhibition was equivalent to that of the well-known protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, as observed on cumulus expansion and protein concentration. Finally, the phosphorylation level of selected kinases was investigated. The pattern of raptor phosphorylation is supportive of activation of AMPK-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis. In conclusion, AICAR-mediated AMPK activation in porcine COC inhibited cumulus cell expansion and protein synthesis. These results bring new considerations to the importance of this kinase in ovarian

  13. Balancing Arc synthesis, mRNA decay, and proteasomal degradation: maximal protein expression triggered by rapid eye movement sleep-like bursts of muscarinic cholinergic receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Soulé, Jonathan; Alme, Maria; Myrum, Craig; Schubert, Manja; Kanhema, Tambudzai; Bramham, Clive R

    2012-06-22

    Cholinergic signaling induces Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate early gene crucial for synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that dictate Arc mRNA and protein dynamics during and after cholinergic epochs are little understood. Using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAchR) stimulation triggers Arc synthesis, whereas translation-dependent RNA decay and proteasomal degradation strictly limit the amount and duration of Arc expression. Chronic application of the mAchR agonist, carbachol (Cch), induces Arc transcription via ERK signaling and release of calcium from IP(3)-sensitive stores. Arc translation requires ERK activation, but not changes in intracellular calcium. Proteasomal degradation of Arc (half-life ∼37 min) was enhanced by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic calcium-ATPase pump. Similar mechanisms of Arc protein regulation were observed in cultured rat hippocampal slices. Functionally, we studied the impact of cholinergic epoch duration and temporal pattern on Arc protein expression. Acute Cch treatment (as short as 2 min) induces transient, moderate Arc expression, whereas continuous treatment of more than 30 min induces maximal expression, followed by rapid decline. Cholinergic activity associated with rapid eye movement sleep may function to facilitate long term synaptic plasticity and memory. Employing a paradigm designed to mimic intermittent rapid eye movement sleep epochs, we show that application of Cch in a series of short bursts generates persistent and maximal Arc protein expression. The results demonstrate dynamic, multifaceted control of Arc synthesis during mAchR signaling, and implicate cholinergic epoch duration and repetition as critical determinants of Arc expression and function in synaptic plasticity and behavior.

  14. The movement protein (NSm) of Tomato spotted wilt virus is the avirulence determinant in the tomato Sw-5 gene-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Ana; Cañizares, M Carmen; Rubio, Luis; López, Carmelo; Moriones, Enrique; Aramburu, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The avirulence determinant triggering the resistance conferred by the tomato gene Sw-5 against Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Sequence comparison showed two substitutions (C118Y and T120N) in the movement protein NSm present only in TSWV resistance-breaking (RB) isolates. In this work, transient expression of NSm of three TSWV isolates [RB1 (T120N), RB2 (C118Y) and non-resistance-breaking (NRB)] in Nicotiana benthamiana expressing Sw-5 showed a hypersensitive response (HR) only with NRB. Exchange of the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) with NSm supported cell-to-cell and systemic transport of the chimeric AMV RNAs into N. tabacum with or without Sw-5, except for the constructs with NBR when Sw-5 was expressed, although RB2 showed reduced cell-to-cell transport. Mutational analysis revealed that N120 was sufficient to avoid the HR, but the substitution V130I was required for systemic transport. Finally, co-inoculation of RB and NRB AMV chimeric constructs showed different prevalence of RB or NBR depending on the presence or absence of Sw-5. These results indicate that NSm is the avirulence determinant for Sw-5 resistance, and mutations C118Y and T120N are responsible for resistance breakdown and have a fitness penalty in the context of the heterologous AMV system.

  15. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  16. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN i